Bulletin of commerce

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin of commerce
Uniform Title:
Bulletin of commerce (Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Commerce
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Field Service, Atlanta Regional Office
Place of Publication:
Atlanta, Ga
Creation Date:
1954
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 11, 1947)-v. 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1954).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 7, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1953) misnumbered as v. 7, no. 26 (Jan. 15, 1953).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 3, no. 13 (July 1, 1949) misnumbered as v. 1, no. 13 (July 1, 1949).
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004850614
oclc - 28680692
System ID:
AA00005235:00006

Full Text



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








ATULATA, GA., CHARLESTON,S.C., JACKSONVILE,FLA., WQMEMS, TENNI., NSIAI, FLA., SAVANNAH, GA.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 8gt.Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel.NAL-4121, Ezr. 453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426~ Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-4755


SOUTHEASTERN BUSfINESS STILL HDLDING UJP WELL


SALES OF WOMEN'S AND NEN'S APPAREL STORES
Yiplonrof oonar. -Wnn...nr oom. Dal



300 ----- /-----( 300



)oo 1 00



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1We's rrd t w and other ~prol uassay, sychity1 staesi ud fwriers.
"C' bq'.'tl ""ihip It "'. "''" ',~t n orv., as


Southeastern business, which in recent years has re-
flected a general upward trend, aboved little or no
signs of slackening during the first 9 months of 1953,
according to the Quarterly Summaary of Business Condi-
tions in the Southeast prepared by the regional office
of the U. S. Department of Commerce*

This is the Commerce Department's 4th
quarterly summary. It's available gratin
at all field offices in the Southeast.

Unusual activity was shown in banking, retail, whole-
sale and department store trade, incorporation of new
business enterprises, manufacturing employment, tele-
phones in operation, new urban construction expenldi-
hures, production of electric energy, and also trans-
portation in Alabana, Florida, Georgia, Missiaesippis
Tennessee and the Carolinas in the first 9 months of
L953 over the corresponding period in 1952*

The only "dark area" in an otherwise good business pic-
ture in the region was in farm income, railroad passen-
ger revenue, and in some individual industrial lines*

In the field of finance and trade, for example, depos-
its in Federal Rese~re member banks were up 2.8 per
cent; loans, 9.5 per cent; and debits, 6.7 per cent*
Retail trade pose fras 3 to 17 per cent in 12 cities
and areas in Which surveys are conducted, fran 2 to 10
per cent in department store trade in 28 oities, and
an overall gain of 3 per cent in wholesale sales*

New businesses incorporated were up 18 per cent, and
manufacturing employment 4.4 per cent,


IMIPORTANT NTICE~

In accordance with a directive issued by the Bureau
Of the Budget to CBIry out the statutory provisions
relating to the use of funds for the printing of peri-
odicale and publications the Department of Commerce
requested approval for the continuation of the publica-
tioR Of the Bulletin Of CGHB9700.

The Bureau of the Budget approved the request but di-
rected that it be pub on a paid subscription basis.
The Department of Comrmerce, recognizing the coats of
handling subscription records and the accounting in-
cident thereto, has determined that the anticipated
returns from subscriptions vould not warrant the con-
ti~aation of this Bulletin. This service is being
discontinued and this will be the last issue of the
Bulletin. We appreciate your interest in the material
contained in this publication and regret the necessity
for its discontinuance.

We aball continue to serve you as we have in the past
and will welcome your inquiries. He also recommend you
make full use of our Gooperative Offices which we have
established in Chambers of Commnerce and similar organi-
sations throughout this area.



In order that you might keep informed on the policies,
pr~ogra and publications of the Department, may we
suggest that you enter your subscriptions for the fol-
lowing publications if you are not already subsoribings
Survoey of Qurrent Business A monthly publionl-
tion giving facts and analyses of the national
economy. $3.25 a Year.

Business Service Check Lst A weekly listing
of material published by the Department of Com-
mperce and Defense Agencies. $1.25 a Year.

SOUTH~EAST ADDS 2) MILLION TO POPULATIONS~

The Southeast in the 10-year period of 1942 to 1952
picked up nearly di million population, scording to
current and past census reports of the Bureau of the
Census, U. S. Department of Commerce,

A report just released by the Cenana Bureau estimated
the population of Allabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississ-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas in July of 1952 as
21s505,000. This compared with a total population for
the ?l-State area previously reported by the Census
Bureau as 19,019s000 in 1942.

In the 10-year period, Florida exrperienoed an increase
in population of 939,000 persons, one of the largest in
the United States.


