Bulletin of commerce

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Material Information

Title:
Bulletin of commerce
Uniform Title:
Bulletin of commerce (Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Commerce
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Field Service, Atlanta Regional Office
Place of Publication:
Atlanta, Ga
Creation Date:
1952
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 11, 1947)-v. 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1954).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 7, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1953) misnumbered as v. 7, no. 26 (Jan. 15, 1953).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 3, no. 13 (July 1, 1949) misnumbered as v. 1, no. 13 (July 1, 1949).
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004850614
oclc - 28680692
System ID:
AA00005235:00004


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OLUIYE 6. NUMBER 1 JANUALRY i. 1952


SOUfHEALSTERN BU]SINESS CONTINUES GOOD

Sharp advances took
place in most lines of
business in the Southeast
in the first 9 months of
1951 as compared with the
/corresponding period in
1950, according to the
quarterly anamary of busi-
1 ness conditions in the
region prepared by the
----- -Atlanta office of the
U. 8. Department of Com-
.TL .. ? .... 1-- rce,
Bank deposited in Federal
Reserve member banks increased from 6.8 per cent in Alabama
he 11.5 per cent in Georgia; loans from a fraction of a per
cent in Alabama to 13 per cent in Florida; and debits 17.3
per cent in the region as a whole.

Copies of this report are available upon re-
quest from the nearest U. S. Department of Com-
merge field qffiqe.

Department store trade in 16 of 28 cities in which mponth-
ly surveys are conducted rose from 1 per cent in Heaphis to
as high as 16 per cent in Augusta. Gains in wholesale trade
ranged fromn 5 per cent in the East South Central region to
9 per cent in the Santh atlantic. Cash farm income was up
1L.7 per cent in the Southeast, and anaber of residential
and business telephones in operation increased 8.7 and 7.5
per cent, respectively.
The number of wage and salary workers in manufacturing in_
dustries in the area showed a gain of 5.3 per cent and
electric energy produced 10.3 per cent. Corresponding upward
trends came in most lines of transportation. Only declines
reflected were in urban building, number of new businesses
incorporated and some forms of transportation.
BANINMZG ACTIVITIES GP SHARPLgY
Banks in the Southeast at the and of the first half of
1951 had aeaete or 11@bilities totalling $i10.9 billion, in-
cluding $10.1 billion in deposited, according to a report of
the FederalrDepoelfainsuranc rCo poration.inteaewih

numbered 1,703 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiesippi*
Tennessee and the Carolinas.


per x m edexceeded tha fobethe nation s wedrhole which ap-


Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S.C.,
50 Whitehall St., S.W., Maxwell Hlouse, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg., 8gt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,I-453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,1-355 Tel. 7771


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673

Miani, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Columbia, S. G.,
13'10 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Blag.,
Tel. 4-7111

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Knoxvile, Tenn.,
313 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-346


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,1-206


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-47~55


Tamnpa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafayette St.,
Tel. 2-3880


THE c1 The National Production Authority
in the closing days of 1951 took action
to move the many hundreds of thousands
Nc gygggg P of pounds of crap contained in wrecked
automobiles in owners' "graveyards" into
coanercial scrap channels.
Pradu tion An order, known as M-92, was issued
()( C~ti)El which affects more than a thousand auto
"graveyaud" operators in Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgiar, Mississippi, South Caro-
Auth rity lina and Tennessee, and which made it
11% Iidify mandatory for them to submit an inventory
report by December 20, 1951, detailing
the number of motor vehicles, car unite,
and amouat of loose scrap they had on
Sand as of Deceaber 1, 1951.
SThe operators are prohibited from
accepting delivery of any auto or car
unit during the three-month periods
beginning March 1, 1952, and the first day of each June,
September, December and March thereafter, unless during the
three-mronth period immediately preceding each such date he
has disposed of a number of motor vehicles or car units at
least equal to the sum of all motor vehicles manufactured
prior to 1946, and all car anits which were in his inventory
on the first day of such preceding three-month period.
The order requires "prompt and complete" compliance with
any directives NPA may issue to allocate motor vehicles, car
units and loose scrap from yards for delivery or disposal to
scrap dealers or consumers.
a "car unit" is defined as a motor vehicle stripped of
salvageable parts, "loose scrap" as the non-s~alvageable secr-
tions or parts removed from ears such as miscellaneous fen-
ders, door, springs and gears, and "motor vehiclean as in-
cluding trucks up to one and a balf tone in eright.
90HSTRUICT10N
Latest action taken by NPA on applications for materials
for the construction of projects in the Southeast for the
first quarter of 1952 found that agency making 37 allotments,
approving one application which did not require an allotaent,
holding 5 other applications exempt from CMP provisions, and
denying a total of 140 other.
AlaPaas ac1 1aaffteotdapr p sed building noperatiln nd
T nnoeaseeProce s Mgeof thelapplications aborn in the latest

Among the allotments, 3 were in Alabama; 8 in Florida;
4 in Georgia; 6 in Missiesippig 4 in South Carolina; and 12


Missiasippi, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee.


UNTE STATE DEPATMEN OFCOMEC





~i~n~lFIELD ~'SERVICE





SWLARIES.IWAGES TOTAL )5sA BILLION

Salaries and wages paid in manufacturing industries
in the Southeast in 1950 totalled nearly five and a
half billion dollars, according to a Bureau of the
Census report.
The report, included in the 1950 Census of Manufact-
ures, also placed the total value added by manufacture
of goods produced in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, Tennessee, the Carolinas and Virginias,
Klentucky, Maryland, Delaware and District of Columbia,
at $11 173,950,000, while wages and salaries approxi-
mated 85,447,781,000.

Note: Copies of these 1950 Census of
Manufactures reports are available without
charge at Department of Commerce field
offices.

The textile industry was the most important in the
region, both from a standpoint of value of goods pro-
duced as well as salaries and wages paid. In that in-
dustry, salaries and wages paid totalled $1,458,656,000
and value of commodities was placed at $2,4G88,464,000.
Payments for services rendered in the food and kin-
dred products industries were second in total amount
with $517,251,000. Others in order of total amounts
were chemicals and allied industries, $495,756,000;
lumber and its products, except furniture, $461,920,-
000; primary netal products, $424,496,000; apparel and
related products, $333,680,000; stone, clay and glass
products, $236,951,000; printing and publishing in-
dustries, $233,661,000; fabricated metal industries,
$229,586,000; transportation equipment, $222,784,000;
paper and allied products, $213,913,000; furniture and
fixtures, $186,250,000; machinery, except electrical,
$171,352,000; electrical machinery, $90,116,000; lea-
ther and its products, $65,188,000; miscellaneous in-
dustries, $63,140,000; petroleum and coal, $34,456,000;
and instruments and related products, $8,625,000.

RETAIL WHOLESALE SALES INCRElSE

Increases in both wholesale and retail sales in
the Southeast were reported by merchants in the month-
ly survey conducted by the Bureau of the Census.
Gains in wholesale sales, including 5 per cent in
the East South Central region and 9 per cent in the
South Atlantic section, were registered for the first
10 months of 1951, and in the retail trade field sales
were up in October 1951 over the corresponding month
in 1950 in 10 of 15 cities.
Brisk selling in such commodities as industrial
supplies, plumbing and heating products, and paper and
its products were contributing factors in the wrhole-
sale sales gains while lesser increases were reported
for drugs and` sundries, fresh fruits and vegetables
and specific lines of grocery products.
Increases in retail sales on the October basis in-
eluded 37 per cent in Augusta; 31 per cent in Biloxi
15 per cent in Columbus, Ga; 10 per cent in Savannah
6 per cent in Gulfport; 2 per cent in Birm~ingham audi
Macon; 1 per cent in Atlanta; 11 per cent in Chilton
and Perry counties, Alabasa; and 4 per cent in Manatee
and Sarasota counties, Florida.
Gains of 7 per cent in the South Atlantic and 9 per
cent in'the East South Central section were reported in
wholesale sales in October 1951 as compared with the
same month in 1950 despite some reductions in various
lines of commodities, such as electrical appliances and
specialties, furniture and house furnishings, jewelry,
lumber and building supplies and machinery equipment.


NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS AUTHIORI Y Coqtipued From Page 1

The denials affected all States in the region and in-
cluded 12 in Alabasa; 50 in Florida; 17 in Georgia;
11 in Missiesippi; 10 in South Carolina; and 40 in Tenn-
essee.
Total value of the proposed construction in the aix
southeastern States involved in the applications denied
was in the millions of dollars.
NUMBERED COTTON DUIK
Growing importance of "converted mill" production of
numbeuuuI~red duck was stressed by NPA in reporting preliminary
data on the third quarter output of that commodity,
While total cotton duck weaving dropped almost 6 million
linear yards from the 94.5 million reported for the second
quarter, production of numbered duck rose from 18.3 million
yards in that quarter to 25.1 million in the third.
Fourth quarter production of converted mills was ex-
pected to rise by about 2,250,000 linear yards or another
3.3 million pounds.
Further increase in numbered duck may be expected in
1952 as a result of rapid tax amortization assistance, NPA
indicated .
YETAL CANS
To insure the most equitable distribution of limited
quantities of metal cans needed to pack various products,
NPA in Direction 2 to Order M-25 directed can manufacturers
to satisfy current demands for cans first and then to fill
earry-over requirements on a pro-rata basis.
01L ANID GAS
Extensive revision of Order K1-46 establishing procedures
for use by U. S. and Canadian oil and gas operators in get-
ting priorities assistance for purchases of controlled
materials was made by NPA
MAC;HINE TOOLS
By amending Direction 1 to Order Y-5, Direction 2 to
Ore -11, Direction 3 to Order M-1, and Regulation 2
procedure was established for granting the machine tool
inustry preferential status on orders for controlled mater-
iasand component parts.
SELENilUM
A new order, Y-91, was issued placing imported and
domstiall-produced selenium under complete allocation.
The product is an element obtained as a by-product in the
electrolytic refining of copper, and is used commercially
in two grades, high-purity and commercial. The order was
issued, it was explained, because defense requirements for
that commodity have been consistently outrunning available
supplies.
PENS & PENCILS
The Fountain Pen and Mechanical Pencil Industry Advisory
Committee told NPA at a recent meeting that labor layoffs
of 20 to 40 per cent are anticipated during the first quar-
ter of 1952 as a result of curtailed allotments of controlled
materials for that industry.
DAIRES
American dairies will be faced with a possible serious
shortage of new crates for the handling, storage and de-
livery of bottled milk unless greater quantities of zinc
for galvanizing of steel are made available to the industry,
the Milk Bottle Crate Manufacturers Industry Advisory Com-
nittee predicted at a meeting with NPA officials.
DEER
The nation's deer hunters have been asked by NPA to
skin carefully deer that have been killed, sell the skip
--- if the State law permits --- to the local dealer or
tanner, and help United Nations forces in Korea and in
other cold areas, becanae the rm~y uses deerskin gloves.
ELECTRONIC PARTS
Shortages of certain types of receiving tubes used in
radio sets continue to plague distributors of electronics
parts and components, but scarcities of test equipment and
radio and television antennae have eased, NPA wase advised.

GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









- --- ~ ~ I


To Obtaip Copies
NICW BOth S A por This Ylatespae.
A RE)(]P()(T'S ,Provided And Sepd
M~ak -5@ ## This Sectign Of The
Bulletin of Commerge
To The Nearest Department g( Cogmoerge Field Qffice. Your


More detailed
Information on
The H~ighlights
of the News in
b.............. __ __ -2-=the Field of
Business is
Available a~t Department of Commerce Field Offices.


Total business inventories at the end of October
1951 were valued at $7.04 billion, the Office of Busi-
ness Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce, reported.
After allowance for seasonal variation, the book value
of inventories at the end of October was almost $150
million above September. An increase of $200 million
in manufacturers' inventories and a slight rise in
wholesalers' stocks were partly offset by a decline of
$100 million in retailers' inventories.
*
Personal income in October 1951, at an annual-rate
of $2573 billion, was almost $4 billion higher than in
September 1951. A large retroactive wage payment to
Federal Government civilian employees and expanded
income of farmers were mainly responsible for the rise.
The remaining components of personal income, nine-
tenths of the total, showed comparatively little
change -- a rise of about $1 billion at an annual rate
from September to October.
*
Total new construction activity declined seasonally
in November by 7 per cent to $2.5 billion, the Depart-
ments of Commerce and Labor announced jointly. All
major types of construction shared in the decline, but
public construction dropped off relatively more than
private, mainly because of the regular fall decline in
hi hwav work


Production of knit cotton and wool underwear and
hightwear during October 1951 was higher than in September
>f the same year but belowr October 1950 levels, the Bureau
,f the Census announced. October daipments of $33.7 mil-
Liod, however, were 3 per cent under the September total
at $34.9 million but 11 per cent above shipments of $30.4
million in October a year ago.
+ + ++
Manufacturers' value of shipments and new orders in-
:reased during October 1951 while inventory accumulation
lowed and unfilled orders remained agable. Sales rose 6
per cent over both the September 1951 and the October
L950 rates. Durable-goods industries, up 9 per cent from
the previous month on a seasonally adjusted basis, showed
;be most improvement, but nondurable sales were also up
. per cent.

Totali wholesalers' sales were estimated at $10,098 mil-
Lion in October 1951. After adjustment for seasonal varia-
;ions, sales were 9 per cent higher than September with all
najor lines of trade contributing to the increase. Sale
,f durable and nondurable goods were $3,103 and $6,995 mil-
Lion, respectively. Durable goode increased 6 per cent and
nondurable goods sales were 10 per cent above September on
r seasonally adjusted basis.
+ + +
Chain store and moail-order sales in October 1951 were
estimated at $3 billion, about 11 per cent above the previous
year. In general, October sales showed a slight improvement
over September 1951.
+ + +
A total of 2,277 million linear yards of cotton broad
roven good wras produced during the third quarter of 1951,
L4 per cent belowr the second quarter and the smallest fig-
are reported since the third quarter qf 1949,
D Final Reports:
7 1950rCensas oof Populat20 ouhCroia...5

SColorado............200 L/ist.of Columbia...154Q
L7 1950 Census of Housing:
SCharleston, S. C....154 asheville,N. C......15C
M anchester, N.H.....20p L~ridgeport,Conn. ...204
SPortland, Kaine.....200 Uharleston,W.Va... .154
Negro Business Associations in the U. S..............
Estimated Distribution of Family Income in 1949, U. S.,
Regions & Selected States, PC-7, #5..................
Vacant Dwelling Units in South Carolina, Apl.1,1950..
Report on Cotton Ginnring, Prior to Dec. 1, 1951......
Census of Agriculture, 1950, for U.S.,Series Ac50.3,#r00
Experience of Workers at Their Current Jobs,Jan.1951..
Changes in Marital Status & In Number of Hlouseholds,
1890 to 1951, P-20,#35............................,...
Lumber Production & Mill Stocks, U. 8. 1st Quarter
1951; Western States, 2nd Quarter 1951, M13G-2-1.....
Fatal & Oils, Oct. 1951, Consumption by Uses, M17-a-101
Iron & Steel Castinge & Steel Ingote,M21-1-91.........
Construction Machinery (Excavating & Earthmoving
Equipment) 3rd Quarter 1951, Y-368-31................
01eomargarine, October 1951, M17J-101. ................
Cotton & Linters, Consumption, Stocks, Imports & Exports,
& Active Cotton Spindles, MI5-1-fi-52
SSmall Business Aids:
Gurdn Maks mezlmns&Yrcads~ae Your Grocery Store a Safer Shopping Place, 1#447
Thefts, #487
Building More Profitable Produce Salse, #448
Some Factors in Establishing & Operating a Trailer
Park, 1#450
WAholesaler' s Customer Analysis, #451
Patents Owned by the Government
pr Quicker Check-Outs for Self-Service Grocery Stores,#454


Naqe And Addrqsa Are On The ~pposite Side. Make Remit_
tappes For Sales Material Payab e Tq Treasurer Of The
United States. There Is No Charge For Items Not Priged.



L73rd Quarterly 1951 Summary of ]Business conditions
in Southeast ............. ............ ......... .
L7National Production Authority Material:
Direction 2 to Order Y-25 O7rder Y-92
Order M-46 Revised 20 Dir. 1 to Order MI-5,Rev.
Dir. 2 to Order M-11, Rev. L/ Direction 3 to
Order K-1, Rev. Regulation 2, Rev.
SOrder 1-91
L7Business Information Service Defense Production
As:
Tool Conservation in Machine Shops, #19
Reclamation of Tools & Workpieces, #18
V -Loans For Defense Production, #117
Government-Owned Inventions For Free Use......$1.00
Census of Manufactures, 1950:
General Statistica by Major Industry Groups,
1950, 1949 and 1947:
South Atlantic States }}East South Central Stae
East North Central Sfates gi W. North Cent. a
Mountain Statses & Pacific Statses
West South Cent. States
iValue of Manufacturers' Inventories for Selected
Industry Groups, 1950 and 1947
M Monthly Report on Labor Force, Nov. 1951,P-57,#113


POW 81100530


ITELLUB N OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





NUMBER OF SOUTB' S FABMS DROP SHARPLY

Sharp decreases in number of farms, fars operators and orop-
land harvested, but increases in mechanized facilities and
equipment have taken place in the South in the past 10 yearea
according to a report issued by the Bureau of the Geneue from
ite 1950 cenana of agriculture*
The number of farms dropped by 352,170 tmrm 1940 to 1950 and
number of acres of cropland harvested decreae~d by 8,924,490,
the report showed. A corresponding decline in farm land acreas*
of 8,517,739 was also revealed*
These reported from the 1950 census of agriculture
are now reaching Department of Commerce field of-
fices in increasing numbers. The preliminary reports
are available Pratfis

The report was compiled for the States of Alabama, Floridas
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, KlentuckYr, the. Virginias and
Carolinas, Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia, Arkansaas
Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas.
It showed that the number of farm operators living on farmse
in the region declined from 2,708,859 in 1940 to 2,464,000 in
1950, a decrease of some 250,000 in the decade, while similar
decreases took place among those not living on farms and those*
working off farms.
While land and farm personnel have decreased in the decade,
however, farmers in the South have been budy electrifying their
homes, installing telephones and equipping their farms with

electricity in 1950 than in 1940, and a 154 per cent rise in


garages.

EAST GULF STATES y?.AD IN LUMYBER OUTPUT

The East Gulf States of Georgia, Florida and Alabama in the
first quarter of 1951 continued to set the pace for the eastern
half of the United States in production of lumber, according to
a Bureau of the Census Faqta For Industry Report,. Total product-
ion of soft and hard woods in those States was 1,173,252,000
board feet, which was lightly greater than the 1,172,572,000
feet produced in the South Atlantic region and the 1,008,699,000
produced in the Lower Missiesippi area.


MAINT~IENANlCE. BEPAIR & O)PERATING SUFFLIES EXPORT

Attention is being called by the Foreign Division of the
National Production Authority that all manufacturers who in
1950 manufactured replacement parts for machinery or equip-
ment for export to a grose value of more than $10,000 aust
adopt a specified procedure to meet eeaential foreign require-
ments for maintenance, repair and operating supplies of cer-
tain types and in limited quantities
The procedure is established in Oi~der M-79 issued by
NSPA providing quarterly 880 export quote for manufacturers
and explaining how they and other exporters may draw on
those quotas. It also permits manufacturers to apply the
DO-MRO rating to export orders and nonmanufacturing exporters
to secure the right to apply such rating to export orders.
By the teras of the order, the manufacturers affected
are obligated to
1. Establish a historically-based quota for his export
business in those items, and
2. From his production of those item, to make
available this quota for export.
He is also authorised to enter on his books as rated
business such exports as he makes, either directly or in-
directly, within his quota, and is prohibited from exporting,
either directly or indirectt-r excess of.



c o v e r nm n apagnnt oftsl F o F t s 8 O D




The inventions embrace a wide variety of products
Sand processes, raw material uses, additional ways of
Producing already known results, and advanops in
ethods and processes. It provides a fertile source
Sof technical information for mpanufacturers who are
'confronted with production problems and scientists
'and technologists wrho are working on new research
problems .
S The publicato.ailia 10 plastic
'hinge-bounchppe e, i o at
1.0 eg
6po as asss


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oflice
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000
Volum~e 6, Number 1 January 1, 1952


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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3 1262 08748 8796


BU LLETI


PAGE 4


See *


UNIV. OF FL Lia3.
DOC '. i ; P:~~ T.


UNIVER ITk 0FFO`D



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


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VOLUME 6. NUMBER 2
GOVERNMENT'S SOUTHEASTERN PURCHASES $1.2 BILLION

75 The Federal Government in the 15-
month period of July 1950 through Sept-
GOVERNMENT ember 1951 purchased goods in the South-
PURCHASES OF east Valued at $1,240,570,000 and in
EOD SAND December alone let 98 contracts to frs
-so in six southeastern States with a value
far in excess of the $12.5 million mark,
,,.****** according to information reaching De-
..*** partment of Commerce field offices,
**BUSINESS FlXED 25The purchases made in the 15-month
INVESTMENT period were conducted in Alabama, Flori
da, Georgia, Hississippi, NorthCaoia
South Carolina and Tennessee. They in-
cluded contracts valued at $258,538,000
I I I I I I o awarded in the area in the three-month
Source: Office of period of July through September 1951.
Business Economics, In December 1951, 14 contracts were
U. S. Department of let in Alabama; 15 in Florida; 26 in
Commerce Georgia; 6 in Mississippi; 13 in South
Carolina; and 26 in Tennessee, the bulk
of which were awarded by the Department of Defense. They called
for the supplying of goods ranging from food products to photo
flash bombs. Seventy-two of the contracts had a dollar value of
$5,925,114 and 26 others called for the expenditure of "in ex-
cess of $250,000." The Defense Department does not reveal
amounts of more than $250,000 for security reasons.

SOU~THEAST PLANT INVESTMENTS TOP BILLION MARK

Plants in the Southeast in the first 11 months of 1951 an-
nounced an intention of investing a total of $1,131,956,003 in
expansion of their facilities to meet the defense effort and
certificates of necessity for that amount authorizing rapid
tax write-offs were approved by the Defense Production Adminis-
tration .
The proposed expansion activities are reflected in a total
of 337 certificates of necessity authorized by DPA. By States, ,
the monetary value of the expansions included Georgia, $b74,752,-
000; Florida, $121,953,000; South Carolina, $30,401,000; North
Carolina, $70,878,789; Alabama, $181,102,000; Tennessee, $64,-
401,000; and Mississippi, $83,994,000.
Five certificates were recently issued covering proposed ex-
pansion operations in Jackson, Hiss., Russellville, Ala., Jackson-
ville, Memphis and North Charleston, South Carolina involving
iron ore, filtrol desiccant, dry kilns, ordnance and kraft paper,
DPA has stated that priority will be given machine and getting
tools, dies, gauges, jogs and fixtures, orea, such as coppers
eadp uan isne,eep d ion, hsulured Sainia en, i a hs and supnporrt
gen, aviation gasoline, steel scrap and special aluminum extrua~
ions in the order named in issuance of the certificates.


JAN~UARIY 15, 1952

NPA VIOLATION CHlARGED
THE -The first alleged violation of NPA
restrictions on the use of steel in the
Southeast will come up for hearing
Ncrtio crl abortly. Defendants in the charges are
i~nG M. M. Magnus, Sr., and 0. R. Brekle,
partners in the M. & B. Metal Products
Produ tion company, of Birmingham, wrho are accused
T~dctonor in.,gany using more than 1.3 minlion
pounds of that product during 1951..
charles J. Hilkey, of Atlanta, dean
wuh rt emeritus of Emory University' s Lamar
Auth rity School of Law, recently appointed NPA
hearing commissioner, will preside
at the hearing, place and date of which
will be announced later.
Specifically, the firm, manufacturer
of wire garment hangers, is charged with
violating NPA Orders Y-47 and M-47A by
using 1,400,296 pounds of steel in the
period of April through June of last
year while lawfully entitled to nee only 801,676 pounds, and
also using 1,449,297 pounds during the period of July through
September while entitled to use only 701,468 pounds.
Order Y-47 limited the use of steel by manufacturers of
consumer durable goods and related equipment in the second
quarter of 1951 to 80 per cent of their average quarterly
use in the first half of 1950, and Order Y-47A reduced the
permitted use for the third quarter of 1951 to 70 per cent
of the base period rate.

Restrictions on consumption of Governrment-produced general
purpose synthetic (GRS) rubber and consumption of total
amounts of newr rubber were removed January 1, 1952 through an
amendment to Order Y-2, basic rubber order regulating consump-
tion of both natural and synthetic rubber.
INVENTORY REGULATION
Inventory restrictions were lifted from five materials
in an amendment to NPA Regulation 1. The products included
natural rubber latex and four chemicals, nicatinamide, nico-
tonic acid, phenolic resin and holding powered, and polyvinyl
acetate, which had been limited to a practicable minimum
working inventory.
NICKEL & CHIROMIUMI
Because of the extremely short supply of nickel in compari-
son with the demand for heat-resistant steel, Schedule C to
Order 8-80 was issued placing certain restrictions on specific
end uses. The action prohibited melting, processing, fabri-

itn dle rndh ahgh rur nobke p ncel-ls edou Rcon
tent than it geFliU;IUtoleBfF use in ioated.


Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala.,
50 Whitehall St., S.W., Maxwell House, 201 County Office 266 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WRA-4121,I-453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,X-355


C))arleston, S.C., Chattanooga, Tenn.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 719 JamPes Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-49772


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bl1dg.,
Tel. 4-7111

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 UInion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


K~noxville, Tenn.,
313 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madisron at Front,
Tel. 8-326


Mieami, Fla.,
9L7 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
30)8 Federall Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3611,1-206


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Tampa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafayette St.,
Tel. 2-3880


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





S 80THIEAST GETS 21 CRITICAL DElWENSE ABRE S

Increased military and industrial activities in the
Southeast in connection with the national program of
defense have resulted in creation of 21 "critical de-
fense areas" in the region in which housing credit
restrictions are relaxed, in some cases rent control
Laposed, and other government assistance advanced to-
ward eomannity development.
The areas,* established by the Defense Production Ad-
ministration in collaboration with the Housing and Boa*
Finance Agency and Federal Reserve System, include 7
in Georgia; aix in Florida, thrweein Alabama; two
wea in Tennessee and South Carolina, and one in Piss-
188Pi-p .
The critical defense area program is designed to
correct situations such as arose dnring World War II
when the building of new production plants and estab-
lishment of military mobilization facilities created a


pointed out. This in turn, it was stated, brought about
delays in production schedules.
Location of the present areas includes
Tennessee -- Tnllahoma, including Bedford, Coffee,
Franklin and Moore counties, and Montgomery county,
included in the Camp Campbell, Kentuckry, area.
Georgia -- Valdosta, including Lowndea and Lanier
counties, and Youltrie, including Colquitt county; the
Savannah river area in Georgia and South Carolina; Fort
Benning, including Chattahoochee and Muscogee counties,
Ga., and Precinct I in Russell county, Alabama; Camp
Stewart, including Long and Liberty counties; and
Marietta. includ~na Cobb county; and Bainbridge.
Mississippi -- Gulfport-Bilozi-Pascagoula includ-
ingam JackIn annadd sionnatunRussell county being em-



known as the Enterprise-0sark area, including Dale'
Coffee and Houston counties.
Florida -- Cocoadielbourne, including Brevard county;
Pensacola, including Eacambia and 6anta Rosa counties;
Key West, including Monroe county; Sanford, including
Seminole county; Palatka, including Putnam county; and
Green Gove Springs, including Clay county.
South Carolina -- In addition to the Savannah river
area, an area was established at Parris Island. includ-
ing Beaufort county and that part of Yemassee included
in Hampton county,

CASH FaRY INYCOME RISES IN REIiON

Farmers in the Southeast experienced a 17 per cent
increase in cash fare income in the first 10 months of
1951 as compared with the corresponding period in 1950,
according to a current report of the Bureau of Agricul-
tural Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
Such income rose from $2,606,636,000 in Alabamas
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee from January to October inclusive
in 1950 to $3,064,382,000 in the same period in 1951*
The gains included 33 per cent in South Carolina, 28
per cent in Georgia; 21 per cent in Alabama, 18 per cent
in Tennessee, 11 per cent in North Carolina, and 5 per
cent in Mississippi.
advances of 22 per cent in sales of livestock and ite
products, or from $812,627,000 to $991,42'8,000, and from
$i1,794,009,000 to $2,072,954,000, or 15 per cent, in
sales of crop products accounted for the overall 17 per
cent rise. Only Florida registered a decline, 5 per cent.


NATIONAL PRQDUCTION AUlTORITY Coptinued Froa Page 1

ALUMINUM SCRAP
Order Y-22 was amended to assure a flow of aluminumr crap
to producers, smelters, reclaimers and fabricators whose in-
ventories were reported precarionely short. It provided
that no owner or generator of aluminum scrap may deliver
within three consecutive days 20,000 or more pounds to a
dealer unless he reports the transaction to NPA on Form 152.
COPPER RAWA YATERIALS
Order Y-16 was amended to attain more effective control
over distribution of basic copper raw materials. The amend-
ment authorizes NPA to direct all copper raw materials, in-
cluding intermediate shapes and refined copper, as well as
scrap, to users. Formerly this authorization extended only
to copper scrap.
STORAGE BA TERIES
1 0 Mcton 3of au o ti Le soat g ba teeri ac ;i Ulitod

.1: :es .8 dantwsaeado the puTh a nghampereahenrt
conserve critically short lead.
TOOL STEEL
In amending Schedule B to M-80, "tool steeP" was re-
defined to permit the unrestricted use of plain carbon
steel for any purpose.
REGiULATION a
An interpretation of NPA Regulation 2 was issued
stating that when a customer signs a purchase or delivery
order the signature may also serve in most cases as the
signature for certification of the fact that the order
complies with NPA regulations.
LABORATORIES
Limited assistance to vital civilian laboratories to
ob tai eled na tube dad resistors needed otodear y on



the orders.
ELECTRIC UTlIITIES
Electric utilities will be permitted to obtain control-
led materials in excess of minor requirements quotas in
cases of emergency, such as damage from fire, flood, wrind
earthquake, and so forth, under provisions of an amendment
to NPA Order Y-50.
STEEL SH~IPPING DRUYS
Order Y-75 was amended modifying limitations on steel
shipping drum inventories to permit packers greater flexi-
blty to operate within their quotas.
REGULATIONS 5& 7
CMP Regulations 5 and 7 were amended to permit manufact-
resand repairmen to use priority ratings for obtainihg
materials for installation of industrial equipment and
oseodappliances and to bring other provisions of both
regulations up to date.
TIN CANS
In Direction 3 to Order Y-25, the metal ean order, NPA
took action to continue the standard procedure whiereby users
of tin cans for packaging purposes may adjust their tin can
bases for the first three quarters of 1952 themselves with-
out the necessity of NPA determining such bases for them.
MARINE MRO
Order Y-70 was amended to permit greater use of the
DO-R-9 rating for minor capital additions, and to bring the
order up to date for the first quarter of 1952. It deal
with marine maintenance, repair and operating supplies.
GLASS CONTAINERS
Order Y-51 controlling the use and manufacture of glass
containers was revoked.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





__ ___I


_


To Obtain Conies L
fili NEW( BOK Of This MateriaL
ChanL It In Spaces
~3~S~iANDl RE iTS aBrovded And Sepd
4.1 This Seption Of The
Bulletin of Cqgmmrge
To The Nearest Department qf Conmmerge Field Qffiee. Yqur L
Nage And Addresp Are On The Opposite Side. Make Remit-
t4Wcep For Sales Yaterial Payable To Treasurer Of The C
United States. There la Nq Charge For Items Not Prieed.

National Production Authority Actions:


Regela 19 2 I e phedn Seoul C ?Order 8 8ir 4

Order M-50 Amended JO Ord er Y-75 Amended
CYP Raeg. 5 & 7 Am~ended UOrder Y-25, Dir. 3
Wor~der Y-70 Aeendunoed eRv oweon oFF0rder 1551Odr Y-4 Yd7 re end
Inorganic Chemicals & Gases, 1950, FFIW19g-00 Sm
Inorganic Chemicals, UI. S. Production, Oct. 1951
Synthetic Broad Worpn Goods, Summary for 1950,15000
Children' s & Infants Outerwear, 1950, M67K-00
Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 3rd Quar. 1951, Y158-3-1
Yen'sa & Boys' Apparel, 1950, M67B-00
19Ulp, Pape su B ard nect. 1951, Y14A-101
UColumbus, Ga., i-E41 15JColumlbia,S.C. ,8-E40,15#
LDra, N.C.,H-E54 159 UCovington, K~y.,8-44415#
U. S. Gensue of Business, 1948:
SRetail Trade: Selected Types of Operations

L7Re~tai 1 2h20#aale, Service Trades: Trucks, "7
2RS25, 55#
SReport on Cotton Ginning, Dec. 20, 1951


The net outflow of private american long-ters capital
to foreign countries in the first nine months of 1951 was
$583 million, or $525 million less than for the same period
in1950, the Office of Businese Economics, U. S. Department
of commerce, said.
*
Total sales of all retail stores in November 1951
amutdto $12,610 million, about 6 per cent above November
1950. Sales by lines of trade were somewhat mixed. The
largest declines -- 4 or more per cent -- were contributed
by the automotive, building material and hardware, and
nall other" categories,
+weawe
A Recommended Coanercial Standard for Wool Felt has
bencirculated by the Comrmodity Standards Division of the
U.S. Department of Commerce to manufacturers, distributors
and users of wool felt, and to testing laboratories for
acceptance ,
+ *
Cash dividend payments by United Statse corporations
issuing public reports amounted to $;533 million in October,
7per cent above the $496 million paid out in the same
onha year ago.
+ *
Total civilian employment dropped by half a million
btenOctober and November with the usual fall curtailment
infarm work and other outdoor activities. The estimate
for the week ending November 10 was 61,336,000 as compared
wth 61,836,000 for the October survey week.
+ + *
A listing of 2,339 patents owned by the U. S. Government
adavailable to American businessmen for use without charge
hsbeen prepared by the Government Patents Board. They cover
a ide range of products and prooeases, new uses for raw
materials, and new methods of handling mechanical problems.
Thyare on inventions developed in Federal rsac anme


More detailed
Information on
The highlights
of the News in
mmmm...----------- -== mthe Field of
Business is
Available a't Department of Commerce Field Offices.



The value of manu~facturers' shipments and inven-
tories in Novem~ber 1951 was maintained at the October
rate, while both new and unfilled orders declined
lightly,
*
Expenditures for new construction approached $30
billion in 1951, the U. S. Departments of Commerce
and Labor announced jointly. A 7 per cent increase
over the 1950 total of nearly $28 billion resulted
from larger public outlays for military construction,
defense plants and schools.
*
The volume of national output increased by about
8 per cent in 1951 as compared with 1950 and was high-
or than that of any other year, Secretary of Commerce
Charles Sawyer said in a year-end review of business
activities last year.
*
Business outlays for new plant and equipment plan-
nod for the first quarter of 1952 were expected to ex-
ceed any previous first quarter, and if realized the
seasonally adjusted rate will be at a new high, the
U. S. Department of Commerce and Securities and Ex-
change Commission reported,


7 umber of Households in Standard Metropolitan Areas,
Counties & Urban Places of 10,000 Or More,Apl. 1, 1950,
PC-14, No. 2
SVacant Dwelling Unite in North Carolina,Ap.1,1950,Ho-7#r33
SPopulation of Standard Metropolitan Areas & Cities of
50,000 or More, By Color, 1950 & 1940, PC-14, No. 1
SSummary of Housing Characteristics for Selected Standard
Yetropolitan Areas, Apl. 1, 1950, H0-5, No. A
SCotton Ginned Prior to Dec. 1 in Specified States,
Crope of 1951 and 1950,
Marital Status of Women in the Labor Forcer, Ap1,1951,50837
Provisional Estimates of Population of U. S., April 1,



Mdlea Atlanti States General Statistica by Major

u Cst yg FulsCon ued Pu ch sed E oct5i .Energy
for Indnetry Groups, 1950 & 1947, MAS-50-5
M easame aed Comrmercial Standard on Boys' Tranaer Size
all Business Aide:
A Modernization Plan for the General Store, #455
Book Stores Can Profit Thru Direct Mail Advertising/4~56
Some Facts About Parcel Delivery Services, #458
A Checklist for Office Forms, #459
Check List for Industrial Workers' Goa la~ints,#462
d11 Basic Ele ents Influencing Dealer Sales Training

SShouldogramAverage Store Sell Meat Self-Service?#464
SSelling the U. S. Market, $1.00
SBusiness Service Check List, $1.50 Year
STable of Dielectric Constants of Pure Liquida, NIBS Cir.

I Physical P opegeses ofSome Samples of Asbestos-Coment
Siding, NBS Structures Report 122,iti, 154


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








PAGE 4 BULLET.. 2207888


BONWHIITE POPULATION IN SOUTHEAST UP 18 PER CENT

An 18 per cent increase in the nonwhite population of urban
areas in the Southeast in the past 10 years was reported by
the Bureau of the Census in a current release from its 1950
census of population.
The number of nonwhites in 28 cities in Alabama, Florida,
Georgiai, Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee from 1940 to 1950 rose from 993,075 to 1,179,940
with only two cities -- Charleston, S. C., and Asheville,
N. C., --- recording decreases, 2.8 and 7.2 per cent, res-
pectively.
The bureau defines the term "nonwhite" as Negroes.
Indians, Japanese, Chinese and other nonwhite races. Persons
of Mexican birth or ancestry who were not definitely Indian
or of other nonwhite race are classified as white. The bulk
of the nonwhite population in the Southeast is, of course,
of the Negro race.
The greatest increase in the nonwrhite population took
place in Jackson, Miss., where a rise of from 21,256 to
40,191, or 65.7 per cent, was registered. Largest number
of nonwhites in 1950 was in Memphis where a gain of from
121,536 to 147,287, or 21.2 per cent, was shown in the 10-
year period.


