Bulletin of commerce

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin of commerce
Uniform Title:
Bulletin of commerce (Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Commerce
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Field Service, Atlanta Regional Office
Place of Publication:
Atlanta, Ga
Creation Date:
1953
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 11, 1947)-v. 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1954).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 7, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1953) misnumbered as v. 7, no. 26 (Jan. 15, 1953).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 3, no. 13 (July 1, 1949) misnumbered as v. 1, no. 13 (July 1, 1949).
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004850614
oclc - 28680692
System ID:
AA00005235:00005

Full Text





U.111111E) SilAidfEf [)EPittiTibiElT C= (C:M EC)AAtltcE

FIELD SERVICE


. .
,
.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TO PRESENT' BIG TECHNOWLOGCAL DlbPLAY IN ATLNTA, FEBRUARY 11, 12 AN~D 1)_


WRILL BE OPEN TO ALL BUSINESSMEN WAITH-OUT CHxiGE

An extensive technological display
featuring the work of the National Bureau
of Standards, Office of Technical Service
United States Patent Office, and Govern-
ment Patents Board in the fields of
science and industry will be presented by

Department of Commerce in the Exhibit
Hall of the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel in
Atlanta, February 11, 12and 13.
The exhibit, the first of its kind ever
to be held in the Southeast, and the first
to be established in the nation following
an initial showing recently at the Conrad
Hilton Hotel in Chicago, will occupy some
14,000 feet of space and will reflect a
wide range of information for business
~men throughout the region, producing for
*them many ideas and suggestions for the
,advancement of their business operations.
It will- be open to everyone without
** charge.
Included in the display will be process-
es developed by the Bureau of Standards
for the Armed Forces, now available for civilian use;
commercial products developed from material originated
or published by the Office of Technical Services; and
data on more than 3,000 government-owned patents now
ready for free use.

Every business man in the Southeast who
can possibly do so should arrange to Bttend
this exhibit. It will be worth his while in
both time and effort expended.

Models of a number of historically important~ patents
will be on exhibition. They will include such items as
a magnetic fluid clutch, new uses for chicken feathers
and sugar cane, a device for reducing a filament to an
infinitesimal degree, a new plastic filling for teeth,
and many others.


1952 BR~ilYS condTUJD BUSINEss ACTIVITY
Upward~ trends in most major lines of business activity
in the Southeast in the first 9 months of 1952 as compared
with the corresponding period in 1951 were reported in
ine quarterly summary of business conditions in the re-
gion, issued by the Atlanta Regional Office of' the U. b.
Department of Commerce.
Summarizing data of Federal agencies and trade orga~ni-
zations for tne period, tne report observed percentage
increases in such important fields of industry anld com-
merce as banking, trade, agriculture, manufacturing, and
transportation in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas witn many of the gains exceed-
ing the average for the United States.

Note: Copies of this report are available
gr~atis at your nearest Department of Commerce
field office. It is known as CD-52r-220. Use
the order blank on Page ) for ordering.

The report showed an d per cent increase in deposits
in Federal Reserve member banks at the end of tne 9-montn
period, a gain of nearly the same rate in loans, and a
5.8 per cent rise in debits.
Department store trade was better in all but twro major
cities, tne increases ranging from 1 per cent in Raleigh
to as high as 29 per cent in Augusta, Ga., while in the
nation an unmnanged situation was reported, aind in whole-
sale trade a 2 per cent rise was shown, while the nation
reflected a 1 per cent drop.
A similar situation prevailed in cash farm income,
whien registered a 2.5 per cent increase mnile one national
average wa~s 2.4 per cenlt. New business incorporations were
up 9.3 per cent, both in the region and the United States.
The number of residential and business telephones in opera-
tion snowed a gain of 7 per cent, respectively. The number
of wage and salary workers in manufacturing industries in
the region increased 3 per cent while the nation reported a
1 per cent dtop.
One of the "rough spots" in thle picture was construct-
ion where the value of urban building declined 9 per cenlt
in the region and 5 per cenlt in 13 major cities,


) DEPARISIki 09 COMERCE ANNOUNCES CLOSING OF THREE ADDITIONAL OFFICES t

SClosing of three additional field offices, those at Columbia, South Carolina; Nashville, Tennessee; and
IJackson, Mississippi, effective Januaryr 1, 1953, is announced by the United States Department of Commerce.
SClosing of the 6ffices, established in 1950 with creation of the National Production Authority in the
1Department of Commerce to handle the nationwide conservation of materials for the defense effort,primarily
cfor the purpose of handling NPA astters is made necessary as a result of the curtailment of NPA programs,
las well as a reduced appropriatima for the current fiscal year. Field offices in Charleston, S. C., Mlemphis,,
ITenn., Mobile, Ala., Birmingham, Ala., Jackcsonville, Fla., Miami, Fla., Savannah, Ga., and the Regional
*Office in Atlanta will continue to function and will be available for assistance to all1 business men.


Atlanta, Ga., B irmingham, Lla.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Eldg.,
Tel. 1A-4121,Ex./.53 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Charleston, S.C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


Jacksonlville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


demphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel 9-7533 Tel 2-3641Ex206


Savannah, Gar.,
218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel~ 2-1,755l


JANUARY 1 1


OV LUME NUMBER 1





BAN~K DEPOSITS IN SOUTHEAST REwCH 811.2 BILLION
Residents and governments of the Southeast at the
end of June of this year had $11,220,269,000 on deposit
in 1,707 banks operating in the region, according to a
current report of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corpor-
ation.
The deposits included not only those of a business
and personal nature, but those of States and subdivis-
ions, the Federal Government, and inter-bank and postal
savings deposits.
This was a 10 per cent increase over the $10,135,-
788,000 recorded on deposit at the same time last year.
The figures listed assets in operating banks in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas as $12,150,879,000 this year, a sharp
rise over the $10,995,334,000 recorded at the same time
last year.
Loans and discounts this year were given as $3,889,-
667,000 compared with $3,607,803,000 in June 1951.
Georgia had the most operating banks in the South-
east with 403. The others waere Tennessee, 297; North
Carolina, 225; Alabama, 220; Florida, 211; Mlississippi,
202; and South Carolina, 19.
Biggest percentage increase in deposits in the
year' s period was recorded in South Carolina where they
went from $660,117,000 at the end of June of last year
to $771,922,000 at the same time this year, a rise of
16.9 per cent.

YOTOR VERLICE OPERATORS' FUEL PURCHASES HIGH

Motor vehicle operators in the Southeast in the first
half of 1952 paid taxes on a total of 2,645,660,000
gallons of motor fuel in the operation of their cars
trucks, busses and other such vehicles, according to'
reports of State authorities to the Bureau of Public
Roads of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
This was an 8 per cent increase over the correspond-
ing period in 1951 when 2,426,214,000 gallons of tax-
able fuel were sold.
Increases for all southeastern States in the first
half of 1952 over the same period in 1951 were indicated
in the reports with three Statse, Florida, Georgia and
South Carolina among the nation's leaders in percentage
gains. Their 11.9 per cent, 11.6 per cent, and 11.2 per
cent rise, respectively, were exceeded only by Arizona's
15,2 per cent; Kansas' 13.7; Nevada's 14.5; and New
Mexico'sa 12.7 per cent.
In the region, North Carolina, Florida and Georgia
in the order named were the three leading States in
total gallonage.

SPECIAL DAYS. IEEKS. MONTHS DISCONTINUED

Lack of funds has caused the downfall of another
" institution.,
The Department of Commerce has announced that its
annual booklet "Special Days, Weeks and Months" which
has been of nationwide interest for several years will
have to be discontinued.
The booklet had received a wide distribution in the
Southeast. It was designed primarily to assist busi-
neas men in the planning of special sales, campaign,
but it was also of interest to many other seepents of
the population.
Work of compiling the 1953 edition of the booklet had
been going ahead, but it was found that a shortage of
funds would prevent its issuance. Meanwhile, it was sug-
gested that such organizations as the National Retail
Dry Goods Association, New York, Printers' Ink Magazine,
New York, and Dartnell Corporation, Chicago, would be
good sources of continued information on that subject.


CERTAIN RELAXATIONJS ON CONSTRUCTION ANNOUNCED

T Announcement by the National
Production Authority that certain
Restrictions on controlled mater-
ials for construction purposes
NCL 011(1 would be relaxed effective January
1, 1953, instead of May 1, 1953
as originally planned should lead
Sto increased activity in that
Produ tion field in the Southeast, in the
opinion of those familiar with
the situation.
11 hoiCtd It is known, it was pointed out,
that NPA has had a rather lengthy
list of applications for materials
for the construction of certain projects affected by the
restrictions, such as drive-in theatres and other amuse-
ment enterprises, and toe action just taken will serve to
expedite work on jobs of that kind.
The relaxation was effected through an amendment to
Direction 8 to Rievised Controlled Mlaterials Plan Regula-
tion 6, the basic construction order.

For copies of this amendment get in touch
with the nearest Department of Commerce field
office. See order blank on Page 3 for ordering.

Briefly, the relaxations will increase the amounts of
ateel or copper, or in some cases both, that may be self-
authorized for commercial and most other types of con-
struction. The almost complete ban on recreational, amuse-
ment and entertainment construction also was lifted and
the restriction eased as of January 1, 1953.
But, NPA officials emphasized, the action by no means
removes all restrictions on construction, and those
interested in that field should obtain the latest inform-
ation on that subject from their nearest Department of
Commerce field office.

MODICAlrATIO ORDERED IN M-B METALS CASE
Modification by the National Production.Authority of
the suspension order issued in February 1952 against the
I and B Metals Products company, of Birmingham, was
announced .
Evidence at the February hearing before NPA Hearing
Commissioner Charles J. Hilkey showed that the firm,
owned by Ml. M. Magnus, Sr., and 0. R. Brekle, had used
673 tons of iron and steel in excess of their allotments
for second and third quarters of 1951.
The suspension order denied the firm all allocations
of iron and steel products from March 1 to April 15, 1952
and reduced future quarterly allotments by 50 short tons
until additional total of 548 tons were returned to the
national economy.
In November, 1952, the firm applied to the NPA for re-
vocation of the suspension order, or modification of it,
pleading severe hardship. The owners said their plant had
been closed for 24 weeks in 1952 having shut down in
November. They reported they would have to remain closed for
the remainder of the year if fourth quarter relief was
denied them.
Judge Curtis Bok, of Philadelphia, NPA deputy chief
hearing commissioner, denied the firm any relief for the
fourth quarter, but extended the period of repayment and
reduced the amounts of the quarterly repayments. Under
terms of the original suspension order, repayment woula
have to be completed by the middle of March.
Judge Bok ruled that final repayment of the remaining
123 tons must be spread over the first two quarters of
1953 instead of over the first quarter. He ordered that
the cespondenter allotmaent of iron and steel products
be feduced in the amount of 25 tone a month during the
firht half of 1953.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





T


I


I


kor futher
Details of
Any Of These
Highlights in
The Field Of
==business Get
In Touch With
'he Nearest; Departmenlt of Commerce F~ield Office.


Manufacturers' sales and new orders expanded during
October 1952 while inventories were unchanged and un-
filled orders showed a slight decline. Sales rose
nearly 4 per cent after seasonal adjustment to a new
high. New orders were 3 per cent higher than in Sept-
ember. Inventories changed less than $100 million with
durables increasing $300 million and nondurables drop-
ping $200 million.
*
Newr corporate securities offered for cash during
the third quarter of 1952 amounted to $2.2 billion,
according to the Securities and Exchange Commission.
This brought the amount of offerings during the first
nine months of the year to $7.2 billion, 30 per cent
more than in the corresponding period of 1951.
+ + *
The Wholesale Trade Advisory Committee of the De-
partment of Commerce has endorsed the program of the
Department'sa newly-established Office of Distribution
to foster a more efficient and effective distribution
of goods and services in support of an expanding
national economy.
*
Production of cotton broad woven goods in the third
quarter of 1952 totalled 2,323 million linear yards,
the Bureau of the Census reported.


~-i-------- -- To O obtain Thia
19114'~ B()()KS 1d pp YIterial, check
1~U I UVV~V ~It In The Space
ANI) REI'(IllS Provided Ami
ild 1 6, it$ P Send This Por-
tion Of The Page
To The Nearest Department of Commerce Field Office.-
Your Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side. M~ake
Remi$4tances Fqr Sales Material Payable To Treasurer Of
The United States. Unpriced Material Is Free*


A total of 9.1 million bales of cotton were consumed
in the United States in the first 12 months ended August
2, 1952, the Census Bureau said. This was an average of
35,706 bales per working day. The average daily consumption
ranged from 29,068~ bales in July 1952 to 39,128 bales in
February 1952. Approximately 35,000 running bales were
destroyed during the 1951-52 cotton year.
+ + *
Total wholesalers' sales during October 1952 were estimated
at $10,400 million, which, on a seasonally adjusted basis,
wsas an increase of 4 per cent during the month. Sales by
durable-goods dealers, at $3,250 million, and by nondurable-
goods dealers, at $7,150 million, showed seasonally adjusted
increases of 5 and 3 per cent, respectively, from September.
+ +
Personal income in October 1952 was at an annual rate of
$276 billion, or $2 billion higher than in the previous
nonth. With this rise, the income total was $12 billion
above the average annual rate of $264 billion prevailing in
the first six months of the year. Further increases in
private-industry payrolls and nonfarm proprietors' income
accounted for the September-October advance.
+ + +
Expenditures for new construction totalled almost $)2.8
billion in November, a 7 per cent decline from October, ac-
cording to a joint report of the Departments of Commerce
and Labor. All classes of construction activity except com-
mercial building shared in the downward movepenlt from Oct-
ober, but the declines were less than seasonal in most major
types of work.
+ +
Total estimated receipts for all governmental units for
igwy purposes in 1951 exceeded $5 billion for the first
time, amounting to $5,040 million, including $779 million
for new borrowings, the Bureau of Public Roads of the U. S.
Department of Commerce announced. This total represented
an increase of $413 million, or 9 per cent, over 1950.

01eomargarine, Oct. 1952, M117J-102, 54, 504 Ir.
Fats a ones, oct. 1952, Y17-1-102, lo#, $2 a Year
Fatal & Oils-Consumption by Usea, Oct. 1952, M17-2-102,
10#, $2 a Year
L7 86th Quarterly Report of Lumber Survey Committee, Nov. 21
1952
SAutomotive Antifreezes, NBS circular 506, 154
U 950 Census of Population:
SPopulation of Counties, Apr. 1, 1950, PC-9, #7, 101
L~Population of Urban Places, Apr. 1, 1950, PC-9,#18, 104
SPopulation of Standard Metropolitan Areas, Apr. 1, 1950,
PC-9, #6
Small Business Aids (Renrn):
Advertising to Pre-Sell, 1#92
auacturers Should Aid Distributors, Retailers, #99
iligPrescription Department Sales, #101
ulc Accounting in Smaller Communities, #102
odenizngthe Front of Your Store, #103
et Factors Affecting the Future of Retailing, #1104
CaeStudy Distribution Channela Used by a Paint
Manufacturer, #Y105
FreDeals Are Not Free, #k106
ater-Resistant Organic Adhesives for Installation of
clay Tile Commercial Standard 181-52 A Voluntary
Standard of the Trade, 59
2 Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards,
October 1952, 504, $5.50 a Year
2 7nplnedAirline Traffic by Community, Calendar Year
1951, 15#
ethods & Equipment for Home Laundering, 15#
ashing, Cleaning, and Polishing Materials, 204
family Fare, 254
Meat For Thrifty Yeals, 154
oultry Cooking, 154
rut and Vegetable Buying Guide, 15#


/7 Quarterly Summary of Business Conditions in the
Southeast (First 9 Ilonths of 1952) CD-52-220
Foreign Commerce Weekly, )3.50 a Year
NPA Order M-77 amended Dec. 10, 1952
aNPA Revised CHP Regulation No. 6, Direction 8 as
amended Dec. 10, 1952
December 1, 1952 Consolidated Cotton Report
Report on Cotton Ginning, Dec. 8, 1952, A/C-0-10G
Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Nov. 1952, 10#
WReport on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 21, 1952, A/C-0-10G
Housing Characteristics for the State, Standard Metro-
politan Areas & Urban Places of 10,000 or More:Apr.1950:
L7 Virginia 22Louisiana /}Kentucky
Cotton Ginned Prior to Nov. 1, Crops of 19 52 & 1951:

North Carolina Louisiana LSkississippi
South Carolina iAlabama Uy Georgia
/}Specified States
Facts For Industry Reports:
UConfectioneryr, Oct. 1952, Kl60-102, 54, 504 Ir.
SGlass Containers, Oct. 1952, M770-102, 54, 504 Yr.
JO Heating & Cooking Equipment, Sept. 1952,M15H-92,
104, $1 a lear


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3










1,000 NEW subscriptions in four months prove that businessmen like


the NEW



FOREIGN COMMERCE WEEKLY


Send Your Subscriptions To The Nearest De-
p~artment Of Commerce Office Listed At The
Top Of Page 1 Of This Bulletin Of Commerce


* Wider coverage
--New departments
-More news


* Easier to read
--Larger type
--Newrs-style headlines


* Faster service

* Quicker delivery
--First-class mailings

* Lower cost~
-$3.50 a year


PPRTU1UlNITIS to sell United States
products abroad,
SOURCES of foreign raw materials and mer-
chandise for import to the United States.
LIST of businessmen from abroad visiting
the United States.
O BUSINESS and industrici deveplomen
broad.
LEADS for new business.
WORLD economic conditions.
EXCHANfGE and finance information.
CO PROGRE in international transport and
communications.
*woRLD-WIDE commodity information:
Metals, textiles, chemicals, machinery, lum-
bor. .sacs.
a DETAILS of new foreign commercial laws,
tarif changes, other regulations.
O EXPQT controls oad other United States
Govrnment actions offcting foreign tode.
NEWS of world trade fairs and exhibitions.


TYIELY SUSIINES NEWS FROM ALL OVER TNE WOLD
FASTER preparation .. FASTE5R printing .. FASTER delivery

MrORE pages .. MORE departments .. MORE information

Larger Type .. EASIER READING .. News-style Headlines


sea asassex1


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
GPO









BC-6-JP


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMdENT OF ECONOMICS
GAlamSVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IllIlllIIII IIUI IIIllllllllUlllllllllllliI ll111
3 1262 08748 9158


PAGE 4


BU LLETI


A Better, Handier, Working Tool for World Traders .. .









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE










ATLANTA, GA. SAVAMAIIY, GA JACK(SDAVLLE, FLA HInI 82, FLA noBILE, ALA CHARLESTON, S.C.,
716 Forsyth Bhdg. Reoo 218, P.O. Bldge, 126 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Aldg., 308 Federal Bldg** Sgt. Jasper Building,
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453 Tel. a-Fyss Tel. e-71st Tel. 9-7588 Tel. 2-8841 Tel. 7771
BIRMINGHAMY, AWL., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,Ex. 355

V(40,7 MO() 26 BIG TECHNOLOGICAL EINIBIT FOR BUSINESS MYEN TO BE HELD IN A~TLAINTA,FE~B.11-13 JANUARY 15, 1953


PROSPECTIVE INVESTMENT IN S. E. IN 1953 BIGH

Inifiedulent Trends in Industries peculiar
Nonmanufachsane Irndushi'es to the Southeast, such
as the textile trade,
means.---- mmes" plan to spend hundreds
naumma ne mom IOMUCIN of millions of dollars
this year on new plant
and equipment opera-
tions, according to the
s publication nIlarkets
After The Defense Ex-
a a~ pansion," just released
o oby the U. S. Department
of Commerce.
uummes Ruarwmon The publication,
5- mmmN m a available at all Com-
merce Department of-
...dd ad fices in the region,
asse. listed prospective
'plant and equipment
mus I I expenditures nationally
a. a in the textile indust-
ry this year as approx-
2~~~ waiting $380 million.
Others were food and
..wagiagil 'kindred products, 9589,
o z**,='j *. ,* .* 000,000; beverages,
we~~1~ ir.paw r iO a $416,000,000; paper
.................... .unand allied products,
$424,000,000; chemicals and allied products, $1,450,000,-
000; and petroleum and coal products, $2,651,000,000, all
predominantly important in the Southeast,

This publication sells for 55 cents. Use Order
Blank on Page 3 for ordering.

The report, prepared by Commerce Department experts in
collaboration with that agency' s Committee for Economic
Development, is intended for southeastern business men
who have an eye on the future after the present defense
expansion program runs its course. .
"It attempts only to present the facts with ample
words of caution as to the infallibility of human judg-
aent and the shortcomings of powers of prophecy," says
the foreword to the publication.
The prediction is made that the publication will become
one of the nation's "beat seller" of government origin,
and the demand for it in the region is already brisk.
The publication consists of 90 pages profusely illus-
trated with charts and graphs, with separate departments
devoted both to domestic commerce and world trade.


KARKCET PRODUCT POTENTIAL TO FEATURE BIG EXHIBIT

Possibilities in
~s~ ~i lcn~~the development of
market products of
the future will be shown to manufacturers, technical
students, technicians and businessmen generally of the
Southeast in a technological exhibit to be presented in
Atlanta, February 11 to 13.
The exhibit, to occupy approximately 14,000 square
feet of space in the Exhibit Hall of thqAtlanta Bilt-
more Hotel, will be sponsored by the Field Service of
the U. S. Department of Commerce and will be participated
in by the National Bureau of Standards, Office of Tech-
nical Services, and U. S. Patent Office, all of the
Commerce Department, and the research division of the
Armed Services.

Nlote: This exhibit will be open to all
business men and other interested persons
without charge, and every one wrho can
possibly do so is urged to attend.

It wnill consist of displays of newn processes developed
by the government agencies, as well as reports on research
activities conducted by the Office of Technical Services in
Germany and Japan followinng the end of World War II, and
post-war material of that kind prepared through the coop-
eration of the Armed Services and private industry.
The exhibit, designed to "tip off" business men and
other interested persons on ideas and suggestions for
broadening and improving their manufacturing and productive
techniques, will be similar to that held in November at
the Conrad H~ilton Hotel in Chicago when the displays and
reports ran the gamut of products and material from
electronics to textiles.
One feature of the exhibit will be a file of some 3,000
government-owned patents nowr available fo~r free use deal-
ing with everything from a radio program jammerr" to min
"overrunning clutch."
"OUR FEDERAL INCOME TAX," 1952 EDITION

S The nation's best seller on income taxes is
again available for southeasterners. It's Uncle
Sam's booklet entitled nYour Federal Income Tax." *
This time, it's the 1952 edition.
a Like the booklet issued in previous years, the
1 1952 edition incorporates any changes made in the ,
internal revenue law in the~past year.
In addition, the publication "Bulletin F" on
depreciation and obsolescence and also various
leaflets on other aspects are available.





NPA EASES CONTROLS:GOOD YEAR IN SOUTHEAST SEEN

SThe year 1953 should bring a "stepped
T 2 up" activity in several lines of in-
dustry in the Southeast, even surpassing
N~tionalthe high level of 1952 in some respects,
(0 (IICS as a result of action of the National
Production Authority in easingn con-
trols in some directions.
Pro ucio a~~*~ Affec~~tg~Aeted by NPA'sa action particularly
as the construction industry, forest
products, textiles and some metalwrork-

111 IC)i@t Ing athe constuction field alone, an
acceleration of building for recreation-
al, amusement and entertainment purposes,
which was banned in the region for more than two years, is
anticipated. Controls on such construction operations have
been relaxed --- not removed --- materials for which should
be available without "undue interference" with supplies
needed for the $33 1-3 billion worth of other types of
construction estimated as "in the mill" for the nation
during the year.
The forecast has been made that a quarter of a billion
dollars worth of theatres, bowling alleys, skating rinks,
swimming pools, playgrounds and other places of recreation
will be established nationally during 1953, a large part of
which will come to the Southeast. Steel for such jobs has
not been available heretofore, because of the industrial
expansion and other defense construction work, but effective
January 1 of this year a relaxation of the controls went
into effect.
The Southeast should likewise benefit from the relaxation
order as it concerns public works, utilities and other
projects in 1953. Larger allotments of steel will be made
during the year for building highways, bridges, streets,
electric power facilities and such activities. There will
also be a higher ceilings for from one through four family
houses, and for multi-unit residences, or apartment build-
ings, permitting the use of greater quantities of controlled
materials in their construction.
In other fields, NPA removed controls from certain forest
products, textile materials, chemicals, iron and steel
products, and metals and minerals, all important to the
region, insofar as inventories are concerned. The action
affected such commodities as southern pine, gray iron castings,
aluminum foil and powder, nylon staple and filament yarn,
high tenacity rayon yarn, and twine, binder, and baler.

~NPA ADMINISTRATOR RESIGNS
'Richard A. McDonald, of San Francisco, has resigned
' as Administrator of the National Production Authority
and Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer accepted it
' with an expression of "great regret." Horace B. M1cCoy, '
' veteran Commerce Department official, was named Acting '
' Administrator. M~r. M~cDonald, who was on leave of
' absence from his post of chairman of the Executive
Committee of the Crown-Zellerbach Corporation, of San
Francisco. joined NPA in February 1952. '

RECENT NPA ACTIONS:
Softwood Plywood: Revoked Order Y-63.
Rubber: Amended Order M-2 providing that only those com-
panies using rubber in excess of certain specified amounts
need file monthly consumption reports. (Order Y-2 Amended
Dec. 11, 1952) .
Ferro-Tungsten: Revoked Schedule 3 to Order Y-80.
Retailers: Revoked Direction 1 to Order Y-89 governing
distribution of controlled materials to retailers.
Brass Mill Products: Revoked Direction 1 to Order M1-82
permitting distributors to acquire increased quantities to
strengthen their inventories.


SOUTH ATLANTIC REGION LEADS NATION IN BROILERS

The South Atlantic region of Florida,Georgia, the
Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland and Delaware in the
first 11 months of 1952, with a production of 389,110,
000 chicks hatched in commercial hatcheries led all
other regions in the country in total output of that
product, according to a report of the Bureau of
Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture issued recently.
Production in the South Atlantic section wass some
89 million more than the second largest producing
region, the WAest North Central, where an output of
300,250,000 was recorded.

Southeastern field offices of the
Department of Commerce shown on the top
of this Bulletin of Commerce have for
some time been receiving reports from
the 1950 Census of Agriculture. Some
of them are gratis and others on a sales
basis.

Among the individual States, Georgia led the nation
with a total of 119,254,000, which wass far more than
any other State in the nation. Missouri, with an out-
put of 99,300,000 was second, and Indiana third with
97,512,000.
Production in other southeastern States included
57,093,000 in North Carolina; 12,110,000 in South
Carolina; 18,535,000 in Florida; 17,650,000 in Tenn-
essee; 27,498,000 in Alabama; and 36,897,000 in Miss-
issippi.

SLIGHT RISE IN FARM INCOME SHOWN FOR REGION

Aided by sharp increases in Georgia and Mississippi,
the Southeast ended the first 10 months of 1952 with
a slight rise in cash farm income, according to the
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of
Commerce.
The overall gain came despite substantial decreases
registered in North and South Carolina and Florida.
Total receipts in the 7 States was $3,100,353,000,
which compared with $3,065,196,000 registered at the
end of October 1951.
Increases of from $356,278,000 to $426,092,000
were shown for Mississippi, or 20 per cent, and from
$489,546,000 to $537,159,000 in Georgia, nearly 10 per
cent. These gains offset declines of from $734,657,000
to $708,917,000, or 3.5 per cent in North Carolina;
$343,138,000 to $313,992,000, 8.5 per cent in South
Carolina; and $419,351,000 to $380,027,000, or 9.4 per
cent in Florida.
Tennessee joined with Mississippi and Georgia on the
#plus" side by recording a gain of from $383,517,000
to $399,918,000, or 4.3 per cent. In Alabama, however,
a slight drop of from $338,709,000 to $334,248,000 was
shown.

s NEWR JCSOILEISIT AGR
I~~~~~~~~~~ WE bKOVLEDSRC BAE

S Appointment of Rufe B. Newman, Jr., of Wash- ,
ington, as District Manager of the United States ,
t Department of Commerce in Jacksonville, Fla.,
succeeding William A. Dunlap, retired, has been ,
Announced. Mr. Newman has already entered upon ,
Shis new duties. He has been serving for some ,
time as Assistant Administrator of the National ,
Production Authority in charge of the Facilities ,
and Construction Bureau. ,


GPO 81100530


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





BUSINESS IfRENDS

unrn Dntniledl Informat~ion on the Highlights of the


Department of Commerce Fi s


.


Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
-reports in November 1952 amounted to $249 million, up 2
per cent from the $243 million paid out in the same
uonth in 1951.
*
Total business inventories at the end of October 192
were estimated at $74.4 billion, which after allowance
for seasonal variations, was an increase of $450 million
during the month,
*
Capital outlays by American business were expected
to reach new highs in the final quarter of 1952 and in
the first quarter of 1953, according to a joint report
of the Department of Commerce and Securities and Ex-
change Commission.
*
Third-quarter 1952 United States balance of payments
estimates indicated a substantial improvement in the
financial position of foreign countries. Transactions
with the United States enabled foreign countries to
raise their gold and dollar assets by more than $700
million .
*
American insurance companies in 1951 paid net prem-
iumas of $147.2 million to foreign reinsures against
which the amount recovered for losses was $106.8 mlin
Net foreign dollar earnings from the reinsurance of
United Statse risks were $40.4 million.
*
The value of manufacturers' shipments in November
1952 eased off from the record October rate with new
and unfilled ordersdelinsihl.