JANrBRY 1, 1954


VOLPNE 8, NUBER 1








I


HATCH1ERY OUTPU~T IN REGION STILL HUMMING

Katchery production in the Southeast in 1953 continued
high with the result that final figures will show the
region far ahead of previous years in the output of
chicks .

Bureau of Agricultural Economicsa figures for the first
10 months of the year showed commercial chick produc-
tion in Alabamas Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennes-
see and the Carolinas exceeding the quarter of a bil-
lion mark, with substantial gains scored over the cor-
responding period in 1952 in North Carolinas Georgia,
Florida, Tennessee and Piasissippi.

The figures credited North Carolina with a rise in
production of from 52,200,000 chicks hatched from Jan-
nary through October of 1952 to 58,316,000 in 1953;
Georgia, from 107,700,000 to 109,269,000; Florida, 17,-
151,000 to 19,896,000; Tennessee, 16,870,000 to 17,-
160,000; and Mississippi, 33,646,000 to 35,508,000.
South Carolina and Alabama registered declines of from
11,545,000 to 11,045,000,and 25,716,000 to 24,397,000,
respectively,

Indications were also that Georgia, which had taken the
national lead in hatcbery production, would have two
"crownan in the chicken field, since that State has led
the Dh~ited Statse for several years in broiler output,

U. S. INTERNAL REVENUE "TAKEn" $200.24 PER CAPITAL

Residents of the Southeast in the fiscal year ending
last June 30 paid into the United Statee Treasury a
total of $4,306,250,760 in internal revenue taxes, an
average of $200.24 for every persons according toa
current report of the Internal Revenue Service.

The per capital payments were the lowest regionally in
the United States. Next lowest were in the region of
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico,
which averaged $237.78 per person,

The collections included Alabama, $398,572,462, a per
capital of $128.86; Florida, $657,863,268 and $211.40;
Georgia, $708,213,975 and $201.31; Missisesippi, $142,-
325,433 and $65.77; North Carolina, $1,611,536,349 and
$)385.90; South Carolina, $266,782,452 and $122.27, and
Tennessee, $520,956,821 and $159.80,

Total collections in the Southeast were 6.6 per cent
greater than for the same period in 1952.

WHDLESALE SALES ARE 10 PER CENT UP

wholesale merchants in the Southeast in the first 10
months of 1953 experienced a 2 per cent increase in
sale as compared with the corresponding period in 1952
the MoDnthly Uholesale Trade Report of the Bureau of
the Censue showed.

At the end of the period in 1953, however, dealers in
the region reported a sharp upward trend in inventor-
ies, stocks on hand reflecting a 13 per cent rise over
the same period in 1952.

Gains in sales were reflected in such commodities as
same electrical goods, furniture and house furnishings,
refrigeration equipment, drugs and anIdries, certain
food products, and paper and its praoducts. The 2 per
cent increase fell lightly abort of the 4 per cent
rise for the United States as a whole.


68 EXPANSION GOALS AN~NOUN~CED BY ODM

Sixty-eight different fields of industry in which the
Office of Defense Mobilisation in Washington will en-
courage expansion operations through issuance of tax
amortization approvals, some of which will be of in-
terest to southeastern firms have been announced.

Included were various types of aluminum gray iron
castings, oil, certain minerals, and other products
produced in the region.

For information as to this latest list
of expansion goals, get in touch with
the nearest Department of Cammerce field
office,

Following a review of the expansion program, ODM1 said
120 of the 237 presently established expansion goals
are being closed. The action was taken because of the
amount of expansion already in place or planned and on
the recommendation of agencies to which authority had
been delegated for that purpose in each instance. Tax
amortization certificates will not be issued for the
closed goals after December 3, 1953, but processing
of applications already on file will be completed, it
was stated.

MACBENE TOOL PROGRAM IMPETUS, GIVEN

The Office of Defense Mobilization in Washington has
given impetus to the machine tool project of the nla-
tional program of defense by issuing an order dealing
with the handling of such equipment owned by the Fed-
eral Governrment itself.

The order, VII-4, largely concerns disposition of the
equipment. It instructs the Department of Defense, for
example, to hold in efficient operating condition in
"packaged form" tools for which there exists a known
or anticipated defense mpobilisation need, particularly
those tools at or near the plants which will operate
them in event of an emergency.

As to other Govermnent agencies, the order says the
equipnnent anst be stored adjacent to manufacturing es-
tablishnments only if there exists a known or antici-
pated defense mobilization need at such location, and
if storage arrangements provide for its maintenance in
efficient operating condition.