HOME OWANERSHIP INCREASES IN SOUTHEAST


A sharp advance in home ownership has taken place in metro-
politan areas of the Southeast in the past 10 years, according
to a report issued by the Bureau of the Census.
Forty-eight per cent of the dwelling units in Atlanta, Bir-
mingham, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Nashville, Riichmond, Tampa
and St. Petersburg were owner-occupied in 1950 compared with
but 35 per cent in 1940. .
In the eight metropolitan areas, including Tampa and St.
Petersburg in the one area, last year there were 1,191,800
dwelling units of which 580,500 were occupied by owners and
the remainder by renters. This compared with a total of 818,116
units in 1940 of which 287,649 were owner-occupied.
Among the different southeastern areas, the Tampa~t. Peters-
burg area led in percentage of its 132,500 occupied dwelling
units which were owner-occupied last year with 64 per cent.
Second in rank in the region was Nashville with 56 per cent 'of
its 89,000 units in the hands of owners.


FIRST-CLASS POST OFFICES
The southeastern States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mlississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee have a total of 645 first-
class post offices, according to a booklet pre-
baed e mthea d.S. Ist OfIceepartmen fora_
tivities and now on sale at field offices of the
U. S. Department of Commerce. The booklet is priced

aI cludentin the first-class post offices in the
region are 96 in Alabama; 157 in Florida; 110 in
Georgia; 153 in North Carolina; 76 in South Caro-
lina; and 53 in Mississippi. The publication also
gives information on zone rates on parcel post
mail.
Also on sale at Commerce Department field offices
in the region are two parts of the Postal Guide,
which is issued annually. Part I deals with domestic
mailing and is priced at $2.00 and Part II is con-
cerned with foreign mailing and sells for 75 cents.


21-YEAR OLDS ON INCREASE IN REGION

Another 1,852,2;d6 persons have turned 21 years old in
the Southeast,
According to a current report of the Bureau of the Census,
in 1950 there were 12,229,486 21-year olds and over in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee, a 17 per cent increase over the
number of persons of that age 10 years previously.
Twenty-one years old is the voting age in all southeastern
States except Georgia where it is 18 years old, the only State
in the nation with such an age requirement.
Florida boasted a 49.6 per cent increase in number of 21-
year olds and over in 1950 as compared with 1940 and stood
second in such gain among all States in the nation* see jl ;.


Several universities in the United States are
considering using the U. S. Department of Commerce booklet
Selling the United States Market as a textbook. The publica-
tion, which is priced at $1.00, is available at Department
of Qgamerce field offices.


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMNMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009

Volume 6, NUMBER 2 January 15, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300







~--. Is


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA































VOLUME 6. NUMBER 3 FEBRUARY 15


SOUTHEAST PLANT EXPANSION PLANS 28 PER CENT COMPLETE

Capital outlays by defense-supporting Certificates of ne-
manufacturing industries are expected to continue cessity calling for
upward in the first quarter of 1952. plant expansion opera-
INDE, 2n Ott1950lootiODs in the Southeast
aso1 to meet the needs of
the national defense
program have been is-
300 -mr ocaie -sued calling for hun-
dreds of millions of
dollars worth of im-
250 t -( provements. The ques-
tion arising now is to
,af&8~LEn" b:u sonsL~ an what extent are these
200o. romeL an~uracruam~o operations being car-
ried out in the region.
.*** According to the De-
150C /~ 2. fense Production Admin-
iso ... .. ...istration, which issues
*** kOTHE MANFACTRI~s the Certificates, Of a
looI~FI I total of $655,789,000
100 represented in certi-
Source: Office of Business Economics, ficates issued at the
U. S. Department of Commerce end of the third quar-
ter of 1951 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee, the value of projects
put onplac au oue .to $187,217,000, or about 28 per cent of

ManLy Fleischmann, Administrator of the Defense
Pr":!Min Adahhstrtin i slchedu Ad addresss
11. Mr. Fleischmann is expected to discuss the inter-
national sidutona itherelates to the present


The certificates provide for rapid tax amortization on pro-
jects contributing to the defense effort. Here is how the pro-
gram has been developing in the Southeast by States:
North Carolina, 22 certificates issued; estimated cost of
projects, $73,356,000; value put in place as of September 30,
1951, $17,215,000; percentage pult in place, 23.5; expected final
completion date, fourth quarter of 1953.
South Carolina, 18 certificates; estimated total value,
$28,813,000; value in place, $10,552,000, or 36.6 per cent;
final completion, third quarter of 1952.
Georgia, 13 certificates; estimated cost $51,930,000; value
in place, $10,258,000, or 19.8 per cent; final completion, third
quarter of 1953*
(SEE CERTIFICATES OF NECESSITY PAC 2


Atlanta, Ga., ALugusta, Ga.,
50 Wshitehall St.,S.W., Maxwell Bouse,
Tel. WA-4121,I-153 Tel. 2-8394


Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala.,
201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg.,
Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,1(-355


Charleston, S.C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Mias.,
4626 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-492


Jacksonville, Fla., Knoxville, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn., MianI, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg., 313 0. S. Post Office Madison at Front, 947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111 Bldg., Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal 81dg.,
Tel. 2-361,1-206


Mashrille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. L2-2426


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-L755


Tampa, Fla.,
420 V. Lafayrette St.,
Tel. 2-3880


AUTO WRECKERS CALLED
THE Auto~mobile wreck~ers ofthe northern
half of Georgia affected by the recent
NationalNPA inventory order are being called
GliOHGIto meet in Atlanta, Wednesday, February
6, to have the order explained to them
as well as their responsibilities under it,
Similar meetings have been and are
Al 1Oduction being held in other sections of the
Southeast called by NPA representatives
in the various districts.

&Luthonity up compliance with the order, whic
NPA recently warned must be carried out
or penalties provided for under the
Defense Production Act may be applied.
CONSTRUCTION
The Federal Government has set no
600,000 mark or any other limitation on
h029 coDstruction in the UJnited States. It simply allocates the
material for such activities and by certain conservation meas-
ures and other careful utilization of materials it will be pos-
sible for those conducting building operations in the Southeast
to produce a substantially higher number of housing units in
This was the statement of Defense Production Administration
of iialalin cla ifying pub ihed reports at eDPA had estab--

for the coming year.
onlThe responsib~iiMe of DPA a ee te all twentu tmanterial

man etot be rec eer du er Afthneo 1e a lelk o ae Mas

marns bTheoultimate o ectie o ourseali to d t the maxi-

The basic chlorine order, Y-31, wass amended to make provie-
ions of three sections of the order effective for the calendar
year 1952 instead of 1951. The order wass designed to assure
chlorine supplies for public health needs and to provide for
equitable distribution of defense-rated orders among chlorine
producers.

Supplemenlt I to NPA Order 61-2, the basic rubber order, was
revoked. The action was purely procedural and did not in any
oray affect the substance of the rubber control program.
VENETIAN BLINDS
To tighten control over the use of steel, copper and alumi-
oum in the production of venetian blinds, NPA announced it
rould make second quarter allotments of controlled materials
(SEE NPA PAGE 2)


L / 8. 2 0 'i 43

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE









_ ____


NEWB ESSENTIAL ACTIVITIES 87S ISSUED


NP Continued From Page 1

to manufacturers of venetian blind components rather than
to manufacturers of completed blinds.
PRIMARY PAPER. PAPERB0ARD
Stocks of primary paper and paperboard have improved
sufficiently to warrant suspension of the use of all DO
ratings except six reserved exclusively for the military
and Atomic Energy Commission and for the filling of machine
tool orders, NPA announced.


Twrenty-five classes of occupations are included in a
revised list of essential activities just issued to be
used by the armed services in considering calls to ac-
tive duty of reservists and the National Guard.
The revised list, issued by Secretary of Commerce
Charles Sawyer, is used by the armed services in con-
junction with a list of critical occupations issued by
the U. S. Department of Labor,

Note: Copies of this list of essential
activities are available without charge
through Departement of Coquerce f1916 offices*

Principal additions to the revised list involve the
production of knolir; clay, tetraethyl lead and adhesives
As the list stands now, the essential activities in-
clude production and maintenance of aircraft and parts
and ships and boats, ordnance, agriculture and commer-
cial fishing, food processing, forestry and forestry
products, production of wood products, pulp, paper and
board, metal and nornmetallic mining and milling, smelt-
ing, refining and processing of metal, including scrap
salvage, production of machinery and equipment, communi-
cation equipment, chemical and allied products, rubber
and rubber products, leather and leather products,
stone, clay and glass products, petroleum, natural gas
and petroleum and coal products, transportation equip-
ment, shipping containers, industrial .transportation
and communication services, heating, power, water
supply and illuminating ser-vices, health and welfare
and education and research activities.

CERTIFICATES OF NECESSITY Continued From Page 1

Florida, 18 certificates; estimated cost, $189,463,-
000; value in place, $30,206,000, or 15.9 per cent;
completion time, fourth quarter of 1953.
Tennessee, 29 certificates; estimated cost, $53,578,-
000; value in place, $19,666,000, or 36.7 per cent;
expected completion, third quarter of 1953.
M~ississippi, 12 certificates; estimated cost, $81,-
728,000; value in place, $44,307,000, or 54.2 per cent;
time of completion, fourth quarter of 1952*
Alabama, 40 certificates; estimated cost, $176,921,-
000; value in place, 855,013,000, or 31.1 per cent;
completion expected in first quarter of 1953.
DPA' s compilation also listed the degrees of com-
pletion of projects in the various industries, including
a large number in the southeastern region.

RETAIL, NHOLESALE SALES UP IN REGION
Retail sales were higher in November 1951 in 11 of
17 cities and areas of the Southeast in which the Bureau
of the Census conducts monthly surveys as compared with
the corresponding month in 1950, and in the wholesale
trade field, firms in the South Atlantic region reported
a 9 per cent gain in sales in the first 11 months of
1951 over the same period last year and those in the East




Ga., including rises in Birmingham, Columbus, Ga., Mlacon'
Ga., Savannah, Biloxi, Gulfport and Asheville, N. C.
Advances of 3 per cent in the South Atlantic region
and 4 per cent in the East South Central section in whole
sale sales in November 1951 over November 1950 were also
reflected, but both areas experienced declines in Novem_
ber 1951 from October of the same year. Mlore than 700
firms reported sales of $129,437,000 in November 1951.


FCDA GlVEN AUTHORLTY
Authority to handle its own construction applications,
to assign ratings and to issue allotments of steel, copper
and aluminum was delegated to the Federal Civil Defense
Administration by NPA, in an amendment to Delegation 14.
PLASTIC TYPE NYLON
Allocation control on plastic type nylon, a moldable
thermoplastic iwhica is marketed as molding granules to
the plastic industry or as level or tapered monofilament
to the brush industry was roked.

All limitations on Tnii"Timiof bismuth were withdrawn
in an amendment of Order M-48. The action was taken in
line with NPA' s policy of rescinding controls as soon as
they are no longer needed.
METHYL CHLORIDE
The methyl chloride allocation order, Schedule 8 to
Y-45, has been revoked because expanded production facili-
ties and increased operating efficiency have enlarged prod-
notion by more than 500,000 tons a month.

BASIC TAX INMoaxTI0N
The principal types of Federal, State and local
'taxes and tax laws which must be considered in plan- '
'ning or operating a small business are summarized
Sin a bulletin issued by the Office of Small Business '
'of NPA entitled "Basic Tax Information for Small
'Business ."
The publication, available without charge from '
'any Department of Commerce field, office, is designed '
'to assist operators and prospective operators of
Small manufaicturing, distributive and service firms. e

WATER WELLS
Waiter well drilling contractors must submit CMIP-LC con-
struction applications for second quarter 1952 steel and
copper allotments by February 15, NPA announced, as that
agency at the same time issued Direction I to CMP Regulation
6 establishing a news procedure for such action.
PACKAGING CLOSURES




CHRlYSOTILE ASBESTOS
Order 61-96, effective February 1, 1952, was issued to
asuethat decreasing supplies of spinning grades of chryso-
tie asbestos fiber are made available to manufacturers pro-
duigend products most essential to the defense effort and
deense-supporting industries. It prohibits the use of some
grdsfor other than certain specified purposes.


STEEL VIOLATION HEARING SET
A hearing into charges brought by NPA against
the M and B Metal Products company, of Birmingham,
for alleged violation of quarterly steel allotments
has been set for Birmingham, February 7, beginning
at 10 A. M. The hearing will be held before NPA
Hearing Commissioner Charles J. Hilkey.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





More Detailed
Information On
The Bighlights
Of The News In
The Field Of
Business Is A-
vailable at UI. S. Department of Carmerce field Offices.


Total wholesalers' sales in November 1951 were esti-
mated by the Office of Business Economies, U. S. Depart-
ment of Colmmerce, at $9,821 million. After allowance for
seasonal variations, sales were 2 per cent lower than in
Detober 1951. Sales of durable-goods were $2,812 million
and non-durable-goods, $7,009 million, reflecting de;-
clines of 4 and 1 per cent, respectively, below October
on a seasonally adjusted basis.
*
Foreign countries as a whole sold about $290 million
of gold during the July-September 1951 period in order to
settle obligations incurred in the U. S. This was the
first time in two years that losses of foreign reserves
to the U. S. had occurred.
*
Expenditures for new plant and equipment by manufact-
urers in defense and defense-supporting industries were
at peak levels near the close of 1951 although fixed in-
vestment by most nondefense industries were off from the
peaks reached at mid-year, according to a joint report
of the Securities and Exchange Commission and U. S. De-
partment of Commeree.
*
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports in November 1951 amounted to $224 million, an 8
per cent decline from the $242 million paid out in the
same monta in 1950.
*****


NEW ~ ~ ~ O BOOKS Y rrtaterial
ANYD REPORTS check It In sa,
IP/i4 Space Provided And
Send This Section
Of The Bulletia Of
C2omerce To The Nearest Department of Commerce Field Of-
fice. Your Name And Address Are On The Onoosite Side.
Maker Remittances For Salesa aterial Pavrable To Treasurer
Of The Ulnited Statses There la No Charse Por Items )ot



~NationalZ Production Authority Actions:
Order M-31 Amended L/ Su 1 to NPA Order Y-2 Rev
Delegation 14, Amended LOrder 8-48, Amended '
Schedule 8 to Order Y-45 Revoked L/0rder M-96
Direction 4 to CMIP Reg. 6 L/Order Y-26 Amended
revised List of Essential Activities
1948 Census of Business:
Retail, Aholesale, Services Trades, General Statistics
Alaska, Bulletin #2-RWS-26, 150 *
S1948 Census of Business:
Retail Trade Employment and Pay Roll, 2-R-13, 400
L71948 census of Business:
WAholesale Trade, Sales Size & Operating Expenses
2-W-2, 500 '
L71948 census of Business:
Retail, Wholesale, Service Trades, General Statistics
Hlawaii, 2-RRS-27, 254 '
S1950 Annual Survey of Manufactures:
LSelected General Statistics By Size of Establishment
for Major Industries, Groups & Selected Industries
1950 & 1947 *


Employment moved downward as usual between November
and December 1951 as farm activity continued to decline,
according to a Bureau of the Census report. The estimate
for the week ending December 8, 1951 was 61,014,000 as
compared with 61,336,000 for the November survey week.
*
Personal income in November 1951 wras at an annual rate
of $257 billion, only slightly below the October 1951 rate
and higher than in September 1951. The October-November
change was largely the, result of a reduction in farm pro-
prietors' income from the usually high rate in October.
+ + +
Total business inventories at the end of Nlovember 1951
were valued at $70.9 billion. After allowance for seasonal
variations, the book value of inventories at that time was
almost $150 million lower than in October, reflooting a
decrease of the same magnitude in retailers' inventories.
Manufacturers' stocks rose by about $100 million as whole-
salers' inventories declined by the same amount.
+ +
American insurance companies in 1950 paid $129.4 million
in reinsurance premiums to foreign companies and recovered
losses amounting to $83.7 million,
++++t
National income in the third quarter of 1951 reached a
seasonally adjusted annual rate of $278 billion, 33 billion
dollars above the preceding quarter. This alackened rise
compared with an advance of $5 billion in the second quarter
and mobh larger increments in the earlier quarters of the
mobilization period.
+ *
In the closing weeks of 1951, business activity register-
ed only minor changes with total national output continuing
at a peak rate 4 to 5 per cent higher than a year earlier,
the Office of Business Economies, UI. S. Department of Con-
merce reported. Consumer buying wras seasonally higher in
December, but spending remained low relative to income.

L71950 Annual Census of Manufactures:
SExpenditures For Plant & Equipment in the U~nited States,
,1950, 1919 and 1947, YAS-5o-6
L/Latals Consumed by Metal Product Producers for Selected
Industries, 1950, 1949 and 1947, MAS-50-7
L 950 U. s. Census of Population:
-aOklaboma, 204 7innesota, 254 flouisiana, 204
U1950 U. 8. Census of housing:
Housing Characteristies, By Regions, Apl. 1950,H0-5,#Y3
olms, Ga., 15P L7Columba, 8. C., 15#
Greensboro, N. C., 204 DJdugusta, 154 f/Knoxville, 204
Compendium of City Government Finances in 1950, 404
ascTax Information for the Small Business, #519
19 0 census of A agriculture:
J/ Florida Lf Missisexppi
~Sodel Forms for Boys' Apparel, Com. Std. 180-52, 101
L Three Keys to Strength Production, Stability, Free-
World Unity, 3rd Quarterly Report of Defense Mobilizer,300
Mall Airports, 1951 Edition, 204
aRbber, 3rd Annual Report of Secretary of Commerce,20C
LJanking Institutiona Owned and Operated by Negroes, 10C
Small Business Aids:
SChecklist for Locating Physical Hlazards in Offic~es,465
hiding the Salesman to Prove Quality of Product, #Y466
nlnga Wiindow Display That Sells, #467
he awards of Competition in Retail Credit Terms, #468
Guarding Against Thefts of Retail Merchandise, #r469
Important Points in Retail Salse by Telephone, #4r70
Cotton Broad oven Goods, 1950, FFIMI50-00
Wool Manufactures, Summary for 1950, FFIY158i-00
Cotton System Spinning Activity, Dec. 1951,FFIM15-3-5-52
Metal Cans, Sept. 1951, M75D-91
Pulp, Paper & Board, Nov. 1951, FFM14A-11
L7 Fats & oils, Nov. 1951, FFI YI-17-2-111


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





SOUTHEAST ASSUMES LEADERSHIP IN TEXTILES

Ten years of industrial development in the Southeast has
seen the South Atlantic region, comprising Georgia, Florida,
the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland and Delaware gradually
assume leadership in the nation's output of textiles, according
to a study of Bureau of the Census figures made by the Atlanta
office of the UT. S. Department of Commerce.
The 2.1 billion dollars worth of goods produced in the South
Atlantic section in 1950 was by far the largest of any area in
the country, and salaries and wages of $1.2 billion paid in
those plants also exceeded all other regions.
This was not the case, however, in 1939, when both the New
England and Middle Atlantic regions led in value added by mann-
facture of textiles produced and in salaries and wages paid in
such plants. In the New England area in 1939 the output was
valued at $575,527,218 and in the Middle Atlantic it was
$561,168,402 compared with $541,609,856 in the South Atlantic,
ana in saLaries and wages paid, the New England section was
credited with $367,340,987, the Middle Atlantic, $328,396,204
and the South Atlantic, $321,293,093.
Salaries and wages paid in the South Atlantic rose 284 per
cent from 1939 to 1950 to $1.2 billion and 271 per cent to
$224.8 million in the East South Central section, comprising
Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentuckry. In value added by
manufacturing, the increase has been 289 per cent in the South
Atlantic and 295 per cent in the East South Central.
OAK( RIDGE STUDENT SPONSORSHFIP INVITED

Industrial organizations in the Southeast interested in
obtaining special training in nuclear reactor technologyr for
experienced engineers in their employ have been invited to
sponsor their enrollment in the 1952-53 session of the Oak
Ridge School of Reactor Technology. The deadline for exper-
ienced engineer applicants is March 1, and the school tera
begins September 8, 1952.
Established in 1949 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
the school operates a 12-month session open to engineers
selected from the applications sponsored by Government agencies
and private industrial firms interested in participating in the
AEC nuclear energy program. Such firms need not be connected
with the AEC currently.
Further information may be obtained by writing to the Direct-
or, Oak Ridge School of Reactor Technology, P. O. Box P, Oak
Ridge, Tennessee.


SOUTH HAS 470.000 LOW-RENT DWELLING PLACES

There are 470 dwelling places in the South that rent for
less than $10 a month and 946,000 are valued at less than
$3,000, according to a current report of the Bureau of the
Census.
Of the 170,000 dwelling units renting for less than $10 a
month in the area, 255,000 were occupied by nonwhites. The
470,000 in this category constituted 11.2 per cent of the
4,207,000 units reporting in the 1950 Census of Housing taken
by the Census Bureau. Both the total number of such dwelling
units and ratio of those renting for less than $10 a month
to the total of all dwelling places reporting were far greater
than in any other region in the country.

A copy of this report is available at any
Department qf Commerge field office.
Most popular rental category in the South was from $10 to
$19 a month with 955,000 unite in that class. Next wrere the
$20 to $29 a month of which there were 742,000. In the $75
to $99 a month group there were 227,000 and only 79,000
rented for $100 or more.
The 946,000 dwelling units valued at less than $3,000
represented 23.7 per cent of the 3,987,000 listed as owner-
occupied and vacant units for sale only. Of that number
2242,000 occupied by nonwhites were valued at less than /2,000.

SOUTHEAST ACTIVE IN METAL CAN MANIUFACTIRING

Southeastern manufacturing plants in the first nine months
of 1951 abipped metal cans to market made from a total of
377,454 short tons of steel, a slight decrease from the 386,-
050 tone used in making that product in the corresponding
period of 1950, according to Bureau of the Census data.
Steel used in making the cans in the last year period in-
cluded 285,168 tons in the production of containers for food,
and 59,996 tons in producing nonfood cans.

Note: The data for this story were taken
from Facts For Industry Reports copies of
which are available for a number of industries,
See Page 3 Order Blank for latest numbers,

The region stood fourth among all~ areas in the United
States and possessions in such shipments from January through
September of 1951. sea as-2ssy.


IUNIVERSIIIHIIITY OF FLORIDA

3 262 08748 8770
BULLET L_ ,.........non


PAGE 4


U. S. OEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000

VOLIUE 6, NUMBER 3 FEBRUARY 1, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
































rmnn~ ~r rn


E KULOV 6, NUMBER 4 I 4


SOUTBEAST ISADS IN BUSINESS FIRM GAINS

Per Ceq4 Change In Ngqber Of Firms
In Operatipp, March 31. 1948 To
Marek 91. 1951. By Major Industry
Divisions And Regions Largest gains in
business popula-
-10 OFERGENT CHANGI t tion between Mar.
UNITED STATES 31 & 9 8 and Ea
SOUTHEAST 3, 1951 were made
YI THEE AF in the Southeast,
sEWRA a survey just con-
NEW ENBJND AGted by the Of-
FIR WEST f100 Of Busin988
Economics, U. 8.
Source: Office of Business Economics, Department of Com-
UJ. 8. Department of Colmmerce mere shows.
The increase in the Southeast, 5 per cent, was greater than
for any other region. The Middle East was second, with 3 per
cent. Also, the Southeast has shown the largest relative gains
not only for the business population as a whole, but also for
most of the major divisions, the 08E report, published in its
publication Survey qf Current Business revealed*

Note: Copies of ~this Sqrveyr of Cqrrent Bqsiness
publication carrying the comprehensive review of
the business population are available from any
Departagnt qf Commerge field office for TQ cents.

Incidentally, a study of the figures made by the Atlanta
office of the Department of Commrerce showed that Florida' s
business population from 1944 to 1951 had increased more than
that of any State in the nation. The rise in that State was
from 48,200 to 91,200 firs, or 89.2 per cent. The State
nearest that mark was Oregon where a 55.8 per cent gain took
place,

LAST CALLt '
S Copies of the booklet "Your Federal Income Tax, ,
a For Individuals, 1951 Edition" are now available ,
S at all Department of Commerce field offices. It in- ,
S corporates the recent changes made by Congress. ,
S The price is 25 cents. Also available are "Bulletin ,
a F Depreciation and Obsoleacence," 30 cents; "Your ,
a Rights of Review When The Government Questions Your ,
Income Tax," 10 cents; nThe Small Businesssan and ,
a His Declaration of Estimated Tax," 10 cents; and ,
Sthe leaflets "H~ow An Unincorporated Business May ,
S Convert A Net Operating Loss Into a Refund on Last '
SYear's Income Taxes," and "Basic Tax Information For '
Small Busiqess Enterpriaea," both nratiar '


Birm~ingham, Ala.,
246 Federal Blag.,
Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355

K~noxvile, Tenn.,
313 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9

Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Blag.,
Tel. 2-4755


Charleston, 8. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771

Hamphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673

Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C.,
50 Whitehall St., S.W., Maxw-ell House, 201 County Office
Tel. RA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 UInion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Tam~pa, Fla.,
420 W. Larayette St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Building,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206


AURBEF RY


~rrnm I ~mnnn


THE :~TQSYAL BUSINESS HARDSHIP
In still another move to help mall
5 business over the present materials con-
Ncrtin~ l ervation emergency, the National Pro-
C E" Anotion Authority has announced the crea-
tion of a "Small Business Hardship Ac-
P~odu ti~n count" on controlled materials.
g (ggPurpose of the procedure is to give
speCidl &B8sirtaBc8, if possible, to
small manufacturers facing shutdowns
Authoitrr because of low quarterly allotments of
IC~ri Fthe controlled materials, steel, copper
and alum~inum. To qualify, a firm must
(1), be classified as small business
ast defined by the recent Department of
Commerce study of manufacturing concerns
by size; (2), it mlust be a single-line
producers (3), the fira mest be faced
with failure or prolonged shutdown be-
cause it has received insufficient controlled materials; and
(4), the plant facilities are not suitable for conversion
because it would require either a abbstantial financial in-
vestment or extensive retooling.
FARML MACHINERY
Priority assistance similar to that accorded to producers
of farm machinery and implements was asked by independent
distributors of repair parts for farm machinery and implements
at a meeting with NPA officials. A large number of south-
eastern firms are producers.
CONlSTRUCTION PROJECTS
In a recent interpretation of controls on construction
materials, NPA held that delivery of controlled materials,
delayed from a previous quarter, may be accepted on a con-
struction project without the necessity of charging them
against the allotment for the current quarter. The interpre-
tation was of Amendment 1 to CHP Regulation 1.
STEEL DISTRIBUTORS
Procedures by which steel distributors will be required to
give preferential treatment to machine tool builders', aliU--
tary, and atomic energy orders which can be filled from ware-
house inventories have been announced in Order Y-6a, Direction
1 of January 21, 1952. At the same time, a process was also
established by which distributors may replace steel products
sold for production of machine tools and maetal-working machine-
ry and equipment by ordering additional steel from their sup-
pliers in excess of normal base-period tonnage.
IRON & STEEL
Order M-47 limiting the use of iron and steel in the mann-
facture of consumer awrable goods has been revoked in a routine
procedure .
SEE NATIONAL PRODUCTION AUITBQRITY East


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





LICENSE TAG MANUFACTURING CURTALED

The National Production Authority of the U. S. De-
partment of Commerce will set out in April of this
year to save for the defense program several million
pounds of steel in the manufacture of 1953 license
tags in the Southeast through the simple expediency
of denying the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas sufficient
second quarter allotments of steel for that purpose.
The 1953 tags would be made for use on upwards of
6 million motor vehicles in the seven States. In 1950,
the last year for which such information was avail-
able, a total of 5,545,764 vehicles were registered
in the area, including 685,812 in Alabama; 984,838 in
Florida; 897,518 in Georgia; 484,374 in Mississippi;
1,056,309 in North Carolina; 578,802 in South Carolina
and 858,111 in Tennessee.
Ordinarily, the tags each weigh an estimated half
pound, most of which now consists of steel since
little aluminum is available for that purpose.
NPA has agreed to allot about 20 per cent of the
usual needs for the manufacture of tage, clips or
tabs to revalidate 1952 plates for use in 1953.
Eighteen States in the nation have decided to use tabs
or clips. None of the seven southeastern States has
indicated its plans for tags, clips or tabs.

NEWR URBAN BUILDING DECLINES IN SOWtHEAST

A drop of $100,687,000 in the value of new urban
building authorized in the Southeast in the first 11
months of 1951 as compared with the corresponding
period in 1950 is shown in recent figure compiled
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of
Labor*
Included in the decline was a decrease of some
$47 million in the value of such building authorized
in 13 larger cities in the region*
The decrease, State-by-State, was reflected despite
a $6,429,000 increase for Florida.
Factors in the State-by-State decreases were drops
of from $115 981,000 to $93,426,000 in Alabama; $124,-
805,000 to $117,840,000 in Georgia; $58,291,000 to
$43,686,000 in Mississippi; $189,584,000 to $140,979,-
8000u inC Ioth Caroia )6,74,0 $ 8,3 9,0 M E

Thennescline of some $47,000,000 in the 13 south-
eastern cities came in spite of an increase of from
$14,131,000 to $;38,663,000 in Nashville; $8,672,000
to $9,953,000 in Chattanooga; and $12,306,000 to
$12,49?t000 in Tampa.

POPULATION GAIN FOR SOUTH IN 19(pg SEEN

The South will remain the leading section of the
country in point of population in 1960, the Bureau of
the Census reported in a special survey just released.
The region, however, will not lead in percentage
gain in the next 8 years. This position will go to
the West where a 34 per cent rise is predicted.
The report consisted of predictions of things to
come for the country as a whole in population by 1960.
It was the first State and regional breakrdown issued
by the bureau in some time and came as a result of
urgent requests from business and other sources.
The South' s population today was given as 47,296,000
and that in 1960 was forecast as 56,003,000. This
would be a greater percentage gain than either for the
North Central or Northeastern States, both of whose
population would rise 15 per cent.


NIATIONArL PRODUCTION AUTHORITY COntinued Frge Page 1

CAM~S
An increase in the quantity of cans that may be used
to pack four low cost basic food products and two essential
non-food products was made possible as a result of an
amendment to Order Y-25. The food products are spaghetti
and macaroni, chili with beans, non-seasonal soups and
dried soaked beans. The non-food products are baby powder
and mechanics' hand paste soap.
AtLUMINUM PRODUCTS
Order Y-88 wass amended regulating the distribution of
aluminum controlled products to add aluminum conductor
wire and cable products to the controlled materials list
in the order.
RUBBlER GREPE SULE
A natural rubber crepe sole which has not been compounded,
vulcanized or attached to a aboe is still natural rubber
and therefore cannot be privately imported, NPA held in
an interpretation to Order M-2, the basic rubber order.
COPPER PRODUCTS
The copper order, Y-11, controlling the acceptance
and scheduling of authorized controlled material orders
for copper products was revised harmonizing the order with
the Controlled Materials Plan.
ALUMNUM
A general revision of the aluminum order, Y-5, to adapt
it to the Controlled Materials Plan was announced. It was
also announced that all holders of CMP allotments will upon
application to the Aluminum and Magnesium Division be
guaranteed positions on a mill schedule.

a HEALNG OJF CONITHO~LS I
a Controls over seven different materials have been
removed or relaxed by MPA in keeping with a policy
'of such action as facts justify it. Latest decon-
'trolling action was in the case of non-nickel-bear-
'ing stainless steel removed from CMP coverage in
'Direction 9 to CMP Regulation 1. Major controls
n ere previously revoked on glass containers, syn-
Sthetic rubber, plastic type nylon, methyl chloride,
bi~santh. and agle leather.

INVENT~ORY COTROLS

non eRelgulation 1hsh ben amended to includeortl manrm
subject to inventlRy ceont ol.

Order Y-20, controlling iron and steel scrap, has been
amended to bring it into conformity with Order M-92 so as
to prevent anyr duplication of controls or reporting re-
quirements .
DMPA
In a series of amendments, the Defense Production Admin-
istration and NPA spelled out in detail areas in which DMPA
will serve as claimant and disburser of materials for mines,
concentrators, smelters and refineries. The actions were
amendments to DPA Order 1, NPA Delegation 5, and NPA Dele-
gation 14.
MININGC
Order Y-78 was amended making it applicable to that
segment of the miningr industry under the Defense Materials
Procurement Agency.
A~LUMINU SHELTERS
Issuance of a directive limiting monthly receipts of
aluminium scrap by smelters during February and March of 1952
to 110 per cent of their average monthly abipments during
the first 8 months of 1950 was announced by NPA. The direct-
ive covers aluminum scrap, pig and ingot, primary or second-
ary, both purchased and for toll.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









PAGE 3

Manufacturers' sales in 1951 amounted to $265 billion
representing an increase of 16 per cent over 1950. About
three-fourths of the advance reflected higher prices and
one-fourth a gain in volume. The 1951 sale total for the
durable goods manufacturing industries was $125 billion,
18 per cent above 1950. All of the major industries in
the group showed sales increases from the previous year.
+ees+
Need by the armed forces of a light, durable, corrosion-
resistant, hand-operated aerosol sprayer for spraying mili-
tary quarters with insecticide was announced by the National
Inventors Council of the U. S. Department of Commeree. Tech-
nical requirements for the sprayer are described in a
"Defense Problem Sheet" obtainable at the Council's offices
in Washington.


r(--~ NEW B()()IS' )~ Of This Material

~3~~i5 Afl) REfPORTS Check It In Space
ag Provided &t Send
~iu ~;uiu~~ ThiS;ec;:tion Of
The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The nearest Dearmn of Commece Feld
Office. Pour Name & Address Are On The Opposite Side*
Fake Kemittances For Sales Material Payable To Treas-


I


urer Of The United States. Unpriced items Are Free.


Sales of all retail stores in December 1951 were
estimated at $1L4.6 billion, or 2 per cent below a year
ago, the Office of Business Economies, U. S. Department
of Commerce, reported. This brought sales for 1951 as
a whole to about $151 billion, exceeding by 5 per, cent
the high established in the previous year.
*
Creation in the U. S. Department of Commerce of a
national clearing house for suggestions to improve in-
dustrial productivity, was announced by Secretary of
Commerce Charles Sawyer. Fashioned after the War Pro-
duction Board'sa so-called "Brain Bank" in World War
II, the Department's Clearing House for Beneficial
Suggestions is designed for the pooling and inter-
change of ideas to benefit the nation'sa current de-
fense production efforts.
+ + + **
Chain store and mail-order sales in December 1951
were estimated at $3.8 billion, an increase of 3 per
cent over December 1950. This brought the total dol-
lar volume of sales for the year in this segment of
retail trade to $34 billion, a gain of 8 per cent
over the previous year's total, a slightly larger
advance than for retail sales generally.
*
A supplementary first-quarter 1952 export quota of
25,000 tone of unbleached sulfate wood pulp was an-
counced bv the Office nf International T rade


+ + *
Establishment of a minimum $3 charge to individuals re-
questing a search of census records to obtain a transcript
of information on file about themselves has been announced
by the Bureau of the Census of the U. S. Department of Com-
merce. The fee applied to all applications postmarked on or
after January 1, 1952.
+
Cotton-growing States of the nation last month had pro-
duced a total of 263,129 bales of cotton linters and pulp
for shipment to foreign countries since the 1951 crop har-
vest began in August 1951. The Office of International Trade,
U. S. Department of Commerce announced that licenses for
that quantity of winters and pulp had been issued on proposed
exportations to other countries with England, Germany, Japan,
heNetherlands and Italy taking the bulk of the shipments.
+ + +
A goal for the annual production of 8.4 million long
tosof sulfur and sulfur equivalents by 1955 was announced
bythe Defense Production Administration. Most of the
aio's supply of sulfur is produced along the Gulf coast.
he1955 goal would be an bacrease of 2.3 million tons over
the190 uplyof6 iintoe

Public Employment in October 1951, G-GE51, No. 4
Report on Cotton Ginning, Jan. 23, 1952
Vacant Dwelling Unite in Louisiana, April 1, 1950
1950 census of Agriculture for Florida (Preliminary)
Facts For Industry Reports:
/}Backlog of Aircraft Orders, 3rd Quarter 1951, Y42D-3-1
J~lumbing Fixtures, Summary for 1950, M15H-00
LClay Construction Products, Nov. 1951 M26B-111
teel Mill Products, 1950, ME2B-00
norganic Chemicals, U. S. Production,Nov.l~19Y1,M98-111
9hAnnual Report of Secretary of commerce, 1951, 304
CAStatistical Biandbook of Civil Aviation, 504
C Airworthiness Directive Summary, $1.50
Cnrl& Removal of Radioactive Contamination in
Laboratories, National Bureau of Standards H~andbook 48,151
Census Publications Catalog &r Subject Guide, January
to September 1951, 250, Subscription Price,$1.50 Yearly
Table of Dielectric Constants of Pure' Liquids,
National Bureau of Standards Circular 514, 304
hsclProperties of Some Samples of Asbestos-Cement
Siding, Nat. Bureau of Stds. Building &r Mata. Structures
Report 122, 151
ecmedtions of the International Commission on Radio-
logical Protection and of the International Commission on
Radiological Units, 1950, Bat. Bureau of Stds.Hlandbook 47,
154
_17 1950 Supplement to Screw-Thread Standards for Federal
Services, Nat. Bureau of Stds. Handbookr H28 Supp. 50C
S 1Business Aids:
iliying the Manufacturer'sa Linre of Products, #471
seof Collection Ser~vice A Feature of a Sound
Consumer Credit Policy, #472
elevenn Tests for a Good Business Letter, #473
ak1L~ingJ Effective Use of Handbill Advertising, #474


Survey of Current Business, $3.25 a Year
Your Federal income Tax For Individuals,1951,259
Bulletin F Depreciation e Obsolescence, 309
S/Your Rights of Review When the Federal Government
Questions Your Income Tax, 10#
L7The Small Businessman & Hlis Declaration of
Estimated Tax, 10
/ How an Unincorporated Business May Convert a Net
Operating Loss Into a Refund on Last Year's Income
Tazes
SBasic Tax Information for Small Business Enterpris-

L7National Production Authorit~Yaterial:
LZCMP Reg. 1, Amendment 1 LfOrder M-6A, Dir. 1
Order P-25, Amended gi' Order Y-88 Amended
Interpretation of Order Y-2 UOrder M-11Amended
Order Y-5 Revised 22CMP Reg 1, Direction 9
Regulation 1 Amended L70rder Y-20 Amended
DPA Order 1, NPA Del. 5, NPAl Del. 14 Amended
ff Order Y-78 amended
Record Keeping for the Small Hlome Builder, $;11.25
Wlork Experience of the Labor Force, Har. 1951





SOUTHEASTERN FARIYING BILL NEARLY BILLION

All is not profit in farming operations in the Southeast, ao-
cording to a study of bureau of the Census figures on the 1950
Census of Agriculture made by the Atlanta office of the U. S.
Department of Commerce.
The study shows that in 1949 farmers of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennes-
see spent $976,692,075 on such things as hired labor, machine
hire, feedstuffs, seeds, bulbs, and so forth.