To Obtain This
~~~~ ME OKSI material CheckIt

kNI) RICP01RiS "d~Thi',e Sacn-o
MLu This Pantion Of
The Page To The
Nemeest Departmentr DfCommercppFsel d Ofcollaou ei-

U nted FtatSales Material Payable To Treasurer Of The
-nte -

Your Federal Income Tax, 1952 Edition, 254
Bulletin F Depreciation & Obsolescence, 304
The Small IBusinessman & Declaration of Estimated
Tax, 10#
Basic Tax Information for Small IBusiness Enterprises
Markets After the Defense Expansion, 554
Order 11-2 Amended Dec. 11, 19;52
WProjections of the Number of Households and Families,
1955 & 1960, P-20,#42, 10#
Gvrmna e i 92 -F2l 0Report on Cotton Ginning, Dec. 22, 1952, A/C-0-10G
Housing Characteristics For The State, Standard Metro-
politan Areas & Urban Places of 10,00q or More, Apr.19)
SAlabama northh Carolina //Tennessee
SFlorida U Georgia
Cotton Ginned Prior to December 1, Crops of 1952 & 1951:
//Georgia 2784uth Carolina 27klorth Carolina
}Tennessee U Kississippi L/Arkansas


Prosperous post-war business conditions have maintained
the business population at tne high level of 4 million firms
but the bulk of American businesses -- most of them small --
are comparatively young. Half of the firms in operation at
the enid of 1951 had been operated by their present owners
for 4 1-3 years or less.
+++e+
Total sales of all retail stores in November 1952
amounted to $13.9 billion, about 4 per, cent above the same
month a year ago. After adjusting for seasonal factors and
trading day differences, November sales were down about 2
per cent from October.
+ + +
Individuals in the United States in the third quarter
of 1952 saved $5.6 billion in liquid form, the Securities
and Exchange Commission announced. The rate of saving: was
the highest since the fourth quarter of 1945 and compared
with $2 billion in the second quarter of 1952 and $5.1
billion in the third quarter of 1951.
t++++
October 1952 shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear
and nightwear, including knit outerwear shirts, amounted to
$36 million, or 6 per cent higher than the October 1951
total and 7 per cent above that of September 1952, the
Bureau of the Census reported.
w+se+
First readhae of a new census of American Direct Invest-
ments in Foreign Countries established a book valuation of
$11.8 billion for those investments as of the end of 1950,
the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Com-
merce announced. The census just taken was the only one
since the war and contains a wealth of detail on the post-
war growth of American foreign investment.
+ + +
Business activity moved ahead strongly in the closing
months of the year with consumer purchasing continuing its
recent rise, according to the monthly Department of Commerce
publication Survey of Current Business. Retail sales continued
the upswing evident since mid-summer based largely on the
steady growth of personal income. The rise in Government
purchases of goods and services moderated considerably.

Texas /Ptouisiana UAlabama ifSpecified States
SA Projected Growth of the Labor Force in the United
States Under Conditions of High Employment, 1950 to 1975,
,P_50, #42, 104
M onthl Repo#12on the Labor Force, November 1952,

Facts For Industry Reports:
~Cotton Broa dtoven Goods,D31ae5Ai3-2 &1 Ffi504oYean i

the U. S., Revised, Season of 1951-52, Y15-1 Sup., 54
L7Paint, Varnish & Lacquer, Total Factory Shipments,
October 1952, M19J-102, 54, 504 Year
~Commercial & home Canning Closures, Oct. 1952,M75c-102,
104, $1 Year
Superphosphate, October 1952, M19D-102, 5#, 504 Year
LCotton & Linters Consumption, Stocks, Imports, Etc.,
November 1952, Y15-1-4-53, 104, $1 Year
7,Synthetic Broad Woven Goods, 3rd Quar. 1952)415C-3-2,
lot. 504 Year
SEffective Competition A Report to the Secretary of
Commerce by his Business Advisory Council
Catalog of U. S. Census ]Publications, Jan-Sept.1952, 304
World Trade Directory State of Georgia
fSimplified Practice Recommendation 3-52 Metal Lath
(Expanded & Sheet) & Metal Plastering Accessories, 54
86th Quarterly Report of Lumber Survey Committee
E;Commercial Standard 181-52 Water-Resistant Organic
Adhesives for Installation of Clay Tile 5#
L7Transportation Factors in the Mlarketing of Newsprint -
Transportation Series No. 2, 4O#


Nqwa in the Field of Business is Availableat all


GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





BOOKLET ISSUED pN1 TRANSPORTATION OF NEWSPRINT

Production of newsprint is an upcoming industry in the South-
-east. While at the present time, only Alabama is listed as an
active producer, relatively recent plant expansion projects
call for a broadening of that activity in the area.
The Department of Commerce has just issued a comprehensive
study of the many transportation factors which enter into the
marketing of newsprint in a publication entitled "Transportation
Factors in the Marketing of Newsprint. The study examines the
significance of transportation costs and services in the market-
ing and flow of newsprint from the mill-manufacturer to the
consumer-publisher and evaluates the relationship of such
transportation factors to newsprint supply, coat, pricing and
newsprint plant location.

Copies of this publication are available
at all Department of Commerce field offices
in the Southeast at 40 cents a copy. See
Order Blank on Page 3 for ordering.

The study covers such subjects as the importance of trans-
portation costs in the marketing and pricing of industrial
products; manufacturing, marketing and consumption of newsprint;
national and regional newsprint traffic flow patterns; level
and structure of newsprint rates; transportation costs and
delivered pricing, and transportation costs and newsprint mill
locations. Tables and charts illustrate the major features of
the study.
'NEW "BUSINESS MAN'S BIBLPTOFF PRESS '

'In 1790, the Southeast had a population of 1,851,806 '
persons. Today, the total population is 21.1 million. '
r There are 376 persons still on pension rolls in the '
Indian wars. *
The purchasing power of the dollar in 1935 had an '
index of 99.5. Today, it' s 44.0. '
In 1888, 11.3 million persons voted for presiden- '
tial electors. Recently, some 60 million participated. '
These and many other facts and figures of yesterday '
and today are contained in the "Bible" of business men, '
statisticians, research experts, and students of the '
i national econongr just issued known as the Statistical '
Abstract of the United States. The current issue is '
for 1952 and it' s available at all Department of '
Commerce field offices for $3.25 buckram baund, '


IHEL FOR BUSINESSMEN URGED IN NEWI REPORT

Southeastern business men, particularly the smaller ones,
would receive assistance from the Federal Government on
legal matters if a report just issued by the Business Advisory
Council of the U. S. Department of Commerce is put in effect
by legislation.
The report, sent to Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer,
would provide a Conference Section in the Department of
Justice where business men could go and get guidance in
advance of and perhaps in place of costly litigation,

Copies of this report will be available
at all Department of Commerce field offices.
It' s entitled "Effective Competition."
Request information from the nearest office
as to price.

In approving the committee' s report as to assistance
by the Justice Department on such matters, the Secretary
said it was interesting to note the figure in the report
that fully 90 per cent of the cases arising in the anti-
trust field could be solved by preliminary conference.
The report was described by the Secretary as "one of the
post constructive discussions of the subject of competition
and the laws undertaking to govern it which has appeared in
many years."

DEMALND FOR LUMLBER STRONGER IN 3RD QUARTER OF 52

The Lumber Survey Committee of the Secretary of Commerce
in a recent report said there had been a strengthening of
demand for certain lumber items in the third quarter of 1952,
but that for the most part the tendency was still toward
softness.
The report, the 86th quarterly one of that group, said
some spottiness in markets had resulted, but that wholesale
lumber prices on the average remained "relatively steady.'
Production showed an 8 per cent seasonal increase over the
second quarter, and new orders were slightly greater than
production. Shipments were 3 per cent below quarterly output.
In the manufacture of wooden boxes and shook in the third
quarter, production in the Southeast totalled 14,140,940
board feet, which was a decline of 18.2 per cent from the
same period in 1951. All regions showed decreases, except
the entire South, where the output was up 17 per cent, the
Inland Empire, and the Rocky Mountains* ero sa~ooo


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

XI5185518IIR15I I
3 1262 08748 9141
BULLET... w- wanrmmRCE


PAGE ~4


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
SATLANTA, CA.
716 Forsth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Volume 7, Number 26 January 15, 1953


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
ENTI~W OF POSTAG $300


BC-d-JP


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY ,. ~QUAL9~LS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOKtIC
GAINESVILLE, F1LORIDA







UNITED ST TES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE








Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, 1,a., Charl-eston, 8.C., Jacksonville, Fla., Memphis, Tenn.,
7th FloorForayth Bldg., 266 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., Madison at Front,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453' Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426

Miam~i, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Savannah, Ga.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,308 Federal BldgE., 218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-36/..Ex,206 Tel. 2-4755

,O~ 7 Ng, 3 February 1, 1953


CHIEMICALZ INDUSTRY ALDVANCES SHAIRPLY IN REGION

One of the fastest growing businesses in the South
today is the chemical industry. This is evidenced by
figures just released by the Bureau of the Census show-
ing that in two branches of the industry alone -
sulfuric acid and sodium 50 per cent or mtore of the
production and shiptoents originated in southern States.
The data, reflected in a Facts For Industry Repgrt,
showed that of a total of 12,388,868 abort tons of sul-
furic acid produced in the nation, 6,046,772 came' from
southern States, including 298,404 in Alabamra; 535,719
in Florida; 247,307 in Georg~ia; 160,087 in North Caro-
lina; 206,779 in South Carolina; 549,918 in Virginia;
835,310 in Kentuckyr and Tennesseei 947,916 in Teaus;
1,340,009 in Delaware and Maryland; and 435r335 in
Louisiana. The report was for the year 1951.

These Facts For Industry Reports are
available at all Department of Commerce
field offices on a nominal sales basis.
See Page 3 for listing of this one.

Incidentally, this was a sharp increase for most
States, especially in the Southeast, over production in
1950 when the South as a whole produced 6,110,376 tons
of a national total of 12,142,791, a decreased production
in Virginia, Kentuckyr, Tennessee, Texas, Delaware and
Maryland reducing the overall output in 1950 somewhat.
In other divisions of the industry, the region was
equally as active. For instance, the South Atlantic
States of Georgia, Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias,
Delaware and Maryland in 1951 abipped and inter-plant
transferred 448,305 tone of sodina hydroxide valued at
. $22,672,000, and the remainder of the South 615,816 tone
valued at $29,944,000. The South Atlantic produced 515,062
tons and the repairing area, 1,017,969.
In the production of chlorine gJas, the South Atlantic
turned out 345,212 tone and the remainder of the South
938,003, which was more than 50 per cent of the nation' s
2,517,913 ton production. The South could also point to
relatively high productions of oxygen an~d acetylene.


CONTAINER INDUISTRY IN SOUTH AT BILLION LEVEL

The container and
packaging industry
in the South has
!_. i----S---- P become a billion
unrm according to a cur-
rent issue of the
Container and Pack-
aging Industry Re-
port of the Nation-
al Production Ar-
----thoritr, U. S. De-
partment of Comlmerce.
p ......s..,..... Citing Bureau of the Census
figures for 1950, the publica-
w.......... tion points out that the dollar
volume of business done by that
as...... industry in that year included
paper aind paper board containers,
-- $532,000,000; metal cone and
eteel shipping containers, $238,-
,,,, ,000,000; wooden containers,
~188,000,000; glass containers,
and ~110,000,000; and textile bags,
Containers and PackaginR '135,000,000.
Industry Repqrt of the '
National Production Note: Those interested in
Authority this report can be placed
on the srailing list for it
at any Departmrent of Com-
aerce field office. Sub-
acription price. $0.60 Year.
Of further interest is the fact that the South stood
third among all regions in total value of, the output,
ita $1,203 million outstripping all other sections ex-
cept the Northeast and Midwest.
In regional reports on the situation for the winter
`of 1952, MPA said the steel strike had adversely affect
ed manufacturers in the area although container demands
were generally met.


I.AST CAL't

A final reminder to manufacturers and other businessmen, technical students and
technicians that the United Statse Department, of Commerce will present an unusual
' Technological Exhibit in Atlanta, Pebruary 11, 12 and 13, in the Exhibit hall of
the Atlanita Biltaore Hotel. It will occupy some 14,000 square feet of space. It
will consist of models, material and reports dealing with magy advances ma~de in
the fields of science and industry, and is designed to help business men develop
' their operational techniques. It will be the first abowing in the South and the
' second in the United Statse. The first was held in Chicago at the Conrad Elilton
hotel in Novemrber,1952. Everyone is invited. No admission will be charged. It
' will be or994 from 9 a. a. until 9 p, a.









I


RETAIL TRADE BRISK IN SOUTHEAST IN 1952

Southeastern retail merchants rang the registers at
a greater rate of speed in 1952 than in 1951, judging
from the Monthly Retail Trade Report of the Bureau of
the Census for the first 11 months of last year,
Augusta, Ga., registered the second highest percent-
age gain in sales in the country, 11 per cent, and in-
creases were also shown in nine other cities and areas
in the region in which the Census Bureau conducts its
monthly surveys.

These Monthly Retail Trade Reports are
available at all Department of Commerce
field offices. The subscription rate is $1
a year. See Page 3 for ordering.

Other gains in the 11-month period included 2 per
cent in Atlanta; 3 per cent in Columbus and Savannah,
Ga., and Asheville, N. Ci 8 per cent in Manatee and
Sarasota counties, Fla; 2 per cent in Biloxi and Gulf-
port, Miss; and 6 per cent in Clarksdale.
Only Birmingham, Bristol and Johnson City, Tenn.,
and Chilton and Perry counties, Ala., reported declines
of from 3 to 8 per cent.
Exceeding Augusta's 11 per cent gain was Paducah,
Kentucky' s 14 per cent.
Sharp declines in most areas in November from Oct-
ober 1952, but equally as effective increases in
November 1952 over the same month in 1951 were also
observed .

FACILITY EXPANlSIONS IN REGION $85.1 MrILLON

Further development of railway transportation facili-l
ties in the Southeast to cost a total of $83,131,800
ras approved by the Defense Production Administration.
The approval was given in the granting of 29 certi-
ficates of necessity for tax amortization purposes to
firms operating in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississ-
ippi, South Carolina and Tennessee calling for plant
and facility expansion operations at a total cost of
$5,158,800.
Twenty of the 29 certificates involved improvements
in railway transportation. The others were concerned
with production of refractories, electric power, phos-
phatic fertilizer and steel drums, and development of
waterways transportation, petroleum storage and ship-
yard facilities.

GEORGIA LEADER IN BABY CHICK( OUTPUT IN 1952

Final preliminary figures for 1952 oh the production
of baby chicks by commercial hatcheries gave Georgia
a commanding lead in 'the nation with a total of 128,-
924,000, according to a Bureau of Agricultural Econo-
mies, U. S. Department of Agriculture, report. This
was some 24,500,000 more than were hatched in the
State in 1951.
The figures gave Missouri the runnerup position
with 102,800,000, and Indiana third place, with 101,-
365,000.
The South Atlantic area of Georgia, Florida, the
Carolinas and Virginias, Mlaryland and Delaware led all
other regions in the United States with a grand total
of 424,861,000, which was approximately.24 per cent of
the entire national output of 1,725,347,000 chicks.
More than half a billion chicks were hatched in the
Southeast as a whole last year. In addition to the
South Atlantic region, the States of Alabama, M~ississ-
ippi, Tennessee and Kentucky turned out 100,609,000.
Incidentally, it looked as if 1953 might continue to
be a banner year for the industry in the Southeast.


SECOND QUARTER 1953 STEEL ALLOTMlENTS INCREASED

Southeastern businessmen who use
THE steel in their fabrication operations
in the production of consumer goods
EI~atonal will receive a "boost" in their pro-
action just taken by the National
Production Authority increasing allot-
Produ tion ments of carbon and alloy steel for
[4 gythe second quarter of 1953.
The action was taken through an
amendment to the Controlled Materials
Auth rity Plan regulation permitting certain
11 1th T producers of so-called "B" products,
which run a wide gamut of commodities,
to calculate their own allotments of
carbon and alloy steel items for that
period on the basis of 110 per cent of their total third
quarter 1952 allotments, provided such previous anlorments
did not exceed 500 tons in the case of carbon steel, and 90
tons of alloy steel.
The action, important to many southeastern business
firms, was taken after NPA had conducted a survey of the
supply-requirements position of steel controlled materials
indicating that additional quantities of carbon and alloy
items would be available for industry in the months ahead.
All business firms in th~e region contemplating the need
of additional quantities of carbon and alloy steel in the
second quarter of~ the year and affected by the change in
allotment provisions were urged to proceed on the basis
decided upon and to get in touch with their nearest Deparrt-
ment of Commerce office for a copy of Direction 18 to CMP
Regulation 1 dealing with the allotment change.

SNPA REGULATORY MLATERIALr ON SUBSCRIPTION BASIS
'Discontinuance of the publication Defense Production '
Record January 1 of this year has led to the placing
by the National Production Authority of the List of
Regulatory Material previously carried by that publi-
cation on a subscription basis. The title will be
National Production Authority Regulatory Material and
Formal and it will continue to be published monthly
with a weekly supplement.
i The subscription price of the information will be
$1.50 a year, domestic, and $B2, foreign. Subscript-
ions will be handled in the usual manner by the
Superintendent of Documents and the nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce field office will be glad to take
subscriptions of those interested. The first issue
on the new subscription basis was released early
in January.

OTHER NPA ACTIONS
Other actions taken by NPA recently included the follow-
ing:
Priorities S st~em: Revo~ked Direction 5 to NPA Regulation 2
establishing basic rules of the priorities system.
Iron & Steel: Issued Schedule 5 to Order ML-6A requiring
purchasers of high nickel alloy to furnish end-use certifi-
eates to distributors (Dec. 17, 1952) and amended Schedule
A to Order M1-80 requiring purchasers of nickel-bearing
stainless steel or high nickel alloys from melters, process-
ors, or further converters to furnish suppliers with certifi-
cations. (December 17, 1952). Finally, Amendment 4 to Order
Y-80 was revoked.
Aluminum: Amended Order M-88 to provide for a more stable
flow of aluminum through warehouse channels. (Dec. 16, 1952).
Copper Scrap: Issued Amendment 1 to Order ML-16 eliminating
end-of-month reports on inventories or purchases and sales.
December 22, 1952).
Electric Utilities: Issued Direction 3 to Order M-50 permit-
ting deliveries of controlled materials for major plant
additions .


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





For turther
e -- Details oef
Any Of These
Highlights ln
Th Field Of
hamm..........----- -bisiness Get
In Touch With
he Nearest Departmenlt of Commerce Field Office.


Personal income in November 1952 was at an annual
rate of $276 billion, unchanged from the high October
level, the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce announced. The stability of personal
income total largely reflected divergent movements
between private nonagricultural payrolls, which con-
tinued to increase, and farm income, it was stated.
For the first 11 months of 1952, personal income was
at an annual rate of $b267) b~illio, 5) per cnt~ above
the same months of 1951.

A record volume of $32.3 billion was spent for new
construction in 1952, according to a joint report of
the U. S. Departments of Commerce and Labor. New pri-
vate construction put in place was valued at $21.8 bil-
lion, slightly more than in 1951, while public expendi-
tures for newn construction reached $10.5 billion, up
$1 1-3 billion from 1951.
*
Total business inventories at the end of November
1952 were estimated at $75.5 billion. After allowance
for seasonal variations, the book value of inventories
increased $450 million. Stocks of durable goods were
$550 million higher, while nondurable goods inventories
were $100 million below the previous month.
*
Americans spent more than a billion dollars on
foreign travel in 1952, exceeding the previous year by
$100 million. + w *


T


_1 __


__________


I


L/ Projections of the Number of Households & Families,
1955 and 1960, P-20, 1#42, 10Q

~ANNOUNCING ---
I7 Volume 1 of the 1950Censu of Population, a single
'book of 1,C00 pages containing the official population '
for the UInited States, each State, and Territories
Sand possessions, as well as for counties, each minor
n ni ndi o nawithi nceunties,0andofomoincorporat d


S]Provisional Estimates of the Population of the U. S.,
April 1, 1950 to Nov. 1, 1952, P-25,#67
S 40th Annual Report of the Secretary of Commerce on
operations of the Department of Commerce, 1952, 254
Area & Industrial Development Publications #21, 154
Selected Publications of the Area Development Division,S4
Fruit Spread Production, 1951, 204
Inorganic Chemicals & Gases, 1951, FFIM119A-01, 254
Superphosphate, Summary for 1952 Season, FFIMI9D-1-02, 54
Small Business Aids:
Direct Mail Advertising by Furniture Stores, #108
Wlhen the Feed Dealer Modernizes, #109
Experience With Profit Sharing, #110
Safety Talks to Newa Workers Lower Accident Rates, #113
Too Little and Too Late in Distribution, #115
/' Twelve Steps for Staying in the Radio-Appliance Business,

/ 7 Settlement of the Dollar Line Case A Report by the
Secretary of Commerce to the President of the U. S., 15#
/ ZCivil Aeronautics Administration List of Publications,
November 1952


To 00tain This
19)(\ BO())}[ materiall Check It
~3~348e sND ItfP MilS IndTheaSpacenPro-
Ask --/ This Portion Of

Nearest Department of Commerce Fieldh afiee Tourhe
Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side. Make Remit-
Ga ted FoatSales Material Payable To Treasurer Of The



Commercial Standards Recorded Voluntary Standards
of the Trade:
17 Men' s Work Shirt Siz~es, 187-52, 5# 30 water-
Resistant Organic Adhesives for Installation of
Clay Tile, 181-52, 56 27 Plastic Tableware, 249-52,

Census of H~ousing: (HIB Series)
IRaleigh, N. C., 114, 154 O9'hattanooga, 35, 200
L~Charleston, S. C., 32, 154 #Knoxville, 76, 20
SNashville, 96, 20
Census of Agriculture:
L7 The United States Horticultural Specialties,
V-V.Pt. 1, 83.50 Irrig~ation of Agricultural
LandandLouisiana, 30 /Z7Irrigation of Agricultur-
/ Public Employment in October 1952
ZCT Petroleum Products Secondary Inventories and
Storage Capacity, Nov. 30, 1952


Profits after taxes of U. S. manufacturers in the third
quarter of 1952 continued on the same level as the first
and second quarters of the year, the Securities and Exchange
Commission and Federal Trade Commission reported. Estimated
sales declined to $60.7 billion from $61.4 billion in the
second quarter and not profits before Federal. income taxes
amounted to $5.4 billion, a 5.3 per cent decrease from the
second quarter and 12.9 per cent below the third quarter.

November 1952 shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear
and nightwear, including knit outerwear shirt, amounted to
$28.6 million, 10 per cent under the November 1951 total and
20 per cent less than that of October 1952, the Bureau of the
Census reported.
+ +
Employment moved downward as usual between November and
December 1952, as fana activity was sharply curtailed at the
end of the harvest season. Total civilian employment was
estimated at 61,480,000 in the week ending December 13, or
about 3/4 million below the November figure, the Census
Bureau said.
*
Total wholesalers' sale during November 1952 were esti-
nated at $9,500 million, 7 per cent below those of the pre-
vious month when adjusted on a seasonally basis. Most of the
decline'reflected the unusually short working month in
November, the effect of which was not fully eliminated by the
seasonal adjustment.
+ *
The total number of individual income tax returns filed
for the income year 1950 was 53,060,098, of which 38,186,682
were taxable and 14,873,416 nontaxable, the Treasury Depart-
sent announced.
+ + 9
Business activity continued strong in November and Dec-
ember as heavy buying brought retail sales to new highs for
the holiday period, according to the Office of Business
Economics. An increasing demand for the national product in
llmajor sectors of the economy was observed in the final
nre. Goods and services flowed in increasing volume into
gerona cosumtion, private investment, and to Governmeqt.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





STANDARDS ADOPTED AFFECTUIG TEITILE GOODS INDSTRY

The spectre of flammability in the textile goods industry
- something that plagued the industry in the Soibtheast in
recent years through the spontaneous ignition of sweaters and
rayon chaps of children' s cowboy anita will be a thing of
the past now with the fuloption of certain standards just pro-
anlgated through the U. S. Department of Commerce' s Commodity
Standards Division.
The standards were set up in a document entitled "Flamabil-
ity of 01othing Textiles, Commercial Standard C8191-53" approved
by the Industry through efforts of the'Commerce Department.
Printed copies of these standards are expected
momentarily at field offices of the Department
of Commerce. Keep in touch with the office near-
est ygn,
The standards represent the combined opinion of an Industry
Committee representing cotton and rayon producers, and fabric
manufacturers, finishers, converters, wholesalers, retailers
and consumers coordinated by the American Association of Textile
Chemists and Coloriate and the National Retail Dry Good Associa-
tion,
The standards will serve as a guide in the manufacture and
sale of only those commodity textiles that are not dangerously
flammable, providing the public with the maximuml protection
from such textiles and at the same time permitting the unrea-
tricted merchandising of the great majority of those fabric
known to have no unusual burning characteristics.
NEW SECRETARY OF COMMERCE

' Sinclair Weeks, -of Boston, who becomes the new Secretary
of Commerce succeeding Charles Sawyer, will be the 17th
' representative- of southeastern businessmen in the Federal
Government since the cabinet position was first created
' in 1903,
' Four officials Georgia B. Cortelyou, New York; Victor '
' H. Metoalf, California; Oscar 8. Straus, New York; and
' Charles Nagel, Missouri served in the order named '
' from 1903 through 1912 as Secretary of Commerce and Labor *
' when the two departments operated jointly.. In 1913, the *
' Department of Comnerce was established as a separate '
' department and William G. Redfield became the first
SSecretary of Commerce under President Wilson. '


SOUTH CONTINUES LEALD IN WHOLESALE SALLES TREND

Wholesale dealers in the South led the nation in~ the first
11 months of 1952 in percentage increase in sale, according
to the Moqthly Wlholesale Trade Report of the Bureau of the
Gensue for November 1952.
In fact, sales in the region reflected gains of 1 per cent
in the South Atlantic; 2 per cent in the East South Central;
and 3 per cent in the West South Central section, while other
regions were reporting decreases or declines.
These reports are available gratin. Ask
the nearest Department of Commerce to place
you qn the mailing lit t9 receive them.
In the New England and West North Central regions a 1 per
cent drop was showay 4 per cent in the Middle Atlantic; and 2
per cent in the East North Central area, while the Mountain
and Pacific zones were recording no changes.
Gains in sale of certain electrical goods, groceries and
tobacco products in the South were largely responsible for
the clunlative increases, offsetting declines, some rather
sharp, in transactions invol ig~ndnletria supplies, lamber
and building materials, machinery equipment, and paper and
its products.
Slight gains in end-of-the-month inventories were also
reported in the region at the end of Novemrber, 538 wholesalers
in the South Atlantic section participating in a Bureau of the
Cenous surey recording a rise of 1 per cent; 210 in the East
South Central-area, 4 per cent, and 402 in the West South
Central, 3 per cent.-
DEPALRTMENT OF COMMERCE A~NNUAL .REPORT

SThe 40th Annual Report of the Secretary of Cormerce '
Covering operations of the U. 8. Department of Com-
Smerce for the fiscal year 1952 was made available.
The report, by former Secretfary of Commerce Charles
SSawyer, showed that the Department was extremely
Active during the year as its constituent bureaus
Performed the normal functions of promoting the
Nation' s foreign and domestic commerce whiile also
engaged in many activities directly related to the
defense program. Activities of the various bureaus
and actions to improve management throughout
the Departm8ent are reviewed in the report. *
oPO 63-47551


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYvMNT OF POSTAGE $300
sro


VOLUME 7, NUMYBER 3 FEBRUARYR 1, 1953


80-6-JF


3 1262 08748 9133
BULLETL .


PAGE 4


U. 5. DEPARTMENT OF 00MMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, CA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


;B~~
~2irs~s~s~s~,
~-i~"9~'


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





C, / 3, lb :7 7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, l~la., Cha~rlestonl, S.C., Jackson~ville, Fla., M~emphis, Tenn.,
7th Floor Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Eldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., Madison at Front,
Tel. WA 1~,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426

Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Savannlah, Ga.,
947 SEybold Bldg.,308 Federal Bldg., 218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 91-7j3~3 Tel. .2-3641,Ex,206 Tel. 2-4750

*Jl. 7 Mo* 4 February 15, 19)53


GOVERNMENT BUYING IN SOUTHIEAIST 2) BILLION

More than twro and a half bil-
INMx, amounsolfIoo01 lion dollars worth of goods and
soo ,we MilidES services have been sold to the
Federal Government since the
a FEOLERAL lo program of national defense
Began after the Korean war out-
4~L break, according to a Mlunitions
soo- Board report.
From the beginning of the
loo Korean war through last Septem-
STaTE AND Lc~aL
ber, the value of purchases in
eo selI~rAlabama, Florida, Georgia, Missl-
issippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
1950 1951 1952 'linas totalled $2,687,936,000,
Source: Survey of Cur- 'the report showed.
rent Business, U.S. 'Included wasl a total of $373,-
Department of Commerce' 698,000 in Alabama; $244,352,-
000 in Florida; $448,339,000 in Georgia; $150,206,000
in Mississippi; $661,217,000 in North Carolina; $299,-
023,000 in South Carolina; and $511,101,000 in Tennes-
see.


BILLIONS PUT IN CONSTRUCTION IN REGION_

The dollar value of all new construction in the
Southeast in the first 9 months of 1952 neared the $5
billion mark, according to figures contained in a recent
issue of the Industry Report Construction and Building
Yaterials issued by the National Production Authority.
Included were $2,709 million in private building
operations and $2,248.8 million in public construction.
Expenditures in Florida approximated $)598.2 million;
in Georgia, $398.6 million; and $458.1 million in Tenn-
essee, the only three southeastern States for which
separate figures were given in total new construction.

This Industry Report, Construction and
Building Materials, is available at any De-
partment of Commerce field office on a sub-
scription basis of 83 a year.

The seven States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas registered an ex-
penditure of $1,471 million in new public construction,
including Alabama, $133.2 million; Mississippi, $84.3
million; North Carolina, $160.8 million; and South Caro-
lina, $557.8 million, in addition to the sums spent in
Georgia of $135.1 million; Florida, $189.5 million; and
Tennessee, $210.3 million.
Expenditures in the ?-State area on new public con-
struction included $705.2 million on non-residential
public building; $269.8 million on highways; and $54.8
million for sewer and water facilities.

SLIGHT DROP REFLECTED IN CIVIL AIRCRAFT

A slight drop wass shown in total number of civil air-
craft in the Southeast in 1952 as compared with 1951,
as well as number of those active in the region, accord-
ing to a compilation of the Civil Aeronautics Administra-
tion, U. S. Department of Commerce.
Last year, the total number in the ?-State area was
8,297 of which 4,380 were active. In 1951, a total of
8,716 was counted with 4,744 active.
Florida led the other States in the Southeast last
year in number of aircraft, with 2,571 and also in number
of this active, with 1,160.
Other totals in the area in 1951 included 753 in Ala-
bama; 1,153 in Georgia; 775 in Mississippi; 1,551 in North
Carolina; 598 in South Carolina; and 896 in Tennessee.
Active planes last year, in addition to Florida, were
Alabama, 444; Georgia, 575; Mississippi, 435; North Caro-
lina, 909; South Carolina, 330 and Tennessee, 527.
In continental United States last year there were 86,-
884 such planes of which 51,879 were active.


Attention of small business firms is again
called to the daily lists of contract awards
made by the Federal Government which are
valuable for sub-contracting purposes. See
the nearest Department of Commerce field
office for further information.


According to the Munitions Board, the contracts list-
ed referred only to "prime" contracts, and did not take
into account the many millions of dollars worth of
subcontracts let in the ?-State region to small firms.
Regionwrise, the dollar value of all contracts let in
the ?-State area amounted to about 3.5 per cent of the
$77,194,783,000 worth let during the same period in
continental United States.


SCountless numbers of copies of the booklet
"Your Federal Income Tax, 1952 Edition" have
I been distributed by Department of Commerce
I offices in the Southeast as prospective income
I taxpayers have sought information as to wabt
I they do and do not owe Uncle Sam. Some schools
Shave made it part of their curriculum. Another
Popular booklet is nBulletin F on Depreciation
and Obsolescence." Also in demand are the leaf-
leta "Small Businessman and His Deolaration of
SEstimated Tax" and "Basic Information for Small
SBusiness Enterprises.n


INCOME TAX BOOKLET P k





HEARINGS SET ON ALLEGED NPA VIOLATIONS

Hearings will be held in Mliami the
latter part of February into charges
Brought by the National Production
THE 'i~i~~I~~ Authority of alleged violations of
JU~:PA relations arising, against two
8 firms in that city.
(1% ()IICL The firms are the Jalousie and
Windowr Engineering, Inc., and the
Ludman Corporation. The hearing on
Pod cto rllbehldFerur 2 ad charges against the Jalousie firm
other February 23.
Charles J. Hilkey, NPA hearing
Autho 1%)y inecommissioner will conduct both hear-
Also named in the charges against
the Jalousie company are Henry A.
Keller, president of the firm, and Albert E. Stanley, secre-
tary-treasurer, both of Miami.
Both firms are charged with having placed controlled
materials orders and using such materials in excess of
authorizations in various quarters of 1951 and 1952.
NPA AUTHORIZES PUBLIC WIORKS PROJECTS IN REGION
Local governments: of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mlissies-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas in the last quarter of
1952 put nearly $12 million into the development of water
,adsewer projects, according to a compilation made by
the National Production Authority.
The projects, totalling $11,886,561 in cost were those
authorized by NPA through the allotment of controlled mater-
ials.
Forty-one projects were included reflecting an expenditure
of $497,800 in Alabama; $5,145,758 in Florida; $1,807,007
in Georgia; $104,900 in Mississippi; $1,029,338 in North
Carolina; $1,317,071 in South Carolina; and $1,984,687 in
Tennessee.
Of the total expenditures, $9,322,145 went into water-
works facilities and the remainder for sewage projects.
OTHER NPA ACTIONS
Followingg were some other actions taken by NPA regarding
the materials conservation program:
Secondary Tin Mill Products: Removed them from the
controlled materials category. (Amendment 1 to CMIP Regulation
1 and IRevised Amendment 2 to CYP Reg. 6, Dec. 24, 1952)
Steel Products, Components: Extended special preferential
acceptance and delivery status to defense-rated order for
products and components containing steel calling for delivery
on or before June 30, 1953 placed in support of military,
atomic energy and machine tool programs. (CYP Reg. 3, Dir. 4
as amended Dee,. 24 1952).
Iprentories: Revised its regulation removing controls
from more than a acor~e of commodities. (Reg. 1 Amended Dec. 24,
1952) .
Consumer Durable Goods: Removed four products from Order ?rf
M-47B* (Order MY-47B Amended Dec. 29, 1952).
Cans: Removed parts of Order M-25 becoming obsolete in
1953. (Order M-25 Amended Dec. 31, 1952).
8%eel Distributors: Revoked Direction 1 to MI-68 effective
January 1, 1953.
Tin: Removed allocation controls over pig tin, effective
January 1, 1953. (Order Y-8 Amended Dec. 31, 1952).
041-Country Tubular Goods: Granted general authorization
for oil and gas operators to make trades or exchanges of new
oi-country tubular goods and line pipe involving foreign-
maegoods under certain conditions. (Order Y-46A, Dir. 5
aeddJan. 6, 1953 and Order Y-46, Dir. 7 Amended Jan. 6,
1953).
Electric Utilities: Steel inventory limitations for elec-
teutilities were restored to their normal 90-day level.
provided full first and second quarter 1953 and advance
ureryallotments of controlled materials for "minor re-
quirements" of electric utilities. (Order Y-50, Amendment 1)


DPA ORDERS "CUTOFF" IN KALNY EXPALNSION LINES

Manufacturers of such heavily produced products in
the Southeast as paper, paperboard, lumber and wood
products, many metals and chemicals who are planning
an expansion of their plant facilities with tax amorti-
sation aid from the Federal Government in the months to
come may find the going rather rough, because most of
the defense expansion goals have been reached, accord-
ing to an announcement from the Defense Production Ad-
ministration.
Applications for certificates of necessityr authoris-
ing the tax amortisation procedure ,ce facility expan-
sions are processed by DPA, which has stated that near-
ly 200 products and classes of commodities have been
included in lists classed as "goals filled" or to be
filled when pending and prospective applications are
processed, closing out many such expansion opportunitieE
for a broad segment of southern industry.
The only expansion goals remaining unfilled and for
rrhich applications for necessity certificates are in-
vited, said DPA, are those involving such products as
"AA" type dry cell batteries, Diesel locomotives,
freight cars, gas utility industry pipe lines, metal
can manufacture concerned with tin conservation, Great
Lakes and ocean-going ore carriers, domestic aviation
gas petroleum, scientific instruments, ocean-going
tankers, and inland waterway vessels of specified
types, few or any of which are produced in the Southeast


.


Q n SR-4 Strain Gage Conference will be held *
i at the Georgia Institute of Technology in At- '
lanta, March 4. The conference is purely '
educational, and those whfo will lecture and '
demonstrate are considered the most outstand- *
ing specialists in their field. It has been *
i successfully presented throughout the United a
States and Canada during the pae4 two years. *


GOVERNMENT BUYING HIGHI IN SOUTHWEST IN1 JANUARY

The Federal Government in January of this year
bought upwards of $45 million worth of goods and ser-
vices in the Southeast with Florida drawing nearly 50
per cent of the value of the contracts, according to
a summary of daily lists of contract awards received
in Department of Com~merce field offices in the South-
east.
Million dollar awards went to firms in Birmingham,
Jacksonville, Tampa, Fort Lauderdale, Mliami, Spartan-
burg, Greenville, South Carolina, and Nlashville.
Four big contracts for shells and msinesweepers went
to firms in the region, with others of multiple value
being awarded for construction work, textiles, and
concretee mattresses.*
A total of 109 contracts was awarded during the
month writh a dollar value of $45,369,373 in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee. Two others were listed as "over $250,000" each,
actual amounts of which were withheld for security
reasons, and another was shown as "indefinite" ~as to
value. Awards in Alabama totalled $11,511,769; Florida,
$22,217,605; Georgia, $4,817,203; Missiasippi, $685,-
507; South Carolina, $2,986,357; and Tennessee, $3,-
105,732.
The number of contracts awarded by States included
Alabama, 26; Florida, 34; Georgia, 26; Yissiasippi, 9;
South Carolina, 7; and Tennessee, 10.
The total for the month was one of the largest of
recent periods.


BR-4 STRAIN GAGE CONFERENCE


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





Z


For further
-- Details of
Any Of These
Hiahlights it
The Field Of
Bueiqqas Get
In Touch With
he Nearest Departs n\ qf Commerge Field Office.



More than 2.4 million full-time site jobs, on the
average, will be available on new construction projects
in 1953, according to estimates released by the U. S.
Department of Labor. This is lightly more than the
monthly average indicated for 1952, but well over a
quarter of a million below the record high of 1950.
*
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing pub-
lic reports in December 1952 amounted to $1,742 million
in December, down 4 per cent from the $1,820 million
paid out in the same month in 1951. The dividend de-
cline, the heaviest payment month of the year, steamed
from a sharp reduction in "extra," speciall," and
"year-end" dividends. This factor was particularly
evident in the declines in oil refining, textiles and
leather, iron and steel, nonferrous metals, machinery,
transportation equipment and finance,
*
Total sales of all retail stores in December 1952
amounted to $16.9 billion, about 10 per cent above a
year ago. This brought total retail sales for 1952 as a
whole to about $164 billion, exceeding by 4 per cent the
value for the previous year. Since prices of goods sold
at retail were up, on the average, about 2 per cent
from 1951, this implied an increase as well in the phy-
sical volume of activity in retail channels for 1952.


L -- -I--- ---~ -~--- U I--n rl .


I


Tq Obtain This
rQI NE BO()))( Mmi~ material Check It
1L4ill ICDEP()ITS Ind TeaS ace Pro-
4.1~,, hiortion Of

Nearest Department of Commerce Field Th Pae. Tourhe
Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side. Make Remit-
5 nced SoatSalses material Payable To Treasurer Of The



Your Federal fnceme, Tax, 1952 Edition, 25#
Bulletin "F" Obsolescence and Depreci~ation, 30#
Construction and Building Materials Industry Re-
port, $3 a year
M monthly Report on the Labor Force, Dec. 1952 10
Report on Cotton Ginning, prior to Jan. 16, 1953>
A/C-0-10G-11-52-53
SExpanding Our Industrial Might, Quarterly Report
of Henry H. Fowler, DPA Administrator, Sept. 1952
Cotton GinnedPr to Jan.16, Crope-qf 1952 & 1951:
klahomaSouth Carolina UTennessee
Brkansas Texas D7Geor la 229. Carolina
Alabama isisipi L/ouisiana
Specified States
195 Census of Housing: Non-Farn Housing Characteris-
ties: UCharleston, S. C. H-B32,~5 15 chattanooga,
Tenn., I-B 35, 204 arllTenn. H-B96, 200
sleigh, N. C., tI8114, 151 27burham, N.C.,Hb-51,150
& Louieville, Ky., 88-85, 20C Liknoxville, Tenn.,
Hb-76, 204


I


Construction activity continued at record high levels
during January 1953, according to a joint report of the
Departments of Commerce and Labor. Despite a seasonal
decline of 8 per cent from December, the total value of
new construction put in place during-January amounted to
more than $2.3 billion, 6 per cent above Jamuargr 1952.
This marked the fourteenth consecutive month that the
current total had exceeded that for the comparable month
in the previous year.
++ees
A total of 1,131,300 new permanent nonfarm dwelling
units was started during 1952, of which 1,074,300 were
privately owned, according to the U. S. Department of
Labor. This was the fourth consecutive year that housing
starts nationally have exceeded the million mark. The 1952
estimate represented an increase of 40,000 units, or 4
per cent, above the 1951 total, and was exceeded only by the
1,396,000-drnit starts record established in 1950.
ea wea
Requirements of the Navy for asbestos cloth during 1953
can be met by the producing industry provided sufficient
chrysotile asbestos fiber of certain spinning grades can
be made available, the gAbestos Fiber and Textile Manu-
facturers Industry Committee told the National Production
Authority at a meeting in W~ashington.
+ + *
Relaxation of export controls on sulfuric acid was an-
nounced by the Office of International Trade. That product
of strength less than 93 per cent was removed from OITr g
"Positive Listn and may be shipped under "General License
gR"to all areas exoopt the Iron Curtain Countries, Hong
Kogand Macao without prior application. Shipmsents to the
latter areas still require a validated export license.
*
The Defense Production Adrministration announced an
arrangement with the British Government and Aluminum Company
of Canada for supplying this country with 44 million pounds
of aluminum fqr delivery during Februalry and March Q1_


Rubber 4th Annulal eprbythe eceayof
Commerce, 204
National Production Authority Yaterial:
L/Amendment I to CMP Reg. 1 and Revised Amendment 2 to
CMP Reg. 6, Dec. 24, 1952
CMP Reg. 3, Dir. 4 as amended Dec. 24, 1952
Reg. 1 Amended Dec. 24, 1952
Order M-478) Amended Dec. 29, 1952
Order M1-8 Amended Dec. 31, 1952
Dider'7n-m68 dDilan5 amended Jan. 6, 1953 and Order Y-46
SOrder M-50,(Ampendment 1)
Facts For Industry Reports:
SWomen' s, Misses' & Juniors' Outerwear, 3rd Qr. 1952
Y67I8-3-2, 104, 504 Ir.
SCotton and Lintera,Imports & Exports, Jan. 19, 1953,
8-15-1
L7Cotton System spinning Activity,Dec. 1952, Y-15-3-5-53,
54, 504 Year.
L7Iron & Steel Foundries & Steel Ingot Producers, Report
on Products Shipped & Materials Used, Oct. 1952,
M210-102, 100, $1.25 Year
/7The Sustaining Economic Forces Ahead, 204
Small Business Aids: (Rerun)
Operating an Automobile Accessory & Parts Store, #11l9
Significant Factors in Plant-Location, #1ir20
Elements of Purchasing, #124
Checking the Soundness of Your Company's Organisation,#129
Advertising Suggestions for the Office Appliance
'Dealar,#132
'7 Graivity Waves, National Bureau of Standards circular 521,
Buckram Bound, $1.75
/7' Economic Report of the President, Jan. 1953, with Report
by the Council of Economic Advisers, 50#


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





TORNADDES IN SOUTHEAST TO BE CLOSELY WATCHED

Approach of the tornado season in the Southeast it usual-
ly begins in the spring has brought from the Weather Bureau
of the U. S. Department of Commerce the announcement that a six-
pronged procedure is to be followed this year to keep down loss
of life and destruction in the region such as a large portion of
the area experienced a year ago. They are:
Expansion of the public warning system on dangerous local
storms through the formation of more reporting networks of vol-
untalry citizens and cooperating organizations to protect many
additional communities.
Probing of the upper air by instrument-earrying balloons four
times a day in vital areas and the operation of additional radar
storm detection posts.
Operation of 21 stations in making additional soundings of the
atmosphere reaching 60,000 to 75,000 feet above ground so that
upper air conditions of temperature, pressure, moistures and
wind may be followed to catch first signs of changes which result
in tornadoes, dangerous thunderstorms, severe wind squalls, or
flood-producing rains.

Mag gfgtiRLS~~tis_ is the title of a leaflet issued
by the Weather Bureau listing what to do if a tornado
comes. It' s available at any Department of Commerce
field office.

Ulse of surplus aircraft radar sets obtained from the Navy as
rotating storm detection units capable of sweeping the horizon
over a radius of about 100 miles in the day-and-night search for
indications of storms.
Reporting of sharp local jumps in barometric pressure often
accompanying peculiar conditions which tornadoes develop.
Volunteer work of thousands of residents who are alerted by
warnings to watch for tornadoes and report them to Weather Bur-
eau offices in the communities, or if no such offices exist to
'central telephone offices, fire departments or other public of-
fices where sirens or other special signals are sounded as waarn-
ings*
To implement some of these plans, the Weather Bureau is in-
stalling aircraft radar sets in Charleston, S. C., Topeka, Kansas,
and Des M~oines, Iowa, to augment those in operation in other
areas, including points in Florida and along the Gulf and South
Atlantic coasts, and similar installations are being planned at
10 other Weather Bureau offices egat of the Rockies.


ADDITIONAL FACILITY EXPANSIONS 0.K.'D FOR REGION

Tax amortizations on nearly $1L million worth of facility
expansion operations in the Southeast, including $7,500,000
for Delta Air Lines, Inc., of Atlanta, have been approved by
the Defense Production Administration,
The bulk of the expansion activities involved some form of
transportation, but in a few instances other projects waere
affected.
A total of 13 projects in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina,
,Florida and Tennessee was included in certificates of necessity
issued by DPA, with Georgia and Florida receiving the "lion' s
share," four each. Twro each were in Alabama and South Carolina
and one in Tennessee.
In the case of the Delta Air Lines project, the amount cer-
tified for rapid tax write-off purposes represented 80 per
cent of the amount applied for.
The nearly $14 million authorized in the five southeastern
States was part of a total of $289,029,425 certified for the
nation as a whole. At the same time, DPA turned down applica-
tions for facilities costing another $69,043,000.

PROGRESS IN U. S. PICTURED IN NEWA REPORT

If the United States continues to grow as it has --
Housing requirements for the remainder of the 1950-60 decade
will average at least as high as the annual average constructed
during the "good years" 1947 to 1952.
Our annual pig crop will have to be increased equal to all
of the pigs produced in the leading States of lowa and Nebraska
in 1950.
Other crop will have to be expanded proportionately.
Additional school construction to cost $20 billion will be
required.
Additional hospital beds costing $14L billion will be needed.
Highway construction will have to be stepped up $7 billion
a year.
This, in essence, is a report issued by the United States
House and Senate Joint Camnittee on the Economic Report just
made a'vailable for distribution through UJ. S. Depatment of
Commerce field offices.
The study, it was stated, undertakes to examine certainn
sustaining economic forces ahead.n
The report is 70 pages long and is repleted with many
illustrations


FOREIGN COMMMRCEYEB(0
The "Bible" for southeastern womld-traders, te- "Fe reign Commerce Yearbook" is now off the press and
Available for distribution. It's the 1950 edition. bat many facts and figures have been advanced. are as.

U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, CA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


VOLUME 7, NUMBER I liebruary 15, 1953


iulllAlwuimunHiiiill5\l
3 1262 08748 9125
BULLETI.. .. vw.........u~L


PAGE 4


UN v. oF FL us*. PEN ILTY FOR PRIVATE: USE TO AVOID
CI~I!'":13T D_ AYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
roro




U.s. DEPOS1TORY


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF PLORIDA
LEROY L., QUELLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAI~NESVILLE, FtLORIDA









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE









Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S.C., Jacksonlville, Fla., Memphis, Tenn.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., Mladison at Front,
Tel. WAQ-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426

Miami, Fla., Mobile, Alg., Savannah, Ga.,
947 SEybold Bldg.,308 Federal Bldg., 218 P.O.Bldg..
Tel. 4-7533 Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206 Tel. 2-4755

4)$. 7 No(. 5 MARCHl 1, 1953


RETACIL,WHOLESALE TRADE FIELD BRISK IN 1952


4 SOUTHEASTERN COUNTIES AMONG AGRICULTURAL "TOPS"

Four southeastern counties --- Polk and Orange in
Florida, and Sunflower and Bolivar in Mississippi ---
are among the nation's 100 leading counties in point of
value of farm products sold, according to a report just
issued by the Bureau of the Census entitled "1950 Census
of Agriculture -- Ranking Agricultural Counties."
The value in the four counties was listed as Polk,
$851,178,L52; Orange, 826,072,891; Sunflower, $825,68t7,L404
and Bolivar, $22,558,578. Polk county was twenty-first in
rank, dropping back from eighteenth in the previous cen-
sus; Orange was sixty-fourth, moving up from seventy-
ninth; Sunflower wass sixty-seventh, advancing from eighty-
eighth; and Bolivar was ninety-third, dropping back from
Oighty-Seventh place.

Copies of this report are available at
any Department of Commerce field office.
See Order Blank on Page 3 for ordering.

Five southeastern counties were listed as leading all
counties in the nation in respective fields, Hobeson in
North Carolina in number of mules and mule colts on
farms; Pitt in Nortn Carolinal, in number of acres of
tobacco harvested; Palm Beach in Florida, in number of
acres of green beans of the snap, string, or wax variety
harvested; Polk, in Florida, in value of all fruits and
nuts sold; Spartanburg, in South Carolina, in number of
peach trees of all ages; and Dougherty, in Georgia, in
number of pecan trees of all ages.

PATIENT CARTRD OFFERED IiUX SALE
+
+ The U. S. Department of Commerce has placed on
sale for the benefit of southeastern business men
+ entire sets of the more than 3,000 eards showing
9 Government-owned royalty-free patents now made
4 avilable for commercial use. The price is $5.00
+ per set.
+ The cards show the kind of invention, with
+ brief abstract of its purpose and other informa-
+ tion; name of inventor; Government department to
+ which offered; and other data.+
+ Also made available for purchase is a comple-
+ mentary publication entitled "Government-owned
+ Inventions for Free Use,n which cost $1.00
w The collection provides an excellent source of
+ technical information on new products and proces-,
+ ses. Nearly all active inventive areas are cover-,
+ ed. The cards are available at all Department of
+ Commerce field offices.


PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN SLES: 1952 FFOM 1951,
KnoI-oF-auslNEss GRoups
Percent
ALLKINRS OF BUSINESS 55
BASDLINE SERVICE STATIONS g gq
LIQUOR STORES
F0006GRDE M 2
APPIREL GRDIP 5
u*TINGrm DR111KINGPUCEs
DRUB AND PROPRIETARY STORES
FUMITIUREANDAPPLIANCE GROUP
GCIERALMERCHNIDISE BROUP
AUTOMOTIVE GROUP
UIYOBER 8UltINGHARIIOWARE
un" P
* nocusE
Source: Bureau of the Census


leader in percentage gains in wholesale sales when the
year ended.

Copies of these reportr-, issued onl a
monthly basis in two documents for th*
United States and for cities and areas
are available at any U. S. Department of
Commesrce field ofice. _

In retail sales, four of five Georgia cities showed
percentage increases, with Augusta ranking second among
all cities and areas in the United States shown in the
report, and proportionate rises were recorded in Miss-
issippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida.
Only in Birmingham and Chilton and Perry counties,
Alabama, and Bristol and Johnson City, Tenn., were de-
creases shown. Otherwise, Atlanta and Columbus, Ga., and
Gulfport, Miss., registered a 3 per cent gain; Augusta,
12 per cent; Savannah and Clarkedale, Miss., 5 per cent;
Phnatee and Sarasota counties, Fla., 8 per cent; Asehe-
ville, n. C., 4 per cent; diloxi, Miss., and Kingsport,
Tenn., 1 per cent.
Over-the-year gains in sales of such products as
those in some electrical lines, refrigeration equipment,
confectionery, drugs and sundries, some food commodities,
tobacco products, and wines and spirits, brought whole-
sale sales at the end of 1952 up 2 per cent in the South
Atlantic and East South Central areas, and 3 per cent in
the West South Central section over 1951, which compared
with 1 per cent increases in the Mountain and Pacific
areas, a drop of 2 per cent in the Mliddle Atlantic, and l
unchanged situations in the other regions.


Southeastern mer-
chants, both whole-
salers and retailers,
experienced a rather
successful year in
1952, judging from
trade reports of the
Bureau of the Census
just issued.
The reports showed
cumulative retail
sales up in mOSt of
the areas in which
the Cgnsug 887888
conducts its monthly
suTVeyB 88 compared
with 1952 and also
establishment of the
South as undisputed





MODIFICATION OF CMP CONlTROLS ORDERED BY NiPA

: manufacturers in the Southeast
10]808using steel, copper and aluminum
are receiving notices from the
National Production authority that
National their fabrication operations begin-
i()I1CLning June 30 will be unhampered by
NPA restrictions.
Letters have already gone out noti-
Pro)uctio fOr ying business men in the area af-
fected by NPA'sa controlled materials
program that they need not file ap-
Auth~ityplications for'third quarter 1953
told not to submit applications for
supplemental allotments for the
second quarter of this year, except
for defense purposes.


DPA APPROVES ALUMINM PROJECT FOR SOUTHEAST

The Tennessee valley of the Southeast is preparing
for one of the nation's biggest aluminum projects.
Official announcement has been received that the
Defense Production Administration had approved a cer-
tificate of necessity calling for establishment of a
$70 million facility by the Wheland company, of
Chattanooga, for that purpose.
It will be the "third round" of expansion in the
primary aluminum industry in the United States in the
DPA program to encourage broadening of the nation's
production facilities for the national program of de-
fense .
The facilities are expected to be supplied with
power by the Tennessee Valley Authority and to con-
mence operations late next year. They will be private-
ly financed.
DPA said the projected Wheland installation will
complete accomplishment of the 200,000-ton third round
increase in aluminum expansion announced last October.

STATE HIGHWAY AGENCIES LET $207 MILLION JOBS

Highway departments in the Southeast last year
awarded 2,881 contracts calling for the construction
and maintenance of 13,084 miles of roads at a total
cost of $207,424,000, according to the Bureau of Pub-
lic Roads of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
On 873 of the projects, a total of $64,336,000 in
Federal funds was used.
Tennessee far out-stripped the other'States in n~um-
ber of projects, amount spent, and miles of road in-
volved.
Following were the awards by Statses:
Alabama, 308 projects costing $26,892,000 and 1,321
miles; Florida, 221 and $29,938,000 and 776; Georgia,
219 and $29,543,000, and 986; Miesissippi, 178 and
$17,779,000 and 766; North Carolina, 315 and $37,616,_
000 and 2,533; South Carolina, 551 and $19,978,000 and
1,586; and Tennessee, 1,089 and $45,678,000 and 5,116.

DROP IN STATE,LOCAL PUBLIC BUILDING SHARP

A sharp drop in the value of State and local pub-
lic construction in the Southeast in the first 10
months of last year as compared with the corresponding
period in 1951 is reported in a current issue of the
Industry Report CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING KATERIALS I
issued by the U. 8. Department of Commerce.
Final figures for the period showed, it was stated
a decline of some $;89,257,000 in such construction in'
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas, or from $596,977,000 at the end of
October 1951 to $507,720,000 at the same time last year.

This report is available at any D~epart-
ment of Commerce field office. See Order
Blank on Page 3 for ordering.

All Statse in the region shared in the decrease
except South Carolina, where a rise of from $45,613,000
to $53,540,000 was reflected.
Otherwise, the declines included Florida, $105,253 -
000 to $78,715,000; Georgia, $100,786 000 to $76,263,'
000; North Carolina, $18,851,000 to ~91,669,000; Ala-
bama, $66,468,000 to $64.330,000; Mississippi, $57,-
143,000 to $45,834,000; and Tennessee, $102,863,000 to
$97,369,000*
All phases of that type of construction felt the
downward trend, except public utilities where the value
went from $11,926,000 to $;15,047,000. Hardest hit,
however, were residential and edrreational facilities.


Copies of the Directions mpodifying the CMP
program~ are available without charge at all
]Department of Comrmerce field offices. See
Order Blank for convenience in ordering.


"The controlled materials plan will continue in effect,
with certain modifications, through June 30, 1953," the
notice stated. "Plans are being made to provide for the
reduced controls which will be necessary after June 30 to
insure that requirements for scarce and critical items
essential for our defense are set in an orderly manner.
An announcement will be made regarding the new procedures
as soon as plans are completed."
At the same time, NPA officials cautioned that revision
of the CKP program does not mean any change in regulatory
activities on other commodities. Only steel, copper and
aluminum, which were brought under the controlled materials
plan program nearly two years ago were affected.
Under the new procedure, producers of the three materials
in the Southeast mpay now accept "unrated" orders for them
after the beginning of lead time, calling for delivery after
February 1953, and rules have been established under which
producers and distributors may ship the materials against
orders not covered by an allotmpent number.
Construction activities in the region were also affected
by NPA' s latest action. In a separate step, owners and con-
tractors were provided with a procedure for obtaining con-
trolled materials for use in construction projects without
an authorized controlled materials order after the beginning
of lead time for deliveries after February 1953. Under the
new direction, they may now commence or continue construction
without an authorized construction schedule.

ATLANTAN APPOINTED TO NPA STAFF +

* Appointment of Clifford L. Newton, of Atlanta, as *
+ Director of the Commaunications Equipment Division of +
+ the National Production Authority with headquarters in +
+ Washington was announced. Mr. Newton is now on leave +
* from the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company +
* where he holds the position of Superintendent of Sup- +
* plies and Motor Vehicles.
OTHER RECENT NPA ACTIONS
Brass Mill Products: Distributors ar- permitted to replace
materials immediately after selling them fromt stock. (Amend-
ment to Order Y-82, February 16, 1953).
Conversion Steel: Authorization to purchase carbon conversion
st**1 on an ex-allot~ment basis by manufacturers of Clras
A and B products containing steel was extended through the
second quarter of 1953. (cKP Reg. 1, Dir. 19 amended Feb. 12).
Electric Utilities: A selected group of electric power pro-
jects of significant importance to the atomic energy program
were given priority status. (Order Y-50, Dir. 4).


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





Details of
an Of These
Highlights Tn
The Field Of
Business Get
In Touch With
The Nearest Departmenlt of Commerce Field Office.


Construction activity continued at record high
levels during January of this year, according to a
joint report of the U. 8. Departments of Commerce and
Labor. Despite a seasonal decline of 8 per cent from
December 1952, the total value of new construction put
in place in January amounted to more than $2.3 bil-
lion, 6 per cent above January 1952. This marked the
fourteenth consecutive month the current total has
exceeded that for the comparable month in the previous
year.
*
Manufacturers' sales in December 1952 amounted to
$24.2 billion, or 3 per cent above the previous month.
This brought sales for the full year 1952 to $276.5
billion, 3 per cent higher than in 1951. The advance
reflected a gain in the physical volume of deliveries
as there was, on balance, an easing in prices during