KDRE PLANT~, FACILITY EXPANSIONS 0.K.lD

The Office of Defense Mobilization in the period of
November 19 through December 2 approved six certifi-
eates of necessity authorizing rapid tax writeoffs on
that many plant and facility expansion operations in
the Southeast. They includes

Kilby Steel Company, Anniston, for the production of
ordnance, $050,000.
Vulcan Asphalt Refining Company, Cordova, Ala., petro-
leum refining facilities, $1~22,700.
Armoulr and Company, Bartow, Fla., uranium concentrates,
$75,000.
Atlanta & Saint Andrews Railway Company, Dothan, Ala.,
railroad Freight ears, $252,181.
Continental Can Company, Inc., Tampa, metal cans,
$230,400.
Volunteer Towing Service, Inc., Memphis, inland water-
way vessels, $b1,170,000.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





Total wholesalers' sales in October 1953 were estimated
at $;9,700 million, which after adjustment for seasonal
variations were 2 per cent higher than in the preceding
month. Sales by durable-goods dealers were $3,100 mil-
lion and nondurable goods dealer $6,600 million. On a
seasonally adjusted basis, sales of those groups each
were up about 2 per cent from September.

Total production of rayon and acetate broad woven goods
in the third quarter of 1953 amounted to 479 million
linear yards, 7 per cent less than in the second quar-
ter, but approximately the same as the third quarter
of 1952, the Bureau of the Census said.

Exports of nickel-bearing stainless steel vere "open-
ended" for the first quarter of 1952. Time schedules
for filing applications to export that product were
also abolished,

Creation of an office of international travel in the
U.S. Department of Commerce was unanimously recormemeded
following a meeting of 31 American leaders in various
fields of travel services.

World production of natural rubber in October 1953
amounted to 142,500 long tons, it was announced. Dut-
put in the first 10 months was placed at 1,410,000
tons, some 42,500 less than in the same period in 1952.

American investments in initiating and developing manu-
facturingl facilities abroad in the postwar period have
doubled and have reached a value of $3.8 billion, the
Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Com-
merce estimated in its publication "Foreign Investments
of the United States.n

Shipments of copper and copper-base alloy mill and
foundry products in 1953 were estimated at above 5.1
billion porunds, exceeding those of 1952 by nearly 200
million pounds.


/27 Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Stan-
dards, 604 a copy, b5.50 a year
L7 1952 Annual Survey of Manufactures, Meet North Cen-
tral States, General Statistice by Major Industry
Groups, 1952, 1951 & 1947, 104
K7rnit Underwear & Nightwear, Summary for 1952, FFI
M670-02, 104, $1 a year

SOMETHING OLD & SOMETHING NEW

: 7 Statistical Quality Control & Acceptance
:oSampling, PBllll64, $2.00
S Productivity Team Report Saving Scarce
:oMaterials, PBl06425, 504
S Development of a New "Jeep-Clasan Foam
Fire-Fighting Vehicle, P8111175, 754
SSign Advertising, SBA 282
SRetail Salesmanship, SBA 284
'U Sponsoring nopen Bbuse" and Community
SProjects to Promote the Services of a
SLocker Plant, SBA 285
pcii Impr smIoving Your Bowling Business, SBA 286
SpcifiL~haganto Consider in Choosing


SMarkets After The Defense Excpansion, 55#
Bulletin "F" Income Tax Depreciation and Obso-
lescence Estimated Useful Lives & Depreciation

Business Statistice, $1.50
Farm Tenure A Graphic Sumnmary, Vol. V, Part 5,604


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


FOR FURTHER DE-
-, TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITEMS GET
IN TOUCH WITH
TBIE NEAREST U.Sr
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMERCE FIELD
OFFICE .

Personal income in October 1953 was at an annual rate
of more than $287 billion, or $1 billion higher than in
September of the same year. October income was aug~ment-
ed by disbursement of a special dividend from the Gov-
ernment Life Insurance fund to certain World War I vet-
erans. The total of other types of personal income was
virtually unchanged from September.

Employment held fairly steady in November 1953, but un-
employment rose for the first time in some months, the
Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Cammerce,
announced. Civilian employment was estimated at 61.9
million, or not significantly different from October,

U. S. iron mines maintained production and shipments
at high levels in September 1953, the Bureau of the
Mines, U. S. Department of Interior, reported. The
15,142,769 gross tons produced was only 2 per cent be-
low August 1953 and 5 per cent below September 1952.

Expenditures for new construction declined less than
seasonally in November 1953 to $3 billion, and both
public and private activity were at new record levels,
according to a joint report of the U. S. Department
of Commerce and Labor. Most major construction catego.
ries continued strong for that time of year, with can-
mercial building showing a contra-seasonal rise to an
all-time monthly high. Private spending for residential
building remained above the billion-dollar level for
the seventh consecutive month, and was about the same
as in November 1952.