N~ote: Preliminary returns from the 1950 Census
of Agriculture are now being received in Department
of Commerce field offices on many subjects. See *
your nearest Commerce Department for latest informa-
tion.

The expenditures included $72,618,624 for hiring of machines;
$284,595,524 for hired labor; $228,138,827 for feed for live-
stock and poultry; $149,000,207 for livestock and poultry
bought; $67,316,656 for seeds, bulbs, plants and trees; $109,-
905,349 for gasoline and other petroleum fuel and oil; $35,851,-
'--760 for repairs to tractors; and $26,265,128 on the repair of
other farm machinery.
The reports also showed that in 1949 farmers of the seven
southeastern States received a total of $2,441,982,890 in the

sal ofal "pro 'ct, Fincresi f \ perc od ra lhe

remainder for livestock and its products.
I KECORD KEPING POR sMnALL hOME BULLDER s

'TheIifousing and home Finance Agency has issued a publica- '
' tion entitled Recqrd Keeping for the Small home Builder, which '
should be of interest to many small home builders in the South- '
east* '
Emphasis in development of the manual was placed on '
making it a practical system for the small volume home builder '
' not employing an accountant nor himself versed in accounting. '
The system has been pre-tested by small volume builders '
' who use it in their own business operations, KKIFA said. The a
' text is written in non-technical language and is fully illus- '
treated through examples from every-day home building operations.'
The publication sells for $1.25 '


SOUTHEASTERN FIRMS GET 120 CONTRACTS IN JANUARY

Business firms in the Southeast received a total of 120
contracts from the Federal Government in January 1952 for
goods and services to be performed in connection with the
national program of defense.
Eighty-eight of the 120 contracts were valued at a total
of $7,990,914 and 28 other were in excess of $250,000 each.
Four had no dollar value listing.

This information was taken from daily lists of
bid and contract award information supplied by the
Department of Defense for the benefit of business
firms. See your nearest Department of Commerce field
qffiqe for latest information on this subject.
Under regulations of the Munitions Board no dollar value
of contracts in excess of $250,000 has been given in the
past, but shortly this restriction is expected to be lifted,
Included in the purchases were paint, textile goods,
clothing, food products, sand bagel, cross ties, petroleum
products, ammunition containers, construction work, sleeping
bags, spices,women's handbags and other commodities.

MOVIES ON CIVIL DEFENSE AVAILABLE


motor a ialur idstry atn ot dto t ver aet tough
capital, production to be effected under supervision of the
Federal Civil Defense Administration, and distribution to be
made by that agency, which will supply basic information
and technical consultation.
Yore than 4,000 prints of the first film produced have
been sold. This film, entitled "Survival Under Atomic Attack"
was narrated by Edward R. Murrow, well-knmown CBS commentator.
The second and third films were "Fire Fighting for House-
holders" and "What You Should Know About Biological Warfare"
and have also been distributed.
Other subjects are "Duck and Cover,n a film for schools,
"Our Cities Must Fight," "Civil Defense for Industry "
nIhat You Bhould Know About Nerve Gas,n nEmergency Action
to Save Lives," and "This is Civil Defense, n which are now
in production.
Additional information is available at the Castle Films
Division, United World Films, Inc., 1445 Park Avenue, New York.
GPO 8*68


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FICLD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Ofhce
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Attanta 3, Gas.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIIT No. 1009

VOLUMLE 6, NUMBER 4 FEBRUAKE 15, 1952


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. 'QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8762IIII


PAGE 4


BU LLETI


gggS-1


UNIV. OF FL LIB.

oo liUtib-4-JF_g5



U.S. DEPOSITORtY





YN V U I- I-


SOUTHEASTERNI WHOLESALLE SALEtS ON UPGRADE IN 1951


NPA' S SMALL BISINJESS PROGRAM


More than 700 whole-
GROCEY WHLESAERS ale firms in the South-
Supply of Merchandise on Hand east reporting to the
I*hER OF DAY$ NUKBMX OF DA ue& fth OBU R
I Isse month-to-month sales
1 use0 trends ~eatiated their
,, a dollar volume sales in
1951 at $1,497,203,000,
or nearly $160 million
,, ** ore than was realized
in 1950, according to
monthly reports issued
,s as by the Census Bureau.
Cumulative sales in
1951 were 8 per cent
greater in the South At..
a a .> a a ** lantic region and 4 per
Sqqrge: Burean q( file Census cent up in the East
South Fentral sections largely as a result of unusual activity
in such lines as some electrical goods, industrial supplies,
plumbing and heating supplies, drugs and sundries, and paper
and its products.

Note: Copies of this Monthly Wholesale Trade Report
are available gratis at any Department of Commerce
field office. Request that your name be placed on
the paing let.

A decline of 6 per cent in both regions was reported, how-
ever, on sales in December compared with November and 4 per
cent for December as compared with the easet month in 1950.
End-of-the month inventories were up in both regions at the
end of 1951 as compared with the same time in 1950, including a
12 per cent gain in the South Atlantic region and 4 per cent in
the East South Gentral. Inventories at cost in the South Atlan-
tic section at the end of 1951 were estimated at $103,986,000
and $37,138,000 in the East South Central.
SEE IWHOLESALLE SALES PAGlE 2

EAST GUI.F STATES CON3TINUIE LUMBE OUTPUIT LEALD

The East Gulf States of Georgia, Florida and Alabama contin-
ued to lead the eastern half of the nation in the production of
lumber at the end of the third quarter of 1951, according to
Bureau of the Consue figuresa contained in its Facts For Induat-
.yr series.
Total production in the three-State area for three quarters
of last year was 3,398,457,000 board feet.
SEE LUMBER PRODUCTION BE 2


Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, 8. C.,
50 Whitehall St., S.W., Maxwell House, 201 County Office
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292


Birmingham, Ala.,
246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355

Knoxville, Tfenn.,
313 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9

Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Charleston, 8. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldgl.,
Tel. 7771

Hemphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673

Mia~ni, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Colurmbiaz S. C.,
1310 L~ady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Blag.,
Tel. 4-7111

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 UInion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Building,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206


Tam~pa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafayette St.,
Tel. 2-3880


MULOV E 6 NUMBER 5


MARCH 1 1992


THE


Realignment of functions of the Nat-
ional Production Authority' s Office of
GEtORO} small business to meet a recent Executive
Order of the President transferring cer-
tain anall brusiness functions of the Com-
Produ tion erce Department to the newly-established
.L F~d ction S~an1 Defense Plants Adinisitration has
been announced by NPA.
N(PA' s Economic Production and Research
A uul~it ~ Division will continue to handle the fol-
Rilt~ri owing functions:
A quarterly study of low-allotment
firma.
Periodical reports abowing the impact
of the production program on smalleee~~~~eeee~~~~eee bush-
ness.
Analysis of orders and regulations
affecting anall business.
Evaluation of the extent of small firms' representation on
PAindustry advisory coanittees.
Prompt evaluation for the Defense Production Administration
and excpediting of processing applications for certificates of
necessity for small firs.
Operation as a focal point for consultation and cooperation
with Small Defense Plants Administration regarding orders, regu-
lations and distribution policies and representation of that
agency at proper levels within HYPA.
NPA' s Materials and Equipment ~Asistance Division will be
responsible fors
Direct spot assistance to obtain adjustments in base periods
and adjustments in material allotments for anall business.
Expediting orders and delivery of equipment for mall busi-
nees firae engaged in defense work.
Staff work related to administering the Small Business Hlard-
ship Account under advice of the hardabip Panel of NIPA' s Office
of Small Business.
CONSTRUCTION
Of a total of 217 applications calling for the proposed ex-
penditure of $60,606,124 on construction operations in the
southeastern States of Alabeaa, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
SuhCarolina and Tenneseeo in which building materials in
the first quarter of 1952 were sought, hPA was forced to demy
169 of the requests, or 77 per cent, because it was found that
use of the materials would endanger the program of national
defense .
Of the total anaiber of applications received, 23 were flied
in Georgia of which 18 were denied; 21 of 24 from Ailabass were
denied; 55 of 66 in Florida; 18 of 25 in Missiesippig 12 of 18
in South Carolina; and 45 of 61 in Tennessee.
858 hPA PAGE 2


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





SOUTHEAST PLANT EXPANSIONS AUTHORIZED


Certificates of necessity calling for plant expan-
sion activities in the Southeast to cost an estimated
$i6,143,000 were included in recent such action taken
by the Defense Production Administration.
The certificates, providing for rapid tax write-offs
in connection with the expansion work, were issued so
that the industries concerned can participate more
actively in the national program of defense*


For a complete summary of DPA and NPA actions
subscribe to the Defense Production Record, the
official weekly bulletin of DPA. The subscript-
ion price is $2.50 a year.

Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama and Missiasippi



were rcanted eritificat in uthies asu ofi $287904or ai


the production of equipment for blood transfusion pur-
poses .

WHOLESALE SALES Continued From Page 1

In the field of retail sales, about a "50-50" situa
tion prevailed in the region. Approximately half of the
cities and areas in which the Census Bureau conducts
monthly surveys reported increases in sales in December
1951 over the same month in 1950 while the other half
experienced declines. For example, increases included
9 per cent in Savannah and Chilton and Perry counties,
Alabama; 11 per cent in Manatee county, Florida; 17 per
cent in Augusta, Ga; 13 per cent in Columbus, Ga; 5 per
cent in Macon; 6 per cent in Biloxi, Miss; and 10 per
cent in Bristol, Tenn*
On the other hand, decreases of 6 per cent were re-
corded in Birmingham; 7 per cent in Atlanta; 3 per cent
in Clarksdale, Miss., 5 per cent in Gulfport, Miss.,
3 per cent in Asheville, N. C., 33 per cent in Green~
wood, S. C., and 5 per cent each in Johnson City and
Kingsport, Tenn.

LUMBER PRODUCTIONl Coatinued From Page I

The figures also showed that a close second in total
production in the eastern half of the nation was the
South Atlantic region with an outpult of 3,391,939,000
feet, including 1,555,360,000 in North Carolina and
712,680,000 in South Carolina.
With the 3,172,103,000 board feet produced in the
Lower Mississippi region, including 903,052,000 feet in
Hissiasippi; 652,492,000 in Louisiana; and 814,224,000
in Arkansas and Oklahoma, production in the South as a
whole approximated 9,962,499,000 feet, which was 69 per
cent of the total production in the eastern half of the
United Statse and 35 per cent of the output for the U.S.
as a whole*
Production in the East Gulf States for the three-
quarter period of 1951 included 2,571,318,000 feet of
softwood and 827,139,000 feet of hardwood*

BHLLU~GRALPPH C7 TEUMMAUACL~ HEUnTU~i s
STechnical and scientific studies for the bene- a
Sfit of the southeastern businessman are listed *
Sin the Bibliography of Technical Reports issued a
'by the Office of Technical Services. Subscript-'
ion rice L5 a yeear-


IRON & STEEL
NPA has announced that production of iron and steel
henceforth will be regulated entirely by directives or by
production schedules authorized in connection with approved
CYP 4-B applications. Consequently, the steel order, M-1,
was revised to incorporate amendments and provisions carry-
ing out this action.
CONSTRUCTION
NPA and the Housing and home Finance Agency have sent
to members of the NIPA Construction Industry Advisory Com-
mittee the draft of a proposed revision of the housing
construction regulations which will be issued separately
from the basic NPA construction regulations. Chief among
the new provisions are a restriction on one-family houses
to one and one-half bathrooms per unit of housing, and a
reduction in amounts of steel and copper allowed for use
in construction of one to four-family housing units.
COPPER




which became effect ve February 15, 1952.

The 30-day inventory limitation governing purchases of
synthetic (GR-S) rubber was removed by NPA and an approxi-
ate 20 per cent increase was made in the amount of high
eacty rayon which may be used by rubber manufacturers
in an amendment to Order M-2.
REPAIRMEN' S MATERLALS
Controlled Materials Plan Regulation Number 7 was amended
broadening its effect with respect to repair parts and
aerasused for repairmen.
WOOD PULP
A recommendation that all restrictions on inventories,
conumpionand reserve production of unbleached sulphate
wodpulp be temporarily removed as soon as possible was
maeby the Market Wlood Pulp Consumers Industry Advisory
Comttee at a meeting with NPA officials.
ELECTRICAL UTILITIES
Electrical utilities may now place orders for allotments
controlled materials for "minor requirements" for the
seodquarter of 1952 and advance allotmlents of these
materials for minor requirements in the following three
Quresas a result of an amendment to Order Y-50 issued
by NPA.AIRCRAFT QUALITYr STEEL
Two types of engines w~ere added by NPA to the list of
military items for which steel distributors are required to
earmark aircraft quality alloy steel in an amendment, number
one, to Schedule 1 of M-6A.
COPPER KI7RE MILL PRODUCTS
Order M1-86 has been amended to bring it into fuller
conformity with objectives of the Controlled Materials Plan.
The order deals with copper wire mill products distributors.
BRASS MILL PRODUCTS
simultaneously, NPA took similar action with respect to
brass aill products distributors by amending Order Y-82 to
bring that regulation into complete harmony with the "closed-
end" Controlled Materials Plan.
USED TIN CANS
In a new order, M-98, NPA directed the flow of used tin
cans, now regularly collected in nine counties in California
and two in Arizona, to shredding plants where they are pre-
pared for use in producing copper through a chemical precipi-
tation process.
APPEAL
NPA has appealed to manufacturers to support the economic
stabilization program by maintaining an adequate sup ly of
low and medium-priced essential civilian-type goods.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





-- More detail-
ed Informa -
ston on the
tSighlihts
--= of theNews
in the Field
of Business is Available at Department of Commerce
Field Offices.



Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing pub-
lic reports in December 1951 amounted to $1,805 million
a decline of one-sixth from the $2,139 million paid
out in the same month in 1950, the Office of Businese
Economics, U. S. Department of Commeree, reported. Des-
pite the decline, which was attributable to a lower
rolnae of "extra" or "special" dividends, December 1951
was the second heaviest dividend payment month on re-
cord.
+ + *
Personal income in December 1951 was at an annual
rate of $257 billion, slightly above the November 1951
total of $256) billion. For the full year 1951, person-
al income amounted to $251 billion, 12 per cent higher
than the $225 billion total for 1950.
*
With some curtailment in outdoor activity as well
as the nanal post-holiday 181l in trade, employment
dropped by about 1 1-4 million between Deceaber and
January. The estimate for the week ending January 12
was 59,726,000 as compared with 61,014,000 for the
week ending December 8. Nonagrienltural employment
fell to an estimated 53,540,000 in Januarry from 54,-
636,000 in Deceaber, a drop of about the size expected
at this time of year.



,,, To Obtain Copies
1479 li BO()KS -p or Tis. Yataral
AND RPORTSCheck It In Space
1 241)Provided & Send
As hi ecin f
the bulletin Of
Commerce To The Nearest Departet o Cmerce eld
Ofic. our Name & Address r On Th pste Sd.
Me:Rittances For SlsaerlPab ToTra-


urerOf The United States. Ulnpriced Items Are Fre~.


Wholesalers' sales totalled $106.8 billion in 1951,
$10 billion above 1950. After adjustment for price in-
creases, unit sales in 1951 were little changed from
1950. December sales, at $9,252 million, were 4 per cent
below Bovember after allowance for seasonal factors. Sale
of churable goods were $2,516 million and nondurable goods
$6,736 million, 8 and 3 per cent, respectively, below the
previous month on a seasonally adjusted basis.

Construction activity continued at near-record levels
in January after allowance for seasonal factors, according
Sto a joint report of the U. 8. Departments of Comlmerce
and Labor. The total valne of new construction put in place
during January amounted to more than $2.1 billion, a 4 per
cent decline from December and a slight rise above the
January 1951 total.
t *
Total business inventorkee at the end of December 1951
were valued at $69.4 billion, $9.7 billion higher than at the
end of 1950. Manufacturers accounted for about $8.7 billion
of the rise with retailers and wholesalers sharing equally
the remaining $1 billion increase. After allowance for
higher replacement costs, the physical volume of trade in-
ventories was virtually unchanged from year-end 1950. About
90 per cent of the rise in manufacturers' stocks represented
physical accumulation.
se
Shipments of knt cotton and wool underwear and night-
wear, including knt outerwear shirts, were valued at $348
million in 1951, 30 per cent more than the 1950 total of
$267 million, the Bureau of the Census announced.
+ *
Cuttings of the major types of men'sa apparel during 1951
were under 1950 levels, the Consus Bureau reported. Only the
prodnetion of rayon and other synthetic fabric garments and
undershorts showed an increase over 1950 figures.

L7Latest National Production Anthority Material:
revisionn of Order Y-1 Order 8-97
L~rcer 8-2 Amnnaed H ~gulation lo. 7 Amended
Murder 8-50 Amended bendment #1, Schedul~ 1)-6a
Murder M-86 Aaended Urder M-82 Amended L/beer 8-9a
L- defense Production Record, $2.50 Yearly
-j Pire Tests of Steel Columns Protected With Siliceous
Aggregate Concrete, Nat.Bureau Stda., Report 124, 159
Report of the 36th Mational Conference on Weights &
Measures, Nat. Bur. of Stda., KP202, 50e
1i-Rey Calibration of Radiation Survey Meters, Rooket
Chambers & Dosineters, YBS Cir. 507, 154
L~ethods of Heasuring Huamidity &L Testing Bygrometers,
NBS Cir. 512, 151
oas& Geodetic Survey, Combined Operatione
SllBusiness Aide:
einitions of Buseiness Teras, #8475
ricpe &Purposes of Decorative Packaging, #1476
oeFacts About Automatic laundries, #r477
owto Choose or Revise Your sales Compensation Plan,#478
owto Apoly for a Business Loan, #479
,lJBusinese Life Insurance, #480
1950 Canaus of Population, Wumber of inhabitants,
Florida, P-A10, 204
L7 50s Census of Agriculture;
L/Irrigation of Agricultural lands summrargl 17
Western States & Arkansas, louteiana &1Forida,1R50-1
50Census oflAgriculptore rort aultuaissSpecialtices,

korth Carolina ?South Carolina L/Tennessee
e--""* -*BoardlyFFUL14Anl2QuarDecemberF ELA-2-
echnical Reports Newaletter, 504 Yearly
orFederal Income Tax, 1951 Edition, 254
- The Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1951 Edition, $3


Zi Monthly W9holesale Trade Report (Pat On Mail List)..
/ Census of Manufactures, 1947, Classes of Products
by States, MC204
L7Canned Food Report, Distributors & Canners
January 1, 1952, Stocks & Shipments *
School Enrollaent, Oct. 1951, P-20, No. 37
f Lumber Production & Mill Stocks, 3rd Quarter 1951,
FFI M13G-3-1
Monthly Report on the labor Force, Jan.1952,P-57#115
Iron & Steel ~Foundries & Steel Ingot Prodnoera,
Products Shipped &r Materiale UsedNlov.1951)42Y~1G#11
Flour Milling Products, Dec.1951,FFU16a-121
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Products,FFIM26D121 1
Confect one 6lnceudinglChocolate ProductsMI60121

Commpercial & home Canning Closures,D~ec.1951,M75C121


Annual Report,l8ureau of Public Roads,Fistcal Year
1951, 35#
/ 7 Bibliography of Technical Reports, $5 Pearly


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





FEHROUS SCRALP USE HIGH~ IN SOUTHEAST

Southeastern mills in the first 10 months of 1951 confused
a total of 3,354,798 gross tons of ferrous scrap, including
1,914,042 tons of "home" crap and 1,441,443 tone of "purchased"
scrap, according to figures compiled from month-to-month reports
issued by the U. S. Department of Interior.
At the same time, 3,852,806 tons of pig iron and 2,222,058
tons of scrap stock were also used in the region.
Consumption of purchased and home scrap by Statse in the
area included 2,032,991 tone in Alabamar, 162,847 in Florida and
Georgia, 1,091,809 in Mississippi, Kentuckry and Tennessee,
~24,248 in South Carolina, and 42,923 tons in North Carolina,
In the United States as a whole, the consumption of ferrous
scrap in the 10-month period totalled 57,438,751 gross tone,
including 28,972,412 tone of home and 28,466,339 tons of pur-
chased.
Meanwhile, in the various sections of the country, the can-
paign to get scrap back into the mills to help the steel
situation has been continuing. In the Southeast,
committees appointed for that purpose by
local Chambers of Comeerce in anch
communities as Jacksonville, NYash-
A ~~ville, Chattanooga and otherpons
are bearing down on holders of
the metal in an effort
to get
loose
pound of

t~o w~-
Let*
In the

aloo has


PROOSEDHI hGHWAY WORK IN SOUTHEABST EXTENlSIVE

If plans for the future construction of highways in the
Southeast now being conducted in the "plan preparation" atage
are carried out, some $300,000,000 will be spent on the
construction of 7,762 miles of road in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
easee, according to the annual report of the Bureau of Publio
Roads, UI. S. Department of Com~erce for the fiscal year 1951
recently isoned.

bote: Copies of this report are available through
any Department of Conmerce field qffiqe fqr 315.

The "plan preparation" data include the future construct-
ion of Federal-aid and State highways, highways in national
forests, and other Federal areas as of ALpril 1951.
The plane, by States, include the expenditure of $29,005,000
on 782 miles of highways in Alabeaa; $19,000,000 on 500 in
Florida; $87,376 000 on 3,304 in Georgia; $24,729,000 on 655
in Yiasiasippig 86,700,000 on 1,146b in North Carolina;
$28,000,000 on 650 in South Carolinai and $43,221,000 on 7~25
siles in Tennessee.
Plan have been completed for the expenditure of $57,968,000
on 1,263 miles in the 7-State area, and plans under way called
for the disbursement of $1238,063,000 on 6,499 miles.


-


.


see .says,)


come a new program in the scrap situation in the form of select,-
ion of two counties best suited for intensive camprain to a-
chieve the objective. The counties chosen are Coweta in Georgia
and Marion in Florida. The selection was made on the basis of
the prospective availability of crap, ability to more it into
the hands of scrap dealers, agricultural and comercial poten-
tials, cooperativeness of the citizenry and other factor. To
date, the campaign is progressing satisfactorily in both areae
and it is expected that designation of the two counties will
result in the moving of a maximum amount qf quyqp frong both.


UN~iV. OF FL LIB.
DOC IE '8 P





U1.S. DIA80ftRY


A comprehensive review of the nation's s conomic situation
in 1951 is contained in the February 1952 issue of the
Swnear of Curreant Business. published by the Office of Busi-
naes Econamdoss U. S. Department of Comerce. Tfhe article
is entitled 'Mobilising Prodnetion for Defense." The issue
of the publction is the Annulal Review Nuber,
Tfhe article takes up anch anbjects as the total output;
plant **pe******; consumer savings; ecosniom control and
a host of other topical. In addition, this nmber discusess
the national income and product, anadfacturing production,
and so forth,
Tfhe Surrvey of Current Business is published on a monthly
basia and is available at all U. S. Department of Commerce
field offices on a subsoritatto baste of $3 25 a year~


UNIVERSITY OF FLORID L
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 9042
BULLETL_ ,,.........*,.-..


PAGE 4


U. S. OEPARTMEnT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Offace
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009
VOLUME 6, NUMBER 5, MARCHl 1, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
































VOLUME 6, NUMBER 6 KRH1,15


VALUE OF NEW URBAN CONSTRUCTION DROPS IN REGION

Final figures on new
Valuef Ve C~hstrution urban building author-
Inl1939 PMrees,ISIS5-1951 ized in the Southeast
uummeormun last year reflected de
Is anNnua onrr creases in the value of
such building operations
in all of the 7 south-
eastern States and in 12
of 13 major southeastern
cities, according to an
,,o __ II_ analysis of figures con-
1\ piled by the Bureau of
I 1 "^ I Labor Statistics, U. S.
/ ; Department of Labor made
4 1 frby the Atlanta f'egional
PRIVATE I r 1 / OffiOO Of the U. S. De-
rI apartment of Commerce.
s ~The 7 southeastern
~~ / 1i States of Alabama, Flor-
I t 11 ida, Georgia, Yississip-
v mouc / pi, North CarolinaSouth
A j/ I Carolina and Tennessee
I 'Ii Ireported the value of
new urban building au-
thorized in 1951 as
1915 en w wa a re waswe 931,044,000 and in 1950
Source: Construction and building! the total wacs $1,123,-
Materials Industry Report, U. S. 584,000.
Department of Commerce I The 13 major cities of
Atlanta, Birmingham,
Charlotte, Chattanooga, Jacksonville, Knoxville, Mlemphis, Miami
Mobile, Montgomery, Nashville, Savannah and Tampa recorded a
total of $265,551,000 in 1951 which compared with $341,167,000
in 1950
SEE URBAN CONSTRUCTION PAGE 2

SOUTHEAST FIRMS SELL GOVERNMENT $16 MILLION

The Federal Government in February bought more than $16 mil-
lion worth of goods and services in six southeastern States
including miniature practice bombs in Alabama and durmmy nose
plugs in Tennessee.
The purchases were made from 34 firms in Alabama with a
dollar value of in excess of $)3.5 million; 26 firms in Florida
sold goods and services valued at $1.4 million; 29 in Georgia
at $3.6 million; 16 in IMississippi at $1.2 million; 5 in South
Carolina at $823,1; and 23 firms in Tennessee closed con-
tracts with a dollar value of $5.5 million.
SEE SOUTHEASTERN CONTRACTS PAGE 4


THEi BIRMINGHAMl FIRM HELD GUILTY
A suspension order was entered by Charles
Ncltinal Hilkey, National Production Authority
1 ICITICL Hearing Commissioner, prohibiting the &B
Yetal Products Company, of Birmingham, from
using iron and steel for a period of 6
eeks commencing March I and thereafter
P Et) 110lC)I reducing their allotment by 50 tons a
month until they have paid back the amount
of steel wire they had used in excess of
Autho~ity NPA authorizations in the second and third
11 C)1 37 quarters of 1951.
The firm is a partnership engaged in the
manufacture of coat hangers. It is composed
of M. M. Magnus, Sr., and 0. R. Brekle,
,both of whom were also personally named in
,.the Canakssioner's order.
The firm had been charged by the NPA Gen-
eral Counsel'sa office with using 673 tons of steel in excess of
the amount authorized during two quarters of 1951. The respon-
dents admitted the excessive use but pleaded that their conduct
was8 not nwrilful.n
The Commissioner'sa decision asserted the position of NPA
General Counsel that it was unnecessary to allege or prove a
wilful violation of NPA orders in order to lay the foundation
for issuance of a suspension order.
In commenting on the Commissioner's order, Robert H. Winn,
of Washington, Assistant General NPA Counsel in charge of
enforcement, said he regarded the decision as "an important
step in furtherance of the enforcement program." It~ established
"beyond dispute,n he said, that a violator "may not assert
ignorance or misunderstanding of the regulation nor careless-
ness in its observance as an excuse for the unauthorized or
excessive consumption of critical material."
CONSTRUCTION
Southeasterners who expect to build anything from now on,
and who attempt to justify such building operations on the
ground that they had the materials on hand prior to Detober 1,
1951, will have to furnish documentary proof to that effect,
according to an NPA ruling just issued.
The documentary evidence, to accompany CMP 40 applications
sent to Washington must either be to the effect that the mater-
ials for such building operations actually were on hand or in
inventory prior to October 1, 1951, or the owner had legal
title to the controlled materials if stored at other locations
prior to that date.
CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS APPROVED
Approval by blPA of construction projects in the Southeast
including religious,lpunicipal, institutional and community
buildings to cost nearly $8.5 million was announced by that
agency. SEE NPA Continued on Pagg 2


Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S.C., Chattanooga, Tenn.,
50 Whitehall St., S. W., Maxwell House, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 719 James Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Mliss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-711


Knoxville, Tenn., Hemphis, Tenn.,
313 P. 0. Bldg., Madison at Front,
Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 8-3426


Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex. 206


Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,,
Tel. L2-2426


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Tampa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafevette St.,
Tel. 8-6081 & 8-6082


UNITEd STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





$10.8 IILlION IN NECESSITY CERTIFICATES ISSUED

Business firms in five southeastern States ---
Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, South Carolina and
Tennessee --- have been granted certificates of neo_
easity totalling approximately $10.8 million permitting
rapid tax writeoffs in proposed plant expansion opera-
tions to meet the present program of national defense.
The approvals, given by the Defense Production Ad_
ministration, included improvements costing an esti_
mated $1.7 million to the Plant of the Gulf Naval
Stores company, Andalusia, Ala., for the production
of turpentine; a $2.3 million certificate for the
Union Carbide and Caron Corporation, of Columbia,
Tenn., for the production of graphite electrodes;
and a third certificate given the Mississippi Power
and Light company, Jackson, for $1.9 million in-
volving the generation of electric power.
URBAN CONSTRUCTION Continued From' Page 1

Decreases in the value of such building authorized
last year were rather general throughout the Southeast.
Of the 7 States and 13 major cities included in the
Commerce Department's analysis, only Nashville showed
an increase --- 137 per cent. Otherwise, the trend was
downward, Alabama reflecting a 26.3 per cent drop;
Florida, 2.2; Mississippi, 26.3; Georgia, 16.7; North
Carolina, 32.6; South Carolina, 18.8; and Tennessee,
15.1. Among the cities, Atlanta registered a 26.6 per
cent decrease; Birmingham, 35.4; Charlotte, 35.8;
Chattanooga, 17.7; Jacksonville, 19.9; Knoxville, 60;
Memphis, 32.8; Miami, 21.5; Mobile, 43.6; Montgomery,
26; Savannah, 23.1; and Tampa, 17.2 per cent.

SOUTHIEASTERN CONTRACTS Continued From Page 1

Of the 139 contracts awarded in the six-State area
21 were listed- as "over $250,000." '
The purchases in Alabama included textiles, food
products, wood manufactures, magazine subscriptions
and naval stores. Florida sold fruit juices, plywood
and cotton jackets, and entered into contracts for a
number of construction, dredging and other services.
In Georgia, the government bought textiles, refriger-
ators, caskets and pipe, paid Georgia Tech Research
Foundation $28,724 for research investigations, and
the Wright Contracting company, of Columbus, more than
$250,000 for relocating Virginia Secondary Highway
Number 712.
In Mississippi, surgical drapes, textiles and ply_
wood were purchased, more than $250,000 was paid for
levee construction work in one section and $44,799 in
another. South Carolina's Cecil's, Inc., of Spartan-
burg was given a contract for $221,497 for construct-
ing an air force dormitory, and Tennessee contributed
textile goods, black pepper, electric fans, pontoons
and muzzle brakes for guns, among other things.

INCOME~i Ar n~m .nrrrnr Imm~


AUTO~ wnuo "" m ~mn.r


1~1 ___ YPLIlI~YY


Auto wreckers in the Southeast have been given
until April 1 to get rid of their pre-1946 model
motor vehicles in the nationwide program being con-
ducted to alleviate the serious scrap shortage in
ateel mills and foundries.
NJPA amended its order requiring the movement of
that form of scrap into scrap channels to provide an
additional 30 days for that purpose. After Apr'il 1,
however, those dealers who have not complied will be
in violation of the order.
As originally issued last December, the order
provided that the wrreckers must dismantle the care
included in the regulation within a 3-month period
ending March I of this year. Complaints of many
wreckers that they would not be able to dispose of
their ears within tne prescribed time led to amend-
ing of the order.
WATER.SEWOERAGE PROJECTS APPROVED


YIIIII


Ll V *N


'
'
'
'

1
'
'
'
I
I
'
1


NPA announced the approval of water and sewerage projects
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina
and Tennessee to cost an estimated $20,840,144. Applications
for construction of the facilities were on file. They in-
cluded work to cost $1,154,638 in Georgia; $2,733,475 in
Alabama; $7,408,692 in Florida; $449,690 in Mississippi;
$4,863,077 in South Carolina; and $4,230,570 in Tennessee.
A total of $11,213,652 wrill go into development of water
facilities and the remainder on aewerage syatems.
POLIO TETRA-FLUOR ETHYLENEE
Removal of allocation control over poly tetra-fluor ethy-
lene, also kn~own as "Teflon," was announced by NPA. She
removal was made by revoking Schedule 2 to Order M-45.
HIDES & SKLINS
Two orders regulating sale, purchase and processing of
certain hides and skins in demand by the leather trade were
revoked through the cancellation of Orders L1-35 and Y-62.
2ND QUARTER 1952 ALLOTMLENTS
Second quaFWFT9~752TIMENEUTIEWI for controlled
materials for production of consumer type products was an-
nounced by NPA. Under the announced procedure, most manu-
facturers were allotted 50 per cent of their base period con-
surmption of steel; 30 per cent of brase mill, copper foundry
adalurminum products; and 35 per cent of their copper wire
milbase. The allotments were in addition to those for
diet military orders.
RUBBER
Exporters wishifigETBj~pucchase up to $100 worth of GR-S
(general purpose) synthetic rubber are no longer required to
obtain a validated export license as a result of an amendment
toNPA Order MY-2.
STEEL DISTRIBUTION
Corrugating and forming of iron and steel roofing and
siding, ridge roll, valley and flashing by steel distributors
designated as a warehouse operation subject only to the
PA warehouse order M-6A in an amendment to that order.


T~L P BOOLET MADE~ SUNOOL TEXTBOOK ,
The Federal Government'sa best seller "Your Fed- *
eral Income Tax," thousands of copies of which ,
have been distributed in the Southeast, has been ,
established as a textbook at Hoke Smith High a
School in Atlanta. It is believed to be the first ,
school to take such action in the United States. ,
Clyde T. Warren, instructor in economics at ,
the school decided to undertake the study in order,
to teach his some 60 students same of the rudi- a
ments of tax paying so that they may be better *
equipped for that task in the years to eqme. '


GPO 81100530


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


NJ$[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The approvals, given under the Controlled Materials
Plan conserving steel, copper and aluminum for the defense
effort, included churches, fire stations, a prison stockade,
home for the aged, police building and county jails in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Misslissippi, South Carolina and
Tennessee. They embraced all projects in the categories
involved for which applications had been filed to commence
construction in the first and second quarters of 1952 with
the exception of a few "border line" cases to be acted on
shortly .
At. the same time, NPAP announced approval also of 16
otlger projects to be carried out in the Southeast costing
nearly $4 million. This particular list involved the use of
materials in 1952 and in the first quarter of 1953.







PAGE 3


More detail
ed informa-
tion on the
Highlights
mam........-------. -=RE of theNews
in the Field
of Business is Available at Department of Commerce -
Field Offices.

The business population of the United States was
maintained throughout 1951 at 4 million firms, the
Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Com-
merce reported. The business population last year did
not show the increase that would normally have been
associated with a large expansion of business activity,
because of the Lapact of defense production upon the
economy, it was stated.
*
Total sales of the nation's retail stores amounted
to $151 billion in 1951 as compared with $144 billion
in 1950, an increase of 5 per cent. When account is
taken of price rises over the year, the physical volume
of retail sales was estimated at about 4 per cent below
the year ago figure.
*
Sales of all retail stores in January 1952 were
estimated at $11.3 billion, 8 per cent below January
1951, the peak month of the buying wave a year ago.
However, the decline in sales from December to January
was less than seasonal. As a result, after adjusting
for seasonal factors, sales in January were up about 2
per cent from the preceding month.
*
Capital requirements of American corporations in
1951 amounted to about $38 billion, only slightly below
the record volume of the preceding year. Fixed capital
expenditures, substantially higher than in 1951, ac-
counted for $21.7 billion, or almost three-fifths, of
new capital requirements last year, as compared with
t16 6 billion in 1950.