the year.
*
Employment in January continued its normal aidwinter
decline, with some further curtailment in outdoor work
and the usual post-holiday reduction in trade. Estimat-
ed at 60,524,000 in the week ending January 10, civil-
ian employment was about 1 million lower than in Decem-
ber 1952. The January eatisate, however, is the high-
est on record for the month, exceeding last year's

To Obtain This
rC~NEW B()(KS I pp Material Checkr It



The Page To The
Nearest Department of Commerce Field O~ffce. Your
Name and Address Are On The Opp~osite Side. Make Remit-
tances For Sales Material Pavable To Treasurer Of The
United States*



Yonhl ";"'"'' T .. ade R porustu e1a Renkng
Agricultural Counties V.V-pt. 3, 404
// Set of Government-Oned, Royalty Free Patent
Cards More Than 3,000.In Number, 85.00
/} Government Dned Inventions FoDOFree Use (To Go

Monthly Wholesale Trade Report
Constrihetion & Building Materials Industry Report *
$3 a Year
/7Insurance Companies Owned & Operated By Negroes,400
National Production 1 thority Material:193
SDir. 10 to Rev CP Reg. 6, Feb. 16, 1953
Order M-82, Amended, Feb. 16, 1953
LLCMP Reg. 1, Dir. 19 Amended Feb. 12, 1953
7 Dir, 4, Order M-50
0 CitySGovernment F naning in o9farm CompendiumraD em


1950 U. S. Consue of Housing General characteristics
~7 Florida, H-A10, 604


Wholesalers' sales in 1952 totalled $106 billion, not
far off the 1951 total of $107 billion. Wholesale prices
declined between the two years, however, so that the phy-
sical volume of sale in 1952 was moderately higher than
in the previous year.
wea we
Total business inventories at the end of December 1952
were valued at $73.5 billion, or $700 million higher than
at the end of 1951. After allowance for lower replacement
costs, the change from 1951 in physical volume of business
Inventories was somewhat higher than the change in the book
value. Manufacturers accounted for $600 million of the in-
crease. Retail inventories were more than $200 million
higher than at the end of the previous year, and a decrease
of $100 million was shown in wholesalers' stocks.
+ + +
Personal income in December 1952 was at an annual rate
of $279 billion, over $3 billion higher than in November.
The December increase reflected the continued rise in wages
and salaries as well as gains from November in both fara
and non-farm proprietors' incomes.
+++++
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $548 million in January, an 8 per cent
cieabove the $506 million paid out in the same month in
L952. All but six of the industrial groups for which date
represented in the tabulation increased their dividend
libreets over January 1952.
aea we
World consumption of natural and synthetic rubber set a
new record of 2,332,500 long tons in 1952, erasing the old
mark of 2,312,500 tone made in 1951.
e weaa
Production of cotton carpets and rugs amounted to approx-
imately 26 million yards in 1951, the Bureau of the Census
reported. Production in the first six months of 1952 amounted
to almost 16 million yards, including tufted ruge and woven
and knitted cottonru.
1950 Census of Housing General characteristics
L7 Missiasippi, 8-A24, 55#
1950 C s~ue of Housing Nonfarm Housing Characterieties:
SSavannah, H-B 129, 204 gColumbus, Ga.,Hl-B 40, 154
SColumbia, S. C., 8-839, 154
1950 U. s. Census of Agriculture:
g( Multiple Unit Operations, Special Reports, V.V-pt 2,
$2.25 20 Territories & Possessions, V.1-pt.34,)1.25
Ua Puerto Rico, V1-pt. 31.5, 604
D Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Jan. 1953, 100
Fae a For Industry Reports:
Fats & Oils, Consumption by Usea, Dec. 1952,*M17-2-122,82 Yr.
Anhmalcal uStokers, Deec. 1952, MM1BM212204 109 Ir.
Farm Pumps, December 1952, M318-122, 504 Ir.
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Products,Dec.1952,M26D-122,
504 Tr. D/Softwood Plywood, Dec. 1952, M138-122,504 Yr.

An]RAmoatedaedB bleography ol9 21ee13d R22ere0#esron the
Slid-State Reactions of the Uranium Oxides, NBSCir.535,3D#
ive Loads on Floors in Buildings, NBS Building Materials
and Structuree Report 133, 204
Sma Business Aide ( Rerun):
LLSalesmanship in a Self-Service Store, #134
g ase Studyear 8thods of Sales Approach for a Women'sa
Protecting Customers from Accidents, #136
Frozen Bakery Products Find Steady Clientele in a
Suburban Community, #13'7
Training Retail E~mployees Pays, #139
A Qualification Car foe Re P~rospentive Retailers, #141

Ub FluideYilk Cana08- 2 Recorded Voluntary Recommendation


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





HALF BILLION IN NEGRO LIFE POLICIES IN REGION

Negro reserve life insurance companies at the beginning of
1952 had policies or certificates in force in the Southeast
amounting to more than half a billion dollars, according to
a report isoned by the Office of the Adviser on Negro Affairs
to the Secretary of Commerce in Washington.
There were 10 firms carrying on such activities located in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee with
2,560,933 policies or certificates in force totalling $540,-
747,867.
See Order Blank on Page 3 for listing of
this report.

Alabama had one firm with 98,364 policies or certificates
amounting to $15,559,277; Florida, two with 409,377 and $59,-
648,713; Georgia, three with 1,019,072 and $207,161,772; North
Carolina, two with 662,063 and $174,591,366; and Tennessee,
wo with 372,057 and $83,786,739.
The greatest volume of insurance in force existed in the
South Atlantic, East South Central, and West South Central
regions, commonly known as the "South. In those combined areas,
in which 69 per cent of the Negro population is concentrated,
70 per cent of the total insurance ownership is found.
Missiasippi had the largest number of burial associations,
Louisiana led in industrial life companies, Virginia was the
ranking State in fraternal benefit societies, and Tennessse
was among three States in the Ulnited States having the most
legal reserve life companies,
SHARP INCREASE INS SCHOOL AGE POPULATION IN ALREA

A 2 per cent iziorease in the number of children of school
age in the Southeast between April 1950 when the last regular
decennial census of population was taken and July 1, 1951 has
been reported by the Bureau of the Canaus.
The figures showed a rise of from 7,646,000 persons 18 year
old and under in 1950 to 7,827,000 in July 1951 in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas.

bAk the nearest Department of Coaneroe
field office for a copy of this report.
All of the southeastern Statse except Allabamar shared in the
gain, that State recording a two~-tenths of one per cent decline,
Florida' a 7.2 per cent was exceeded only in Nevada and California.


24 SOUTHEASTERN CITIES OPERATING IN BLACK"

Twenty-four of 56 sisable cities in the Southeast have been
able to operate "in the black," according to a report just
issued by the Bureau of the Cenaus entitled "Compendina of City
Government Finanaea in 1951.*
Seven cities in AlCabama; 6 in Florida; 3 each in Georgia,
Hiasiasippi and North Carolina) and one each in South Carolina
and Tennessee took in more than they paid out in 1951 while 32
others were the reverse.

Copies of this report are available at all
Department of Commerce field offices. See Order
B],ank qq Page 3 for listing.
Cities enjoying the distinction of "using black ink" instead
of red included Birmingham, Mobile, Montgomery, Gadeden, Annia-
ton, Beeseaer, Tuscaloosa, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Daytona
Beach, K~ey West, Panama City, West Palm Beach, Columbus, Ga.,
Macon, Ga., A~lbany, Ga., Biloxi, Hattiesburg, Vickaburg, Ashe-
ville, Greensboro, High Point, Spartanburg, and Knoxville.
On the other hand, Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Fort Lauder-
dale, Gaineeville, Fla., Lakeland, Miami Beach, Pensacola,
Tallahassee, Atlanta, Savannah, ALugusta, Athens, Ga., Rome,
Jackson, Miss., Laurel, Meridian, Charlotte, Durham, Raleigh,
WRinaton~ales, Fayetteville, N1. C., Rocky Mount, Wilmington,
N. C., Charleston, Columbia and Greenville, S. C., Heaphir,
Ghattanooga, Nashville, Jackson, Tenn., and Johnson City paid
out more than they took in,
All told, the 56 cities listed in the compilation had revenue
totalling $372,766,000, while total expenditures approximated
$399,557,000.


+ SOUTHEASTERNERS GET SILVER MEDAt L AWRDS


I


Six southeasterners are recipients of silver medal
awards made by Secretary of Commerce Sinclair Weeks
to U. S. Department of Commerce employees for "ser-
vice of unusual value to the Department of Connmeroe."
They are Robert P. Boyd, Atlanta, employed in the
Bureau of Public Roads; Elvin D. McPherson, Dyersburg,
Tenn., of the Civil aeronautics Administration, and
Douglas W. Faust, Oscar Mizon, Bernard C. Pedersen,
and Tompmie J. Roley, of Mobile, all of the Maritime
Administration. The awards, among 119 other silver
medal presentations, 19 gold medal, and 15 bronse
pina were conferred by Secretary Weeks.


GPO 85-49412


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
Y,-rMENT OF POSTAGE $300Iro


BC.6.Jp


UNIVERSITy OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


|||1 |||||1|llIIII lill||lllllllllll illilllllll ll IIIIIII IU II


PAGE 4


BULLET


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLUME 7, NIUMBER 5 MARCHI 1, 1953





SOUTHEAST PUTS $1.5 BILLIONt IN PLAN~T EXPANSIONS


5 (2nt cancI Equaiprrent Ebcpeandlituress in uthe
PERCENTAGE CHANGE5, 1950TO 195tADND 1951 TO 1952 SRh&t
-so -20 -10 O +IO +20 +30 +40 since the


REGION LEADS NATION IN BUSINESS FIRM GROWTH

The Southeast last year was the fastest growing re-
gion in the country in business population, according
tO & Current issue Of the "SrvyT~ Of CurreRL Busin988,"
publication of the Office of Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerce.
The monthly publication showed that the percentage
change in business population in the area in 1952 as
compared with 1950 was about 5 per cent up against
some 4 per cent in the Southwest, second best region
in business expansion.

The monthly publication "Survey of Current
Business" is available on a subscription basis
to all business men in the Southeast at a
pricO Of $3.25 a year. See the Order Blank
on Page 3 for convenience in ordering.

uThe Southeast and Southwest have continued a
better-than-average growth since 1944," the publication
pointed out. "W~hen the present business population is
compared with the number of firms in operation in 1944,
these two regions show the greatest gains, with the
Far West appearing in third place.
nTo a large extent, the more favorable showing in
the Southern areas in the past two years is attribut-
able to growth in retail trade, in contrast to the de-
cline in the number of these firms in all other re-
gions except the Mliddle East."
No figures as to the actual number of firms in oper-
ation in the various regions accompanied the article.
The Southeast also reflected a 5 per cent increase
in number of manufacturing firms last year over 1950,
it was stated, that region with the New England section
taking the "runnerup" position in that category. The
largest increase, 7 per cent, was in the Far West.

GOVTERNMiENT PURCHASES HIGH IN FEBRUARY

Firecrackers in Florida, shells in Alabama, and
bomb in Tennessee were among $54.7 million worth of
goods and services bought by the Federal Government in
the Southeast in February, according to lists of con-
tract awards received in Department of Commerce field
offices.
A total of 103 contracts was let, 20 in Alabama for
$16,077,870; 29 in Florida for $6,036,4648; 18 in Geor-
gia for $5,793,596; 8 in Mlississippi for $b521,295; 8 in
South Carolina for $2,146,659; and 20 in Tennessee for
$24,188,050 for a 6-State total of $54,763,918. The
firecrackers are used as a training aid.


I outbreak
of the
-SI
Korean
war has
put a to-
tal of

aggy 000,000
in plant
and fac-
Silityr ex-
pansion

ments, ac_
cording
tO & sum-
nary con-
piled in
the Reg-
ional Of-
fice of
the Ui. 8.
Depart-
IpOnt Of
Commerce .
a---- Some


ALL INDUSTRIES 1J950'

communicaTIONS


R ggggggggg


U s.gurrgoa or*om~asyor DITYN O OYR OCC BUNI CW(S


Charleston, S. C., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Sgt, Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111


Memphis, Tenn.,
M~adison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala.,
7th Floor,Foreyth Bldg., 246 Iederal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Miami, Fla.,
9467 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex. 206


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg,,
Tel. 2-4~755


MARCH 15, 1953


$193,419,000 went for the development of transportation
facilities, $189,488,000 in pipeline and storage expan-
sion work, and $338,848,000 in the improvement of elec-
tric utility activities,
The summary was for the States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee, and
covered those projects for which Federal tax amortisa-
tions were approved through issuance of certificates
of necessity by the Defense Production Administration.
A total of 746 projects was included in the total
for the six States with Alabama leading both in number
of projects as well as total amount expended and to be
expended. Georgia was second in amount involved.
Amounts by States included Alabama, $458,639,381;
Florida, $266,826,986; Georgia, $315,949,569; Mississ-
ippi, $179,060,766; South Carolina, $77,332,034; and
Tennessee, $207,366,387.
Eleven other projects totalling $8,672,517 were
interstate in character and could not be assigned to
any particular State.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE


V4I. 7 N4. 6


NODURABLE-GOODS

MANUFACTURING

PUBLIC UTILITIES


RAILROAIE

TRANSPORTATION gg
OTHER TH~P RAIL

MINING

COMMERCIAL
AND OTHER





CENSUS BUREAU TO CONDUCT NEW CENSUSES IN REGION

Southeastern business men in six major lines of in-
dustry will be called upon this year for facts and fig-
ures on production, shipments, wage and employment, and
other data to meet the needs of the regional economy for
information as to progress and developments in their
respective enterprises.
The survey, to be conducted by the Bureau of the
Census, U. S. Department of Commerce, will include cen-
suses of manufacturing,. minerals, wholesale, retail and
service trades, and the transportation industry for the
year 1953. Results of the censuses will be announced
early in 1954.

Final reports fran the 1950 Censuses of
Population, Hlousing and Agriculture are
now being received in Department of Commerce
field offices. See the nearest field office
for details.

All district Census Bureau offices in the region are
cooperating in collecting the information. They are
located in Birmingham and Clanton, Ala., Sarasota,
Fla., Atlanta and Cochran, Ga., Clarkedale, Gulf port
and Jackson, Mise., Asheville and Raleigh, N. C.,
Greenwood, S. C., and Johnson City, Tenn.
The censuses in the trade and service fields will be
the first since 1948; that in manufacturing will be the
first since 1947; and no census of minerals has been
taken since 1939. The one to be conducted in the trans-
portation industry will be the only one ever taken to
date. Nationally, more than 3,000,000 business estab-
11shments will be covered in the surveys.

SOUTHEAST TRAFFIC 2ND LARGEST IN U.S. *
+~ +
STraffic on the highways of the combined south- *
Eastern regions of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, *
w ississippi, Tennessee, Kentuckyr, the Carolinas *
Sand Virginias, Maryland and Delaware is the *
Second greatest of all regions in the U. S., *
According to a current issue of "Public Roada,n *
Official publication of the Bureau of Publie *
SRoads, U. S. Department of Commerce. *
SIn the summer of 1951, a count of vehicles *
Traveling highways of the U. S. was made and *
Sit showed a total of 346,788 on the highways *
Sof the 12 States, whlich was lightly less than *
Sthe 354,951 counted on the highways of Iowa, *
Klansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska and the *
+ Dakotas, the leading region. *

UPWARD TREND IN WHOLESALE SALES REFLECTED

A sharp increase in the dollar value of whiolesale
sales in- the Southeast last year as coldpared with 1951
is indicated in final Bureau of the Census figures just
released.
Some 750 firna participating in month-to-month sur-
veys conducted in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississip-
pi, Tennessee, Kentuckyr, the Carolinas and Virginias,
Maryland and Delaware in 1952 reported sales approxima-
ting $)1,560,694,000, a $63,491,000 rise over the pre-
vious year.
The sales last year showed a gradual increase from
early summer and maintained the advance almost contin-
nously through the fall and winter.
Incidentally, the South as a whole wound up the year
with percentage gains in sales well above those of all
other regions in the United States. In the South Atlan-
tic and East South Central sections it amounted to 2
per cent each, and in the West South Central, 3 percent>


NPA APPRO)VES $40 MILIONl WORTH OF BUILDING


ion work.
The work being done and to be done included a total
cost of $6,023,498 in Alabamia; $8,718,696 in Florida;
$17,390,671 in Georgia; $2,039,268 in Yississippi;
$3,783,131 in South Carolina; and $3,333,231 in Tenn-
essee.
One hundred and one projects received the "green
light" in the six States, 90 of which were given allot-
ments, 6 were cleared without allotments, and 5 others
were found to be exempt from NPA regulations.
Commercial, religious, municipal and entertainment
projects were in the 101 approvals in the area.
SUSPESION ORDERS AGAINST FLORIDA FIRK
Issuance of suspension orders against two Florida
firms charged with violation of controlled materials
orders and regulations was announced by NPA. They are
the Ludman Corporation, Miami, and Jalousie and Wlindow
Engineering, Incorporated, Dade County. Both manufact-
ure aluminum windows.
The orders were issued after hearings held by NPA
Hearing Commissioner Charles J. H~ilkey, who held in the
Ludman case that the firm during the period from Oct.
1, 1951 to Dec. 31, 1952 placed controlled materials
orders for 500,000 pounds of aluminum more than it was
authorized to place, and that the other firm had recei-
ved and used in the first three quarters of 1952 a
total of 387,745 pounds of aluminum in the manufacture
of aluminum windows and jalousies in excess of that
provided for in its production schedule.
Commissioner Hilkey, in the Ludman case, ordered all
allocations and allotments of aluminum for use in the
period commencing April 1, 1953 and ending Sept. 30,
1953 be reduced by 250,000 pounds in the oceand quarter
of 1953 and by 250,000 pounds in the third quarter. In
the other case, he ordered all priority assistance be
withdrawn and withheld from the firm for three months
beginning March 1, 1953, and that all allocations and
allotments, including privileges of self-authorisation
and self-certification be withdrawn and withheld for
the same period.
The Ludman Corporation was also prohibited from ac-
quiring aluminum in excess of its allocations and alloti
ments as reduced and ordered it to cancel all controlled
materials orders issued for delivery in the second and
third quarters of 1953 in exceassof allocations as re-
duced in the two quarters.
RESTRICTIONS ON BIRM~INGHAM FIRM EASED
The M and B Yetala ]Products company, Birmingham manu-
facturers of wire garment hangers, who some time ago
were stopped by the National Production Authority from
obtaining supplies of steel for their business becanae
of alleged violation of NPA regulations have now been
given authority to "acquire, use or dispose of any con-
trolled material" under action taken by NPA.
A suspension order issued against the fi rm as modi-
fied so as to place an "open end" on controlled materials.
(SEE NPA CONTINUED ON1 PAGE L)


10200


Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
South Carolina and Tennessee, in-
cluding multimillion dollar pro-
jects in Montgomery, Ala., Jackson*
ville, Fla., Atlanta, and Green-
ville, S. C.
The approvals were in the form
of maaterials' allotted in the last
quarter of 1952, whlich, as a re-
sult of the clearances, will re-
ceive precedence in the construct-


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


The National Production Author-
ity has approved more than $41 adl-
lion worth of construction opera-
tions in the six States of Alabama,


aggogggfiony



A1% 1()itf







PAGE 3


Details gg
&5 9 These
Hiahlihts 1 .

Business Ce gg}{ Tggggh l15 hNaggagga U. 8. Department
Of Commerce Field Office..


Manufacturers' sales and inventories in January of
this year were little changed from December of last
year, with new orders slightly lower, the Office of
Business Economics, U. S. Department of Compmerce report-
ed. Sales of all manufacturers amounted to $24.3 bil-
lion, and equalled the December seasonally adjusted
rate. Durable goode shipments were 4 per cent higher
than in the previous month due to rather sharp increases
in deliveries of motor vehicles and Fabricated metal
products .
*
Total newr capital requirements of corporate business
exceeded $30 billion in 1952, about $9 billion less
than the record voluna of the preceding year. The re-
duction was entirely in new working capital funds and
reflected the virtual cessation of inventory accumula-
tion which had been substantial in 1951. Corporate
fixed outlays, on the other hand, reached a new high of
$23 billion in 1952.
*
Grose national product, the market value of the
nation'se output of goods and services, was $346 billion
in 1952 as compared with $329 billion in 1951. National
income, which measures output in terms of the total in-
come earned in production, advanced froms $2T77 billion
in 1951 to $290@ billion in 1952. .
*
Production of cotton broad woven goods in the fourth
quarter of 1952 totalled 2,540 million linear yards, an
increase of 9 per cent over the third quarter, and 10
percent above the. corresponding period in 191,
To Obtain
r AM{) IUEP()ICS Check It In


Of The Bulletin Of Compmerce To The legresg U. S. Deart-
rent Jp Commerce Field Office*.La Norame And Bdgress
4re OE ~h ODosite Side. Make Regittances but Sales
Material Pagaggkg Is Treaputer Of 32Th litued jhatses


2 7 Synopsis of U. S. Government Proposed Procurements
and Contract Awards (PIace on Mailing List),
40 Annual, $7.00 U 6 Months, $4.00
j'Survey of Current Business (Place on Mail List),
43*25 a year
Public Roada (Place on Mail List) $1.00 a year
Monthly Wholesale Trade Report (Place on Mail List)
Trends in the Wines & Spirits Trade (Mail List)
1950 U. S. Census of Housingg:
M emphis Standard Metropolitan Area, Mon-Farm
Housing Characteristics, 8-890, 20#
Aldabama, General Characteristics, II-A2, 55#
L7Petroleum Products, Secondary Inventories and
Storage Capacity, Dec. 31, 1952
~71950 Consue of the Amesricas, Population Consus,
Urban IData~-lo. 1, Costa Rica, 5#
SProvisional Estimates of the Population' of the
U. S., Apr. 1, 1950 to Jan. 1, 1953, P-25,#69,54
L7Foreign Television Developmlents, BIS, 01T, 150


Total sale of retail stores in January of this year
amounted to $13 billion, about 10 per cent above a year
ago. After adjustment for seasonal factors and trading
day difference, sales in January were down about 1 per
cent from their December 1952 high. The decline from
December to January occurred primarily in the nondura-
ble sector. Sales of general merchandise stores'de-
creased by nearly 8 per cent.
*
Expenditures for new construction declined lees
seasonally in February to $2.2 billion, and were at a
record high for the month, according to a joint report
of the U. 8. Departments of Commerce and Labor. Private
spending on commercial and most other types of nonresi-
dential building continued strong for this time of year,
reflecting to some extent a backlog of projects put
under construction since relaxation of credit and
materials controls in the latter half of 1952.
+ + +
Last year, new securities offered for cash sale, in-
oluding both new money and refunding issues, amounted to
$9.7 billion, about one-fourth higher than in 1951, the
Securities and Exchange Commission announced. It was
the largest operation of its kind in any year since 1929.
Of total net proceeds obtained in the capital market,
$8.3 billion, or 87 per cent, was for new money purposes
including $6.4 billion for plant and equipment expendi-
tures and $1.9 billion for additional working capital.
*
]Production during 1952 of knit cotton and wool under-
wear and nightwear generally fell below 1951 levels, the
Bureau of the Cenana reported. The only category to
show an increase over the preceding year was men'sa and
boys' shorts and briefs.
+ + *
Shipments of the dozen-price dress industry in the
fourth quarter of 1952 totalled $80 million compared
with $71 million in the same period in 1951, the Census
Bureau said. The bureau also announced that rayon and
acetate broad woven goods production in the fourth quar-
ter of 1952 was 8 per cent above the third quarter output.
L/ Canned Food, Distributors Stocks of Canned Vege-
tables, Fruits & Juices, Jan. 1, 1953
L7Consue of Population, Georgia, Number of Inhabitants,
PA-11, 254
L7Selected List of Publications of the Department of
Commerce of interest to Those Engaged in Distribution,
204
S ources of information on the U. 8. Market, BIS,20C
Commercial Standards A Recorded Voluntary Standard of
the Trade:
UStandard Stock Ponderosa Pine Windows, Sash, and
Screens, No. 163-52, 15#
OWaye' Sports-Duterwear Size Measuem~ents, INo.186-52,
10(
/Gas Floor Itenaces Gravity Circulating Ty-pe,
Noe. 99-52, 54
S/Simplified Practice Recoommendation #89-52, AL Recorded
Voluntary Recommendation of the Trade Coated Abra-
shve Products, 5d
SIron Ore Reprint From Bureau of Mines Minerals
Yearbook for 1950, 15#
Small Business Aides (Rerun)
Case Study Main Sales Floor Becomes at Window
Display in a Retail Bardware Store, #14i
g Case Study Finding Work for the Dull Seasons in'
Rug Cleaning Industry, #145f
Packaged Produce Withoult Retrigeration, #r146
Operating a Photographic Supply Store, #147
kEstablishing a Linen Supply Business, #148
/ / Tufted Textile Products & Woven & knitted Cotton Rugs
FFI, Series 8158-01, 100 s
./ 7Construction Machinery,FFIH1364-4-2, 10C,50# Year.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





SOUTHEAST'S TURKEY PRODUCTION 80ARS IN 15 YEARS

The Southeast is "talking turkey these days with tur-
keys.
U. S. Department of Agriculture figure show that in
the past 15 years, turkey production in the South Atlan-
tic region of Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas and Vir-
ginias, Delaware and Maryland increased 450 per cent, the
largest percentage gain of any section in the U. S.
If the region's 15-year progress is maintained, it
may eventually take the leadership of the nation in the
production of turkeys as it did in 1951 in the output of
commercial broilers, the figures indicated.
The compilation showed that in 1938 the region's out-
put of turkeys totalled 2 million while in 1952 the pro-
duction had expanded to the impressive figure of 11 mil-
lion.
Incidentally, the combined South Atlantic and South
Central regions produced nearly 17 million in 1952.



)MOTN NTC
Beginning AprillIst, 1953, the Synopsis of U. S. government
Proposed Procurements and Contract Awards, published daily
Monday through Friday, will be placed on a subscription basis
for direct mailing to subscribers.
The subscription prices will be $7.00 per year or $4.00 for
aba mnuths.
With the institution of direct mailing on a subscription basis,
dlishributism on a pick-up basis through our cooperative outlets
will be discontinued. Each such outlet will continue to receive
one copy of each issue for use by the cooperating agency and
for reference purposes by interested parties.
Subscriptions, acccanpanied by check or rnoney order rnade
payable to the Treasurer of the thrited States, should be sent to:
U. S. Department of Commerce, Administrative Ser-
vice Office, Room 1300, New Post Office Building,
433 West Van Buren Street, Chicago 7, Illinois
-OR-
To the Nearest Department of Commerce Field Of-
fice As ShowRn At The Top Of This Bulletin of
Commerce.


SPIRITS SALES IN SOUTHEAST INCREASE IN 1952

Residents of the four southeastern States of Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee 14at year consumed
an estimated 7,712,659 gallons of distilled spirits, near-
ly 175,000 nore than were consumed in 1951, according
to monthly reports on trends in the wines and spirits
industry issued. by the Bureau of the Census.
The consumption figures were reflected in sales by
wholesalers which showed that in Florida, 3,213,348
gallons of spirits were sold, 1,442,889 in Georgia,
1,609,592 in South Carolina, and 1,446,830 in Tennessee.

These reports are gratis. See Page 3
.for listing and order them from the near-
est UI. S. Department of Commerce field
office.

No figures were given for North Carolina or Alabama,
where spirited stores are State-operated, or Hississippi,
which is listed as "dry."
Georgia concluded the year still leading the nation
in percentage increase in sales in 1952 over 1951 with
a high mark of 21 per cent. The State nearest that was
North Dakota with a gin of 8 per cent.
The reports also showed an increase in wine sales by
some 266,000 gallons. The total for the four-State area
was 1,519,861, including 870,020 in Florida; 348,101 in
Georgia; 149,265 in South Carolina; and 152,475 in Tenn-
essee.

NPA CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2
Following were some recent NPA actions:
Chemicals: Order Y-32 giving producers of certain
chemicals the option of refusing to accept DO-rated
orders in excess of specific percentages of their pro-
duction was revoked.
Carbon Conversion Steel: Acquisition and use of fin-
ished carbon conversion steel by self-authorization in
approved construction projects was extended through the
second quarter of 1953 for oil and gas operators.
Oil, Gas Operators: Self-certification privileges in
the purchase of materials for projects were Liberalized
by elimination of some requirements for filing copies
of delivery orders.
Selenium: Allocation control was removed.
GPO 83.50087


__


I


Bo-6-JF


LEROY L. QUALtS
DEPARTMENT OF CNMS
GAIESYLL, FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 9109


PAGE 4


BULLETIN


U. 3, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE S,~
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Volume 7, Number 6 March 15, 1953





SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


c~i~S~~


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT STAGEE $300
~-~-----(GPO)






Ls DEPC 8 ORY





C, / 3. 6 7~/ 7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE






igtras of


REGION SPENDS $108.8 MILLION IN DRAINAGE WORK

Farmers and other tillers of the soil in the South-
east have paid out a total of $108,838,974 in drainage
operations since the beginning of the present century,
cordingg to a final report from the 1950 Census of
Agriculture just'issued by the Bureau of the Census.
The disbursements included $480,22c3 in Alabama;
$61,959,203 in Florida; $2,197,194 in Georgia; $2 L,-
962,591 in Mlississippi; $6,906,604 in North Carolina;
$81,560,786 in South Carolina; and $6,772,373 in Tenn-


euTh reepthe Unitenttis lee9Drc nage of Agri-
enltural lands, and is priced at $1.50. See
Page 3 for ordering from the nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce field office

The payments were made in the draining of 11,273,708
acres of land, which constitutes about 5 per cent of the
213,052,800 acres of land in the entire ?-State area.
The acreage included 76,671 in Alabama; 6,083,676 in
Florida; 96,259 in Georgia; 3,023,766 in Mississippig
1,1286,509 in North Carrolina; 249,011 in South Carolina;
and 615,838 in Tennessee.
In the decade between 1940 and 1950, the seven south-
eastern States have been able to pay off a total of
$25,709,872 in drainage indebtedness.

1953 OPENS WIlTH BRISK UPTURN IN RETAIL SALES

Retail merchants in the Southeast may find 1953 to
be a profitable year if sales continue as good through
the year as they were in January. According to a Bureaud
of the Census monthly survey, sales reflected sharp up-4
turns in January of this year as compared with the same
month in 1952 in most of the cities and areas.
Birmingham reported an advance of 16 per cent, At-
lanta, 16 per cent, Augusta, 11 per cent, Maeon, 18 per
cent, Johnson City, 21 per cent, and Gulfport, 13 per
cent among the larger increases in the area.


vO.7N.?
VALUE OF GOODS PRODUCED IN SOUTHEAtST UP 27 PER CENT ,
rWUL *DnymD seneam-n..oo An in-
ErwsHruAPRIDDUCONm crease of
oo I ,/ some 27 per

as-- V---- au de
-J ~----s --- by manufact-
900.\V\, i~=ame ruin__cl us- uredofegoods
.soon I~usumlsa the South-

1949 1950 1951 1952 fiVe year
period of 1947 to 1951 is shown in results of the 1951
Sreynor Yanufactures just released by the Bureau of
The new census shows a rise of from $b5,941,616,000
in the value added by manufacture of goods produced in
1947, when the last previous census of manufactures was
taken, to $7,593,689,000 in 1951.

Note: This 1951 census is reflected in two
separate reports for the Southeast, one for
the South Atlantic Region and the other for
the East South Central region. Both are avail-
able at the nearest Department of Commerce
field office. See Pag~e 3 for ordering.

The value added by manufacture of goode produced is
the value of the products less the cost of materials,
supplies, fuel, electric energy and contract work.
Proportionate gains were also reflected in the region
in number of manufacturing employees and total salaries
and wages paid them. For example, in 1947 the bureau re-
corded a total of 1,402,933 employees and 1,540,548 in
the latest census, and an advance of from $2,846,485,000
to $3,954,254,000 in salaries and wages paid in the two
periods.
Georgia led.in increase in number of employees alth
35,408; North Carolina paced the other States in gain
in salaries and wages paid, and Tennessee was the
leader in gain in value of goods produced.


1


The time has come' again to ipurge" the mailing list of those recipients of the Bulletin of Cqamerce
wtho do not wish to receive it in the futurei. This is required by law. By the time this issue of the
Bp~Le 39( Commerce reaches you, you abould have received under separate cover an orange-colored.
card. calling upon you to indicate whether you wish to remain on the mailingJ list to receive this
publibation. You anat sign and return this card, stamped with a 2-cent postage stamp, within 20 days
of_ its receipt by you, or we will have to remove your name from the mailing list. Be sure to affix
'pos'taje- to your card. It cannot be handled under the 8anking privileges.


Atlanta, Ga., Birmningham, Ala.,
7th floor,Foreyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Charleston, 8. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


Jacrsonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Miamiz Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-36j41,Ex.206


Savarnah, Ga.,
218~ P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


ALPRIL 1. 1953


ATTENTIONJ, RECIPIENTS OF BULLETIN OF COMMERCE'.





CMAP TO END JUNE 30;DMS IS PLANNED

Southeastern distributors and
TH- consumers of steele copper and
aluminum will be interested in a

fice of Defense Mobilisation in
WAashington that effective June 30
of this year the Controlled Mlater-
Produ tion iale Plan will be terminated and
) a new system instituted known as
the Defense Materials System to
sake certain that defense product-
Authority ion and construction remains onehdi
The latter plan is dependent,
of course, it wcas stated, on ac-
tion by Congress to give the President authority to
continue the controls on products and materials with
respect to defense priorities and scarce and critical
items essential to defense requested in his State of
the Union Nessage.
DMS Regulation Number 1 will be issued at the same
time that the National Production Authority issues
Direction 21 to CMP Regulation Number 1 providing for
an orderly transition from the total control system
incorporated in CYP to the support that DMS will pro-
vide for defense programs, the announcement stated.
Except for nickel-bearing stainless steel, the NPA
direction will cancel all non-defense controlled mater-
ial allotment authority for the third and subsequent
quarters.
DMS, it was explained, will provide an allotment of
materials required for production and construction for
defense. At the same time, material controls over
civilian production and construction will be terminated
for operations beginning with the third quarter of
this year.
The plains include raising of the third quarter 1953
allotment authority for the purchase of nickel-bearing
stainless eteel to 100 per cent of the supply so asr to
permit acquisition of this material by defense and
other essential users, it was stated.
OTHlER NPA RECENT ACTIOlS_
Oil.Gas Operators: Permission to revalidate allotments
of controlled materials for delivery in the calendar
quarter following t~he allotment quarter was granted
certain oil and gas operators.
Cryolite: Exports of cryolite to countries other than
Canada may be made hereafter by persons licensed by
the Office of International Trade, U. S. Department: of
Commerce, to purchase and export the material.
Silicon: Consumers of silicon are permitted to use, or
have in inventory, up to 50 gross tone per month with-
out reporting such usage to the NPA Iron and Steel
Division under an amendment to Order M-80.
Platinum: Platinan recovered from completed jewelry or
parts of jewelry, or from scrap or sweepings, received
by a refiner from jewelry manufacturers and wholesalers
and retail jewelers may be delivered by a refiner to
a processor for use in manufacturing! an item included
in List A of NPA Order Y-54 under an amendment to the
order adopted.
Aluminum Scrap: Revocation of Order Y-22 under which
aluminum scrap has been controlled since January 1951
was announced.
Machine Tools: Rated orders no longer are needed to
obtain certain machine tool in an amendment to Order
Y-41.
Selenium and Selenium Allloys: These items were added
to the list of those for which defense (DO) ratings
may not be applied or extended to obtain delivery.
ESeeiSDASeaium AR-laE68selenium Dioxide: Inventories
restricted to 30-day supply.


INFORMlATION ON CENSUSES TO BE AVAILABLE '

SSoutheastern firms participating in this year's '
censuses of manufactures, minerals, transporta- '
tion and trade can obtain informational material '
on the censuses from field offices of the Bureau '
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of the U. S*
Department of Commerce located in Atlanta, Say- '
annah, Memphis, Charleston, Mobile, Jacksonville '
and Miami.
'Arrangements have been made for distribution of '
the material upon request as a convenience to '
business men, as well as to make it possible for '
than to determine immediately the type of inforn-'
ation they will be called upon to supply in the '
censuses. e
'In addition to the Bureau of Foreign and Domes- '
tic Commerce offices, the information will also '
be available, of course, at field offices of the '
Census Bureau in the region, which include those '
in Birmingham and Clanton, Ala., Sarasota, Fla., '
Atlanta and Cochran, Ga., Clarkedale, Gulfport '
and Jackson, Miss., Asheville and Raleigh, '
N. C., Greenwood, S. C.. and Johnson CityzTenn. '

16,500 NEWA MANUFACTURING PLANTS COME TO REGION

A total of 16,500 new manufacturing plants have
come into the Southeast in the past 9 years, according
to a summary compiled by the Office of Business Econo-
mlics of the U. S. Department of Commerce. This was the
second largest increase of its kind in the United
States.
The "Southeast" in this instance includes the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georg~ia, Mlississippi, Tenn-
easee, the Carolinas, Virginia, Kientuckyr and Louisiana*
Only the Middle Eastern region with an increase of
17,800 had a better showing. Other gains were Niew Eng-
land, 5,200; Southwest, 3,200; Central, 6,800; North-
west, 1,200; and Far West, 12,500.
Between 1944 and 1952, the 10 southeastern States
added 215,900 firms to its business population, includ-
ing those engaged in contract construction, manufactur-
ing, and wholesale, retail and service trades. A rise
of from 422,600 in 19L4 to 638,500 last year was record-
ed.

$;6.9 iI~LION IN STATE ROAD WORIK AIRARDED

State highway departments in the Southeast opened
1953 with the awarding of contracts for the construct-
ion of $6,957,000 worth of road work, according to a
compilation of the Bureau of Publie Roads, U. S. De-
partment of Commerce.
The figures were for the month of January and in-
cluded 79 contracts for the construction of 292 miles
of highways in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas.
At the same time, the Bureau said road construction
operations under way or in the planning stage in the
?-State area at the end of January represented a total
cost of $307,612,000 for work on 5,695.5 miles of
roads.
The cost of the projects on which contracts were
awarded by the States included $1,967,000 in Alabama;
$11,000 in Florida; $15,000 in Georgia, $896,000 in
Kississippi; $1,953,000 in North Carolina; $2,034,000
in South Carolina; and $81,000 in Tennessee.
The others included $62,658,000 in Alabama; $36,-
219,000 in Florida; $53,651,000 in Georgia; $31,130,000
in Yississippi; $50,088,000 in North Carolina; $28,159,-
000. in South Carolina; and $43,671,000 in Tennessee.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2








PAGE 3


Employment showed evidence of a rise between Jan-
nary and February of this year following the usual aid-
winter lull. Estimated at 60,924,000 in the week ending
February 14, total civilian employment was about 400,-
000 above the January level and 1.2 million higher than
in February 1952, according to latest Bureau of the Cen-
sus figures.
*
An up turn in housing starts began in February when
77,000 new permanent nonfarm dwelling unite were put
under construction, according to preliminary estimates
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of
Labor. The estimate represented an increase of 6,000
units, or 8-per cent, over January and almost equalled
the February 1952 figure, despite severe storms in the
latter half of the month in some sections of the coun-
try.
*
B appointment of Francia V. du Pont, of Wil- '
i sington, Delaware, as Commissioner of the
Bureau of Publio Roads, U. S. Department of
Commerce, succeeding Thomas H. MacDonald
has been announced, Mr. du Pont is national- '
ly recognized as one of the foremost admin-
istrators of public highways in America.
+ *
January production of all types of knit cotton and
wool underwear and nightwear, except union suits, regia-
tered increases over the January 1952 totals but follow-
ed no general trend in comparison with December 1952
levels, the Bureau of the Census reported.
*
Steel production in December 1952, the second high-
est month of the year, required the melting of 9,720,-
145 gross tone of ferrous materials, the Bureau of
Mines, U. 8. Department of Interior, reported. The
quantities used in steel-making furnaces were 4,700,195
gross tons of scrap and 5,019,950 tone of pig iron.
*
Average weekly cuttings of most types of men's ap-
parel in January registered increases over January 1952
levels but did not follow a general trend in comparison
.wful December 1952, according to the Census Bureau.


1


Eggr Furt12e
Details of Agg
Of These Items
G~ et In Touch
With Tg Near-
est U. S. De-
partment of Commerce Field Office.



Personal income in January 195~3 was at an annual rate
of $280) billion, virtually unchanged from the December
1952 figure, but 6 per cent higher than a year earlier,
according to the Office of Business Economies, U. S.
Department of Commerce. Most components of personal in-
come in January remained close to their December totals
and the small changes which occurred were largely off-
setting.
*
Total business inventories at the end of January
were valued at $74 billion. After allowance for seasonal
variations, the book value declined $100 million. Manu-
facturers' and wholesalers' stocks each declined about
$100 million. Retail inventories were $100 million
higher than at the end of December.
s *
Cash dividend payments issuing public reports
amounted to $181 million in February, the same as in
February a year ago. Total dividend payments in manu-
facturing were slightly higher than in February 1952.
WAith the exception of a sharp rise in .th~e food, bever-
age, and tobacco industry, caused by altered payment
dates by a few major firms, and a substantial drop in
the textile and leather industry, changes in manufactur-
ing were of small magnitude.
+ ** *
Total wholesalers' sales in January were estimated at
$8,600 million, which on a seasonally adjusted basis,
was a decline of 4~ per cent from the previous month.
Sales by durable-goods dealers were at $2,1660 million
and by nondurable-goods dealers at $C6,130 million, rep-
resenting seasonally adjusted declines of 6 per cent and
more than 3 per cent, respectively, from December.
+ +


/ Revised Estimates of Farm Population of U. S., 1910
to 1950, BALE, Nlo. 16, 10C
19~ 1 nnual Survey of Manufactures:
L/alue of Shipments of Selected Classes of Products,
1951, 1950 & 1947, KAS-51-3, 20#
DJCost of Fuels Consumed & Quantity & Cost of Electric
Energy Purchased by Major Industry Group, 1951,1950
& 1947, MALS-51-7, 104
General Statistics by Major Industry Groupasl1951-1947
East North Central States, MAS-51-6.3, 154
West South central Statse, KAS-51-6.7, 154
Mountain States, MAS-51-6.8, 15#
Pacific States, MAS-51-6.9, 15#
West North Central States, KA8-51-6.4, 15#
New England States, KAS-51-6.1, 154
Middle Atlantic States, MALS-51-6.2, 154
East South Central Statse, MAS-51-6.6, 156
South Atlantic States, Y1AS-51.6.5, 154
Metal Consumed by Kanufacturers of Metal Product
For Selected Industries, 1951-1947)KALS-51-5, 154
Sml Business Aide:
U Prepackaging Offers New Problems For Refrigeration,
#150
gO Case Study Business, Civic & Trade Connections
Maintained by a Retail Florist to Stimulate His
Business, #151
Facts on Welding Shope, #154
How to Analyse Your Local Mhrket, #156
Case Study Analysis of Customerb to Determine Buy-
ing Policies By A Marine Supplies Store, #157


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


NEW BOOKS ~3~5 This Materialp Reev
AN REPRTS.Check It In
-= g~ At@ \EO T TeM SaeRS
Provided An
Send This Portign of the Bulletin ofCmec ote
Nearest U. S. Deateto omreField Office. Your
Name and Address are On The Opposite Side. Make Remit-
tances' For Sales Material Pangle to Treasurer of the
United States.


; 7 Estimates of the Farm Population of the U. S.,
April 1950 to April 1952, BAE-#18, 5#
1950~ Consue of Housing:
OSummary of Housing Characteristice for the U. S.,
by Regions, Divisions & States, Apr. 1950,80-8 #1
{ Tennessee, General Characteristics, H-642, 60#
// North Carolina, General Characteristica 8-A33,65#
1950 Census of Housing, Non-Fara Housing Characteristics
gi Winaton-Salem Standard Metropolitan Area, 8-8159,
15#
Asheville Stand. Metropolitan Area, H-Bl6, 15#
Tampa-St. Petereburg Std. Yet. AreaH-8144, 20#
Augusta, Ga., Std. Met. ALcre, 8-819, 15#
Jacksonville Std. Met. Area, 8-872, 20#
Macon, Ga., Std. Met. Area, N-888, '15#
rJ Work Experience of the Populatiam in 1951,P-50W,#4
10#
j' Drainage of ALgricultural Lands,V-IEV, $1.50







1 _


COLOR TELEVISION IS ALREADY IN YEXICO

SColor television is already in operation in
i Yexico, a pamphlet just issued by the Office
of International Trade, U. S. Department of
Commerce, says,
The station is in Mexico City and is one of
three in operation there. It' s on an experi-
mental basis.
The pamphlet, entitled "Foreign Television
Developments," shows that television has made
remarkable strides in most foreign countries.
Even the USSR can point to stations in Moscow,
Kiev and Leningrad, with a small station also
in Kharkov. Others are planned for Stalingrad
and Sverdlovak.
Hesre and there the stations are operated by
the government, which, of course, means no
commercials.' The publication estimates that 80
per cent of the people in Grealt Britain now
have access to television.


"SINGLE BLESSEDNEESS" MORE DESIRED AMONG MALES

'Single blessedness" is more desired among, males in
the Southeast than females, according to a Bureau of the
Census report from the 1950 Consue of Population.
In Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tenneasee,
and the Carolinas of a total of 14,704,581 persons 14
years old and over there were 1,901,124 males who were
single and 1,476,378 single females.

Copies of this report entitled n~arital
Status of Persons 14 Yeare Old and Over"
are obtainable at all Department of Commerce
field offices*

The disparity in favor of males was shown, in spite of
the fact that there are some 400,000 more females in the
area than sales,
The report also showed that there are three times as
many widows in the ?-State area as widowers. The totals
were: Males, 356,067 and females, 1,077,039.
MANYP SOUTHEASTERN HOMES YMIUS ME~CHANIJCAL ICE

There are still 2,094,558 homes in the southeast that
have no mechanical refrigerator, according to a Bureau
of the Censue report from the 1950 Census of Population.
A total of 3,338,284 others do have them.
The report also showed that in the seven Statse there
were 4,760,963 homes without central heat, while only
671,879 had it.
The foregoing report, another 1950 Census
of Population summary, is also available at
any Department ofI Commerce field office.
The Southeast also has a relatively high rate of mort-
gaged homes. Of the owner-occupied non-farm homes in
Alabama, 34.6 per cent were mortgaged; Florida, 42.1 per
cent; Georgia and South Carolina, 40.2 per cent each;
North Carolina, 36.4 per cent; Mississippi, 29.4 per
cent; and Tennessee, 37.2 per cent.
Other figures revealed that Florida' s homes had the
highest median value, $6,612. Alabam~a'e s as $4,473; Geor-
gia, 45,235; Mississippi, $4,159; North Carolina, $4,901;
South Carolina, $5,112; and Tennessee, E5,268.
South Carolina had the lowest median rent, $i17.39.





IMPORTANT NOTICE
Beginningr April 1st, 1953, the Synopsis of U. S. Government
Proposed Procurements and Contract Awards, published daily
Monday throurrh Friday, will be placed on a subscription basis
for direct malilmsp to subscribers.
The subscription prices will be $7.00 per year or $4.00 for
six months.
With the institution of direct mailing on a subscription basis,
distribution on a pick-up basis through our cooperative outlets
will be discontinued. Each such outlet will continue to receive
rnerempy of each issuebformru by the operating agency and
Subscriptions, accompanied by check or money order made
payable to the Treasurer of the United States, abould be sent to:
U. B. Department of Commerce Adminis8trative Service Office
Room 1800, New P.O. Bldg., 433 W. Van Buren St., Chicago 7, Ill.
--OR-
To the Nearest Department of Commerce Field Office
Shown At The Top Of This Bulletin Of Commerce.

cre ...so...


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIllIIWIIIIUIIllWIIIUIIIWIYIll
BULLETII 3 1262 08748 9091


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMIERCE
FIELD SERVICE


Tel. WA-4121AN, C.1 o r t lgExt. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


VOLUME 7, IOMBER 7 APRIL 1, 1953


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TIO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT TOUR FIED OFFICE REGULARLY.


uNv. OF P$iaulTY FO~ PRIVATE USE TO A0OID
DOCUM~F. 9 EN~IE~ OF POSTAGE $300


U.S. DEP ~ (TORY




~glgITy OF FLORIDAI BC-6-JI
LEFROY L. QUAL;LS

GAnEVLE sti, (fres






























$b6.6 BILLION IN NEWI CONSTRUCTION IN REGION

A total of $~6,643,500,000 was spent in new construction
in the Southeast last year, according to figure reflected
in a current issue of the Construction and Buildng ate-
ials Industry Report issued by the U. S. Department of Com-
merce.
Some $3,681,600,000) went into private construction, in-
cluding $b1,791,300,000 in residential building, and also
$2Z,961,900,000 in new public construction,

This Industry Report is available on a
subscription basis at all Department of
Commerce field offices _fg _~aL.Jae yar

The figures represented final summaries for 1952. They
showed a gain in the region in value of all forms of con-
struction of around $b660,100,000 in 1952 over 1951, despite
sharp declines in some southeastern States.
The Southeast in this instance included Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mississippi, the Carolinas and Virginias,
Tennessee, Kentucky, Delaware, Mlaryland and the District
of Columbia.
Regionally, $742,800,000 was spent in private non-
residential building; $831,800,000 in privately-owned
public utility. improvements; $126,100,000 in sewer and
water development; $1l,395,700,000 in public non-residential
activities; and $540,900,000 in highwaay work. Slight de-
creases from 1951.were reflected in private residential and
nonresidential building.

TEXTILES STILL nKING" INY INDUSTRIAL SOUTHEAST

Textiles are still king" in the industrial world of the
Southeast. This is indicated in the 1951 Survey of Manu-
factures recently released by the Bureau of the Census
which showed that industry producing 41 per cent of the
dollar value of all of the principal commodities produced
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mlississippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas.

Reports from this Survey of Manufactures were
listed in the Bulletin o~f Commerce of April 1,
1953. They are available at all Department of
Commerce field offices on a nominal sales basis.

The survey just announced credited the textile industry
with the output of goods based upon the value added by manu-
factures worth $2,281,214,000, with Alabama, Georgia, North
Carolina and Tennessee sharing in the major production.
Value of the output included $242,453,000 in Alabama;
$450,378,000 in Georgia; $863,8)95,000 in North Carolina;
$594~,370,000 in South Carolina; and $130,118,000 in Tenn-
essee. Food products were next in order of importance.


1952 GOOD YEAR FOR BUSINESS I?1 SOUTHEAST

iosonowr-us The year 1952
RLEC RC- POWER PRODUCTION was another
so good one for
most major
lines of busi-
T.oI P. .k t9~L~OO-- ness in the
1951' ~ 1\ Southeast, ac-
601 ass I cording to the
19so/' V Iannual summary
s~o use 1,,,~~l1,. n......n.I .wimin1.min Of business con-
.. .. .. sy .. u. s. v. .. editions in the
region issued by the Atlanta regional office of the U. S.
Department of Commerce.
Increases over 1951 in bank deposits, loans and debits,
retail and wholesale trade, department stores, cash farm
income, new business incorporations, telephones in operr-
tion, manufacturing employment, production of electric
energy, railroad and airline freight revenue, airline
passenger traffic, and the dollar value of imports
through customs districts of the region were reported.

Copies of this report with statistical
tables showing business trends are avail-
able gratis at all Department of Commerce
offices in the Scutheas~t. Listing on Pagg 3.

The financial data were for Federal Reserve member
banks. One or two principal divisions of the business
economy did not quite make the grade. Urban building
registered a decline; there was more unemployment in the
general labor force; airline express was off; consumption
of cotton was down; and production and shipments of sou-
thern pine decreased.

-.. ---
PLEASE RETURN THE CARD'.'

A slight delay has been encountered in getting '
the Bulletin of Commerce renewal card to those on
the mailing list to receive that publication to '
determine if they wish to continue to receive it '
during the coming year. The card abould have been '
received by you by the time this Bulletin.2fQgP-
mere reaches you. This is just a reminder that
Sit must be returned, or it will be necessary to
remove your name from the ~mailing list. This is
required by law. Remember, be sure to place a
2-cent stamp on the card.


Atlanta, Ga., Birminghan, Ala.,
7th Floor,Forsyrth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-kl21,Ex.453 Tel. 53-31421,Ex.355


Charleston, S. C., Jacksonville, FLa.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 625 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111


Mlemphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Savannah, Ga.,
947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 218 P. 0. 31dg.,
_____Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-36(1 .Ex.206__ ITel. 2-4155 _
VOL. 7,_8 NO.________ 8_ __ _____APfRIL 15. 19$3


UNITEd STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE







PAGE 2

REGION BIG PRODUCER OF WOOD PULP AND PAPER

The Southeast produces more wood pulp, paper and board
than any other region in the United States, and most of
the output in the area is concentrated in~ the two States
of Florida and Georgia, according to a Faots For Industry
Report of the Bureau of the Census entitled "19942912>
Paper and Board, 1951."
Production of wood pulp in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Yississippi, Virginia, the Carolinas and Maryland in 1951
was placed at 6,712,186 tons, and all grades of paper and
board at 6,424,187 tons. Some 37 per cent of the regional
production of wood pulp was produced in Georgia and Flor-
ida. The output in the two States totalled 2,535,602 tons,
including 1,209,1645 in Georgia and 1,326,157 in Florida.

Copies of this report are available
at all Department of Commerce field
offices in the Southeast. It's listed
on Page 3.

In the production of paper and board, the same south-
eastern States adlcng with Yest Virginia and the District
of Columbia produced a total of 6,424,187 tons of which
Florida and Georgia produced 2,181,628 tons.
In all instances, the production in 1951 exceeded that
of 1950. In wood pulp, the regional output in 1951 was
nore than a million tons greater, and in all grades of
paper, the total for the southeastern States in 1 '51 was
447,979 tons more than in 1950.

,SALES OF BOKED CANDY LESS;BARS POPULLAR

Sales of plain and fancy confectionery in boxes are *
More than 20 million pounds less than they were 25 '
years ago, according to data reflected in Department *
of Commerce material. On the other hand, bar goods '
sales have increased by more than 175 million pounds. *
'Last year, sweet-toothed southeasterners paiid nearly *
$45 million to satisfy their craving for confection, *
including $29.4 million in Georgia, Florida, the Caro-'
linas and Virginias, Maryland and the District of '
Columbia, and $15.4 million in Alabama, Mississippi, '
'Tennessee and Kentudgy, Bureau of the Census figure *
also showed. Sales in the South Atlantic region were '
7 per cent more than in 1951, and in the East South '
Central section the increase was 4 pDer cent. I

LUMBER SITUATION IN SOUTH LAST YEAR GO)D

Last year was one of the best for the South' s lumber
industry. More southern hardwoods were produced than in
any year since 1948, it was a high productive period for
southernpine, and consumption of both types of lumbjer was
at an exceptional rate.
This, in substance, wea shown in the 87th Quarterly Re-
port of the Lumber Survey Committee made to the Secretary
of Commerce of the United States.

Copies of this report are obtainable through
any Department of Commerce field office gratis.

A total of 4,463 million board feet of southern hard-
wroods was produced, which compared with 4,413 million in
1951, 3,797 million in 1950, and 2,937 million in 1949.
Production of southern pine hit a high mark of 8,775 mil-
Lion board feet, which, while exceeded by the 9,939 mil-
lion feet of 1950, was higher than either 1951 or 1949.
Consumption of hardwoods in 1952 was placed at 1,392,-
000,000 board feet, somewhat higher than any of the pre-
vious. three years. The use of southern pine last year,
8,848 million feet, was short of 1950'sa 9,912 million, but
was higher than either 1951 or 1949,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

NEW MATERIALS CONTROL SYSTEM ANNOUNCED BY NPA

THE A new materials control system
limited to assuring deliveries of
Enough steel, copper add aluminum
Naio al Aomc neg Cmmsso as nfor the Department of Defense and
nounced by the National Production
Authority.
Subject to Congressional extension
Produ tion of Title One of the Defense Product-
ion Act, this Defense Materials

Auh rt System will govern the defense dis-
July 1, following the June 30,expir-
ation of the more embracing Control-
led Materials Plan.
The new Defense Materials System will make effective
the policy outlined on March 11 by Acting Defense Mobiti-
ser Arthur S. Fleshing and first enunciated by President
Eisenhower in his State of tae Union Message. The Presi-
dent then asked that materials controls be limited to de-
fense requirements.
Under the new Defense Yaterials System, the defense
programs identified by the symbols A, 8, C, D, and E,
namely, military and AEC orders, will be carried out un-
der DMIS Regulatione No. 1 (production) and No. 2 (con-
struction). Direction 21 to CMP Regulation No. 1 and
Direction 11 to CMP Regulation No. 6 remove both controls
and program assistance from civilian production and con-
atruction beginning with third quarter requirements. The
program syabol D is reserved by the National Production
Authority for special assistance to defense connected
projects certified as such by the Department of Defense
or Atomic Energy Colmmission.
RECENlT NPA ACTIONS
Recent NPA actions included the following:
Ferro-Allloys and Allov Products: Consumers of silicon are
permitted to use, or have in inventory, up to 50 gross
tons per month without reporting such usage to the NPA
under an amendment to Order Y-80. Other changes made in
the order to conform to NPA Regulation 1 excluded boron,
calcium and ferro-silicon from inventory control under
both the order and regulation. The term "powder" ras
deleted from the definition of nickel, and Schedule 1 to
the same order was amended to add Section 5 requiring certi-
fication by any person ordering nickel' from a supplier at-
testing that the ordering and use was in compliance wRith
the order, and that the person would use the nickel himself.
Cryolite: Exports of cryolite to countries other than
Canada may be made hereafter by persons licensed to pur-
chase and export the material under an amendment to Order-~
-99.
Oil and Gas: Permissionl to revalidate allotment of con-
trolled materials for delivery in the calendar quarter
following the allotment quarter was granted to certain oil
and gas operators through the issuance of Direction 8 to
Order M-46 establishing a priorities assistance system for
domestic and Canadian oil and gas operators.
Porities System: In a move to facilitate scheduling opera-
tions, NPA amended its basic priorities regulation provid-
ing that after acceptance of a rated order suppliers and
customers may agree upon a delivery date which is earlier
or later than the datea established in the original order,
and that changes in program identifications of rated orders
approved by NPA do not affect the position of such orders
on producer delivery schedules.
CoprRaw Yaterials: Removal of allocation control over
copper scrap and copper-base alloy scrap, copper-base alloy
ingot, blister copper, copper and copper-base alloy shot
and waffle, and copper precipitates was ordered in an amend-
ment to Order Y-16.
Mananee:Order M-80 was amended to redefine ferro mangan-
ese.







PAGE 3


1 ----.


_______.


I


I~ NE~ BOOI(S This Materialp Reev
1~~3~'_1" LN) IRElP()IlS Check It In
Jpt$@ ff The Spac
Provided An
Send This Portion of the bulletin of Commerce to the
Nearest U. S. Department of Commerce Field Office. Your
Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side. Make Remi~t-
tances For Salses material Payable to Treasurer of the
United States*

Annual Summary of Business Conditions in Southeast
Construction & Building Materials Industry Rpt.$2.50
Wood Pulp, Paper & Board, 1951, FTIIM14D-01, 154
87th Quarterly Report of Lumber Survey Committee
L9 0 Census of Population Advance Reports:
SIndustry Group of Employed Persons for the U. S.,
Urban & Rural & For Regions, Divisions & States
PC-14, #10O, 54 '
/7Labor Force in the U. S. by States, 1950, PC-14,#11

~7Class of Worker & M~ajor Occupation Group, for the
U. S., Urban & Rural & For Regions, Divisions &
States, 1950, PC-14, #A9, 5#
M7larital Status of Persons 14 Years Old & Over for
the U. S., Urban & Rural & For Regions, Divisione
& States, Apr. 1, 1950, PC-14, #8, 54
Family Income in 1949 for U.S.,By States,PC-14,#12~,5)
Estimates of Total Population of U.S.,1940-1950,
P-25,#71, 54
L7Estimates of Population of States, July 1, 1950 to
1952, P-25, #170 5
D Monthly Report of Labor Force, Feb. 1953,P-57,128,10#


Total sales of retail stores in February amounted to
$12.5 billion, about 7 per cent above a year ago. after
adjusting for seasonal factors and trading day differences
sales rose about 3 per cent from January to exceed the
total in any previous month. Advances in sales in February
after adjustment for seasonal patterns were shown for all
major kinds of trade except drug, stores where sales de-
clined somewhat from the January high.

Manufacturers' deliveries in February advanced 4 per
cent over the January-rate to a new high, with new orders
registering a similar increase and inventory book values
relatively unchanged. Sales of all manufacturers totaled
$26.1 billion. After seasonal allowance, sales of both
durables and nondurables were higher than in January. New
orders rose 4 per cent above the January seasonally ad-
justed rate.
+ *
Consumption of raw wool on the woolen and worated
systems averaged 9.6 million pounds, scoured basis, per
week in January, the Bureau of the Census reported. This
wars the same as the December average. Apparel wool was
consumed at at 2 per cent higher rate, however, while
carpet wool consumption dropped 6 per cent.
+ + +
Preliminary figures indicated that manufacturers'
sales of confectionery and competitive chocolate prod-
ucts in February were somewhat lower than in February
1952 in terms of both poundage and dollar value of sales.