CHIE6K THE MABT-
1s VL 24 ERIAL DESIRED IN
B US R E 5 5THE SPACE PROVID-
-I.R ED AND SEND TBIS
D ED RI PORTION OF THE
~2~'9t LI BULLETIN OF COM-
MERCE TO THE NEAREST U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ylgCE
YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. MBIZE
REMITTANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER Of
THE UNITED STATES.



L7Quarterly Smummary of Business Conditions in South-
east First 9 Months of 1953
E Postage Stamps of the U. S., 1847-1953, 654
Anmnul Survey of Manufacturea General Statistics
for the U. 8. by Geographic Divisions & States
1952, 1951 & 1947, MAS-52-5, 10
L7Estimates of the Population of States, July 1, 1950
to 1952, P-25, #fi84, 54
M a r i a l t a t u o f W o r e r s A p r l 1 53 P 5 0 # r 5 0 1 00 # 0
#r48, 10#
M~obip it 195the Populationlof the U. S., April 1952
Your Federal Income Tax, 1953 Edition, 25#
Report on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 23, 1953
Defense Mobilisation Report to the President By
The Director of ODM, October 1, 1953







PAGE 4


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

11l1 III1lll11ll l ill llillilllillII IIIII IIIIII111llIIIIIII1
BULLETII3 1262 08748 9505

OVER $300 MILLION IN GOODS, SERVICES BOUGHT
The Federal Governent in the first 11 months of 1953
bought goods and services in the Southeast valued at
mor* *h** ,oo0millon, according to Hasts of contract
awards received daily in U. S. Department of Comrmerce
feldx ofies...

The purchasea vere those made on a formally advertised
and negotiated anolassified basie as shown in day-by-
day lists, and did not include those made on a classi-
fied basia which, for security reasons, are not immed-
lat*l publi*se .


These contract award lists are available
on a mailable subscription basis of $7
a year. Order them from the nearest U.S.
Department of Commerce field office,


Cunmulative purchases for the 11-month period of 1953,
which totalled $303,150,608, by States, included 176
contracts awarded in Alabama totalling $5i4,502,006;;
223 in Florida for $60,652,620; 256 in Georgia for
$59,526,840; 49 in Mfaseiasippi for $20,255,620; 87 in
South Carolina for $22,661,937; and 194 in Tennessee
for: $85,651,585.
WORKERS IN 809TlHEASTERN PLANTS GET $4b.2 BILLION

Factory workers in the Southeast in 1952 received an
estimated $4s221,407,000 in wages and salaries, an in-
crease of $3,366s110,000 over the normala" year 1939,
according to a study of current and past reports ia-
sued by the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of
Commerce.

The wages and salaries paid in 1952 to 1,568,668 vork-
ere in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Misesisippis Tennes-
aee and the Carolinael represented an average of $2,691
paid to each employee in the plants. This compared with
a per capital of $846 paid to 1,010,993 workers in 1939.
Also, the 1952 payments reflected an increase of
$1,376,922,000 in the five year period of 1947 to 1952,
and a rise per worker of $663.

The highest per capital average payment in 1952 was in
Tennessee where it totalled $2,945.
GPO 868506


YOUR

FEDER AL

INCOME

TA X, 19 5 3

Issued each year by the Internal Revenue
Service, this useful booklet is designed
especially to assist American taxpayers in
filing their individual income tax returns.
vIn this year s edition maan o tobeeptra
regulations which have recently gone into
effect are fully explained. In addition,
the booklet covers, in a series of short
articles, Internal Revenue Service rulings,
representative court cases, and numerous
questions which often arise when com-
pleting tax returns.
Among the variety of subjects covered
are--who must file a return; when and
where; nontaxable income; collections
and refunds; deductions; family exemp-
tions; what type of return to file; and the
substance of many of the regulations based
on recent tax laws.
Although Your Feder~al Inciome Tax is
still in preparation, advance orders are
now being accepted. By placing your
order now, delay will be avoided when
copies become available late in December.
25 cents a copy paperboundd)

Order FrOIm Your Nearest Us So
Department of Commnerce Field


I


Office


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Bldg.,

OFFICIAL BUSIN ESStlnt 3,Ca

VOLINE 8, NSQER 1 JANUARY 1, 1954



-BULLETAW OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMIYERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.I


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
(GPO)





8C-6-JF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDa
LEROY L QUALLS
0125,i Or "?NMeS