To Obtain Co- Heating & Cooking Equipment, Except Electric,FFIM5In-00
=-4 NE 1)()(KSi ies Of This Construction Mlachinery,8th Quarter 1951,FFIM136A-4-1
AN1) 1 CB*Material Check alp, Paper & Board, 1951, FFM314A-01
AND RPORTIt In Sparce Synthetic Broad Woven Goods, 4th Quarter 1951,FFlMI5c-4-1
LA Provided And en' s Apparel, Dec. 1951,FFlM67B-121
'Send This See- Inorganic Chemicals,U~.S.Production,Dec.1951,FFM19-2
tion Of The ]Bulletin of Commerce To The Nearest ]Depart- _/Enit Underwear & Nightwear,Dec.1951,FFIM67C-121
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name & Address Are t~Plumbing Fixtures,lcth Quar. 1951,F'FIM51H-4-1
On The Opowsite Side. Make Remittances For Sales Mater- ats & Oils, Jan. 1952, FFIM17-1-12
ial Pavable To Treasurer Of The United States. Unpriced Uleomargarine, Jan. 1952, FFlM17J-12
Items Are Free. Small Business Aids:
...... ... ....... ....Sole Proprietorship Life Insurance, #481
/57 onsrucion t Bildng MteralsIndutryReprt, Partnership Life Insurance, #482
7 Costrctio & uildng ateialsIndstryReprt, Corporation Life Insurance, #483
issued Monthly, $3 A Year Training Retail Salespeople to Meet Competition,#48I,
Your Federal Income Tax, 1951 Edition, 254 How Wholesalers Assist Manufacturers, #485
National Production Authority Actions: How Wholesalers Assist Retailers, #486
evocation of Schedule 2 to Order M-45 Financing: a New Small Business, 154
location of Orders M-35 & M6-62 TeRetailer Looks at Packaging, 101
ndQuarter 1952 Allotments, Consumer Products ill Making Concrete Blocks Pay in Your Comrmnity, 204
/rder M-2 Amended 270rder M-6A Amended irst Class Post Office Stations & Branches, 254
/ 19 Census of Business: Trade Series: Government Organization Manual, 1951-52, $1.00
ermet Stores, Bulletin #3-2, 204 Leveloping & Selling New Products, 354
TeJewelry Trade, Bulletin #3-7, 304 suggestedd Research Problems in Business Economics, 55Q
TeGrocery Trade, Bulletin #3-1, 354 modernizingg & Operating Grocery Warehouses, 254
TeElectrical Goods Trade, Bulletin #3-4, 404 /utline & Source Material Small Business Education,
.//Variety Stores, Bulletin #3-3, 154 1950, 304
/-Provisional Estimates of Population of U. S., April 1, elSling the U. S. Market, $1.00
1950 to January 1, 1952, P-25, #57 L1Business Statistics, 1951 Edition, $1.50
LFinal Reoorts: 1950 U. S. Census of Population: National Income, 1951 Edition, $1.00
7 Georgia, 254 27 Mississippi, 15e / / Regional Trends in the U. S. Economy, 1952, $1.00
S/Self-Siphonage of Fixture Traps, NBS,Report 126, 204 / 7 Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1951, $b3.00


Chain store and mail-order sales in Jeanuary were
estimated at $2.4 billion, about 3 per cent below January
1951. After adjusting for seasonal factors and trading
day differences, sales in January 1952 were down about
2 per cent from December 1951.
+ *
Cotton broad woven goods production totaled 2,302
million linear yards in the fourth quarter of 1951, an
increase of 1 per cent over the third quarter, but 14,
per cent less than in the fourth quarter of 1950, the
Bureau of the Census announced.
+ + +
A method of testing the abrasion resistance of non-
woven fabrics is described in a report now available at
the Office of Technical Services, U. S. Department of
Commerce. The report was prepared by the Textile Materials
Engineering Laboratory of the Quartermaster Corps and is
of importance to the textile industry because non-woven
fabric are being used increasingly for expendable items
such as hospital sheets, napkins, diapers, and wiping
cloths .
*
Rayon broad woven goods production totalled 425 million
linear yards in the fourth quarter of 1951, 3 per cent
above the third quarter production, but 33 per cent
below the peak production of 636 million yards reported
in the first quarter of 1951.
+ + +
A guide which may be helpful and a timesaver to in-
dustry in its research on the effects of perspiration on
clothing, shoes and metal or painted surfaces is provided
in a report now available to the public through the
Office of Technical Services, U. S. Department of Commerce.
+ + +
Shipments of the dozen price dress industry for the
year 1951 totalled $333 million, a decrease of 3 per cent
compared with the 1950 total of $344 million. The 1951
output was 8.5 million dozen compared with 9.1 million
out in 1950.


OMMERCE





UNIVERSITY ESTABLISHES COURSE IN COMMERCE DEPARTlENT

A revolutionary move in the field of education in this coun-
try to bring the youth of the nation closer to the administra-
tion of government has been taken by Florida State University
in Tallahassee with the establishment by that institution of an
extended course .in administration and management in the United
States Department of Commerce.
Described by the UniversityJ itself as a "case study of a
Federal Department," the institution said the course would
bring to the student an actual case study or "close view of
a Federal department at work, its organization, procedures,
programs', and problems as presented by nkey officials of the
Department of Commerce.
The course was formally opened February 25 by Secretary of
Commerce Charles Sawyer in an address delivered to the student
body and university officials. Later, the Secretary also spoke
at a luncheon given for Tallahassee business men which was
sponsored by the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce and Junior
Chamber of Commerce jointly.
The course will continue through May 16 during which various
officials of the Department of Commerce will discuss such
phases of Departm~ent activities as its overall origanization
and functions, the part played by the Office of the Secretary,
program planning, management control, personnel administration,
general administrative services, budget administration and
fiscal policy, accounting installation and control, the
departmental field service, operation of the Bureau of the
Census, and a discussion of program organization and operation
of a typical bureau of the Department, such as the Civil Aero-
nautica Administration or Maritime Administration*
The course is believed to be the first of its kind ever to
be established by any college or university in the United
States, and its sponsors predict that it will be a forerunner
of others to come. Those in charge are convinced that it will
be especially valuable to those students who contemplate making
government service a career*
SOUTHEASTERN FARM INCOME BIITS NEWI HIGH
Cash farm income of southeastern farmers hit a new high level
last year when collections totalled $3.8 billion, according to
a report of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture. This was 15.9 per cent more than the $3.3
billion realized in 1950 and 219 per cent above the $1.2 billion
returned in 1941. Included were an increase of 20.3 per cent in
cash receipts from sales of livestock and its products and 14
per cent on sales of crop, products


COOPERATIVE EXPORT CONTROL ACTION ANNOUNCED

Ten Western European nations have joined with the United
States Government in a cooperative move to prevent traneship-
ment of strategic commodities to unauthorized destinations,
Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer announced.
The participating countries are Belgium, Denmark, France,
Italy, Luxembourg, Norwray, Portugal, United K~ingdom, Western
Germany and the Netherlands.
Under the agreement, if strategic goods are exported from
one of the cooperating countries to another, the importing
country in effect will certify to the exporting country that
the goods will be used in the importing country, or will not
be re-exported without official authorization. Government
verification that the goods have been delivered in the import-
ing country also will be supplied upon request of the exporting
country .
The documents carrying these official assurances will be
obtained by importers from their governments and transmitted
to exporters for submission to their own governments under
an import certification and destination verification system.

REGIONAL SALES OF SPIRITS ARE UPWARD

Southeasterners consumed more distilled spirits in 1951
than they did in the previous year, but their taste for wine
was a bit dimmer.
According to reports of the Bureau of the Census on wrhole-
sale sales, last year distilled spirits sales of wholesale
firms in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee
aggregated 7,539,561 gallons, including 3,056,823 gallons
in Florida; 1,314,900 in Georgia; 1,750,581 in South Carolina;
and 1,417,260 in Tennessee.
This was about 760,000 gallons more than were sold by
wholesalers in 1950, which totalled 6,775,537 gallons, and
which included 2,854,794 gallons in Florida; 1,092,010 in
Georgia; 1,586,484 in South Carolina; and 1,242,249 in Tenn-
essee.
In the four States, a total of 1,253,539 gallons of wine
was sold at wholesale.

EXPORTS OF COTTON PRODUCTS HCIG
A total of 348,753 bales of cotton linters and pulp had
been licensed for export from the 1951 new crop at the begin-
ning of February of this year, the Office of International
Trade, U. S. Department of Commerce announced.


090 83.28002


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BULLETII 3 1262 08748 9059


PAGE 4


U. 5, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St, S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMI'T No. 1009

VOLUME 6, NO. 6 MARCH 15, 1952


UNDIVERSITY9 OF FLORIDA
LEFROY L. QUAL~LS
DSPARTRENT OF ECONOMIICS 't
GAENESVfILE, FLORIDA 4





























_____~_ __I_~_


, 199


SOUTHIEASTBER BUSINESS HOLDS IT OWNl IN 1951
Production Southeastern bsne
1943 -100 ems71o held its own in t1951
with some three-outh
flNE COTTONI GOODS- eO t6 OBgan
of the region' s econoqr
***** son registering increases
in activities over 1950
-re according to the annual
solayof business
s conditions in the 2
gion, ieened by the
-" **tlanta office of the
| | | | ( | | U. 8. Department of

ing8%@ yeni ria, eoTh ,eot as doct-
Nlorth Carolina, South C'~~-arolna and ennese,; showed that 195;1
brought regional advances in bank deposited, loans and debits,
cash fara income, telephones in operation, number of employees
in manufacturing industries, electric power generated, railway
freight and passenger revenue, and airline. passenger and ex-
press service, sad a decrease in number of persons drawing un-
employment compensation.

Copies of this report are available without charge
at anr Donartment of Comerce field office.

On the other hand, declines took place in number of newbsi-
nseses incorporated, urban building authorized and wholesale
trade, with a potty" condition prevailing in retail trade.

GOVERNYMETAT, UI~TS DECREASE III SOUTHEAST

A 14e per cent decrease in number of governmental units in
the Southeast in the past 10 years was reported by the Bureau
of the Census in a sumnary just released.


COW8TUCTiION TUIMUATED
A decided stimlus, to buiding operse
tons in the ooutheast is forseson as a
..nl of reS & kna rumQtl amnunod
GcrtORGA by the Nationral Production Au~thorit in
its oanatraction restrictions.
Prodution ew regulations affooting all types
including a revision of CMP Regulation
Wember 6 and the promlgatio of a nse
A~fh~ifO~order, Y-100, concerned with the build-
The forecast of a construction stima-
lus in the region in the wake of the

result of these najor change stel

~lllhousing ulnit in amounts of that metal
that may be self-authorised for from
one to four family housing unite.
An inroas n & Ae amount of copper whene local bidn
codes require the use of Types "B" or "1[ copper tubing for
unaderground water connections.

Notes ~Copies of this new order and te
revised regulation are obtainable from arnr
Donartment of Comenrce field office.

substitution of alniumi for copper for electrical wirinrg
on the basis of one pound of alumine for two pounds of copper,
Up to 50 per cent of new construction allowanoes isl permitted
for alteration, addition or extension of existing residential
atractures .
Use of additional amounts of steel or copper for alterations
by initial installation of electrical wiring, or plumbing sys-

Use of foreign and used steel in addition to a quantity of
steel for which a builder has received an allotment with an




An uinrease in thgraer amonmt of steel ro twor fivenl tons

trolled(88 raeAal -h PAGse 2) hc shsreerda I


Atlanta, Ga., ALuguseta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., BirmIngham, Ala., Charleston, S. C., Charttanooga, Tenn.,
50 Whitehall St., 8. W., Maxwell House, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg., 8gs. Jasper Bldg., 719 James Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, 8. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Ulnion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Knoxville, Tenn.,
313 P. O. BLdg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Memphia, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Miant, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ez.206


Savannah, Ga.,
.218 P. O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-47155


Tampa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafayette St.,
TeL. 8-60818 & 8-60


suonev 4 assa ?


trapA 1


Cls zF.2 f: 4/7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





LVESTOCK,.PRODUCTS SALES IN REGION INCREASE

Sales of livestock and its products rose 305 per
cent in the Southeast between 1940 and 1950, reports
from the 1950 Census of Agriculture conducted by the
Bureau of the Census show.
in the 10-year period, such sales went from $164,-
151,277 in 1940 to $664,744,000 in 1950, with Georgia
registering the sharpest rise, 410 per cent.
Other increases in the region were:
Alabama, $19,054,687 in 1940 and $84,771,000 in
1950; Florida, $18,965,930 and $85,729,000; Georgia,
$24,249,246 and $123,590,000; Mississippi, $17,023,974
and $81,551,000; North Carolina, $25,763,530 and $91,-
267,000; South Carolina, $)10,480,975 and $40,258,000;
and Tennessee, $48,613,035 and $157,608,000.
The Census Bureau defined "livestock and its
production as horses, mules, cattle, hogs, sheep, goats,
chickens, dairy and poultry products and turkeys, and
wool, mohair and other by-products.

REGIONAL RETAIL SALES OFF TO SLOW START

Retail stores in the Southeast got away to a slow
start in 1952 when sales in January in all but one re-
porting eity --- Clarksdale, Miss.. --- were recorded as
below the same month in 1951, according to the monthly
report of the Bureau of the Census.
The decline was a natural one, however, because the
nation at the beginning of 1951 was still in the throes
of a "scare buying" campaign superinduced by the K~orean
war.
The declines included 18 per cent in Birmingham; 17
per cent in Savannah; 15 per cent in Atlanta and Kinge-
port, Tenn; 11 per cent in Asheville and Bristol, Tenn;
16 per cent in Greensood, S. C; and 25 per cent in
Johnson City, Tenn. Corresponding decreases took place
in a number of two and three-county areas also.
General merchandise stores, motor vehicle dealers'
automotive accessory establishments, and apparel stores
in some sections seemed to have been hardest hit.
The report showed that the lone increase, Clarkedale,
amounted to 16 per cent.
At the same time, while retail dealers were marking
up decreases for the first month of the current year,
wholesale merchants in the area were also having their
troubles. Sales in both the South Atlantic and East
South Central sections were 12 per cent down from Jan_
nary 1951, due primarily to heavy declines in automo-
thve supplies, some of the electrical products, furni-
ture and house furnishings, hardware, jewelry, lumber
and building materials, refrigeration equipment, dry
goods, paper and its products, and wines and spirits.
More than 700 firms participating in the Census
Bureau wholesale panel reported sales in January ap-
proximating $118,000,000 and inventories at the end of
that month from 4 to 7 per cent higher than in 1951.

FLORIDA.GEORG1A CITED IN SCRAP PROGRAM e
,Florida and Georgia in January of this year stood ,
third and fourth among all States in the nation in ,
i amount of iron and steel scrap moved from their ,
highways in the x4tionwide scrap recovery program. ,
SAltogether, 23,282 tons of the metal were reported ,
i moved from the nation' s highways in January. New a
1 York topped all States in the cleanup" and Penn- a
s ylvania was second. s
SResponding to an appeal from the National Product- a
I tion Authority to get old automobiles and other a
pieces of junk from off the roads and back into '
Scrap channels, presence of the scrap was reported '
Sby the Bureau qf Public Roads. r


NPA Continued From Pagre 1


An increase in the amount of steel that may be self-
authorized for road and highway building.
CONSTRUCTION APPROVALS.DENIALS
In its latest list of applications for permission to
carry on construction operations in the Southeast, NPA
announced that four of the applications, representing a
coat of $191,588 had been approved while eight others which
would have cost $540,603 had been denied.
The approvals included an application of the First Nat-
ional Bank of Birmingham for permission to construct shops
valued at $45,901; one from B. Solomon, of Miami, for a
funeral home to cost $60,000; a prison stockade at Griffin,
applied for by the Spalding County Board of Commissioners
to cost $52,000; and an application of K~enneth Richardson,
of Seneca, S. C., for remodeling of a theatre to cost
$33,687.
Five of the denials involved proposed projects in
Florida; one in Georgia; and two in Tennessee.
SULFUR.SULFURIC ACID
Order Y-69 on sulfur and Order M-94 on sulfuric acid
were amended establishing new reporting forms which must
now be filed by all consumers and suppliers of those pro-
ducts.
CRYOLITE
A new order, 1-99, was issued limiting the purchase of
both natural and synthetic oryolite pending establishment
of full allocation. It was expected that this commodity
would be put under complete allocation in May.
LEAD
NPA announced the removal of all restrictions on the
use of lead in an amendment to Order M-38.
TI;N PLATE & TERNE PLATE
Establishment of three new classifications of irregular
or off-grade tin plate and terne plate was announced by NPA
in an amendment to Order Y-24.
SELENlIUM
SeleniumP Order Y-91 was amended authorizing suppliers
to make deliveries on the purchaser's certification that he
is entitled to bruy and use the material.
TUNGSTENI & MOLIBDEUMJ
Reagent chemicals containing scarce tungsten in package;
of five pounds or less may be sold by distributors for ana-
lytical laboratory use without obtaining allocation authori-
sation in an amendment to Order M-81.
MRO FOR EXPORT
Order Y-79 providing priority assistance in procurement
of certain maintenance, repair and operating supplies for
export was amended so as to reinclude machine tool replace-
ment parts.
USED,1MrPORTED MACHINE TDO0LS
A new order, M-101, was issued in a step designed to ease
the machine tool abortage by providing for control on the
distribution of used and imported metalworking equipment.
TINLEALD & ZINC
NPA announced revision of Order M-9 regarding zine and
revocation of Orders M-15 and M1-37 in steps to provide
quarterly as well as monthly allocation of zinc and incor-
porate inventory restrictions.
FERRO-ALLOYS
A change in handling requests for allocations of nickel
anodes, salts, chemicals, oxides and catalysts, and allo-
cations of ceramic grades of cobalt, eliminating consider-
able paper work for thousands of users was announced in an
amendment to Order M-80.
CHIEMICAL WIOOD PULP
Order M-72 wass amended suspending reserve production and
consumption controls and partial relaxation of inventory
limitations on unbleached sulphate wood pulp until July 1,
1952.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2







BULLETIN OF COMMERCE PAGE 3
More detailed Expenditures for new construction declined seasonally in
Information on IFebruary by about 7 per cent to $2 billion, according to a
the Highlights joint report of the U. S. Departments of Commerce and Labor.
of the News in IAll major types of construction shared in the drop, except
== Ethe Field of private industrial building, which is heavily influenced by
Business is A- the basic steel and aluminum and the aircraft plant programs.
available at all Department of Commerce Field Offices. + + +
.. ... ... ... ._Employment remained virtually unchanged between January
and February 1952 according to Bureau of the Census figures.
Total business inventories at the end of January lEstimated at 59,752,000 in the week ending February 9,
1952 were estimated at $69.8 billion, the Office of civilian employment continued at a midwinter low, roughly 3
Business Economics, U. S. Department of Commearce an- million below the 1951 summer peak when large numbers of
nounced. After allowance for seasonal variation, the students and other seasonal workers were in the labor force.
book value of inventories at that time was virtually The F'ebruary estimate, however, was the highest on record
unchanged from the end of December 1951. This stability for this time of year.
Was also evident in manufacturing and at each trade + + + + +
level. Allowing for lower replacement costs, however, American expenditures for foreign travel in 1951 amounted
there was a small increase in the physical volume of to $733 million compared with $727 million in 1950. This
business inventories during January 1952. Figure excluded international ocean and air fares estimated
+ + at $282 million, of which $137 million was paid to foreign
Total wholesale sales for January 1952 were estimated ships and planes, and $145 million to United States carriers.
at $8,746 million, which, after allowance for seasonal The estimate was released by the Office of Business Economics,
variations, was an increase of 4 per cent over December U. S. Department of Commerce.
1951. Part of the December-January increase wass due to + + + +
the greater number of trading days in January, the ef- Manufacturerse sales and new orders increased during
feet of which wass not altogether eliminated by the sea- (January 1952 while inventories and unfilled orders showed
sonal adjustment. little change. Sales of all manufacturing industries, after
+ + + + + seasonal adjustment, were above the late fall totals and
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing pub- within 3 per cent of last May' s peak. Increasing deliveries
lic reports in January 1952 amounted to $506 million, of defense materiel boosted shipments of durable goods 3 per
a 2 per cent rise above the $494 million paid out in the cent higher than last spring's previous record and more
same month a year ago. The volume of January dividend than 10 per cent over January 1951.
payments wass affected by the action of some corporations + + + + +
in shifting their first quarter dividend payments from Exports of goods and services from the United States
January to March. during 1951 were valued at $20.1 billion, the highest amount
+ + + + 9 since 1944 when lend-lease exports alone amounted to nearly
Personal income in January 1952 was at an annual $816 billion. Foreign countries partly financed their purchases
rate of $257 billion, about $81 billion lower than in lof $20.1 billion in this country by selling U. S. goods and
Deceber 1951. services valued at $15.1 bilo e iesofeor
U Control & Removal of Radioactive Contamination in
BU Ij[ $4 S i BO )] $ Laboratories, Nat. Bureau of Stds. Handbook 48, 154
(J' Tables of the Exponential Function ex,NBS Applied
AND ) ( ) Mathematies Series 14, $3.25
)7 Recommendations for Waste Disposal of Phosphorus-32 &
lodine-131 for Medical Users, NBS Handbook 49, 101
TO OBTAIN COPIES OF THIS MATERIAL CKECCK IT IN THE SPACE
PROVIDED AND SEND THIS SECTION OF THE BULLETIN OF COMMERCE Special Days, Weeks &k Months. 1952
3YO THE NEAREST DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FIELD OFFICE. YOUR Doisothsubcaonreowvillea
NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAKE REMILTTALNCES all Department of Commerce field offices. It lists
FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREaSURER OF THE UNITED about 400 leading business promotion events, legal
STATES. TRERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ITEMS NOT PRICED. holidays, religious days, and other special occasional '
observed in the U. S. Price 159 1

J71951 Summary of Business Conditions in Southeast The Cooperative Weather Observer, $1.00
SGovernments in the U. S. in 1951, G-SS-#29 / / accounting (Reference Source), 104
SNational Production Authority B2tions: L7 g ctive Chlorine Bleaching Compounds (Information
SCMP Regulation #6 Revised 27 Order MY-100 -- Yynopsis), 101
Order Y-69 Amended ?Order M-94 Amended _/Advertising Volume and Expenditures (Reference
Order 11-99 (Order M1-38 Amended Sources), 101
Order M1-24 Amended Dprder M-91 Amended Air Conditioning (Information Sources)
Order M-81 Amended ,//rder M-79 Amended Aircraft Production (Informpation Sources)
Order ML-101 i7 Order 1-9 Amended Air Transportation, 101
tOrder M6-80 Amended L/ Order Y-72 Amended Small Business Aids:
Montly Rtai Trae Rport Soth Alanic ad 7 GuardinK Against Embezzlements & Merchandise Theftsuf487
SEast South Central Regions (Place on Mailing List) haNeEpleeSoudnoAbuYoruies
Monthly Wholesale Trade Report (Place on Mailing List and Its Policies, #488
Special Days, Weeks & Months in 1952, 154 Planning Retail Newspaper Advertisements, #1489
Facts for industry Reports: Fundamentals of Preparing & Selling Self-Service
Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 4th Quar. 1951,M15A-4-1 Meats, #490
Household Furniture & Bedding Prods. 1950,M54A~-00 7 Steps Involved in the Incorporation of a Business, #491
Pulp, Paper &L Board, Jan. 1952, M14-A-12 20' What Downtown Herchants Can Do About the Parking &
gi Mechanical Stokers, Sulmmary for 1951, Y51B-01 Traffic Problem, #492





SOU~~rTHEASTR FIRMS S~LT $1,.6 BIILIONl GOODS, SERVICES

Southeastern business firms from the start of the Korean war
and up to the end of 1951 received military contracts from the
Federal Government with a dollar value of $1,602,311,000, ac-
cording to a tabulation released by the Munitions Board.
The awards included $243,219,000 in.Alabama; $132,307,000
in Florida; $270,849,000 in Georgia; $49,556,000 in Mississippi;
$468,164,000 in North Carolina; $180,270,000 ini South Carolina;
and $257,946,000 in Tennessee.
The contracts were divided among the Ara~gr, the Nlavy, the
Air Force and the Armed Services Petroleum Purchasing Agency.
Awards by the Army totalled $1,162,899,000; the Mary, $350,282,-
000; the Air Force, $83,640,000; and the Armed Services Petro-
leum Purchasing Agency, $i4,323,000.
Thirteen States California, Connecticut, Illinois, In-
diana, Maryland, Massachusetta, Michigan, New Jersey, New York,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washiington -- eren in the
"billion dollar class" in contracts awarded during the period
receiving some 83 per cent of the dollar value of all such
contracts.

aquIot aSuEIIs on8 #ll? YGIMIMO IH DRAIH~GE
Southeastern States in the past decade have invested a
total of $119,471,300 in the preservation of their soils through
drainage operations, according to a staxl of late reports from
the 1950 Consus of Agriculture conducted by the Bureau of the
Census*
Land in drainage enterprises and those drained aggregated
17,199,480 acre in Allabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippis
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee, or about 8 per
cent of the 213,052,800 acres caomrising the area of all the
seven Statea*
Capital invested in drainage enterprises in the various
States from 1939 to 1949 included $481,744 in Alabama; $68,-
866,095 in Florida; $2,197,194 in Georgia; $32,478,134 in
Mississippi; $6,884,326 in North Carolina; $1,624,760 in South
Carolina; and $6,939,087 in Tennessee.
In the 10-year period, the seven States had out their out-
standing indebtedness on drainage enterprises from $42,680,862
to $i16,346,490.
In the area, there were some 271 per cent more lands drained
or in drainage enterprises at the end of 1949 than there were
in 1940, the reports showed, and in the decade, $26,536,809 had
been put into the cost of construction operation and maintenance
of the pr~cs


PIANT EEPANSIGHS 0.KtD lit 22 FIPEIS lp RED]D

The Defense Production Administration announced approval
of an additional list of certificates of necessity for 22
southeastern firms wishing to expand their facilities so that
they might more effectively participate in the national pro-
gram of defense.
Represented in the firm' applications was the proposed
expnditure of a total of $24,564,367 in the expansion opera-
tions. Included was the application of the National Chemical
Corporation for the pending of $i7,202,446 in the location
of a contained nitrogen plant at Yazoo City, Mise., for the
production of 34,500 short tone of that product.
Five of the certificates approved were for expansion ao-
tivities in Tennessee; six in Alabama; two in Florida; five
in Georgia; three in Mississippi; and one in South Carolina.
Expendituree reflected included $1,698,756 in Tennesseel
$304,000 in Solith Carolina; $1,330,218 in Alabama; $14,070,-
924 in Misesisippis $506,392 in Florida; and $6,654,077 in
Georgia.
SOUTHEASTERN ~IMSTUTONS HELP 08 MLCHINIE M001.


. yp p ,


.


Three southeastern institutions Georgia Institute of
Technology of Atlanta; South Georgia Trade and Vocational
School of Amerians, Ga., and Presrbyterian Junior College
of Maxrton, N. G. were among nine educational schools in
the nation responding to a call for the recovery of machine
tool needed in the national program or crorense.
The nine institutions have turned over the tools to the
government at a coat to the latter of about $16,500, whereas,
the acquisition cost to the government, if it had to buy
them, would have been about $600,000. Some 260 unite figured
in the transaction. They will be placed in the hands of
between 5,000 and 25,000 defense contractors, who in turn
will lease them out.
The machine tool recovery program was instituted by the
National Prodnetion Au~thority of the U. 8. Department of
Commerce January 15i of this year in conjunction with the
Federal Security Agency and Department of Defense.
The tool had been trnsnferr~ed to the educational instita-
tions after World War II and their title had been in doubt
until recently. Under procedures worked out by FSA, the
government will pay the institutions full ceiling prices for
the tools, which were donated without qualification. InI cases
where clear title wras not given, the government will per only
phippfpy eate sand e ae ees~60~~( 1


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IlI llIUIIIIIUI lIHIH\\lIlIIU III
3 1262 08748 9034


PAGE 4


BULLET


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERDE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Of~ce
So Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000

Volume 6, Number 7 April 1, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
UNIV. Of FI FL U.
DOC (g p .S



A Dov


UNIVERSITY[ 01 FLORIDA
LEROY t,- QUA~LLS
DEPARTlENT- OF E~CONOIDZCS
GAINIESV'ILE,>. PLORIDA







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S. C.,
7th Floor, Forsyth Bldg., 3[aamell house, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4l21,Ex.453 Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771

Chattanooga, Tenn., Colurmbia, S. C., Jackson, Miss., Jacksonville, Fla., Knoxville, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg:., 1310 Lady St., 426 Yazoo St., 425 Federal Bldg., 313 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 5-1138-9

Memphis, Tenln., Miami, Fla., Mlobile, Alat., Nashville, Tenn., Savalnnah, Ga., Tamp~a, Fla.,
Madison at Front, 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 315 Ulnion St., 218 P.O.Bldg., 420 WA. Lafayette St.,
Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,X 206 Tel. 42-2426 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 8-6081-82

VOLUME 6. NUMBER 8 APRIL 15. 1952


hPtA CLEARS HALF BILLION OU1LAY IN SOUTHExST PLANrTS


Billion Dollars

-lto


- 5


- o I
1950 1951
1st Half 2nd


merce. .
The projects, to be ,
constructed in Alabamna,,
Florida, Georgia, Miss-,
issip~pi, South Carolina,
and Tennessee, covered ,
a total of 115 con- ,
struction operations of,
both large corporations,
as well as small busi- ,
ness firms. ,
The estimated cost ,
of the individual pro- 1
jects represented the '
overall cost of the ,
project and not just .
the value of the see- a
ond quarter allotment
of materials.


THE xtLhhTA REGIONAL OFFICE OF
DEPARTM~ENT OF COMMERCE HAiS MOVED


7th FLOOR, FORSYTH BUILLDING,
NORiTHWEST CORNER OF FORSYTH AN:
ATLAMt' A 3, GEORiGI^

THE MOVE WbaS MtJDE SO THxT THE
OFFICE MIGHT BETT'IER SERVE THE
OF THlE ATLANTA A~REA, SINCE THE i
THE HEKRT OF THE BUSINESS SECTII
LANT^*


q*]gg NPA HELPS TORNADO AR~EA
The National Production Author-
Nationality has acted to help the tornado-
Chi~ict) stricken residents of Alabama,
Mississippi, Tennessee and other
storm-ridden States to repair and
reconstruct buildings and other
A IO( 1ctCion projects damaged by the elements.
The agency authorized special
priority assistance to those wish-
Auth rity ing to obtain materials for the
11% 1)ri@T reconstruction and repair opera-
tions in the disaster area with
the exception of buildings and
other projects used for recreation,

Spouses.
The action was taken through an
--~--------- amendment to Direction Number 2 of
,the revised Controlled Materials
,Plan Regulation Number 6, which
,provides the assistance for getting
'THE UNITED STATES I the materials needed. Originally,
TO A NEWA LOCATION ( Direction Number 2 referred onily to
,such special aid given residents of
,Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma where
,recent floods did extensive property
D TIUCE STREETS' damageg.
SThe procedure by which residents
,of the tornado area may obtain the
STAFF OF THIE ATLANTA ,materials for permitted repairs and
:BUSINESS INTERESTS Ireconstruction operations is a sim-
NEWA LOCATION IS IN Iple one. All they need do is place
ON OF DOWNTOWAN AT- ~(on their purchase order the allotment
Symbol "IA" or the rating "DO~-14,"
with the certification "Certified
Under Direction 2 to CMP Regulation Number 6," signed by
the owrner, and they will be given priority in the supply-
ing of the materials.
AUTOMOBILE WRECKERS HELPED


Included in the approvals were the following projects
with types of products being produced and to be produced:
Lehigh Portland Cement company, Bunnell, Fla., cement,
$b11,062,290; E. I. Dupont company, Woodstock, Tenn.,
chemicals, $5,175,000; Spencer chemical company, Vicks-
bur~g, Miss., ammonia and nitric acid, $b13,958,000; Chem-
strand Corporation, Decatur, Ala., staple acrylic fiber,
$25,540,000; E. I. Dupont company, Pensarcola, Fla.,
nylon project 9999, $84,414,000; Mathieson Chemical Cor-
poration, McIntosh, Ala., chlorine and caustic soda,
$11,120,000; Tennessee Eastman company, King~sport, Tenn.,
cellulose esters, $b6,196,500; Tennessee Coal, Iron and
(See CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Page 2)


Approval of
materials for
the second
quarter of
this year to
-permit the
Construction
Sand finish
Sthe building
Sof plants in
the Southeast
'to cost an
estimated
Half'$594,125,000


PLANT AND EQUIPMENT EXPENDITURES


Defense programs
stimulated
MIVAeNUi R '


Source: Survey of Current Business, 'was announce
U. 5. Department of Commerce 'ed by the
National Production Authority, U. S. Department of Com-


^ ^^ __


More than 1500 automobile wreckers in the Southeast
were affected by a ruling: issued by NPA.
A previous order prohibiting the purchase of any cars
unless the wreckers had sold during the period of December
1 to Hpril 1 all pre-1946 models and car units, or their
equivalent, was amended permitting the buying of as many
cars after April 1 as they sold during the previous year.
If the wreckers sold during the period of December 1.
to April 1 all of their pr~e-1940 models, they are not
(See NPA Continued on Page 2)








I


NlE;ESSITY CERTIFICATES TOTAL OVER $100 MILLION

Plant expansions in the Southeast to cost more than
$100,000,000, including a $47.9 million grant given the
Bowrater Southern Paper Corporation, Charleston, Tenn.,
$17.5 million to the Deere and company for a nitrogen
plant at Gulfport, Miss., and one for $13.8 million
for the American Cyanamid company, of Savannah for the
development of titanium and dioxide facilities waere
reflected in latest lists of certificates of necessity
approved by the Defense Production Administration.
By States, the totals represented in the certificates
issued included Alabama, $7,209,439; Florida, $613,844)
Georgia, $16,167,824; Mlississippi, $)17,987,921; South
Carolina, $7,606,104; and Tennessee, $57,945,556.
Some of the other larger certificates were Aluminum
company of Amperica, Alcoa, Tenn., $4,970,600; 8. F.
Goodrich company, Tuscaloosa, $9019,300i Filtrol Corpora-
tion, Mbclutosh, Ala., three certificates, including one
for $1,037,084; Alabama Grain Elevator company, Mobile,
$1,917,801; South Carolina Electric and Gas company,
Columbia, two certificates for $5,667,064 and $1,253,-
940; Electro Manganese Corporation, Memphis, $1,944,800;
and Firestone Tire and Rubber company, Memrphis, two
certificates, one for $1,144,580.

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Continued From Page 1

Railroad company, Mobile, iron and steel, $41,525,000;
Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation, Anderson, S. C.,
glass yarn, $9,860,000; Union Carbide and Carbon Cor-
portation, Columbia, Tenn, carbon and graphite elec-
trodes, $16,528,000; U~nion Bag: and Paper Corporation,
Savannah, kraft pulp and paper, $20,017,000; Inter-
national Paper company, Natehez, Miss., bleached dis-
solving pulp, $22,233,968; Buckeye-Cellulose Corpora-
tion, Foley, Ala., dissolving wood pulp, $28,979,000;
St. Regis Kraft Corporation, E~astport, F~la., kraft
paper, $;16,750,000; Courtnaldo, Inc., Salco, Ala.,
rayon staple fibre, $25,000,000; a second Dupont pro
ject for Pensacola for nylon fiber, $84,414,000; and
American Enka Corporation, Lowland, Tenn., rayon yarn,
$10 ,769,500.

153OO M~IION GOING INTU SOUTHEAST HIGHW~AYS

Nearly $300 million is being spent in road-building
operations now being planned and conducted in the South_
east, the Bureau of Public Roads, U. b. Department of
Commerce, announced.
The expenditures, totalling $295,641,000, are going
into highway operations in the "programming stage," in
plans approved, but on which construction has not been
started, and on activities in which construction is
under way.
Funds being spent and to be spent include $48,399,000
in Alabama; $36,364,000 in Florida; $52,425,000 in
Georgia; $32,230,000 in Missiasippi; $)49,337,000 in
North Carolina; $27,846,000 in South Carolina; and
$49,040,000 in Tennessee*
The work is being done cooperatively between the
Bureau of Public Roads and the various State highw~y
departments*
A total of 6,036 miles of highway are involved in the
so-called "active program" of highway work, 904.5 miles


Caolinhe dtal fund direpnees nd in the expenditures,
about 49 per cent will be in the form of Federal aid.

'Sybacribe ty the Defense Prodnetion Recqrd.$2.50 Yr.'