+e4+ s+
Production of cotton broad woven goods in the fourth
quarter of 1952 totalled 2,540 million linear yards. In-
creases were shown for all items except napped fabrics
which declined 5 per cent from the third quarter output.
w *
Rayon and acetate fabric production totalled 499 mil-
lion linear yards in the fourth quarter of 1952, an in-
crease of 8 per cent above third quarter production and
19 per cent over the fourth quarter 19'il output~


apartment Id: Commerce Field Office-


Business is planning capital outlays in 1953 at slight-
ly above the record rate of 1952, according to a survey
of capital budget conducted by the Department of Commerce
and Securities Exchange Commission. The survey indicated
that if present programs materialize, new plant and equip-
ment expenditures this year will total $;27 billion com-
pared with outlays of $26.5 billion in 1952 and $25.5 bil-
lion in 1951.
*
Foreign countries continued to acquire gold and dollar
balances from the United States during the fourth quarter
of 1952, according to estimates of the balance of inter-
national payments released by the Office of Business
Economics, U. 8. Department of Commerce. Nlet transfers
from the United States in the last quarter of 1952 were
$b395 million, bringing the total since March 1, 1952,
when the outward movement began, to approximately $1.6
billion .
*
In the final quarter of 1952, foreign military aid by
thle United States government exceeded economic aid for
the first time since 1945. Of the total gross aid of $1.4
billion, approximately $1 billion consisted of military
aid and less than half a billion dollars of economic
assistance. Total grants and credits of $5~.6 billion in
the year 1952 as a whole were 10 per cent above the pre-
ceding~ year


Cotton Ginned, Crops of 1952 & 1951:
NLC/I. Carlns arolina ffLouisiana LGeorgia A~l abama
8. aroina Tennessee Oklahoma Alrkansas
STexas 2178pecified States M ississippi
Facts For Industry Reports:
/ JConsumption & Inventories of Steel, Copper & Alumi-
num in Mletalworking Industries, let Quarter 1951-2nd
Quarter 1952, NPAF-1-1, 154
/ 7 Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 4th Quar.1952,M-15-AL-4-2,
104, Annual Subscription Rate, 506
af Synthetic Broad Woven Goods, 4th Quar. 1952, Y150-4-2,
104, 504 a Year
Nonferrous Castings, Sept.-Dec.1952,K24E-122,5#,50eYr.
Cotton & Linters Consumption, Stocka, Imports &
Exports & Active Cotton Spindles, Feb. 1-28,1953,M15-1-
-53, 104, Annua;l Subscription Rate, $1
/ Petroleum Products Secondary Inventories & Storage
Capacity, Jan. 31, 1953
191 nnuail Survey of Manufactures:
SGeneral Statistics for Industry Groups & Selected
Industries, 1951,1950,1919,1947, MaS-51-4, 304
aff General Statistica for U. S. by Geographic Divisions
& States, 1951, 1950,1949 & 1947,KAS-51-6, 154
Small Business Aids: (Rerun)
af) Case Study Distribution Channela Used In Marketing
Toys, #158
Establishing a Diaper Service, #r160
Developments in Frosen Food Packaging, #161
Facts About the Used Furniture Store, #162
Establishing an Orthopedic Department, #163
Operating a Paint Store, #164
Wlhat Retail Druggists Want From Their Wholesalera,#165
Population Estimates & Forecasts for Selected Coun-
tries, Jan. 1, 1950 to 1954, P-91, #1


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE






PittiE 4i


2 PER CENT RISE IN SOUTHEAST POPUTLATION RECORDED

An increase of nearly 12 per cent in the population of
Florida, the third largest percentage rise~ in the U. S.,
and lesser gains in Georgia and the Carolinas, have
enabled the Southeast to maintain an overall rise of more
than 2 per cent in total population since the regular
decennial census of population wass taken in 1950, accord-
ing to a Bureau of the Census report.
This report is listed in the Order Blank
section on Page 3. Request it from the near-
est Department of Commerce field office.

The Census Bureau estirnate showed an advance on July
1 of last year of from 20,927,214 on April 1, 1950 to
21,1c06,000 in the '-Stalte area of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas, with
Florida registering an increase of from 2,771,305 to an
estimated 3,10)0,0)00, a gain of 11.9 per cent.
Only Arizona, with an increase of 14.6 per cent, and
Nevada writh 12.4 per cent could better Florida' s percent-
age rise, and only Mlichigan, Texas and California ex-
ceeded its 329,000 gain in population.
Incidentally, it wras the first time that Florida
had broken into the 3,000,000 population class since
the cenlsuses have been taken.
The 2 per cent increase for the region compared
with a 3.4 per cent gain for the United States.
TIennessee lost jq,000 persons, or from 3,291,718 to
3,257,000, 1 per cent; Alabama, 11,000, from 3,061,7L3 to
3,051,000; and Mississippi, 6,000, from 2,178,914 to
2,173,000, both less than 1 per cent.
MYANY FAMILIES IN REGION HAVE LOW INCOMES

Thirty-twfo per cent of the families anld unrelated in-
dividuals living in the Southeast have incomes of less
than $1,000 a year, or did before Korea, according to a
Bureau of the Census report just issued.
Of a total of 6,182,535 families and unrelated in-
dividuals in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, MiEsissippi, Tenn-
essee and the Carolinas, 2,003,140 were listed as receiv-
ing less than $1,000 in income. Georgia led with 330,415.
North Carolina was next with 323,360. The others included
Alabama, 305,330; Tennessee, 298,210; Mississippi, 292,-
520; Florida, 258,010; and South Carolina, 195,295.


Quick tax writeoffs on $b35,346,698 worth of plant and
facility expansion activities in the Southeast, including
another certificate of necessity for $22,160,000 for the
Wheland company, of Chattanooga, for its proposed aluminum
plant in the Tennessee Valley, were authorized by the Of-
fice of Defense Mobilization in Washington.
among the certificates issued also was one calling for
$11,000,000 to the Florida Power and Light company for
development of electric power at Cutler, Fla.

TOYOL, DIE MANUFACTURERS' DIRECTORY ISSUED

.Directory of Independent Tool and Die Manufacturers"
is the title of a new publication issued by the National
Production Authority of the U. 5. Department of Commerce,
copies of which are available at all Commerce Department
field offices for 25 cents each.
The publication, whiich lists many such manufacturers
in the Southeast and other regions, will be of special
interest to those engaged in the production of hard goods
items requiring the engineering and procurement of
special dies, jigs and fixtures.
WHOLESALE SALES CONTINUE UPWARD


Wholesale firms in the Southeast experienced a 2 per
cent increase in sales in the first two months of 1953
as compared with the same period last year, according to
a current issue of the Monthly Wholesale Trade Report
of the Bureau of the Census.

These Monthly Wholesale Trade Reports are
now on a subscription basis. They are available
through any Department of Commerce field office
for $1 a year.
Relatively sharp advances in sales of such commodit-
ies as automotive supplies, some electrical goods, and
drugs and sundries were factors in the gains, offsetting
declines in transactions in hardware, industrial sup-
plies, plumbing and heating products, and fresh fruits
and vegetables.
In some sections of the a'rea, sales were brisk among
lumber and building materials dealers.
The 2 per cent regional rise was the same as the U.S.
GPO 83-52024


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


it.V O5~t.L


LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Bo-5.3,


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

BULE~k 11\11\\gA M5 \\1118llM MII
EltJILETIF 3 1262 08748 9083

FIRMS IN REGION GET $35.3 TRILLION EXPANSION 0.K.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office .~LL~c'~~
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga. ~e
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLUMbE 7, NUbBER 8 APRIL 15, 1953



--BULLETIN OF~ COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WELL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.I


























MY 1~. 1049


VOL. 7. NO. 9


i~i-iL~i~-iL---- ----- ---- -I -IM


SOUTH EXPANDS ITS PULPWOOD INDUSTRY IN 10 YIEARS
PAPERi & BOAR~D_ nuas~mmes An increase
PRlODUCTION so of 95 percent
BY REGIONS in the con-
sumption of
1942-1952 -- \ toe pulpwrood in
the South in
the past 10
,o years is re-
flected in a
current issue
of the Induat-
ru ry Report PuZIJ
Pauar k Board
issued by the
'o U. S. Depart-
ment of Com-
I erce.
aThe publicr-
tion, the An-
a nual Review
Ag ~ ~ ~ i ETn +1I O number, shows
1942 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 YS2 a year-to-
Source: National Production Authority, year tabula-
Pulp, Paper & Paperboard Division 'tion of re-
ceipts, consumption and inventories of pulpwood regional-
ly from 1942 through 1952. It places consumption of that
product in the South in 1942 at 6,804,000 standards cords
and in 1952 an expansion to 13,330,000 cords.

This publication is of special interest to
the Southeast because of the importance of
the industry. It is available at any Depart-
ment of Commerce field office on a subscript-
ion basis of 75 cents a year.

In the same length of time, receipts of pulpwood in
the South rose by 102 per cent, or from 6,622,000 to
13,381,000 cords.
The rapidity with which the industry has expanded in
the southern region far exceeded that of all other regions
in the U. S. In the nation as a whole, for example, con-
sumption in the 10-year period went from 17,275,000 to
26,4662,000 cords, or 53 per cent, and receipts from 17,-
139,000 to 27,358,000 cords, a gain of 59 per cent.


REGION RANKS 3RD IN GAIN IN KANUFACTIIRZNG
The combined Sout~h Atlantic and East South Central
States, representing the entire Southeast, in the 5-year
period of 1947 to 1951, inclusive, ranked third among all
regions in the United States in increase in dollar value
of manufactured goods produced, according to a study of
current and past figures of the Bureau of the Census.
The increase amounted to $3,860,618,000, or from
$9,817,482,000 in 1947 when the regular census of mranu-
factures was taken by the Census Bureau to $13,228,100,-
000 in 1951, when the Bureau issued estimates.

These Census of Manufactures reports are
available at all Department of Commerce field
offices. Specify the region desired.

The latest Census Bureau compilation listed the in-
crease in the East North Central region, $10,070,083,000,
or from $23,473,563,000 to $33,543,646,000, as the
largest, and that of the Middle Atlantic region, from
$20,790,62?6,000 to $26,666,411,000, or a gain of $5,875,-
785,000, as second in order of rise.
The other regional increases were: New England, from
$6,813,800),000 to $8,469,050,000, or $1,655,250,000;
West North central, $4,119,409,000 to $5,688,029,000, or
$1,568,620,000; West South Central, $3,027,709,000 to
$4,809,571,000, or $1,781,862,000; Mountain, $839,202,000
to $1,257,762~,000, or $418,560,000; and Pacific, $5,544,-
034,000 to $8,423,245,000, or $2,879,211,000.
The combined southeastern areas include Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, the Carolinas and
Virginias, Kentuckyr, Delaware, Maryland and the District
of Columbia.
The increase in the South Atlantic region of Georgia,
Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland, Delaware
and District of Columbia was from $6,942,054,000 in 1947
to $9,316,475,000 in 1951, or a rise of $2,824,421,000,
and that of the East South Cenltral section, comprising
Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky was from
$2,875,428,000 to $3,911,625,000, or $1,036,197,000.
The percentage increase for the two southeastern re-
gions combined, 34.7, ranked fourth in the nation. It was
exceeded by the West South Central'sa 58.9 per cent; the
East North Central' s 42.9 per cent; and the West North
Central' s 38.1 per cent.


SSOUTHEASTERN FIRMS SELL $3.3 BILLION NOIRTH OF GOODS,8ERVICES TO U. S. I
I
SBusiness firms in the seven southeastern States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee I
I and the Carolinas from the outbreak of the K~orean war to the beginning of 1953 sold goods and services 1
Sto the United Statse Government for military purposes valued at $3,363,750s000, according to a current (
Report of the Munitions Board in Wlashington.
Included in the sales were $;2,025,967,000 paid by the Army; $708,184,000 by the Navy; $617,174,000 a
by the Air Force; and $12,125,000 by the Armed Services Petroleum Purchasing Agency. Sales by States in- a
c luded Georgia, $929,809,000; North Carolina, $701 030,000; Tennessee, $;582,130 000; Alabama, $390 921-
S000; South Carolina, $311,746,000; Florida, $285,972,000; and Missiesippi, $159;142C,000. (


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WYA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-34i21,Ex.355


Charleston, S. C., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111


Memphis, Tenn.,
229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426


Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-?5)}


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel 2-3641Ex206


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-1755


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE









I


RETAIL SALES TRENDS CONTlINUE UPWARD IN AREA

Cumulative retail sales continued upward in the South-
east in the first two months of 1953.
In its monthly survey of retail trade conditions in
some 15 or more cities and areas in the region, the Bur-
eau of the Census reported an advance of substantial pro-
portions in most of them at the end of February 1953 as
compared with the corresponding period in 1952.

These Monthly Retail Trade Reports, issued
for the United States as a whole, and with
breakdowns for the various cities and areas,
are available on a subscription basis of
$1 a year.

Included in the increases were 13 per cent in Birming-
ham and Macon, Ga.; 11 per cent in Atlanta; 6 per cent in
Augusta and Bristol,' Tenn; 10 per cent in Gulfport, Miss;
7 per cent in Asheville and Greenwood, S. C; 19 per cent
in Johnson City, Tenns 9 per cent in ]Kingsport, Tenn; and
1 per cent in Savannah and Biloxi, Miss.
In addition, advances of 12? per cent in Chilton and
Perry counties, Alabama, and 11 per cent in Manatee
county, Florida, were reported.
Only in Columbus, Ga., and Clarksdale, Miss., were de-
clines reported, 3 and 5 per cent, respectively.
Unusual activity in the larger cities in sales of such
commodities as apparel, automotive. supplies, furniture
and appliances, and fuel was largely responsible for the
gains in. the two-month period. In the United States, an
8 per cent rise was shown.
HOUSING PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE '

Southeastern business men will be interested
Sin two new publications issued by the Housing '
and Home Finance Agency and made available for '
distribution through field offices of the U.S. '
Department of Commerce. They are: a
Easing Research Price 40# '
STrailer Courts (Recommended Standards) 154 '
The publication Housing Research should be of '
interest, too, to all home owners. In the March '
1953 issue, for example, are articles entitled '
s nIs Your Roof Construction Leaking Dollars?" '
nSelection of Dultable Exterior WAhite House a
Paint," "New Home Price Shifts, 1951-52,n and '
others '

OVER QUARTERLY BILLION IN ROAD-BUILDING

More than a quarter of a billion dollars was involved
Ln~ road-building operations planned and under way in the
Southeast at the beginning of March of this year, a-ccord-
ing' to a tabulation made by the Bureau of Public Roads,
U. S. Department ~of Commerce.
Activities in the so-called "active program" in Ala-
bama, Florida, Georgiac, Mississippi, Tennessee and the
Carolinas on March 1 embraced an expenditure of $302,-
868,000 in the construction of 5,561.9 miles of highways.
The active" program includes those projects programmed,
those on which plans' have been approved but construction
has not been started, and those on which construction is
under way. -
Expenditures and proposed -expenditures included
$61,907,000 in Alabama; $36,039,000 in Florida; $52,482,-
000 in Geor'gia; $32,472,000 in Mississippi; $48,158,000
in North Carolina; $28,090,000 in South Carolina; and
$43,720,000 in Tennessee.
At the same time, the Bureau reported that in the first
two months of 1953, State highway departments in the area
had awarded contracts totalling $17,036,000.


IRON AND STEEL SCRAP ORDER IS REVOKED


revoked.
OIL.GAS CON'STRUPCTION REGULATIONS EASED
Oil and gas operators in the Soutbeast may now use
any lawfully acquired materials in any construction pro-
ject without first getting authorization from the Petro-
leum Administration for Defense, NPA announced.
The permission wass grnted through Direction 1 to NPa
Order M-46b,- just issued.' It paralleled permission given
other industries through the recent Direction 10 to CMP
Regulation 6.
Order Ml-46b, Section 4, previously .had provided that
with certain specified exceptional "no material may be
used in the petroleum and gas industries unless permis-
siod'ha been granted by PAD. Direction 1 to the Order
now provides that "any material lawfully acquired may
be used for construction in the petroleum and gas in-
dustries without authorization for such use from the
Petroleum Administration for Defense."

845.4 MLL10N PLAhT EXPANSIONS 0.K.'D I
Certificates of necessity calling for rapid tax '
wrriteoffs on $45,488,182 worth of plant and fac-
ility expansion operations in the Southeast, in-'
eluding one for $24,134,500 granted the Rayonier, '
Inc., for the development of white wood pulp at
Brunswick, Ga., were among more recent actions
taken by the Office of Defense Mobilization.
Other large amounts included $8,076,118 to the
South Georgia Natural Gas company, Birmingham,
for a natural gas transmission line; $3,750,000
to the American Can company, Plymouth, Fla., for
production of metal means; and $3,055,921e to the
Gulf,-Mobile and Ohio Railroad company, Mlobile,
for railway transportation improvements.

NICKEL-BEARING STAINLESS STEEL RULE CHANGED
Nickel-bearing stainless steel may no longer be pur-
chased on unrated orders under the open-ending arra~nge-
ment of Direction 20 to CMP Regulation Number 1. Con-
tinued heavy demands for that commodity requiring main-
tenance of controls for use in both civilian and mili-
tary economy caused NPA to amend the direction.
The amendment also establishes June 30, 1953 as the
cut-off date for open-end orders calling for delivery
after that period; includes in the restrictions a foundry
copper and copper-base alloy products or powder mill
products distributor operating under Direction 5 to Order
M-11 not previously mentioned, and records Section 6 (b)
of the direction to permit distributors, except those
of oil-country tubular goods, to ship controlled mpater-
ials to consumers against unrated orders upon acceptance
of the distributor's unrated order by a mill for the
same kind of materials.
USED RALLS, AXLES, WHEELS ORDER REVOKED
Revocation of the order, 5-64, allocating used rail-
road rails, axles and cast. iron wheels was 'announced.


Revocation of the order, M-20,
restricting shipment and consump-
tion of iron and steel scrap hars
been announced by the National
Production Authority.
The action eliminates allocations
and directives covering iron and
steel scrap, and also ends alloy
crap segregation requirements
in force under Direction 1 to Y-10.
NPA said th~e supply of iron and
steel scrap, including alloy scrap,
is now adequate, and that there is
no further need for the controls
contained in; the order and direction


TME


CaT~ionlOC


P I'((11CtiCn



Au1h iC)I 7.


PAGE 2


.BULLETIN OF COMMERCE









~~LI~ I


_ __


Employment continued upward in March with the usual
spring expansion in farm activity and a pre-Easter pickup
ir: trade. Estimated at 61,460,000 in the week ending Mar.
14, total civilian employment was about half a million
higher than in February and 1 3-4 million above the March
1952 level. The totals included th~e self-employed and un-
paid. workers in family-operated enterprises.

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $t1,251 million in March, 4 per cent
above the $1,203 million paid out in the same month a
year ago. The bulk of the dividend rise in March, typical-
ly a heavy payment month, was centered in the nonmanu-
factur~ing industries, where disbursements expanded 9 per
cent in the aggregate.
+ *
Business continued at a high rate into early April
with investment and consumption expenditures strong,
according to a current issue of the Department of Com-
merce publication Survey of Current Business. Peak out-
put had been generally absorbed, with late inventory data
showing little change in business holdings.
9 *+~
Corporate net working capital continued to increase
during 1952 and at the end of the year was estimated at '
$86.5 billion, the Securities and Exchange Commission
reported. Corporations had $4 billion more of net working
capital at the end of the year than at the start of the
year, about the same increase as in 1951. The rate of
growth in 1952 reflected an increase of $9 billion in
current assets and a partly offsetting increase in current
liabilities of $5 billion.
9+ **
Fourth quarter 1952 shipments of the women's, misses'
and juniors' outerwear industries totalled $653 million,
7 per cent above the same quarter in 1951, the Bureau of
the Census reported.


Of Commerce Field 211122*


Expenditures for new construction in March 1953 in-
oreased by 10 per cent to $2.5 billion, rounding out a
record first-quarter total of $7 billion, according to a
joint preliminary estimate of the U. S. Departments of
Commerce and Labor. The January-March total also repre-
sents a first-quarter record for work actually done on
new construction, after allowance for higher costs.
M *
Total wholesalers' sales during February amounted to
an estimated $8,200 minlion, which, on a seasonally ad-
justed basis, wras an increase of 2 per cent over the
corresponding month in 1952. Durable-goods sales amounted
to $2,600 million, and non-durables, $5,600 million.
*
Personal income in February was at an annual rate of
$280.5 billion, which was unchanged from January. The
stability reflected divergent movements in the farm and
nonfarm components. A moderate increase in private non-
agricultural income from Ja~nury to February wass counter-
balanced by a reduction in agricultural income.
*
Total business inventories at the end of February were
estimated at $75.3 billion, which, after allowance for
seasonal variations, was an increase of $350 million. Re-
tailers' stocks increased $200 million; manufacturers
$100 million. Wholesalers' stocks were slightly up.


-7 Mass Spectroscopy in Physics Research, NBBCir.522,
Buckram Bound, $1.75
/ 7 Foreign Government Purchasing Agencies, BIS, World
Trade Series No. 365, 100
S List of Foreign Products Exhibitions in the United
States, BIS, World Trade Series, #370, 10Q
(7Quarterly Financial Report U. S. Retail & Wholesale
Corporations, 3rd Quarter, 1952, Federal Trade Commis-
H an & Securities E change Commission
Radio Frequency Power Measurements, NBS Cir.536, 15#
Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Stand-
ards, $5.50 a Year
P aximum Permissible Amounts of Radiosotopes in the
Human Body and Mlaximum Permissible Concentrations in
Air and Water, NBS Handbook 52, 204
Facts For Industry Reports:
M hetal Cans, December 1952, M75D-122, 504 a Year
Fats & Oils Consumption by Uses, Feb.1953,M17-2-23,
$2 a Year
Mechanical Stokers, Summary for 1952,8518-02,504 Tr.
Superphosphate, Feb. 1953, M19D-23, 506 a Year
Pulp, Paper & Board, Feb.19)53, M14~A-23, $1 a Year
Small Business Aids (Rerun):
SFacts on Sheet Metal Shops, r#167
SWhen Are Transportation Risks "In Transit?n, #r168
Salesmen Services to the Building Products Customer,
#169
Reducing Storage & Materials Handling Costs, #172
A Survey of Diaper Service Practices, #177
Facts About the Auto Accessory, Tire, and Battery
Store, #181
L7 Steps For Reducing Your Distribution Costs, #184
/ Preparing The Tourist Court Income Tax Return, #191
/ 7Facts on Ornamental Metal Shops, #192


PAGE 3


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE


To Obtagg
NETW 13()KS ppC3~ This Material
~3 ~ AD REORTSCheck It In

This 21198
Of Th~e Bulletin gg Commnerce To The Nearest U. S* DeMBE1_
Illny( 9 Commerce Field Office. Your Name And Address
Are On Th Opposit~e Side. Make Remittances For Sales
Material Payable To Treasurer Of The United States.





List), $1 a Year -
Housing Research, 406.-
Trailer Courts Recommended Standards, 15#
190U. S. Census of Housing:
Georgia General Characteristics, H-All, $1.00
Mobile Nonfarm Housing Characteristics, H-894,200
Miami HB91, 200
Charlotte n HB34 20#
Jackson,Mise., n HB71 15#
Atlanta HB17 204
Louisiana Genleral Characteristics, HA18, 55#
O9j U. S. Census of Population:
Hawacurii General Characteristics, P-B52, 300
U. S. Summary General Characteristics, PB1, $1.00
SPetroleum Products, Secondary Inventories and Storage
Capacity, Feb. 28, 1953
JC Houshold Furniture & Bedding Products, 1951 & 1950,

DIainal Br Inau 8f Stna 1slnnual Report, 1952,30





SOUTH'S FURNITURE SHIPMENTS UP $175 jKILLION

ALn increase of nearly $175,000,000 in the value of
shipments of household furniture and bedding products
produced in the South in the 5-year period of 1947 to
1951 is reported by the Bureau of the Censue in a current
Facts For Industry Report entitled Household Furniture
and Bedding Products, 1951 and 1950, just issued.
The current report along with previous reports on the
subject showed that the value of such goods shipped in .
the region in the half decade went from approximately
$477,140,000 in 1947 to $650,046,000 in 1951.

This report is listed in the Order
Blank on Page 3. It's available at any
Department of Commerce field office
fgg 15#.

Bulk of the production has been in the Southsestern
States where in 1951 shipments were valued at $555,848,000
including $8227,662,000 in North Carolina --- one of the
largest furnitu~re-producing States in the United States --
$115,847,000 in Virginia; $48,137,000 in K~entucky; and
$47,618,000 in Georgia,~ the "big four" of the Southeast.
The value of shipments in other States in the South in
1951 included $18,758,000 in South Carolina; $14,196,000
in Alaonaa; $20,426,000 in Maryland; 89,516,000 in Flor-
ida; and $5,rC97,000 in West Virginia.

r SA,TCA PURCHASES IN PROCUREMENT LIST '

'Southeastern world traders who would like to '
sell goods for use abroad, purchase of which '
are financed through the Mutual Security Agency '
and Technical Cooperation Administration will
find U. S. Department of Commerce offices in the '
region a good medium through which to obtain in- a
formation as to what those agencies are in the '
market for. *
aDaily lists of goods the Federal Government is '
buying, received in Commerce Department field '
offices are now including a special section show- '
ing procurement activities financed through MSA '
and TCA for the benefit of business men in the '
Southeast. The lists were recently placed on a '
subscription basis and can now be mailed to those '
wishing them. t


REDUCTION IN CHICK PRODUCTION IS SHOWN

A decline of more than two and a half million in num-
ber of chicks produced by commercial hatcheries in the
Southeast in the first quarter of 1953 as compared with
the corresponding period in 1952 was reported by the
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of
Agriculture, in a report issued recently.

For countyr-wide data on many agricultural
subjects see the 1950 Census of Ag~riculture
now being released in final form. Copies
are available at all Department of Commerce
field offices on a nominal sales basis.

The South Atlantic region, however, continued to lead
all other sections by a wide margin by virtue of rela-
tively heavy production in Georgia, the nation's "champ-
ion" broiler State, Maaryland, Virginia, Delarrare, and
North Carolina.
The figures reflected declines this year in all of
the Southealstern States, except North Carolina, Florida,
and Mlississip3pi. The decreases included approximately
300,000 in Georgia; 500,000 in South Carolina; 800,000
in Maryland; more than a million in Alabama; and nearly
a million in Delaware.


~CONTAINER INDUSTRY HIU'dS IN REGION

More than half a million tons of steel were used
Sin the manufacture of metal cans in the Southeast
Last year, according to a Facts For Industry Re-
'port issued b~y the Bureau of the Census.

See Page 3 for listing of this report.

SIncluded were 469,564 tons consumed in the South
SAtlantic States of Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas
Sand Virginias, Mary~land and Delaware, and 42,747
'tons in Alabama, Mlissiasippi, Tennessee and Ken-
Stuckyr.
'Consumption in the Southeast in 1952 was 183,373'
'tons greater than in 1951.
Mst of the containers shipped in the Southeast
wre' for food packaging purposes.
6wo as-snos1


BC-6-3F


UNIVERSIfY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 9075

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlata Regional Ofcce cCT
716 Forsyth Bldp., O
Atlanta 3, G.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

Volume 7, Nuaber 9 May 1, 1953



SBPULETIN OF COMMERCE
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-..
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENTS OF COMMIYERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIEIA OFFICE REGULARLY.


PENALTY FOR PR UTE USE TO AVOID
UNIV O TOF T0CAGE $300
DOCuU M. O





3.$~. DEPOlSSITORY


Ut3IVERSITY OF FLORIDA



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


























e 9- 7 e 4 x. e -4


VOL. 7. NO. 10__ _

SOUTHEAST'S STATE DEBT 3/4 BILLION DO)LLARS


WHOLESALE SALES ]REFLECT UPWARD TREND

Sales of wholesale dealers in the Southeast were up
from 4 to 5 per cent La the first quarter of 1953 as com-
pared with the corresponding period in 1952, according
to the Monthly Wholesale Trade Report of the Bureau of
the Census.

The rise included a I per cent gain in the South At-
lantic States of Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas and Vir-
ginias, Delaware and Maryland, and a 5 per cent advance
in Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky, compris-
ing the East South Central section.

This Monthly W~holesale Trade Report
is available on a subscription basis
of $1 a year. Order it on Page 3.

The report credited sharp increases in sales in such
fields as electrical goods, lumber and building materials,
refrigeration equipment, and drugs and sundries as factors
in the overall gains.

The wholesale trade picture in the region took a sub-
stantial upward trend in March with rises of 10 and 11
per cent, respectively, in the two areas over the same
month last year due to heavy demands for electrical goods,
furniture and house furnishings, hardware, refrigeration
equipment, surgical and medical equipment and supplies,
dry goods, some grocery lines, and paper and its products.

Inventories increased slightly at the end of March.
In the South Atlantic section they were reported as 2
per cent above those at the end of February and in the
East South Central they were 3 per cent greater.


+ ELEVEN "COOPERATIVE" OFFICES FUNCTIONING
*
w Ten local Chambers of Commerce and one State agri-+
+ cultural and industrial agency in the Southeast are+
+ now serving as "cooperative offices" of the United
+ States Department of Commerce in supplying local
+ business men with business data, published aids andw
w other assistance.
+ The Chambers of Commerce include those in Birming-
+ ham and Montgomery, Alabama; Key West and Tampa,
F'lorida; Augusta, Brunswick and Valdosta, Georgia;
9 Greenville and Sumter, South Carolina; and Nash-
ville, Tennessee. The State agency is the Mississ-
9 ippi Agricultural and Industrial Board in Jackson.


epndlle- This included ob-
ci 9' ligations of $20,-
reveme883,000 in the col-
LarE umn of Georgia,
earndlwr which is constitu-
roma tionally prohibited
an from:pfrm having a State
debt. Its debt was
'assumed to be that
Source: Bureau of the Census 'of certain of its
State agencies. The Bureau defines a debt" as nall long-
term credit obligations of the State and its agencies
whether backed by the State'sa full faith and credit or
nonguaranteed, and all interest-bearing short-term credit
obligations."

This report is entitled Summary~ of State
Government Finances in 1952, and is avail-
able at any Department of Commerce field
office for_15C. See Page 3 for odeig. _

Six of the seven southeastern States -- Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee --
were able to operate in the ablackn during the year, but
the seventh, North Carolina, not only spent $49,672,000
more than it took in, but concluded the year with some 37
per cent of the total debt of the region, which approximated
$718,596,000.

$42.3 MLILLION PAID FOR BETTER FAR'dlNG

The Federal Government last year spent $42,304,000 in
the Southeast to encourage better farming practices, accord-
ing to a U. S. Department of Agriculture report.
Alabama, with a total of $8,286,000, led the region in
total payments followed closely by Georgia with $7,589,000.
The others included North Carolina, $6,790,000; South Caro-
lina, $3,497,000; Tennessee, $6,766,000; and Mississippi,
$5,739,000.
A total of $97,206,000 was paid in the South as a whole,
which led all other regions.


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111

Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,


Memphis, Tenn.,
229 Federail Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S. C.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. WA-kl21,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771


Miami, Fla.,
91;7 Seybold Bldg.,
T l 75 3


Mobile, Ala.,
308J Federal Bldg.,
Tl236 1 E 206 ~


MLAY 15. 1957


Starte governments
in the Southeast
WOund up the fiscal
year 1951-52 with a
total indebtedness
of nearly three-
fourths of a bil-
lion dollars, ac-
cording to a report
issued by the Bur-
eau of the Census.


Fig. 1.--SELECTED TOTALS OF
STATE GOVERNMlENT FINANCES, 1952 AND 1951
sinlions of oonars
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14
Genlera .
revenue .iii:::.-.::.; q :.j:.:.:eg..:. .:.; ..:

evenatr~e :::::ppy;:iiiiijii~:;::::-:ppy:;: : :

avenue -


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





NICK(EL-BEARING STAINLESS STEEL PLA~N EVOLVED

--The National Production ALuthority
THE :ihas completed procedures governing
the use and distribution of nickel-
Nationalbearing stainless steel in the third
CLEC)RCL) quarter of 1953.


SOUTHEAST FEDERAL INCOME: $4.2 BILLION IN 1952

Federal internal revenue collections from all sources
in the Southeast in 1952 totalled $4,297,048,832, a 21.5
per cent rise over the $3,535,938,442 collected in 1951,
according to the annual report of the U. 8. Bureau of
Internal Revenue.

South Carolina, with a 32.7 per cent increase in 1952
over 1951 led the other southeastern States in percentage
gain in the two years, and Georgia wass second with an ad-
vance of 26.4 per cent, North Carolina had the largest
dollar increase, $258,475,500, or from $1,358,812,013 to
$1,617,287,513, 19 per cent, and again Georgia was the
runnerup with a rise of $145,359,963, or from $550,460,-
159 to $695,820,122.

For comprehensive financial reports by
States see the Bureau of the Census
summaries issued annually and available
at all Department of Commerce offices.

Other increases in the region, with percentage change,
included Alabama, from $330,238,889 in 1951 to $403,980,-
977, or 22.3 per cent; Florida, $514,006,932 to $b637,-
885,066, 24.1 per cent; Mississippi, $125,418,646 to
$143,942,672, 14.8 per cent; South Carolina, $214,717,-
149 to $284,886,401, 32.7 per cent; and Tennessee, $442,-
284,654 to $513,246,081, 16.1 per cent,
The dollar increase for the region as a whole in 1952
over 1951 totalled $761,110,390.

'BOOKLET FOR PROSPECTIVE MANUFACTURERS *

'Southeastern business men planning: to enter the '
manufacturing field will be interested in a new '
booklet just issued by the Small Defense Plants a
Administration entitled "One Hundred and Fifty I
Questions for a Prospective Manufacturer" It is I
available at any Department of Commerce field a
office for 204. I
SThe booklet is a complete revision of a aimeo-'
graphed pamphlet issued by the Office of Small '
Business, U. S. Department of Commerce called a
"100 Questions for a Prospective Manufacturer. I


FARM INCOME IN SOUTHEAST SHARPLY REDUCED

Southeastern farmers experienced a reduction of $31,-
693,000 in cash farm income in the first two months of
1953 as compared with the corresponding two months of
last year, according to a current U. S. Department of
Agriculture report.

The decrease ranged from a loss of $3,668,000 in
Alabama to $18,564,000 in Georgia, with only two States
in the area, Tennessee and Missiasippi, pointing to a rise
in cash returns. In Tennessee, it amounted to $3,503,000
and in Mississippi, $4,237,000.

In North Carolina, the decline totalled $6,100,000)
South Carolina, $6,452,000; and Florida, $7,649,000.

The reduction was shared by both of the principal
classes of commodities, livestock and its products and
crop products. Returns from livestock and its products
were $)13,709,000 lower, dropping from $183,140,000 to
$169,431,000, and receipts from crop products went from
$248,809,000 to $227,825,000, a decline of $20,984,000.


Under Direction 1 to DMS Reg. 1, procedures for ob-
taining nickel-bearing stainless steel were simplified
for manufacturers of B-products. Most manufacturers will
be able to self-authorize orders for their third quarter
requirements of nickel-bearing stainless steel without
application to NPA.

Peginning with the fourth quarter of this year, no
priorities assistance will be given for the acquisition
of nickel-bearing stainless steel for purely civilian
uses, NPA officials said. Allotment authority will then
be limited to military and atomic energy programs. General
allocation and use of nickel products will be continued
under Order Y-80 as long as necessary.

OTHER ACTION TAKEN ON N~ICKEL-BEARING
Distributors of steel products will be permitted to
deliver nickel-bearing stainless steel to other distribu-
tors without requiring authorized controlled material
orders under an amendment to Schedule 3 of Order M-68
just announced. The action recognized a general business
practice in the steel warehouse industry.

PLATINUM
Controls over the sale, purchase, delivery, receipt,
inventory and use of platinum except for defense rated
orders was announced by NPA with the revocation of Order
M6-54. The action supported current NPA policy of removing
or relaxing controls whenever supply exceeds military and
atomic energy requirements by a substantial margin.

INVENTORY CONTROL MEASURES REVOKED
Revocation of NPA Regulation Number 1 and CMP Regulation
Number 2, effective April 30, 1953, which were NPA'sa prin-
cipal inventory control measures, was announced. H~ence-
forth, it was explained, specific inventory limitations
needed to assure defense requirements will be provided in
individual orders governing the use of particular mater-
ials and products in short supply.

COBAL~T
Removal of a prohibition on certain uses of cobalt
salt and compound made from resides not suitable for
metallurgical applications was announced. An amendment to
Schedule 2 of Order M~-80 dealing with alloy materials and
alloy products, permits the use of such cobalt salts and
compounds in coloring glazes, glass batches, porcelain
enamels, ceramic body stained, porcelain enamel color
oxides, glase batch colors, paint or plastic pigments.
The amendment also permits use of these and other forms
in paint driers for use in exterior house paints only.


Direction 1 to Defense Materials
System Regulation Number 1 on Pro-
duction, and Direction 1 to DMS
Regulation Number 2 on Construction
were issued supplementing Direction
1 to CMP Regulation Number I and
Direction 11 to CKP Regulation 6,
which validated third quarter au-
thority to purchase nickel-bearing


The edutio in eorialargst n te ara, as lso Relaxation of the controls wcas made possible by a recent
the fourth greatest for the United States. ices niprso oatslaadcmons


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


A E)(11Clc)t o



11%}1(rity


stainless steel.







I


. 1


r/ 'Moisture and Durability of Wood-Frame Walls, 154

J7ar olndPlyw~od d4eportarter 1952, M113A-4-2, 104, 504





rCotton SysYe rSpinning Activity, Marehal9ear Y15-3,

57Iron and Steel Foundries and Steel Ingot Producers -
Report on Products Shipped and Materials Used,
January 1953, M210-13, 104, $~1.25 a Year
u a~lrrOMETHIN OLDr AuN ~um~~~


//17behydration of Green Beana,PB108331, Microfilmn,$1.25,
Photostat, $1.25
/ / Role of Pectin in Dehydrated Foods, PB108329, Micro-
film, $;2, Photostat, $3.75


For Further
Details of Any
Of These Items
a Get In Touch
With Ig Nearr-
eat U. S. De-
partment of Connerce Field Office.





Mortgage and short-ters indebtedness of individuals
amounts to $82 billion as compared with $24 billion at
the end of World War II, the Office of Business Econo-
nics, U. S. Department of Commerce reported. The increase
in 1952 was $10 billion, reflecting a combination of
several important developments, namely, increasing sup-
plies of automobiles and other consumer durable goode
usually purchased "on time," a well-maintained high
volume of new housing, and the suspension of credit con-
trols.
*
Sales at all retail stores in Marda amounted to $13.9
billion, about 9 per cent above a year ago. In general,
sales eased only slightly from the record February rates,
after adjustment for seasonal factors and trading day
differences. March sales were down about 1 per cent from
February but still higher than in any other month.
*
Expenditures for new construction in April increased
by 8 per cent to $;2.6 billion, and were 5 per cent above
April 1952, according to preliminary eatinates of the
Departments of Commerce and Labor. Private outlays of
$1,801 million in April represented an increase of 5 per
cent from March.


Preliminary figures indicate that the output of sweat-
ers and dollar shipments of knit outerwear during 1952
was 13 per cent higher than in 1951, the Bureau of the
Census reported. No general trend was apparent in either
the age-sex groupings or fiber content of the sweaters
produced by selected firms.
*
Manufacturers' sales in Mlarch continued high, while
Aiventories and new orders declined slightly. Sales of
all manufacturers aggregated $26.7 billion and were at
about the same seasonally adjusted rate as in February.
Billings of both durable and nondurable-goods producers
were at rates about equal to those of the previous month.
S+ *
Individuals in the United States during 1952 saved
more in liquid form than in any year since the end of the
war, according to estimates of the Securities and Exchange
Commission. Liquid savings in 1952 totalled $14.6 billion
compared with $11.8 billion in 1951, the previous peak in
the post-war period.
+ *
An average of 14.2 million pounds of yarn per week
was produced on the woolen and worated system, an increase
of 10 per cent over the January figure and 7 per cent
above production in February 1952, according to the Census
Bureau.
w +
Steel production in January of this year was at an
all-time high and required the melting of a record quan-
tity of ferrous materials, according to the Bureau of
Mines, U. S. Department of Interior. The quantities used
in steel-making furnaces were 4,870,476 gross tons of
scrap, a new high, and 5,094,356 gross tons of pig iron
for a total melt of 9,964,832 tons. The melt consisted of
49 per cent scrap and 51 per cent pig iron.


1)(()K diPRT The Spcc !I t T

Provided Ag



taces Fo ales Material Payable to Treasurer of the



unayof State Government Finances in 1952, 15
othly Wholesale Trade Report, $1 a Year
ne Hundred and Fifty Questions for a Prospective
Manufacturer, 20#
HZighway Statistics, 1951, 60#
/ Monthly Report on the Labor Force, March 1953, 10#
1950 U. S. Census of Housing: (Nonfarm Housing Character-
istics)
J7Greenville, 8. C., Standard Metropolitan Area,
HB-63, 150
S7irmingham Standard Metropolitan Area, H-B25, 200
LLublic Employment in January 1953, 54
S/rea and Industrial Development Publications, No. 22,
Economic Outlook After Peak of Defense Expenditures,
Business Information Service, 20#
/7Export Control Twenty-Second Quarterly Report of the
Secretary of Commerce, 15#
f7 Fire Tests of Steel Columns Encased WAith GYPaumI Lath
and Plaster, National Bureau of Standards, 15#
? A Method of Mixing Silicate Cement, NBS Color Sound
Film, $40.31
17 Hydraulic Research in the U. S., NlBS UP205, $1


Wl~llaUVY ~LID SOMETHING HER +
G7 governments in the United States in 1952, a

rP~ Iopose Commercial Standard on Body
Measurements For Sizing of WAomen'sa Pat- +
terns & Apparel
Your Shop Location, SBA#193
t3Selecting & Training Mlanufacturers' Sales- +
men, SBA#1r94
A/7 The Best Type of Building For An Apparel
Factory, SBA#195
rj House-to-Hiouse Selling Credit Hindrance
or H~elp? SBA#19l6
217 26 Pointers to Help You in Merchandising
Cigars, SBA197


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3







PAGE 4 BULLET@ 26 84896


GAS TAX RATES IN SOUTHEAST MOSTLY STATIC

Only twoe southeastern States, North and South Carolina,
have changed their gas tax rates for motorists in the past
20 years, the annual summary of highway statistics, issued
by the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department of Com-
merce, shows.

In 1932, North Carolina and South Carolina each had a
tax of 6 cents a gallon, and by 1952 the rate had been
advanced to 7 cents. In Alabama, the rate was at first
5 cents in 1932 and then was increased to 6 cents where
it remained throughout the 20-year period. Florida has
had a 7-cent rate over the 20 years. In Georgia, it was
6 cents until 1949 when it wsas raised to 7 cents. Miss-
issippi had a 5 cent rate in 1932, raised it to 6 cents
that year, and continued a 6-cent rate until 1950 when
it wvas "upped" to 7 cents. Tennessee, like Florida, bas
not deviated from a 7-cent rate in the entire 20 years.

Copies of this report, entitled Highway
Statistics, 1951, which is replete with
statistical data on highways and motor
vehicle operations, are available at any
Department of Commerce field office for 600.

The figures presented in the report also show that in
1951 there were 95,133 publicly-owned vehicles plying the
streets and highways of the region, including 11,778 in
Alabama; 15,809 in Florida; 10,607 in Georgia; 7,586 in
Mississippi; 20,730 in North Carolina; 10,759 in South
Carol~ia; and 17,864 in Tennessee.

There has been a gradual increase in number of gallons
of taxed motor fuel in recent years. In 1951, for instance,
there wore 4,898,979,000 gallons, an increase of L57,628,-
000 gallons over 1950, in the ?State area.

In 1951, highway users paid a total of $181,310,000
in motor vehicle excise taxes in the region. This included
$b22,825,000 in Alabama; $30,898,000 in Florida; $31,388,-
300 in Georgia; $16,931,000 in Mississippi; $35,655,000
in North Carolina; $17,648,000 in South Carolina; and
$b25',965,000 in Tennessee.

The report is the seventh of an annual series.
evo as3ssay,


GOVERNMENT PURCHASING IN REGION $172 MILLION

The Federal Government in April bought goods and ser-
vices in the Southeast valued at more than $40 million,
bringing cumulative purchases in the region for the cur-
rent year to nearly $172 million, according to day-to-
day lists of contract awards received in Department of
Commerce field offices for small business firms.

Purchases in April, reported on a formally advertised
and negotiated unclassified basis, included an award of
$3,308,388 in Florida for ammunition containers; multiple
million dollar contracts in Georgia for construction work
at various military installations; and similar amounts
and activities in South Carolina and Tennessee, with an
$8.9 million award in the latter State for additional
operation of the Holston Ordnance Works.

These lists are available for inspection
purposes only at Commerce Department field
offices. They can be obtained on a mail
basis at subscription rates of $7 a year
and $4 for six months.

By States in April the purchases totalled $81,669,903
in Alabama; $4,805,992e in Florida; $9,746,538 in Georgia;
$293,626 in Mississippi; $5,983,149 in South Carolina;
and $17,703,073 in Tennessee.
By States, the cumulative totals for the year were
Alabama, $39,427,784; Florida, $37,956,388; Georgia,
$30,896,477; Missiasippi, $2,679,399; South Carolina,
$12,323,484; and Tennessee, $48,418,232.

Other buying in the area in A~pril included textiles,
wood manufactures, food products, magazine subscriptions,
paints, fire protection, and a variety of other goods and
services.

INDUSTRY EXPANSIONS CONTINUINGr IN AREA

Approval for the broadening of production of titanium
in Tennessee and wood pulp in Georgia, and to develop
electric power in Walker county, Alabama was given by the
Office of Defense MYobilization in Washington with the
issuance of a series of certificates of necessity for tax
amortization purposes in the Southeast. The titanium cer-
tificate, issued to the Cramet, Inc., was for $625,740,500.


PENALTY FOR


PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
OF~ POSTAGE $300
(GPO)


"WNErHSITY OF FLORID)A
LEROY L. QUAILS
DEVARTlSWeK OF ECONOMICS
GAiNE~~SVILLE, FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oftice O
716 Forsyth Bldg., 5
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 10 May 15, 1953



-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMIYERCE
FIED OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.










UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








Atlanta, Ga., Birmningham, Ala., Charleston, 8. C., Jacksonville, F'la., bdemphis, Tenn.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 F'ederal Bldg.,
Tel. N~-41;21,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426

Miarmi, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Savannah, Ga.,
947 Seybold LBldg., 308 Federal BLdg., 218 fP. O. Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 TLel. 2-3641, Ex. 2506 Tel. 2-4755

VOL. 7. NO. 11 JUNE 1, 1953


$1.6 BILLION SPENT IN FACILITY EXPaNSIONS


F'ARU MORTGIAGE DELUT IN SUUTHEAST HALF BILLION


PERCENT OFA41.FARMS WITH MORTGAGE
FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1930-1950
PERCENT o

1950
1945
1940
1935
1930


Source: Bureau of the Census
1950 Census of Agriculture.


This report is entitled 1950 Farm-Mrlpgtage
Debt Cooperative Report. It is available at
any Department of Commerce field office. See
Page 3 for ordering*

The report placed the mortgage indebtedness of farmers
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas at r1549,539,000.

Although in the 10-year period of 19lc0 to 1950, the
region' s agriculturists were able to take some 219,300
farms from under the mortgage yoke, yet the mortgage debt
itself rose about i#18,541,000 during the decade or from a
total of 4530,998,000 in 191t0 to )549,539,000 in 1950s
coating the farmers an annual total of 926,739,000 in
interest to maintain*

The mortgage debt rose in three States, Georgia, Florida
and Mississippi in the 10-year period while declining
slightly in the other four.

SHIARP RiSE IN irETAIL TRADE SIOIIN IN REG10N

One of the sharpest advances in retail trade since
World Wlar II was experienced by merchants in the Southeast
in the first quarter of 1953, the Monthly Hetail Trade
Report of the Bureau of the Census showed*

Sales in the 3-month period of this year advanced from
1 per cent in Savannah to as high as 19 per cent in John-
son City, Tenn., as compared with the first quarter of 1952.
Birmingham registered a rise of 15 per cent; atlanta, 13
per cent; Kingaport, Tenn., 14 per cent; Maeon, Ga., and
Asheville, N. C., 11 per cent; Bristol, Tenn., 10 per cent;
and Greenwood, S. C., 9 per cent. Only Columbus, Ga., re-
ported a decline, 3 per cent*


Nearly a billion dollars was spent in the Southeast
in the establishment of new industries and expansion of
old ones from the beginning of the K~orean war through
April of this year, according to a summary prepared by
the Atlanta regional office of the U. S. Department of
Commerce .

The expansion operations were reflected in lists of
certificates of necessity issued by the Defense Product-
ion Administration and its successor the Office of Defense
Mobilization calling for rapid Federal tax writeoffs to
encourage the production of strategic materials and com-
ponents needed in prosecution of the military preparedness
programs .

The summary showed that altogether 91,663,876,733
was and is being spent in all forms of expansion and in-
provement operations, including not only industrial, but
for transportation, pipeline, storage, and electric util-
ity purposes.

A total of 8933,297,967 went into the establishment of
new industries and expansion of those in operation; 8350,-
949,305 in improvements to electric utilities; Y202,476,-
702 for broadening pipe line and storage facilities; and
extension of the transportation system by rail, air and
water involved an expenditure of $177,152,759.

A total of nearly 800 certificates of necessity was
issued in the process.

REGION NEEDS $1.3 BILLIlON IN SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION

The six southeastern States of Alabama, Florida, Geor-
gia, Mississippi, North Carolina and Tennessee need
91,308,000,000 worth of new school construction to meet
their present requirements, according to a tabulation of
the U. S. Office of Education contained in a current
issue of the Construction and Building Materials Industry
Report issued by the U. S. Department of Commnerce.

This report, issued on a monthly basis, is
available at all Department of Commerce field
offices on a subscription basis of $2.50 a lear.

The estimate placed the needs in Alabama at 11269,000,-
000; Florida, 9191,000,000; Georgia, 9218,000,000; M~isa-
issippi, 9127,000,000; North Carolina, 9309,000,000; and
Tennessee, $194,000,000.

The six States in 1952 let school contracts estimated
at $85,000,000.


Farmers in
the South-
east have a
mOrtgage in-
debtedness
of more than
half a bil-
lion dollars
according to
a report of
the Bu a
of the Cen-
sus prepared
from its





OVERH 6 MILLION OUT-MIGRATE FROM SOUTHEALST

The Southeast has lost a total of 6,163,285 native-
born persons to other States through out-migrations to
other sections of the country, according to a series of
special reports prepared by the Bureau of the Census in
W~ashington. Heaviest loser was Georgia from which 1,189,-
185 native-born have gone to every State in the nation
and the District of Columbia,

Reports on the population and population
characteristic for all States for 1950 have
been receivelin Commerce Department field
offices, and for nearly all States on detailed
characteristics*

The State to hold on to its native-born more than any
other in the region was Florida. That State lost only
326,160 persons to other States.

Other heavy "losers" in the Southeast were Tennessee
with a total of 1,050,145, and Alabama, with 1,032,250.

Another relatively light loser was South Carolina
where only 717,835 native-born chose other climes. North
Carolina lost 900,435, and M~ississippi, 947,275.

'REGION HAS HAL~F KILLION MILES OF KIGHIWAYS

Motorists in the Southeast now have a total of '
nearly half g ~milion. miles to travel around on
just -iI ~the-ir own region. --e
This is another fact taken from the 1951 issue '}
of "Highway Statistics" of the Bureau of Public '
Roads now available at Department of Commerce '
'\field offices. Price 60#. '
Que total existing mileage in Alabama, Florida,'
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and -the Carolinas'
is 475,020 miles, some 58 per cent of which was *
surfaced. Georgia led in total highway mileage, *
i but was lowest in surfaced mileage, with only 32 '
per cent of its 97,087 giles in that category. '
Tennessee was highest in surfaced mileage, with '
83 per cent of its 69,715 miles in thnat class. '

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 2ND IN BEEF CATTLE

The South Atlantic States of Florida, Georgia, the
Carolinas and Virginias, Mlaryland and Delaware were
second in the nation in rate of increase in beef cattle
population in the past 6 years, according to figures con-
piled by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture,
A 51 per cent gain was registered in the region, in-
cluding 97 per cent in North Carolina; 96 per cent in
South Carolina; 46 per cent in Georgia; and 36 per cent
in Florida.

Facts and figures on many agricultural
operations are contained in the 1950 Census
of Agrienlture reports now being released
through Department of Commerce field offices
by the Bureau of the census,

The beef cattle population in the area, including
calves, went from 2,474,000 in 1948 to 3,734,000 this
year. Florida led in numbers with a rise of from 1,010,-
000 to 1,376,000, and Georgia was the runnerup with an
increase of from 507,000 to 741,000. Other increases were
from 109,000 to 214,000 in South Carolina, and 149,000
to 294,000 in North Carolina,
Regionally, the greatest rate of increase, 72.9 per
cent was in the East North Central section,


NPA GETS RE~ADY FOR DEFENSE MLATERIALS SYSTEM

Getting ready for the new
Defense Materials System
program when the fiscal
year 1954 begins July 1 of
this year ---provided Con-
gress acts favorably on the
materials conservation fea-
ture of the Defense Product-
ion Act --- the National
Production Authority has
isuda series of direct-
onamendments and so
orhdesigned to bring
certain strategic products
into conformity with the prospective procedure. They in-
cluded the following:
NYICKrL
To assure continued conservation of critical supplies
of nickel, NPA revised its list of items in which its use
is prohibited, adding approximately 40 more groups to
Schedule A of Order M-80. A separate prohibited list for
permanent magnets containing nickel for special applica-
tions such as pinball machines, and so forth, also was
added to Schedule A. In this list an exception is made of
permanent magnets made from high contaminated scrap.

ALUR~6INUM
Basic rules for regulating production and distribution
of aluminum controlled materials under the DMS were an-
ouced through the .issuance of Order M-5A. The new order
cobie in one document the activities previously control-
Ldby Order Y-5, which is applicable to primary aluminum
proucesindependent fabricators, and smelters; and
f,)rder M-8 which now controls operations affecting alumi-
mmdistributors .

COPPERI AND COPP8K BASE ALLOYS
Percentages of copper and copper-base alloy products
reurdto be set aside by producers under the DMS for
every of military and atomic energy orders during and
after the third quarter of 1953 were announced with the
issuance of Order MY-11A. The new orders, applicable to
orders for copper and copper-base alloy products for
delivery after June 30, 1953 for defense programs identi-
fied by the symbols A, B, C, D), and E, will supersede
order Y-11, which will continue under the Controlled
Materials Plan until that date, embracing in its scope
both civilian and defense mobilization requirements.

IRON AND STEEL
Order M-1A was issued continuing government control on
carbon, nickel-bearing stainless, and alloy steel products
after June 30, 1953 only to assure production and delivery
for direct military and atomic energy applications. The
new order requires producers and further converters to
reserve space on the mills for authorized controlled mater-
ial orders bearing the symbols A, B, C, D, and E and a
digit. Superseding Order M-1, the new order provides no
control or program assistance for civilian production and
construction during the third and subsequent quarters of
1953.

CONSTRucTION MACHINERYrEQUIPMENT
The amount of construction machinery and equipment
that will be reserved for defense rated orders after June
30, 1953 was reduced from 50 to 35 per cent of base
perloo proauction.
CRUTSHING BORT.DIAMIOND POWDLER
Order M-102 establishing control over crushing bort,
diamond powder or dust, and unreelaimed diamond material
was revoked.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE










PAGE 3


_ I


L7 U. s. Manufacturing Corporations, Ath Quarter 1952,
Quarterly Financial Report, Federal Trade Commission
& Securities & Exchange Commission
L7Fire Resistance of Concrete Floors, NBS Materials &
Structures Report 134, 154
C7Service-Weight Cast-Iron Soil Pipe & Fittings Con-
mercial Standard 188-53, A Recorded Voluntary Standard
of the Trade 254
L7Properties of Cavity Walls, NBS Building Materials &
Structures report 136, 154

SOMETHING OLD AND SOMETHING NEW
i JHuman Relations in Small Industry, SDPA Small'
Business Management Series No. 3, 254
~Protective Display Lighting of Historical
S Documents, NBS Circular 538, 154
eServices of the Service Wholesaler, SBl98
F iring & K~eeping: Bank Employees, SBAl99
ase Study Fountain Service, Bakery & D~eli-
catessen Departments Added to a Frozen Food
'Store, SBA 200
r]Case Study Factors in the Success of a Whole- '
a sale Automobile Accessory Concern Based on
:o Service to Its Dealers, 8BA 201
SThis Furniture Store nMajors in Musion Howr a
Furniture Store Built Up Its Sales of Records,
SBA203

Facts For Industry Reports:
/7 Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Products, Summary
for 1952, M26D-02, 104, 504 Year
/7 Plumbing Fixtures, Summary for 1952CI551-02,104,504
a Year
/7Glass Containers, 1952 Summary31M770-02,100,81 Year
S7 Aluminum & Magnesium Wrought Products, 1952 Summary,
104, $1 Year, M24-1-02


The gross national product -- the market value of the
nation' s output of goods and services -- in the first
quarter of 1953 was at an annual rate of $361 billion,
which compared with 8359 billion in the preceding quarter.
Outstanding: was the $84 billion increase in flow of goods
to final use -- consumers, fixed investment, and govern-
ment.

Employment remained relatively unchanged between March
and April, as a post-Easter drop in trade offset gains in
other sectors of the economy. Total civilian employment,
estimated at 61,228,000 in the week ending April 11 was
much the same as in March but stood about a million higher
than a year earlier.

Profits of manufacturing corporations after taxes in
1952 were estimated at $10.7 billion, or 10 per cent lower
than in 1951, according to a joint report of the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission and Federal Trade Commission.
Profits before taxes declined 16 per cent in 1952 compared
with 1951.

March production of all types of knit cotton and wool
underwear and nightwear, except men' s and boys' drawers,
was higher than output both in March 1952 and February
1953, the Bureau of the Census reported. Dollar shipments
of $21.8 million were 14 per cent and 9 per cent more than
shipments in March of last year and February of this year.

Cotton innings for the crop 1952 totalled 14,950,999
running bales, the Census Bureau reported. The figures
were 1,892 running bales greater than the preliminary
figures issued March 20. Innings for the 1952 crop were
equivalent to 15,135,950 bales of 500 pounds each. The gin-
nings in running bales included Alabama, 897,125; Georgia,
732,100; Mississippi, 1,859,364; South Carolina, 670,972.


Total business inventories at the end of March of this
year were estimated at 876.6 billion. After allowance for
seasonal variations, the book value increased 3200 million
during that month. Manufacturers redneed their stocks $100
million from the end of F'ebruary, wholesalers' holdings
were up slightly, and retailers stocks increased more than
%200 million.

Personal income in March, at an annual rate of $282)
billion, was $1)C billion higher than in february. The
latest rise brought the total of personal income in the
first quarter of 1953 to 281 1-3 billion at an annual rate.
This was 84 billion, or 1 1-2 per cent higher than in the
final quarter of last year, and 7 per cent above 1952's
first quarter.

Total wholesalers' sales in March were estimated at
88,960 million, which, on a seasonally-adjusted basis, was
slightly above the previous month. Sale by durable-goods
dealers amounted to )2,910 million and 86,050 million by
nondurable-goods dealers.

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $561 million in April, 4 per cent
above the $540 million paid out in the same month a year
ago. The rise centered in the nonmanufacturing sector.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


FOR FURTHER DE-
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITEMS GET
IN TOUCH WI1TH TIE
NEAREST U. S. DE-
PARTMENT 0 190M-


MERCE FIELD OFFICE


-- B O S d CKECK[ THE MA~T-
filifER1AL, DESIRED IN

Iq5 ANDl ItfPODITS THIE SPACE PROVID-
Iit (47 ED AND SEND THIS
PORTION OF TIE
BULLETIN OFCOb-
MERCE TO THE NEAiiEST U. S. DEPARTMENTS OF COMMrERCE OFFICE*
YOUIR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THIE OPPOSITE SIDE. KLAKE RE-
KITTANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE
UNITED STATES*


Technical Aids for Small Business, SDPA #23 Titanium
Income of Persons in the U.S., 1951,P-60,li11, 150
_/Petroleum Products Secondary Inventories & Storage
Capacity, March 31, 1953
1950 census of Agriculture:
19l50 Farm-Uortgage Debt, Vol. V, Part 8, 30#
special orts Farms and Farm Characteristice by
Economic R~ions, V.V-pt.10, 50#
Governmfte/k the United States in 1952, 30#
S. Census of Population Florida, P-C10,
Detailed Characteristics, $1.00
i_ 1950 U. S. Census of Housing, Mlontgomery, Ala., Stand.
Metropolitan Area, Nonfarm Housing Characteristics,
a-s95, 204
Catalog of U. S. Census Publications, 1952, 35#
A Survey to Improve the Utilization of Wool in Navy
Fabrics, OTS, PB111096, 94.50
Cleaning & Degreasing Practices, OTS,PB99724, 254
Machining of Plastics, PB 100861, Parts I & II,25e each
_/Fresh Fruite & Vegetables Storing & Packaging for
Market, PB 106469, 75#
SU Mnfcui Croain 3 uat 15 Technical Progress in the Feather Industry,PB11090,500
Quarterly Financial Report, Federal Trade Commission &
Securities Exchange Commission