NPa Continued From Page 1

restricted as to purchases of other cars and can buy as many
as they wish, NPA ruled further.
Other changes in the order just made included revision
of the definition of motor vehicles" to exclude buses with
a capacity of more than a ton and a half, or 16,000 pounds
gross weight, or having a passenger capacity of 32 or more
persons, eliminating from the definition of a "car unit"
the phrase "1,500 pounds of loose scrap," which was found
not to be in conformity with trade practices and confusing
to the wreckers, and prohibiting the wreckers from acquir-
ing a greater number of vehicles during any quarter than
they junrred in the preceding quarter, unless they have
wrecked out a number of cars equal to the total number of
pre-1940 vehicles which were in their inventory at the
beginning of the previous quarter.
CBDYZUY
Relaxation of the use controls of Order Y-19 dealing
with cadmium was announced. An amendment to the order
provides for the unrestricted nae of cadmium in items or
processes formerly included in the "permitted use" of
the order, unrestricted use of it to fill orders bearing
rating symbols "A", nB", "C", nE" and "Z-2," and a monthly
use of 70 per cent of the average monthly quantity for all
other items produced in the first half of 1950.
DIAMOND GRINDINiG WHEEHS
Restrictions on users and manufacturers of diamond
grinding wheels which would conserve diamond crushing borG
and tend toward a more equitable distribution in the trade
are contained in a new order just issued, Y-103.
CMP REGOILATION I
Users of controlled materials mlay now receive them
from distributors 15 days prior to the quarter for which
the allotment is valid, NPA has ruled in an amendment to
CMP Regulation Number 4.
NON-NCICKEL-8EARING STANLESS STEEL
Authorized controlled materials orders for non-nickel-
bearing stainless steel, which were outstanding on the day
such steel became a non-controlled material are now convert-
ed to delivery orders bearing a DO rating, NPA ruled in
an amendment to Direction 9 to CKP Regulation Num~ber 1.
FERRO ALLOYS
An additional list of products in which the use of
nickel-bearing stainless steel, high nickel alloy steel,
and nickel silver is prohibited was announced in an
amendment to Schedule A, Order Y-80.
YB0
Printers, publishers and manufacturers of footwear may
now apply the allotmrent symbol MRO or the rating DO-RO to
their delivery orders for certain types of wire products
regardless of accounting practices, according to an amendment
to Direction 1 to CYP Regulation Inuber 5.
SIDEiRALL T1RES
Restrictions on the manumfacture of white sidewall tires
were lifted in an amendment to Rubber Order M-2.
QUJEBRACHIO
The restriction visiting use of quebracho in oil well
driing to 60 per cent of base period consumption was lifted
to help the petroleum industry reach and maintain the high
output desanded by the present defense emergency in an
amendment to Order M-57.
AU~igOYF
Aluminum foil was placed under a two-level limitation


of foil is insufficient to meet all his orders in an amendment

PETROLEUM ,GAS
Direction 2 to Order Y-46 was issued to help small oil and
gas operators.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





-tion on the


.~In the Fied
of Business is Available at Department of Commrce


American business is planning to spend $24.1 billion
jn 1952 for new plant and equipment, the Department of :
Comrmerce and Securities and Exchange Commission reported
after a joint survey. This total exceeds the previous
high in 1951 by 4 per cent in dollars, and by almost as
much in physical volume. Actual expenditures of $6.7
billion in the fourth quarter of 1951 brought capital
outlays in that year to $23.3 billion.
*
Business activity continued at a high rate in the
early months of 1952, paced by rising defense product-
ion and record business outlays for plant and equipment,
the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of
Commerce reported in a current issue of its monthly
publication Survey of Current Business.
w *
A total of 12.2 million pounds of yarn a week was
produced on the woolen and worated systems in January
of this year, which was the sane as the December fig-
ures, but compared with a year ago was down 22 per cent,
the Bureau of the Census announced. yarns other than
carpet were produced at a 4 per cent lower rate in Jan-
nary than in December while carpet yarn production in-
creased 16 per cent.
*
January shipments of all major types of nonelectric
heating and cooking equipment, except wara-air furnaces
and domestic heating stoves were above the level of
Dycembe~r 1951 shipmen .tshe Census Bourea reported.


, ,_ ___ ___ ___ R II__ U


To Obtain C P
NEW BOOKS ~I e P~l
AND REPORT'S it In Se

Send This See-
tion Of The Bulletin of ~Coerce To The Nearest Depr~t-
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Bras & Addre~ss Ae
On The Opposite Side. Yake Remittances For Sal~es Ster-


a a a o treasure The d


Total sales of retail stores in February.wrere estimated
at $1;1.2 billion, slightly above the total for February
a year ago, but when adjustment is made for the extra day,
February 1952 was under February 1951. After correction
for seasonal factors and trading day differences, dollar
sales in February 1952 were up nearly 2 per cent from the
previous mronth.
+ + +
An atmosphere of caution prevailed in the lumber market
in the fourth quarter of 1951 as the second highest home-
building year on record drew to a close, according to the
83rd Quarterly Report of the Lunabr Survey Committee made
to the Secretary of Commerce. Fourth quarter shipments and
new orders continued at levels below the seasonally reduced
rate of production.
+ + w
United States production of superphosphate in January
totalled 809,314 short tons for normal, 58,22?1 tons for
concentrated, and 7,380 tons for wet-base goods, the Census
Bureau said. Although these totals were greater than for
the last month of 1951, they represented a decrease over
January 1951 figures of 2 per cent for normal; 7 per cent
for concentrated; and 6 per cent for wet-base goods.
+ + +
Allocation and licensing of coal exports from the United
States, required since November 1, 1951, ended April 1,
the Department of Commerce and Mutual Security Agency
announced jointly. Lower estimates of coal requirements
from the principal importing countries, and easing of the
shipping shortage and port congestion in this country were
the main reasons for the move.
+ + +
A total production of 651 million pounds of carded cotton
sales yarn in 1951 demonstrated the ability of the industry
to meet the exceptionally heavy deumnds of the defense pro-
gram without neglecting its civilian market, in the opinion
of A. Henry Thurston, Director of the Textile Division of
the National Prodnetion Authority. Shipments in 1951 amount-
ed to 626 million pounds~ or 96 per eapt of total nrllin


i7Facts For Industry Reports:
~LSuperphosphate, Jan. 1952, Y19D-12
ff ara Pumps, R31B-12, Jan. 1952
Aluminumr & Magnesium Wrought Products, Jan. 1952
Lumber Production & Kill Stocks for the Western States,
4th Quarter 1951, Preliminary, M13G-4-1
Red Cedar Shingles, Jan. 1952, M130-12
Steel Forgings, Jan. 192, Y220-12
Cotton & Lintere Consumption, Stocks, laports &
Ip/Prt i atiTe chtnqe Spindles, Febral952esulsol-7-52
System, Rational Bureau of Standards Cir. 530, 304
Housing Resrearch, W9inter 1951-52, Housing & Home Finance

Pup, PpO & Board Induster Report, Ann~ual BReiewr, 20#
83rd Quartehemi Rporinofi Lub emogene eCoRait{ e,

Ra ona Bua no fo Standards Circular #510, $4.00

dSam Pa racsin Est Uis~hing a Typewriter Rental and
acts Albout Retail Outdoor Advertising, #494
oa Rotting Ideas for Retail Stores, #495
SoeFa tore in $atablishiag a 8mal Wursery Businese,#496

owthe Retailer Can Develop & keep Regular Customera,#498
th Ye ning a Purposes & Uses of Discounts & Invoice

Al7coholic Bevrages, February 1950


U~ioResins, Apr. 1950 (Commodity Review)


Itn A re.r~


In come of ludO.Nam and Persons in the U. S., 1950,

M7 monthly Report on the Labor Force Feb. 192,

fjReport of Cotton Ginned, Crops of 1951, 1950 L 19L9

Ok~lahoma ssisipi labma
penik Carot tes Tennessee ftieorgia

o7 950 nensuen or Po latio : Pid oRepoets: Yumer
Ntional Production Auth~ority Yaterial:
Order 8-92 ed 27 Order Y-19 mended
Orer5103 ftlP Regulation So4 d dend Odr -



ir. 2 to Order M-46 (?Dir. 2, CMP Reg. 6 Amended


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3









I


SOMLE SOUTHEASTERN INDUSTRIES LEVEL OFF IN 1951l

A study of Bureau of the Census Facts For Industry reports
on various industries operating in the Southeast showed a
slight slackening off in activity in two lines of business in
1951 as compared with 1950.
For example, in 1951 a total of 493,938 short tons of steel
was used in the manufacture of metal cans in the South Atlantic
and East South Central regions, while in 1950 the steel consumed
in such operations aggregated 544,451 short tons.

These Facts For Industry reports are issued-
for a large number of industries and are obtain-
able upon request at any Department of Commerce
field office.

Last year' s total production of metal cans in the Southeast,
however, was 13 per cent of the United States consumption of
3,803,312 short tons of steel for that purpose-
Of the total production of cans in the region in 1951,
373,426 tons of steel was used in the manufacture of cans for
food and 81,242 tons were consumed in making nonfood containers*
In another industry, the Facts Fqr Industry reports showed
a reduction in 1951 also in the production of unglazed brick
as compared with 1950. Last year, the area produced a total of
1.2 billion brick, a slight decrease from the 1.5 billion out-
put of 1950. Shipments last year totalled 1.1 billion against
1.5 billion in 1950, and the value of such shipments in 1951
was $26,574,000 as compared writh $33,216,000 in 1950.

SAVANNAH RIVER CRITICAL AREA EXPANDED

Extension of the Savannah river critical defense housing
area in Georgia and South Carolina to take in additional terri-
tory in Georgia has been ordered by the Defense Production Ad-
ministration because of the situation prevailing in the section
just added.
The area has been expanded to include Columbia and McDuffie
counties and District 81-Wrens, including the town of Wrens,
in Jefferson county, all in Georgia.
Originally, the area wnas defined as consisting of Richmond
county, Georgia, and Aiken, Allendale and Barnwell counties in
South Carolina.
The new area added has extensive atomic energy and military
and other defense activities, it wras explained. Immigration of
civilian workers and military personnel has been extensive and
is expected to increase further*


THREE SERVICES FOR BUSINESSMEN ESTABLI~SHED


Establishment and improvement of three types of service
designed to assist southeastern businessmen in their operations
in both private enterprise and government purchases have been
announced by the U. S. Department of Commerce. They are:
Maintenance for world traders in the region of lists of
German correspondents in the Federal Republic of Germany or
in the Soviet Zone of Germany so that those engaged in foreign
trade may know where their German correspondents are located.
Resumption of full information in most instances on the
dollar value of contract awards for businessmen wishing sub-
contract data.
Revision of the government procurement manual so that the
contents, reflecting 5,000 items and classes of items ordinarily
bought by government agencies, will be more readily understand-
able to businessmen.
The list of German correspondents will be kept on file in
world trade sections of Commerce Department field offices in
Atlanta, Savannah, Charleston, Miami, Memphis, Mobile and
Jacksonville .
The dollar value of contract awards is available each work-
ing day at Commerce Department field offices all over the
Southeast and Chambers of Commerce and other cooperating
agencies throughout the region.
Copies of the procurement manual are also on file for
reference purposes at Department of Commerce and cooperating
field offices in the Southeast. They also include a military
and civilian agency index with a listing of locations of
appropriate procurement offices.

E `m 12r~ -n0T--- lli


Appointment of Russell A. Rasco, dean of law of the
University of MYiami, Miami, Fla., as hearing commission-
er for the National Production Authority has been an-
nounced by NPA.
Mr. Rasco will preside at public inquiries into
charges of violation of NPA orders and regulations in
the Mliami area. He is the second NPA hearing commission-
or to be appointed in the Southeast. Charles J. Hilkey,
of Atlanta, dean emeritus of Emory University' s Lamar
School of Lawr and now a professor at Rollins College,
in Florida, wats designated as hearing commissioner
several months ago.


UNIV. OF FL LIB.
DOCUisET E



. oEPr iO


Wr~ A


A )rl


GPO 83-29009


Volume


6, Number 8 April 15, 1952


UI VER IT OF FLORIDA11111111111111 11 1111 11111


PAGE 4


BULLET


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Of~ce
50 Whitehall SL, S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


UNIMMIsTy OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUlALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








Atlainta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, ala., Charleston, 8. C., Chattanooga, Tenn.,
716 Forsyth Bldg., Maxwell House, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 719 James Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.-453 Tel. 2-8394 Building, Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 7-5673

Columbia, S. C., Jackson, Miss., Jacksonville, Fla., Knoxville, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn., Mai l.
1310 Lady St., 426 Yazoo St., 425 Federal Bldg., 313 P. 0. Bldg., Madison at Front, 947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533

Mobile, Alar., Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga., Tampa, Fla.,
308 Federal Bldg., 315 Union St., 218 P. 0. Bldg., 420 W. Lafayrette St.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206 Tel. 42-2426 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 8-6081-2

voLrUE 6, NUMBER 9 MAY 1, 1952


1951 CONSTRUCTION UP IN SOUTHEASTERN REGION
V'.lu mi of~ev Construction Final official figures
II Crrelt Prkmmul92 I'B52ee on construction opera-
sexucen~ouRs tions in the Southeast
as1 35 last year just issued
www. show a 16 per cent in-
so s crease in the value of
all building in the
area as compared with
251 ~1 2 1950, or a rise of from
$5.0 billion to $5.7
20 r 20 billion.
The figures, taken from
Federal and private a-
isgencies and compiled by
the Building Materials
to lo Division of the Natrion-
PRVT al Production Authority
a / of the U. S. Department
Pueuc \ / of Commerce revealed
sharp advances in the
5 9 9 9 9DOvalue Of ROnrTsidential
Source: Building Materials Div- 'private construction,
ision, National Production Au_ 'public utility outlays,
thority, U. S. Department of 'and most types of pub_
Commerce. 'lic building Aictivities,
but proportionate decreases in money spent on private
residential projects and highway expenditures.

Note: A full and complete review of con_
struction activities in all States and Regions
Ln the U. S. is contained in the Industry
Report Construction and Building Mlaterials
available at all Department of Commerce Field
Offices. Subscription price $7 a year.

New public construction activity nearly doubled,going
from $1.4 billion in 1950 to $2.1 billion last year with
all south-
eastern I


BUILDNG PROJECTS O.K.'D
Clearances on the starting and
1 completion in the second quarter
rl of 1952 of construction projects
LAin Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee to cost an estimated $8,731,-
i 847, including religious, community,
and business establishments, were
announced by the National Production
authority .
ry Tne action came in the form of 39
cases of allotments of materials for
conducting the work; approval of four
operations where allotments were not
required; and exemption of 23 appli-
cations from the restriction provis-
AB~ions because the materials needed
did not exceed limitations.
the clearances were a community building


THE


Authepy






Included in


in St. Petersburg to cost $478,000; a Y. M. C. A. building
in Columbus, Ga., costing 8521,000; a court and jail in
Jackson, Miss., entailing an expenditure of $678,700; and
a Y. ML. G. A. in Memphis, Tenn., representing an outlay of
$067,700. In the category of "approved" was an $850,000
building of the Gulf Life insurance company in Jackson-
ville .
Simultaneously, NPA announced that controlled materials
had been allotted for the second quarter of this year pro-
viding for the construction of projects in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee, costing an estimated $30.6 million, including
$3,548,372 in Alabama; $2,951,173 in Florida, 82,937,875 in
Georgia; $3,025,489 in Mississippi; $12,083,042 in North
ICarolina; $794,382 in South Carolina; and $5,267,045 in
Tennessee. These allotments waere in addition to the more
than half a billion dollars worth of industrial expansion
construction work approved for the Southeast recently by
NPA' s Industrial Expansion Division. in the latest list
7of approv-


and a large
number of
business es-
tablishments
located over
the region.


S:!;:s P:-
in the ad-
vance. In new
private res_
idential con-
struction a
drop of 12
per cent was


SPlE:(04IA N()TICE
FEDERAL REGULATIONS PROVIDE FOR AN ANNUAL REVISION OF MAILING LISTS. IF
YOU WISH TO CONTINUE RECEIVING THE BULLETIN OF COMMERCE REGULARLY IN
1952, PLEASE FILL OUT THE SEPARATE REPLY CARD, PLACE A STAMP ON THE REVERSE
SIDE AND MAIL TO THIS OFFICE IMMEDIATELY. BULLETIN OF COMMERCE READERS
ARE REMINDED THAT IF THEY FAIL TO RETURN THE REPLY CARDS WITHIN 20 DAYS,
THEIR NAMES WILL BE REMOVED FROM THE MAILING LIST.










I____ _


PLANT EXPANSIONS 39 PER CENT PLACED IN REGrION

UIp to the beginning of 1952, southeastern industriail-
ists were spending upwards of $1.3 billion in the ex-
pansion of their facilities to mleet the national defense
program, 39 per cent of which had already been put in
place, the Defense Production Administration announced*
The expenditures included $825,795,000 on 223 pro-
jects in the South Atlantic area, comprising Georgia,
Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland and Dela-
ware, and $513,441,000 on 149 in the East South Central
region including alabama, Mississippi, Tengessee and
Kentucky.

For current information dealing with the
national defense program, subscribe to the
DefensePro~d~uctio ecr through any
Department of Commerce field office. Price
82.50 a year.

The figures were shown in a compilation of number of
certificates of necessity issued by DPA from the out-
break of the Korean war through December 31, 1951. The
Certificates entitled the operators of the plant facili-
ties to rapid federal tax w~riteoffs under the internal
revenue act.
The 39 per cent completion of the southeastern pro
jects was slightly below the 42 per cent for the United
States as a whole wshere $12,350,000,000 worth of ex-
pansions had been authorized of which $5,233,000,000
had been completed.
Machinery and equipment accounted for the great bulk
of the certificates issued, with construction, railroad
operating equipment, organic chemicals and electric
light and power following in the order named.

WHOLESALERS' SALES OFF IN SOUTHEAST

Sharp decreases in sales of automotive supplies, some
electrical lines, furniture and house furnishings, hard-
ware, jewelry, dry goods, and lumber and building mater-
ials were factors in a decline in sales in the wholesale
trade field in the Southeast in the first two months of
1952 as compared with the corresponding period last year,
according to the Monthly Wholesale Trade Report issued
by the Bureau of the Census.
The decreases amounted to 9 per cent in the South
Atlantic region and 7 per cent in the East South C~entral
section, Nominal gains which took -place in sales of such
products as drugs and sundries, fresh fruits and vege-
bables, tobacco and its products, and among specific
grocery dealers failed to offset the losses in the other
fields.


The Monthly WNholesale Trade Reports are
available at all Department of Commercee
field offices. Request that your name be
placed on the mailing liat*


NPH COntinued Fron Page 1

CONSUMER DURABLES
.Considerable extension of the degree of manufacturing
flexibility permitted under the consumer durable goods
order Ml-47B was announced by NPA. The order was amended to
combine the first three groups of products listed in
M-47B's schedule into one large group.
STE EL EBRGO
As a precautionary measure to save existing supplies of
steel for vital defense production in the face of declining
production due to the possibility of a work stoppage in
that industry, NPA shut off the flow of steel to exporters
and manufacturers of conslumer durable goods, including auto-
mobiles. The freeze applied to all steel products now on
hand in any warehouse or mill. Under Direction 10 to CKP
Regulation 1, issued effective April 7, no one was permitted
to ship or accept delivery of steel controlled materials
for export or for production of civilian-type items.
MACHINE TOOL FINIISHES
Issuance of a new order, Y-104, to minimize requirements
for protective finishes on metalworking machines so that
scarce manpower could be conserved and deliveries expedited
was announced. Under the order, no producer in the finish-
ing of any new metal-working machine, or anly part or assembly
to be incorporated into such a tool could apply a primer,
sealer, filler, paint, lacquer or enamel in excess of (1),
not more than one coat of primer or sealer; (2), no filler
except for spot filling of bad cavities or fissures; and
(3) not more than two coats of paint, lacquer or enamel.
CHERICAL WOO0D PULP
Revocation of Order Y-72 regulating reserve production,
consumption and inventory limitations on chemical wood pulp
was announced. The order, issued July 1, 1951, applied to
makt wood pulp including bleacbed and unbleached pulps
prdcdfor sales by the sulphite, sulphate and soda process-
es.

To improve the effeE-6lveness of use limitations by small
uesof tin, NPA amended order M-8 to require more exact
certification concerning the permitted uses of pig tin.
DELEGATION NUMBER 1
The Delegation of Authority under which the Secretary
of Defense may allot controlled materials and apply DO
ratings and allotment symbols to defense orders was amended
to include in one document similar existing authority.
COPPER
Production of copper controlled materials by the copper
fabricating industry in 1951 exceeded that of 1950 and
reached an all-time high for peacetime production, NPA
announced in a report.
FOREST PRODUCTS
Publication of a 68-page report on a nation-wide survey
of amounts of equipment, operating supplies and manpower
used in 1950 by the primary forest products industries,
sawmills and round wood concentration yards was announced by
NPA. The report was prepared by the Forest Service of the
U. S. Department of Agriculture through information obtain-
ed in an extensive field survey of the primary forest prod-
ucts industries.
WOOD LAMINATING
An industry-government symposium on wood laminating
technical and procurement problems was recommended to NIPA
by its Wood Laminating Industry Advisory Committee. The
symposium would include industry representatives, govern-
ment procurement officials, and interested government re-
search agencies.
CANNING MAHCHINERY
The Canning Machinery Manufacturers Industry Advisory
Committee meeting with NPA requested among other things an
extension of permitted materials inventory provisions.


The figures were compiled in a survey conducted among
742 firms in the two areas. They also showed decreases
of 7 per cent in the South Atlantic and 1 per cent in
the East South Central region in sales in February of
this year compared with the same month last year and 2
per cent in the South Atlantic and 1 per cent in the East
South Central in February compared with January.
The 762 firms included in the survey reported dollar
volume sales in February 1952 as approximating $123,000,-
000. End-of-February inventories in the South Atlantic
region were valued at $128,870,000, a 3 per cent drop as
compared with February 1951, and in the East South Cen-
tral section the value wnas $50,087,000, a 3 per cent de-
cline .


GPO 81100550


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2








PAGE 3


More detailed Gross foreign aid extended in 1951 by the United
Information States Governlment in the form of grants and credits
on the High- amounted to $5 billion as against $4.6 billion in 1950.
ts~ lig~lts of the Military aid represented nearly one-third of the gross
News in the foreign aid in 1951. At the end of the year, $13.4 bil-
Field of Bus- lion remained available for further deliveries under foreign
iness is Available at all Department of Commerce Field grant programs. Approximately $11 billion of this un-
Offices. utilized amount was earmarked for military aid.
& Wa &
Carded cotton sales yarn production in 1951 totalled
Total business inventories at the end of F~ebruary 651 million pounds, amply demonstrating the ability of
1952 were estimated at $70.5 billion, the Office of Bus- the industry to meet the exceptionally heavy demands of
iness Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce, announced the defense program without neglecting its civilian
After allowance for seasonal variation, the book value market, National Production Authority officials sacid.
of inventories at that time was about $250 million below Shipments amounted to 626 million pounds, or 96 per cent
January 1952. Reductions in stocks held by manufacturers of total production. Of the shipments, 116 million pounds,
and wholesalers, by about $100 million and $250 million, or 18.6 per cent, represented defense-rated orders.
respectively, were partly offset by an increase of more aA a a
than $100 million in retailers' inventories. Capital outlays for new construction in March 1952 con-
tinued at record levels, the U. S. Departments of Commerce
Personal income in February 1952 was at an annual and Labor reported. Substantial increases in private
rate of $257 billion, slightly less than in January home-building activity and in highway construction, to-
of this year. The small degree of change was in line gether with seasonal advances in most other types of con-
with the general stability of total personal income struction boosted the dollar value of new construction
in evidence since October 1951. The modest January- in March to about $24 billion, a rise of 13 per cent over
February decline stemmed from a reduction in farm income February and slightly above the March 1951 total.
largely offset by small increases in nonagricultural a 9 a a a
income. The annual rate of total nonfarm income rose by Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
about a billion dollars in February. reports amounted to $181 million in February, a 15 per
+ + + cent decline from the $214 million paid out in the same
Total wholesalers' sales in February 1952 were esti- month a year ago. The February decline resulted from a
mated at $9,025 million, which, after allowance for marked shifting of regular February dividend disbursements
seasonal variations, were 2 per cent higher than in to March payment dates.
January. Sales by durable-goods dealers, at $2,696 mil- 9 9 a a
lion, and nondurable-goods dealers at $6,329 million, Manufacturers' sales registered a moderate increase in
showed seasonally adjusted increases of I, and 1 per cent February while new and unfilled orders and inventories
respectively from January. declined slightly


To Obtain Cop [ 2Facts For Industry Reports:
NFW Il()(KS pp~~l ies of This -Fata &r Oils, Consumption by Uses, Feb. 1952, M117-2-22
Lc NI) IIEPOlRTS Material chec Hardwood Veneer &r Plywood, 3rd Quar. 1951, M13A-3-1
LA I I Sac Superphosphate, Summary for 1951, M19D-01
Provided And Iron & Steel Castings &r Steel Ingots, Jan. 1952,M21-1-12
Send This Sec- Wool Manufactures, Jan. 1952, B15H-12
tion of the Bulletin of Commerce to the Nearest Depa~rt- O 0eomargarine, Feb. 1952, MI7J-22
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name &r Address Are / Asphalt & Tar Roofing &r Siding Prods., Feb.19)52,M26D-22
On the Opposite Side. Make Remittances for Sales Mater- fKnit Underwear & Nightwear, Feb. 1952, M67C-22
ial Payable to Treasurer of the United States. Unpriced Inorganic Chemicals, U1.S. Production,Jan.1952 ,M19A-12
Items AeFee Softwood Plywood, Feb. 1952, M13B-22
--- -- ab Pulp, Paper &r Board, Feb. 1952, M14A-22
SConstruction &r Building Materials Ind. Rpt.$3 Yr. 'FOR TRE COMMUNITY DEVELOPER
/1Monthly Wholesale Trade Rpt. (Place on Mailing List) L/Locating Industrial Prospects For Your Community,'
UNew NPA Material: '5
L/Order M-47B Amend~ed L/Dir.10,CM(P Reg.1 }Ae & Industrial Development Publications, #18,
L Order M1-104 1/Revocation of Order M-72 101
/ Order M-8 Amended /7bel. of Authority #1 Amended
/Containers &r Packaging Ind. Report, Spring 1952, Small Business Aids:
Subscription Price, 604 Year 12Ten Factors in Successful Retailing, #501
L19 0 Census of HousingL L~atents &r Government Patent Services, 1#500
L/akacon, Ga., 15# /Jalcksonville, 306 LLnfantsl &r Children's Wear Shops, #~502
~2Public Empployment in Janua 1~952, G-GE52-No. I Uown Food Manufacturers Can Benefit From Food Broker
Highway Statistics, 19505,60 Services, #503
Traffic Volume Trends, Fe ~try 1952 22Robby Shops Can Be Profitable
SNational Industrial Dispersion Program A Question watering Services, #f505
& Answer Guide NSRB opyrights & Copyright Office Services, 1#506
Recommended Commercial Standard for Boys' Sports- official Gazette of' the U. S. Patent Office, $33 Year.
Outerwear Size Measurements, NlBS TS-5110-Ts-5081 utline and Source Material for Small Business Educa-
Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1951, 3;tion, 1950, 304
Effect of Exposure to Soils on the Properties of 2Zopies of Trade Marks, 104 each
Asbestos-Cement Pipe, NBS RP2264, 15Q /oter of Attorneys & Agents Registered to Practice
/7Harmonic Output of the Synchronous Rectifier, Before the U. S. Patent Office, 1950, 81
NBS RP2264, 104


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





SOUTHEAST VITALLY CONCERNED WITHI STEEL OUTPUT

If the Federal Government had not taken over the
steel allls and the work stoppage program had gone
through, a billion dollar business in the Southeast ---
the primary metals industry --- would have been af-
fected*
Latest figures from the Bureau of the Census ---
thoshe Soul1950 lant hownth~astheoprimar tmetalse dust y
the country in that year shipped goods valued at 4b936,-
114,000.

See your nearest Department of Commerce
office for latest official figures on popu-
lation, housing, manufacturing and agricul-


In that industry, a total of 126,200 employees are
employed in the region receiving salaries and wages
totalling $324,496,000.
The Census Bureau defines the "primary metals indust-
rf" as those establishments engaged in the smelting and
refining of ferrous and nonferrous metals from ore, pig,
or scrap, in the rolling, drawing, and alloying of fer-
rous and nonferrous metals, and in the manufacture of
castings, forgings and other basic products of ferrous
and nonferrous metals.
Most of the industry in the Southeast is concentrated
in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, K~entucky, Virginia, west
Virginia and Maryland.

SOUTHEAST OUTSTRIPS NATION IN AUTO GAIN '
'Final figures on 1950 registrations of motor ve- '
hicles in the United States just issued show that '
all States in the Southeast have far outdistanced '
the United States as a whole in per cent increase '
in number of vehicles in the past 10 years, accord-'
ing to a compilation of the Bureau of Public Roads,'
U. S. Department of Commerce. *
'The figures, combined with statistics supplied by '
the Statistical Abstract of the United States is- *
sued by the Bureau of the Census, reflected an 86 '
per cent gain in motor vehicles of all types in '
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North '
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee compared '
with a 53 per cent rise in the United States.


SMALLER SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION GETS "GO" SIGNAL

The National Production Authority, U. S. Department
of Commerce has given the "green light" on the cons~truct-
ion of smaller schools and also public road work in the
Southeast in the third quarter of 1952.
NiPA ordered an adjustment in its construction regu-
lations, effective July 1, which, in effect, would permit
she ca oyn pou naof primary adnsecondary school con-
Under a proposed amendment to the controlled materials
plan expected to be promulgated shortly, school builders
will be permitted to self-authorize up to 50 tons of
carbon steel, of which seven tone can be structural
shapes; 1,000 pounds of copper and the same quantity of
aluminum. The quantities will be per project, but not
per quarter.

You oieharest Depar sen onoaCommerae NP s

The public roads program is also affected. Such pro-
jects will be given up to 25 tons of carbon steel of
which 12 tons can be structural shapes, and 200 pounds
of copper per project.
Under present regulations, which remain in force for
the second quarter, school project self-authorization
is limited to five tons of carbon steel, not to include
more than two tons of structural shapes, 200 pounds of
copper, or, in substituting aluminum for copper, 100
pounds of aluminum per project per quarter.


The Office of International Trade, U. S. Depart-
Sment of Commerce, has taken action to reopen
Most world markets for naval stores. Shipments
of those commodities, except pine oil and pine
tar, may now be made without the necessity of
Applying for individual export licenses, to all
Countries except the "Iron Curtain countries "
Hong Kong and Macao. Shipments may be made under
wabt are known as general or nGRO" licenses and
without prior application to 01T.
In the case of pine oil and pine tar, individual
export licenses will continue to be required on
shipments other than to Canada.
GPO 83.31285


UNIV. OF FL LIE.



Ar~n 4. 7lJ

U.8L. DEPO81TORY


I


WORLD MARKETS FOR NAVAL STORES REOPENED


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
Gee


:-NoncZs
ORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF Ft
LEROY L. QUALL
DEPARTMENT or E
GAINESVILLE, FL(


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 9018

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE (
Atlanta Regional Office
716 FORSYTH BUILDING, N. W.,
Atlanta 3. Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .

PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 6, Number 9 May 1, 1952


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


































VOLUME 6. NUMBER 10 M ~AY 15,19


OVER BILLION DOULLAS PUT IN SOUTHEAST PLANT EXPANSIONS


STEEL EMBaRGO AGAIN DECLARED BY NPA IN DIRECTION

An immediate embargo on shipments of
THE steel to exporters and manufacturers of
consumer durable goods to preserve exist-
ing supplies for vital defense production
was ordered for a second time by the
GEltORG1 National Production Authority following
the second work stoppage in the industry
within a month.
PrOduction Ra. o taly whdthe first wrk stoppage
rescinded it on the advice of the Secretary

uthoritPresidential action. When the second work
sopage came, the embargo was again de-

The embargo, referred to in Direction
11 to CMLP Regulation 1 applied a freeze"
on all steel products in warehouses and
mille, except mills which continue to
operate. It also ordered that no one may
ship or accept delivery of steel controlled materials for ex-
port or for production of civilian-type items. An exception
was made of steel actually in transit whenl the direction was
issued.
MY AD B MLETA~LS DECISIONi AFFIRMED
Declaring that the allocation system was designed to super-
vise a "belt tightening" process in time of "declared emergency"
Common Pleas Court Judge Curtis Bok, of Philadelphia, National
Production Authority deputy chief hearing commissioner, dismis-
sed an appeal of the M and B Yetals Products company, of
Birmingham, from a decision that the firm had violated NPA
regulations conserving the nation' s supply of steel for the
defense effort.
Judge Bok was asked by the Birmingham firm to overrule a
decision of NPA hearing Colmmissioner Charles J. B~ilkey, of
Atlanta, dean emeritus of Emory University' s Lamar School of
Law withholding certain supplies of steel from the firm
because it had violated Orders 8*-47 and dl-47A allocating steel
for civilian production.
"No doubt the respondents must tighten their belts stringent-
ly, but so must the national econotay in a time of declared
emergency," Judge Bok said. "The allocation system is designed
to supervise that process so that the least possible pain
results, and if the respondents had observed the rules, they
would have suffered far less,
"With the memory of full war-time priorities still fresh
and the present system not difficult to understand, a plea of
confusion or of hardship after the fact comes stale upon the
ear." SEE NPA PAGE 2


PETROLEUM, CHEMICALS, ,
.*. AND RUBBER PRODUCTS Z8HL Or commerce f~ro.
160C -' TOTAL acin te k y cothed-

ministration on ap-
in plications for certi-
~ficates of necessity
for such purposes.
120 -The improvements,
OHERMAUFATUR~oauthor zed in a toa

too 1 calling for rapid tax
write-offs under the
Source: Office of Business Eognomics, 'Federal Internal Rev~
U. S. Department of Commerce enue Act, included
'8310,698,800 in Ala_
bamai $191,475,200 in Florida; $212,993,300 in Georgia; $122,-
426,900 in Mississippi; $63,749,362 in South Carolina; and
$124,850,10)7 in Tennessee.

One way to keep abreast of the issuance of
these certificates is to subscribe to the
Defense Production Record. See the last page
of this Bulletin of Commerce for further in-
formation with order coupon.

A list of such approvals issued recently by DPA authorized
improvements to cost $77,276,900 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mlississippi and Tennessee.
In the certificates issued since outbreak of the Korean war
the bulk of the expenditures on expansions have been in the de'
velopment of transportation and electrical power, both running
well into nine figures. Electric power expansions have included
$231,348,000 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and South
Carolina. A large number of railroads operating in the region
have obtained certificates authorizing improvements in their
transportation systems with something like $100,000,000 to be
used to that end.


Atlanta, Ga., Augcusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala.,
716 Forsyth Bldg., Maxwell House, 201 County Office 246 Federarl Bldg.,
Tel. WAA-4121,Ex.-453 Tel. 2-8394 B~uilding, Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Charleston, S. C., Chattanooga, Tenn.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


Knoxville, Tenn.,
313 P. 0. Bldg~.,
Tel. 5-1138-9

Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. O. Bldg~.,
Tel. 2-4755


Hemphis, Tenn.,
Mladison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Miami, Fla.,
.947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
3083 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206


Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Tampa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafayette St.,
Tel. 8-6081-2


ated rise in Plant expansions in
ibutale to the Southeast to meet
the program of nation-
al defense represent
an expenditure of more
METL PODUING than a billion dollars
a FABRICATING since the beginning of
the Korean war, ac-
aodn dto a compila-
lanta Regional Office
Of the U. S. Depart-


In MANUFACTURING, the anticipe
CAPITAL OUTLAYS in 1952 is attr
defense-related industries,
Index, 1950=100
120- I


/


8~::- :


looP -


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





RETAIL SALES TREND DOWN IN SOUTHEAST

Retail meronanlts in the Southeast experienced sharp
downwardr trends in sales in the first two months of 1952
as compared with the corresponding period in 1951, the
Monthly Retail Trade Report of the Bureau of the Census
showed.
Cumulative sales in such cities as Birmingham, At-
lanta, Macon, Greenwaood, S. C., and Johnson City and
K~ingaport, Tenn., were off substantially at the end of
the second month of this year, and a corresponding sit-
nation prevailed in various areas in the region in wrhion
the Bureau collects its data.

These Monthly Retail Trade Reports are
available for the asking. They are issued
for regions and for the United States. Ask
the nearest Department of Commerce field
office to place your name on the mail list.

Of a total of 17 cities and areas reporting to the
Bue" o sa".:" "i int ""?? ehn-- amr and 8 raota

creases reported over last year. Birminghamn recorded a
15 per cent drop; Atlanta and Kingsport, Tenn., 12 per
cent; Columbus, Ga., 5 per cent; Macon, 13 per cent;
Savannah, 7 per cent; Biloxi and Gulfport, 3 per cent;
Asheville, N. C., 9 per cent; Greenwood, S. C., 11 per
cent; Bristol, Tenn., 6 per cent and Johnson City,
Tenn., 22 per cent.
The situation in the Southeast in cumulative sales
for the first two months of the year, however, was not
unlike that for the nation as a whole, since most cities
and areas polled by the Census Bureau reflected similar
declines, with a 10 per cent decrease recorded for the
United States.

FEDERAL REVENUE COLLECTIONS RISE IN REGION

Federal internal revenue collections in the Southeast
last year totalled $3.5 billion, a rise of 30.6 per
cent over 1950 and nearly 487 per cent in the last 10
years, according to current figures released by the
Bureau of Internal Revenue in Washington*
Last year' s collections in Alabama, Florida, Georgia>
Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas included $2.4
billion in income, profits and employment taxes, and
$1.0 billion in miscellaneous revenue*

Department of Commerce field offices each
year have available the booklet "Your Federal
Income Tax" to help income taxpayers on their
taxpaying problems. It sells for 25#.

The figures showed nearly a billion dollar gain in
collections last year over 1950 in the region, which
totalled $2.7 billion, and a vast advance over the $602
million realized in 1941.

STHIE U. 8. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
IN FOREIGN TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

This is the title of a booklet just issued giving a '
brief outline of some of the international activities '
of the main bureaus and offices of the Department of a
Commerce. It includes, in addition to a description a
of such activities, reference to the exchange of in- '
formation and other kinds of cooperation with coun- '
tries that have achieved industrialization. The pub- '
location is available without charge at any Depalrt- '
Sent of Commerce field office. I


& COITINUED FROM PAGE 1


The cryolite conservation order, 1Y-99, was amended by
NPA to require users to report by the end of April IS 2
their stocks, receipts and consumption of cryolite and
the end use for which it was purchased.
RIreF SYSTESa~
Order 11-73 was amended, which, amaong other things,
governed the acquisition of maintenance, repair and opera-
ting supplies as well as minor capital additions by rail
systems, raising the dollar limitation on minor capital
additions from $750 to $2,500.
COLULSIBLE TUBES
Removal of all restrictions on the use of aluminum in
collapsible tubes was announced by NPA in an amendment to
Order 11-27. The remafbing controls in the order are limited
to tin specifications
ELECTRICAL UTILITIES
Allotments for minor requirements of controlled materials
toel tr bal n HR ad r he th rd quar rj 21952 and

first two quart as of 1953 were announced by NPA in an

COPPER CC LSTRUCTION MATER1AS
Permission to use cropper and copper-base alloy on hand
in inventory as of Ju~y 1, 1951 in the manufacture o'f 30
building materials items, provided the materials are still
maintained in inventor, was granted to manufacturers
-through the issuance of Direction 1 to Order P-71.
MAC INE TOOLS
Establishment of a Inumlerical preference liat" similar
to the one the War Prodiuction Board used during World War II
to govern the priority .of machine tool deliveries to defense
contractors was made it an amendment to Order M-41.

Ten yeaze of rubber dentrols came to a virtual end when
MPA revoked, effective Monday, April 21, specification con-
trols limiting the amount of natural rubber that night be
used in malking rubber products. The action was taken in an
amendment to Order Y-2.
CONTROLLED MALTERIALS
Restrictions on portions of an allotment of controlled
materials that can be ordered for delivery during the last
month of any calendar quarter were removed in Direction 3
to CMP Regulation No. 1.
INTERPRETATIONS
So that the public may have a clear understanding of its
official views and decisions, NPA issued a new regulation,
Number 7, governing future issuance of authorized intrepre-
tations of orders and reulations.

Further conservation of scarce nickel will result from
inaction announced by NPA limiting the amount of nickel-
baigstainless steel that can be sold by steel distributors
customers who have no allotments. The action was taken in
Sceue3 to M-6A.
PACKAGING CLOSURES
All restrictions on the sale, delivery and use of aluminum
closures and closure liners were removed when an amendment
asissued to NPA' s packaging closure order, Y-26. The order
applies only to tin plate.
CARBON STEEL
Second-quallitycarbon steel was removed from the list of
cotoldmaterials for the fourth quarter of 1952 when NPA
inormed users of that product they need not include it in
herstatement of requirements on which allocations are to
bemade. Attention was also called by MPA to several important
haesmade in the new Form CMP 4-B on which users of con-
roldmaterials make their report.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2











More detailed With most outdoor activity still at a lull, employment
Information showed little change between February and March 1952, ac-
on the Hligh- cording to the Bureau of the Census. The estimate for the
lights of the week ending March 8 was 59,711,000, or almost the same as
Hews in the I in the February week. Nonagricultural employment, at an
Field of Bu#- estimated 53,702,000 in March, also remained at the level
iness is Available at all Department of Commerce Field of the previous month.
Offices. *I *
Fourth quarter 1951 shipments of the women's, misses',
and juniors' outerwear industries totalled $607 million
compared with $606 million in the same period in 1950, the
Manufacturers' sales and new orders expanded somewhat Bureau of the Census said. Cuttings of the principal gar-
less than seasonally during March, the Office of Business ments held their own or showed increases with the exception
Economies, U. S. Department of Commerce announced. Back- of dozen-priced dresses and suits.
logs of unfilled orders declined slightly during the + + + *
month while book values of inventories were held relative- Chain store and mpail-order sales in February of this
ly unchanged. Sales, or shipments, of all manufacturing year were estimated at $2.4 billion, or about 5 per cent
industries were down 5 per cent from February on a sea- above February a year ago. When adjustment is made for the
sonally adjusted basis. extra day this year, however, Februarry 1952 was only
+ + + Islightly above February 1951.
Sale of all retail stores in March amounted to $12.2 + + + + +
billion, about 6 per cent below the value for the same Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
month a year ago. When account is taken of the extra reports amounted to $181 million in February, a 15 per cent
trading day and the earlier date of Easter in March 1951 decline from the $214 million paid out in the same month a
the level in March 1952 was calculated to be less than year ago. The February decline resulted from a marked shift-
2 per cent below the year-ago figure. ing of regular February dividend disbursements to March pay-
+ + + t Iment dates.
Business activity continued to advance slowly in March, + + *
the Department of Com~erce reported. The recent easing of The February wheat flour production was ,estimated by the
material shortages made possible an expansion in most Bureau of the Census at 18,519,000 eacks, or an average of
types of construction, and larger allocations for the 1926,000 sacks per working day compared with 964,000 sacks
production of consumer durable goods in coming months. Piper day in January and 937,000 in February 1951. Mills in
+ + + Cebruary operated at 83 per cent of capacity compared with
February settings of all types of men' s apparel, (86.4 per cent the previous month.
except cotton sport abirts and pajamas were under Feb- + + + + +
muary 1951 levels but registered increases over January The dollar value of confectionery manufacturers' sale
1952 averages, the Bureau of the Census reported. lin February 1952 was $84 million, an increase of 4 per cent
+ + + + over the level of Fepgr 91
L7Provisional Revision of the Projections of the Total
To Obanop Population of the U. S., July 1, 1953 to 1960, P-25,#58
NEW BOOK(S 4IC ies or rThi D Provisional Estimrates of the Population of the U. S.,
r~~~AD REPiORTS MaeilCekApril 1, 1950 to March 1, 1952, P-25, #s59
It In Spac Fac a For Industry Reports:
Provided And ifFara Pumps, Summary for 1951, Y319-01
Send ThsSe- 0eomargarine, March 1952, M17J-32
tinof e Bulletin o Comret the learest Deat Aluminum & Magnesium Wrought Products. Summary for 1951
aent of Comaerce Field Office. Your Name & Address Are eIating & Cooking Equipment, Feb. 1952, Yj51-N-22
On te Oposte Sde.Mak Remttacesfqr ale Maer-Wool Manufactures, Feb. 1952, U15II-22
ia} ayale o Trasuer f th UntedStats. nprcedCotton System Spinnring Activity, Mar. 1952, Y15-3-8-52
Items Are Free. 014y Construction Products, Feb. 1952, Y268-22
Iron & Steel Foundries & Steel Ingot Producers Report
on Products Shipped & Materials Used, Jan. 1952, M21C-12
M7 etal Cans, Feb. 1952, Y75D-22
eense Production Record, Subscription, $2.50 Year Red Cedair Shingles, Feb. 1952, M13c-22
ewNPA Material: Superphosphate, Feb. 1952, M19D-22
irc ion1 to CMP Re 1 90rder U-99 Amended Cotton & Linters, Consumption, Stocks, Imports & Exports
Ore -73 Amended Ugrder U-27 Amended &Active Cotton Spindles, Mar. 1952, MI5-1-8-52
Ore -50 Amended LEbir. I to Order M-74 Small Business Aids:
Ore -41 Amended L/prder U-2 Amended LZTen Factors in Successful Retailing, #501
Di.3 to CMP Reg. I regulation Number 7 i Patents & Government Patent Services, #500
Sceue3 to U-68 L/Order U-26 Amended Infants' & Children' s Wear Shops, #Y502
onhRetail Trade Report: L/How Food Manufacturers Can Benefit from Food Broker
U. 8. and Regions (Place on Mailing List) Services, #503
iThe U. S. Department of Commerce in Foreign Technical Business Service Checklist Lists all Department of
Assistance Commerce & Defense Agency Uaterial, $1.50 Year
U7 S. scensus of Business, 1948, Trade Series, A7 n Adhesive Tape-Resistor System, National Bureau of
The Lumber Trade, 35# Standards Circular #1530, 30C
M7 arital Status & Household Charac teristics,Apr.1951, ~ Basic Radio Propagation Prediations for June 1952,
Series P-20, Number 38 National Bureau of Standards, CRPL-D91, 104
1950 U. S. Census of Housing: i7Nuclear Data, Suppldment 2 to National Bureau of
/j7Nashrile. Tenn.., LL-E1, 20#* /Jlobile, Ala., Standards circular 499, $4.25 a set
HI-E114, 204; I Chattanooga, Tenn., H-E33, 254 L Simplified Accounting for Wholesale Grocers, 204
// Louisville, Ky., H-E101,251


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





your wieto MISe/ORID OACtioR


'main won aus vraOS T, e..


$500ilioatuain *Summaries of All Regulafions
program is underwinpoutoepnin sudb P n P
Yu"'" ** *U~ Summarles of AII Actions by Othier
Defense Agencles



Eeel... ~r..DEFENSE PRODUCTIONi RECORD
e.n SUBSCRIPTION FORM
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE

*~,11~~ sqa ),, i i Please enter Eg~ Subscription for the weekly
"-It- Defense Production Record

NAME
ADDRESS
CITY ZONE STATE
(ENCLOSE CHIECK OR MONEY ORDER. $b2.50 PER YEAR


GPO 83-32892


e Offidoal Weekly Bulletin of the
Defense Production Program

e Summaries of Aff Industry
AdVISory Commlitee MOeffngs


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000
VOLUM' 6, NUMBER 10, May 15, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAG6E $300




IJN\IV. OF FL_ LIa.
D~OCI r) a aggl~



*6- F
UNIVERSITY 0tlrr~IL EPOaiTORY~
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08748 9000
BULLETln or comMEIRCE


PAGE 4































VOLUME 6. NUMBER 11
CHCICKN OUTPUT HIIGH IN SOUTHWESTERN REGION

Farms With chickens
Percentage by Statep Paced by Georgia, which
assumed the leadership in
broiler prodnetion in
46 52 1951, the South Atlantie
ag- region, comprising Dela-
PERCENT ware, Maryland, Georgia,
as 1 7_1i45 -59- Florida, the Virginias
15560-69 and the Carolinas, last
|5570-79 year was credited with
67 518 &over 43 per cent of the number
of broilers produced in
the nation; 42 per cent
-- of the poundage output;
Source: Bureau of Census & 'and 40 per cent of the
Bureau of Agricultural Econo- 'gross income from that
migs ~ "production in a report
issued by the Bureau of Agricultural Economies, U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture.

Note: Reports from the 1950 Census of
Agriculture are nowr being received in De
apartment of Commerce field offices. Ask
the nearest office for information.

Georgia took the nation's leadership in the commercial
broiler industry after 10 years of steady progress. Ten
years ago that State stood thirteenth. Last year, its
production totalled 88,678,000 in number and 248,298,000
in pounds, while its total income from that source ap_
proximated $68,530,000.

I-WHOLESALE TRADE DOWNI IN REGION

Sharp reductions in sales of such commodities as cer-
tain electrical goods, furniture and house furnishings,
hardware, lumber and building materials and dry goods
resulted in an overall decrease of 9 per cent in wholesale
sale in the South Atlantic region and 7 per cent in the
East South Central section in the first quarter of 1952
as compared with the corresponding period last year, ac_
cording to the Monthly Wholesale Trade report of the Bureau
of the Census.
A 9 per cent decline in such sales in each of the two
southeastern regions wras also reported in March of this
year from the same month last year.
The report also reflected a 3 per cent increase in in-
ventories in the South Atlantic area among 425 firms re-
porting in the panel, and the estimated value of such in-
ventories at the end of March wras placed at $131,399,000.
There was no change in the East South Central area.


JUNE 1, 1952
NPA APPROVES 129 CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN AREA


__ __ _____1 ___ _____ _____


Seventeen projects costing $5,998,-
500 wrere approved for Alabama; 23 coating $1,938,166 for
Florida; 11 costing $1,359,860 for Georgia; 15 costing
$~1.507,731 for Missiasippi; 29 costing $4,948,498 for North
Carolina; 12 costing $852,724 for South Carolina; and 22
costing 88,957,331 for Tennessee.
In addition to the allotment of materials for carrying
out the work in the region, NPA gave the "green light" in
some instances by approving projects, which, it was held,
did not need materials allotments, and in a few cases found
the projects exempt, because the materials requirements did
not exceed the permitted Limitations on the use of copper,
steel or aluminum, the end-use of which is controlled under
the so-called controlled materials plan.
NPA LlBERALIZES RECREATIONAL PROJECTS
A boost in construction work on a number of amusement
and recreational projects in the Southeast has been forecast
as a result of action taken by the National Production
Authority to ease restrictions on the use of materials in
such activities beginning July 1.
Particularly affected will be such projects as baseball
parks, football fields, swimming pools and drive-in theatres
applications for the building and improvement of which have
~een blocked by controlled materials plan regulation Number
Restricting the use of steel, copper and aluminum. Also
on the "upcoming" list are assembly halls used primarily for
Recreation or amusement purposes, athletic field houses,
ladexposition or exhibition buildings or structures.
Bleachers for baseball and football fields and flood
fighting systems for such projects have been in special demand.
SEE NPA CONTINUED 011 PAGE 2


Charleston, 8. C., Chattanooga, Tenn.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 7-5673


Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C.,' Birmingham, Ale*,
Maxwell House, 201 County Office 24b6 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-8394 B~uilding, Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Atlanta, Ga.,
716 Forsyth Bldg.,
Tel. EKA-4121,Ex.-453


Mia~mi, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federa~l Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


K~noxville, Tenn.,
313 P. O. Bldg~.,
Tel. 5-138-9

Savannah, -Ga.,
218 P. 0. Blag.,
Tel. 2-4755.


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-36G1,Ex.206


Nashville, Tens.,
315 Ulnion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Tampa, Fla.,
420 W. Lafayette St.,
Tel.- 8-6081-2


The National Production Authority
during April approved allotments of
controlled materials for the con-
structionl of 129 projects in the
-rSoutheast valued at an estimated
$25,562,800.
CE Included in the approvals were a
State office building in Montg~omery,
Ala., to cost $3,000,000, a $1,100,000
tin State office and Supreme Court build-
ing for K~nozville, Tenn., a $1,619,115
armory and gym for Vainderbilt Uni-
versity at Nashville, and a $2,350,000
w~ warehouse for Memphis, Tenn.


Note: A list of these projects
is available in Press Release NPA-
52-29 obtainable at the atlanta
Regional Office of the Department
adof Commarrp. Sa n rdear R~annk.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FEL~D SERVICE


tin

CA ICHI




Auto





URBAN BUILDING SHOWS DOWNIRARD TREND IN REGION

A reduction of some $22 million in the value of all
urban construction in the Southeast in the first two
months of 1952 as compared with the corresponding per-
iod last year, including a decline of $10,000,000 in -
new dwelling units, was reported by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics of the U. S. Department of Labor.
All States, except Georgia, reflected decreases,
both in total new building as well as new dwelling units
in the area. The gain in Georgia was from $21,662,000
in 1951 to $22,987,000 this year in total construction
and from $11,646,000 to $14,718,000 in new dwelling
units .
The report also revealed proportionate decreases in
such construction operations in most of the major
cities in the region, only Birmingham, Jacksonville,
Nashville and Tampa registering gains in total value
and Atlanta, Birmingham- and Nashville in increased
dwelling unit values. For 13 principal cities in the
region, the total dollar value of urban construction
in January and February of this year was $37,471,000
compared with $44,732,000 in the same period last year*
The value of dwelling units was $18,052,000 this year
and $22,491,000 last year.

RURAL ROAD MILEAGE HIGHB IN SOUTHEAST

Fourteen per cent of the nation's 2,990,036 miles
of rural roads are in the Southeast and 17 per cent of
its 1,311,417 unsurfaced rural highways are in the
region, according to a compilation of the Bureau of
Public Roads, U. S. Department of Commerce.
Tennessee has the highest percentage of surfaced
rural roads in the area with 51,816 miles of a total of
64,807 in the State, or 80 per cent, ani Georgia has
the lowest percentage, with only 23,136 miles of a
total of 89,398, or 26 per cent, surfaced*
Sixty-nine per cent of Alabama' s 60,028 miles of
rural roads are surfaced; 67.7 per cent of North Caro-
Lina' s 64,536; 55.3 per cent; of Mississippi' s 61,634
46 per cent of Floridar s 40,844; and 37.3 per cent o
South Carolina's 47,036.

REGIONAL GAINS IN BEEF CATTLE OUTPUT KlIGH

A 28 per cent increase in the production of beef
cattle in ~the~ So~utheast in the past 5 years is found
in reports of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics of
the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
A comparison of a report just issued by that agency
with one of several years ago showing production
figures for 1948 reflects an increase in the staber of
such cattle in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippis
Tennessee and the Carolinas of from 3,569,000 to
4,585,000. The later figures are for 1952*
Greatest increases were recorded for South Carolina,
North Caraolina and Alabama in the order named. The '
number went from 109,000 to 172,000 in South Carolina
for a gain of 57 per cent; from 149,000 to 229,000 in
North Carolina, an increase of 53 per cent; and from
508,000 to 762,000 in alabama, a rise of 50 per cent.
The other increases were from 536,000 to 714,000 in
Tennessee, an advance of 33 per cent; 507,000 to 627,_
000 in Georgia, 23 per cent; 1,010,000 to 1,250,000 in
Florida, 23 per cent; and 750,000 to 831,000 in Mliss_
issippi, 10 per cent.

I NATIONAL INCOME, BUSINESS STATISTICS *
'Get your copies of current issues of the publica- a
'tions National Income and Business Statistics wrhiles
they Last. Prices )1.00 apd $1.50 respectively, a


DYmn~l~~T\a ~D mr~ r\nrnm~n


OISNETXE N OF TIME OR D


Southeastern manufacturers who make copper
wire mill and brase mill products have been
given until June 2 to report their inventories,
receipts, and shipments. The filing time was
originally set for May 15. The extension was
made at the request of the industry advisory
committee.

ALUM~INUM
Production operations of producers of aluminum con-
trolled materials were stabilized by an amendment to
controls raising the level of order acceptance from 100
per cent of authorized production schedules, excluding
backlog, to 125 per cent. The action was taken in an
amendment to Order M-5.
SELF-AUTHORIZATION
A liberalized self-authorization procedure under the
Controlled materials Plan permitting manufacturers to
obtain substantially increased quantities of carbon
steel, alloy steel and aluminum, beginning with the
third quarter of 1952 was announced. An amendment to
Direction 1 of CMP Regulation 1 is designed to permit
small concerns to share directly in the improved mater-
ials supply situation, and to extend the benefits of
self-authorization to many small producers who formerly
were unable to take advantage of -the provision.
COLUMBIUMd AND TANiTALUM
Modification of controls covering the scarce alloying
materials columbium and tantalum to exempt from previous
limitations the use of columbium-content welding rods for
welding certain types of nickel-bearing stainless steels
and non-ferrous nickel base alloys was announced. Amend-
ment of Schedule 5 to Order M-80.

TEXTILE ORDER REVOKED
Revocation of Order M-23 establishing rules
for placing, accepting, and scheduling rated
orders for carded cotton sales yarn was an-'
nounced. The order was promulgated in January
1951 to meet military needs for Army and num-
bered ducks, as well as cotton webbing and
tape. An improved supply situation was given
Sas the reason for the revocation.

WATER WEL~L DRILERS
Easing of government paper work required of waster
well drillers was ordered in an amendment to Direction
4 to Controlled Materials Plan Regulation 6.
DMILESTIC COMMBUNICATIONS
Broader assistance in obtaining materials for
maintenance, repairs and operation and for essential
construction will be available to the nation' s telephone
and telegraph industries under a revision of Order 1-77
issued by NPA.
COBAL
To conserve further available supplies of cobalt, a
scarce metal alloy used in heat-resistant steels, NPA
amended Schedule 2 to Order Y-80 to include compounds
produced from ores, metal, concentrates, and refinery
residues in the definition of cobalt.


NATIONAL PRODUCTION AUTHIORITY Continued From Page 1

NJPA amended its regulation because the needs for the
defense construction program will be substantially
reduced during the last half of this year, it was stated.
In addition, limitations on the use of the three
metals in general commercial construction and in housing
construction were revised upward, the former effective
October 1.


I


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








~VLUIIr ~


1


To Obtain Cop
ifEW9 II()KS pcl~ ies Of Thip
AIYDREPO TS material Check


tiqn of the Bulletin of Commerce _to te eaet Depar-


ment qf Coamerce Field Office. Your Name & Bddress Are
On the Opposite Side. Make Resittances for Silees Mater-


ial Payable to Treasurer of the United States. Ulrpriced
Items Are Free.



Y monthly Wholesale Trade Report (Place on Rail List)

Bus olea Snaometics 1. 1.50
Nato essr due senN uthort9 y tCitP Rgula~tion 6 amended

Schedule 5Amendeder/ D 0 Amended L e del Maend Ry.
Dir. 4 to CMP Regi. 6 Amended L/Order M1-77 amended
Schedule 2 to.Order M-80 Amended
EduatinalAttainment of the Population 25 Years Old
andt ovez3 Inted eUnited States, 19950, SerieslPG27486



7 Tampa, 25F L/Savannah, Ga.,204 17kiami, 300
7T Birmingham, 354 27St. Petersburg, 20
ffAaleigh, N. C., 150


IMYPORTAHNT NOTICE'.
S In ordering publications and other material, '
please either send tne woaole of Pages 3 and 4
with your order, or the lower half of the two
a pages, so that the name of the sender and the
address will accompany tae order. Some of the
orders being received contain only a portion of
the reverse side of the order blank, with neither '
name of sender nor address shown. For example,
the Atlaanta office now has an order postmarked
Jackson, Mliss., with the sum of 40 cents enclosed '
in payment for certain material, and the order
blank was torn off in such a way that it does not '
show the name of the sender or the address.
1950 U. S. Census of Population:
198 Dunham, BusC nesjnus Tracts, 15/

1 nTaade Seeiesrod marketing by Producers of Basic
J7 Annual Survey of Manufactures, 1949 and 1950,
buckraml bound, Regional &r State Breakdown, $2.00
Facts For industry Reports:
~ZMen's Apparel, Mar. 152 LiNonferrous CastingsMar.1952
Su Hfractories, 91 aitConsa tion Me oinerusyota



SLumber Production &r Mill Stocks Fourth Quarter 1951
&r Selected Annual Totals 1951
~7iomen' s, Misses' & Juniors' Outerwear, 4th Quarter 1951


Total wholesalers' sales in Marcn were estimated at
$8,049 million, which after adjustment for seasonal varia-
tions was almost 8 per cent below the previous month.
Part of the decline resulted from the leap-year day in
February of this year.

New construction outlays rose seasonally in April to a
total of nearly $2.5 billion setting a new record for the
month, according to a joint report of th~e Departments of
Comlmerce and Labor. Tne total value of new construction
put in place during April was 8 per cent above the Maren
195! total. Private outlays rose by 5 per cent and public
expenditures increased by 12 per cent over the previous
month.
+ *
Chain store and mail-order sales for March were esti-
mated ait $2.7 billion, about 5 per cent below the previous
year but approximately equivalent to the year-ago level
when allowance is made for the one ress trading day and the
effect of the later Easter this year. After adjustment for
seasonal factors total sales of those store categories wera_
down about 3 per cent from February to March.
*
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $1,202 million in March, 12 per cent
higher than the $1,073 million paid out in the same month
a year ago.
*
Employment moved upward between March and April with
the usual spring pickup in farm activity and other outdoor
work. The estimate for the week en~ding April 12 was 60,132,-
000, which compared with 59,714,000 in the week ending March
8, the Bureau of the Census announced.
*
Cuttings of men' s apparel in March were considerably
under March levels with many items also registering decreases
from February 1952 cuttings, according to the Census Bureau.
There was an average of 262,400 regular-weight suits cut
weekly in March, 24 per cenlt lower thian in March 1951.


More detailed
Information
on the H~igh-
Rights of the
--=-s ews in the
Field of Bus-
iness is Available at all Department ~of Commerce Field
Offices



The net working capital of U. S. corporations
at the end of 1951 amounted to $80.9 billion, according
to estimates of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
During 1951, working capital increased $2.5 billion,
less th~an half the increase in the preceding year. The
growth in 1951 reflected a large increase in total cur-
rent assets amounting to $18.5 billion while total aur-
rent liabilities rose by $13.3 billion.
*
Production of knit cotton and wool underwear and
alghtwear in March was slightly under February'sa output
and considerably below March 1951 levels, the Bureau
of the Census reported.
*
Personal income in Mlarch, which was at an annual
rate of $~258 billion, was virtually unchanged for the
third consecutive month, the Office of Business Econo-
mics, U. S. Department of Commerce, announced. The
stability of the income total from February to March
extended to most of its major components. The only
changes registered were a decline in the income of pro-
prietors and a largely offsetting gain in corporate
dividend receipts.
*
Total business inventories at the end of March were
estimated at $71.4 billion. After allowance for seasonal
variations, the book value waes unchanged from the pre-
vious month,


-


PAGE 3


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE









I


SPIOPSES OF BID AND CONTRACT AWARD INFDRBMTION IN DEPARTMENT OF 90MMERCE OFFICES ARE VALUABLE


Small business firms that are not now taking advantage of the synopses of bid and contract award information
a in Department of Commerce field offices may be overlooking an excellent opportunity to obtain Federal Govern-
I ment contracts. There is no charge for it.
SThe synopses, which show the goods to be bought in the immediate future by the Government and those just
I purchased, are being made available to representatives of business for prime and sub-contracting purposes.
I Hundreds of local Chambers of Camerce and State and trade offices are cooperating in the distribution.
*In April of this year, the Federal Government awarded contracts for goods and services in the. Southeast
r nith a dollar value of some $35,000,000. The goods bought included fruits and fruit juices, wood manufactures,
* chemicals, textiles andl many other commodities. The value of the awards were $5,806,600 in Alabama;
i $5,800,800 in Florida; 49,823,500 in Georgia; $1,907,300 in Missiasippig $6,137,400 in South Carolina; and
1 $5,751,500 in Tenninssee.
SSince Korea, the Federal Government has been awarding contracts for goods and services in the Southeast
Saith an average dollar value of nearly 890,000,000 a month.


NEARLY (100 MILLION IN SOUTH[EaST PyLAT EXPANS1IONS

Recently announced intentions to expand plant capacity and
effect other broadening of industrial operations in the South-
east to meet the national program of defense represent a pro-
posed expenditure of more tnan $83,000,000, according to data
released by the Defense Production Administration.
;L ~The information was given in the form of lists of approvals
of certificates of necessity for tax amortization purposes per-
mitting rapid tax writeoffs of portions of the proposed in-,
provement .

Notas Lists of these certificate of necessity
approvals are received at all Department of
Cqimaerce field offices.
Some of the larger proposed expansions, with purposes and
amounts represented included:
Mississippi Power and Light company, $23,365,000 electric
power development project in Bolivar county, Mlississippi.
Georgia Power compagIy, Rome, Ga., electric power expansion,
$15,885,588.
Florida Power and Light company, Cutler, Ga., electric
power, $8,801,564.
Combustion Engineering~uperheater, Inc., Chattanooga, steam
generating units, $5,800,369.
Monsanto Chemical company, calcium carbide, Muscle Shoals,
Ala., 13,975,000.
Alabama Power company, electric power, Mobile, $16,000,000.
Hercules Powder comlpany, H~attiesburg, camphone, 527,000.


SII SOUITHIEASTERN STATES KIGHt IN LUMBER OUTPUT

Six southeastern States --- Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Vlirginia and the Carolinas -- last year produced 47 per cent
of the lumber output of the eastern half of the UInited Statee,
according to figure released by the Bureau of the Censue.
The figures were contained in a Facts For Indqusry Report
on lumber production just issued showing the total for the
six-State area in 1951 as 8,690,861,000 board feet, or nearly
2 billion greater than the production of 1949, but lightly
below the total for 1950, which was 9,259,385,000 feet.

This report is available without charge.
See Order Blank for ordering. Many other
Facts For Industry Reports are also obtain-
able at Department of Commerce field office.


The southeastern production included 6,369,590,000 feet
in the South Atlantic area, consisting of the Carolinas
and Virginia, which was the greatest for the region, and
4,321,271,000 in the East Gulf States of Allabama, Florida,
and Georgia, the runnerup section.
Total production in the eastern half of the United States
was 18,271,197,000 board feet, and for the country as a
whlole, 36,748,397,000 feet, of which the western half of the
nation produced 18,477,200,000.
Three sections of the South, the _South Atlantic, East Gulf
and Lower Mississippi States, the latter comprising Arkansas,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Texas, produced 34 per
cent of the national total, including 4,127,510,000 feet in
the Lowrer Mississippi States. HOe es-asses


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8994
BULLETl w.- YVms.......


PAGE 4


U. S. OEPARTHEAIT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional O~ace
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsth Bldg.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 100

Volume 6, Number 11 June 1, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
cGP0)




IJI\\/.OF FL- U\


BC- -FU.S.DEP EgTOR


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA



























, 12 JUNE 15, 1952


SKRBP ADVANCES SHIOWN IN SOUTIEASTTER ECONOMY
Lqage of Insured Coagercial
Banks. 19L5 to 1951
Broad advances in the econ-
. ..m'"I' omly of the Southeast in the
consuuM HTU~NTe past 10 years was shown in a
--1 I ~c o te U S Dpatmsttudy made by the Atlanta of-
MALESTAHE Of COmneroe of trends in major
segmnts of the region's busi-
ness life*
Bank depoafts rose from $3.2
billion to $10.1 billion, or
213 per cent; salaries and
wages paid in manufacturing
wsEs industries from $)847,155,000
to $i3,491,129,000, a 312 per
cent gain, and receipts from
s ~the operation of motor vehic-
les from $41,881,000 to $392,-
IU no1 no1 no I m I 1We no m 712,000, an increase of 837
'per cent*
Source: Federal Deposit The figures were for the
Insurance Corporation 'States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinaa*

Nlote: Copies of the Press Release, CD-52-85s
reflecting advances in the economy of the South-
east are available at the nearest Department of
Commerce field.offices


INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION ALLOTMENTS CLERE


Press releases reflecting these projects
by States, with amounts involved in each,
and type of operation, are available at the
nearest Department of Coamerce field office,

nHABRDSHIIP" ACCOUNT STILL AVAILABLE
Small manufacturers in the Southeast whio are finding it
difficult to operate on materials allowed them by the NPA
under the controlled materials plan" till have time in
which to file applications for supplemental allotments
under the so-called "hardship account" program. Certain
data are required of firms filing applications under the
program, and guide sheets for the supplying of such in-
formation are available at Compmerce Department offices in
the region.
The "hardship" program was established for the second
quarter of.this year wrhen small manufacturers in some see-
tions of the country complained that NPA allotments were
insufficient to permit continuation of operations. In the
Southeast, less than 50 manufacturers have availed thea-
selves of the supplemental allotment allowance.
SEE NPA CONTINUED ON PAGE 2


B sharp decline in activities and budgetary limitations for the fortheoning fiscal year have made it
'necessatry for the Department of Commerce to close its offices in Chattanooga and Knoxville, Tenn.,
'Augusta, Ga., and Barnwell, S. C., effective June 20, 1952. Business firms and others in those areas
'interested in Department of Commerce and National Production Authority services should communicate with '
'the field office nearest them. Those in the K~noxville and Chattanooga area will be served by the
'Nashville and Atlanta offices; those in the Barnwrell area should use the Charleston, S. C., office;
'and those in the Augusta area are asked to communicate wRith the Atlanta office. Other Department of
'Commerce offices in the Southeast are functioning in the cities shown at the top of this page of the'
'Bulletin of Commerqq.'


following were some of the changes taking place in the
7-State area:
In the manufacturing field, in addition to the sharp
increase in wages and salaries paid in the decade, the
number of employees rose from 895,280 to 1,469,909 and
the value added by manufacture of good produced in south-
eastern plants from $1,746,008,000 to $6,867,545,000 a
gain of 293 per cent.
In the trade field, retail sales increased from $3.5
billion to $14.1 billion, or 300 per cent; wholesale sales
from $3.9 billion to $15.6 billion, 294 per cent; and
service trade receipts, $198.4 million to $;735.1 million
270 per cent. The number of retail employees went from '
428,873 to 723,398; wholesale workers from 139,932 to
239,035; and service trade from 95,101 to 159,529.


Atlanta, Ga.,
7th Floor, Forayth Bldg.,
Tel. WA~-4121Ex.453

Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Birm~inghamn, Ala.,
266 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355

Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Charleston, S. C., Columbia, S. C., Jackson, .dies., Jacksonville, Fla.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 426 Yazoo St., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ez.206


Nashrille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Savannah, Ga., Tampa, Fla.,
218 P.O.a14g., 420 W.Lafayette St.,
Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 8-6081-82


E KULOW 6 NUMBER


Z~I~) ~L ~~~I~


`t Allotment of materials by the
National Production Authority for
the carrying out of $679,266,900
.worth of newr and old industrial
rC1 construction operations in the South-
east, including the expenditure of
$243,538,200 in new projects was
announced. The allotments were for
91()21 the third quarter of 1952.
Among the projects approved were
40 in Tennessee costing an estimated
)88,515,600; 19 in Georgia to coat
rity $138,201,700; 47 in Alabama, approxi-
mating $150,282,908; 11 in Florida,
$i110,686,400; 16 in Mississippi,
&64,315,900; 12 in North Carolina,
-)65,881,971; and 11 in South Carolina,
to cost $61,382,200.
The allotmrents were made under NPA'sa
"controlled materials plan," which
end-use of steel, copper and aluminum.


TE












controls the


C ~2UN;ITEDSTATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE




~~RRR~FIELD SERVICE





U. S. cOTRArCTS UIN soUTH~gsA TORAL $42 MILI*ON

The Federal Government in May awarded contracts for
goods and services in the Southeast valued at more
than $42 million, including the purchase of pallets
ini8labama, tow targeted in Florida, portable bleachers
in Georgia, sterile glove wrappers in Missiasippi,
Turkish towels in South Carolina, and torpedo contain-
ers in Tennessee.
Georgia led the region in dollar value of awards
with 23 contracts valued at $14,307,882 and two other
with a valuation of over $250,000. each. Florida and
Tennessee were tied for first place in number of con-
tracts awarded with 31 each.

Department of Commerce-NPa offices in the
Southeast have lists of goods being bought
by the Government for distribution for the
agin.

The awards in Alabama totalled 16 with a value of
$2,848,854; Florida, 29 valued at $6,196,054 and two
others of "over $250,000" neah; Missiasippi, 16 valued
at $6,185,380 and one with the value not stipulated;
South Carolina, 16 valued at $1,599,282 and one of
over $)250,000;" and Tennessee, 29 contracts tota~lling
$9,697,508, one "over $250,000," and another in which
no dollar value was given*
Some of the larger awards included one to the Sou-
thern States Iron Roofing e raq, Savannah for pre-
fabricated buildings costinom g8ny5,480; a /3,179,242
contract given the MRS Manufacturing company, Flora
Miss., for tractors; and one for $i3,980,108 to the '
Cleveland Container company, rMemhis, for 3 million
ammunition containers.

RTAg~IL SALES TRENlD DOWNl INI SOUTHEAST

Southeastern retail merchants in the first quarter
of 1952 generally speaking experienced a downward trend
in business activity as compared with the corresponding
period last year, according to the Monthly Retail Trade
Report of the Bureau of the Cansus.
Only two sections of the region in which the Census
Muneaneconducasaisosaonuthy etae iotradeasurveas kadle
Mississippi --- reported gains over last year, 9 and 1
per cent, respectively.
Otherwise, sales were off sharply, ranging from 4
per cent in Augusta, Ga., and Biloxi and Gulfport
Miss., to as high as 18 per cent in Baeon, Ga., and
Johnson City, Tenn. '
Other declijnes in the first quarter included 15 per
cent in Atlanta and Savannah; 13 per cent in Birmingham
and Columbus, Ga; 12 per cent in Kingaport, Tenn., and
Chilton and Perry counties, Ala; 11 per cent in Green-
wood, S. C., and Bleckl~ey and Twiggs counties, Ga.
7 per cent in Bristol, Tenn., and 6 per cent in Ashe-
ville, 8. C.

CONFECTIONIERY MANlUFACURERWS' SALES UP
Confectionery manufacturers in the Southeast ex_
perienced an increase in sales in the first quarter of
1952 as compared with the corresponding period last
year, including a 1 per cent rise in Florida and Georgia
and 6 per cent in the remainder of the South Atlantic
area. In the East South Central section of Alabama,
Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentuckry, sales were 12 per
cent higher.
In Florida and Georgia, 44 firms reported the dollar
volume of sales at $4,070,000, 118 firms in the other
South Atlantic States, $7,699,000, and 53 firms in the
East South Central section, $i3,639,000.