REGION 2ND LARGEST IN OUTPUT OF STEE~L PRODUCTS

The Southeast last year was the second largest region-
al producer of gray iron, malleable iron, and steel cast-
ings and ingots in the nation, according to a survey con-
ducted by tse Bureau of the Census reflected in a current
Facts For Industry Report.
The combined areas of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mliss-
issippi, Tennessee, K~entucky, the Carolinas and Virginias,
Maryland and Delaware turned out 14,549,631 short tons of
the steel and iron products, taking second place to the
heavy steel producing area of Pennsylvania, New York and
New Jersey, the Middle Atlantic section, where 34,959,160
tons were produced,

This F'acts For Indqstry Report is entitled
"Iron and Steel Castings and Steel Ingots,
Summary for 1952" and is available at any
Departmeqt of Coqqerge field office.

Included in the Southeast'sa total were 8,358,980 tons
produced in the South Atlantic area of Florida, Georgia,
the Carolinas and Virginias, M~aryland and Delaware, and
6, 190,651 tone in the East South Central section of
Alabama, Tennessee, dlississippi and Kentuckry.

GOVERNMENTAL UNITS IN AREA RUN HIGt

The Southeast last year had 4,290 governmental units,
including 3,766 local governments of which 616 were in
counties, 2,213 in municipalities, and 935 in speelal
districts, according to a report issued by the Bureau
of the Census.

The title of this report is "Governments
in the United States in 1952" and is avail-
able at all Department of Commerce field
offices for 30#. See Page 3 for ordering.

By States, the totals included 548 in Alabama; 617 in
Florida; 976 in Georgia; 693 in Mississippi; 608 in North
Carolina; 413 in South Carolina; and 435 in Tennessee.

The Census Bureau defines a governmental unit as up
organized entity having governmental attributes and suf-
ficient discretion in the management of its own affairs
sordiseginu sa itoa ese avetemenrmlthni~dinistrative


DEc;LINE IN EXP~URTS,IMPtOnTS EXPERIENCED IN S. E.

The Southeast observed "World Trade Week" May 17 to
23 by eyeing an overall decline of 15.9 and 9.3 per cent,
respectively, in the value of exports and imports passing
through its ports in the first two months of 1953 as com-
pared with the corresponding period in 1952.
A tabulation compiled in the Atlanta regional office
,of the U. 8. Department of Commerce credited only Mobile
with an upward trend -- sharp increases in both cate-
gories -- and Florida with a rise in value of imports.

Ask the nearest Department of Commerce field
office to be placed on the mailing list to
receive the biweekly lorld Trade News issued
by the several field offices in the Southeast.
It'sa both comprehensive and informative, and
is available without cost.

Otherwise, South Carolina experienced a decline of 43
per cent in exports and 14 per cent in imports; Georgia,
a 60 per cent drop in goods to other countries, and 22.7
per cent in imports; Florida, a reduction of Lb per cent
in exports; and North Carolina with a slight drop in
exports, but a 73 per cent fall in imports.

Mobile's increase in value of exports was 76 per cent,
and a slightly less gain in Laports wras recorded.

'SOUTHIEAS'l~TERNRS "SWEET TOOTH" INACTIVE

'The "sweet tooth" of southeasterners was nothing to'
brag about in the first quarter of 1953, and sales
of manufacturers of confectionery products in
Georgia and Florida were up only 1 per cent over '
the same period last year, while those in other sec- '
tions of the South atlantic region were almost
stationary, while in the remainder of the Southeast, '
Alabama, Missiasippi, Tennessee and K~entucky they
were down 1 per cent, the Bureau of the Censue said. '
In another report, the Bureau said distilled
spirits sales in two southeastern states, Georgia
and South Carolina, declined in the same period,
a with two others, Florida and Tennessee experiencing
increases. Wine sales were off in Tennessee, but up
in the other States.
GP oes- s4 sel


UI VEnl~nnnlnIllm 111r1 reu nivn111111


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Fonrsth Bldl.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLUME 7, NUMBER 11 JUNE 1, 1953



BILLETHI OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NIFFE OF YOUR DEPARTMYENTI OF COMMlYERCE
FlIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORIMTION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMVENT O POSTAGE $300

UNNV OF FL. UBI. a)


L).S. DEP ORY



unvenarrr or econna


LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECON011ICS
GA'INESVILLE, FLORIDA








UNIT D STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE








Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, 8. G., Jacksonville, )'la., Memphis, Tenn.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., 8gt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WnA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Exr.355 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426

Miami, F'la., Mobile, Ala., Savannah, Ga.,
947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal bldg., 218 P. O. B~ldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641, Ex. 206 Tel. 2-4755

VOLUME 7. NUMBER 12 JUNEL If, 1953


SOUTHEASTERN CITY PAYROLL~S $200 MILLION
CITY EMIPLOYMLENT
MK)MH OF OCITNMER, 1940-1952 It cost 111
sig southeastern cit-
M~ON7LEYRLL nealnearly $200
MONTLY PYROLS mllio inpay-
Aroll expenses to
operate last year,
3001 1 I I Iaccording to a re-
I I I Iport of the Bur-
I ~ ~ ~ .u e ~~~~ au of the Census
zoo ----- -----just issued.
tTheere it en-
I~ ployment in 1952,"
too showed that 72,-
591 employees on
sonschootpayrolla owncitn

o Adlabama, Florida,
1940 '42. '44 '46 '48 '50 *52 Georgia, Y188188-

and the Carolinas drew $16,603,300 in Oippberoennessee
year60which, on a 12-month basis would approximate $199,-

This report is available at any Department
of Commerce field office for 254. See Page
3 for convenience in ordering.

The figures did not include employment in the schools
but were restricted to general government operations.
The best paid city workers on the basis of the report
seemed to be in Florida where the monthly average was
$243. Next best were in Georgia where an average of $233
was paid, and Tennessee was a close third with $231. In
Alabama and North Carolina, the monthly average was $216
La South Carolina it was 9212, and in Mlississippi, $192.

BIOTOR VEHICLE KFE(l8TaWTIONS UP 76 PER CENT

Motor vehicle registrations in the Southeast have in-
ereased 76 per cent during the post-war period with three
State --- Florida, Georgia and North Carolina -- now
in the million vehicle class, according to figures com-
piled by the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department of
Commerce .
Last year, registrations in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee an'd the Carolinas totalled 6,292 '
936 as compared with 3,578,847 in 1946 "
Gains of from 61 per cent in Yississippi to as high
as 94 per cent in Florida have taken place, the figures
showed. Alabama registered a 77 per cent rise; Georgias
75 per cent; North Carolina, 68 per cent; South Carolina,
72 per cent, and Tennessee, 75 per cent.


SBANK DESPOSITS IN REGION $12.2 BILLION

Residents of the Southeast at the beginning of this
year had on deposit in all operating banks a total of
$12,262,513,000, or more than twice the $5,160,100,000
carried in banks 10 years ago, according to a report of
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in Washington.

The total deposits in banks in Alabasa, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas with\
the start of 1953 represented an average of $573 for
every man, woman and child in the region. The 1953 per
capital deposits more than doubled the $280 per capite
carried in savings bank in 1942, a study of previous
reports showed.

Included in the deposits in the region at the beg~in-~
ning of this year were 89,923,553,000 in checking so-
counts and $2,338,960,000 in savings.

Florida led in total deposited at the start of the
year in the region with $2,471,776,000. Tennessee was
second with $2,298,929,000, and North Carolina third with
$2,boi,3 $000,,000 T ohr r~ieies eorgi$91 2206 000 00;1
South Carolina, 8841,183,000.

GOODS,8ERVICES BOUGHT IN REGION $187 KlILLION

Goods and services valued at $187,121,300 were bought
by the Federal Government on a formally advertised and
negotiated unclassified basis in the Southeast during
the first five months of 1953, according to a capitula-
tion of daily lists of contract awards received in U. S.
Department of Commerce field offices.

These lists are for consultation by anall
business men interested in obtaining sub-
contracts. They are also available on a
subscription basis of $7 a Year and $4 for
Six Months.

A total of 485 contracts was awarded in Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mlississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee
in the purchase of textiles, food products, wood manu-
factures, ammunition supplies and other products, and in
the execution of construction operations.

The value of purchases included $44,137,167 in Ala-
bama; $42,645,403 in Florida; $33,400,243 in Georgia;
$3,067,481 in Yississippig $12,648,088 in South Carolina;
and $51,323,005 in Tennessee. purchases for the 5-month
period included contracts awarded in May totalling
$15,419,623. Eighty-four contracts were awarded in the
region during that month.


GPO all~oonan








I


WHOjLESALE: SALES CONTINUE THEIR ADVANCE

Wholesale sales continued to advance in the Southeast
in the first 4 months of 1953, according to the monthly
report of the Bureau of the Censue.

Sales in the South Atlantic region were up 4 per cent
as compared with the corresponding period in 1952, and 6
per cent in the East South Central section.


NPA RE~VOKES ORDER ON ASBESTOS FIBRE

r Of particular interest
~-;~EPrr~i'': to the textile industry of
.the southeast wras the ac-
-:i tron of the National Pro-
: auction Authority in re-
;, .vorking Order M-96 removing
U'~ all restrictions on the

~EE~ .~ chrysotile asbestos fibre.


The report reflected sharp gains in such products as
electrical supplies and appliances, furniture and house
furnishings, lumber and building materials, refrigeration
equipment, surgical and medical supplies and equipment,
and some foods.

The uptrend followed a general pattern cut for the
nation as a whiole in which increases of 10 per cent came
in the Mountain region; 8 per cent in the Pacific Zone,
5 per cent in the New England and East and West South
Central sections; and 6 per cent in the Middle Atlantic
and West North Central areas for an average advance of 6
per cent in the United States as a whole.


BIRMNGRAM OFFICE TO BE CLOSED JUNE 30 '

'Announcement has been made that the Birmingham dis- '
trict office of the U. 8. Department of Commerce will '
be closed June 30. The closing is due to a sharp cur- '
tailment of activity under the National Production '
Authority materials conservation program, and a re- '
duction in appropriation for operation of the district *
offices. '
aThe Birmingham office was opened in late 1950 when *
the NPA program first got under way. Almost simultan- '
cously nine other district offices were established '
over the Southeast all of which now have been closed. '


RcEGION IS HIGH IN STEEL IRON PRODUCTION

The Southeast last year was the second largest regional
producer of gray iron, malleable iron and steel castings
and ingots in the United States, according to a Bureau of
the Census Facts For Industry Report.

The combined areas of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas, Virginias, Maryland,
Delaware and Kentucky turned out 14,549,631 short tons of
the steel and iron products, taking second place to the
heavy steel producing area of Pennsylvania, New York and
New Jersey, the Middle Atlantic section where 34,959,160
tone were produced.

These F'acts For Industry Reportp are avail-
able at all Department of Commerce field of-
fices at nominal cost. They are issued for
many industries. See Page 3 Order Blank.

Included in the Southeast's total were 8,358,980 tone
produced in the South Atlantic area of Florida, Georgia,
the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland and Delaware, and
6,190,651 tons in the East South Central section of Ala-
bama, Tennessee, Mississippi and Kentucky.

Total production in the South represented about 13 per
cent of the output of 110,135,488 tons produced in the
nation as a whole.


OTHER REST'EuCTIONS RELAXED
Continuing its plans for adjusting the materials con-
servation program in operation for the past two and a
half years to the new Defense Materials System expected
to be instituted Judy 1, 1953, WBH' has acted to revoke
and relax restrictions on other commodities. Here are
some of them:
Electric Utilities
amendment Number 2 to Order hi-50 was issued removing
inventory restrictions on controlled materials for
electric utilities.
Basic Priorities Rules
Direction 3 to Regulation Number 2
was issued identifying certain products for which non-
military ratings could not be applies or extended to
obtain preferential delivery, and this direction was
revoked.
Crvolite
Government controls over distribution, inventory, and
quarterly reporting of cryolite, a substance used chiefly
in production of primary aluminum, were eliminated with
the revocation of Order M-99.
Copper Controlled Materials
Revocation of Order M-11 under which producers of
copper controlled materials accepted and scheduled
authorized controlled materials orders in accordance
with the Controlled Materials Plan was announced effective
at midnight June 30, 1953.
Surplus Controlled Materials
NPA eased its rules to permit the sale and use of
surplus controlled materials, except nickel-bearing stain-
less steel, on unrated orders and without charging allot-
ment authority.
Copper.Brass Mill Products
Orders M-86 and M-82 providing for control of distri-
bution of copper wire mill products and brass mill prod-
ucts to distributors were revoked.
Non-Military MRO
Revocation of Controlled Materials Plan Regulations
5 and 7 and Orders M-78 and M-87 relieving business firms
of record-keeping requirements, including Maintenance,
Repair and Operating quotas, beginning July 1, wass issued.
Communications
Materials and priority assistance for the nation'sa
operating communications industry and for amateur and
Civil Air Patrol radio stations will end July 1 as a result
of revocation by NPA of Orders M-77 and Y-85.
Consu~mer urbl God
Two orders, Ml-47A and M-47B, affecting use of control-
led materials for consumer durable goods will be revoked
July I when CM6P expires, NPA announced.

NICKEL
Allocation of nickel will be on a monthly basia instead
of quarterly commencing in July as a result of action taken
by NPA in amendments to Direction I and M-80 Schedules.


This Monthly Wholesale Trade Report is
available at any Department of Commerce
field office on a subscription basis of
$1 a year.


TIhe action wras in line
w~ith NPA's policy of re-
laxlng or removing con-
trols whenever the supply


situation appears sufficient.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





______ ____


U_ Industrial Wastes Practices, Proceedings of the' 5th
National Public Health Engineering Conference, Universi
of Florida, May 20 and 21, 1952, 60 pages, PB108136
SHeat Resistant Laninating Rtesins, PB 108757, $2.25
F Eruit and Vegetable Storage and Pre-Packaging, PB
106469, 754
Facts For industry Reports:
7 Iron & Steel Castings & Steel Ingots, Summary for
1 2, M21-1-02, 104, $1 a Year
N onferrous castings, Summary for 1952, M24E-02, 104,
$1 a year
/ r ans, Blowers & Unit Heaters, Summary for 1952,
Y31E-02, 104, 504 a year
Superphosphate, Summary for 1952, Y19D-02,10Q,$1 Ir.
Flour Milling Products, 116A-02, Summary for 1952,
10#, $1 a year

I BURIETLLLNG OLD AND SOMLETHING NEWR ,
I D' Qu~;a;rtemasht~er R~ese arch on own ad Feathers
Sand Other Filling Materials for Sleeping Baga, I
S OTS PB111104, $4
r Minerals Yearbook, 1950, $4.50
a State Distribution of Public Employment in
S 1952. G-GES2-No. 7, 201
Case Study Forms of Insurance Carried by a I
( Retail Grocery Store (Case A), 8BA #1205
si/ Opportunities in the Retail Tobacco Business
I SBA #1206
IL Modern Lighting for Hardware Retailera,SBA#207(
aU Retail Florist Builds Up Business By Partick- (
I ntion in Local Affairs, SBA#208
rU case study Promotion and Advertising in a
I children'sa Ready-to Wear Store, SBA #r209


Corporations offered $2.1 billion of new securities
in the first quarter of 1953, the same amount as offered
in the Forresponding quarter of last year, the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission reported. It compared with
$2.4 billion in the fourth quarter of 1952. The amount
of new issues in recent periods, comparable in volume
to the large-seale financing of the late twenties, re-
flects the continued high level of expansion of business
facilities, the report added.

Net profits of trade corporations, retail and merchant
wholesale, in 1952, amounted to $2.5 billion after taxes
and 5B4.8 billion before taxes, the Federal Trade Commissio
and Securities and Exchange Connission announced in a
joint report, The 1952 sales of retail trade corporations
were estimated at 877.5 billion; profits after taxes at
%1.4 billion. Wholesale trade corporations had sales of
$72.8 billion and profits after taxes of 51.1 billion.

Total wholesalers' sales in April were estimated at
$8,500 million, which, on a seasonally adjusted basia,
was a decline of 4 per cent from the previous month.
April sale by durable-goods dealers amounted to $3,000
million; those by nondurable-goods dealers totalled
b5,500 million.

Employment moved upward only slightly in Mlay as the
spring expansion in out-door work was slowed in many
parts of the country by unfavorable weather, the Bureau
of the Census reported. Estimated at 61,658,000 in the
week ending May 8, civilian employment was about 400,000
higher than in April.

Production of cotton broad woven goods totalled 2,609
million linear yards during the first quarter 1953, an
increase of 3 per cent over fourth quarter production
and 10 per cent above the corresponding period last year,
according to a Bureau of the Census survey.


r~-~-NEW OOKSCHECK( THE HALT-
SERIAL DESIRED IN
AN0 ftE:P()IlS THE SPACE PROVID.
,ED AND SEND THIIS
PORTION OF TIE
BULLETIN OF COM-
YERCE TO THE NEAREST UJ. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMIERCE OFFICE.
YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. KAKE RE-
IITTNC ES OR SALES KATERLAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE
UNITED STATES.

f City Employment in 1952, G-GE52-#6, 25#
1950 U. S. Census of Population, Mississippi>
Detailed Characteristics, P-c24, 454
L)'1950 census of Agriculture, Special Reports, Irri-
gation 1950, a Graphic Summary, A Cooperative Report,
V.V-pt. 7, 35#
a Canned Food Report, April 1, 1953, Distributors
Stocks of Canned Vegetables, F'ruits & Juices
U Monthly Report on the Labor Force, May 1953,
SSeries P-57, No. 131, 10#
U Production & Consumption of Selected Textile Items,
Industry 236, MI5A-1-3
Receipts and Classes of Post Offices, 1952, 754
U. 6. Retail and Wholesale Corporations, Quarterly
Financial Repore., 4th Quarter 1952, Federal Trade
Commission and Securities & Exchange Commission
Office of Technical Services Reports:
U Symposia on Materials & Design for Lightweight
Construction, The Titanium Seninary, 95 pages, PB1l1083
$250 o
SMetal Working Machine Tools, PB106466, 904


OPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


av FOR FUlRTHER DEF,
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESEE ITEKS GET
kmmm.........------- == TOC A I H TE
PARTd(ENT 01 C08-
KERCE FIELD OFFICE



Manufacturers' deliveries in April increased over
the March rate on a seasonally adjusted basia and in-
ventory book values rose slightly. April sales by mranu-
facturers, estimated at $26.4 billion, were $3.5 billion
over the year-ago total. After seasonal adjustment,
deliveries were 5 per cent higher than in the previous
month with both durable and nondurable-goods shipments
expanding at about the same rate.

Personal income in April wras unchanged from the
March annual rate of $283 billion. The stability re-
sulted from mall and approximately offsetting movements
of farm and nonfarm income. Nonfarm income, which has
advanced steadily since mid-1952 rose lightly again in
April as farm income declined.

Total business inventories at the end of April
amounted to $77 billion. During the month, inventories
rose about $100 million, with an increase in durable-
goods' stocks more than offsetting a less-than-seasonal
decline in nondurable goods.

New construction expenditures rose 10 per cent during
May to $2.9 billion, and were 6 per cent above May 1952,
a joint report of the Departments of Commerce and Labor
showed. Although most of the April-May rise occurred on
private residential construction and road building, ad-
verse weather kept that type of work from rising as
much as usural~





| IRoATION INTO U~THEAST HAS BEeN HEAVY
A total of 1,734,715 residents of other Statee who
liked the Southeast as a place in which to live have
taken up their residence in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Misasisippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas, according to
a special report prepared by the Bureau of the Census
from its 1950 census of population.

Into Alabama went 110,755; Florida, 747,665; Georgia
150,2253 Mississippi, 122,930; Porth Carol'ina, 223,7601
South Carolina, 69,030; and Tennessee, 310,350.

These' data are not in the regular reports
from the 1950 Consus of Population, but those
reports do contain much interesting informa-
tion on population characteristics. They are
gow available by States,
Ai total of 2,054,815 southeastern residents shifted
around in the States in their own region. Alabam~a re-
ceived 232,530; Florida, 650,230; Georgia, 324,270; Miss-
issippi, 102,970; North Carolina, 251,480; South Caro-
lina, 166,960; and Tennessee, 326,375.
At the ease time, while these shift swere going on,
the seven southeastern States were able to retain a total
of 16,736,450 persons born within their own boundaries.
Of this number, 2,684,750 AClabanians remained in Allabama;
Florida held on to 1,202,100 of its native-born; Georgia,
2,920,700; Missiasippi, 1,927,680; North Carolina, 3,530,-
075; South Carolina, 1,852,230; aind Tennessee, 2,618,915.
In the shiftsr that have taken place from States oub-
side the Southeast into the Southeast, the heaviest con-
tributor was eew York, which sent a total of 184,215
persons into this region to live. Next in numerical order
was Virginia, which lost 174,195 to the Southeast, and
the third largest was Pennsylvania, which gave up 140,660.

Other large in-sigrations into the Southeast were
27,935 from Galifornaia Illinois, 101,905; Indiana,
&64635; Kentuckyr, 131,285; Louisiana, 78,700; New Jersey,
60,760; Massachusetts, 53,010; Michigan, 62,265; Yissouri,
56,870; Ohio, 120,660; Tease, 74,245; ALrkansas, 82,425;
and West Virginia, 42,215.
sros r- soso a


TEXTILE FIRS INlVITED INTO EXPAN81UN PROGRAM
The Of~fice of Defense Mobilisation has invited textile
manufacturers in the Southeast to participate in a facil-
ity expansion program calling~ for the reclamation and re-
habilitation of damaged military canvas products.

The program, to be carried out through the issuance of
certificates of necessity for rapid Federal tax writeoff
purposes, calls for completion of the facilities by June
1, 1956 with an annual capacity equivalent to 5 million
linear yards of canvas products.

The expansion goal calls for facilities to be used in
restoring to a practically new condition worn military
canvas and duck products, such as tarpaulina, track our-
tains, and gun and tank covers, thus reducing military
requirements for new cotton duck and eff'ecting a substan-
tial saving in procurement costs.

015 has announced the granting of a
series of certificates of necessity call-
ing for expansion operations in five
southeastern States to cost nearly a sil-
lion dollars. They included a $780,000
project at Pascagoula, Miss., to improve
the inland waterways transportation sys-
eeq qf the A, V. W. Boats. her
Production of cotton duck last year totalled approxi-
mately 365,652,000 linear yards, of which a large quanti-
ty was produced in the Southeast.
It was emphasized that participation in the proposed
expansion program would involve heavy and expansive
equipment, as well as specialized treating and processing
facilities. The following operations would be involved:

Thorough cleaning to remove previous impregnation,
dirt, oil, paint and any other materials foreign to new
untreated canvas.

Repair of the product, including replacement of all
ropes, worn eyelets, worn leather fittings, windows, re-
panelling to replace all torn or worn areas, restitching
at all seams and a~ny other necessary repairs.
Reimpregnation of canvas with original type of improg-
nation to render it waterproof and so forth,


I


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PArYMENT OF: POSTAGE: $300


BCd~JF


srnlllflllllilflflllYlfnI lIl( ilil
31262 08748l 9356
BULLETIN OF commrns.


PAGE 4


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Offace 8ps D
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLUME 7, HUMBER 12 JUNVE 15, 1953



- BILLETAW OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMd~ERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMdATIOY.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE RECULARY.T.


UNIVERSITY OF FLOIRIDA
LBROY t. QUlALLS
DEPARTBJENTr OF ECONOMIC
GAINESVILLZE, FLORIDA



























VOLUME 7. NUMBER 13 JUY 9


BUSINESS TRENDS UP IN SOUTHEAST IN 1ST QUARTEy
I"OU*DanY"n A general
corTN csulmpnced uptrend in
so maymmonbusiness con-
tinued in the
Southeast in
r I hh Ithe first
y ~quarter of
no I1 71 11953, accord-
ing to the
s s !s '''''' regular quar-
terly summary
of business conditions in the region issued by the
Atlanta regional office of the U. S. Department of Con-
merce.

These reports are issued each quarter and
are available gratin at any ]Department of
Commerce field office in the Southeast. See
the order blank on Page 3 for requesting
single _copies.

The report, a composite word picture of reports from
various government agencies and private sources showed
among other things that the upward movement as compared
with the first quarter of 1952 was pronounced in most
major segments of the region's economy, with financial
transactions, over-the-counter trading, construction,
employment, and transportation particularly feeling the
effects of "good times."

Federal Reserve Banks in Atlanta, Richmond and St.
Louis reported a rise of 6.7 per cent in debits in 50
major cities in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas, and a 5 per cent gain in
deposits and 15 per cent in loans in most of the area.
Retail trade skyrocketed from 1 to 19 per cent, depart-
ment store trade went from 1 to 26 per cent in 28 cit-
ies, and wholesale trade advanced 4 and 5 per cent.
Gains in manufacturing employment, telephones, urban
construction, electric energy, and rail and air trans-
portation also came.

1952' COUNTY ANID CITY DATA BOOK

Statistical information for each of the South-
Seast's 616 counties, for each of its 28 cities ,
of 25,000 or more population, and for each of a
its 26 abandard metropolitan areas are presented a
i in the 1952 edition of the Cognty and City Data ,
Book just published by the Bureau of the Census a
and available at all Department of Commerce field a
offices. The Price is $4.25 buckram bound. *


REGION LEADS EASTERN U.S. IN LUMBE;R OUTPUT

Nearly 50 per cent of the lumber produced in the
eastern half of the United States in 1951 came from the
southeastern States, according to a Facts For Indusagg
report issued by the Bureau of the Census.

Of a total production of 18,312,641,000 board feet
produced in eastern United States, 4,363,153,000 ease
from the South Atlantie States and 4,310,893,000 from the
East Gulf States, the report shows.

These reports are available at all field
offices of the Department of Commerce at non~-
inal prices. See Page 3 for listing.

Moreover, four southeastern Statse --- Alabama, Geor-
gia and the Carolinas --- were the principal producers in
the Southeast, with Georgia leading all with an output of
2,177,193,000 feet. Alabama produced 1,540,921,000 feet,
North Carolina, 2,022,050,000, and South Carolina, 912,-
829,000.

Relatively heavy production was also recorded in the
Lower Mississippi States of Mississippi, Arkansas, Okla-
homa, Louisiana and Texas, the total output in that area
approximating 4,118,494,000 feet. This included a product-
ion of 1,188,611,000 feet in Missiasippig 1,051,019,000
in Arkansas and Oklahoma; 1,032,352,000 in Texas; and
846,512,000 in Louisiana.

_CASH FARI INCOME CONTINUES OFF IN AREA
Southeastern farmers took a reduction of $57,889,000
in cash income in the first four months of 1953 as com-
pared with the same period last year, according to a
current report of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.

The decline was from $816,961,000 to $759,072,000,
with all of the southeastern States sharing in the re-
duction, except Missiasippi and Florida.

Keep in touch with Department of Commerce
field offices for latest reports from the
1950 Consus of Aarigulture.

The reduction in Georgia was largest for the region,
both in volume and rate of decrease. Misesisippi's in-
orease was 8.5 per cent, or from $b94,369,000 to $102,-
429 000, but Florida'sa gain was nominal, from $208,824,000
to $~210,721,000, less than one per cent.
Regionwise, the biggest decrease was in crops, returns
from those products going from $449,797,000 to $406,541,-
300, but livestock also took a cut of $14,633,000.


M~IAK1P,.FLP .,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


ATLA~NTA, GA.,
7th FI*or,Fersyth Bldg.,
Tel, WA-4121,Ex.453


CHARLESTON, S. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 2-7771


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


MEMbPHIS, TENN.,
229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 8-31+26


MOBILE, ALA.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641, Ex. 206


SAVANNAH, GA.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE




Ars~ ~ nnnr-&n i








I


DEEgNggEg LAIRBL S SYSTE REPAES ggQME_1 AUTEBAST

Southeastern businessmen onJuly
THE 1 began to adjust their requirements
for "controlled materials" --
steel, copper and aluminum -- A
Nertionalthe Federal Government'sa newn mater-
ials conservation program, the
nDefense M~aterials System," which
P~odu tion came into operation at that time.
WAith the advent of "DMS," the
"Controlled Materials Plan,n which
has been in effect since the middle
Auth rity of 1951 ceased to exit.
SEssentially, "DMS" will confine
itself to seeing that there is
channelled into the program of nat-
ional defense sufficient quantities of scarce strategic
materials to assure an uninterrupted and unhampered pro-
duction of goods for that purpose, as well as the carry-
ing out of construction operations for defense.

Both controls and program assistance are being re-
moved from civilian production and construction beginning
with the third quarter of 1953. Under CKP, the government
had been allocating all steel, copper and aluminum not
only for defense purposes, but also for the entire civil-
ian economy. Under DMS, the government steps out of the
civilian aide of the materials control picture.

CONFORMANCE TO NEW PROCEDURE CONTINUES
The National Production Authority continued its
actions to bring about conformance with the new program
which have characterized NIPA'sa operations recently. Here
are the more important:
Iron and 8teel
Iron and Steel Order Y-1, Direction 5 to Order M-1,
and steel distributor Order Mr-6a, and Schedules 1, 2, 3,
4 and 5 to M-6A, regulating production and use, acceptance
of certain orders, and distribution of iron and steel
products under the Controlled Materials Plan were revoked
effective July 1, 1953.
Power and Electric Equipment
Controls over production and delivery of power and
electric equipment were removed through revocation of
Order Y-44 in line with NPA policy to remove controls
no longer needed to meet military and Atomic Energy
Commission requirements.
Aluminum
Revocation of Orders M-5, Y-84, and M-88 were revoked
because thaey have been superseded by Order Y-5A under
which aluminum production, use and distribution will be
regulated under the new program.
M~etalworking Equipment
Controls over the use and distribution of used and
imported metalworking equipment were revoked through the
cancellation of Order M1-101.
Defense Contract Laboratories
NPA announced that priorities assistance will be con-
tinued for defense contract laboratories, but withdrawn
for all other laboratories. To carry this plan out, Dir-
ection 3 to DMS Reg. 1 was issued, while Order M-71,
temnting the broader system in effect ainee June 26,
1951 was revoked.
Nickel-Bearing Stainless
Use of nickel-bearing stainless steel by manufacturers
ofpaper, paper board and pulp machinery and equipment in
prouctonof parts intentionally in contact with corroe-
ive products is being permitted by an amendment to Sched-
leA of Order M1-80 just issued.
Electrical.Electronies
Order 1i-17 wra amended removing percentage limitations
on ertinelectrical products.


U. S. STEPS UP PURCHASES OF CHICKEN-FEATHER BAGS

The Federal Government has stepped up purchases of
comforter sleeping bags made of cotton filled with chick-
en feathers, instead of waterfowl feathers, giving great-
er impetus to a potential southeastern industry, and now
the Office of Technical Services of the U. S. Department
of Commerce is offering a report on the subject.

Following upon an announcement made by the New York
Quartermaster Procurement Agency of the awarding of con-
tracts for a large number of sleeping bags made with
obicken feathers, the Commerce Department'sa Office of
Technical Services is offering a report entitled nQuar-
termaster Researcb on Down and Feathers and Other Filling
materials for Sleeping Bags," which relates how technical
progress has been made to develop the feathers as a fill-
ing material for the bags.

This report is available at all ]Department
of Commerce field offices at a price of $4.
It' s listed on Page 3.

The report, among other things, tells how World War II
brought on the problem of providing equipment to enable
the individual soldier to sleep out in the open, in
arctic cold. Consequently, sleeping bags were produced in
the largest amounts at any time in history.

nThe best material to fill the bag with so as to
provide the greatest warath, highest resilience, and
lowest cost was feathers and down from water fowl,n
the report added. "But the supply of these feathers was
much below the need, so the Army Quartermaster Corps
developed better methods of testing feathers, improving
techniques for processing feathers, and chicken feather
substitutes for waterfowl feathers."

Significance of the iPeport to the Southeast is
reflected by the fact that this region is one of the
largest broiler-producing sections in the country.

817.811 ON PUBLIC PAYROLLS IN SOU 4 EST

There were 817,811 persons on public payrolls in the
Southeast last year, but nearly three-fourths were emI-
ployed by State and local governments, according to a
report issued by the Bureau of the Census.

The report also showed that it eoet Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas an
estimated $)1,351,339,200 in State and local payrolls. The
total paid to Federal workers was not immediately avail-
able.


This report is entitled "State Distribu-
tion of Public Employment in 1952" and is
available at all Department of Commerce
field offices in the Southeast for 206.


Nearly half of the State and local employees, however,
were engaged in educational work.

State workers numbered 190,661, local employees, 362,-
060, and Federal civilian workers, 265,090. Those employed
in educational wrork totalled 261,505.

A large part of the employees wrere in defense work, but
the exact number was not known.

North Carolina had more State and local employees than
any other southeastern State, 102,663, and its monthly
payroll of $23,1467,100 was the largest.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





_____


4 )Economic Indicators, Prepared for the Joint Committee
on the Economic Report by the Office of the Economic Ad-
viser to the President, June 1953,~ ol. hog
L7 Weights and Measures Case Refe eBokThoh
July 1952 Court Decisions, NIB8 Cir. 540,41.25 Buckram
M ap of U. S., ]Population Distribution, Urban and
Rural, 1950, 359

'o SOMTHING oLD, AND SOMETHINrG NEW~re
:o Committee to Secretary of Commerce
SEducational Order Trial On 10.5 Ounce
'Shrink Resistant WAool Flannel Shirting,
:o PB 111105, 754
SImproving Wholesaler'sa Displays of
'o Fluorescent Lighting, SBA#210
SCase Study Merchandising Cooked Frosen
SFoods, SBA211
'Sporting Goods Rental Service, SBA212
What Glese Blocks Can Do For You,SBA213
SCase Study-Use of Market Yeasurement in
'Plan~ning Introduction of a New Product,
I SBA2~1,

Facts For Industry.Reports:
~7Gloves and Mittens, 1952, M67D-02, 10#
SIron & Steel Foundries & Steel Ingot Producers,
Report on Products Shipped and Materials Used,
March 1953, lo#, $1 a Year
Aluminum Products, July 1951-Dec.1952JK24-2-02,101
Pulp, Paper & Board, April 1953,,MMAL-43, 104,$)1 Yr.
fSynthetic Broad Woven Goods, let Quar.1953,
MY150-1-3, loC, 504 Year
'K nit Underwear & NightwearApr.1953 $i670-43,104,
$1 a Year


Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $222 million in May, or 6 per cent
below the $235 million paid out in the same month a year
ago. The decline in May, one of the months in which
relatively few corporations pay dividends, centered in
manufacturing, where disbursements fell 14 per cent.

April 1953 cuttings of all types of men'sa apparel
registered sharp increases over April 1952 levels but
were generally below cuttings of March of this year, the
Bureau of the Cenous reported. Mlen's regular-weight anit
cuttings averaged 294,300 anite per week during April,
69 per cent more than in April 1952; summer-we'ight ent-
tings of 149,700 muits were a fourth more than the
April 1952 average.

Foreign countries were able to raise their gold and
dollar assets by about $750 million through first-
quarter transactions with the United States. During the
corresponding period last year, they had to draw on their
gold and dollar reserves by more than $400 million. For
the 12-month period ended in March, the total increase
of foreign gold and dollar assets through transactions
with the U. S. amounted to over $2.3 billion.

More than two-thirds of the $1.8 billion grose foreign
aid extended by the U. S. Government in the first quarter
of 1953 comprised military aid, which was a continuation
of the trend which began before the Korean invasion. For
the second consecutive quarter, military aid exceeded
economic and technical assistance.

Sales of retail stores in the United States in April
were 7 per cent higher than in the same month last year
according to the Monthly Retail Trade Report of the
Bureau of the Census. The dollar volume in April 1953
was estimated at ~LLh~~n


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


~FOR FURTHER Eg-
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITERS GET
IN TOUCH WIlTH THE
NEAREST U. S. DE-
PARTMENT OF COM-
RCE FIELD OFFICE



Tenants of nonfarm rental housing paid nearly $10
billion in rent last year, or an average of $530 per
dwelling unit, the Office of Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerce, reported after a survey. It
was estimated that about one-fourth of the total re-
mained as net return to landlords after payment of
taxes and other expenses.

Foreign countries received about one billion dollars
from American travelers in 1952, of whidr amount $~822
million was spent in those countries and $;175 million
was paid to foreign ships and planes for fare, U. S.
international carriers also collected $180 million in
fares from American travelers.

Business purchases of new equipment more than
doubled between 1946 and 1952, according to the June
issue of the Department of Commerce publication 839005'
of Current Business. During the period 1942-52, pur-
chase's totalled about $145 billion. In the same period
total discards of producers' durable equipment were
about $67 billion in current dollars.

Total U. S. production of miscellaneous chemicals in
1952 was 15,786 million pounds, a decrease of 5 per
cent from the 16,613 million in 1951, the U. 8. Tariff
Commission reported.


KEI


NEW BOOI(SCHECK( THE MIAT
NICTV Il()()KS AL silD1EIElD IN

BULLETIN OF -C) 1--
)@0C 2 T THE NEAREST U. 8. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OFFICE.
YOUR NAMLE AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDIE MAKE RE-
M ETT NCES O SALES YATERAL PB~bLg 2Q TREASURER OF Tgg



/ 7 Quarterly Summary of Business Conditions in the
8 utheast, First Quarter of 1953
S1952 County and City Data Book, $4.25, Buckram
SLumber Production & Mill Stocks, Summary for 1951*
Facts For Industry, 13G-01, 100
Q7 uartermlaster Research on Down and Feathere and
0 ~er Filling Materials For Sleeping Bags,PBl11104,$4
~CState Distribution of Public Employment in 1952,204
M monthly Retail Trade Report, (Place on Mailing
List), 1
[2Paers Offered by the Chaplain, Rev. Peter aha
a Daily Senate Sessions, 300
SJury Duty For Women, 5
1 P0 U. 8. Censan of Population:
/1eorgia Detailed Characteristice, P,-C11, 65#
S/ennessee Detailed Characteristics, P-C42, $1
SRorth Carolina Detailed Characteriatecs, P-C33,600
1.2i Census of Agriculture:
/ Lhe United States Irrigation of Agricultural
Lands, $6.00
/7Age, Residence, Years on Para, Work off Farm,
G eral Report, V. 11-Ch.11, $1
M monthly Report on Labor Force, May 1953,P-57131Q







1


REGION SEES CONTINUED RISE IN RETAIL SALES
Cumulative retail sales were up sharply in the South-
east in the first four months of 1953 as compared with
the corresponding period last year, including gains of
14 per cent in Birmringham, 10 per cent in Atlanta, and
19 per cent in Johnson CityJ, Tenn., according to the
Monthly Retail Trade Repqrt of the Bureau of the Census.

Other advances were 10 per cent in Macon; 15 per cent |
in Kingaport, Tenn; 12 per cent in Bristol; 13 per cent
in Asheville; 8 per cent in Gulfport; 6 per cent in Green i
wood, S. CI 3 per cent in Savannah, and 2 per cent in
Biloxi and Augusta.


R(EGIONAL OUTPUT OF BOIES.SHOOK UP*0 (pRS DOp

The Southeast was the only region in the country
showing an increase in the production of wooden boxes
and abook in the first quarter of 1953 over the same
period last year, according to the 88th Quarterly Report
of the Lumber Survey Committee meade to the Secretary of
Commerce.

Production in the region for the 1953 period was
19,051,142 board feet compared with 17,831,883 feet at
the same time last year, a 7.1 per cent rise. In the
South as a whole, however, a drop of 50 per cent was
reported .

This report is available gratis. It's listed
qn Page 3 for ordering,

Other regions in the country showed proportionate
declines.

As for the lumber situation as a whole in the first
quarter of this year, the Committee said overall demand
held up well in relation to supply, although there was
considerable variation among different sizes and grades
exf the several species. For some items an active demand
resulted in a rather tight supply while others moved more
slowly.

Favorable weather at the beginning of the year con-
tributed to the production of an estimated 9,198 million
feet in the first quarter, 8 per cent above the similar
period in 1952 and the highest first quarter output since
quarterly figures were compiled. Shipments were slightly
above production, bringing a 2 per cent decline in gross
milstooks .


In only one city, Columbus, Ga., was a downward trend
reflected, 2 per cent, and in Clarkadale, Miss., the sit-
Suntion was unchanged.

Sharp rises in sale of motor vehicle dealers and 121
apparel were factors in the increase in the larger cities.

In the United States as a whole, an 8 per cent gain
wras registered for the four-month period.


CONTROLS CONTINUE ON IRDN RTEEL SCRAPE_100MHS

Stringent controls over the export of iron and '
steel scrap from continental United States will '
'be continued for the remainder of 1953, the De- '
apartmentt of Commerce has announced. '
S Some carefully controlled shipments of "off- '
s aore" scrap to friendly countries ill be permit-
Sted, it was stated. '
A two-month survey by the government, including
Consultations with industry indicates that the
'ferrous crap situation warrants a continuation *
'of tight export control over shipments from con-
Stinental U. S. in order to maintain capacity
'steel production and meet national mobilization
r yggirements. it wae qqinted out. '


Defense plants are humming in the Southeast now
and many persons are interested in establishing
Proof of citizenship for security purposes. The
SBureau of the Censue, which can assist in this,
has announced a change in form. Details are avail-
able from that office.


I~~~v EPO -sms()


This report is available on a subscription
basis of $1 a year. Order on Pare 3


'
gMQ giff)MBAU ANNJ g


UNIVERSITY 0- I-LUMIUn


3 1262 08748 9331


PAGE 4


BULLETIN


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
P F POSTAGE $300
UN VrF L (QPO)
SPT.









UNIVERSITY OF FLiORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINES'VILLE, FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regionall Office
716 Forsyth Bldll.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLUME 7, NUmBER 13 JULY 1, 1953



BPULETIN OF COMMERCE
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENTS OF COMMd~ERCE
FIED OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIN
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMTION.
CONSULT YOUR FlIED OFFICE REGULARLY.




























1^__I__ ______ _


, JULY 15, 1953


SOUTHEAST MOTORISTS PAY $365.3 MILLION IN TAKES

Southeastern
I?""""""""CCL motoriate last
MOTCNE-VMtIPRODUcnON year paid a
,, -~o~n~ remnd ardu) total of $365,-
377,000 in State
a ---taxes on 5,317,-
J 176,000 gallons
( of fuel used in
u ----- sorra--Y---t--C- the operation
Sof their motor
Iss 1... ... ...t .. / vehicles, ac-
'cording to a
Source: Survey of Current Business, 'report issued
U. S. Departagnt of Cqmmerce 'by the Bureau
of Public Roads, U. S. Department of Commerce for inclus-
ion in its forthcoming issue of the publication "H~ighway
Statistics.=

The motor fuel, consumed in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Yississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas, represented an
increase of more than 400 million gallons over the 4,-
901,157,000 gallons used in 1951, and the taxes collected
were nearly $25,000,000 greater than the $;340,666,000
paid during 19~51.

The publication nHighwray Statistice" is avail-
able annually at any Denartment of Commerce
field office for 60t a copy.

It was also abown in other figures released by the
Bureau that the number of publicly-owned motor vehicles
operated in the region last year has gone over the 100,000
mark, or to 104,733, some 9,600 more than those in opera-
tion the previous year.

SOUTH'S RAlRDWOOD PLYWOOD OUITPUT 60 PER CENT OF U.S.

The South last year produced nearly 60 per cent of the
nation' s output of hardwrood plywood writh a production of
852,439,000 square feet, surface measure, according to a
Fapta For Induatry Report of the Bureau of the Consue.

This report, nLlardwood Plywood, Summary for
1952," is available at Department of Commerce
field office fqr 10#. See Page 3 for listing,

This was some 2,511,000 feet more than was produced in
the region in 1951. The bulk of the region's output was
veneer core plywood, which totalled 730,867,000 square
faptozn a952,1The remaindfeewras lrumber core plywood, which


U.S.PURCHASSE SINCE KOREAN $3.6 BILLION IN AREA

The value of all Federal Government purchases of goode
and services in the Southeast from the beginning of the
Korean war through March of this year was $3,680,505,000,
according to a Lmuitions Board announcement.
They included $2,250,551,000 worth bought by the Armyv,
8750,156,000 by the Navy, $664,423,000 by the Air Force,
and $15,375,000 by the Armed Services Petroleum Agency.

Business firne in the region interested in
selling goods and services to the U. S. can
be placed on the daily lists of proposed
procurement and contract awards by subscrib-
ing to this service at any Department of
Commerce field office. Price $7 a year; $4
for six months.

Among the individual States in the region, purchases
in Georgia, totalling 8973,139,000 were far greater in
value than those moade in the other Statse. Awards in North
Carolina approximated $770,946,000; Tennessee, $655,314,-
000; Alabama, $461,332,000; South Carolina, $335,177,000;
Florida, $313,249,000; and Mississippi, $171,348,000.

Construction contracts let in the region during the
period of July 1951 through March 1953 totalled $496,393,-
000, with Florida standing seventh in the nation in total
amount with $110,872,000.

SOUTH SECOND LARGEST TURKLEY-PRODUCING SECTION

The South last year was the second largest turkey pro-
ducing area in the United States, according to a Bureau
of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agricul~-
ture report.

The States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee, K~entucky, the Carolinas and Virginias, Mary-
land, Delawrare, Brkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas
produced a total of 249,310,000 pounds of turkey and
received a gross income from sales of the birds approxi-
mating $85,638,000.

The BAE report credited the region writh an increase of
41,305,000 pounds of turkeys produced in 1952 over 1951,
and an additional $8,647,000 in grose income.

Production in the South included an output of 147,-
746,000 pounds in the South Atlantic States of Georgia,
Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland and Dela-
ware and 97,340,000 pounds in the remainder of the area.


ALTLANTA, GA., CHAIRLESTONI, S. C.,
7th Floor, Forsyth Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,E6x.453 Tel. 2-7771


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


HEMPHI~S, TENN.,
229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426


YIAMI, FLA.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


MOBLE, ALA.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641, Ex. 206


SAVANNAH, GA.,
218 P.'O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


E MULOV 7 NUMBER 4


G 16. 2 l 7 / f


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE





BASE PERIOD FOR NEWA COPPER PRODUCERS ESTABLISHED

A basis on which new producers of
Tygg copper controlled materials will
calculate required set-asides for
acceptance of military and atomic
N energy orders after June 30, 1953
CLECioC11 was established by an amendment to
Order M-11A.

Produ tion The amendment provides that pro-
ials who did not produce a certain
ites, such as bar, sheet, wire,pow-
Anth~ity der, and so forth, during the regu-
months of 1952 -- will determine the
reserve for military and atomic
energy copper controlled material orders on the basis of
the current month'sa output of the item involved.

NPA officials said the current months a production may
vary from time to time, but will remain the basis for
calculating the required product set-asides needed to fill
orders bearing the symbols A, B, C, D and E in the follow-
ing month.

IRON AND STEEL ORDER AMEN1DED
Order M-1A~, dealing with iron and steel, has been
amended to permit steel distributors to place inventory
alloy steels containing a higher percentage of molybdenum
than heretofore allowed.

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION ORDER R1EVOK(ED
NPA announced revocation, effective July 1, 1953, of
Order M-95 requiring producers of railroad transportation
equipment to make regular reports on production and ship-
ments. The order has been the mechanism for obtaining the
industry' s production and delivery data necessary for
allocation of materials by NPA'sa Railroad Equipment Div-
ision.

otice: Anyone wisrhing any of
i the documents mentioned in this '
column should get in touch with '
the nearest Department of Com~-
merce field office, specifying
the document desired.

FAVOR(ABLE PAPER SUPPLY PICTURE SEENI
A favorable supply picture for the industry during
1953 was described at a Joint meeting of the Commercial
Printing and Lithographing and the Continuous Forms
Industry Advisory Committees with NPA officials.

Industry representatives were told by NPA that most of
their raw materials are more than adequate, inventories
are satisfactory, and the outlook for the balance of 1953
is "very good.n

MOTOR TRUCK( MANUFACTURERS
Motor truck manufacturers have taken a first step to-
ward setting up a division within the Department of Com-
merce after July 1 to keep the government accurately in-
formed on problems and viewpoints of their industry in
Peace-time as well as during emergencies. At a meeting
with NPA officials the industry's Advisory Committee also
agreed to participate in the preparation of a basic order
for their industry in case of all-out war. The action was
taken after NPA officials had pointed out the need for a
basie control order for the industry in case of enemy
attack. It wras emphasized that should a bomb drop, motor
truck makers would need to take proper immediate actions.


REGION IS KEAVY USER OF METAL FOR CANS

The Southeast last year used 512,311 short tons of
steel in the manufacture of metal cans, an increase of
18,373 tons over the consumption in 1951, according to a
Bureau of the Census report.

The 1952 use included 469,564 tons in the South Atlan_
tic region and 42,747 in the East South Central section.

This report is one of the Facts For In-
duaggy series and is entitled Metal Cape,
Slummary for 1952. It's available at all
Department of Commerce offices for 10
cents a copy or $1 a year*

The Southeast was the fourth largest regional user of
steel in the production of cans last year. Its total con-
sumption was exceeded by the 1,222,302 tone used in the
East North Central region, 876,317 tone used in the Moun-
tain-Pacific and H~awaii areas, and 717,932 tons in the
Middle Atlantic region.

Nationally, 3.8 million tone of steel were used in the
manufacture of metal cans in 1952, which was approximate-
ly the same as the 1951 consumption.

BIG TEXTILE EXPANSION PROJECT 0.K(.'D FOR REGION

Further development of the Southeast's textile industry
was assured when the Office of Defense Yobilization in
Washington issued to the Lm'erican Enka Corporation a cer-
tificate of necessity authorizing a $35,000,000 nylon
fiber project at Lowland, Tennessee.

The certificate, which authorized a rapid tax wrriteoff
of -the plant and facility expansion being undertaken in
the region, was one of seven recently issued to firms in
Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Tennessee calling for
plant and rail improvements to cost more than $54,400,000.

Another multimillion dollar expansion in the area was
authorized when the Florida Power and Light company was
given a $17,186,300 certificate for development of eleo-
tric power in Cutler, Florida.

Other certificates issued in the period of June 4
through 17, with names of firms, product or service in-
rolved, and amount certified were:

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad company, Sanford, Fla.,
railway transportation, $420,713; Westinghouse Electric
Corporation, Monterallo, Ala., are welding electrodes,
$1,220,006; BNw Orleans and Northeastern Railroad company,
Heidelberg, Miss., railway transportation, $25,740; Sea-
board Air Line Railroad company, Nichola, Fla., railway
transportation, $200,000; and Mueller company, Chatta.
nooga, Tenn., industrial valves and fittings, $348,730.


Detailed characteristics of the population of all ,
southeastern States, taken from the 1950 cenana of ,
population, are now available for the individual ,
States at all Department of Commerce field offices.t
There is a small charge for eaeb. The reports are ,
in much greater detail than the data reflected in ,
the "generall characteristics" reports issued earl- a
ier in the year. ,


, UkTAILED CHARACTER E


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





__~~~~~~~~~ ._ __ 1_ I____ _


fractionally from April. The largest advance in seasonally
adjusted sales from April to May was the 7 per cent rise
for the general merchandise group, which came largely as
a result of increased activity in the soft goods depart-
ments of department stores. Apparel stores were up from
about 4 per cent in May on an adjusted basis.

A revision in the expansion goal for the productive
capacity of glycerin was announced by the Office of De-
fense Mobilisation, with the program now calling for an
overall annual capacity of 268 million pounds by January
1, 1955, a decrease of 10 million pounds from the initial
goal announced on April 28, 1952.

Iron mines in the United States produced 9,970,938
gross tons of iron ore and shipped 10,486,456 tons during
April, the Bureau of Mlines, U. S. Department of interior
announced. The totals represented a normal increase com-
pared with last month (March). The southeastern States
of Alabama, Georgia and Virginia produced 639,879 tons,
an increase of 5 per cent above March. Shipments in those
States aggregated 628,183 tons, also a slight increase
in April over March.

The U. S. Tariff Commission announced that the out-
put of all synthetic plastics and resin materials in
1952 as a group, except cellulosics, amounted to 2,334
million pounds, slightly less than the 2,441 million
pounds reported for 1951.

The Bureau of the Census announced that consumption
of raw wool on the woolen and worsted systems averaged
9.8 million pounds, scoured basis, per week in April
1953, 8 per cent below the revised March figure, and
an average of 14 million pounds of yarn per week was
produced, 3 per cent belong the March figure.


CHECKS[ THE
~ N\VB()(KS ccdi~ pp MTERIAIN
ANDREPR' THE SPACEPDIE &
4.1 SEND THIS
PORTION OF
THE BULLETIN OF COMMERCE TO THE NEAREST U. S. DEPARTMENT
OF COMMERCE OFFICE. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OP_
POSITE SIDE. MAK(E REMITTANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE
TO TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES


H~ighwray Statistics, 60#
SHardwood Plywood, Summary for 1952, FFISM13A-02,
10#, Annual Subscription, 50#
/7Synopsis of U. S. Government Proposed Procurements
Sand Contract Awards, yearly, $7, semi-annually,i4
M etal Cans, Summary for 1952, FFI Y75D-02, Single
Copies, 104, Annually, $1

Estimates of the Population of the U. S., By Ageopnie fSaeGvenetFnne n15, 5
Color, and Sex, July 1, 1950,1951,1952,P-25 ,73,10#
Part-Time Workers, May & Nov.1952,P-50,46,100
/ karital & Family Characteristics of the Labor Force
in the U. S., Apr.1952,P-50,44b, 10#
L7Estimates of the Population of Statse, July 1, 1940
'to 1949, P-25,72, 10#
SPetroleum Products, Secondary Inventories & Storage
Capacity, Gasoline, Kerosene, Distillate Fuel Oils,
Residual Fuel Oils, Apr. 30, 1953
M ethod for Determining the Resolving Power of Photo-
graphic Lenses, NB8 Cir.533, $1.00
L7Comparative Statistice for the American ]Republices
Business Information Selrvice, World Trade Series #raGE
20#
~7 Airport Terminal Buildings, CAA, 25# |


/ 7 Tables for Rocket & Comet Orbits, NBS Applied Mathe-
matics, Series, 20, Buckram Bound, $1.75
,f Table of Arctan, N88 Applied Mathematica Series 26,
Buckram Bound, $1.75
1 0 Census of Agriculture Special Reports:
UA Graphic Summary, Vol. V-Pt.6,65#
General Reports:
Size of Farm, V.11-ch.X, $1
Color, Race, Tenure of Farm Operator,~L1-ch.UT,$1.25
Economic Class of Farm, V-11.chlII, 754
Field Crops & Vegetables, V-11-ch.Vii, $;1.25
Farms & Land in Farms, V-11.Ch.1, 654
Value of Farm Products, V-11-Ch.II, 50#
Livestock & Livestock Products, V-11.Ch.VI,$1
Farm Taxes & Cash Rent, V-11-Ch.V,55#
Fara Facilities, Roads, Trading Center Equipment,
V.11-Ch.111, 554
Cooperative Report:
L7Land Utilization, Vol.V-Pt.B, 456

SOMETHING OLD AND 80KEGTHING NEW
S Processing of Feathers, P8111090, 50#
S British Cotton Industry, P8106464, 754
Y etalworking Machine Tools, PB106466,904
SRadio Frequency Power M~easurements,
B BS cir. 536, 15#
A Public Relatione Program for America'sa
SRetailers, SBA#~215
a '7Case Study Handling Floor Display of
SFurniture in a Store of Limited space,SBA216
Six Tools for Industrial Selling, SBA217
SCase Study Advertising Hlealth Foode,8BA219 '
SFacts About the Flower Store, SBA#220 e
Fir Prevntionin Retail Storea, SBA#r222
/ Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 1st Quarter 1953,
FFI, M15A-1-3, 101, 504 Year


FOR FURTHER
DETAILS OF
ANY OF THE
ITEMS LIST-
---== ED IN THIS
COLUMN GET
N I TOUCH KITH THE NEAREST U S DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


FIELD OFFICE


Business activity nationally in the second quarter
of 1953 advanced over the first quarter rate with most
major segments recording moderate increases, according
to the Office of.Business Economics, U. S. Department
of Commerce. Manufacturers' shipments rose substantial-
ly, resulting in a limited reduction in backlogs. Capi-
tal investment showed continued strength, personal in-
come remained high, consumer prices were stable, and
retail sales of durables other than automobiles were
rnmning slightly higher in 1953 than a year earlier,

The net working capital of U. S. corporations at
the end of March of this year was estimated at $86.9
billion, the Securities and Exchange Commission re-
ported. In the first quarter of the year, working capi-
tal increased by $1.3 billion, considerably more than
in the preceding quarter. The growth in working capital
Ln the first quarter for the most part reflected a re-
Suction in current liabilities of more than $1.2 bil-
lion.

Total sales of retail stores in May amounted to
$14.7 billion, about 2 per cent above a year ago. Sales
continued steady at the high rate experienced during
earlier months of the year. After adjusting for seasonal
factors and trading day difference, the total mved up


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





NALTURAL INCREASE IN REGION'S POPULATIlON HIGH ~

Every minute of the day and night, a baby is born in
the Southeast, adding that anch to the region' s population
according to a Bureau of the Census report just issued,

But, every three minutes an average of one person is
taken by death, subtracting that mpuch from the population,
and every five minutes somea person migrates to other see-
tions, adding further to the "minus side."

This report is entitled "Estimates of the
Population of States, July 1, 1940 to 1949."
See Page 3 (qr lstinng.
These estimates were arrived at when the Census Bureau
reported that in the 10-year period of 1940 to 1950, North
aruolina.experiened an estimated 1,052,000 births,' 304,-
000 deaths, and a not outa-mgration of 258,000; South
Carolina, 633,000 births, 186,000 deaths, and 230,000 mi-
grations; Georgia, 910,000 births, 300,000 deaths, and
290,000 migrations; Tennessee, 805,000 births; 296,000
deaths, and 143,000 migratione; Alabama, 839,000 births,
268,000 deaths, and 342,000 migrations; and Mississippi,
637,000 births, 209,000 deaths, and 433,000 migrations.

Florida was in a elase by itself, not only in the
Southeast, but in the nation as well, because nearly
everything was "coming in" in that State and little
"going out." For Florida, the Census Bureau credited
530,000 births, 234,000 deaths, and a net nin-aigration"
of 578,000 persons. In the 10-year period, it gained 46.1
per cent in population, one of the three highest in the
nation, and it was one of a relatively few Statse record-
ing a "plue side" in migrations*
$25.5 MILLION IN AMUSEMENT TAXES PAID '

Southeastern lovers of armsements in the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1952, paid g25,521,000 in '
racing, hunting and fishing, and other amusement '
taxes, according to the report entitled "Compen- '
' diun of State Government Finances in 1952," just *
' issued by the Bureau of the Census. Of that amount, '
race-track devotees in Florida paid $17,655,000 in '
pari-autuel taxes. Mississippi, a "dry" State, con- '
' tiqued to eqllect taxes on alcoholic bererages, a


ROAD DEVELOPMENT WORK TAKESB FARMS FROM MUD

Twenty years of rural road improvement work in the
Southeast has placed more than half a million farms in
the region on hard surfaced highways, according to a
report from the 1950 Censusl of Agriculture issued by
the Bureau of the Census.
It was just one of a number of important farn develop-
ments that have take place in the region in recent years
reflected in a number of such reports just released.

The titles of these reports are listed
on Page 3 for convenience in ordering
from the nearest D~epartment of Commerce
field office.

Among other things, the reports show that whereas in
190only 161,719 fares in the area were on hard surfaced
rastoday there are 533,257.

But, the region still has a long way to go to pull its
farms entirely out of the aud, because today there are
still 1,255,2(T/ farms on dirt or unimproved roads, the
reports show.

While 360,905 farms reported telephones back in 1920,
on1,y 269,351 had them in 1950, probably due to a sharp
reduction in number of faras.

But, a big advance in electrification has taken place.
n 1920, only 67,127 had electrification, and in 1950
erewre 1,309,978 with it. With the coming of electri-
ity, many farms in the region have established modern
onvnieces too. In 1950, 406,395 had electric water
pumps, 187,880 electric hot waterheer,1399oe
reer,764,556 electric washing machines, 155,982 had
elcrcchick brooders, and 15,726 electric power fe~d
rnermany unheard of on the fara 30 years ago.


In August of this year, the 1952 data on income pay-
mesnts to individuals will be issued by the DepartmPent
of commerce for regions, Statse and the U~nited States.
The data will be reflected in the august 1953 issue