YPA CONTWIUED FROM PAGiE 1

The Appeals or fteMeoa Production Authority
has denied an appeal of the Clearview Louver Window Corpora-
tion, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, for a second quarter 1952
increase in allotment of aluminum, according to an announce-
met. The extra alumirum was to be used in the manufacture
of metal door, sash and trial. The board held that there
adbeen no "persuasive showing" that the appellant would
suffer an exceptional or unreasonable hardship not exper-
ienced by other in the industry by having to operate on the
regularly assigned quantities of the metal.
COTTON DUCK ORDER REVOIKED
MPA has revoked Order Y-53 governing the distribution
of cotton duck. A 30 per cent expansion in prodnetion capac-
ity made the revocation possible. The order was issued
Mac'31, 1951 when military and civilian demand was high
to establish rules for placing, accepting and scheduling
defense-rated orders.
CARDED COTTON SALES IARNI
Production of carded cotton sales yarn in the first
qrerof 1952 totalled 159,638,000 pounds, the Textile
Vision of NPA estimated. WChen final reports are in, it
wsstated, that total may be expected to reach about 163
ilonpounds, a figure approximately 10 per cent above
the 147,519,000 pounds produced in the fourth quarter of
1951.
FIVE METALS ORDERS REVOKED
Complete revocation of five metals orders --- Orders
-19, Y-38, Y-76, u-39, and Y-48 --- and substantial
relaxation of another --- Y-9 --- was announced by N1PA.
Th etals affooted were bisanth, eadmium, the use of lead,
the distribution of lead, and antimony. Supplies of the
affected metal ewere considered sufficient to warrant
abolition or modification of control with indication
that requirements generally could be met throughout the
remainder of 1952.
BRASS MILL PRODUCTS
Distributors of brass mill products and copper wire
milprodnets will be able to replenish their inventories
with materials sold for military, Atomic Energy Commission
and machine tool programs under amendments to Ordere Y-82
and Y-86 issued by NPA. The amendments also provide for
greater flow of dormant materials back into normal channels
p rpeasitting dists maters ta apply the 1(-6 symbol for
NlEWIRONI.STBEE ORDER ISSUED
A new order --- M-105 --- covering the procurement of
mterials and products essential to the day-to-day operation
of the nation's steel mills and to the maintenance and
repair of plants and equipment in the iron and steel industry
asissued. The order provides the industry with a uniform
and comprehensive method of securing priorities assistance
for necessary maintenance, repair and operating supplies
adfor minor capital additions and replacements up to $5,000
in value.
STEEL EMBARGO RESTORED
Reinatitution of the work stoppage in the steel industry
following the decision of the Supreme Court of the United
Sttes brought from NJPA an immediate ban on shipments of
ateel to manufacturers of consumer durable goods so as to
prsrecurrent supplies for vital defense production.
Traction ease in Direction 12 to CMP Regulation 1.
LEATHER ORDER REVOKED
Removal of the last remaining HPA controls on leather
announced with the revocation of Order M-28. The easier
supply situation in leather and its raw materials, including
hesand skins, combined with the falling off in both demand
for military and civilian leather products motivated the
aio.The order, issued January 17, 1951, limited the
volume of rated orders any leather producer was required to
accept to a percentage of average monthly production.
GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2






PAGE 3


More detailed
information on
the Highlights
-of the News in
the Field of
Business is Available at all Department of Commerce
Field Offices.


Chain store and mail-order sales in April totalled
$2.9 billion, 11 per cent more than in the same month
last year. After allowance for the extra trading day in
April of this year, and the later date of Easter, sales
for the month were about 5 per cent larger than the year
ago figure.
*
Manufacturers' April sales expanded over March
rates, while inventories and orders showed little
change, the Office of Business Economics, U. 8. Depart-
ment of Commerce reported. The value of shipments of
all manufacturers wass 5 per cent higher than during
March 1952, and 2 per cent larger than in March 1951*.
*
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing
public reports amounted to $534 million in April or
2 per cent above the $;524 million paid out in the same
nonth a year ago. The dividend rise in April, which was
not a heavy-payment month, was restrained by a 5 per
cent decline in the large manufacturing sector, Outside
of manufacturing there was an overall increase of 6
per cent, from $319 million in April 1951 to $338 mil-
Lion in April 1952.
*
Sales of retail stores in April were 6 per cent
above the same month a year ago. Wlhen account is taken
of the extra trading day and the later date of Easter
this year, the April level was about 3 per cent above
the figure for the same month a year ago. Gales were
generally firm during the month.


NEW B()(KS ;(m Ta O8tuate pta8

LNI) RICPO0RTS ICheck it in Space
dk-1 fIt@ (ff Provided and Send
This Portion of
the Page to the
Nearest Department of Commerce Field Office. Your Name
and Address are on the Opposite Side. Make Remittances
for Sales Material Payable to Treasurer of the United
States. Unpriced Items Are Free*


Z Economic Advances in Southeast in 10-Year Period
--- Press Release CD-52-85
/_1 onthly Retail Trade Report (Place on Mail List)
LILatest National Production Authority Material:
L/ List of Recent Industrial Construction Projects
Cleared Press Release NPA 52-34
D Order Y-53 Revoked L/2 Qders M-19, M-38, M-76,
-39 and M-48 Revoked //Orders M-82)M-86 Amended
U New Order, Y-105 L7 Dir. 12 to CMP Reg. 1
Order M-28 Revoked
Cotton Production & Distribution, Bulletin 188, 201-
/Fruit Spread Production 1950, 204
X-Ray Protection Design, NBS Hiandbook 50, 15#
U_ Methods & Equipment for Testing Printed-Enamel
Felt-Base Floor Covering, NBS Report 130, 154
17 Fire Tests of Gunite Slabs & Partitions, NJBSRpt.131,
15
/7 Strength for the Long Run, Last Quarterly Report to
f)'hdiPlegident oniDef nee Mobilizer nl sosme35 15


/ Z oxorccargrpe a5,Fat FrInutr 17-1,
U Cotton System Spinning Activit~y, FFI M15-3-9/52, 56
/_/Cotton & Linters, April 1952, FFIMI5-1-9-52, 104
ZZonsrution Machinery, 1st Quarter 1952, FFIML36A-1-2, 101
alts & Oils, April 1952, FFI Y17-1-42, 104
Pulp, Paper & Board, Mar. 1952, FFIM14A~-32, 10#
lay Construction Products, Mar. 1952, FFIM26B-32, 104
Ion Poo SteehiFpured & Matr eel lngotFPboduce2)42Rep22t 1

GOW 81100530


A total of 2,348 million linear yards of cotton fabric
were produced in the first quarter of 1952, the Bureau of
the Census reported. This was 2 per cent above the fourth
quarter production but 17 per cent less than in the first
quarter of last year.
*
Outlays for new construction in 1952 are expected to
set a new record of more than $32 billion, according to
a joint statement of the Departments of Commerce and Labor.
This would be about $1 billion more than the revised 1951
total reflecting largely increased expenditures for mili-
tary and atomic energy facilities. Private investment of
more than $21 billion in new construction will vary little
from last year' s total, but public outlays amounting to
nearly $11 billion will represent an increase of $1.6
billion, or 17 per cent, over 1951.
+ + +
Compensation of employees in the first quarter of 1952
increased almost $4 billion from the preceding quarter to
reach an annual rate of $185 billion. This continued the
unbroken advance begun in early 1950 and carried employees
compensation, which forms two-thirds of the national income,
25 per cent above the rate prevailing just prior to the
Korean conflict.
+ *
Employment continued upward in May, with a further ex-
pansion of farm work and some pickup in nonfarm activity
as well, the Bureau of the Census announced. Total employ-
ment in that month for the week ending May 10 was estimated
at 61,176,000 as compared with 60,132,000 in April. The Yay
estimate was about equal to that of the year before and
higher than any other May figure of record.
+asa+
Gross national product --- the market value of the
nation' s output --- was at an annual rate of $;339) billion
in the first quarter of 1952, which compared with $3343
billion in the preceding quarter, the Office of Business
Economics estimated. This moderate increase represented in
the main a larger physical volume of production.

/1 M ortgaged, Residential, Nonfara Properties Acquired
90Dueing s949P &FlasiaBalf of 1950, HC-9, lumber I
Greensboro, N. C. (Census Tracts) P-D22, 154
Texas Number of Inhabitants, P-A43, 304
ag'American Samoa, Canal Zone, Guan,Virgin Islands,
Number of Inhabitants, P-A54, 15#
1950_Densus of Housing:
Atlanta, Ga., block statistics, HI-E9, 30C
Dallas, Texas, block statistics, H-E45, 354
1nua heport on the Labor Force, 1951, P-50, No. 4o
~arital & Family Characteristics of the Labor Force in
the U. S., April 1951, P-50, 39
8 1l Business Aids:
Hobby Shops Can Be Profitable, #504
Catering Services, #5~05
Copyrights & Copyright Office Services, #506
Building Produce Profits Thru Iced Displays, #~508
Starting a Rug & Upholatery cleaning Business, #1509
Selling Related Items Adds to Store Profits, #510
0' How Small Business Can Profit by Using State Employment
Services. #511


Note: With this issue of the Bulletin of Commerce '
the Facts For Industry Report a'





CAILIWIORNI EDING UP ON SOUTH IN COTTONI OUTPUT

California is fast creeping up on the South in the product-
ion of cotton.
According to a report just issued by the Bureau of the
Census, that State from 1910, when its first cotton was produced
in any quantity, up to last year had increased its bale output
by 16,253 per cent and the number of acres on which cotton is
produced in that State by 7,162 per cent.

Note: This report is entitled nCotton Production
and Distribution." It is available at all Department
of Commerce field offices. See Order Blank on Page
3 for listing.

In the same 40 years shown in the review, California' s
cotton acreage went from 8,000 to 1,341,000, and its bale
output from 6,000 to 981,225.
In fact, California' s cotton acreage now is just short of
Georgia' s 1,470,000 and Alabama' s 1,575,000, is not far behind
Arkansas' 2,350,000 and Mississippi' s 2,625,000, and exceeded
Louisiana' 8 1,000,000, North Carolina' s 775,000, South Caro-
Ilna' s 1,170,000, and Tennessee' s 835,000.
While California' s cotton acreage has expanded extraordi-
narily in the 40-year period, that of andt of the deep South
either has grown little, or has actually decreased. For
example, Georgia" a acreage in 1910 was 4,539,000 and last
year had decreased to 1,470,000. Alabama' s went from 3,456,000
to 1,575,000. Yississippi's 40 years ago was 3,322,000, and
last year was 2,625,000. North Carolina' s shrank from 1,251,000
to 775,000. Proportionate decreases also were shown in South
Carolina, Tennessee and Oklahoma. In two States in which in-
ereases were reflected Arkansas and Texas -- the gains were
relatively slight.

PLANT EXPANSIONS CONTINUE OVER REGION
Proposed plant expansions in the Southeast calling for the
expenditure of an estimated $;5,508,800 were announced by the
Defense Production Administration in the latest list of
certificates of necessity issued by that agency
The projects ranged from a $i10,000 improvement in railway
transportation facilities of the Charleston and Western Car~-
lina Railway in Barnwell county, South Carolina, to the develop-
ment of equipment for power generator plants at West Point>
Mississippi, to cost $;1,368,500.
At the same time DPA announced that since the inception of
the plant expansion program approval had been given for such
exasons in the Southeast to cost 81 94'{ 000 000,


SECOND MORTGAGE STILL WPOPLAR IN SOUTH

That second mortgage is still used extensively in the finan-
cing of southern homes.
A Bureau of the Census report just issued shows that of
a total of 507,000 one-dwelling residences purchased in the
region in 1950, 105,000 had two or more mortgages with loans
averaging 17,300.

Note: Copies of this report are available
gratin at Department of Commerce field offices.
See Order Blank qn Page 3 for lsinat.

The report abowed that 39,000 southern homes had two or
more mortgages totalling between $6,000 and $;8,000, the
neoat popular" range of all the loans. Some 22,000 homes had
loans of $8,000 to $10,000 and 14,000 from $10,000 to $15,000.
Such loans on 2,000 were placed at more than $15,000.
The 507,000 home owners reporting to the Bureau had first
mortgages ranging from less than $2,000 to more than $15,000,
with the median loan placed at $5,800. A total of 151,000
had a first mortgage loan of between $6,000 and $8,000. A
loan of $15,000 or more was carried on 6,000.
Of the properties reported, 240,000 were new and 267,000
had been previously occupied. The most popular purchase price
in the region was between $6,000 and $8,000, a total of
115,000 going for that figure. Then came the $8,000 to $10,000
range with 86,000 in that category. In the more than $;14,000
class were 39,000.
The report was for the urban area only and did not cover
farm properties.
Mationwrise, the South had more second-mortgaged one-
dwelling residences than did any other area.

SOUTHEASTERN NEGROES BID FOR U. 8. BUSINESS
A move to pave the way for possible participation by south-
eastern Negro business firms in Federal Government purchasing
operations was taken at a meeting of leading members of the
race held in Atlanta with government officials.
A steeringg committee" composed of seven Negro businessmen
and women was named to devise ways and means~ of obtaining some
of the contracts following a series of talks by representatives
of various procurement agencies operating in the Atlanta area.
The some 25 Negroes attending the meeting were cautioned by
procurement officers that obtaining government contracts was
not an "easy procedure" and that before being given a contract
they wouls' have to possess the necessary "know-how.
ero es-seass


_ t ,________


PENALTY F~OR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300




~p~g~ UNIV. OF FL USR.
DOC_ 8

A DTS *$JS--
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS I U.S. DEPO0tTOR
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BULLET 3 1262 08748 8986


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009

VOLUME 6, NUMBER 12 JUNE 15, 1952




























,Vvu ruru


SOUTHEASTERN BUSINESS CONDITIONS SATISFACTORY
LiFedra Rse
Sixth District *
TEXTILE PRODUCTS Aside from the trade field,
where sharp declines in sales were
waveses.ces registered, business conditions
.0------ ----- in the Southeast in the first
oo ----- -- quarter of 1952 were generally
o ......... .... satisfactory, according to the
230 first quarter summary prepared by
220 th Dprmn o omrete Atlanta Regional Office of the
'@,0 nce..... Deposits in Federal Reserve
a a member banks were up 9 per cent
as compared with the first quarter
of 1951; debits, 3 per cent; new
-eO ***~ business incorporations, 7 per
0"cent; number of telephones in
Source: Federal Reserve' operation, 8 per cent; number of
Bank of Atlanta manufacturing employees, 1 per
/Ala., Fla., Ga., La.,' cent; electric energy produced,
Misa.. Tenn. 12 per cent; railroad freight
revenue, 5 per cent; railroad passenger revenue, 8 per
cent; and airline passengers carried, 8 per cent.

Copies of this report, CD-52-96, are avail-
able without charge at Department of Commerce
field offices. See Order Blank on Page 3.

In the trade field, however, reductions took place
largely because the comparable period was the first quar-
ter of 1951 when abnormal post-Korean buying was still
under way. Retail sales dipped I, to 18 per cent; department
store trade, from 1 to 19 per cent; and wholesale sales
7 and 9 per cent in the East South Central and South Atlan-
tic regions, respectively.

MLOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRA~TIONS HIGH IN REGION
There was a motor vehicle for every 3.4 persons in the
Southeast last year, according to registration figures
supplied by the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department of
Commerce .
Registrations in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas in 1951 totalled 5,988,671,
which included automobiles, busses and trucks. Florida led
in ratio of vehicles ,to population with an average of a
vehicle for every 2.5 persons. Alabama had one for every
4.2 persons; Mississippi, 4.2; North Carolina, 3.5; South
Carolina, 3.2; Tennessee, 3.6; and Georgia, 3.5.
It took 5,292,855,000 gallons of motor fuel to operate
the vehicles, and operators paid.a total of $340,666,000
in State taxes on the fuel. There were 91,472 operated for
public purposes. North Carolina led with~ 18,957.


CLINICS HIELP SOUTHEASTERNl BUSIN~ESSMEN

TH More than $16 million in prime and
subcontracts for defense programs were
awarded to 106 small manufacturers, in-
El~~tona l eluding a number in the Southeast, as
CL 10RC1a result of the Industry Assistance
Clinics held early this year, the
P~adu tion National Production Authority announced.
.4)(11('1011 The clinics were held in 17 cities,
including Birmingham, Miami and Char-
lotte, and contracts were let in all 17.

11t100ffy- Charlotte and subcontracts in both of
those cities and in Birmingham.
The Yunitions Board joined wita NPA
in announcing results of the clinics.
As of April 1 of this year, it was
stated, 48 small companies obtained a
total of $10,589,684 in bid or negotiated
prime contracts, while 58 small concerns
received $5,537,335 in subcontracts.
The clinics, arranged and conducted by the Armed Forces
ReinlCouncils and Department of Commerce-NPA field
offices, in a coordinated effort to develop defense contracts
for small manufacturers of less essential consumer-type
pocts who received low allotments of controlled materials
for the first quarter of this year, were attended by 1,127
epeeatives of anall firms out of 2,571 invited.
HAQRDSHEIP ACCOUNT BENIEFICIAL
Thirty-six small manufacturers in the Southeast were
given supplemental allotments of steel, copper and aluminum
under the so-called "Small Business Hardship Account" of
the National Production Authority in the second quarter of
1952, according to an NPA announcement.
Those receiving the assistance included 14 firms in
loida; 8 in Alabama; 5 each in Tennessee and Georgia; 2
in South Carolina; and I each in North Carolina and Mississ-
ippi.
The additional allotments were made upon representation
of the firms that they were faced with failure or prolonged
shutdown because of low allotments of controlled materials,
and their inability to obtain defense work.
Applications for similar assistance for the third quarter
of the year are being received in Commerce Department of-
fices in the Southeast.
Nationally, a total of 452 small manufacturers of
civilian-type products were given the assistance out of a
total of 539 applications. The applications approved were
spread over 36 States. The allotments made ranged from
6,277 tons of carbon steel to 4,396,816 pounds of aluminum.
Alowere 96 tons of alloy steel, 37,103 pounds of stainless
steel, 2,172,323 pounds of copper brass mill, and 91,257
pounds of copper waire mill.
SEE NPA CONTINUED ON PAGE 2


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S. C., Columbia, S. C.,
716 Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111

Tampa, Fla.,
L20 W. Lafayette St.,
Tel. 8-6081-2


Hemphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426
POLUmEr 6 NUMBRru 1)


Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala., aashrille, Tenn.,: Savannah, Ga.,
308 Federal Bldg., 662 UJ. S. Court 218 P. O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206 H~ouse,Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755


Y LUJ 1 1952


S/ If ;t & 7 b/ 2

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE






PAGE 2

FIRST UPTURN IN WHEOLESALE SALES IN REGION

April of this year brought the first upturn in sales
in the southeastern wholesale trade field.
After reflecting month-to-month reductions as com_
pared with corresponding months last year, sale in
April of this year were 7 per cent greater than in the
same month last year in the South Atlantic and 8 per
cent in the East South Central section, the largest
percentage gains shown by any region in the country
and substantially more than the 4 per cent increase
for the nation, according to the Monthly Wholesale
Trade Report issued by the Bureau of the Census.
The report showed, however, a 4 per cent overall
decline in the South Atlantic region and 5 per cent
in the East South Central section in cumuilative sales
for the four-month period ending in April of this
year as compared with last year, due primarily to the
decreases shown this year in January, February and
March .
April' s upturn took place after automotive supplies
showed gains of 11 per cent in the South Atlantic and
19 per cent in the South Central, with proportionate
increases registered for some electrical goods, furni-
ture and house furnishings, hardware, beer, confection-
ery, drugs and sundries and other products.
Another encouraging sign for the region's whole-
salers, the report showed, was a 6 per cent reduction
in the value of inventories of wholesale goods in the
South Atlantic area at the end of April from the same
time last year, and an 11 per cent decrease in the
East South Central section. Such goods in the South
Atlantic were valued at $129,678,000 at the end of
April this year, and $49,159,000 in the East South
Central region.

ASSETS OF SOUTHEASTERN BANKS INCREASE

Assets of all operating banks in the Southeast at
the end of 1951 totalled $12,458,627,000, a 10 per cent
rise over 1950, according to a report of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation just issued.
Assets increased from 7 per cent in Tennessee to as
high as nearly 18 per cent in South Carolina. Demand
deposits advanuth aoml nper nent in Tenne see to 20

per cent in Mississippi to 11 per cent in Florida.
All States except North Carolina abowed increases
in number of operating banks.
Two States, Alabama and Georgia, concluded the year
with slight decreases in loans and discounts, 1.4 and
1.1 per cent, respectively. Otherwise, gains were shown
of from 2 per cent in Tennessee to 14 per cent in
Florida.

FERROUS CASTINGS SHIPMENTS 2.4 KILLION TONS

The Southeast in 1950 shipped 2,394,050 abort tons
of ferrous castings, most of which consisted of gray
iron castings. Only 42,817 tons were steel castings
and 18,308 tons malleable iron castings. '
The shipments included 566,156 tons from the South
Atlantic region and 1,827,894 tons from the East South
Central section. Shiprments from the two regions con-
stituted 17 per cent of the 16,147,786 tons shipped in
the nation as a'wphole.
The figures were supplied by the Bureau of the
Census in its Facts For Industry Report entitled Iron
and Steel Castings and Steel Ingots. 1950. ~~~
Nationally, the shipments were some 3 million short
tons greater than in 1949. Activity in the last half of
1950 was at a much higher rate than in the first 6
months of that year, the Bureau reported,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

HPA Continued From Page 1

CARDED COTTON SALES IARN
Productio o cf csarded~coton sae arn in the first
quarter of 1952 totalled 159,638,000 pounds, NPA's Textile
Division reported. When final reports are in, it was stated,
the total may be expected to reach about 163 million pounds,
approximately 10 per cent above the 147,519,000 pounds
produced in the fourth quarter of 1951.
The first quarter's output was not as high as production
in the first and second quarters of 1951, which reached
194,182,000 and 174,487,000 pounds, respectively. This,
however, it was added, indicated a reversal of the downward
trend that began in the second quarter of 1951 and is as
high as the quarterly average for 1951.
COTTOd DUCK
Cotton duck production during the first quarter of 1952
set a postwar record of 108 million linear yards, according
to a report of NPA' s Textile Division. Continuing a trend
that started early in 1951, the first quarter's production
represented an increase of 14.8 million yards, or 16 per
cent above the output during the fourth quarter of 1951 and
was 24.6 million yards or 29 per cent more than during the
first quarter of 1951.
ASBESTOS FIBRE
Asbestos cloth requirements of the Navy in 1952-53 are
in excess of supply because of lack of sufficient quantities
of crude fibre for production, members of the Asbestos Fibre
and Textile Manufacturers Industry Advisory Committee told
officials of NPA at a Washington meeting. Almost all of the
U. S. supply of the fibre is imported mainly from Canada
and Southern Rhodesia. Some increase in the supply from both
foreign and domestic sources is expected in 1953, but not in
sufficient quantity to meet the Navy need, it was stated.
For the Navy, the solution seemed to be (1) use of substitute
materials, or (2) deferment of portions of its program.
SCARCE MATERIAS LIST
MPA has announced the removal of more than a score of
items from its Designation 1, formerly NPA Notice 1, listing
scarce materials that are subject to anti-hoarding controls
of the Defense Production Act. The action was intended to
make the list current by reflecting changes in the supply-
demand situation of materials since November 1951, date of
the last amending of the order. The revised list now conforms
with NPA regulations and orders relating to inventory control.

Three relaxations of rubber controls which will lift
restrictions on the use of Number 3 grade pale crepe rubber,
increase the permitted use of high tenacity rayon and increase
the permitted purchase of cold GR-8 (Government-produced)
synthetic rubber was ordered in an amendment to Order 11-2,
Traction was in line with NPA' s policy of relaxing material
captrols whenever increased supplies become available.
AUTO WRECKLERS
Early revocation of Order Y-92 requiring inventory reports
from automobile wreckers, limiting acceptance of used car
deliveries, and making wreckers subject to allocation
directives was urged upon NPA by the Auto Wreckers Industry
AdioyCommittee. The committee, representing 25,000 auto
wrecking yards, informed NPA that Y-92 has achieved its
objective, namely, expediting the flow of critically-needed
scrap to steel allls, and that there is no further justifica-
tion for its continuance.
D~IAMOND GRINDING WHEELS
Order M-103 has been amended to permit the manufacture of
some necessary shapes of diamond grinding wheels. The amendment
served as a clarifying measure.
BASIC PRIORITIES RULES
Interpretation 3 to NPA Regulation 2 has been issued
coeigthe use of "DO" (defense order) ratings for the lease
machinery or equipment on a long terse basis where it is
customary for the manufacturer of the item not to sell it.







1


.r- More Detailed
Infqrgation On
The H~ighlights
of the News in
= The Field qf
Bqsinesp is A-
vailable at all Deparrtment of Commerce Field Offices.
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. _

Personal income in April wras at an annual rate of
$259 billion, slightly higher than in March, the Of-
fice of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Com-
merce reported. The small change was in line with the
general stability of total personal income which has
been in evidence since last October when the annual
rate was $258 billion. Except for moderate increases
in dividend receipts and the income of nonfarm pro-
prietors, the major components of personal income were
virtually unchanged in April.
*
Manufacturers' shipments of complete tractors and
tractor attachments and parts amounted to $1,417 mil-
lion in 1951, an increase of 29 per cent over the
$1,098 million shipped in 1950, the Bureau of the
Census announced. The value of complete tractors ship-
ped during 1951 was $1,043 million compared with $820
million in 1950. Shipments of attachments and parts
for tractors were valued at $374 million in 1951, an
increase of 35 per cent over the 1950 value of $278
million.
*
Cuttings of most types of men'sa apparel in April
remained below 1951 levels and also registered de-
creases from March 1952 cuttings. Weekly cuttings of
men's regular-weight suits averaged 174,400 in April,
more than a third under the A pril 1951 average; sum-


mer-weight suit cuttings of 118,300 suite were 17 per cent
below cuttings in April of last year. There were 66,400
overcoats and topcoats out each week of April, 36 per cent
less than cuttings in April a year ago.
*
Total business inventories at the end of April were
estimated at $71.2 billion. After adjustment for seasonal
variations, total business inventories increased $400 mil-
lion during April 1952. Manufacturers' and retailers'
stocks each increased almost $250 million, with the gains
occurring almost entirely in durable goods. Wholesalers'
inventories were almost $100 million below the previous
month.
+ + *
Expenditures for newn construction in May 1952 rose
$2 3-4 billion dollars, setting a new record for the month,
according to a joint report of the Departments of Colmmerce
and Labor. During the first five months of 1952, total new
construction outlays amounted to $11.9 billion, 3 per cent
more than the total for the corresponding period of last
year. Seasonal advances in most types of construction in
maintained total construction activity at a level
moderately above a year ago.
++ w +
Total wholesalers' sales in April were estimated at
$/8,160 million, which, after allowance for seasonal varia-
tions, was 5 per cent more than in March. Sales by durable-
goods dealers at $2,726 million, and by nondurable-goods
dealers at $5,434 million, showed seasonally adjusted in-
oreases of 10 and 3 per cent respectively from March.
+++++
The United States provided a $3 billion market for foreign
services of all kinds in 1951, and foreign countries in
return spent about: $2.8 billion for services from the United
States. Both totals reflect large increases over the preced-
in erand a record peacetime flow in bt ietos
U Small Sawrmill Operator's M annual Agricultural Handbo~ok
Number 27, 654
Facts For Industry Reports:
SFats & Oils, Consumption by Usea, April 1952, lu#
Flour Milling Products, Apr. 1952, 54
Mechanical Stokers, Apr. 1952, 54
Fara Pumps, Apr. 1952, 54
K~nit Underwear &r Nightwear, Apr. 1952, 54
Fans, Blowers & Unit Hleaters, Summary for 1951, 104
Steel Shipping Barrels, Drums &r Pails, Summary for 1951,15#
Shoes & Slippers, Mar. 1952, 10P
Inorganic Chemicals, U. S. Production, Mar. 1952, 104
Nonferrous castings, 1950, 254
Synthetic Broad Woven Goods, 1st Quarter 1952, 104
Wool Manufactures, Mar. 1952, 104
Asphalt & Tar Roofing &r Siding Products, Apr. 1952, St
01eomargarine, 1951, 54
Carded Cotton Sale Yarn, 1st Quarter 1952, 5#
SalBusiness Aids:
Regulation of Trade Practices, #512
Modern Lighting Increases Retail Sales, #513
Establishing a Collection Agency, #514
How Field Warehousing Helps Solve Manufacturers &
Distributor Credit Problems, #515
Post Office Service of Interest to Small Business, #1516
Appraising &r Buying a Retail or Service Busin~ess, #517
iWhat the Amended Social Security Act Means to the
Self-Employed, #518
Capacities of Plumbing Stacks in Buildings, National
Bureau of Standards Building Katerials &r Structures Rpt.132
S84th Quarterly Report of Lumber Survey Committee to
Secretary of Commerce
Population of the United States, Urban &r Rural, By
__States, April 1, 1950, Series PC-9, No. 3
S/Population of the United States, By Regions, Divisions
&r States, and of its Territories, Possessions, Eto.,
April 1, 1950, Series PC-9, No. 2


To Obtain Copies of
NEW B()(KS ,4 $This Material Check
It In Space Provi-
~;;4pi4 ANDl ItFORT)IlS ded And Send This
4.1 I 48 / Section of the
Bulletin of Com-
aerce to the Nearest Department of Commerce Field Of-
fice. Your Name & Address Are On The Opposite Side.
Make Remittances for Sales Material Payable to Treas-
urer of the United States. Unpriced Items Are Free.


'7 First Quarter 1952 Summary of Business Condit-
ions in Southeast, CD-52-96
Mi otor Vehicle Registrations, Fuel Consumed, Etc.,
S1952
SNational Production Authority Material:
if Designation 1 Amended U/.Order Y-2 Amended
/U Murder Y-103 Amended L/Interpretation 3,Reg. 2
County and City Data Book, 1949, Supplement to
SStatistical Abstract, $3.50 Buckram Bound
S/ U, 8. Census of Business, 1948:
7 Volume 1, Retail Trade General Statistics,
Part 1, Buckram Bound, $4.50
/ M monthly Report on the Labor Force, May 1952, P-57115
/ Iron & Steel Castings and Steel Ingots,1950,
Facts For Industry, 121-1-00, 254
/ / 1950 Census of Housing Vacant Dwelling Units in
SGeorgia, April 1, 1950, Series HC-7, Number 11
/ 1950 Census of Agriculture Farm Census Shows
Changes in Puerto Rico, Series AC50-1
I / 950 Censue of Population South Carolina -
Population-General Characteristics, by State,
-- County and Area, PB40, 500
-J'Public Roads A Journal of H~ighway Research,
Subscription Rate, $1 A Year


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BULLETI 3 1262 08748 8978


PAGE 4


PED ARTMENT OF COMME E


YYLIU;I~ ~ UIUILYVVYILVI~YY~ C VYYLV W~UIYI VVrYn~l VlU


.


SOUTHEAST LOSES LEAD IN OUTPUT OF BOXES AND SHOOK

The Southeast in the first quarter of 1952 yielded to the
New England region the lead for the eastern half of the
United States in the production of boxes and shook by regis-
tering a 16.7 per cent reduction as compared with the first
quarter of 1951, according to the 84th Quarterly Sumrmary
Report of the Lumber Survey Committee to the Secretary of
Commnerce .
The report placed the production of those commodities in
the region in the first quarter of this year at 17,006,760
board feet compared wAith 20,408,522 feet in the first quar-
ter of 1951 when the area led all regions east of the
Rockies.


SOUTHWEST IS STILL PREDOMINANTLY RURAL

Fifty-four per cent of the total population of the South
Atlantic and East South Central regions of the United States,
comprising, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee,
the Carolinas and Virginias, K~entuckry, Delawrare, Maryland
and the District of Columbia, is classified as rural by the
Bureau of the Census in reports from the 1950 census of
population just issued.
The Bureau places the total population of the 12 States
and the District of Columbia at 32,659,516 of which 17,783,582
are in the rural category.

These reports are available gratis at
Department of Commerce field offices. See
Page 3 for listing.

Among the individual states in the nation, Mississippi
is listed as the second most rural with only 27.9 per cent of
is populationpopssaed asourban. Nort bDakoet le ds thernation

the District of Columbia, whose population, of course, is
regarded as 100 per cent urban, the most "citified" State
in the United States is New Jersey with an urban population
of 86.6 per cent. Second in that class is New York, with
85.5 per cent urban.
In a second release on that subject, the Census Bureau
gives the ranking of all States in total population which
shows that in the Southeast North Carolina is tenth among
all States; Georgia is thirteenth; Tennessee, sixteenth;
Alabama, seventeenth; Florida, twentieth; Mississippi, trenty-
sixth; and South Carolina, twrenty-seventh, see ns-ssase


Note: Copies of this report are avail-
able. See Page 3 for listing.


I
I
The United States Department of Commerce is establishing a "cooperative" office in the Augusta
Chamber of Commerce to assist business men and other interested persons needing the services of
the Department of Commerce, and particularly the National Production Authority, its agency in
charge of conserving the nation's strategic materials for the program of defense.
The office will function through a cooperative arrangement entered into by the Department of
Commerce and the Augusta Chamber of Commerce, which is providing space and other facilities for
its operation. The office is being established so that the Department of Commerce will have
representation in the rapidly-expanding Savannah River Basin and on-the-spot assistance can be
given in connection with matters handled by NPA and the Department as a whole
e


PaThe raea r gionalnleadefiin theacountoy th we ear, tethe
output was 109,816,000 board feet, a 4 per cent drop from
the 114,564,000 feet produced in the same period last year.
The deep South led the nation in percentage decrease in
production with a decline of 44 per cent.
In its quarterly summary the committee said the lumber
market in the first quarter was characterized by a feeling
of uncertainty. International affairs, the domestic politic-
al situation, and noonfused state of the economy" contributed
to a wait and see"' attitude evident ~in all phases of the
Lumber industry, it stated. Production in the first quarter,
Lt was added, while below the corresponding period of 1951
comparedd favorably with first quarter volume of earlier years


PanALTr FoR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300





UNIV.I OF FL LIB.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORI~DA U.S. DEPO91TOPIY
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINSSVILLE, FLORIDA


3. OEPARTMENIT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
I'el. WA-4121 Ext. 453

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009
;UME 6, NUMBER 13 JULY 1, 1952









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








VOLUME 6. NUMBER 1L JULY 15, 1952


biPA APROESQ EADDTIQHALEEQJECTS


onForty-four of the applications for permission to carry
out the egnatraction under NPA'sa "controlled materials
plann were approved with allotments of materials granted;
in one case it wnas found that an allotment was not neces-
sary; and three others were held exempt from the program.

These approved projects are listed in Press
Release NPA 52-36 available through the nearest
Department of Commerce field office in the
Southeast.

The allotments were for materials to be delivered in
the third quarter of 1952 or in subsequent quarters, but
the statement wass made that the action was taken before
the start of the current work stoppage in steel mills and
that, as is the case with all such allotments, they must
be subject to revision.
The projects cleared in the Southeast included two in
Alabama to cost $365,000; 11 in Florida at a cost of
$2,638,607; 5 in Georgia costing $)2,782,500; 5 in Misa-
issippi, $434,275; 8 in South Carolinas $3,4622,610; and
13 in Tennessee to cost $7,066,835.

NPA has taken act~oion tFio provide hohe bidrsith
aluminum and to increase supplies of copper for home-
building and for other purposes. The action was taken in
amendments to Direction 1 to CMP Regulation 1, to Revised
CMP Regulation 6, and to NPA Order Y-100.
The additional metals will be available through self-
certification. Here, in brief, is what the amendments do:
1. Provides self-authorisation of sq? So 250 pounds of
aluminum in the building of dwelling units to house up to
four families.
2. Increases self-certification of copper for such
purposes .
SEE NPA Contioned on Pare 2


RETAIL SALES IN SOUTHEAST START UP AGAIN
Retail sales in
RETAIL RDEOTINAOUTSEEHODLD ALPPSLILANSE DEALERS April iR mOSt R-
reas in which the
n '*""""o Do""******jeto~l., Bureau of the Cen-
nousanssus conducts its
monthly surveys
1 ,,0 showed an increase
over the corres_
ponding month
'"20011-- __ __ -I____. I last year, after
declines in a maj_
ority of the sec_
Ison -%B-~C---~----------- ** tions were shown
in the first three
months of 1952.
ia~~Lf~ I ,I,, nin, oThe upwardimicad
mmon~cuse movement on the
part of wholesale sales in the same months, gains having
been recorded in that division of the southeastern trade
field in both the South Atlantic and East South Central
regions .

Note: Under a policy just established by the
Department of Commeree, the Monthly Retail
Trade Reports are now on a sales basis. See
the announcement in another section of this
Bulletin of Commerce.

The increases in retail sales in the area in April
included 8 per cent in Birmingham; 22 per cent in At-
lanta and' Savannah; 30 per cent in Augusta; 26 per cent
Ln Columbus; 32 per cent in Macon; 17 per cent in Biloxi
11 per cent in Manatee and Sarasota counties, Florida;
6 per cent in Clarkadale; 7 per cent in Gulfport; 15
per cent in Asheville; 4 per cent in Bristol; and 1 per
cent in Johnson City. Only in Greenwood, 8. C., did a
decline come, 1 per cent, and in K~ingaport, Tenn., the
situation was unchanged.

EXPOTS.MPOTS RE UP IN REGION
The dollar value of exports through customs dist-
riots in the Southekst in the first quarter of 1952
was more than $3 million greater than for the same
priod last year, and the value of imports was nearly
)25 million more.
The total dollar value of exports in the region in
the first quarter of this year was $119.3 million as
compared with $116.1 million for the same time last
year. Iayorts this year approximated $100.1 million
against $75.4 million in the same period in 1951.