of the Survey qf Current Business. Watch for it!
bPo .s-aeases


1


INCOME PAYMENTS TO INDIVIDUALS


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


PENALTY FORPR TE USE TO AVOID
UNIV O F PTAE$300





US. DEPOSTOR



so-s..w
UNOIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENTS OF ECONYOMICS
GAINESVIL~LE, FLORID)A


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE a<
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Blds.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLUME 7, INUBER 14 JULY 15, 1953



SBI1El.ET OF COllMMECE -
SfERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE K(EY-
NIOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTHI OF BUSINESS WFOR~MATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE RECULARIY..










UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








ATLANTA, GA., CHARLESTON, S.C., JACKLSONVILL,FLA., MEMPHLIS, TENN., MIAMI, FLA., SAVALNNAHI, GA.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., Sgtlasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel.WA-4121,Ex. 453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-4755


, AUGUST 1, 195)


RAIL FREIGHT REVENUE IN REGION OVER (i BT pgO

Railroads serving the Southeast in the first 5 months
of 1953 collected more than half a billion dollars in
freight revenue, an increase of more than $19,000,000
over the same period last year, according to a current
report of the Bureau of Railway Economics, Association
of American Railroade.

The report showed that revenue from freight transporta-
tioq in the region fromn January through May of this
year of 24 carriers was $558,262,558, which compared
with $538,794,506 for the corresponding period of 1952.


For more detailed information on freight and
passenger revenue in the Southeast watch for
the Qnrtierly SUEmarieB Of BDsiDBss Condi-
tions in the Southeast issued every three
months by the Atlanta Regional Office of the
'Depar~tment of Cammesrce. They are available-
gratis .
The figures also reflected an advance of from $643,-
169,334 to $657,101,266 in total operating revenue. To-
tal operating expenses dropped fran $468,259,823 to


s71,894,950 at the same time last year.

In the same period, however, passenger revenue in the

ren of day ata yea bu tj0r6 m,0 ata nhe9same tim
crease

* M+ih LMAOFC LSN
* The Mobile, Alabana District Office of the United *
* States Department of OCamerce was closed on July *
C 31 and business men in that area needing the ser- *
* vices of the Clmnerce Department are asked to com-+
* municate with the Atlanta Regional Office at the *
a addressed shown at the top of the Bulletin of Com- *
* mece.
SThe closing was in line with a program in which a
the number of field offices of the Depar~tment of a
Commerce is being reduced from 42 to 31 as an *
+ economy measure and the cooperation of local Cham-+
bars of Caammerothroughoult the nation is being *
enlisted in order than an even vider segmnt of I
+ the business public can be served than hereto- *
*'fore. The change in procedure, it was stated, a
f vill result in a saving of approximtely $200,000 *
a year.
SA total of 580 cooperating Chambers of Casmerce *
had cme into the programs by July 1, and it was a
expeted that at least 700 would be in before the *
yertign was anaoltded.


SKARE-CROPPINGC IN SOUTHEAST ON WAIE


Percent of Rented Farms
By Class of Tenant 1950
PERCENT
sOUTH





Soure Fr ete ulsd

Bo _______ ofteCnu


the report shows, abarp declines have taken place in
the South Atlantic and East South Central regions, as
well as in the South as a whole, in number of farm
operated by share croppers.



field office for 60 cents. See Page 3 for
listing'

Fo~r elrman ~lev~ annil92eceone 19eperopent of the f rms
paer," in 1950 the rmnnbs? bad decreased to 14.8 per
cent, and in the East South Cen~tral area a decline of
fran 21.7 to 15.8 per cent took place. Proportionate
declines were recorded for the South as a whole,or from
17.5 to 13.1 per cent.

The Buxresl characterised the abrishage in share crop-
ping as see of the "pronouncd changes" in farm tenare
in the United States.

TRADE FIELD CONTINUES STABLE IN REGION

The first five months of 1953 found trade conditions
stable in the Southeast with sales in retail establish-
ments up in most areas as compared with the correspond-
ing period in 1952 and wholesale' sales reflecting pro-
portionate gains, according to current reports of the
Bureau of the Census.

Increases in retail trade of 11 per cent in Birmingham
and 4Aheville, 9 per cent in Atlanta, 7 per cent in Ma-
con, 5 per cent in Savannah, 6 per cent in Gulfport, 16
per cent in Johnson City, 12 per cent in Bristol, and
LA per cent in Kingapar~t were abovn, and in the region
wholesalers reported an advance of 4 per cent in sales.


c / b"l cl


ULOV ME 7 NEKBER 5


1I~11Pm ~ ~~CJ


Share-oropping in
the Southeast, the
butt of many lt-
erary efforts in
recent years, is
passing into the
limbo of forgotten
thbxgs judging from
a current report
of the Bureau of
the Census prepar-
ed from its recent
COBsus Of Agricul-
ftur.

In the 25 years
from 1925 to 1950,


64 :7/14










I


SOUTH HIGH IN U.S. IN CONTAINS MANUFACTOIRING

The South stands third in the nation in regional dollar
rolume of container manufacturing, a current indusry
report of the Containers and Packaging Division of the
National Production Authority abows*

The report listed the value of containers produced in
the South in 1951 as $1,441,000,000. This camrpared with
$2,295,000,000 in the Midweat; $2,108,000,000 in the
Northeast; and $784,000,000 in the West*

The figures, compiled originally by the Bureau of the
Census, credited the paper and paper board container
industry with an output of $673,000,000; metal coan and
steel shipping conltainers, Y283,000,000; vooden con-
tainers, $192,000,000; glass containers, $132,000,000;
and textile bega, $161,000,000.

--CONYFICTIONRY SALES INCREASE IN 1952

Sweet-toothed southeasterners went after confection in
a big ~wy last year, manufacturers-vholesalers report-
ing an increase of more thian $2,000,000 in sales over
1951*

Last year's sales in the South Atlantic region of Geor-
gia, Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias, Mlaryland and
the District of Columbia approximated $29,516,000 as
compared with $27,694,000 in 1951, and products valued
at $15,481,000 vare sold in Alabeman Mississippi, Tenn-
easee and Kentoroky in 1952 against LL,837,000 in sales
in 1951.

More than half of the dollar volume of sales in the
South Atlantic region last year vae in Georgia and
Florida where they totalled $15,454,000*

Again, sales of her goode far exceeded those of any
other confectionery. Nationally, they amounted to $216,-
088,000 and included 527,775,000.pounds*
CALIFORNIA NOWJ SECOND IN CO~TTO OUTPUT

California has moved into second place in the U. S. in
cotton production and innings, according to the Latest
issue of the Census Bureau's annual publication Cottan
Production and Diptributiop just issued.

The bboklet shows that Califarniacs output of cotton
free the 1951 arop was 1,767,743 bales, and gnis
totalled 1,764,325 bales, which vere exceeded only 67
Telrae' production of 4,035,080 bales and ginninlgs of
4,053,196 bales*

This booklet is available at all Department
of Camerce field offices for 25#. It's
listed on Page To

Four years prevonely, California vas in fifth place in
prodnotion*
The western State was also second in eatisated value
of the nation's cotton crop in 1951 vith a total of
$395,856,000. Texas led with $871,003,000*

A stucb of cotton production in California reflected
in the report shows a gradual increase in acreage har-
vested in that State since it was discovered in 1910
that the soil was adaptable to a crop oif that kind. In
1910, only 8,000 acres were harvested, and last year
it had been boosted to 1,406,000. And, while its acre"
age has increased, in same respects that of southern
States has declined in recent years.


MATERIALS CONTROLS MOSTLY OFF IN SOUTHEAST

SSou'teastern manufacturers and
THE builders, who for the past two
years have been told by the Fed-
Nationaleral Government what they could
C111HC11 and could not use in the way of
raw materials in their manufac-
turing and construction opera-
tions,now will find an open mar-
K TOduction ket for everything enmonly used
in the region, with two excep-
tions, nickel and nickel bear-
Auth rity ing stainless steel.
UthorityProduction Act Reenacted
Last month, Congress reenacted
the Defense Production Act for a
period of two years. Briefly, it eliminantes controls
in the production of civilian goods with only a few ex-
ceptions, among which is the use of nickel and nickel-
bearing stainless steel. The use of those metals is
prohibited in certain instances in the manufacture of
so-called "A" and "B" products, which include virtual-
ly everything a manufacturer produces.
_Symbols Not Nov Necessary
Except in the case of nickel and nickel-bearing stain-
less steel, manufacturers not producing for defense and
defense-related activities are not now required to put
rating symbols and allotment nurmbers on their ordlers
for supplies. Instead, they may adlmit their orders to
suppliers just as they did before NPA vent into opera-
tion. Those manufacturing for defense and related ac-
tivities will be given the inside track" on supplies
through priority ratings issued by the contracting db
fense agencies.
Nickel. Nickel-Bearing Stainless Steel
Controls are still in effect for nickel and nlickel-
bearing stainless steel to assure production and deliv-
ery for direct military and atomic energy applications.
The use of nickel and nickel-bearing stainless steel
is permitted onl7 for certain products as outlined in
NPA Grder M-80, and it ney be obtained by manufacturers
in the third quarter of this year for such uses by the
placing of unrated as well as rated orders with sup-
pliers. Those placing the orders, however, mant cob
tinue to certify that it will be used in compliance
with limitations established in Order M-80.
Controlled Nlaterials Plan N~ov Out
From July 1, 1951 to June 30, 1953, the National Pre
doetion Authority, U. S. Department of Commerce, has
had in operation what was knouwn as the "Controlled
Materials Plan which controlled the end-use of steel,
copper and alumnm the three metals mostly in demand
anange manufacturers and contractors. With reenactment
of the Defense Production Act last month, however, the
*Controlled Materiale Plan" was dropped, and the nDe-
fense Naterials System" substituted under which any
pliers and distributors of strategic materials will be
concerned primarily with providing enough materials to
carry out the national program of defense, after which
mannufac~turers of civilian goods and other users of the
materials will find the market "wide open" for their
needs.
LATE IIPA ACTIONS REVISED
Just before the new "EMS" program went into operation,
NIPA announced revocation of Orders M-46, M-46A, M-46B
and M-50 and amendments to Direction 1 of DMS Reg. 1
and Direction 1 of DMS Reg. 2 which, in effect, can-
celled priorities assistance for petroleum and gas in-
dus~tries and electric utilities, but provided for nee-
essary additional amount of nickel-bearing stainless
steel far the third quarter of this year.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





__ ____I ______ __ _______ __ __ __


I


I


Public Ebployment in bFApil 1953, G-GES3-#~2, 5#
City to Airport Highwcays, CAA, 20#
1950 Cenrsu of Agricultures
gf'Type of Farm, Gen. Report, Chapter IIII, $2
SOMETHING OLD AND SOMETHING NEI


CHECK( THE
~- NEW Il()(KS ,dli~ $5MTRIALIN

~`~3~ AN]D RElPORllS THEPOIE &SPACE
)g0Y/ SEND THIS
PORTION OF
THIE BULLETIN OF COMMERCE TO THE NEAREST U. S. DEPARTLYHET
OB COMMERCE OFFICE. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OP-
POSITE SIDE. MAK(E REKFITTANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE
TO TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES


/ 7 Farm Tenure A Graphic Summ~ary, 1950, Vol. V,
Pt. 5, 60
Monthly Retail Trade Report, $1 a year
Monthly Wholesale Trade Report, $1t a year
Qularterly Summaries of Business Conditions Place
on Mailing List
SContainers &t Packaging, Industr Report, Summesr
1953, Issued Quarterly, Subscription, 604 year
L7Cottonl Production & Distribution, Bull. 189, Tear
Ending July 31, 1952, 25#
L7Confectionery, Including Chocolate Products Facts
For Industry,Summery for 1952,M160-02 104f 1 r.
L7Provisional Estimates of Population of U. S., Jan.
1, 1950 to May 1, 1953, P-25,#71c, 5#
L7Petroleu Products Secondary Inventories & Sto
age Capacity Gasoline, Karosene, Distillate
Fuel Oils, Residual Fuel Ols, May 31, 1953
School Ehrollment, Oct. 1952, P-20,#43, 5#
ffMonthly Report of Labar Force, Jane 1953, @-57
#132, 104, Annual Subsoription, $1.50
SCanned Food Report, Distributors Stocks of Canned
Vegetables. Fruitsr & Juioes, June 1, 1953
1950 Census of Agricultures
/rf Fruits, Nute, Nortionltural Specialties, Forest
Produota, Gen. Report, V-11-ch.VIII, 65#


Packaging Pointere For Governmept Contractors,
Management Aids for Small Business, SDPA #31 / /
Gaging Tolerances in Machine Sho s Tec l


Aids for Small Business. SDPA a23 if
Selling Electrical Appliances B~ Truck Proves


__ __1 I~_


E pents, SBA #224 / /


FOR FURTHER
DETAILS OF
AN'Y OF TIE
ITEMS LIST-
ED IN THIS
COLMIIN GET
OF COMMERCE


Expenditures for new construction in the first half of
1953 vere at the highest level in history, the Depart-
ments of CommPerce and Labor announced jointly, Each
month this year, spending for new construction has
reached peak levels, and by the end of June totalled
$16 billion, almost 8 per cent above the January-June
1952 total.

Indivianals saved $2.5 billion in liquid form in the
first quarter of 1953,the Securities and Exchbange Com-
mission estimated. The rate of saving was slightly
higher than in the first quarter of 1952 and vae the
highest for any first quarter of the post-var period.

Personal income in May was at an annual rate of $284
billion, or $1 billion higher than in April and about
the same as in March. The April-May rise was largely
in wages and salaries and farm income.

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $1,250 million in June, 6 per cent
above the $1,178 million paid out in the same month a
year ago,

Business :Leventories at the end of H67 were valued at
$78 billian.a Relatiag o wsalses Mad stocked v re about

durable and nondurable goods manufacturers offsetting
somewhat higher trade ratios.

Cross national product --total value of goods and ser-
vices produced by the nation -- in 1952 was placed at
8348 billion by the Office of Business Economies, U.S.
Department of Conmmerce, or Si per cent above 1951.Nat-
ional income amounted to $292 billion, 5 per cent up.


F'IED OFFICE


Total expenditures for highway purposes in 1952 vere
estimated by the Bureau of Public Roads,U. S. D~epart-
ment of Commerce at $5,014 mpillion,and forecasted exe
penditures of $5,453 million in 1953 were made,repre-
senting steady increases over previous years. Expen-
diturea in 1951 totalled $4,541 million.

Employment swung abarply upward in June as students
streamed into the labor force at the close of the
school term,the Burean of the Census announced. Esti-
mated at 63,172,000 in the week ending Jone 13, total
civilian employment was about li million higher than
in Mhy and about the same as last year's record Jane
total.
Manufacturers' shipments continued in large volume in
)Hq and were under the April record rate but larger
than in March. Sales or shipments, amounting to $25.4
billion, were more than 10 per cent above a year ago,
with deliveries of hard goods up more than shipments
of nondurables.

Wholesalers' sales in Hay were estimated at $8,200
million, or lightly above the same month a year ago,
and 2per cent below the April rate after adjustment.


_:


I
t
t
t

(I


*


Profit~able, Small Busines Ad #2
praigA Retail Frolzen Food Business. Small
Business Aid 23 /

Seasonality (Iu laigIdsr)B 2 /7
Ice trean Adds Bie Volume to Frozen Food Dewart-


/} Mechanics of ELastic Performancoe of Textile Mater-
ials Relations of Fiber Properties and Fabrio
Strucoture to Crease Resistance, P?81114, $2.25
Recent Publications of Offio* of Defense Mobilisation,
SResourrces ALdvisory Committees
Production at Any ALge
The Disabled Can Work
A Job For Wemen
TIhe Worker and His Health
Facts For Indnetry Reportas
SPulp, Paper & Board, Way 195,a53,3,14A-,10,0 year
U Noamen's, Misses' and Juniors't Outerwear, 1st
--Quarter 1953, M67B-1-3, lo#, 500 year
Sumrmaries for 1952r
D Coomnercial & Home canning closures, M750-02,100
$1 a Tear
/ 7 Knit Cloth for Sales, M15K-02~, 10/


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


--- --"iDSECCSEmer-=ms-1====;gggg

N L TOUCH WITH THE NEAREST U. 5. DEPARTMENT





$361 MILLION SPENT IN HIGHWAY WORK

"ALctiven highway pr~ogram in the Southeast in the first
half of 1953 involved an expenditure of $361,066,000,
according to a report of the Bureau of Public Roads,
U. S. Department of Camlerce*
Included were those projects in the programming stage
those on which plans had been approved, but construe r
ion had not been started, and others in which construe-
tion was under way*

The expenditures, made and being made, included $66,-
298,000 in Aabama; Flarida, $1.2,333,0003 Georgia,
$60,595,000; Mlississippi, $42 672,000; North Carolinas
$59,377,000; South Carolina, g30,063,000; and Tennea-
see, $59,728,000*

The work involved 7,2811.6 miles of highways in the ser-
on States. Of the total spent and being spent, $180,-
008,000 represented Federal funds.


U. S. PURCHASES IN SOUTHEAST $233.3 MILLION

The Federal Government in June stepped up purchases of
goods and services in the Southeast with the result
that contracts let in the region in that month totalled
more than $)46,000,000 bringing cumurlative purchases for
the first half of 1953 to $233,349,295, according to
lists of contract awards received in U. S. Department
of Commerce field offices.
Awards in June included 139 different contracts valued
at $46,227,908, with Mississippi receiving $b15,573,180
worth; Georgia, $11,88t,317; Tennessee, $1,719,543;
Florida, $3,291,513; Alabama, $i2,570,171;and South Car-
olina, ~1,189,186.
These contract award lists are available
for inspection at all Department of Com
merce field offices and on a subscription
basis of h,00 a year,
Among the June awards were two contracts awarded in
Mississippi for bombs with a dollar value of $9,352,-
700 for the demolition type, and more than $2,000,000
for another type of bomb. Florida,Georgia and Tennea-
see also received million dollar contracts.

The contracts were among those awarded on a formally
advertised and negotiated unclassified basis. They did
not include those let where national security was in-
volved.

$b23.4 MILLION INI CMTIFICATES OF NECESSITY

Certificates of necessity calling for facility expan-
sion operations in the Southeast to cost $23,452, 500
vere awarded by the Office of Defense Mobilization dur-
ing the period of June 18 to July 1.

They included expenditure of sone $i6,750,000 by the
Central of Georgia Railway compapy, of Savannah, in im-
pr~ovements to its railroad pr~operties,$9,125,000 by the
Florida Power Corporation in development of electric
power near Enterprise, Fla., )5,394,000 by the same
firm in a similar operation at E~llaville, Fla., and
$1,124,590 by the U. S. Phosphorio Products company in
plant expansion activities for the production of ground
phosphate rock at East Tampa, Fla.
GPO 83*81(510


Z Athur K, O'Keefe, Fall River, Mass., as Deputy
SAdministrator of the National Production Author-i


SSalmuel N_. Coaply Greenwich, Conn., as Assistant '
SAdministrator of the National Production Author- i


'Charles L, Dearing, Bethesda, Maryland, as Deputy
.Under Secretary of Commerce for Transportation.

ALABAMA ASSOCIATION IS GIVEN AVARD

The Automotive Wholesalers Association of Alabama was
presented with a plaque by Under Secretary of Commerce
Walter Williams for its services ~throughout Alabama in
the fields of highway safety,industry relations, legis-
lative research and office management.


PERSONNEL APPOINTMENTS

e The following appointments in the U.
Sent of Commerce have been announced
'Rotbachild, Kansas City, Mo., as a 1
SChairman of the Federal Maritime Board,


S. Depart- *

member and


5, PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

UNIV. OF FL LIS.





U.S. DEPOS1TORY I'BCd$,$

LssOr t.. Qusuts

GA INEES V I Le, LOtRIDA

': rr ?- .~- *e,. ~ C n:--~,, ~.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3llllll 1262111 08748 9315lllllI


PAGE 4


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Bldg., i6
Atlanta 3, Ga. S
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLUME 7, NUMBHL 15 AUGUST 1, 1953



- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE K(EY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMIYERCE
FILUD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMYATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





SOUTH STILL, LOW IN FIRST-CLASS FARMS


KOREAN WAR LEAVES IMPRINT ON SOUTHEAST

Three years of war in Korea with its accompanying threat
of comamnism left their imprint on the Southeast in the
form of plant and facility expansions to meet the needs
of the national program of defense costing an estimated
$1,728,1L5,000, and the purchase of goods and services
from business firms in the region with a dollar value
of upwards of $63,000,000,000, or a total in all of some
four and three-quarters billion dollars, according to a
study made in the Atlanta Regional Office of the U. S.
Department of Commerce.
Plant and facility improvements and expansions in Alaba-
ma, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, South Carolina and
Tennessee included the establishment of new and expan-
sion of old factories for the production of a vast array
of products that would help in prosecuting the war and
defense programs, improvements to the physical proper-
ties of railroad transportation systems in the area, as
well as in the air and on water,development of huge net-
works of pipelines and storage facilities,and establish-
ment and expansion of power projects,

Expended and being expended in the process were $480,-
625,000 in Alabama; $b327,556,300 in Florida; $327 975,-
100 in Georgia; $~181,245 500 in Mississippi; $77,6t8,500
in South Carolina; and $325,921,900 in Tenneasee.

Approval of the projects was given in the form of certi-
ficates of necessity authorizing rapid tax writeoffs un-
der the Federal internal revenue act.

Purchases by the Federal Gove~naent in the sirtState
area by dollar value included Georg~ia, $b973,139,000;
Tennessee, $655,314,000; Alabama $461,332,000; South
Carolina, $335,177,000; Florida, 3113,249,000; and Mise-
issippi, $171,348,000. Hundreds of thousands of dollars
were spent on clothing and textiles, and other large
sums were expended on food Fproducts, wood manufactures,
ammunition, packing cases, and other products, and in
contracts awarded for construction work at military in-
atallations.

In the plant expansion and facility improvement oper~a-
t~ions,45 of the projects reflected expenditures in eight
figures .
WESTERN COUNTIES STILL LEAD IN GINNING

Counties in the West are still "chaimpioans when it cases
to the ginning of cotton,according to the ananal publi-
oation of the Burean of the Censue entitled "Cotton Pro-
duction in the United Stateen just issued for the crop
of 1952. It shows such counties as Kern, Fresno, Tulare,
Kings and Imperial in California, and Maricopa and Pinal
in Arizona as well in the lead in bales ginned,


Copies of this report are available at any
Department of Conmmerce field office. It is
a sales publication priced at L0 cents.


On the other head, the report places more than two-
thirds of the nation's Class 6 commercial farms in the
Southern States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississip-
pi, Tennessee, Kentucky, the Virginias and Carolinas,
Delaware, Maryland, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and
Texas. The anmber in the South was 519,455 as compared
with 717,201 in the United States*

Class I farms are those reflecting gross sales of $t2S,-
000 or more; Class II are those in the $10,000 to $b21,-
999 group; Class 3, $5,000 to 89,999; Class 4, $2,500
to $41,999; Class 5, $1,200 to $2,499; and Class 6 are
those with gross sales of $250 to $1,199 as the major
source of income.

The northern part of the continent has more commercial
farms than any other aeotion, 1, 172,083,. and leads in
number of Clase I farms with 43,774. The South iis eco-
ond in total nmrber with 1,611,795, and the West, which
has 322,534 such farms is second in the Class I group
with 31,275*
REGION'S PLANTS SHIP $58 MILLION IN CLBY PRODUCTS

Southeastern plants engaged in the production of clay
construction products last year shipped to market goods
valued at upwards of $58,000,000, according to a Facts
For Industry Report issued by the Bureau of the Census*

Included were nearly two billion common and face unglas-
ed structural tile and 52 million glazed and unglazed
floor and wall tile and accessories, including quarry
tile, also went forward from southeastern plants.


iLEMPHIS, TENN.,
229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426


MIAMI, FLA., SAVANNiAH,0A.,
947 Sey-bold Bldg., 218 P.O.tBldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-4755j


ATLANTA, GA., CHARLESTON,S.C., JACKSONVILLE;,FLA.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg5.,
Tel.WA-I;121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111


VOLUME 7, NUMBER 16


AUGUST 15, 1953


--The South only
has 28,182 com-
/mercial farms
in Clase I of a
total of 103,-
231 in the U.S.
according to a
Bureau of the
Census report
just issued in
connection with
its 1950 Census
Sof Agriculture
recently taken.
and Type of Farm -
types of commercial
farm ~products sold*


The report, entitled "Economnic Class
A Graphic Summary, 1950," listed six
farms on the basis of total value of


G / 7, 2 1.* 7I7/ /L.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE






brasITO DFG&EC





SHARP RISE IN REGION'S ECONOMY IN 5 YEARS SEEN

A sharp rise in the economy of the Southeast in the
past 5 years is seen in figures received at Department
of Comrmerce field offices.

Retail sales in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, ]Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas increased by nearly 4 bil-
lion dollars fran 1948 to 1952, net effective buying
income advanced by nearly $5 billion, and per capital
buying income went fron $869 to $1,037 in the same per-
iod.

The output of manufacturing plants increased in value
by more than a billion and a half dollars from 1947 to
1951, number of manufacturing employees more than 100,-
000, and salaries and wages paid such employees by more
than a billion dollars.

The period of 1918 to 1952 also saw an accompanying
"prosperity" in the region's financial field,including
a rise of nearly two and a half billion dollars intaude
deposits.

Sources of information on the data vere the Bureau of
the Census Census of Mhnufactures, Federal Deposit In-
surance Corporation, and Sales Management Magazine.

SNEW LISTING OF AVAILABLE PATETS ISSUED

SInventions for extracting potato juice, recover- +
Sing values from waste canteloupe, making of soy n
Ship, extracting nicotine from tobacco, and get- ~
Sting rubber out of goldenrod leaves, are some
Patents which the U. S. Government is now offer- r
Sing southeastern businessmen on a nonexclusive, #
Sroyalty-free license basis in a new publication ~
Just issued by the Department of Commerce in "
SWashington,

SThe publication, entitled "Govrernment-0wned In- '
Sventions Available for License," and available t
Sat Department of Commerce field offices for $1 a "
Copy, lists 3,658 patents of a total of 16,000
Sin the hands of various Government agencies and t
Snow being offered businessmen in the Southeast r
Sfor industrial development purposes,

SOUTHERN STATES ARE PROLIFIC PRODUCERS

Southern States are active producers of certain com-
modities not ordinarily coming within the purview of
the so-called "Industrial South," recently issued Facts
For Industry Reports of the Bureau of the Census indi-
cate.

For example, one report credited Tennessee with the
production last year of 21,628,000 pairs of shoes, and
another listed the South Atlantic States of North Caro-
lina,Delaware and Maryland with an output in 1952 of
metalworking machinery, except machine tools, valued at
$2,792,000.

Tennesseels shoe production last year was some 3 mil-
lion pairs in excess of that of 1951, and about 500,-
000 more than in 1950. The other three southern States
"upped" their shipments of metalworking machinery over
1951 by about $400,000.

These Facts For Industry Reports deal with many conmmo
dities and are available at all Depar~tment of Commnerce
field offices.


SYMBOLS NOT USED EXCEPT IN DEFENSE WORK


The only symbols that are in
use now are those assigned by the Department of De-
fense and Atomic Energy Commission in connection with
allotments made for defense and defense-related pur-
poses .
There still seems to be some confusion in the minds of
businessmen in the region regarding operation of the
new program, and some of than are still trying to use
symbol numbers on their orders to suppliers.
NICKEL-BEARING STAINLESS STEEL

Unanimous recommendation that nickel-bearing stainless
steel be taken from what remains of the conservation
program was made to the National Production Authority
by the Stainless Steel Industry Advisory Cormmittee at
a meeting held in Washington.

NPA officials stressed the need for a continued assur-
ance of a sufficient supply of that product to meet the
requirements of the defense program, but the committee
task force said the industry was "willing and able to
assume responsibility for equitable distribution of the
supply remaining for civilian consumption after assur-
ing the military and AEC requirements without the need
for continuance of Government controls."

NPA promised to take the matter under advisement,giving
the recommendations "every consideration."

NATION'S SUPPLY OF CEMENT AMPLE

The cement industry is capable of meeting estimated re-
quirements of the defense program established in 1952
by the Office of Defense ]Mobilization,its advisory com-
mittee advised NPA at a Washington meeting.

The industry committee pointed to an expansion of about
10 per cent in production capacity since the defense
production program was initiated in 1950. While there
have been some temporary shortages within areas and re-
gions, it was pointed out, the committee felt the in-
dustry was now in a position to meet demands for both
military and civilian requirements on a national basis.

AIRCRAFT-QUALITP ALLOY STEEL

Amendment Number 2 to NPA Order 7 1A was issued July 31
dealing with deliveries of nickel-bearing aircraft-
quality alloy steel products by distributors. The a-
mendment is available at Department of Commerce field
offices.

Specifically, the amendment amends Item 14 in the table
of contents, and Section 14 applicable to deliveries of
the products by distributors.


-r-7-' If you are a southeastern man-
" ~Ai ofacturer and need formerly
controlled metals in your man-
ofacturing operations, you need
CL1 not now use symbols and nmrbers
as was the case when the Con-
trolled Materials Plan of NPA
was in effect.


THED


N (gigggy

r


All that has been changed un-
der the Defense Material System
which replaced the CMP program
July 1 of this year.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


A EOdctioC CI


11111C)ty








I


__


fillV B)()K ,4 ppERIAL DE~SIRED IN
AND[ RElP(R'IS THE SPACE PROVID-
4.1 /\ED AND) SEND THIS
PORiTION OF' THE
BvULLTIN OF -COM-
MLERCE TO THE NEAtEST U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OFFICE*
YOURH NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDr. MAKlE RE-
MIlTTANCES FOR SALES MATERiALUL PAYABLE TO TREASUREK OF Ttlb
UNITED) SAES.




aL7 Economic Class & Type of F'arn A Graphic summary
1950, 40#Volume V, Chapter 9
L7 Clay Construction Products, Summary For 1952, FFI
M26-92, 104, $1 a Year
Cotton Production in the U. S. Crop of 1952, 15#
Government-0wned Inventions Available for License,
D$100
SProvisional Estimates of the Population of the U.8*,
January 1, 1950 to June 1, 1953, P-25,#ft75, 50
~7Estimates of the Population of Alaska, Hawa~cii, Puer-
to Hico, Canal Zone, & Virgin islands, 1950-1952,P-25,

SAnnual Report of the Labor Force, 1952, P-50,#45,
A nual Subscription, $1.50
SFamily Income in the U. S., 1951, P-60,#12, 204
R evised Summary of State Government Finlances, 194E-
1 0, 354
SRes~ults of Physical Tests of hoad-Buildingy Aggregates
to january 1, 1951, P'ublic Roads, $1.00
/ / Improving Mater~ials Handlinr in Small Plbnts..20#


Business activity continued at a high rate in the aeo-
ond quarter of 1953, the Office of Businese Economnice
of the U. S. Department of Commerce reported. Produo-
tion rose in both dollars and real terms. Aggregate
personal income also was higher, although agricultural
income was lowered by a further decline in farm prices.

Total expenditures for new construction rose slightly
in July to a new monthly peak of almost $3.3 billion
and were 8 per cent above July 1952, according to pre-
liminary estimates of the U. S. Labor Department's Bur-
eau of Labor Statistics, and the Building Materials Div-
ision of the U. S. Department of Comrmerce. The small
July increase --- about 2 per cent above the June esti-
mate --- resulted chiefly from seasonal gains in high-
way construction and in private outlays for public
utilities, plus a more than seasonal rise in commercial
construction.

Consumption of apparel class raw wool on the woolen and
worated systems increased 8 per cent between April and
May, according to the Bur~eau of the Census. Carpet wool
consumption, on the other hand,dropped 17 per cent over
this period.

United States iron are production and shipments in May
reflected further exp~ansion in response to high demand,
the Bureau of Mndea said. Production and shipments in
the southeastern States of Alabama, Georgia and Virgin-
is increased 9 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively,
above IMy- 1952. Mine stocks were 127,217 tone and con-
sumers' stocks in Alabama were 1,859,276 tons at the
end of the month.

Manufacturers' sales of confectionery and competitive
chocolate products in June showed little change fran
June 1952 in terms of both poundage and dollar value.


Facts For Industry~ Reports:
[ 7 Cotton & Linters, Consumption, stocks, Imports &
>~Lorts, & Active Cotton Spindles, M15-1-11-53 101,$1 Yr.
/ Cottoni System Spinning Activity., MI5-3-11/53,5$,509Yr
/1Steel Forgings, Surrmmary for 1952, M220-02,10P,81 Yr.
SSteel Shipping Barrels, Drums & Pails, Summary for
19 2, M75-A-02, loe, 81 Year
SPaint, Varnish & Lacqluer, Summary for 1952, M19JL-02c
10e $ a Year
SAir Conlditions & Refrigeration Equipment, M52A-02,
1952, 10#
'/7 Wool Manufactures, summary for 1952, MI5fHc02,10e0,1Yr,

SOMJETHING OLD AND SOMETHING NEW
i7 e uarterly Financial Report, U. S. Manufact-
Surin~g Corporations, let Cuarter, 1952
/ 7 Influence of the Wash From Bronze on the
'Weathering of Marble, BM1SRpt. 137, 15e
A / Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns,
NBS Cir. 539, Vol.I & II, 454 each
a /7 rage Incentives Will Help Reduce Costs,
'SBA 1#229
n Suggestions for Successful Millinery Retail-
'ing, SBA #230
a [ 7 Service Provides Information on Prospective
'Employees, SBA #231
'Informative Labels Do A Job, SBr 1#232
SSelling Tips for the Toiletries Saleswoman,
SBA #233

Case Study Data on Production &I Factory Performances
Menl's Winter Suits & Topcoats
Beet Sugar Refining
Processed Foods, Canned Vegetables
Dry Electrolytic Capacitors
Coarse Cotton Gray Goods


PAGE 3


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE


FOR FURTHER DE-
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE TITES GET
IN TOUCH WITH THE
hammmmmm-----------Czz RANEARiEST U. S. DIE-
PARTMENT OF' COIM-
M~ERCE FIELD OFE10E


Manufacturers' shipments in June totalled $25.8 bil-
lion almost a fifth higher than in June 1952. Inventory
book values rose more than seasonally to about 6 per
cent above those of June 1952. New orders held close
to the May 1953 rate, but were smaller than June de-
liveries, so that unfilled orders declined.

Total sales of all retail stores in June amounted to
$14.7 billion, about 6 per cent above a year previonely
it was announced. Sales continued to be generally firm.
After adjusting for seasonal factors and trading day
differences, June sales were virtually unchanged from
those of Mhy. All the major ~trades showed little change
from Map to June after seasonal adjustments.

Net profits after taxes of U. S. manufacturing corpora-
tions in the first quarter of 1953, while well below
the peak reached in the corresponding quarter of 1951,
were 11 per cent higher than in the first quarter a
year ago, according to the quarterly financial report
made public jointly by the Securities and Exchange Coan-
mission and Federal Trade Co~mmission,

An average of 14.L million pounds of yarn per week was
produced on the woolen and worsted systems during Mhy,
the Bureau of the Census reported. This was I per cent
above the April figure.




YII IUNIVCII II~oliT UK LUIUAI111 1 I
3 1262 08748 9307
PAGE 4 BULLETIN ,., ......


U. S. BUYING IN SOUTHEAST HITS $;273 MIIIION MARK

Federal Government purchases of goods and services on a
formally advertised and negotiated unclassified basia
in six southeastern States in July had a dollar value
of $39,802,284, bringing to $273,151,579 the emunlative
value of such purchases in the first 7 months of 1953,
according to daily lists of contract awards received in
U. S. Department of Connerce field offices.

A total of 218 contracts was let in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi,South Carolina and Tennessee, with
Georgia drawing the largest no bar of contracts and
Tennessee leading in dollar value.

The awards in July included 43 in Alabana for $4,973,-
555; 34 in Florida for $4l,454,331; 71 in Georgia total-
ling $9,761c,868; 8 in Mississippi aggregating $1,579,-
319; 14 in South Carolina for $1,210,006; and 48 in
Tennessee for $17,820,205.

These daily lists of contract awards are
available at all Department of Comrmerce
field offices on a subscription basis of
$7 a year.
In the ?-month period of January through July of this
year, Alabama received 153 contracts for $51,680,893;
Florida 185 for $50,391,21;7; Georgia, 223 totalling
$b51,919,428; Missiasippi, 48 for qb0,219,980; South
Carolina, 72 with a value of $15,047,278;and Tennessee,
161 contracts carrying a value of $80,862,753.
NEW SDPA PUBLICATION AVAILABLE

Southeastern firms interested in improving materials
handling in their plants will now find a comprehensive
publication on that subject in the form of one just ia-
sued by the Small Defense Plants Administration enti-
bled "Improving Materials Handling in Small Plants."

The publication, available through Depar~tment of Com-
merce field offices for 20 cents a copy,is entirely new
in every respect, and was written specifically for the
small manufacturer, SDEA officials said. It is designed
to be practical and easy to read, and is also illus-
trated. It will be of direct interest to wholesalers,


REGIONS RESIDENTS PAYI $4.2 BILLION IN U.S.TAXES

Residents of the seven southeastern States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas in the fiscal year just ended paid to the U. S.
Government a total of $4,296,151,867 in internal rev-
enue taxes, a quarter of a billion dollars more than
was paid in the Fprevious fiscal year, according to a
report of the Bureau of Internal Revenue.
This was an average of some $b200 for every person in
the area.

For current data on tax collections and other
information watch for Bureau of the Census re-
ports on Governmrent finances,
All of the seven States shared in the increase in fis-
cal 1953 over 1952 with North Carolinaand Georgia lead-
ing. North Carolina registered a gain of $88,947,569;
Georgia, $70,295,654; Florida, $57,581,992; Tennessee,
$b26,586,14; Alabama, $b8,923,611; South Carolina,
$2,763,288; and Mississippi, $2,372,139.
Total payments in 1953 included Alabama, $b395,325,1175;
Florida, $652,830,784; Georgia, $707,651,374; Mississ-
ippi,$142,191,374; North Carolina,qb1,611,14c0,287; South
Carolina, $~266,404,602; and Tennessee, $520,601,970.
FIVE SOUTHEASTERN AREAS RECER~TIFIED AS CRITICAL

Recertification of five southeastern areas as critical
defense housing areas was announced by the Office of
Defense Mobilization. They are Greenville, Miss., Camp
Rucker, Ala., Pensacola, Fla., Camp Le Jeune, North
Carolina, and Parris Island, S. C.
The four areas will remain under Federal rent control
until next AFpril 30, or until they no longer meet re-
quirements of the Housing and Rent Act of 1953.

The Greenville area includes all of Washington county,
Mississippi; Camp Rucker embr~aces Coffee and Dale coun-
ties, Alabama; Pensacola takes in Escambia and Santa
Rosa counties, Florida; the Camp LeJeune area includes
Onalow county, North Carolina; and Parris Island has
part of the town of Yemassee and Beaufort county.
GPO 862413


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USIE TO AVOID
POSTAGE $300
UN DLEP ( PO)





U..DEPOSITO

BC-6-JP


DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Offce W
7 Frt Bd.Atlanta 3, Ga.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLUME 7, NUMBER 16 AUGUST 15, 1953



-BULLETII OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE K(EY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPAR IENOF COMMlYERCE
lE~LD OFFICE. THERE YOU WIU. HND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORIMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





INCOME PAIMENTS INJ SOUTHEAST $36.1 BILLION

Residents of
Per capital income as a percent oi Ntionai average 11santheaet.
l20 ern States,
Alabama,Vir-
loo I I 'II ginia,Louis-
..inna, Arkran-
so- IILII sas,Florida,
Z Mississippi,

ucrim-uky,Tenne-
40 I asee,and the
Carolinas in
20 IIIIII 1952 receir-
ed a total
o EN MD OT F SUH E OH of $36,160,-
ERANL- M E STTH FEASRT WSWO HN- N ERS- 000,000 in
EAST LAND inccmrg an
us cenns, r owenc oeror usses eonme a-'" average of
$1,121 for every manu, woman and child in the region,
according to the annual report of the Office of Busi-
ness Economics, U. S. Department of Connmeroe on income
payments to individuals.

This report is incorporated in the August 1953
issue of the Survey of Currenlt Business,avail-
able at all Department of Connmerce field of-
fices for 30 cents a copyper on a subscription
basis of $3.25 a year.

Total income payments in 1952 in the 11-State area vere
approximately $1,888,000,000 more than was received in
1951.

Increases in total income in South Carolina, which was
10 per cent over 1951, and in Florida and Liouisiana, 8
per cent each, were among the highest in the nation.
South Carolinals went from $2,128,000,000 to $2,341,-
000,000, Florida's from $3 789,000,000 to $4,088,000,-
000, and louisiana's from $3,18,000,000 to $3,396,tX,-
000.

Last year's income payments also included $3,089,000,_
000 in Alabama, which compared with $;2,926,000,000 in
1951; Arkansas, $1,785,000 000 and $1,753,000,000; Geor_
gia, $3,998,000,000 and $3,842,000,0001 Kentucky, $3,-
311,000,000 and $b3,111,000,000;Mississippi $1 778,000,-
000and $1,688,000,000; North Carolin, )4,383,000 000
and $4,290,000,000; Tennessee, $3,669,000,000 and 13,-
536,000,000, and Virginia, $4,322,000,000 and $4,073,-
000,000.

The income included wages and salaries, net income of
proprietors, including farmers, dividends, interest, net
rents,and other iteme such as social insurrance benefits
relief, veteranal pensions, and so forth. '


8.1 MILION~3B DRIVING MOTOR VERCLES IN REGIGBI

An estimated 8,160,490 licenses to operate motor re-
hi~cles were in force in the Southeast last year, up-
wards of 275,000 more than in 1951, the Bureau of Pub-
lic Roads, U. S. Department of Commerce, estimated,

The estimate was made from State reports, which showed
that, inclusive of chauffeurs' licenses, Alabama had
1,146,065; Florida, 1,530,968; Georgia, 1,353,844;
:Mississippi, 5611,735; North Carolina, 1,501,822; South
Carolina, 835,022; and Tennessee, 1,225,034.

All kinds of motor vehicle and highway data
are contained in the publication Kighway Sta-
tistics published annually by the Bureau of
Public Roads and available at all Department
of Commerce field offices far 604 a year,

Florida led the Southeast in number of licenses in
force last year, and that State stood seventh in the
United States in number of operators licenses issued
in 1952, 1,273,461, and fourth in nmaker of chauffeured'
licenses issued, 257,507.

Other 1952 licenses issued in the Southeast were Ala-
bama, 115,545 to operators of all types, chauffeured in-
cluded; Georgia, operators, 125,613 and chauffeured,
13,376; Mississippi, 197,855 and 13,319; North Carolina
365,440 and 37,582; South Carolina, 74,998 and 3,847;
and Tennessee, 113,003 and 7,643.

IRADE FIELD SALES CON3TINUE UPAdRD TIREND

Southeastern wholesalers experiened a contained ad-
rance in sale in the first half of 1953, and in most
cities and areas in the region retail sales skyrocket-
ed, monthly reports of the Bureau of the Consus, U. S.
Department of Commerce indicated,

Compared with the corresponding period last year, sales
in the wholesale field were up 4 per cent in the South
Atlantio region, and in the East Sonth Central section
they advanced 5 per cent. This reflected a month-~to
month gain during the year, with several lines of prod-
ucts sharing in the upward trend.

In retail1 sales, increases of from 4 per cent in Savan-
nah to 14 per cent in Johnson City were reported with
nearly all cities and areas in which the Census Bureau
conducts its surveyed citing gains. Other advances in-
cluded 12 per cent in Birmingham; 11 per cent in Brie-
tol; 13 per cent in Kingapart; 8 per cent in Atlanta
and Macon; 9 per cent in Asheville; and 3 per cent in
Greenwood, S. C. Other gains were 9 per cent in Chilton
and Perry counties, Alabana and 10 per cent in,1Manatee
and Sarasota counties, Florida.


IIEMZPHIS, TENN.,
229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426


ATLANTA, GA., CKARLESTON,S.C., JACKSONVILLE,FLA.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel.WIA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-71l11


Mb~IAMI, FLA.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


SAVANN AH, GA.,
218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


VOLUME 7, NUMBER 17


SEPTEMBER 1, 1953


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE









I


WaGES, SALARIES OF $15 BILLION PPAID IN AREA

Wage and salaried workers in the seven southeastern
State of Alabama, Florida, Georg~ia, Mfississippi, Tenn-
essee and the Carolinae last year received gCn estimated
$15,007,000,000 in compensation for their services, an
increase of $1,267,000,000 over 1951, and $3,172,000,-
000 more than was paid them in 1950, according to the
ananal report of the Office of Bulsiness Economics, U.S.
Department of Commer~e on income payments to individ-
nals.

Workers in Alabama vere paid a total of $1,986,000,000,
which compared with $1,824,000,000 in 1951 and $1,550,-
000,000 in 19503 Florida, $2,576,000,000 in 1952, $2,-
294,000,000 in 1951, and $1,957 000,000 in 1950;Geor-
gia, $2,699,000,000 in 1952, $2,478,000,000 in 1951,
and $2,111O,00000 in 1950; ]Mississippi, $873,000,000
in 1952, $824,000 000 in 1951,and $705,000,000 in 1950;
North Carolina Q,818,000,000 in 1952, $2,658,000,000
in 1951, and $2,374,0000,000 in 19501 South Carolina,
$11,650,000,000 in 1952, $51,408,000,000 in 1951, and
$,158,000 000 in 1950; and Tennessee, $2,405,000,000
in 1952, $2,254,000,000 in 1951, and $1,980,000,000 in
1950.

Included in the total for the 7-State area vere $4l,-
512,502,000 paid to workers in Iannufacturingt $1,068,-
700,000 in construction payrollel and $163,435,000 re-
ceived by workers in the mining industry.

The total paid in the region in wages and salaries rep-
resented about 64 per~ cent of the $23,346,000,000 re-
ceived by individuals in the 7-State area from all
sources,

SHbRP GAIN SHOWN IN1 REGION IN DAIRII INDSBSTRI

Further evidence of how the Southeast has advanced in
the dairying industry, as well as beef cattle, is shown
in a report issued by the U. 5. Department of Agricu-
ture.

While most of the States in the nation showed a defin-
ite decline in number of milk cows on farms in 1953 as
compared with 15 years ago, the seven southeastern
State of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tena-
essee and the Carolinas all revealed a sharp inease,

For example, in 1938 the total mnuber of ad11 cows on
farms in the U. S. vas 23,205,000 and this year there
vere an estimated 22,110,000, a decline of same 5 per
cent. In the seven southeastern Stateas however, in
1938 there were 2,286,000 cows and today there were 2,-
629,000, a rise of around 343,000 animals, or a gain
of. 15 per cent.


REGIION SEES DIP IN EXPORTS IMPORTS UP

rrThe five southeastern eastans districts of Flor- *
Sida, Georgia, mobile and the Carolinas in the *
First 5 months of 1953 registered an overall de- *
r rease of 8 per cent in value of goods shipped to I
Other countrees, despite sharp gains in Mobile, *
Sand North Carolina,but came up with an 8 per cent *
Rise in imports, according to Gensus Bureen fig- *
+ res. *

SRegionally, the value of exports fell from a ~to *
Steal of $193,600,000 in the First 5 months of 1952 *
Sto $177 700 000 this year, and layorts increased *
fra $155ll,200,000 to $167,900,000.


REMOVAL OF Al;L CONTROLS ON NICKEL IS URGED

The Industry Advisory
Committee of Primary
Consumers of Nickel for
Chanmicals and Electro-
plating bas unanimously
recomended that all
government controls on
the civilian uae of
nickel be removed.

The recommendation was
made at a meeting of
the Comm~ittee with NPA
officials in Washing-
ton. Th~e recommendation referred only to the supply re-
maining after all Defense and AEC requirements had been
met in full. It was estimated by NEa officials that a-
bout 410 per cent of total available apply was needed
for defense purposes, excluding stockpile requirements.

Government officials emphaesized that the proposal for
decontrol of nickel is under consideration at this time
and would be thoroughly discussed with all other de-
fense agencies before recommendations were made to the
Office of Defense ]Kobilisation.

REPORT FORM NPaF 1

The HPAF 1 report now being fied to cover the second
quarter of 1953 will be the last in this series, ITA
Acting Administrator H. B. MbCoy announced. A report
covering the third quarter of 1953 will not be requir-
ed, it was stated.

The forms have been filed with NPA each quarter over
the past several years. The tabulated data on product
shipments and consumption of steel, copper, and alumi-
nun have provided a basic record of the metal using in-
dustries of the nation over this period,

ALNHYDROUS AMMIOIA~

Announcement was made that after consultations with
producers of anbrydrous almmonia recommendation had been
made to the Department of the Army regarding dis~tribn-
tion of purchases of sanmonia which vould meet its re-
quirerments. The recommendations are based upon under-
standings with prodnoers as to what quantities of the
military requirements each would supply.

The announcement said the recommendation included a
basis of procurement designed to result in a mitniana
dislocation of deliveries of the product to civilian
consumers.

APPFAL OlF BPA VIOLaTOR DISMISSED

The appeal of the American Callvert and Fabricating Can-
pany of Cambridge, Ohio, and its officers fran a sus-
pension order issued June 16, 1953, has been dismissed
by Appellate Comlmissioner James M. Favoett, the Nation-
al Production Authority announced,

The carmpany~, engaged in the manufacture and installa-
tion of steel bridge superstructures, had been charged
by NPA vith 45 violations of its regulations and orders
consisting chiefly of unauthorized procurement of strue-
tural steel for the manufacture of bridges, illegal use
and failure to keep and maintain required records,


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE










I


_____ _,


FOR FURTHER DE_
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITEMS GET
IN TOUCH WITH
THE NEAREST 88 S
DEPAR'lMENT OF
COMMERCE FIELD
OFFICE.


American insurance companies paid net premiums of
$152.9 million to foreign reinsurers in 1952, Recovery
of losses against this amount was $100.7 million, re-
sulting in net foreign dollar receipts of $52.2 million
franm reinsurance of U. S. risks, an increase of nearly
29 per cent over 1951 receipts.

Farm fixed investment fran 1949 to 1952 averaged $3)
billion and accounted for almost one-eighth of total
fixed investment in the economy, the Office of Business
Economaies, U. S. Department of Commnerce estimated. This
total was more than double the pr~evar rate of farm in-
vestment in the period of 1937-41, even after allowance
for a virtual doubling of prices of farm capital goods.

Broad production advances of the past year have brought
current business sales and output well above those of
any previous summer. With private and public demand
continuing strong, the truce in Korea has had little
Amediate effect on the volume of domestic business ac-
tivity. Industrial activity continued high in the third
quarter, manufacturers' sales in June remained above
$26 billion for the third successive month, and persor-
al income and employment of civilians continued high,


L7 Residential Financing, 1950 Census of Housing, Vol.
IV, Part 1, U. S., Buckram Bound, $4.25
Facts For Indus~try Reportes
Pulp, Paper & BoardJuane 1953, MM~A-63,104 1 Year
Machine Tools, 1952, MDAA-02, 10e
Tractors, ~Eroept Garden Type, 1st Quarter 1953,
M37B-1-3, 10f, 504 Year
Tractors, 1952, M37A-02, 10 254 Year
Construction Machinery, Exccavating and Earthmoving
E tuipment, Summary for 1952, EI36A-02, lot, 50Q Yr.


SOMETHING OLD AND SOMETHING NE
rC State of Birth 7~-n 190 U S Ces of Pop-
nlation, P-E #4A, 554
C7 Farms and Farm People, Population, Incorme
& Housing Characteristica By Economidc Class-'
se of Farm, 50 '
Hydrnaulic Research in U. S., NBS Mis. Pub.
#208, $1.25
L7 Safety Rules for Painters & Decorators, SBA I
#235'
L7Case Study Results of Inadequate Manage-'
ment Planning, SBA #236
Simplifying Stock Room Problems, SBA #237'
Some Ways of Reducing Lamber Yard Expensres, '
SBa #238'
n Suggestions on Keeping Your House in Order, '
SBA #l239
7 How to Save on Shipping, SBA #2L0


Employment in July was at a new all-time high for the
month. Estimated at 63,120,000 in the week ending July
11, total civilian employment showed little change front
June but stood about a million above last year's record
July figure, the Census Bureau reported.

Business inventories at the end of the first half of
1953 were estimated at $77 billion, which, after allow-
ance for seasonal variations, showed a rise of $2.8
billion in book value, with about $b700 million of the
rise in June.

Total wholesalers' sales in June were estimated at $8,-
600 million, or I per cent above the samemonth in 1952
which after adjustment for seasonal variations was
slightly lower than in the preceding month. Sales by
durable-goods dealers were $3,000 million and those by
nondurable-goods dealers amounted to $5,600 million. On
a seasonally adjusted basis, the dur~ables group showed
a small increase from May while nondurable-goods sale
declined 2 per cent.

Gross national product, the market value of the output
of goods and services in the nation was at an annual
rate of $372 billion in the second quarter of 1953 as
compared with $362 billion in the preceding quarter.
Consumer purchases were higher, and most other types of
buying for final use also registered furrther advances
or maintained recent high rates.

Expenditures for new construction this year are expect-
ed to reach $~34-2/3 billion, exceeding last year's re-
cord by 6 per cent or $2 billion, the U. S. Departnenta
of Commerce and Labor reported. This year's dollar vol-
use of new construction also will represent a new peak
in work actually put in place, when adjustment is made
for price changes.


r<-~-t NEW BOOKSCKECKC THE MAT_
?417 (()S ,( p ERIAL DESIRED IN
AN. RE(RT THE SPACE PROVII)..
~,~iv/nED AND SEND THIS
PORTION OF' THE
BULLETIN OF COM-
MERCE TO THE NEAREST U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COM~MERCE OFFICE.
YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAKIE RE-
MITTANCES FOR SALES K6ATERLAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF Tggg
UNlTED STATES.
August 1, 1953 Consolidated Cotton Report
Provisional Estimrates of Population of U. S., Jan.
1, 1950 to July 1, 1953, P-25, #77, 5#
13Mbnthly Report on Labor Force, July 1953, P-57, #133,
104, Annual Subscription, $1.50
Canned Food Report, July 1, 1953, lo#, early, 500
Pe~troleutm Products, June 30, 1953, Secondary Invep-
tories and Storage Capacity, Gasoline, Kerosene, D~is-
tillate Fuel Oile, Residual Fuel Oils
Fruit Spread Production, Preliminaryr Report, 1952, 5#
Synthetic Genestones, PB111163, 25#
Flastics Wbulding, PB 1061172, $1.25
Weights and Weasures Case Reference Book, NBS Cir.
540O, 97 pages, Buckcram Bound, $1.25
/7Economic Indicators, August 1953, Prepared For Joint
Co~mmittee on Econompic Report byg Council of Economic
Advisers, 83d Congreas, 1st Seasion, 201 copy, $2 Tr.
SSurvey of Current Business, August 1953, 304, Year-
ly Subscription, $3.25
Eighway Statistics, 1952, 60#
Wbnthly Retail trade Report, U. S. & Selected Cit-
ies, 101 copy, $1 a year
NbaWothly Wholesale trade Report, U. S. & Regions,
100 copy, $1l a year


'

,
'
*

'
'
'
'

'
'


/ 7 Making Ends Meet On Lees Than $2,000 a ear, Case
Studies of 100 Low-Income Families, Senate Doo,
#112, 35#
Camp Stoves & Fireplaces, 50/
Your Farmhouse Dut-Onrts To Help in Planning, iese.
Pulblication #622, 25#


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








I


FORTI-ONE NWY C. OF 0. ,S NlOW COOPERATING

Forty-one southeastern local Chambers of Camm~erce have
executed agreements to cooperate with the U. S. Depart--
ment of Commerce in making available to their busineess-
men and other interested persons publications and data
of value to business and the public which are supplied
by the Department of Commnerce.
The Chambers of Cammerce entering the cooperative pr>
gram to date in the region areas

Alabama Dotban, Florence, Huntarille, Phenix City,
Sheffield and Tuscaloosa.

Florida Fort Mfyers, Gainesville, Lakeland, Orlando,
Pensacola, St. Petersburg, and Serasota.

Geargia Albany, Athens, Colurmbus, Dalton, Gaines-
ville, Moul~trie, Rome, Thom~asille and Vaycross,

Mississippi Clarkedale, Greenville, Gulfport, Bat-
tiesburg, Natchet, Tupelo and Vickaburg.

South Carolina Anderson, Columbia, Rock Hill, Spar-
tanburg and Walterboro.

Tennessee Cleveland, Colum~bia, Elizabethton, Jack-
son, Johnson City, Kingaport and Morristown.
Previously, 11 other Chambers of Comrmerce and other or-
ganizations in the region had beccame affiliated as cm
operative offices, making a total in all of 52 in the
six-State area. The older ones areas

Alabama Birmingham and Montgamery.

Florida Thapa and K~ey West.

Gear~gia Valdosha, I ~~mswk and Au~gusta*
Missiasippi Jackson (Milssissippi Agricultural and
Industrial Board)*

South Carolina Sumter and Greenville.

Tennessee Nashville'


SOUTHEAST'S HOME OWNERS CARRYP IARGE DEBT

Ho~me owners in the South carry a mortgage indebtedness
on their properties totalling upwards of $2 billion, a
report just issued by the Bureau of the Census from its
17th decennial Census of Housing shows,

Included in the debt, which covered all forms of now
farm residential properties were 300,381 mortgages for
$2,030,363 000, among which were 24,920 second mark-
gages for $171,732,000.
This report is entitled "Residential Finan-
cing, 1950 Censue of Housing, Vol. IV, Part 1,
U. S.," which is available at all Deparim~ent
of Commerce field offices far $4.25, buckrram
bound,

Nearly half of the total indebtedness, or $917,430,000,
was held by life insurance companies, but savings and
loan associations carried more mortgages than any other
group, 84,975. The remainder of the debt and mortgages
were distributed among commercial banks and trust comp
anies, mutual savings banks, mortgage companies, the
Federal National Mortgage Association, and individuals.

Most of the mortgages 82,488, were made or assumed in
1949. They totalled 6573,978,000. But there were 543
for $1,603,000 that were in operation as early as 1929
and even before that year.

VMWN "INVADEn MANY LINES OF MEN'S JOBS

There are 1L omen railroad conductors, 35 f> *
nale locomotive engineers, 16 locomotive firemen *
a and even 45 blacksmiths in the seven southeastern a
a States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, a
a Tennessee and the Carolinas,according to an anal- a
ysis of Bureau of the Census reports issued from a
its 17th decennial census of population recently a
taken in the region.
+ Females have also ninvadedn other lines of man- a
a aal labor. There are 55 plasterers, 257 plurmbers a
and pipe fittera,13 structural metal workers, 457 "
a mine operatives and laborers, 320 oilers and a
a greasers, and 86 langshoremen and stevedores. a


I GPO 663458


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


3 2208748 9299
BULLETIN OF commrnur.


PAGE 4


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oflice
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLWE 7, NWlBI 17 SEPTEMBER 1, 1953



- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE K(EY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMlENT OF COMMIIERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL. FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMlATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE RECULARI.Y.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
(GPO)

















ATLANTA, GA., CHARLESTON,S.C., ~JACKSONVILLE,FLA., MLFMPHIS, TENN., MIAMdI, FLA., SAVANNAH,GA.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 218 P.OI.Bldg.,
Tel.WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-4755


SOUTBFAST THIRD IN REfIONALt FARM MALCHIN3E OUTPUT

The Southeast last
SHIPMENTS OF FARM MACHINES year stood third among
AND EQUIPMENT: 1947-1951 alrgosi h .
S. in value of farm
YLLyON OF DOLLARs m~ohines and equip-
2,50 TOTAL FOastI ment shipped to mar-
2poo k. F t, a current OODBMS
Bureau report showed.
I,500
The $175,257,000 ral-
Ipoo ae of such products
shipped fram plants in
soo At- I Ilabama, Florida, Ten-
nessee, Georgia, Miss
0 ~issippi, and the Caro-
linas, and also Ken-
tackry, the Virginias,
jiourg~e: Bureaa of the Census M~aryland and Delavare
was exceesded anl7 by
the value of such shianents in the East Noarth Central
sootion, which totalled $1,164,994,000, and in the West
North Central area, which amounted to $3j92,251,000.

This report is one of the Facts For Indutstrr
series and is entitled "Farm Nahines and
agairent, 1952." Itrs listed an Page 3 and
pel1p for 25 cents,
In the Southeast, shipments last year krept pace with the
gradual decline in value of farm output in manh of the
region and, consequently, reflected a sharp reduction as
compared with the value et abiFateate fro the area in
1951, which were valued at $190,130,000. Shipments in
1952, however, vare same 47 per cent greater than tho**
in 1950, which vere oalnet at $19,324,000.
8nbatantald ineeases in the value of shitments in the
Southeast last year orse 1950 were Ladiented for neely
all southeastern States.

8ALES TAL1 COLLECTI ESl HIB I~I BMIG 50

The seesn southeastean States of Alabam, Flarid, Gee-
gtia, Missaiasippi, Tenameseesatl the Carolians in the
ii1seal year ending this July colleetea a total of $401,-
100,000 in sales taxes,~~~~ttttt~~~~tttt som $45;,886,000) more than the
eollections in the prvious flcal year, saocardin to
a repart of the Bureen of the Ceases ea State tax col-
lestions.

Georgia's "takes" of S97,818,000 1st the ares, sat, in
hast mes the sevnth largest in the Unit*A Sttes.

Other colleetions in the regaen war* $55,930,000 in Ah-
berai n Fid, $62,517 0003 Mss'isspp, )32a368,000s
Iwth Carolas, t55,198,000; Bath Garela, 56,086,
coon s at **===*, 851,25L~ooe.


50 PW CWT OF U. S. COTT~CH OODS S.E. 'S OUTPUfT

Nearly 50 per cent of the nration'sr output of finished
oottan oven goode in 1952 came off production lines in
plants of five southeastern States, Alabama, Georgia,
the Carolinas and Tennessee, a Poota Far Indutlryll re-
port just issued by the Brrean of the Conn sueaboed.
Of & t0181 Of 7,534,388 000 linear yards produced in
the United States, 1,7~78,5;86,000 eam~ tram South Caro-
Ilna; 1,081,257,000 from warth Carolina; 405,132,000
tram Georgial 240,890,000 from~ Alabama; and 117,835,-
000 from Tennessee, far: a southeastern total of 3,623,-
700,ooo yards.
This report ir listed on Page 3. Its title
is "Cotton and Synthetio Noven Goods, Fin-
iahed, 1952." Av~ailable at all Departent
of Ccanaerce field offio4 for 10 coats.
South Carolina led all other States in production. Mase-
achursette was second with an output of 1,102,651,000
yards, and North Carolina vae third. Georgiacs total was
aixth and was also nemeeded by the 675,566,000 yards
Fp~ruoded in Rhode Island, and New Jersey's total of
582,375,000.
The 1952 production in the 5-state area of the Southeast
vae nearly 500 micllion yards greater than that of 1951
when 3,144,391,000 vare prodce~ad.

GOVRHMwrT PAYMBITS IN REGION $4.5 BIILZION

Residents of the seven southeastern States of Alabamr~
Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas last year received a total of $4,568,888,000 in
ineoase fro State, local rad Federal govermets, as
oarding to a fu~rther analyale of the saunal report on
inseee paymnts to individuals issued by the Offo* of
Business Econmaics, U. S. Department of Cameroe.

Georgia led with $839,580 000, and Flarids was second in
total amount received vti d 825,776 000. Warth Carolin-
t~~ansreive $705,663,000, AL1bahnian $98,124,000,.
Tennaseeasn, $660,420,000, South Carolnr, $461,-
177,000, sat MI~sLesiapplans, $375i,158,000. fall to-
staneas, the paymets were higher than those received
in 1951.
laW BUSIESS STATfISTICS VOulUM IsSUE,

Sontheastsrn business me will now Hand available at all
Department of Coemero* field offless the 1953 bdlems1
*Aition at "Business Statistios,'l the pahliatica il
every7 ~tu years whih supplies a resdy sourse of hifr

at surrent *****- ee ihm It *******==1 il
wasa Ster emeh at the 2,400~ amles et **** SmaLatre
asse +memea lsP) a....a.. rgssa use -..


VOLUME 7, NUIMBEI 18


SEPTEMB 15, 1953


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE






_ ______ 1


U. S. PURCHASES OFF SBAPLY IN AUGIST

A sharp reduction in U. 8. government purchases in the
Southeast inbAugust as compared with July of this year
was reflected in day-to-day contract award listed re-
ceived in U. S. Department of Comm~erce offices for bs-
iness men in the region.

The burying dropped from 218 contracts in July with a
dollar value of $39,802,286 to 31 contracts in A~ugust
valued at $2,7461,091 awarded in Allabama, Florida, Geor.
gia, Missiasippi, South Carolina and Tennessee.

These contract award liste,along wit in -
tations to bid on goods needed by the U. S.
are avathable in all Department of Comrmerce
field offices on an inspection basis, at far
$7 a year. The half-year subscription far $4
bas been abandoned.
The purchases reflected in the lists are made an a for-
mally advertised and negotiated unelassified basis. The
only goods bought in the region in Augusat were lunber
in Allabem~a, brushes and stators in Florida, sugar, pea-
aut butter and methanol In Georgia, and crushed stone,
pencils and coal in Tennessee. Othenrwse, the pulrchases
were either directly or indirectly related to constrao-
tion work.

Io purchases at all vere made in South Carolina, and
for the first time since the Klorean war started in 1950
there wasI no buying of textile goode in the 6-State

arm* --


MRO REGULATIONS ARE REVISED, FASING RES'JRICTIONS


.. _.


Direction 1C to DMS Reg. 1 wae
A th t oed in repose to a joint
U Ori TJrequest by the Department of Db
(Authority fense and Atomrie Ebergy Cam~ie-
aion, the general purpose of which was to provide a
means of permitting any manufacturer to comply frith de-
livery requirements placed upon him by NPA regulations
when inabili~ty to obtain MROD materials without priority
or allo~tmenlt antharity threatened his production sched-
nle. In addition, a companion Direction 3 was iaeued to
IMS Reg. 2 covering MRO requirements of construction
contractors under the Defense Materiale System. The
directions also permit acquisition of installation mat-
eriale needed for completion of defense contracts by
means of self-authorisation.

The new directions, N0PA officials said, will avoid the
neceeaity far making special requests and obtaining ~in-
dividuaal approval far priority authority to obtain re-
pair parts and materials needed far completion of de-
fense contracted

COPPER, COPPER BASE AILOIP ORDER AMENsDE
Percentages of copper and coppeabase alloy products
required to be set aside by producer under the new De-
fense Materiale System far dellive~y of military and a-
tomic energy orders in the first quarter of 1954 were
announced by HPA vith issuance of Amendment 2 to Order
)C11A.

The new amendment, applicable to orders for copper and
copper-base alloy products for delivery after Dec. 31,
1953 for defense programs identified by the symbol A,
B, C, D, and E, sete forth percentages vbich will sup-
ersede the higher set-aside percentages now included
in Section 9 (b) of IPA Grder M-11A.

the percentage reserves far military and atomic energy
orders inearparated in the new a~mendment have been rb
rised dounuard in the light `of subsequent experience
with the copper and coppelbase alloy requirements far
military and stamie energy orders since promulgation
of gPa 0rder )-11A on May~ 6, 1953.

U. S. TO STOCKPILE MORE ALUMImU 4TB QUARTIE
The Office of Defense Mobilization has announced that
a somewhat larger amount of alamimrm vobld be directs
ed to the national stockpile in the fourth quarter of
1953 than in the current quarter,

The moeal, to came from prodnetion supported by Fed-
eral stockpile and *zpansion aide, will be the largest
quantity to be delivered to the stockpile in say quars-
ter to date.

Barring power difficulties, it is expected that chvil-
lan users will have appreciably more alamnump in the
aotobe-Deember patiod than in say previene quarters,


A4 total of 7,220 persons living in the South- '
Senet were bars abroad of Am~erican parents, ao- '
'carding to a report issued by the Bureen of '
Sthe census from its 1950 census of population. '

SIncluded were 1,075 living in Narth Carolina, *
S460 in South Carolina, 1,230 in Georgia, 2,225 '
Sin Flarida, 935 in Tennessee, 675 in Alabean, '
Sand 620 in Mlissiasippt* '
The report is entitled "State of Birth" and is '
available at all Depazrimenlt of Coamerce field '
offices far 55 cents.

364.3 MIIZIGNH CHICKS PRODUCED Il REGIaB

The southeattern States of Alabama, flarida, Georgia,
Hissiesippi, the Carolinas and Virginiae, Kentucy,
Tennessee, Mlaryhand and Dalacare in the first 7 months
of this year produced a total of 364,396,000 baby
chicks in csamercial hatcheries, according to a report
of the Buraeaa of Agriculturarl Econocic, U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

Geargia, with an output of 82,569,000 chicks, moved
into second phece in the United states. Other totaled
were North Carolina, 44,693 000; Mlaryland, 50,396,0001
Virgiiai, 49,044,000; De~laae 34,493,000; Florida,
15,132,0003 South Carolina, 8,630,000) Vest Virginia,
7,661,0003 Alaberan,18,945,000 ) Mississippi, 27,293,-
0001 Tennessee, 14,210,0001 and Kentaccky, 11,330,000,
Niesorrai still held the lead in the United states with
total of 88,400,000 chicks at the ea& of the 7-meath
period. By producing 2,600,000 more chicks than at the
same time hast year, Georgia displae*A TIndIan.


Self-author~ization Fprocedure to
obtain maintenance, repair and
operating materials under the
Defense Mfaterials Systen has
GI been extended to manmfacturers
of "fnclaesified" praoducts and
materials, including controlled
tin materials, the Niational Produo--
tin tion Authority announced,


PrOduc


7,@ KoU'IWasm UIRE WRN IBREAD


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





Fap Fupther Dy-
tailp Of Any Of
These Items Get
In Touch Nity
i The Nearest 8,8,
Department Of
Commnerce Field
Office.

Personal income in July of this year was at an annual
rate of $288 billion, more than $1% billion higher than
in.June. The July income gain reflected the continued
rise of private industry payrolls, while other forms of
income showed only ainar obanges. For the first seven
months of 1953, personal income was at an annual rate
of $281* billion, 7 per cent higher than for the ease
period of 1952.

Excpenditures for new construction continued at record
levels in ALugust totalling lightly over $i3.3 billion,
preliminaryr estimates of the Department of Cammerce
and labor show. Dollar volume was about 7 per cent as
bove the total far: Agus1t 1952.

M~anufacturers( abipments in July totalled $24.5: billion
and after seasonal allowances rose 2 per cent from the
June rate. Inventories rose fractionally, while both
new and unfilled orders fell alightly below June. July
sales by manufac~turers of dra~ble-goode were up 3 per
cent on a seasonally adjusted basis, and vare ano-third
higher than last July during thle steel strike. Record
deliveries of primary metals and transportation equip
meat contributted largely to the June to July increase
for the group.


_~ ~ ~ ___ __


SSysthetic Broad Noven Goods, Sume~ry for 1952,
FFIM50-02, 100, 50e Tear
Steel Mill Products, 1952, FFIM22NO2, 10t
Beating &r Cooking Equipent, 1952, FFIM51N-02, 15#,
$1 Year
Farm Machines &r Equi~Pat, 1952, FFIN35A-02, 25C
aoto 0i snhtic Woven Goods, Finished, 1952,
L7Plum~b Fixtures, 2nd Qwuater 1953, MlB-2-3, 10#,

SOMEITBINOG GED AND S(WETBIING NEU
r r/ Evaluating Schwl lanchee & htrmoal
5 tate of Childlren1 Cir ~859,

1 / 3-1e of loi ating Oils & Greases, 1951
B States, Types & Campany Classificatione

'Pilferage Control, 8BA #241
a Merchandising Progrea for the smaller

Trade Showvs Can Belp the Manufacturer's
SSales Program, SBA #243
/ Reducing Related Expnditur~e in Packing,
S sBa #25
1 / The Retail Jeweler Ganlges the Narket
s Ba #246
L Maintaining Bigher Tpurnovr of Men's Ap
' parel S~aL
Wood Preservation, PB111110, $3.25
EvaloatianP of Fabrice, ?8111151, $L.50
Experiment with Wool flannels, PB111105, 754~
Inspecting Foundry Products, P811116, 500
Business Statistice, 1953 Edition, $1.50
Annual Survey of Heauractures, 1951, Bookram Bound,
$2.25


Check The Mat-
:; eial Desired

or ~ied ad
Send Thip Pr-

Qcpmerce To ~ns:'~+The aet Ui S DprenofCmrce ~-


**e Ada lim n drs r ITeOroit ie


Unemployment dropped in August to match the pookc~orld
War II loo. Estimated at 1,240,000 in the week ending
August 8, unemployment vae about 300,000 below the July
level, the Burean of the Censue reported. Only 1.9 per
cent of all civilian workers were out of jobe as con-
pared with a year ago.
Total sales of retail stores in July amounted to $14.2
billion, about 6 per cent above the same month a year
ago. General stability in total sales D1reviously evi-
denced this year continued. After adjur :ing for seac
sonal factors and trading day differeecse, July sales
were down about one-half of one per cent from June and
about equal to the average far~ the first half of the
year.

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $576 million in July, f4 per cent
above the $547 million paid out in the same month a
year ago. The increase in dividends over July of last
year centered in the nomanumfacturing industries where
Tpayments were up 8 per cent in the aggregate. About
on~balf of the expansion in nomanufiacturing oeourred
in the comm~unications industry in which the nurmber of
shares outstanding bas increased markedly.

Housing starts, totalling 96,000 in July, declined by
7 per cent, at 7,000 anits, from June, the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of labar, said. Al-
though the decrease was widespread geographically, it
vae about the am~ount that alght be expected for this
time of year, it was stated. Privately owned dwellings
vere down from June by 5 per cent to 95,600 starts,
5,500 under July 1952, but more than in any other July
except the record high of 1950. The 400 public housing
unite represented the lowest monthly ouenna~L~


MaeRemtacsFrSlsMtr P yabl To Pes
ep of The Gaited States.


~7 Marital Status & sehold Characteristics, ALPr.

L~1952 Annual Survey of Meanfactures Value of Shi
mrents of Selected Claseea of Products for the U. S.
1952, 1951, 1950 and 19147, MAS-531, 20)
AnanLmal Retail Trade, 1952, Estimated Dollar Volumes
of Merchandise Inventaries & Receivables far Dec.31
1952, Percentage Changes in Inventaries, Sales-Iz a
ventory Ratica
15Census of Populations
Institutional Population, P-B#2C, $1T.00
Panploym~ent &k Persanal Characteristica,P-E#1A,70)
Persons of Spanish Surname, P-E #SC, 45#
Alaska Detailed Charactieritics, P-C51, 35#
095 Census of Housings
U. S. SumaY,1J GeneralB Characteristics, HA-1, $L
Florida, RA 10, 604
Georgia, HA 11, $1.00
Illustrative Projoetions of the Population of th*
o. S. By Ag~e & Sex, 1955 to 1975, P-25,#r78, 10)
8tate Tax Collections in 1953, G-SF53#4,C 10# -
Sumary of City Goverment Finances in 1952, G-CPS2

L7 Report ca cotton Glaning, Aug. 24, 1953


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








) "UNITED STATES OF AMWICAR

' Southeastern business men who engage in forieig trade are being urged by Secretary of Canmerce
( Sinclair Veeks to mark external shipping containers, whenever practicable, with the phrase 1
"United States of America." Th request was made in line with a resolution of Congress that
r the inscription be used whenever possible in the expert of American-ande goods. "We are justly
proumd of the products of American industry, labar and agriculture we export overseas," the
Secretary said. 'They symbolise the accomplishments of our thriving free entepisee system,
and it is just and fitting that they be labelled with the inscription ,Onited States of Amer-aaaaaa
' ica,' I am confident the bupines e opppuity w11 qopewrate *****,"


60 SOUTHEASTIWN~ CITIES WD) 1952 IN "RED"

Sixty southeastern cities ended their 1952 fiscal year
with total general expenditures exceeding total general
revenues by more than $21,000,000,and with an outstad-
ing debt of vall in excess of balf a billion dollars,
acearding to a report just issued by the Bureau of the
Censu .

General revenutes of the cities, including seven each in
Alabama and Tennessee, 15 in Florida, nine in Georgia,
11 in Wcarth Carolina, four in South Carolina, and seven
in Mississippi, all over 25,000 population, totalled
$i266,570,000 and general expenditures, $;287,586,000.
The outstanding debt 6 136 000. 6,OO

entitled "Snanary of City
metFinances in 1952' and is avai.
able at all Department of Commeraee
fesfar 10 cents. Itra listed o
Since the repoiGIB"rmg"~ far the larger cit
ies, it vae not possible to determine which of them
ended the year "in the red," or just how the indebted.
nees was apportioned.
In Florida, the nautgo" exceeded income by around $9,-
600,000, in Georgia the inoame mark was surpassed by .
more than half a million, in Nlississippi by nearly a
million and a half, in North Carolina by mare than $5,-
000,000, and in South Carolina by about $316,000.
On the debt side were Alabeatnac (91,109,000; Flarida's
$i220,930,000; Georgia's $81,022,000; Mfissirsippils
$41,016 000; Nlorth Carolina'a $89,781,000) South Caro.
linals b9,267,000) and Tennaessee' $153,011,000.


$7.8 MILLION IN NICESSITY~ CERTIFICATES ISSUED
Plant and facility expansions in four southeastern
States were included in certificates of necessity ie-
seed by the Office of Defense Mobilisaltion in Washing-
ton in the past month,

Air transportation and railway improvements, as well
as to motor Freight transportation operations, and the
production of fabr~icated steel plate prodnets figured
in the actions taken.

Delta Air Lines, Inc., of Atlanta, received a $7,205,-
000 oartificate covering improvements to its airline
system, and the Birmingham Southern Railroad Company's
projected $200,000 exrpenditure on its own line was ap
proved. Others granted were
Illinois Central Railroad, $34,960 and $53,455, rere
pectively for projects at Vickabur~g and Jackson, Miss.,
Georgia Bighway Expreas, anc., Atlanta, $84,343, for
its motar freight transportation line, and Chattanooga
Boiler and Tank Company, Chattanooga, $156,309, far
the production of fabricated steel plate products.

CAMP RUCKEB ALABAMA GFF RWT CONTROL

Removal of Dale county, ALlabean, in the Camp Rucker
area From~ Federal rent control effective August 31 of
this year was announced by the Office of Defense Nobil-
isation. It was oe of four areas to lose their desig-
nation of criticall defense housing area."
The other three areas to lose the designation airmultas
eonaly are in Nebraska, Nevada, M~issouri, Illinois, and
Louisiana. see assess


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE: USE TO AVOID
PAYMIVENT OF POSTAGE $300


BU LLETII 312207891


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
V001818 7, 50MER~ 18 83TPTBR6 15, 195i3



-- ILETII OF COMMERCE F
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE K(EY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORIATION.
CONSULT TOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.1


I~S


UUInnREasi OPFOR nCoas
LEROY .. QUUALS
MI~~ETHENE :~~QM~Oif: 8 aggg
GAENrssrrt I,LB FLRD P'-rta .




S/ ~If 1f7: '/ / / 7
UNITED' STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE








A, A.,CHALETON S..,JACKSONV~ILLE,FLB MEPITN. IAI, LH ., SAVANNARP,GA.,
7t;P~h looeh Bldg., Sgt.JaperEFd.,425Fedra Bldg. 229 Federal Blg.,9 Seybold Bldg., 218 P.O.Bldg.
TelevA-4121, Ex.453 Tel. -71Tl 11Tl 8-3426Te.-73Tl.275


~rrr


REGION 00W~TINUS TO LEAD IN PULZP,PAPER OW~PfW
The Southeast last year continued to be the nation's
major producer of wood pulp, paper and board with the
regions output concentrated largely in the two States
of Florida and Georgia, sooording to a report of the
Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Comaeroe.

Florida, Georgia, Allabamar, MLsaissippi, Tennessee, the
Carolinas,Virginia and M~aryland produced 6,994,968 tons
of wood pulp and 6,491,726 tons of paper and board in
1952, which was samre 42 per cent of the U.S. production
of 16,472,979 tons of wood pulp, and about 26 per cent
of its output of 24,427,785 tons of paper and board,


This Census Bureau report is one of the
Facts For Industry series. It's entitled
Nood Pul~s Paper &r Board. 1952, and is
priced at 15), soe page 4 for ordering,

Of the some 6.9 million tons of wood pulp turned out in
the Southeast in 1952, Florida vae credited with a pro-
duction of 1,485,571 tone and Georgia, 1,227,057. In
the paper and board field, Floridals output totalled
1,255,989 tone in 1952 and Georgials, 1,010,430.
DIIE IS PRIEDIPAL, PRODUCER OF HARDWEOOD P~ENEER

The South is still the nation's major producer of hard-
vood render. In 1952, sooording to a Bureau of the Cen-
sea report, the southern region produced nearly 65 per
coat of the U. 8. supply of that commodity.

Production in the South last year was plaoed at 6,623,-
872,000 square feet of a total for the nation of 10,-
345s682,000 square feet, the report showed. This, howr-
ever, was, 100 million faet less than the regional pr~o-
duction in 1951, which approximated 6,723,937,000 feet.


This isanother Ft~acts ~Fornduty e
port. Its title is fardvood Venaer.l952
and it's obtainable at any Department
of Coggero* field office .for 1O#,
The report also showed statistically that the bulk of
the southern production was of the oomaercial and
utility type of veneer, rsuh as that used in the 1man-
facture of plywood for containers and packaging, as
well as oores, orosabands and beek for other plgwood.
bext la importance in the region vae the marnufacture
of the container type of veneer used in fabrioat~ion of
virebound sad sailed veneer boaes and other containers
such as berry eups, tiller, heapers, barsets, and the


The report also showed the South as leader in produe-
tion of veneer logs and bolts.


M usear ,, l,,,, l rea ~ 1..< it I.t~l
Sources Survey of Current Business,
Office of Business Economioes,
O. 8, Department of Comuerce,
regional econromy continuing an ulpward
corresponding period of 1952 vith one
income,


Copies of this report are available gratin
from the nearest U. 8. Department of Com-
mere field office,

Deposits, loans and debits in Federal Resere meber
banks were on the rise, as were activities in the trade
field,nrew business incorporations, telephonres in opera-
Sion, malnufacturing emaployment, urban construction,
transportation revenues, production of electric energy,
imports, cotton consumption, rad production of pulp,
paper and southern pine.

In some instanes, the regional advaces were equal
to, or better than, the national average, particularly
in the fields of bank debits, retail and department
store trade, new businesses inoorporated, electric
energy produced, airline revenue passengers carried,
and one or two major lines of industrial output,

Cash fare income in the area dropped some $85 million
and there vae also a dealine in railroad passenger
revenue. More cotton was on hand at the enid of the
first half of 1953 than at the same time last yearI and
shipments of southern pine were off. Alsro, in the field
of world 5 reading, the value of exports slipped some 8
per oeat in the customls distriots.


OCTOBER 1, 1953


S SENISUB CORINUE T


B GIH LEVEL IN 80WH T


a high level
of business
activity for
the Southeast
in the first
half of 1953
was shown in
the quarterly
sumary of
business con-
ditions in the
area jst is-
sued by the
Atlanta reg-
ional office
of the U. .
DepartmQent of
Comneroe. The
quarterly suD--
mary, the soo-
ond such re-
port of the
year, aboved
virtuallyy ev.
'ery major seg-
'aent of the
trend over the
exooption, farm


VOLUMEg 7, NUOMBER 19







I


mDTOR VEHICLES HIT 6.4 MILLION MARK( IN SOUTHEAST

The seven southeastern States of Allabama, Florida, Lea-
sissippi, Georgia, Tennessee and the Carolinas this
year are expected to 'chalk upn a record total of 6,-
490,000 registered motor-vehicles, a 46 per cent rise
in registrations in the past 5 years, according to a
report of the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department
of Commerce on prospective 1953 registrations.

If the 1953 forecast proves corrects this would mean a
vehicle for every 3.30 persons in the ?-State area.

Biggest percentage increase in the region in the 5-year
period muse in Florida where a 55.2 per cent advance vae
recorded, or a rise of 431,500 vehicles. Allabamaa was
second with a gain of 49.4 per cents or 268,000 ve-
hicles.

Florida also was the most "thickly populated with ve-
hicles, that State showing an average of one vehicle
for every 2.55 persons. South Carolina was second with
a vehicle for every 2.99 persons.

The compilation showed the following prospective regisr-
trations for 1953 with those for 1952, and the number
recorded in 1948 is also given for comparison purposes

North Carolinas 1,216,000 in 1953, 1,171,015 in 1952,
and 848,357 in 1948; Florida, 1,214,000, 1,178,682, and
782,435; Georgia, 1,054,000, 1,021,722, and 716,2871
1Tennessee, 946,000, 933,900, and 672,522; Alabenas
810,000, 777,285, and 541,993, South Carolina, 711,000,
686,270, and 484,579; and Mississippi, 539,000, 524,-
062, and 397,723.

REGIONIlS RAIIROADBI SPEND $126.6 MILLION

Railroads in six southeastern States, Allabana, Florida,
Georgia, Ntsiasisippi, South Carolina and Tennessee, in
the past three years have spent and are spending a tot-
al of $i126,609,600 in improving their transportation
systems in the region, according: to an analysis of cer-
tificates of necessity for rapid tax writeoffsr on the
improvements issued in Washington,

The expenditures included $34,738,000 in ALlabama; $10,-
042,500 in Floridai $35,635,900 in Georgia; $i1,006, 900
in Mitssissippi; $2,756,500 in South Carolinat and $41,-
628,800 in Tennessee.

The improvement operations were brought into focus with
the announcement by the Office of Defense Mobilisation,
in Washington, that between August 27 and September 9
eleven plant and facility expansion projects had been
approved for tax amor-tisation purposes in the six
southeastern States of which all but one involved rail-
roada. The one exception was a certificate issued to
the Tennessee Coal and Irom Division of U. S. Steel
Corporation, of Fairfield, A~labana, for plant expansion
purposes in the production of electrolytic tin plate
involving an expenditure of $i8,500,000.

IIICKEL STUDIES ArRE STILL UNDER AYB

The Office of Defense Mobilisation has announced that
it is now clear that nickel studied being made by the
Government will not be completed for some time, and
that no change in the present system of control in-
volving that product can be made effective October 1,
if it is decided to make any change. ODMI has requested
that certain additional information be brought together
designed to show effort of decontrols on that commodity.


PERSONB IN TRADE FIELD GET $5.9 BILLION INY INCOME

Persons in the wholesale, retail and service trade
fields in the Southeast last year received an estimated
total of $5,946,989,000 in income, a further study of
the annual report of the Office of Business Economics,
U. S. Department of Comrmerce on income payments to in-
dividuals in 1952 abows.

The income payments in that sepent of the regional
economy were $339,486,000 above those of 1951 vith all
of the seven southeastern States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mfissiasippi, Tennessee and the Carolinae shar-
Lag in the gain.
This information is available in the Anug-
not 1953 issue of the Survey of Curreng
Business, available at all CommPerce De-
partment offices for 30f,

The payments were greatest in Florida where a total of
$1,324,512,000 was realized in 1952, 10 per cent more
than in 1951, and Georgia vas second on the list with
$1,059,470,000, some 6 per cent up. The others, with
increases in 1952 over 1951 were Alabama, $732,093,-
000, 4 per cent up; Misseissippi, $421,386,000, 4 per
cent; South Carolina, $477,5640000, 7 per cent; and
Tennessees $L928,257,000, also 4 per cent greater.

FARM INCOMEI IN SOUTHEAST OFF $186.4 NILLION

Farmers in the Southeast experienced an overall drop
of $;86,461,000 in cash receipts from farm marketing
in the first half of 1953 as compared with the corrs-
ponding period last year, according to the bimonthly
report of the Bureau of Agricultural Economicas U. S.
Department of agriculture.

The drop in the $-month period was from $1,229,042,000
realizeed at the end of June 1952 to $1,144,581,000 at
the same time this year, including a decrease of from
$1~76,77,000 to $163,898,000 in Nlorth Carolina; $91,-
147 000 to $77,766,000 in South Carolinay $210,979,000
to $167,941,000 in Georgial $189,68G,000 to $173,318,-
000 in Tennesseog $137,900,000 to $116,268,000 in Ala-
bama; and $139,230,000 to $138,040,000 in MIissiasippi

Mbst of the decline came in crop products, returns fran
which fell some $)67,221,000, or from $651,212,000 at
the enid of June last year to $583,991,000 at the same
time this year. In livestock and its products, a de-
orease of from $;577,830,000 to $560,590,000, or $17,-
240,000, took place,
YHDLESALE TRADE CONT~INUES AT HIGH LEVEL

Continuance of a relatively high level of trading in
the wholesale field in the Southeast during the first
seven months of 1953, with 4 per cent increases both
in the South atlantic and East South Central regions
over the corresponding period last year was reported
by the Burean of the Census, U. S. Department of Can-
meree.

Trading during the period was especially brisk in same
electrical supplies, furniture and house furnishings,
refrigeration equipment, drugs and sundries, and cer-
tain foods, offsetting a lack of attention given to
hardware, industrial supplies, plumbing and heating
supplies, and Fresh fruits and vegetables, which re-
flected declines in transactions. A total of 777 firms
in the two areas reported July sales of $i137 million,


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE






1I


Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 1952, FFINI.5A-02, 104
Synthetic Broad Noven Goods, 2nd Quarter 1953, FFI
M150-2-3, 104, 504 Year
L7Household Furniture &r Bedding Products, 1952, Pre-
liainary Report, FFIM54-02, 104
DIConsetruction Machinery, Excavating & Earthaoving
Equipment, Second Qtr. 1953, FFM36~A-2-3, log, 504 Tr.
L7Quarterl SuPmery of Business Conditions in Southeast,
First Balf of 1953

SOMETIEHl OLD & SOMETIME NIEY

Licensling & Exchange Control Require-

Wanfac nree SDl m l Buieas

Improvement of Plastic Laminates and
:o Studies Related Thereto,FB-108421,$2;
NBov the Re aier Determines Customer
Pac ae Planning &r Development, SBA250O
selecting salesmen For the Shoe De-
:opartmrent, SBA#251
Mlodernising the Jovelry store Front,

21eln Jewelry store Campetition,
SSB~Lf254

89th Quarterly Report of Lamber Survey Camittee
ffMobility of the Population of the U.S., ALpril 1952,

U Construction and Building Mlaterials Inustry Re-
port, Au~gust 1953, $;2.50 a Pear
L7shook Tube Tests at Glasing Materials A Publica-
tion Designed To Cut Down Casualties From The Aton
Bomb, $1,00.


Business inventories at the end of July were estimated
at $i77 billion, virtually anohanged from the previous
~nath. Since there was nomsally a seasonal deOline in
that period, the secaonally adjusted book value of in-
ventories rose by $6b00 million in July.

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $221 million in August, 4 per cent
less than the $;232 mlion paid out in the same month a
year ago, The decline in Augeust, one of the lightest
payment months of the year, centered in manufaotaring
where the total fell 17 per cent,

United States international transportation transactions
during the first six months of 1953 indioate that re-
ceipts from foreigners exceeded payments to foreigners
by about $i170 million at an annua rate.

Ret public and private debt in the Unrited States was up
6 per cent last year to a total of $i553 billion, and
the expansion seemed t~o be continuing at about the same
rate so far in 1953. Private obligations were about 55
per cent of the total, and the not debt of the Federal
Government comprised about 40 per cent.

Foreign countries during the second quarter of 1953 ob-
tained in the Unritetd States goods and services valued
at $5.7 billion. They were able to increase their gold
and dollar assets by about $450 million in addition two
repaying various debts to the extent, of $/.40 million,

Total retail sales in August amounted to $14.2 billion
early 6 per cent above a year ago. After seasonal ad-
justment the sales wone down 2 per cent from July,


American business is planning capital outlays of $;14.1,
billion for the last six months of 1953, according to
a joint survey conducted by the U. S. Department of
Camnerce and Seourities and Exchange Com~ission. Out-
lays for the full year 1953 are expected to amount to
a record $27.8 billion, about 5 per cent more than last
ybs*

Total wholesaleral sales in July were estimated at
$i8,900 million, which, after adjustment for seasonal
variation, showed virtually no change from the pre-
vious month. Durable goods sales amounted to $;2,900
million and nondurable, $i6,000 million. On a seasonally
adjusted basis, durable goods sales declined 3 percent
from the previous month while nondurable goods sales
increased lightly*

Production of cotton broad voven goods totalled 2,606
million linea~r yrds in the second quarter of 1953, the
Census Bureau said. This was approximately the same as
the first quarter output but was 15 per cent aboves the
corresponding period last year. All fabric groups
aboved increases over 1952 except cotton duck, napped
fabrics, and cotton tire fabrical


r NEW BOOKS CILI HERIFD HED IN LT
);\t;~AND REPORTS THE SPACE PROVID-
i~u ~ Ri~V/AED AND SEND THIS
PORTION OF THE
BULLETIN OF COY-
TEC O THE NEAREST U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMLERCE OFFICE.
YOUR NAMbE AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAKE RE-
MYITTANCES FOR SALES NATEULAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE
UNITED STATES*
L7Institutional Population, 1950 U. S. Gensue of Popu-
lation, Special Report P-E #20Z, $1.00
SCharacteristice by Sise of Place, 1950 U. 8. Conous
a 2 "oi "lgo*.*."?-# 1 Special ReotPEIb 0

H7 avaii, 1950 Census of Population, Detailed Charo-
t~eristics, Bulletin P-0 52, 604
Fl ars and Famn People, A Special Cooperative Study
Po laion a coe eParsHouing Characteristics By
leone of Persons at New Peak in 1952, P-60,#13, 5#
Provisrional Estimates of Population of U. S., Jan.1,
1950 t~o Aug. 1, 1953, P-25 #7P9, 5#
L7abthly Report on the Labor Force, Aug. 1953, #134,

SPetroleum Products, Secondary Inventories &r Storage
Capacity, Gaeoline, Kerosene, Distillate Fuel and
Residual Fuel Oils, 10#
SReport on Cotton Ginning, Sept. 8, A/C 0-1C00
Cotton Ginned Prior to S pe, 4., Crops of 1953 & 1952s
South Caro ia L/ Louisiana f Alabama
Georgia & Mlrissiippi f Texas f Arkansas
Specified States
Ea dw o Ven er 1952, FFIM13A 0 ,1 0# 0 e r


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


FOR FOJRTHER~ DE.
TAbILS OF ANYJ OF
THESE ITDIS GET
IN TOUCH HITg
THIE NEAREST 58 S
DEPAR'IFENT OF
COMMERCE FIELD
OFFICE.








I


)MANE 80WHEN FAIRM FAIZLIES STILL 08 fIDV IIC P
Mora thaB half a Million farm families in the SOuthseSt
have an income of less than $500 a year. At the other
**.*:0,0 a ": oe.7. ... .
These are some facts gleaned from a new pahblication is-
sued by the Bureau of the Census from its 1950 Census
of ALgriculture entitled "FarmsI and Fara People."
This report is listed on Page 3. Itla
obtainable at anyr Department of can.
merce field office for 50#*
The report shove also that 472,010 other faza families
in the region have been receiving an ineoam of less
than $1,000 a year, and 377,734 others have had to live
on less then $1,500 a year.
The report, one of a series of three cooperative stud-
ies being issued from the 1950 agricultural census
shows, too,that 25 per cent of the region's famn dwell-
ing units surveysed in one prfojec~t were found to be in a
dilapidated condition, and 40 per cent, were more than
30 years old.
iTITWsnnIONAL _PPOPIRATIO HIGH IN AREA
About every 128th person in the Southeast is in soee
sort of an institution, according too a study made of a
ourrent Bureau of the Censue report from ite 1950 cen-
sus of population.
The report showed that of a total population of 20s-
927,214 in Allabama, Florida, Georgia,Mlississippi, Tenn-
essees and the Carolinas, 163,112 vere in institutional*
This report, entitled "Institutional Popn..
lation, is listed in the Order ELank on
Page 3, and is available at all Departmlent
of Caeerce field office f or $1 0 ,


FOREIGN


COMMERCE




.. Is fulfilling Its promise, made when
it was restyled last year,, to give readers

More current information
Easier-to-read type
First-class mailings
At lower cost

88-PERCENT GAIN in subscr ptions


An indispensable tool



for alert world traders


Foreign Commerce Weekly
subscription Form
Please enter my subscriPtion for Foreign Commerce Weekly at $3.50 a year
($4.50 to foreign addresses).
Name........................ ............... ........................... _~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Address..............................................................
C -----------... ...................................... Z ne........... afte ....................
Mail to the nearest U. S. Department of Commerce field office
OPe .*ns.5


The institutions listed by the Cenana Bureau include
those of a correctional nature, hospitals for annual
disease, tuberculosis hospitals, homes for the aged,
homes and schools for aentally and physically handi-
i ft91TnirP thnOP for pageoted and dependent childrengto.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USET TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGIE $300


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BULLETIN3 1262 08748 9273


PAGE 4


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Offce
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

V0151 7, IuMBER 19 OCTOBER 1, 1953


SBILLETIA OF COMMERCE --
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE 1ET-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WHI.L FID
A WEAI.TI OF BUSINESS INFORdATION(.
CONSULT YOUR FlIED OFFICE REQUI.ARIY..





















ATLANTA, GA., ORARLESTON, S.C., JACKISONJVILLE,FTA., MEE>PHIS, TENN., MIAMI, FLA., SAVANNAH, GA.,
7th Floor,Forayth Bldg., Sgt.Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 218 P.O. Bldg.,
Tel.WA-4121, Ex,453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-4755


SOUTHEAST PUTPS BIG SUM IN NEW PLANJTS,EQUIPMENT


U. S. PAYS $285.8 LION FOR GOODS AND SERVICES

The Federal Government in the first nine months of this
year bought goods and services in air southeastern
States valued at $285,813,100, according to a compila-
tion of day-to-day lists of contract awards received in
U. S. Department of Commerce field offices for small
business firms.

Value of the purchases, consisting of contract awards
made on a formally advertised and negotiated unclassi-
fied basis, totalled $52,230,867 in Alabama; $57,531,-
289 in Florida; $57,344,818 in Georgia; $20,255,620 in
Hisoissippi; $15,135,515 in South Carolina; and $83,-
315,014 in Tennessee.

These lists of contract awards, as well
as lists of bids called for are available
to business firms on a subscription basis
of $7 a year at any Department of Commnerce
field office.

In September of this years the value of such buying
amounted to 36 contracts for $9,920,153 in the six-
State area. Two million dollar awards were made, one
to an Orlando, Florida, firm for construction work at
the U. S. Naval Air Station in Jacksonville for $1,-
772,439, and the other to a MJarianna, Florida, concern
for $3,280,565 for a primary pilot training project.

Six contracts for annunition packing boxes, one for lo-
cating missiles and missile components in water, and
another for erection of three radio buildings at Robine
Air Force Base in Georgia vere also among the September
lettings in the region,

TRANSPORdTATON, STORAGE,WAACHIE TOOLS 0.K(.'D

Continued railroad expansions in the Southeast, as well.
as improvements to petroleum and cold storage facili-
ties and production of machine tools were represented
in certificates of necessity granted by the Office of
Defense Mobilisation for the period of September 10
through September 23,

Six such certificates were granted by ODM calling for
a prospective total expenditure of $1,429,800 in Tenn-
essee, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia and Alabama.
The largest was a project of the Southern Railway Com-
panyr for improvements to its transportation system at
Seven Mie, South Carolina, to cost $800,000. Another
for $311,000 was issued to the Chattanooga Uarehouse
and Cold Storage Company, for improvements to its cold
storage facilities.


1950 1951 1952 1953 1953
ANNUAL OTALS UARTERLY TOTALS. SEASONALLY
ADJUSTED. AT ANNUAL RATES
Source: Survey of Current Business,
U. S. Department of Commnerce

Southeastern industries last year put an estimated
$669,823,000 into new plants and equipment, some $157,-
258,000 more than was spent for such purposes in 1947
when the last Census of Harmfactures was taken, accord-
ing to a report just issued by the Bureau of the Gen-
sus.

The expenditures vere made in Alabama, Florida, Geor-
gia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas with all
of the seven showing sharp, increases in such outlays in
the past six years.

This report is entitled 9Ianufacturers,
expenditures For New Plant and New Equip-
ment, 1952, 1951 &1947." It's listed on
Page 3 for your convenience in ordering,

Expenditure by States in the region last year with in-
creases over 1947 included North Carolina, $14,109,-
000, a rise of $6,526,000i South Carolinas 894,489,000,
and $32,746,000; Georgia, $103,666,000 and $19,346,000;
Florida, $87,475,000 and $37,423,000; Tennessee, $110,-
854,000 and $27,062,000; Alabamra, $102,831,000 and
$30,469,000; and Mi~ssissippi, $29,399,000 in 1952, up
$6,686,000 over 1947,

The 1952 expenditurea included $486,948,000 in new
machinery and equipment and the remainder in costrue-
tion,


~~Z"


VOLUME 7, NUMBER 20


OCTOBER 15, 1953


Plant and Eqluipment

Investment estimated at $28 billion
in 1953 vs. $26 '/2 billion in 1952


BILLIONS OF DOLLARS
so I


BILLIONS OF DOLLARS
( 30


c /6:~ZG"i,


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE










-I


REGION SEES CONTINUED HIGH LEVEL OF RETAUILNG

Retail alae continued at a relatively high level in
the Southeast in the first seven months of 1953, with
increases in the various cities and areas in which the
Bureau of the Census conducts monthly surveys ranging
from 4 to 15 per cent.

Advances of 15 per cent in Birminghaml, Johnson City and
Kingaport were reported, 11 per cent in Bristoli 10 per
cent in M~acon and Gulfportt and 9 per cent in Atlanta
and Asheville.

These monthly reports and also those for the
wholesale trade are available on a subscriP"
tion basia at all D~epartment of Coamerce
field offices for $1l a year each*

Brisk trading in apparel and automotive supplies were
e~tperiencect in the larger cities, the report aboved*

Other rises in the region included 4 per cent in Savan-
nah and 5 per cent in Greenvood, S. C. Proportionate
gain vere shown in several southeastern areas, includ-
ing 10 per cent in Manatee and Sarasota countiess
Florida, and 12 per cent in Chilton and Perry counties,
Alabama. Only four of 17 cities and areas in the region
recorded declines in sales for the period*

IRONSTEEL PRODUICTIONY DECLINES IN AREA INS 1952

A decline in iron and steel production, consumption and
distribution in the Southeast in 1952 as compared with
1951 vas reported by the Burean of the Census in its
Facts For Industry series*

Shipments from plants in the region last year totalled
2,306,109 short tons of gray iron, malleable iron and
ateel castings, a drop of more than 300,000 tone trea
the business done in 1951. Included in the shipments
1ast year vere 2,189,270 tons of gray iron oastings;
35,086 tons of malleable iron eastinge; and 81,753 tons
of steel casting*

This Facts For Industry report is entitled
"Iron & Steel Foundries &r Steel Ingot Pro-
ducers 1952 & 1951" and itia available at
Department of Casmerce field offices. L~ist-
ed on Page 3*

In the field of production, the regions output aggre-
gated 21s828,174 abort tons of steel ingote and pig
iron, a abarp drop from the 24,499,267 tons produced
in 1951, and in consumption, the total was 17,559,473
tons of scrap and pig iron, which com~pared with 19s"
563,070 in the previous year*

The production included 12,243,522 tons of steel ingots
last year and 9,584,652 tons of pig iron, and consump-
tion 8,077,760 tons of scrap and 9,481,713 of pig iron.


Y VTCH THOSE CHRISTMAS PACKAGESS '

Christmas 1953 is not too far off now, and U. 8* '
Department of Cammerce field offices are oau-
tionin~g shippers of gift packages abroad that '
they should first familiarise themselves with '
the regulations of other countries regarding the *

and Cammeroe Department offices have copies.


li MILLION CHILDREN IN SOVTB NIOT IN SCHOOL

More than a million and a half children of school age
in the South are not enrolled in school, a study of a
current Bureau of the Census report on the 1950 cenaou
of population abova.

The report listed 1,590,330 children of the age of 5
to 13 years old as not enrolled in school, which is
nearly 20 per cent of the regionto total of 7,977,750
in that age category.

This report is entitled "l950 Census of
Population, U. S. Sunmary, Gene6ral Char-
acteristican and is available at anyt De-
partment of Comerce field office for
8,~.50.
The report also showed that more women go through. high -
achool than men, but more mean complete college courses
than do women.

The "old folk@ vent to school the hard vay* yet more
of then completed their studies than the 22 to 24 year
olds of today.

There were five times as mary married person vbo did
not enroll in school as unmarried.

The largest number of persons going through college are
doing professional, technical and kindred work, and the
smallest number are employed as private household work-
ers.

ORDER ON DIAN1DND GRIINDING WHEELS REVOKED

The National Production Authority, U. S. Department of
Commerce announced the revocation of Order M-103, reg-
ulating the usage of diamond grinding wheels, effoo-
thve immediately.
A review of the order and supply-demand situation re-
vealed that there vae no longer any need for the reg-
ulation, IPA officials said.

Manufacturers and others in the industry have given
assurance they will continue to give preference to
orders for military and atomic energy applications, it
vas stated. .

EXPORT RESTRICTIONS ON SILFUR EASED

.Southeastera shippers of crude and refined suiltur will
find of interest an announcement made by the Office of
International Trade, U. S. Department of Commerce that
the two products, formerly under quantitative export
limitations, have been open-ended for the fourth quar-
ter of 1953. Individual export licenses, however, will
contianue to be required.

NYo significant changes in previously established ex-
port patterns for sulfur vere expected to result from
the action.

DHXIE REPORTS RISE II POLaPHOOD USE

An 8.6 per cent increse in consumption of pulpwood in
the South in the first half of 1953 as compared with
the corresponding period last year vas reported by the
Pu;,p ;* Paed dio rdb autr R por ispai the
aerce. Conomption in the region totalled 7,281,000
standard cords at the end of June 1953.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN O~F COMMERCE









I


D Construction &r Building Materials, Statistical Sup-
plem~ent Consrtruction Volumle &r Costs, May 1953,
$2.50 a lear
L7 Building Materiale & Stnructures, NBS Report IBS 49,
200, Mletallic Roofing for Lov-Cost Bone Construe-
tion


O~rcers'Paper Bags A Recorded Voluntary '
SRecommendation of the Trade, SPR 42-53, 10C *
i M~echanies of Elastic Performance of Texrtile '
Materials, Relations of Fiber Properties & '
SFabric Stnrcture To Creases Resistance, PB- '
.111144., 81 Pages, $2.25
j7he Reduction of Distribution Costs,SBA 256 '
;Is o To Merchandise Infantsc Hear, 8BA 257
~Biding Worker Morale' Through A Plant Pap- *
a er, SBA 258
aood Retailing, SBA 259
Training Program For Small Retailera,SBA260 t
a U~tting Mlerchandise To Sell, SBIL 261
89th Quarterly Report of Lnmber Survey Com8ittee
Nonth27~J Retail Trade Report, 1 a Year
Ibnthly Wbolesale Trade Report, $)1 a Tear
WRevised Estileates of the Population of Alaesk, Bay-
aii, Puerto Rico, the Canal Zone and Virgin Islands
of the U. S., 1940 to 1950, 54
L7 Daily Synopsis of U.S. Government Proposed Procure-
ment and Contract Awards, $7 a lear
Business Service Checklist, $L.25 a Tear
Inooae Payments to Individuals, 1952, August lean
of Survey of Crurent Business, 30C
Reioa Trends ~tbin te coom L.00


The book value of the United States equity in foreign
enterprises in which U. S. investors have substantial
controlling interests was approximately $15 billion in
June 1953. This represented a considerable growth in.
recent years over the total of $11l.8 billion abovn in
a comprehensive census conducted by the Office of Busi-
ness Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce now being
released.

Employment between August and September moved downward
as usual as teen-age workers left their sa\mer jobs to





Business activity continued at a high rate through A~ug-
ust as employment income and sales matched or *zoeeded
the rates of earlier months. Basic sources of demand
vere undiminished, consmoer purchases advanced mpoder-
ately, and plant and equipment expenditures exceeded
the high rate in the first quarter of the year.

Appointment of Carl P. Blackwell, of Stillwater, Okla.,
as director of the International Economic Analysis
Division, Office of International Trade, U. 8. Depart-
aent of Commerce, vae announced,

The number of households in the United States in April
1953 vas placed by the Census Bureau at 466,828,000, an
increase of 950,000 over April 1952. During the three
years of 1950 to 1953, the average annual increase was
also about 950,000, but between 1947 and 1950 the so-
nual gain was about 1,500,000.


SOMETMHI OLD &t SOMETHZING HWJ


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


FOR FUIRTHIER IE-
TAILS OF ANY OF

.IN TOUCI ITrH
THE NEAREST 8,8*

00 ERE FIELD

July cuttings of ments apparel items showed aixed
trends as compared with July 1952, aceodn t h




cent decrease.

Esportere- now may ship amrmonium sulfate, pover backsaax
blades, and certain oven plastic fabric to most coun-
tries without applying for an individual export license
asr a result of action taken by the Office of Interna-
tional Trade, U. S. Department of Coaneroe.

Sales of all manufacturers in August totalled $29;~ bil-
lion, or 4 per cent under the July seasonally adjusted
rate. Shipments of both durables and nondurables in-
creased less than usual. Among the hard goods indus-
tries,the drop in seasonally-adjusted sale centered in
aetals and motor vehicles, the latter being affected by
the fire at the Lavonia transmission plant.

July fiber consumption on the woolen and worated syr-
tems was considerably below that of June, the Census
Bureau reported. To a large extent, the decline was due
to vacation period shutdowns, it was stated,


CBECK THE MAT-
:ERIAL DESIRED IN
BU~ 5H 5 '" "CE PROVIDE
ED NDM SEND THIS
C~6 E PRT 5 Eb,~ 5
MERE a TH IIBS _.S.DEPARFTMENZ OF COMMERCE OFIE
YOR bE IAM AD ALDDRESS ARE ONY TEB: OPPOSITE SIDE* EE l~
REHITTANCES FOR SALES MALTERIAL PAYAbBLE TO TREALSURER g
g WJTED STATES*

Report on Cotton Ginning, Sept. 23, 1953
1952 Annual Survey of MIanufactures Mlanufacturers'
Expenditures For New Plant & Equipment, 1952, 1951>
and 1947, 104 (MAS- 52-3)
0 1952 Annual Survey of Mlanufactures Value of lanu-
facturers' Inventories For Industry Groups and Se-
looted Industries, End of Tear, 1952, 1951 &1947*
10# (MAs-522)
Employgment of Students, Oct. 1952, P-50, #47, 104
1950 U. 8. Census of Population, U. 8. Sunmary, De"
tailed Characteristice, P-C 1, $1.50
L1950 U. S. Consue of Population, Characteristice By
Size of Place, Special Report, P-E, #5A, 40#
SCatalog of U. S. Census Publications, January-June
1953, 30#
/7Iron and Steel Foundries & Steel Ingot Produceras
1952 & 1951, FFI 21~042, 15#, $1 a Year
/7Cotton Broad Yoven Goods, 2nd Quarter 1953, Quar-
terly Production in U.S., FFI MLl5A-2-3, 100,501 Tr.
Pu Rlp, Paper & Board Indostry Report, Sept. 1953,
Issued Quarterly, 755 a Year, Single Copies, 204
Public Roads, $1 a Year, Single Copies, 20#
The bManuacturerse Agent As A Marketing Instita-
tion, 50# -





ALL STATES IN SECTION PROGRESS IN CHICK OUTPUT

The tremendous progress made in the Southeast in the
past five years in production of chickens commercially
is shown in a study of figures released by the Bureau
of Agricultural Economies, U. S. Department of Agri-
culture.

Mississippi, with a 407 per cent gain, leads the way
in rate of increase in a 140.4 per cent expansion in
the region as a whole in the period of 1947 to 1952.
Other rises were Alabama with 221.4 per cent; Georgia,
184.9; South Carolina, 90.4; North Carolina, 72.15
Florida, 57.6; and Tennessee, 55.1.

Mississippita remarkable advance was from a production
of 7,900,000 chicks in 1947 to 40,072,000 last year.
This rise carried that State from a standing of thirty
second in the nation in 1947 to nineteenth today in
output.

Equalling Itasissippita progress, however, has been
that of Georgia. In 1947, that State produced 45,250,-
000 chicks commercially, which was the 11th largest
for the nation, and last year Georgia not only took
the nation's championshipn in broiler production, but
in colnnercial hatchery output as well with a total of
128,924,000 chicks.
U.S.BUILDINGI RISES 800 PER CENT IN 37 YEARS

Construction activity in the United States in the 37-
year period of 1915 to 1952 bas increased from a dol-
lar value of $4,890,000,000 to $44d,001,000,000, or
nearly 800 per cent, according to the ~By 1953 issue
of the publication Construction and Building Manteriala
distributed by the National Production Authority, U.S.
Department of Commerce.
The report, available on a subscription basis of $2.50
a year through all Department of Commneree field offices
contains a comprehensive year-by-year review of all
types of construction work in the nation during the
37-year period. Not only does it review the value of
such construction, but liate construction costs, the
physical volume, and other data. In addition, it con-
tainsl a runnary of petroleum and gas well drilling
operations in the principal producing States.


AREA'S NONWHITE POPULATION RELATIVELY HIGII

You can call them the vanishing Indian" if you wish,
but there are still some 68,000 living in the South,
about 20 per cent of the nation's 342,200.

This is an additional fact developed in a current re-
port of the Bureau of the Censue entitled "U. S. Census
of Population, U. S. Summary, Detailed Characteristice"
prepared from the last decennial census of population,
There are, of course, far more Negroes in the region
than anyr other nonwhite race, but some of the other
races are also well represented. For example, there
are 3,034 Japanese, 10,432 Chinese, and 4,608 Fili-
pinos.

Of a total of 6s974,375 nonwhites in the South, some
half a million did not go to school, but well over
100,000 vent through college, the report showed. Hfalf
of the total was in the labor force, including balf a
million on farms, and another half million who were
classed as ~"operatives and kindred workers."

Of the 6.9 million, 1.6 million had an income of less
than $500 a year and another million were receiving
less than a thousand dollars income.

SOUTHEAST REWPORS RISE IN SHIIPMENTS OF BOXES

A 12.5 per cent increase in shipm~ents of wooden boxes
and crates in the second quarter of 1953 as compared
with the corresponding period last year was reported
by southeastern manufacturers in the 89th Quarterly
Report of the Lumber Sulrvey Committee submiltted to the
Secretary of Commerce,

Shipments from the region in this years quarter total-
led 19,287,031 board feet against 17,139,800 last year.

Signs of both strength and weakness in the lumber mar-
ket in the second quarter of 1953 resulted in a "rather
confusing picture as to the lumaber supply and demand,"
the report said. ." gradual softening in the market was
reflected in the gentle slide in the wholesale price
index, and in reports of the closing of some mills
caught between high production costs and a analler re-
turn for their products," the report added* c.,o asses


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

Ui


BC-6-JF


UNIV ER SITYY 0F LO~R r3A
LERO3Y L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


3I 1 26 087481111111 9265111111il I ll11111111i


PAGE 4


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


U. 3, OEPARTMENIT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office ~ S
71 FrsthBlg. 9
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLUME 7, NURBER 20 OCTOBER 15, 1953



-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





SOUTHWEST SENDS 21) BILLION POUNDS OF MEAT TO TABLES

Federally Inspected Slaughter
Twous. 1 T Irous. -
[ CLATTL CALVES i
1400| ,.4T L 80 so


CUMULATIVE RETAIL SALES STILL AT HIGHC LEVEL

southeastern retail merchants in the first eight months
of 1953 experienced one of the highest levels of conn-
lative sales during 1953, according to the monthly re-
port on retail sales issued by the Bureau of the Cen-
sus.

Those in Birminghas reported a 16 per cent advance over
the corresponding period last year; Atlanta, 9 per
cent; Macon, 8 per cent; Gulfport, 11 per cent; Ashe-
ville, 9 per cent; and Johnson Citys 17 per cent.

These monthly reports as well as those for
the wholesale trade are available at all
Department of Commerce offices on a sub-
scription basis of $1 a eear,
The increases, reflected in the Censue Bureauce report
for the nation as a whole, were due largely to sharp
advances in most areas in the region in August of this
year over the same month last year. Birmingham, for ex-
ample, registered a 20 per cent risel Gulfport, 21 per
cent; Johnson City, 34 per cent; and Biloxi, 12 per
cent. The gain in Atlanta was 8 per cent.

In only two southeastern cities in vbiah the survey is
made, ALugusta and Columbus, were decreases in sales re-
gistered in the 8-month period of 1953 as compared with
1952. In those cities, declines of 5 and 2 per cent,
respectively, were shown. In Bilozi there was no
change.

The larger cities reported accelerated sales activity
particularly in autanotive stores and apparel and gen-
eral merchandise establishmentse

In all of the southeastern cities, showing increased
this year, the gains were well above the 6 per cent
rise in the United States as a whole.

FACILITY EXPANSIOGS FOR FOUR1 SOUTHEAST STATES

Business firms in four southeastern States, Alabama,
Georgia, ]Kissriasippi and South Carolina benefited from
certificates of necessity for facility improvement
operations announced by the Office of Defense Nbbilisa-
tion in washington.
The certificates issued were those for the Southern
Railway for improvements to its railway transportation
system at Forrestrille, Ga.s to cost $537,040; Gordons
Transports, Inc., Jackson, Mtas., two oertifiestes
(Contianed on Page 2)


APR. JULY OCT. JAN. APR. JULY
Bureau of Agricultural Economicr,
U. S. Department of Ag~riculture


The Southeast last year slaughtered 7,872,100 beer eat-
61e and calves and hogs, and sent 2(~ billion pounds of
beef and pork to the American table, according to the
1953 Edition of Cropel and Mlarkets, recently issued by
the Bureau of Agricultural Econanics, U. S. Department
of Agriculture,

In the slaughtering operations were 6,076,500 hogs
weighing 1,234,544,000 pounds; 1,136,300 beef cattle of
836,787,000 pounds in weight; and 659,300 beef calves
with a weight of 175,682,000 pounds,

Department of Commerce field offices have
State-by-State reports from the 1950 Cen-
sen of Agriculture for distribution,
The figure vere compiled from Federal inspection, and
wholesale and retail slaughtering records. The South-
eastern States are ALlabama, Florida, Georgia, Kissies-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas.

The 1952 alaug~hterings reflected an increase of 718,200
animals and 134,770,000 pounds over 1951 with most of
the seven southeastern Statse sharing in the rise.

Slaughterings and poundages by States in the region in-
cluded 884,200 animals in Alabama and 278,090,000
pounds; Florida, 838,100 and 252,777,000 pounds; Geor.
gia, 2,223,000 animals and 577,887,000 pounds; fissiea-
ippi, 361,000 and 124,225,000; IForth Carolina, 886,100
and 244,142,000; South Carolina, 554,700 and 141,836,-
000; and Tennessee, 2,126,600 animals and 628,056s000
pounds.

Georgia led the region in cattle and bog slaughterings
with 290,000 and 1,823,000 animals, respectively, and
Tennessee led in beef calf slaulghteringe vith 318,000,


ATLANTA, GA., CHARLESTON,S.C., JACKSONVILLE,FLA., NEMPHIS, TENN.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., Sgt.Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg;., 229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel.WA-4121, Ex.453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426


NEAMI, F'LA.,
9467 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


SAVABNNAH, GA.,
218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


VOLUME 7, NUKIBER 21


MDVEMBERL 1, 1953


L
JAN.
Source :


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF .COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE






brasll~O ofCM~W








1


AREA'S POSTAL RECEIPTS $149.8 MILLION IN 1952

Post offices in the seven southeastern States of Ala-
bama, Florida, Georgia, Bassissippi, Tennessee and the
Carolinas last year collected a total of $149,876,300
in receipts, an advance of more than 145 per cent in
the past ten years, according to a study made of a cur-
rent report of the U. S. Post Office Department,

The report, entitled "Receipts and Classes of Post
Offrices With Basic Salaries of' Postmasters," contains
the receipts for each city, town and community for all
State in the United States,with salaries of each post-
master.

These reports are available at a price of
$1 each and can be obtained through the
nearest U. S. Department -e Comrmerce field
office,

The study revealed an advance of from $7,304,000 in
1942 to $16,568,000 in 1952 in receipts in Alabama, or
126.8 per cent; Florida, $10,305,000 to $31,386,000,
204.6 per cent; Georgia, $12,437,000 to $29,903,600,
140.11 per cent; Missiasippi, $4,786,000 to $9,791,600,
104.6 per cent; North Carolina, $11,217,000 to $b23,-
135,500, 106.3 per cent; South Carolina, $3,7931000 to
$11,063,300, 191.7 per cent; and Tennessee, $11,210,0100
to $28,128,000, 150.9 per cent.

More than 50 per cent of last year's receipts in the
region, or a total of $78,534,293, was credited to the
larger cities,

1953 OUTPUT OF HARDWOOD IS KIGH IN THIS SECTION

Nearly half a billion feet of hardwood plywood came off
production lines of southern plants in the first half
of 1953, more than 57 per cent of the total for the
United States, according to a Facts For Industry Re-
port issued by the Bureau of the Census.

Production in the southern States approximated 476,-
360,000 square feet, surface measure, which was far
more than the output of anyr other individual region,

This report is listed on Page 3. It's
available for 10 cents, or on a yearly
subscription basis of 50 cents fran any
Department of Commerce field office,

The report credited the southern region with an in-
orease of more than 100 million feet of the product
over the first half of 1952 when production in the area
totalled 399,080,000 feet.

Compared with the South's production in the first half
of this year were an output of 115,500,000 square feet
in the New England area; 25,698,000 in the M~iddle At-
lantic; 127,565,000 in the Lake States; 74,019,000 in
the Central and Prairie States; and 5,421,000 in the
Pacific and Rockcy Nbuntain sections,

CERTIFICATES OF NECESSITY (Continued From Page 1)

for $113,099 and $11,950, respectively for expansion of
motor freight transportation; Karper and Bowere, a cer-
tificate for $269,000 for improvements in their public
grain storage facilities, and the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio
Railroad Company, Mobile, for $645,000 for railway
transportation improvements.


ALL CONITROLS OFF FOR SOUTHEASTERN BUSINESS

Southeastern manufacturers now see clear sailing" a-
head in the manufacture of their products so far as
government materials controls are concerned.

An announcement vae made in Washington by the Business
and Defense Services Ad~ministration, U. S. Department
of Comrmerce, that remaining controls on nickel and
nickel-bearing stainless steel, two major raw materials
used in the region, are being removed effective Nov. 1.

To give impetus to this action, BDSA has revoked Order
M-80 and its schedules under which nickel, nickel sil-
ver, and nickel-bearing stainless steel have been under
government regulation for more than two years.

At the same time, BDSA announced the revocation of Or-
der M-106, which regulated the distribution and use of
colurmbia and columbine-tantalumn~-bearing steels, thus
"freeingn the remaining products under control.

The schedules of Order M-80 which were revoked con-
tained a list of products in which nickel plating vae
prohibited; listed prohibited and permitted uses of
nickel-bearing stainless steel, high nickel alloys,
and nickel silver; limited the use of chrome nickel
for heat resistant purposes; and regulated the use and
distribution of columbian and colum~bium-tantalam.

BDBA also issued Amendmlent 3 to Order MelA, the basic
steel order, deleting Sectione 14 and 15 of that order
to bring it into conformity with the elitmination of
Order N-80.

CERTAIN COMMERCE DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS REORGALNIZH)

Secretary of Commerce Sinclair Weeks has announced ea-
tablishment in the Department of Corrmerce of the Busi-
ness and Defense Services Administration as a primary
unit to continue the residual defense and mobilization
functions of the former National Production Authority
and to provide a focal point for effective cooperation
between government and business in promoting economic
stabilization and growth.

At the same time, the Secretary also announced estab-
lishment in the Department of the Burean of Foreign
Commerce as another primary organization to tedce over
Functions heretofore performed by the Office of In-
ternational Trade.

Charles F. H~oneywell, business executive of California
and Bawaii, was named Administrator of BDSA, and LCoring
K. Ma~cy, formerly OIT Director, as Director of EFC.

RAILROAD FREIGHTP REVENIIE OF IN 7 HNDNTES

Railroads serving the Southeast in the first 7 months
of this year collected a total of $768,455,900 in
freight revenue, an increase of more 11sus $36,000,000
over the corresponding period in 1952, according to the
monthly report of the Association of American Rail-
roads. All but three of the 24 carriers operating in
the region shared in the rise.

At the same time, however, the report reflected a oon-
tinued sharp drop in passenger revenue, collections
fran that source amounting to $)67,128,500, which com-
pared with $73,156,900 in the first 7 months of 1952.
Only two road in the region, the Illinoisl Central and
Tennessee Central,rocorded a gain in passenger revenue,


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





- -


CHECK( THE MBT.
~stNEW BO(()}S ( ERIIAL DESIREDIN
~3~ APD REP()IllS THE SPACE POI-
ED AND SENDTHS
sk v/A ,2% ( RIO O TE
BULLETIN OFCO-
MERCE TO THE NEAREST U. S. DEPARTMENT OF CONDERCE OF-
FICE. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE,
bulti REMITTANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREAS-
ORER OF THE UNITED STATES.

Monthly Retail Trade Report, $1.00 a Year
Monthly Wholesale Trade Report, $1,00 a Year
aReceipts and Classes of Post Offices With Basic
Salaries of Eastmasters, $1.00
S Hanrdood Plywood, 2nd Quarter, 1953, Facts For
Industry, M13A-2-3, loC, 509 a Year
Report on Cotton Ginning, Oct. 8, 1953
Consolidated Cotton Report, Oct. 1, 1953
Public Employment in July 1953, G-GE53-#3, 5#
iCoordinatiqn of Population Estinates by Federal,
State,~ & Local Agencies, P-25, #81, 10#
/7 Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Sept. 1953,
P-57, #135, 10p, Yearly, $1.50
/ / Petroleum Products Secondary Inventories & Storage
Capacity, Aug. 31, 1953, 104
Cotton Ginned Prior to October 1, Crops of 1952-1953
Georgia D lbaa 49 issisagipi
Tennessee North Carolina L/ Arkansas
Oklahoma y Louisiana L7 South Carolina
1 ] Provisional Estimates of the Population of the
Ob~ited States, Jan. 1, 1950-Sept. 1, 1953,
P-25, #82, 5#
/rf Business Statistics, 1953 Biennial Edition, $1.50
/ 7 CAA Statistical Handbook of Civil Aviation, 400


/ ~taisic l Bulletin U. 5. 55curl~tieB Warenangs
Commission Sept. 1953, 20t
/ 7 Container s & Packaging Industry Report, Antumn 1953,
Subscription Price, 60t a Year
/ Building Materials & Structures, BM~S 60, Strength,
Absorption, and Resistance to Laboratory Freezing
& Thawing of Building; Bricke Produced in U.8,,30C
4 ] Building Materials & Structures, BMS66s Plumbing
Manual, Report of Subcommittee on Plumrbing Central
Housing Cammittee on Research, Design & Construction
356
L7 Building Materials & Structures, BMB 70, Asphalt-
Prepared Roll Roofinge & Shingles, 20(
Facts For Industry Re~ports:
//Internal Canbustion Engines, Exccept Automotive
and Aircraft, 1952, M31L-02, 10#
gQ'Confectionery, Including Chocolate Products,
August 1953, M160-83, 10t, $1 a Year

Pulp, Paper & Board, Aug. 1953, 100, $1 a Year
Fate & Oils, Consumnption by Uses, Aug. 1953,
M17-2-83, 10C

t SutaHIno ULD & buMPTHING NEW I
( / 71950 U. S. Census of Population Selected
a Bummaries, PC-14
s 17 Elevated Temperature Properties of Glaess
S Fabric Base Flastic Laninates, PB109024,
:o Mirofilm, $3.75, Photostat, $1.25
ag'Bibliography of Reports on Synthetic, Lub-
:o riaants, IB-21, 10)
a 'Men's Store Builds Sales Through Prompotions, t
S Exclusive Styling, SBA#262
I Check List For Food Retailing, SBA#263
lto A Survey of Inventory Control in 37 Small
1 Companica, SB@d261,


Total wholesalers' sales during August were estimated
at $8,800 million, which, after adjustment for season-
al variations, were about 2 per cent higher than in
the preceding month. Sales by durable-goods dealers
vere $2,840 million, and those by nondurable-goods
dealers amounted to $5,920 million. On a seasonally
adjusted basis, both durable and nondurable goods
sales were up slightly from July.

individuals in the second quarter of 1953 saved $3.7
billion in liquid fora, a rate which compared with
$2.9 billion in the first quarter of this year, and
$1.4 billion in the second quarter of 1952, according
to a report of the Securities and Exchange Comrmission,

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $1,235 million in September 6 per
cent above the $1,166 million paid out in .ae same
month a year ago. Disbursements by manufacturing cor-
porations were 4 per cent higher than in September
1952, an advance that was largely a reflection of a
shift in payment dates.

A total before-tax income of $217 billion flowed to
48) million consumer units of families and punattached
individuals in 1950. The national average was $)4,460
with one-third of the unite receiving more than this
amount. Alnost 6 per cent received incomes of $b10,-
000 and over, and 26 per cent were below the $2,000
income point.

knerican direct investments in Latin-American repub-
Ilis more than doubled from 1943 to the end of 1952,
reaching a value of $5.7 billion at the end of 1952.
This represented a substantial increase over the $4.7
billion reported at the end of 1950.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


FOR FURTHER DE-
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITEMS GET

TNE NEA EST UTH
-= DEPARTMENT OF*
COMMERCE FIELD
OFFICE.


Expenditures totalling $3.3 billion for new construct-
ion in September were virtually the same as the record
August figures and 5 per cent above Septanber 1952,
the U. S. Departments of Commerce and Labor reported.
Private expenditures for new construction, $2.2 bil-
lion, were 8 per cent above the Septanber 1952 figure
while total public outlays, $1.1 billion, were about
the same as a year ago. Housing starts totalled 92,-
000, 2,000 less than in August and 8,800 under the
September 1952 figure.
Business inventories at the end of August were esti-
mated at $77.8 billion, vbich, after seasonal adjust-
ment represented an increase in book value of $450
million from the end of July. The August book value
increase was considerably less than the average rise
during recent months.

Personal income in August was at an annual rate of
$287 billion, about the same as the July total of
$2873 billion. For the first eight months of the year
personal income was at an annual rate of $281, billion
higher than in the same period of last year. Private
industry payrolls were at an annual rate of $167 bil-
Lion, about $1-2 billion lower than in July.





WHOLESALE SALES CONTINUE UPWARD IN SOUTHEAST

The first 8 months of 1953 brought a continuation of
the upward trend in oumaulative wholesale sales that be-
gan some time ago, with an increase of 3 per cent over
the corresponding period last year recorded throughout
the region, according to the monthly report of~the
Bureau of the Census on wholesale sales over the U. S.

In addition, wholesalers in the -area registered de-
oreases in inventories at the end of the S-month period
with those in the East South Central sootion of Ala-
bama, Mfississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky reporting a
4 per cent decline, a record for the nation, and firms
in the South Atlantic region of Florida, Georgia, the
Carolinas and Virginias, Ilaryland and Delaware a 1per
cent drop.

The report indicated an increase in sales despite re-
1stively heavy decreases in August sales as compared
with July, South Atlantic firms experiencing a 7 per
cent fall and those in the East South Central section
a 4 per cent month-to-month reduction.
SJOB APPLICANTS SEEK FOREIGN ASSIGNMENTS

( Department of Canaperce offices are receiving '
( requests from a number of persons in the South- I
east for information on jobs that may be avail- '
s able abroad, and is supplying each with a copy a
1 of ite leaflet "Employment of United States *
Citizens Abroad., ,

I Requested for the informaation came as a result '
1 of a story printed by a national mpagazine con- *
r earning alleged job opportunities abroad. '

The Commerce Department leaflet is enphasizing (
( that opportunities exist for employment of Amer- I
ioan citizene in foreign countries, but that such I
jobs are much more limited in number and kinds *
1 than is generally believed.


SOUTH SHIPS CHEMICALS VALUED AT ij145.3 MILLION

The South last year shipped seven different types of
inorganic chemical to market valued at $145,318,000
and produced 1,426,423 short tons of chlorine gas and
6,293,402 tons of sulfuric said, according to a current
Facts For Industry Report issued by the Bureau of the
Census.

The value of the abipments was some four and a half'
million dollars greater than those in 1951.

This report is listed on Page 3. Order
it from the nearest U. S. Department
of Commerce field office.

The report gave the following breakdown on the quantity
and value of shipments and interplant transfers in the
southern region in 1952:

Liquid sodium hydroxide, electrolytic and limle sode
processes --- 1,146,789 tons valued at $52,525,000.
High purity oxygen -- 1,767,000,000 cubic feet valued
at $b8,917,000.

Acetyrlene --- 2,177,000,000 oubic feet, value, $23,-
671,000.
Sulfuric acid --- 3,885,902 tone, value, yb60,205,000.
CONF2ECTION SALES IN REGION $26.3 MILLION

Confectionery wholesalers in the Southeast in the first
8 months of 1953 sold goods valued at $b26,311,000, and
in most areas experienced gains over the corresponding
period last year, according to a Bureau of the Census
monthly report.

The sales included $b9,3/0,000 in Georgia and Florida;
$b8,997,000 in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, North
and Sout~h Carolina, and the District of Columbia; and
$b7,974,000 in the East South Central States of Ken-
tuckyr, Tennessee, Alabana and Mississippi.

In Georgia and Florida, the dollar value of sales in
the 8-month period were up 3 per cent, and 8 per cent
in the other South Atlantic States,


The leaflet, with other publications
ject, is available at all Department
field offices for 5 cents a cour.


on the sub- '
of Commerce '

GPO 865928


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

UNIlV. OF FL IB. GOPo)
,OCUMM~).E:c~~ D~-I


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAI.PESVILLE, FLORIDA


BC-6-JP


1111 11 Ill lilllllll 1 11 1 lilllllll ll11 111
3 1262 08748 9257


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS





SBULLETIN OF COMMERCE
SER QCE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMIYERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL. FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINI53 04PORIYUL1ON.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE RECUIARLY.





1 _


0. S. BUIS $3.9 BILLION IN GOODS, SERVICES


SOUTH~EAST SHOWS OVERALL DIDP IN CASH FARM INDOME

Increases in cash fans income in M~issiaippi, Georgia,
North Carolina and florida vere insuffiicint to offset
harp declines in South Carolinas Tennessee and Ailabama
and the ?-State southeastern area ended the first eight
months of 1953 with an overall decrease of some $20,-
888,000 as compared with the corresponding period last
year, according to a report of the Bureau of Agricul-
tural Economies, U. S. Department of Agriculture.

Gains in the region of from $299,606,000 last year to
$309,034,000 this year, or $r9,428,000 in North Caro-
Ilna; $364,241,000 to $380 913,000, or $16 672,000 in
Georgia; $366,041,000 to $378,031,000, or 1,990,000
in Floridai and $205,051,000 to $239,108,000, or $34,-
057,000 in Mississippi, were offset by decreases in
South Carolina of tan $186 793,000 last year to
$131,722,000 this year, or 855,071,000f Tennessee,
$253,612,000 to $237,319,000, or $16,293,000) and A;la-
bama, $186,654,000 to $164,983,000, or $21,671,000.

Cash returns from sales of livestock and its products
dropped $34,462,000 in the area, while, on the other
hand, income free crop products was s> $1U3,574,000.
COaaEECTION MAKERS IN REGION SELL 301.5 MILLION LBS.

Southeastera manufacturers last year sold 301,543,000
pounds of confection valured at $17,776,000, an average
of 12.3 pounds for every man, vanan and child in the
region, according to a special report prepared btthe
U. S. bepartmertt of Commerce.

Sales in 1952 substantially exceeded those in 1951 when
284,245,000 pounds were sold valued at $101,000,000.

This report is entitled IConfectionery Sales
and Distribution, 1952,1 and is available at
all Departnent of Commeree field offices
for 60 cents a coorpy

The "Southeastn in the report included Allabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, N(ississippi, Tennessee, Kentuckyr and
the Carolinas.

Total poundage and dollar value by States in the re-
gion last year veres

Allabeas 26,102,000 pounds and $9,532,000; florida,
43,232,000 sad $16,007,000; Ilsisrisippi, 15,868,000
and $5,831,000; South Carolina, 27,122,000 and $9,-
683,000; Tennessee, 41,203,000 and $14,956,000; and
Kentnoky, 40,472,000 and $14,726,000. Georgia stood
highest in per capita sales vish 14.9 pounds,


1950 1951 1952
2UARTERLY TT AA SEASONTELSLYADJUSTED,

Businelrs firms in the Southeast from the outbreak of
the Kloiean war through June of this year were awarded
contracts by the whited Statse government for goods
and services totalling $3,968,030,000, according to a
compilation of the Departmpent of Defense in washington.

Biggest custaaer in the seven-State area of Florida,
Alabama, Georgia, NIsseissippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas was the Army, which let contracts in the region
totalling $2,468,895,000, Second largest amount came
from the Bury, $793,615,000, and Air Force contracts
amounted to $709,431,000,

For a day-to-day list of goods and services
sought by the government, as well. as con-
tracts awarded, subscribe to the 'Synopsis
of Proposed hPocurement and Contract kwvards,*
available at all Department of Commerce field
offices for $7 a year.
Contracts awarded by the Armed Services Petrol n Pur.
chasing Agency in the 3-year ~period approximated $i16,.
089,000.

Totals for the Southeast included Alabama, $511,952,-
000; Florida, $343,015,000; Georgia, $1,018 980,000;
Mlississippi, $198,179,000; Horth Carolina, $823g,388,-
000; South Carolina, $370,791,0000 and Tennessee,
$701,725,000.

The Alabama total was five-tenths of a per cent of the
h95155i4,557,000 for all States) Florida, four-tenths;
Georgia, 1.1 per cent; Mflesie~ippi, two-tenths; Horth
Carolina, nine-tenths; South Carolinas four-tenths;
and Tennessee, seven-tenths.


ATLANPTA, GA., CHALRLESTON,S.C,
7th FloorForsyth Bldg., 8gt.Jasper Bldg.,
Tel.VI-412, Ezx. 453 Tel. 2-7771


JAICKSONVILLE,FLA ,
425 Federal Bldg.,


MEMIPHIS, TEIN.,
229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 8-34~26


947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


BAVANIARU, GAr.,
218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 2 4755


VOLONE 7, HUMBER 22


WOVEMLBER 15, 1953


8
so

4 0

oo


GOVERNMENT PURCHASES




I I


FIELD SERVICE










FU~RNITE sEIPrmBrs II REGION $329.2 MIIION

Five southeastern States, North Carolina, South Caro"
lina, Georgia, 'Florida and Ailabama, last year shipped
household furniture and bedding products vith an esti-
mated value of $329,275,000, vish Nlorth Carolina again
retaining seoond place in the United States in value of
such shipments, s~oooding to a suary issued by the
Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Commeree.

A 29 per cent rrse, or some $75,000,000, in the esti-
mated value of such prodUatel shipped in the region in
the past 5 years was also abovn in a study of the sun-
mary and previous reports issued*

This report isr entitled rFacts For Industrys
Household Furniture & Bedding Products>
1952," and is available at all Department
of Camnerge field offices for 10# a copye

Four of the five Statse experienced sharp increases in
the 5-year period, including 69 per cent in South Caro-
lina; 66 per cent in Georgia; 62 per cent in Allabamayt
and 21 per cent in North Carolina*

In North Carolina, the estimated value of the goods
shipped vent from $192,91,000 in 1948 to $234sl65,000
last yearly South Carolina, $11,816,000 to $19,995,0003
Georgia, $30,072,000 to $50,002,000; and Alabamra, $8,-
984,000 to $14, 506,000. In Florida, a slightly down"
vard tread developed in the 5-year period, or from
$10,&67,000 in 1948 to $10 607,000 last year, but a
gaoin rm $9,516,000 to $10,607,000 from 1951 to 1952
in that State was abova.

OVER rd MILLION COUPLES IN SECTION

The seven southeastern States of Arlabema, a
SFlorida, Georgia, Hi~ssissippi, Tenneaasee
Sand the Carolinas have mpore than 4k ml- ,
lion married couples, with Worthr Carolina ,
( and Georgia standing relatively high in ,
alnaber, according to one report of the a
aBureau of the Census prepared from the ,
1950 Censue of Population. ,

Alabama had 662,225; Florida, 648,930* ,
SGeorgia, 746,700; Miississippi, 462,065; ,
Worth Carolina, 862,770; South Carolina, a
.426.9032 and Tennesssee 743.670. I

BDIOW KOW IS OPENED FOR TRADIB

A vider foreign market for southeastern world traders
has been opened as a result of an announme~tnt made by
the Bureau of Foreign Camerore, U. 8. Department of
Coamsero that shipments of certain goods, previously
restricted, may newr be made to Hon gKong without the
necessity of applying for individual validated lion-


Tezbiles, lamber, wood products, paper, olay prodnets,
chmricals, paints and certain foodataffs, all produced
in substantial quantity in the region and exported
freely to other countries, are among those comaodities
that can now be sent to Boaeg ong under a new general
license designated as "QGH.,

Previously, world traders in the southeastern area vere
required to apply for individual export licenses before
shipping any camodity other than fresh fruits and veg-
eitables and fresh flowers to that country.


MATERIALS AIOHemrEs FOR 18T QUARTER GF 1954

Allotmpents of steel, copper and alrmirnu for "AN prod-
acts for direct defense and ataslic energy needs during
the first quarter of 195C vere announced by the Office
of Defense bMoblistion as 1,4666,840 tons of steels
167,316,000 pounds of copper and copper base alloy
products; and 167,707,000 poruds Of alumium.

This was 20 per cent lover than the fourth quarter of
1953 for steel; 23 per cent for copper; and 18 per
cent for aluminum.

The allotments, it was explained, represent only the
quantities necessary to cover "A product production,
and reflect adjusetments in military sohedules. Th
total quantities of steel, copper and aluminum to be
set aside at the mill level vill include additional
amounts for atomic energy or defense-related "B" pr~od-

NBWI DE~LEION OF AUT~HORITY

The Office of Defease Mobilisation announced delegation
of authority from that agency to the Secretary of In-
terior the program to enYOonrage exploration of strate-
go and critical materials, and to the administrators of
General Servioea for foreign programs of that kind.

Also, OW8 delegated to the Administrator of General
Services the duties and responsibilities of encouraging
development and mirning of strategic and critical mater-
tals and metals.

COMPONERSIII~~~III~~~ OR PASTS

The Bulsiness and Defense Services laministration of the
U. 8. Department of Commerce in an amendment to Order
M-7 made provision for and set forth ceiling Ilmt-
tions for required acceptance of rated orders for ship-
enut during an given month based on a st'ated percent-
age either of the scheduled production of a particular
type of a listed component or part for that month or of
the average monthly shipments of anoh particular type
during a specified base period, whichever is greater,

The purpose of the amendment is to provide equitable
distributionl of rated orders amon~ manuYfacturers of the
specified oamponents or parts in order to achieve mai-
ana production anrd to reduce to a minimum saqydinrup-
tion of normal distribution.

soUrEBASTl GROSSES $650.4 MILIon IIr MBAT

The Southeast last year marketed and used for home con-
srumption purposes seat anma~ls that grossed a total of
$650,451,000 vith hogs realising nearly 56 per cent of
that amount, or som $363,863,000, sooording to a pub-
lication of the Bureau of ALgricultural Economine, U. 8.
Department at A~gricult~ue. Beef battle andl alves
brought $281,292,000.

The report reflected a sharp drop in the values of maet
animals sold and ued for home consumption in the re-
gion in 1952 as compared with 1951. Two years ago, the
returns approdmaated $718,668,000, or around $i68,217,-
000 more than last year. The decline was pronounced in
all three divisions of the meat animal industry. Only
Florida experienced an increase in income from cattle
and calves last year over 1951.

Tennesse led the region in receipts from all three
types of products.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








1


_ __


Expenditures of $b3.2 billion for new construction dur-
ing October 1953, which almost maintained the SepteI-
ber level and set a record for the month were reported
jointly by the U. S. Departments of Camnere and Lab-
or. Private outlays, $2.1 billion, and public, $1.1
billion, were both at peak for the month. Commercial,
educational, and religious building each rose contra-
seasonally to a new monthly high.

Business inventories at the end of September were ea-
timated at $;78.7 billion. After adjustment for season-
81 variations, the book value increased almost $600
million from the end of ALugust. The increase in the
volumee of stocks vae considerably less than that
amount, with higher replacement costs accounting for
two-fifths of the book value rise.

Total wholesaleral sales during September were estira-
ted at $9,400 million, which, after adjustment for
seasonal variations were slightly lover than the pre-
ceding: month. Sale by durable-goods dealers amounted
to $3,000 million and by nondurable-gooda dealers
$6,400 million.
Personal income in September was at an annual rate of
$286 billion, which compared with $287 billion in ALug-
uat. For the third quarter as a whole, personal income
amounted to $286- billion, $)2 billion up from the


I


SSOMETIIEI OLD ANID SQNETRI~ W !

: Selected ~Lt of Publictions of the a
*Department of Camnerce of Interest To
*o Those Engaged in Distribution, 206
S Defense Mobilisation,Report to the Presi-
Sdent by the Director of the Office of r
:o Defense Mobilisations 20d
AStudy of Salae Factors Aiffoting The
I Tear & Nat~er Resistance of Lightveight *
I Clothing &r Tentage Fabries, PE111187, 754d I





7Ica id Adv ~ertisin f or h ml Buorsinelsed BA269 *



~1~8can ioC Conditioning of Textile Fibers, P8111191,

L7Bibliographyr a Quarteraaster Corps Texctile Series
rjfets B- Edg 1%sulation Upon Temperature and
Condensation as Conoret*41ab Floors,MBHE138, 209


second quarter of the year. The ALugust-Septemnber de-
cline stomned mainly from a drop in factory payrolls.

EmPployment held steady between September and October,
despite the return of additional young stainer workers
to school, according to the Bureau of the Census. Ea-
timated at 62,2 million in the week ending October 10,
civilian employment vae also relatively unchanged from
October of last year.

lannfac~turrerl sales rose to $26 billion in September,
the rise from August being less than the usual fall
pick-up. The seasonally adjusted total was off about
2 per cent. The decline centered in durable goods,
which vere off 4 per cent,

Profits after taxes of U. 8. manufacturing corpora-
tions in the second quarter of this year were estian-
ted at $)3.0 billion, or 6 per cent higher than in the
preceding quarter, according to the 8eourities and
Exchange Camoission and Federal Trade Commission. Pro-
fits both before and after taxes were higher than in
any quarter since the second quarter of 1951.

Demands for capital funds by corporations in the first
half of 1953 amounted to approximately $13 billion,
up $13 billion from the comparable period of 1952, the
Office of Business Economics, U. S. DepartmPent of Com-
merce reported following a surrvey.

The United States Government received from foreign
countries in the fiscal year 1953 approximately $)750
million as interest and repayment of principal on
loans extended them in the war and postwar periods. Of
that amount, interest was about $220 million and re-
paymenta $530 million.
Total sales of retail stores in September amounted to
$14.2 billion, about 4 per cent above a year ago. Af-
ter adjustment. they were 1 per cent (lyn from bumt


1LGeneral Statistics for Industry Groups, 1952 Annual
Census of Manufactures, 1952, 1951 & 1947,MA532-4,
30C
Foreign Camnerce Yearbook, 1951~ $1.50 (Buckram)
Yearbook of Agriculture, 1953, G2.50


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


FOR FURTHE De
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITPMS GET
IN TOUCH WITH
THE NEAREST U.S.
DEPARTMENT OF
COMERCE FIELD
OFFICE.


OHE~g THE MALT-
SNEW BOOKS ~I ERIAL DESIRED IN
AND R PORTSED AND SEND THIS
0 r // PORTION OF TE
BULLETIN OF COM-
MERCE TO THE NEAREST U. 8. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OF-
FICE. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE.
MAKE REMITTANCES FOR SLLES .MATERIAL FPAYALE TO TREASU1-
ER OF THE UNITED STATES.

LSynopsis of Proposed Procurement and Contract
Awards, $7.00 a Year
Confectionery Salse and Distribution, 1952, 604
Household Furniture & Bedding Produate, 1952, FI
M54A-02, 104
Report on Cotton Ginning, Oct. 26, 1953, AL/C-0-ICG
Economic Subregions of the U. S., Coneus-BAE#19,300
Educational Atttiinient & Literacy of workers, P-50,
#49, 100, Yearly, $)1.50
Suamarry of Govermnental Finances in 1952,G-GPF52,204
School Enrollment, Educational Attainment, & Lit.
eracy, Oct. 1952, P-20, #l45, 100
women'ss (k Childrents Noven Fabrio Underwear &

N7 woe*,ruee Junos r oue ear, FFIM67H-2-3,

r I a &6 S eloundries & Steel Ifigot Producers,
Reor C rodt Shigga Litrsl le, J l

Clay Coastnrction Products,ALug. 1953, FFM26B-83,10#
Men's ALpparel, 1952, FFM67B-02, 100, $1 Yearly





DEPARTMENT OF COMNERCE AND 8BA COOPERATING

A cooperative arrangement designed to strengthen the
government's assistance to small business firms in the
Southeast and to prevent wasteful duplication of ac-
tivities in that field has been announced jointly by
the U. S. Department of Commerce and Small Business
Administration.

Primary objectives of the cooperative program vill be
to define the areas of special services of the two
agencies; consolidation of other services into cooper-
ative efforts; and making available through their rea-
pective agencies in Washington and in the field the
technical, scientific, economic, and other information,
advice and specific services of value to small busi-
ness.

Under the arrangement, the Department of Commerce will
make available to SBA for further dissemination to
small business its vast reservoir of business data
and SBA in turn will inform the Commerce Department on
its operations and activities so that plans and poli-
cies can be developed promoting the economic growth
and stability of the nations business community.

3 BILLION LOST IN DISEASES OF PLANTS

The peach crop in Georgia, South Carolina and '
other southeastern Statse has been subject to '
Sforty-one different diseases. Twenty differ- '
lent diseases attack the region's peean crop, '
b ndatobacco-grow ngadin the areafais sometimes
'the nation three billion dollars a year just *
Sto combat peata of that kind. *

r These are some highlights of the new 1953 edi- '
tion of the nPearbook of Agriculture," a copy '
t of which has been received in Department of '
I Coaamerce field offices. Its price is $2.50* ,

I The new yearbook contains more than 900 pages
I of reading matter on plant diseases and many
illustrations'


VBDLESALLE SALES SHOW UPTREND IN 9 MONTHB PERIOD

8 3 per cent rise in wholesale sales in the Southeast
in the first nine months of 1953 as compared with the
corresponding period last year was shown in the monthly
survey condneted by the Bureau of the Census, U. S. De-
partment of Commerce.

Brisk selling in such lines as refrigeration equipment,
surgical and medical supplies, and some electrical
goods had the effect of offsetting declines in demands
for plumbing and heating supplies, fresh fruit and
vegetables, and other food products, and lessened ac-
tivity in sales of automotive supplies, hardware, lumP-
ber and building materials, and tobacco products,

Inventories at the end of the 9-month period were up
4 per cent in the East South Central region -- Ala-
bama, Mi~ssiasippi, Tennessee and Kentuckgy --- and were
unchanged in the South Atlantic area, which includes
Georgia, Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias, Mkary-
land and Delaware.

Sales in September in the Southeast were well above
those of August, a 13 per cent increase being shown in
the *,South Atlantic and 10 per cent in the East South
Central section.


s UGANDA COLLECTS POLL TAXES, TOO

SThey pay a poll tax in Uganda, too. RIigeriate
Public debt is 1,000 Uest African pounds.
Ethiopia haskarbalancefrbudg 4.9Int ya alanda

( month.

These are just a few "high spots" rolled fran
Sthe currently-issued RForeign Commerce lear-
Sbook for 1951,'now available at Department of
SCommerce field offices. The publication is of
( vital interest to southeastern world traders.

*In the Belgian Congo, the principal crop is *
Smanioe, which is an edible root stock. In *
SGmabias they grow groundnutss," which in thia
I country are called peanut, ,
tP0 806661


1


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


so-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L, QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GA INES VI LLE, FLORIDA


UNIER IT OF111111111 FLORIDA11111111 11 1111111


PAGE 4


BULLETIN


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional ()05ce
716 Forsyth Bldg., d
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 22 NOVEMBER 15, 1953



--BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





43 SOUTHEASTERN COUNTIES HAVE BULK~ OF INDUSTRY




EMPLC)YMNENT


TAL)AE3LJE PAYRC)LLS


REPORTING UNITS





Forty-three southeastern counties, four in Alabana; 10
each in North Carolina and Florida; five each in Geor-
gia and Tennessee; 3 in Mississippi; and six in South
Carolina, do more than 50 per cent of the regions bur-
iness, according to the annual report issued by the
U. S. Department of Commerce entitled "County Business
Patterns.n

The report, for 1951, is the collaborative work of the
C:":::":< Depatmen':"E:ea ":"of trhe annsus and te
apartment of Health, Education and Welfare.


REGION'S FARMERS HAVE $1~.1 BILLION MORTGAGE DEBT

Southeastern farmers this year had a mortgage debt on
their farms of ,1W,141,08700, according to a report
issued by the Bureau of Agricultural Econanics, U. S.
Department of Agriculture.

The debt, for the Statse of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee, the Carolinas and Virginias,
K~entuckry, Delavare, Maryland and the District of Colum-
bia, was some $/113,121,000 more than that of 1952, and
an increase of $508,055,000 eight years ago.

For one so~urce of detailed information on
the farm mortgage debt, see the Bureau of
the Census-Department of Agriculture cooper-
ative report issued from the 1950 census of
Agriculture and available at all Department
of Commerce field offices. Price 306,
The Agriculture Department'a report listed the farm-
mortgage debt at the beginning of 1953 as $101,761,000
in Alabama; $113,465,000 in Florida; $133,154,000 in
Georgia; $135,977,000 in Mississippi; $139,760,000 in
North Carolina; $56,021,000 in South Carolina; $112,-
842,000 in Tennesseel $135,809,000 in Kentuckyt; $)31,-
g7,0,0 n MaV l nd awhic inl d nbe Dgnistrc
of Columbia; and $11,304,000 in Delaware.

In keeping with a general pattern in the Ub~ited States,
the regions farnamortgage debt bowed an increase in
1953 over 1952, as well asr in 1953 over 1945.


~1953 POSTAL GUIDE IS DELAYED

The "Postal Guide" for 1953, another "Bible"
Sfor southeastern business men will not be
available until around January 1, according
Sto information received from the Government
Printing office in washington.

SA clarmor for the book bas been going up
From business firms over the region, because
Sof certain changes being made in the mailing I
Regulations authorized at the last session
Sof Congress,

The 'daneatic" issue this year will sell for
$1.75, a slight reduction fran the $2 pre-
viously charged, and the "international"edi-
tion will cost 75 cents.


This report, for the U. S. and by Regions
is available at all Departnent of Comrmerce
field offices at varying prices. See Page
3 for Order Blank.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE






asof


ATLANTA, GA., CHARLESTON,S.C.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., Sgt.Jasper Bldg.,
Tel.WA-4121, Ex. 453 Tel. 2-7771


JACKSONVILiLE,FLA., MEMPHIIS, TENN.,
425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426


MIAMI, FLA.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


SAVANNAH, GA.,
218 P.C.Bldg.
Tel. 2-4755


VOLUME 7, NUMBER 23


DECEMBER 1, L1953


The figures, the latest available at the county level,
credit the 43 southeastern counties with employing
2,081,700 employees in nine major branches of industry
of the 3,882,005 workers in the region as a whole, the
payment of $1~,322,418,000 quarterly in ages and sal-
aries of a total of $2,301,820,000 paid in the ?-State
area, and of having 142,142 of the 'region's 297,854
firms engaged in agriculture-forestry-fishing opera-
tions, contract construction, manufacturing, Fpublic
utilities, wholesale, retail and service trading, fi-
nance-insurance-real estate, and mining.

Compared with similar previous reports, the 1951 doo-
unoent reflected a abarp advance in the region in all
departments of business in the past 5-year period. For
example, the number of employees rose 16 per cent,
payrolls nearly 50 per cent, and rnumber of firms more
than 25 per cent. South Carolina led all southeastern
States in all three divisions shown in the report.





MANY COUNTRIES BIDDING FOR SOUTHBAST BUSINESS

Countries in many sections of the world now have rep-
resentation in the Southeast in a strong bid for great-
er distribution and consumption of goods produced on
foreign soil, according to a summary prepared by the
Atlanta regional office of the U. S. Department of Com-
merce.

Nine principal port cities located in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee, for example,
have consulates of some of the world's major exporting
countries,

For up-to-date information on all matters
pertaining to world trade, get in touch
with your nearest U. S. Department of Com-
merce field offices

In Atlanta, eight countries, Austria, Belgian, France,
Federal Republic of Germany, Great Britain, Mexico,
Panama and Peru have representation. In Jacksonville,
Pensacola, Savannah and Tampa are consulates of Belgian
and France is represented in Birmingham, Charleston,
Mobile, Savannah and Tampa. Mexico has representation
in Memphis, Miami, Mobile, and Tampa, Panamanian con-
sular offices are in Jacksonville, Miami, Mobile and
Tampa, Peru is represented in Miami, and the Ohited
K~ingdon in Miami and Mobile. The eight countries do a
$4b.2 billion export and iaport business with the Uhited
States.

MOTrOR-VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS RISE IN AREA

Hotor-vehicle registrations in the Southeast increased
by nearly 400,000 in the first half of 1953 over the
same period last year, and approximately 152.7 million
more gallons of motor fuel were consumed in the region,
the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department of Com-
merce, reported,

Motor vehicle registrations, including automobiles,
trucks, and busses, totalled 5,963,240 in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mtississippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas from January through June of this year, which
compared with 5,561,069 at the same time last year, and
motor fuel consumption went from 2,613,660,000 to 2,-
798,.29,000 gallons.


TITANIUM SPONGE, METAL ORDERED CONTROLLED

The Business and Defense Services Administration, U. S.
Department of Commerce, has issued BDSA Notice 1 and
Schedule A authorizing control of the general distribu-
tion of titanium sponge and titanium metal (ingot and
mill products) in the civilian market.

The action was taken upon the finding of the Adminia-
trator of BDSA that the materials are scarce and criti-
cal and that they are essential to the national program
of defense. Also, it was found that requirements of the
national defense for such materials could not otherwise
be met without creating a significant dislocation of
the normal distribution of such materials in the civil-
ian market to such a degree as to create appreciable
hardship.

It was the first action of the kind taken by BDSA under
authority delegated to the Department of Comrmerce by
the Office of Defense Mbbilization.

AID IN HIANDLING TITANIUM SCRAP ASKED

Government assistance in handling accumulations of ti-
taniurm scrap at manufacturers, plants was requested by
the Titanium Producers and Fabricators Industry Advis-
ory Committee at a meeting with officials of the Busi-
ness and Defense Services Adninistration.

BDjSA representatives were told that, pending develop-
ment of improved technology for reusing titanian scrap,
sanething should be done to salvage that important
strategic material.

ALUMIINMO SETASIDE ANNOUNCED

A total of 194 million pounds of aluminum will be set
aside from total supplies available in the first quar-
ter of 1954 to fill Department of Defense and Atomic
Energy Commission requirements, the Business and De-
fense Services Adninistration announced,

The reserve is 41 million pounds less than the amount
set aside for similar orders in the fourth quarter of
1953. The reduction, it was explained, reflects a de-
crease in military requirements. The first quarter
figure represented 24 per cent of the anticipated sup-
ply of domestic and imported primary aluminum for that
period. Fourth quarter 1953 setasides were 29 per cent
of available supply.

KKPAN~SION GOAL FOR STEEL SHEETS MAPPED

An expansion goal for ngrain-oriented silicon steel
sheets," a steel speciality, was established by the
Office of Defense Mobilization. The goal established
is for facilities with a production capacity of 215,-
000 tons a year of cold rolled grain-oriented silicon
steel sheets, an increase of about 65,000C tons a year
above estimated present capacity.

The goal covers special annealing and other related
facilities peculiar to the production of grain-oriented
sheets but does not include hot rolling or cold rolling
equipment.

The special composition sheets are adapted particularly
for use in electric transformers and other electric
equipment. They are used instead of ordinary steel
sheets because the "grain-oriented" feature reduces the
loss of energy due to the rapid reversal of the elec-
trical field in alternating current equipment, it was
state.


These are additional figures to be included
in the publication "Highway Statistican to
be issued soon by the Bureau of Public
Road. It will be available at all Depart-
mlent of Commerce field offices for 60 cents,


All of the seven States showed sharp gains, both in
motor-vehicle registrations as well as motor fuel con-
surmed. A considerable rise was indicated in the regis-
tration both of automobiles and the other types of ve-
hioles. Biggest gain in automobile registrations was
in Florida where an increase of from 877,503 to 969r-
449, or 91,946 care, was reported.

INCOMEE DISTRIBUTION IN THE U. S. '

The publication 'Income Distribution in the '
United States By Size, 1944-1950" has just '
been received by U. S. Department of Colmmerce *
field offices. Itls a valuable "tool" for '
market analysts, It's priced at 65 cents* '


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





SOMETHING OLD & SOMETHING NEW


Girls', Children's & Infants' Outerwear, 1952, FFI
M67K<-02, 104
Aluminum & Magnesium Mil Products, Sept. 1952, FFI
M24-1-93, 104, $1.00 a Tear
Flour Milling Products, Sept. 1953, FFIM16A-93, 10C
$1.00 a lear
Farm Pumps, Sept. 1953, FFIM31B-93, 106, $1 a Year
Commercial & Heame Canning Closures, Sept. 1953,
FFIMU50-93, 104, $1 a year


' 7
L7
'
' 7


Production and income continued high in the third quar-
ter of 1953 with only small changes reflected in most
major markets of the economy, the Office of Business
Econonics, U. S. Department of Commerce announced fol-
lowing a survey. Th~e gross national product was at a
seasonally adjusted annual rate of $369 billion, $33
billion below the preceding quarter, but $7 billion
above the $362 billion total of the opening quarter,

Third quarter production of all types of knit cotton
and wool underwear and nightwear, except union suits,
was appreciably higher than in the third quarter 1952,
the Bureau of the Census reported. Dollar shipments of
knit cotton and wool underwear and nightwear, and of
knit outerwear shirts amounted to $94.9 million in
third quarter 1953, 2 per cent more than in the same
period of 1952 and 44 per cent greater than in the
second quarter of 1953.

The United States, with only about 7 per cent of the
world's population, accounted for nearly 40 per cent
of the total world production of leather footwear in
1952, the Business and Defense Services Administration,
U. S. Department of Commerce said, Output of such foot-
wear in this country in 1952 exceeded 508 million
pairs, and indications are U. S. production for 1953
will be more than 500 million pairs.

American petroleumn enterprises have carried out a vast
expansion abroad in the last decade, raising the value
of the investment from $1.4 billion in 1943 to $3.4
billion in 1950, and to an estimated total of $4.4 bil-
lion at the end of 1952.

About 2,300 American companies and individuals have re-
ported controlling investment interests in about 7,500
foreign enterprises. Assets at the end of 1950 were in
excess of $22 billion.

CI Flammability of Clothing Textiles Commercial
Standard 191-53 A Recorded Voluntary Standard
of the Trade, 10Q
U_ Simnplified Practice Recommendation R 250-53, Stan-
dard Drug Catalogs, 204


FOR FURTHER DE-
TAILS OF ANY OF
THESE ITEMS GET
IN TOUCH WITH
THE NEAREST U.S.
., -s, 3. DEPARTMENTT OF
COMMERCE FIELD
OFFICE.

"-- -- -- -- -

Expenditures for new construction are expected to total
about $34 billion in 1951, about 2 per cent less than
the record volume of nearly $34 3-4 billion evident for
1953, according to outlook estimates prepared jointly
by the U. S. Departments of Commerce and Labor. A mild
contraction in private construction seems likely, it
was forecast, but indications are that publicly fi-
nanced activity will about equal this year's volume. It
was estimated that private expenditures in 1954 would
total $22.8 billion, and public outlays, $b11.2 billion,

Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $553 million in GOtober, 2} per
cent above the $540 million paid out in the same month
in 1952. The increase in payments centered in the heat,
light and power group, and in the communications in-
dustry. Share capital expansion was a primary factor in
both cases,

Retail sales in October were virtually unchanged com-
pared with the same month in 1952, and were up 6 per
cent over September 1953. Cumulative sales from Jan-
nary to October 1953 were 5 per cent above the corres-
ponding period in 1952. Among the individual items,
food sales increased 4 per cent in the 10amonth period
and automotive transactions were up 20 per cent,

CHECK THE MAT.
SNTW 1300)KS ,dLl p ERIA DESIRED IN
~t~3~-THE SPACE PROVID-
1 $8 F\ PORTION OF THE
BULLETIN OF COM-
MERCE TO THE NEAREST U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OF-
FICE. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE.
MAKE REMITTANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREASWR.
ER OF THE UNITED STATES.


7 /


Income of Hawaii, 554
Productivity Report, Food Canning, PB'
106456, $1b.70
Productivity Team Report, Fruit & Veg-
etable Utilization, PB 106457, $1.00
Aircraft Design Through Service Exper-
ience, CAA, $1.25
Pilt's Radio Handbook, CAA, L5g
SelectSB 2a Men's Apparel Store Loca-

Case Study Measuring Potentials Before '
Introducing a New Product, SBA 273
Picking a Location for a Small Business, '
SBA 274
Checking Job Applicants' References By '
Telephone, SBA 275


Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Oct. 1953, 10 4
Annual Subscription, $b1.50 '
Nov. 1, 1953 Consolidated Cotton Report
Petroleum Products Secondary Inventories & Stor-
age Capacity, Sept. 30, 1953, 10#
Report on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 9, 1953, A/C-0--ICG
CottonbCinned /3Aik nsasNov ~berol in._: Lusaa
Mississippi // North Carolina L/ Oklahoma
South Carolina // Tennessee
1950 Censue of Popuilation Puerto Rico General
Characteristics, P-B 53, 404
1951 County Business Patterns, 1st Quarter, Part 7,
East South Central States, 604
1951 County Business Patterns, let Quarter, Part 6,
South Atlantic States, $b1.25
1951 County Business Patterns, let Quarter, Part 1,
United States Summnary, 704
1953 Postal Guide, Danestic, $1.75
1953 Postal Guide, International, 754
Income Distribution in the United States, By Size,
1944-1950, 654


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3









1


TEN SOUTHWESTERN FIRMS ON MSA LISTING

Ten firms in three southeastern States have been listed
by the Office of Small Business, Mutual Security Agency
in a program designed to facilitate trading with small
business firms in the region under provisions of the
Mutual Security Act.

Six of the firms are in Florida, two in Georgia, and
the other two in Tennessee. They areas

Florida -- Southern Export Company, Mart Kaller, Inc.,
and Maljer Products Company, Inc., Miami; E. -Carles and
Dr. Averbuch and Companly, ~Jacksonville; and Florida
Fishermen'a Supply Company, Tanpa,

Georgia --- Sanders and Company, and Fred Baungarten,
Atlanta.

Tennessee -- Ramon Leon, Jr., and Wynne G. Cannons
Memphis.

For additional information regarding this
program get in touch with the Foreign Com-
merce Office of the U. S. Department of
Commerce nearest you.

The firms, kn~ow as combination export managers and
selected on a voluntary application basis are to as-
sist American small business to participate equitably
in the furnishing of commodities and services financed
with MSA and Technical Cooperation Adninistration funds
and to make available to prospective purobasers abroad
information as to commodities and services produced by
anall independent enterprises in the Uh~ited States.

I NEW FEDERAL INCOME TAX BOOKLET COMING

s Announcement has been made that a revised edi-
a tion of the booklet "Your Federal Income Tax,n a
a so popular from year-to-year among federal in-
a come taxpayers will be available the last of '
a 1953. It will, as usual, incorporate latest '
a information on what is, and is not, taxable,
s and other information of value to taxpayers. *
Watch for the announcement regarding it.
GPO 867231


U. S. PURCHASES IN SOUTHEAST IN '53 $300 MILLION

The United States Government in the first 10 months of
1953 bought goods and services in the Soutteast on a
formally advertised and negotiated unclassified basia
valued at nearly $300,000,000, according to daily con-
tract award lists received in U. S. Department of Com-
merce field offices.

Value of the purchases by States included $53,121,600
in Alabama; $59,807,400 in Florida; $58,440,100 in
Georgia; $20,255,600 in EessiSsippi; $22,341,1300in
South Carolina; and $85,048,400 in Tennessee,

These daily lists, along with information
on goods and services to be bought by the
U. S. are available at all Department of
Commerce offices on a mailing basis of $7
a year.

In addition, other contracts were awarded in the region
on a classified basis, but immediate information on
them was withheld for security reasons.

Altogether, 950 contracts were let in the air-State
area in the 10-month period. Alabana received 170;
Florida, 213;Georgia, 247; Mfississippi, 49; South Caro-
ILna, 86; and Tennessee, 185.


I1IIN~mT~D Im(TrJnnnn~CI


SItla time for antifreeze for motor vehicles
land the U. S. Department of Caommerce is a-
Sgain offering its baooket "Automotive Anti-
Sfreezes" as a guide in selecting the proper
Filling for the radiator. It sells for 15#*

SA product of the Cormmerc~e Department's N~at-
Sional Bureau of Standards, the pamphlet is
Ithe result of an artensive series of tests
Son common types of antifreezes. It tells a-
Sbout the physical properties and also ser-
'vice performances of the product, as well
Sas other information on the use and so on.


a


*


AUTOMOTIVE ANTIFREEZE S


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
(GPO)
UN~~J of, OFL L\
)Oclctp- N31


~... L-~.-.------- -

LE VE tSICUA 0F SFLO ftIDA
DEPTH 0 F EC 0NOMICS
GAINES VILLE FLA


3 1262 08748 9232

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. S. OEPARTMEN(T OF COMMERlE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
VOLSIE 7, NISMBER 23 DECEMBER 1, 1953



-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS 111E KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMIYERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS MINFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


















ATLANTA, GA., CHABLESTON,S.C., JACKSONVILL,FLA., 8MEMHS, TEN,, MINI FA, 8AVANIAR, GA.,
7th Floor,F~orsyth Bldg., 8gt.Jasper Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel.U1-412, Ez. 453 Tel. 2-7771 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 8-3426~ Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-4755


BANK9 IIEPOSITS IN SOUTHEAST 80AR TO $11.6 BLLION


LLARGE CITIES IN REGION SPEND $286.8 MILLION

It costs every man, woman and child in 58 larger south-
eastern cities an average of $61.91 to operate their
city governments, cCO~rding to results Of a study Of
figures contained in a report on city government fi-
nances just released by the Bureau of the Census, U. S.
Department of Commerce.

The report abowed that in the fiscal year ending in
1952, the 58 cities of 25,000 population and over in
Allabama, Florida, Georgia, Meissisippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas had total expenditures of $286,856,000.
The total population in those cities was 4,633,691.

a~l report is entitled Canpendian of City
Government Finances in 1952. It's priced
at 65 cents, See Page 3 for ordering,

Of the seven States, only Alabema operated sin the
black," the seven larger cities of that State showing
general revenue of $29,703,000 and general expenditures
of $29,690,000. Otherwise, the southeastern States
were nin the red" in the larger cities. Alabama's
larger cities had the second lovest per capital expendi-
tures, $41.05. South Carolina led the region with
83g.49.

Highest per capital expenditures for operation of six
larger city governments in the~ area was in Tennessee
where $71,091,000, or $80.40 per person, was diabureed.
Their revenue amounted to $63,760,000.



A NERRY CHRISTMAS ANlD BAlPPI NE YEIR TO tLL

This is the season of
the year when peace on
earth and good will to
all men should prevail.
The IUbited States De-
partment of Coa~mmec Bo
gionral and District OS-
fioes in the Southeast
wish to extend to the
Business men of the
Southeast their very
best dishes for a MCefrr
Christmas, and a New
Tear filled with all of
the prosperity and con-
tentment the sup will
hold.


U.s S
soVERNMENTHO
( AND
A INTERBANK s



BUSINESS
AND

(DEMAND


( TIME

1934 1936 1938 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 1950 1952
Sources Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

All1 operating banks~ in '-he Southeast on June 30 of this
year had a total of $11,628,456,000 on deposit, an in-
orease of $408,187,000 over the same date last years
according to a semi-annual report of the Federal De-
posit Insurance Corporation on assets and liabilities
of the nation's financial institutions*

This was an average deposit of $541 tor every mass
woman and child in the seven-State region of Alabamas
Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas.

For financial, industrial and other data
dealing with the hi~ted Statse economy,
see the 1953 Statistical Pbstract of the
United Statses epected off the press soon.

Of the total on deposit in the region this year, more
than 75 per cents or $9,158,109,000, was in obecking
aLccounts.

Regionally, Flor~ida's deposited showed the biggest in-
orease this year over last with a rise of fro $2,318,-
566,000 to $2,507,228,000, or $188,662,000. The other
were Allabama, fromr $1,329,952,000 to $1,352,762,000, up
$2,810,0001 Georgia, $i1,958,197,000 to $1,976,436,000,
a gain of $18,239,0003 NP~asiasippi, from $818,359,000
to $864,824,000, a rise of $i46,465,0001 NPorth Carolina,
$1,929,427,000 to $1,944,393,000, an increase of $14,.
966,000) South Carolina, $771,922,000 to $7T76,277,000,
an advance of $4,355,000; and Trennesse, $2,093,846,000
bo $i2,206,536,000, an increase of $12,690,000.


YOLUME 7, NUKEIER 24


DECEMBER 15, 1953


DEPOSITS


...... IL


G~NIE ST~aQ::ATt~ESl DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


FIELD SERVICE





COPPER SCRAP FREED FROM TIME SCHEDUILES

Applications for licenses to export. new and old copper
scrap and copper-base alloy scrap may now be filed at
any time, the Bureau of Foreign Co~merc~e, U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce announced. Exporters previously were
required to file such applications during a specified
period in each quarter,

AID TO FIRMS IN0 LABOR SW(PLUS AREAS PROVIDED

The Office of Defense Mobilization has announced two
actions designed to provide avoeistance to firms in la-
bor surplus areas. First, Defense Manpower Policy Num-
ber 4 vas revised to give firm located in surplus la-
bor areas special assistance in obtaining government
contracts. Second, the OIMl's tax amortization procedure
was modified to give additional tax amortization as-
sistance to fitas which establish or expand defense
plants in areas of chronic labor surplus.
BASEITE MATERIAIS SURVEY PUBLISHED

Publication of the Ma~terials Survey on Baurite was an-
nounesd by the Office of Defense Mobilization. The 304-
page study, costing $)1.50, is the latest in a series
of surveyed of strategic materials sponsored by the
National Security Resources Board. It was prepared by
the Bureau of Mines with cooperation of the Geological
Surrey,

A similar survey on alumitnu is now in course of pre-
paration by the Department of Commerce. Since about
four-fifths of all bauxite domestically used is con-
suned in metal manufacture, the alumilnum survey will
provide a complete picture of the importance of baurite
in the production of alumlinurm,

Previously issued materials surveys available for pur-
chase are those concerned with antimolny, asbestos, co-
belt, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, rubber, sino,
iron and steel scrap, and tin, respectively.

INTERAGENJCY MABTERILS GROTP CREATED

The Office of Defense Mobilization has announced crea-
tion of an Interdepartmental MIateriale Advisory Comlit-
See to advise with the Assistant Director for Matterials
on policies, plane, programs, and problems, relating to
defense materials, a tookpiling of strategic and crit-
ical materials, content, statue, rate of progress and
completion dates of defense materials pr~ogreas, obanges
in program emphasis necessary to meet major problems
and objectives, and new programs required to improve
the supply of defense materials,

Represented on the committee will be the Departments of
Agriculture, Callmerce, Defense, Interior and State,
Foreign Operatione Adm~inistration, and General Services
~Admnistration.

RUBBER CONSUMPTION CONTROLS REVOKED

Revocation of a directive of the Defense Production Ad-
ministration of A~pril 1952 requiring resumption of rub-
ber consumption control vas announced by the Office of
Defense Mobilization. The directive provided for the
control if the use of GR-8 fell belov a rate of 450,-
000 long tone a year or if busyl consumption fell belov
60,000 tone per annum. The rubber consumption control
had been removed in May 1952, and there has been no co-
casion to use the directive since synthetic rubber con-
sanption has been above the quanrtities specified, it
was stated.


REGION3'S COTTON MILLS ACTIVE II 1952

Cotton aills Bumned in six southeastern Statse last
year Alabema, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas in the production of 3,438,328,000
pounds of cottonseed crude oils oake, aeal and hulla,
or nearly 38 per cent of the nation'sr output of 9,107,.
022,000 pounds of those products, according to a report
issued by the Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of
Commerce.

Included in the production in the six-State southeast-
orn area vere 1,449,142,000 pounds of crude oil, 1,-
953,828,000 pounds of cake and meal, and 849,096,000
pounds of hull,


This is a Facts For Industry~ report en-
titled "Animal and Vegetable Fata and
Oilst 1952," See Pagre 3 for ordering,


In the production process, the allls crushed or used a
total of 4,033,190,000 pounds of cottonseed. Allso pro.
duced were 659,278 bales of linters.

Although the report aboved a heavy production of by-
products of cottonseed last year, it also revealed a
steady decline in most insrtances in auch activities in
the past four years. In 1949, 400 million more pounds
of cottonseed were crushed, 100 m.llionl more pounds of
;cake and aeal produced, and the output of hoille was
more than 200 million pounds greater. The production or
linters was off around 50,000 bales last year as oan-
pared with the earlier year. The output of crude oil,
however, was more than 600 million pounds greater in
1952,

For the first time, the Census Bureau also reported on
soybean processing in MItssiasippi where the production
of that commodity has greatly increased in recent
years.
80WHEAST H~AS NEARLYf HALF BILLION ROAD MIILES

If all of the nrral and annicipal roads in the South-
east were placed end to end, they would extend around
the world many times, figure just released by the
Bureau of Public Roads, U. 8. Department of Cammerce,
on existing mileage of highways by States in the U. S.
indicate,

The figures show a total of 479,789 miles of highways
in the region's rural and municipal areas, with Georgia
registering the largest network, 96,104. The others
were Allabeaa, 67,473, Florida, 54,745, Mttssissippi,
65,846, North Carolina, 74,420, South Carolina, 51,798,
and Tennessee, 69,403.

Mlore than 60 per cent of the areate highway aileage was
surfaced last year,the report reflected, with Tennessee
boasting of the largest surfaced aileage with 59,741
miles; North Carolina vae second with 57,542, and
AIabama, third, with 47,685. The others were Florida,
30,628, Georgia, 35,319, Hississippi, 38,243, and South
Carolina, 23,048.

These figures vill be incorporated in the
new report "Highway Statistics, 1952, to
be available at, Comrerge DepartmPent offices,

Of the 679,789 miles of highways in the region, nearly
90 per cent were rural roads, Georgia had the largest
auaber of rural roads, 86,849.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE







I


I


CICotton Gimned Prior to NovemPber 1 in Specified
States, Crope of 1953 and 1952
L7Womencs, Misses', &r Juniora' Outerwear, 1952,
FFIM67BI-02, 104, Ahnnually, 504
~7Knit Outerwear, Including Noven Swimwear, 1952,
FFIM7G-02, 100
/7Knit Shadenrear an dnightwear, 3rd Quarter 1953,
mY7--3-3 10e, lyR~4 504
SOMETHING OLD ANYD SOMETHING HNEV
PrdoiiyyenRprEdraulic Research in the U. S., MP208,1;1.25 '
a Prouctiity Tam Rport- Cakes & Biscuit,
PB106455, $1.15
Fruit &r Vegetable Utilisation, PB10&647, $1 *
I Ml~k Utilization, PB106479, $1.25 '
A 1Dov molrowave Reflector, P8111178, 751
There la Money In the Small Towns For Photo- *
:o graphers, SBL #r276
B A Ed To Profit As A Retail Florist, 8BA 277
i an severmeangI~ U~nsexI exas, Ya yle
/ Small Plant Medical Service, SBA #f279
Incentive Plan Profitable to Laundry & York- (
eras SBA f280
1952 Annual Survey of Mkanmfactureas
U General Statistice for the U. 8. by Geographio
Divisions &r states, 1952, 1951 &r 1947, MAS-52-5,
10#
/7 Business in a Growing America," Text of Addrerss
by Secretary of Comrmerce Sinclair Yeeks before
Congress of American Industry, Nlational Associa-
tion of Manufacturere
Selling the U. S. Market, $1.00
County and City Data Book, $4.25


Total sales of all retail stores in October 1953 vere
little changed from September after allowances for sea-
sonal variations and trading difference. On an adjusted
basis, October sales were just over 1 per cent higher
than in October 1952. Durable goods showed a rise of a
little over 1 per cent from September while practically
no change vas indicated for the nondurable goode group.

Increased military assistance raised foreign aid in the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1953 to more than $7 billion
the highest amount ainee the end of Yorld War II. Re-
ceipts by the U. S. Government of reverse grants and
returns on grants, as well as repayment of credits, re-
duced net foreign aid to $6.3 billion. Ifilitary~asist-
ance amounted to $4.3 billion and not economic aid, $i2
billion.

September 1953 fiber consumption on the woolen and
worsted systan was below that of August with raw vool
consumption averaging 9.4 million pounds being consumed
per week in September, 7 per cent below the A~ugust
average, and 11 per cent below September 1952.

The net working capital of U. 8. corporations continued
to increase in the second quarter of 1953 and at the
end of June amounted to $88.2 billion, sooording to the
Securities and Exchange Commission. They had $i1.5 bil-
lion more not working capital at the end of June than
they had three months earlier.
Accelerated devatopnent of private U.S. foreignl invest-
ment in Canadian industry raised the value of our di-
reot investments there to nearly $5 billion at the
middle of 1953.

Sarap and pig iron held by consumers on Septanber 30
totalled 8,525,000 gross tone, a continued rise,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


FOR FURTHER rB-
TAILS OF ANYP OF
BUSIN SS BIEFSTHESE ITEMS GET
SS S E SIUBRIEBIN TOUCHI WITH
THE NEALREST U.S
D~PEPATMENT OF
CQMMERCE FXELD
OFFICE.


Hev corporate aeourities offered for cash sale in the
United States in the third quarter of 1953 amounted to
$1.6 billion, the Securities and Exchange Commission
reported. This represented a substantial dooline from
the high rate of financing continuing tran 1952 through
the first half of 1953, due to the small amount of of-
ferings in July and August.

Incane fran Chrited States direct investments abroad,
excluding reinvested earnings of subsidiaries, have
grown markedly sines the war in line with the continued
expansion of funds invested and of output, the Office
of Business Economies, U. S. Department of Commerce re-
ported. Between 1946 and 1950 income more than doubled,
rising fran $600 million to $1.3 billion. By 1952 in-
come receipts had advanced to about $i1.5 billion, and
continued at that rate in the first half of 1953,

The dollar value of business purchases of new equipment
in the past five year ranged frun 3 to 4 times that of
1929. The postwar expansion brought equipment purchased
to $22 billion in 1951 and again in 1952, Preliminary
indications suggest that equipment purchases may be
somewhat higher in 1953. In terms of physical volume,
equipment purobases in recent years have averaged about
brice those of 1929,


NEW BOOSCHECK( THE MIAT-
7 4)(}[$ AERIAL. DESIRED IN

E-1 -PORTION OF TIE
BULLETIN OF--COM-
P0ggg[ TO THIE NEAREST U. S. DE;PARTMENT OF COMMUERCE OFFICE.
YOUR NAMbE AND ADDRESS ARE ON THEE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAKE RE-
MLITTANCES FOR SALES KATERLAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF EE
UNITED STATES.


/ 7 Animal &r Vegetable Fata &r Oils, 1952, FFIN17-1-02,
404
Highway statistics, 1952, 604 (Released Soon)
Compendiurm of City Government Finances in 1952, 65#
Estimates of the Population of States, July 1, 1950
to 1952, P-25, #84, 54
/ 7 Provisional Estimates of the Population of the U.S.
January 1, 1950 to October 1, 1953, P-25, #83, 54
L7 / bility of the Population of the U. S., April 1952
to April 1953, P-20, #149, 10#
1952 Annual Survey of Wanufactureas
gO Selected Statistics by Size of manufacturing Ea-
tablishrments,for Mkrjor Industry Groupe,1952 & 19519
n88-52-6, 10#
49 East North Central States, General Statistics by
Major Industry Groups, 1952,1951 &.1947,MAS-52-5.3
10#
// New England States, General Statistice by Major
Industry Groups,1952, 1951 & 1947, MAS-52-5.1, 100
7 MIddle Atlantio States,Cieneral Statistics by Manjor
Industry Groups,1952, 1951 & 1947, MAS-52-5.2, 10#
17 Report On Cotton Ginning, Nov. 23, 1953, A/C-0-ICG





CENSUS BUREAU ChANGES M)ONELY RETbAI REPORT

The Bureau of the Census has announced a change in ite
Monthly Retail Trade Report.

Briefly, for the present at least, the Bureau is in-
cluding only four southeastern cities in its reports
~Atlanta, Birmingham, Charlotte and Miami. Atlanta is
among twenty metropolitan areas in which detailed in-
formation on commnodity sales trends is given, and the
other three southeastern cities, along with Atlanta,
are listed with 32 cities showing month-to-month sales
trends in overall figures only.


$55 MILLION EIFAN~SION PRO.TE~CTS 0.K(.'D IN REGION

la two months of operation of the government's plant
and facility expansion program to meet the national
program of defense, approval was given by the Office
of Defense Mobilization in Washington to expansion and
improvement projects in the Southeast to coat nearly
$55,000,000, sooording to information reaching U. S.
Department of Commerce field offices from OIM.

Firms in Allabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South
Carolina and Tennessee were granted certificates of
necessity in October and N~ovember entitling them to
rapid income tax amortizations on the expenditures in-
volved.

The larger projects included $;888,400 to be spent by
the Harrior and Gulf NJavigation Company, Fairfield,
Ala., for development of waterways transportation
Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad Company, Mobile, $i6/5,-
000 on railway transportation; Eastern Airlines, Inc.,
Miami, air transportation, $1l1,382,000; Cities Service
Stations Corporation, port Everglades, petroleum stor-
age facilities, $844,950; Delta Air Lines, Inc., At-
lanta, air transportation, $12,200,000; Central of
Georgia Railway Company, Savannah, railway transporta-
tion, three projects totalling $6,034,900, $1,0,920,
and $159,836; Southern Railway, Atlanta, railway trans-
Portation, $13,886,019; and South Carolina Natural Gas
Company, Columbia, S. C., natural gas transmission,
$)5,724,500.


This report is available at all Commerce De-
partm~ent offices for $1 a year, or in singe
copiesr of 10C each


In addition, the Bureau gives estimated dollar volume
figures for the United States each month, including
those for the pr'inipal commnodities. For example, in
the September 1953 report, the Bureau estimated sales
for that month in the nation as $14.2 billion, which
compared with $)13.6 billion for the corresponding month
in 1952. Cumulative sales for the first 9 months of
1953 vere given as 6 per cent above the ease period
in 1952.

Besides Atlanta, detailed information is also given in
the report for Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland,
Detroit, Fort North, Los ALngeles8, aulvansee, new zrol-
New Jersey, Norfolk-Portsmouth, Philadelphia, Pitts-
burgh, Providence, Rochester, Sacramento, St. Louis,
San Francisco-0akland, Seattle, and Unshington, D. C.,
metropolitan areas.

INCOME DISTRIBUTION IN THE U. S. '


YO~tE FEIERALL IEOME TAI *

Natch for the announcement regarding this '
pulblication for 1953. This year, it will (
have a new feature .. the substance '
of many regulations based on recent tax '
lave. It'a expected soon. (


___ ____ _____ __


* GPO 867879


ODM announces approval of the certificates
biweekly. The general program has been
narroved since the nation's requirements
of national defense have become lessened.


of necessity
considerably
in the field


A total before-tax income of $217 billion
flowed to milknlion consumer units of
fam~ilies and unattached individuals in the
U. S. in 1950, the Office of Business Econ
amics, U. S. Department of Cammerce, re-
ports in a comprehensive publication just
issued entitled *Incomle Distribution in the
U. 8." It's available at all Connaerce De-
bartment field offices for 65 cents,


UNIVERSITy 0~ F 8 C6* J
LER 0Y L 0 UALLSFL0A
0 EPT 0 F EC 0N 0MICS
GaINESVILLE FLA


BULLTIN 3 26208748 9224


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMrERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

VOLUME 7, TIMBER 24 DECEMBER 15, 1953



--BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMlYERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORdATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300




UNIV FFLLB
DOCUMIES 7TZII




U.S. DEPCsiTORY