Atlanta, Ga.,
7th Floor, Forayth Bldg.,
Tel. W1-4121,Ex.453

Memrphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Birminghasm, Ala.,
266 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355

Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Charleston, 8. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771

Mobile, Ala.,'
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, MYiss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
1625 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111

Tampa, Fla.,
420 W.Lafayette St.,
Tel. 8-'6081-82


Nashville, Tenn.,
662 UJ.S.dourt
Hlouse,Tel.42-9651


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P.O.dldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Construction of commercial, re-
ligious, entertainment and rmuni-
cipal projects in the Southeast
to cost approximately $16.7 m~il-
lion has been approved by the
National Production Authority.
Included were hotels in Atlanta,
Yiani and AIken, S. C., two bank.
buildings, forest fire lookout
towers over Georgia, and several
churches. One of the hotels, to be
located in Augusta, w~ill cost
nearly $2 million.
The projects include both those
already underwey as well as new


11% IC)ity





NPA CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

3. Increases amounts of aluminum and copper that may
be self-certified in the building of schools, hospitals,
and structures for the handling of industrial and consumer
products, and other commercial activities.
4. Liberalized allotments of controlled materials for
manufacturers by revising the quarterly cipplication
procedure .
5. Increased amounts of aluminum for self-certification
in industrial construction.
6. Liberalized restrictions on the manufacture of "B"
products .
At the same time, NPA indefinitely postponed the
carrying out of plans for liberalizing self-authorization
of materials for the construction of projects for amnuse-
ment and recreational purposes announced some time ago.
The steel work stoppage was given as the reason.
NPA COMPLIA#_DE STEPPED UP
Action to ste~p unp coplincewit N orders and regula-
tions was taken at meetings of legal and compliance person-
nel held recently in Washington and Atlanta. The Washington
meeting was attended by Regional Attorneys and Hearing
Commissioners from throughout the country. In attendance
also were representatives of the NPA General Counsel' s
office in Washington. Participating in the Atlanta meeting
were compliance officials from Washington and Atlanta
who discussed activities in the Southeast with investigators
of NPA field offices in the region.
MINING MACHINERY
In an amendment io rder MI-78, NPA liberalized provisions
for the procurement of maintenance, repair and operating
supplies and capital additions; brought the order more
in line with CMIP Reguilation 3 establishing a uniform proced-
ure for obtaining controlled and non-controlled materials
for MIRO use, and minor capital additions; and simplified
and clarified procedures used by foreign producers to
obtain equipment and controlled materials.
BRISTLES
Order MI-18 dealing g~s' and hogs' bristles and
bristle products has been revoked because there has been
increased acceptance of substitute materials for China
hog bristles combined with relatively small defense re-
quirements .
RUBBER
Rubber Order Y-2 was amended authorizing the private
purchase of natural rubber latex,
STEEL DISTRIBUTORS
Procedures to aid m~~;anu~~Facurrso machine tools in
obtaining steel from warehouses which were due to expire
June 16 were extended until December 31, 1952 in an
amendment to Direction 1 to Order M-6A.
EMERGENCY STEEL PROGRAM
Emergency action io mt-aintaina long as possible an
uninterrupted flow of components and sub-assemblies contain-
ing steel to aircraft and amanunition factories, atomic
energy projects and other vital defense programs during the
period of the work stoppage in the steel industry was
announced by NPA in the issuance of Direction 4 to CMP Reg.3.
NAPHTHE;NIC ACID
Removal of allocation controls on naphthenic acid, a
petroleum product used in the manufacture of napalal, paint
driers, textile imlpregnants, cutting oils, and emulsifying
agents was taken through revocation of Schedule 1 to Order
M-45 .

Because f rcen velpmets in the world copper
situation, NPA has revised its copper raw materials distribu-
tion Order M-16 for domestic and foreign refined copper
to insure an equitable distribution of both. The new distri-
bution method provides a separate monthly allocation of
domestic refined copper to brass mills, foundries, ingot
makers and miscellaneous producers.


FliAR INCOME II SOUTHEAST UP 153.8 MILLION
Southeastern farmers in the first four months of
1952 experienced an increase in cumulative total cash
receipts from their marketing of $53,883,000, or from
$763,078,000 in the first four months, of 1951 to
$816,961,000 in the comparable period this year, ac-
cording to a report of the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
The gains included from $105,722,000 to $131,437,-
000 in Georgia; $87,442,000 to $113,934,000 in North
Carolina; $42,676,000 to $56,706,000 in South Caro-
lina, and $75,699,000 to $86,475,000 in Alabama.
The increase for the region as a whole came des-
pite declines of from $217,606,000 to $208,824,000 in
Florida; $127,822,000 to $125,216,000 in Tennessee;
and $106,111,000 to $94,369,000 in Mississippi.
Regionally, crop sales showed an increase' of from
$420,033,000 to $763,078,000, and livestock and its
products from $343,045,000 to $367,164,000, reflecting
sharp gains in Georgia, North Carolina and Alabama.
ANOTHER SOU H AST(RN DEFENSE POOL FORMED '
Form~aio'n oif anokI~~er deens prducionpoo in'
the Southeast, the third to be organized in the '
region and the fourteenth for the nation was an- '
nounced by the Defense Production Administration.
The latest to be formed is the Metal Products '
Company Production Pool of Nashville, Tenn. It '
is composed of 15 members, 14 of whom are manu- *
facturing concerns. The other is the Vanderbilt '
University School of Engineering, which will pro-'
vide testing, research and consulting services. '
SThe other two pools organized in the Southeast '
are the Florida WAood Cooperative and Dade County '
Industries. Inc., both of Miami. Fla. '

13 MILZ~~lON IN PLANT XASIONS 0.K.'D

Expenditure of more than $13 million in plant ex-
pansions and improvements in the Southeast was approved
by the Defense Production Administration in latest
lists of certificates of necessity issued for tax
amortization purposes.
The projects included a $9.3 million electric power
development for Riviera, Fla., one for Copperhill,
Tenn., in the amount of $2,944,500 to produce sulphuric
acid; and an improvement of railway transportation
facilities between Birmingham and Montgomery to cost
$1,012,087.

DUCK AND WEBBING POOL FORMED FOR ARIY

Southeastern dealers in duck and webbing will
be interested in an announcement from the Department
of Defense that policies and procedures have been
established for operation of a pool' by the Army
Quartermaster Corps, and that for the fiscal year 1952
the sum of $200,000,000 has been appropriated to
finance purchases of those products.
Under the program, the Quartermaster General of the
Army is assigned responsibility for administering and
managing the pool to supply enrrent duck and webbing
requirements of all the Armed Forces. Administration
and management functions will include control over
pool inventories, stock levels, expenditure and re-
investment of pool funds, and distribution of items.
Its purpose is to maintain a stock of duck and web-
biing from which current military requirements will be
supplied. To accomplish this *the pool will receive
from each military department a forecast of its ,re-
quirements for the ensuing year.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





Business is Artilable at all Department
Field Offices*


Output in 1951 of synthetic plastics and resin mat-
erials as a group amounted to 2,431 million pounds as
compared with 2,151 million pounds in 1950, the pre-
vious record, the United States Tariff Commission has
announced in a preliminary report. Sales in 1951 were
2,023 million pounds, valued at 711 million dollars
compared with 1,876 million pounds, valued at 571 mil-
lion dollars in 1950, an increase of 8 per cent in
quantity and 25 per cent in value.
*
United States exports in May were valued by the
Bureau of the Census as $1,485 million in a preliminary
estimate, a higher total valuation than for any month
of record. It was about 10 per cent above the April
total of $1,331 million. The highest previous recorded
exports were in December 1951 when the total was $1,437.7
million, and in Mlay 1944 the total was $1,455.2 mil-
lion.
*
The national output continued its moderate advance in
the second quarter of 1952 with the defense program ac-
counting for most of the rise, the Office of Business
Economics announced in its June issue of the publication
Survey of Current Business. Private fixed capital in-
vestment remained strong. Consumer expenditures rose
slightly, with current dollar totals approximating the
postwar high, but volume was still below the early 1951
peak.

NEW BOOKSTo Obtain C pe
NINE 3()OES ;( li a this Yate ta"
v. Ng ggR()j{][ Check it in Space
St<( p'f ,Provided and Send I
This Portion of I
the Page to the
Nearest Department of Commerce Field Office. Your Name
and Address are on the Opposite. Side. Make Remittances
for Sales Material Payable to Treasurer of the U~nited
States. Unpriced Items Are Free.



/ M Ionthly Retail Trade Report, 100 each, $1 year
U atest National Production Authority_l~aterials
U Direction to CKP Reg. 1 Amended Ui CMP Reg. 6
Revised Amended U Order Y-100 Amended
Order Y-78 Amended ff~rder M-18 Amended
Order M-2 Amended 30'Dir. 1 to Order Y-6A
SDir. 4 to CHP Reg. 3 20'Schedule 1 to Order M45
SOrder M-16 Revised
Industrial Dispersion Guidebook for Conmmunities,20#
W~ood Conservation Bibliography, 400
Foreign Commerce Weekly, $3.50 a Year
19.50 Census of H~ousing:Block Statistics:
U/ emphis, Tenn., 354 U'charlotte, N.C., 204
L7Provisional Estimates of the Population of the U.S.,
April 1, 1950 to May 1, 1952, P-25, No. 60
U_ U S. Census of Business:1948:
Volume II, Retail Trade General Statistics,
Part 2 Merchandise Line Sales Statistics,
Buckram Bound, $4.50
VHardware, Plumbing & Heating Equipment, Trade
Series, Bulletin 3-13, 404


Sales of all retail stores in May were about 6 per cent
above the same month a year ago. A strengthened tone was
evident in most sectors. After adjustment for seasonal
factors and trading day differences, sales in May were 2
per cent up from April. The increases in April and May more
than made up the decline previonely shown from February to
March with total sales seasonally adjusted reaching a high
for the year.
+ + +
The business population in 1952 consisted of slightly
more than 4 million firms, just above the previous postwar
peak reached in June 1948, the Office of Business Economics
announced. Despite the diversity of conditions which chalr-
aeredthe period from 1948 to date, the overall number
offirms in operation has been notably stable.
+ + +
American business plans to continue plant and equipment
exedtures at a high rate through the third quarter of 1952
aorigto a joint report of the Office of Business Econo-
ics, U. S. Department of Commerce and the Securities and
ExhneCommission. Current spending plans at $6.4 billion
an 6.1 billion, respectively, during the second and third
qrers of this year were at record rates, after allowance
for seasonal factors.
t +
In the first quarter of 1952, the deficit of foreign
cuteswith the United States in the exchange of goods and
sevcstotalled a quarter of a billion dollars compared
ith $1.9 billion in the fourth quarter of 1951. Foreign
cutesdrew upon their gold and dollar assets to the
exetof $370 million to finance that deficit.
+ +
First quarter production of woolen and worsted fabric'
as3 per cent below fourth quarter 1951 output, the Bureau
ofthe Census reported, and first quarter 1952 production of
ronand acetate broad woven goods amounted to 436 million
Lieryards, 2 per cent above the preceding quarter but 32
decent below the first quarter production last year.

F42ts For Industries Series:
steel vorgings, Apr. 1952, MI220-42, 54, 50t a Year
Iron & Steel Castings & Steel Ingots, M21-1-42, 5C,81.25Pr.
WAood Charcoal, Jan.-Mar.1952, 5), 504 Ir. M195-32
Red Cedar Shingles, Apr. 1952,1130-42, 5#, 504 Yr.
Complete Aircraft & Aircraft Engines, Apr.1952,10e,$1.25Yr.
Cotton & Linters Consumption, Stocks., Imports, Exports,
-& Active Cotton Spindles,M~ay 1952, MI5-1-10-52,100,$1Yr.
eSuperphosphate, Apr. 1952, M119D-42, 54, 504 Tr.
STruck Trailers, Apr. 1952, Y45F-42, 54, 500 Yr.
Kn git Cloth for Sale, 1951, M15K-01, 5e
Paint, Varnish & Lacquer, Total Factory Shipments, M197-42,
54, 50e Ir.
fZrends in the Tobacco Trade, ALpr. 1952
ensin the Drug Trade, Apr. 1952
rnsin the Dry Goods Trade, Apr. 1952
Trends in the Grocery Trade, Apr'. 1952
Small Business Aids:
Regulation of Trade Practices, #1512
Modern Lighting Increases Retail Salse, #513
Establishing a Collection Agency, #514
How Field W~arehousing helps Solve Manufacturers'
and Distributors' Credit Problems, #515
Post Office Service of Interest to Small Business, #fi516
Appraising & Buying A Retail or Service Business,#517l
What The Amended Social Security Act Heans to The
Self-Employed, #518
---ojREboIMPORTAN ANNDUNEMENT'
SIn conformity with policy, the U. S. Department of Commerce'
Sis placing ite Monthly Retail Trade Report on a sales basis
Effective at once. The report is priced at 10 cents a copy
and $1 a yeaS. Free distribution will be limited to certain
'.organizations and individuals cooperating in.its publication.'
'The Department recently placed its Facts For Industrr ReDortr ,
on a sales basis. (See prices of' some above).


Lore detailed
Information on
the Hlighlights
of the News in
the Field of
of Commerce


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

llI~IIYIlAIIIUIllllil
PAGE 4 BULLE1 3 1262 08748 8960


I W NE IWIAIW F SUHETR [INS
SThe United States Department of Commerce has announced '
the issuance of two new publications which should be of '
primary interest to southeastern businessmen. One is en- '
i titled "Industrial Dispersion Guidebook for Communities,"'
the third of a series on that subject. As the title im- '
plies, it tells how national dispersion standards may be '
applied to any particular metropolitan area through the a
organization of effective committees for that purpose. '
It sells for 20 cents. '
The other publication is designed primarily for those '
in the Southeast interested in the proper use of wood '
and development of uses for waste wood. It contains al- '
most 3,000 references under 10 subject-matter classifi- '
nations. This publication is priced at 40 cents a copy, '


AUGUSTA HAD LOW~EST AVERAGE RENT.,SUIRVEY SHOWS
Residents of Augusta in 1950 were paying the lowest average
monthly rent of 29 cities in the South and Mliami landlords were
collecting the highest, according to a study of "block statis-
ties" from the 1950 Census of Housing made by the Atlanta of-
fice of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
The census, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, showed
that the average monthly rent paid in Augusta was $b22.69 while
M~iami was collecting $59.93.

Note: These "block statistics" reports are on
sale at all Department of Commnerce field offices
at very nominal prices.

Memphis had the largest number of homes with no running
water, 21,475, and the highest number with no private bath,
43,998. But, by the same token, that city also showed the
largest number of owner and renter-occupied homes of the 29
cities reflected in the compilation.
Charleston, S. C., had the lowest number of owner-occupied
homes, with 4,690 and Fort Smith, Ark., the lowest number of
renter-occupied dwelling units, 5,468.
The lowest number of homes with no running water was in
Orlando, Fla., which had only 944 in that category and Ashe-
ville, N. C., boasted of the lowest number with no private
bath, 3,386.


'A BRAND NEWI FOREIGN COMlMERCE WEEKLY IS ANNOUNCED

SA "better, faster, lower-cost business service for oper-'
eating exporters, importers and others actively engaged in '
world trade" is assured for southeastern businessmen by
the United States Department of Commerce as a result of
action taken to revise the Department's, Foreign Commerce '
Weekly."
SEffective July 7, the publication, the official periodi-'
eal of the Department' s Office of International Trade
began to include more world trade information, arranged
more conveniently, and presented in more readable form.
It is being prepared more quickly, printed on higher_
speed presses, and is being sent by first-class mail to
insure faster delivery to subscribers. And all this at
sharply reduced prices. The subscription price has been
reduced from $9 to $).50 a year. '

SOUTHWESTERN FIRM~S SELL GOVERNMENT GOODS.,SERVICES
From the outbreak of the K~orean war through March of this
year, southeastern businessmen sold goods and services to the
.FedgLal Government valued at $2,013,402,000, ~according to a
compilation of the Munitions, Board recently made.
The purchases included $288,387,000 in Alabama; $157,226,000
in Florida; $340,957,000 in Georgia; $142,250,000 in Misrsiss-
ippi; $547, 5~cin North Caroint3, 700 south ~
Carolina; 6 ,00 in To~a se~
si the Southeast liC~r in
~r9ad ~) contract le;f
teall Iepalrtmen~o

PrhsArmY in the regZ,`kp~ dbT404fn -
by thb NYavy, $490,095,000; by the Air Force, $95,302,000; and
by the Armed Services Petroleum Purchasing Agency, $7,961,000.
At the same time, the Munitions Board announced that pur-
chases made by the Federal Government in the Southeast from
July 1951 through March of this year totalled $1,037,968,000
in value, including $243,755,000 in construction contracts.
The purchases reflected in the Munitions Board announcement
did not include those made by the General Services Administra-
tion, which is in charge of buying for the civilian departments
of the Government. These purchases also amount to hundreds of
millions of dollars annually.
GPO 85-la896


UNIV. OF FL LIS.
DOcUMENT~s QP
I~



U.S. DEPOSTORY
BC-6-JF


U. 3, DEPARTMEnT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldl.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000
Volume 6, Number 14 July 15, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAvMENT OF POSTAGE $300
Por


~JI


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA














~~WLLLLFIELD SERICERC


1


OL 5 ,


TEXTILE SUPPLIES ARE ADE 00{

S aPreennhec paft a f sh ahn sk~rycotton
I 2 adequate for all foreseeable require-
ments from partial to full mobilization,
N~rtona noucedthe National Production Authority an-
The conclusion wass based on an analy-
sis of present production in the bleach-
P a .*io ing, dyeing, roller printing and finish-
A ECQllCM)Iting industries made by NPA's Textile
Division which covered the output of

a etate, nylon and other synthetic

According to the Bureau of the Census,
the finishing mills processed 9,328,681,000 yards of broad
woven goods in 1950, the latest year for which reports are
available. On the basis of supplemental information from
trade sources, NPA calculated that the present mill cap-
acity of the industry approximates 11,145,000,000 yards.
This estimate which is said to be conservative is based
on a two-shift five-day week.
Plant capacity for the various processes in the finish-
ing industry seems to be fairly well balanced, there being
more capacity for dyeing than any other process. Bleaching
facilities, however, run a close second, and the printing
capacity third.
The dyeing capacity, based on a 1950 production of
3,950,245,000 yards may be estimated at 4,750,000,000
yards. On the same basis, the bleaching capacity is 4,426,-
000,000 yards, estimated from 3,466,795,000 yards product-
ion, and the printing capacity is 2,148,000,000, or
1,911,&61,000 yards production.
NPA pointed out, however, that present capacity of the
industry will be sufficient only as long as present product-
ion patterns are maintained. A larger than normal pro-
portionate demand for some special process, such as heat
setting of nylon, probably would create a shortage despite
the ample capacity of the industry generally, it was stated.
AUTO WRELCKLER ORDER REVOKED
NPA has announced revocation of Order M-92, which since
SDeceaber 11, 1951 has governed operations of the nation's
25,000 auto wreckers.
The order, which required inventory reports, regulated
procurement and disposal of' motor vehicles and car units
as scrap, and made wreckers subject to allocation direct-
ives, was rescinded upon recent recommendations of the
Auto Wreckers Industry Advisory Committee. The order, it
was stated, had served its purpose by accelerating the
.flow of critically-needed scrap to mills and foundries.
SEE NPA PAGE 2


DEFENSE CONTRACTS IN SOUTHEAST OVER 850 KLILLION


Attention of southeastern businessmen is
again called to the availability of these
contract award lists in Department of Com-
merce field offices for subcontract urplroses.

In some instances, the dollar awards were indicated
only as "over $250,000" for security reasons. By States,
the dollar value included Georgia, 42 contracts totalling
$16,119,288, six for more than $250,000 each. and one
in which the value was not specifiedi Alabama, 31 con-
tracts totalling $4,328,800, three for over $250,000,
and one with value not given; Florida, 42 with a value
of $3,187,036 and eight for more than $250,000;
SEE CONTRACTS Pade 2i


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala.,
7th Floor, Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,8x. 153 Tel. 53-3121


Charleston, S. G., Columbia, S. C., Jackson, Miss.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,


Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga., Tampa, Fla.,
662 U.S.Court 218 P. 0. Bld~g.,420 WA.Lafayette St.,
House,Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 8-6081-82


Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,120


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


T SUGUA 1 1992


V UME 6 NUMBER 1


GTherFadnrair
June awarded
contracts in
the Southeat
with adolz
value ofmoe
than $50 mil-
lion, acr-
ing to lists
of contract
awards re-
paitmd inoDe-
Commerce of-
fices.
A total of
201 contracts|
figured in
the awards
calling for
the furnish-
ing by Sout>-
eastern busi-
ness firms of
a wide var-
iety of goods
and services.
It was be~
Jan.-'lieved to be
June 'the most ac-
1953 'tive mnonth,-
U. S. 'both in num-
Iber of a-
,nced in the region


July- Jan.- July- Jan.- July-
Dec. June Dec. June Dec.
1950 1951 1952
Source:0ffice of Business Economics,
Department of Commerce
wards as well as dollar value experie
since Korea*


Spending scheduled to rise by one-fifth
during Aiscall1953
Billimnsof Dollars





STATELOCAL. PZIB(C CONSTROC ION DOWN IN REGION
Sharp gains in the value of State and local public
construction in the first quarter of 1952 in Georgia,
Alabama and Tennessee were insufficient to offset
equally as substantial declines in the other States in
the region and the Southeast ended the quarter with a
drop of more than $7 million in that type of activity
as compared writh the corresponding period last year,
according to the current Construction and Buildine
Materialsa Report of the Deparitment of;Comrnea.

Note: This Report is available through
any Department of Commerce field office.
It is replete with good information for
building contractors, dealer in building
materials and related interests. Price
$3 a year or 25 cents per copy,
The increase in Alabama was from $12,433,000 to
$18,738,000; Georgia from $22,596,000 to $28,756,000;
and Tennessee, from /30,460,000 to $32,266,000.
In Florida, however, a drop of from $36,136,000
to $29,479,000 was registered; in North Carolina, fran
$40,723,000 to $31,866,000; South Carolina, from $)19,-
770,000 to $15 192,000; and Missi~ssippi, from $13,-
589,000-to .j11,67,000.
Regionally, increases of from $29,115,000 to $i61,-
743,000 in residential construction and $8,174,000 to
$9,723,000 in development of sewerage facilities were
shown, but on the other hand decreases of from $35,-
910,000 to $28,546,000 in building operations for
educational ~purposes; $7,016,000,to $981,000 in
utility activities; $54,463,000 to $46,332,000 in
expenditures for highways; and $12,808,000 to $6,605,-
000 in improvement of water supply facilities were
reflected.

bDDITOMAL gy ]gaggguggggg EXASOS~PO
Development of the sodium chlorate industry in
Lowndes county, Mississippi, furfuryl alcohol in
Melqphis, steel gear blanks in Jacksonville, and
general purpose bombs in Birminghas were among certi-
ficates of necessity approved by the Defense Product-
ion Administration for tax amortization purposes.
In six States of the Southeast -- Alabamar, Florida,
Georgia, Miasiasippi, South Carolina and Tennessee --
the proposed expansions under the latest certificate
of necessityr list would cost approximately $11.1 mil-
lion.
In addition, railway and motor transportation,
storage facilities and public freezing projects would
be benefited through the planned expansions in the
region.

-OTAT otne 00o Pare 1

Missiasippi, 11 for $1,322,462, three for more than
$250,000, and one with the amount not furnished;
South Carolina, 16 for $6 058,013; and Tennessee
writh a total of 40 for $12,856,706 and four for more
than $250,000.
baong the larger contracts let were: Callaway
Mills, LaGrange, Ga., for cotton and nylon duck;
Harris Foundry and Machine companyv, Cordele, shells;
WillinghamP Cotton Mills, kacon, Ga., cotton and nylon
duck; Micolas Cotton Mills, Opp, Ala., cotton sheeb-
ings; Holaton Defense Corporation, Kingaport, Tenn''
Teaco, Inc., lashrille, all of which ran well into
seven figures*


IYPB CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

LAHORATQRP PRIORITE1
Three changes were hiide ~in OrdIer M-71 to enable scienti-
fic and technical laboratories to expedite their defense
work.
CYP REGULBTICE- 5
CMP Regulation 5 has been amended to eisplity indnetrial
operations under the order governing the procurement of
maintenance, repair and operating items under the Controlled
Materials Plan.
-COLOR TELEVISION
HPA'.e ban on the-manufacture of household color tele-
vision receivers has been replaced with a newly amended
Order Y-90 allowing manufacturers to apply for and, if they
qualify, receive permission to make home-type color TV
equipment under certain conditions.
ZING
Removal of all inventory control over siinc by revoca-
tion of Order Y-9 and deletion of slab sinc from IPA5 Regu-
lation 1 was announced. The action was taken in an amended
action applicable to Regulation 1.
COPPER BALMATERZALS
MPa has amended its basic copper raw materials order
to permit brass and bronze foundries, wire mille, brass
mills and miscellaneous users to place advance orders for
two anoceeding months and to increase the quantity which
may be ordered.
CANS
To enshion the pactat of the steel strike on the
preservation of 1952 food crops, NPA has suspended certain
can material specifications and directed can manufacturers
to give preference to orders for packing perishable food
prodnots. The action was taken through the issuance of
Direction 4 to Order Y-25.
CARBON STEEL CASTINGS
Manufacturers of Class "B" products who require heavy
carbon steel castings, including low alloy, have been
granted allotments of controlled materials for castings
weighing 10,000 pounds or more for seven additional quar-
ters in advance.
CQHIEQLLED YaTEILALLEANVEN~TORIE
in a teavoraz-ry action to minsimiz disruption in suppliers'
shipments, NPA issued Direction 1 to CMP Regulation 2 sus-
pending inventory limitations on copper and aluminum.
BASIC RULES OF OMP
In an amendment to Direction 1 to Controlled Materials
Plan Regulation Number 1, NPA has emphasized that a manu-
facturer of Class "Bn products anat obtain all his controlled
materials either by self-authorization under that direction
or by filing a foray CMP-4B.
CONSTRUCTION MACHIINERP
Order Y-43, which provided rules for placing, accepting
and scheduling rated orders for construction machinery and
equipment was amended to tighten the use of priority ratings
for such equipment.

Although the first quarter of 1952 started slowly for
most container manufacturers compared with the same period
last year, the year' s outlook is favorable with general
economic activity expected to be equal to or lightly above
the 1951 level, according to a report of the National
Production Authority. In its Containers and Packaging I{g-
Agatryr Report recently iarned, NPA seaid the shortage of
materials which wras paranount last year had disappeared
except for selected metals, and that all types of container
and packaging materials were adequate.
TOOL STEELS
Removal of controls over the distribution of all tool
ateels was recommended to NPA by ita Tool Steel Industry
Advisory Commgittee. Leasoning of demand was given as the
major reason for the proposal.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





More Detailed
Information 00
The Highlights
of the News in
The Field of
Business is A-
vailable at all Donartment. of Commerce Field Offices.




Chain store and mail-order sales in May totalled
$3.1 billion, or 9 per cent above the same month last
year. After allowance for seasonal factors and trading
day differences the dollar volume of trade in May was
about 2 per cent above April. The increase brought the
overall total to the highest level this year.
*
May production of all types of knit cotton and wool
underwear and nightwear registered decreases from out-
put in May a year ago, the Burean of the Census reported.
Shipments during the month amounted to $21.4 million,
12 per cent less than in May 1951 but 6 per cent more
than April 1952 abipments.
+ *
The value of manufacturers' shipments in May was
about the same as in April. Orders were off lightly
for the month but the backlogs continued to remain close
to the peak. Sale of durable goods manufacturers were
unchanged from the April rate after seasonal adjustment.
Primary metals, nonelectrical machinery, and lumber were
among the industries registering declines.
*
Oath of office was administered by Secretary of Come
nerce Charles Sawyer to Vice Admiral Edward L. Cochrane,
U. S. N., Ret., as a member of the Federal Maritime
Board. He was renominated to the board on June 26 for a
fear-year term and confirmed June 27~


, .-~


__~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ___ L


I


Baployees and corporations have been receiving a larger
portion of total nationnal income in recent years than in
1929, while income from both interest and rentals has been
sharply lower, a new study by the Office of Business Econe-
mics, U. S. Department of Commerce, disclosed. The share of
income received by farm and non-farm proprietors was about
the sana in the two periods.
*
Cash dividend payments by corporations isoning public
reports amounted to $234 a~llion in May, which was 10 per
cent more than the $213 million paid Dut in the B&RO month
a year ago. The dividend rise in May, which was typically
the lightest payment month, in comparison with May of last
year was the rresult of widely divergent movements in individ-
nal industries arising from special causes.
*
Liqudd egg production in May totalled 71,053,000 pounded
compared with 87,484,000 pounds in May of last year and the
1946-50 average of 119,513,000 pounds, the Bureau of Agri-
cultural Economies, UI. S. Department of Agriculture, report-
ed. The quantity frozen and dried was 16 and 48 per cent
respectively smaller than last year.
*
Manufacturers' shipments of farm machines and equipment
in 1951 amounted to $2,205 million, an increase of 23 per
cent over 1950 shipments of $1,793 million, the Bureau of
the Cenana anunouncd. Of the 1951 value of shipments, $1,759
million, or 80 per cent, represented value of complete units
and $446 million, or 20 per cent, attachments and parts.
*
Corporations in 1949 filed a total of 649,957 income tax
returned of which 384,772 showed not income of $30,576,517,000
while 230,070 showed deficits of $2,381,680,000 and 35,115 bad
no income data as inactive corporations, the Secretary of the
Trauyannounced. The income tax liability reported op,the
rrbkh was9,817.308 000 representing a decreas eZ of
per cent as compared with Ehe 1968 total.
+ + *
shipments of the dozen price dress industry in the first
aaerof 1952 totalled $i93 million. the Caneas Bureau saidr


L2 Defense Production Aide:

if "lepn sacorant aiee Pd."enPo aible Price Controls,#1
Technical Aids for Factories, Metalworking Planta &r

~ hebkn Lsh opr Locating Weaknesses in Your Production
SOperations, #4
Better Plant Maintenance Increasee Production & Profits,#$S
SSubcontracting Pointers" for Small Plants, #6
Fac s For Industry Reportes
Cplte Aircraft &r Aircraft Engines, MA2A-42, 10#-41.25 Ir.
ass &r Oils, May 1952,M17-1-52, 10C, $2Yr.
01eomargarine, May 1952, M117J-52, 54, 504 Ir.
ratr,1951, M37A-01, 104, 256 Ir.
Rool Manufactures, Apr. 1952, Kl5HI-42, 10#, $1 Ir.
Softwood Plywrood, Apr. 1952, M13B-42, 50, 504 Ir.
otton System Spinning BativityMay 1952,MI5-3-5),50p~r.
Comrca Home Canning Closures, Apr. 1952,5750-42,
104, $1 Year
letalworking Kachinery, Except Maohine Tools, M340-01, 104
~letal Cana, Summary for 1951, M75D-bl, 10C, So# Ir,
Ul~otton Broad Woven Goods, let Quarter 1952, Quarterly
Production in U. S., M15A-1-2, 5#, 504 Ir.
Small Business Aides (Rerun):
ff~A Go akg hu D 15 10 Point Check List for Employers of Veterans, #1
SStimulating Salse in a Business Limited to Radio Sales
and Repair in a Highly Comapetitive Area, 4l$
Packing Industrial Equipment, #r20
Finding the Right Color for Your Product, #21
The Use of Preminas, #22
Sales Training for B~ardware Store Employees, #23
Conducting a Consumer Contest, #25


:To Obtain Copies of
--a NEW 13()()S Id4( gp his sateriarrcheok
tril)N IIIP01RTS'ded And Send This
IlkLr/ -- 1 section of theCo

seroe to the Rearest Department of Commerce Field Of-
fice. Your Name & Address Are On The Opposite Side
Make Remittances for Sales material Payable to Treas-
urer of the United States. U~npriced Items Are Free.


National Production Authority Material:
SOrder M-92 Revoked 27 Order 1-71 Revised
f:CYP Regulation 5 ALmended L7 order 1-90 Revised
Order 1-9 Revoked 0' Direction 4 to Order 1-25
SDirection 1 to CKP Reg. 2 D~Direction 1 to
CMP Reg. 1 Amended gi Order M-43 amended
2'_ Construction & Building Materials Report, $3 Yr.
U. S. Census of Business, 1948, Trade Series:
SThe Optical Goods Trade, Bull. No. 3-14, 20#
//The Automotive Trade, BullNo.3-5, 45#
SLatalog of U. S. Cenana Publications,Jan. War.1952,25s
S/atalog of Filars Distributed by the Civil Aeronauties
Adninistration,Revised, Mar. 1952
/ echanical Properties of Metals at Low Temperatures
National Bureau of Standards Cir. 52_0, $1.50 *
Tornado Safety Rules U. S. Weather Bureau
Code For Protection Against Lightning, Parts
I, II and III, Nati~onal Bureau of Standards. 30#
U Defense Prodnetion Record, $2.50 Year
7 Selling to Navy Prime Contractors, 20#


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








PAGE 4 BULLETin ur* cummanun



TORADOO

SAFETY RULOCES


CONTAINER SITUATION IMPROVES IN SOUTI.SOUTH~AST
A seasonal stimulus in business and increased interest in
textile containers and cotton bale ties resulted in a generally
improved first quarter container operations in the South and
Southeast this year compared with the preceding quarter, ae-
cording to Summer 1952 issue of the Containers and Packaging
Industry Report of the Chemical, Rubber and Forest Products
Bureau, Containers and Packaging Division, National Production
Authority .
Cooperage and corrugated container industries, however, were
exceptions, it was stated, as demand continued stable to lower.
Incoming orders improved and, in instances, the volume was
heavy. The outlook for the area was considered "good."
heavy demand from the citrus fruit and vegetable trades push-
ed wirebound box production and shipments to the seasonal peak
and substantially ahead of the fourth quarter totals. One rea-
pondent reported gains in production and shipments of 77.6 per
cent and 83.3 per cent, respectively. Manufacturers operated
longer hours and many added a third shift in order to keep
orders filled currently.
(Continued in Next Co~qle()


Government purchases of nailed wooden boxes, particularly
aamunition boxes, partially offset the decrease in civilian
demand. A number of manufacturers reported sufficient defense
contracts to keep plants operating full time for 60 days.
This Report is available through any Department
of Commlerce field office at a price of 154 each or
606 a year.
The tight cooperage industry experienced a business slump.
Whiskey stock was at record level and dermad soft as distillers
were operating at one-quarter to one-third the rate of certain
periods of 1951. No contracts for staves and headings were
reported.
Production of cotton bale ties was about 15 per cent over
the same period of last year. A large volume of orders for
future delivery was accepted and indications were that demand
would continue to exceed supply.
Textile container manufacturers continued to operate at
near capacity. Production was strong on feed bags, but de-
clined somrewhat on citnru bags. Demand continued steady with
no change in the immediate future. 6Pe assasse


PTHEY TELJ. YOU ---


THEIY TEl. YOU VWHT TO DO ---

If you Are In Open Country
If In A City Or Town
If In A School
If In a Factory Or Industrial Plant


Where Tornadoes Occur
How Often They Occur
How To Recognize A Tornado
The Direction A Tornado Travels


(Available for distribution without charge at Department of Commerce Field Offices)


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
sro


Volume 6, Number 15 August 1, 1952



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


TO KNOW WHAT TO 00 WHEN A WARNING IS RECEIVED, OR A

TORNADO IS OBSERVED, MAY MEAN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
LIFE AND DEATH !!


U. S. OEPARTHEWT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000


pUR~
IEP~. ~~







UNITED' STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE


_____ ____I __ ___ ___ ____


Nashville, Tenln., Savannah, Ga., Tampa, Fla.,
662 U.S.Court 218 P. 0. 314g.,420 WA.Lafayette St.,
House,Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 8-6081-82

COPPER, ALUMINUM RESTRICTIONS EASED


SOUTH LEADER IN HARDWOOD VENIIER OUTPUT

Sixty-four per
k badr cent of the nation-
,-r,mue"mm* al output of hard-
==ME- wood veneer is
*----. a ---- being produced in
--'"1 **** /the southern 11
.----- <***Statee of Alabama
Florida, Gesorgia '
Ngg Miseissippi, the
Carolinae, Arkan-
.........see, Louisiana'
.a., e :6. ma sm Oklah aginTexaso-
-am.. ......q.. ...... nu ording to figure
released by the Bureau of the Consue, U. 8. Department
of Commerce.
The data eare shown in a current issme of the
Burean'sa Facts For Industry Report elntitled ]&45224
Veneer and Plywood in which production and consumption
figures for: all regions in the first quarter of 1952
were given.

Notes There is a small charge made for these
Facts For Industry Reports now. This particular
one is pried at 10 cents each, $1 a year, and
can be obtained through anmy Department of Com-
Basrge field office .. .

This report showed that production of hardwood
renoer in the southern region in the first quarter of
1952 totalled 1,636,092,000 square feet as compared
with 2,550,037,000 in the nation.
Like the nation, however, production trends in the
southern States this year have been generally downard
asr compared with the first quarter of 1951 resulting
in a reduction in output in the region of some 300 mril-
lion srquare feet. In the Uniterd States, the dealing
amounted to 722 million feet.
The 11 southern States were far ahead of all other
regionsin total output in the first quarter of 1952.

S1951 NATIONLAL INCOMS.PRODUCT REPORT ,
p etailed estimates of last year' e national income ,
'and national product have been releaased by the a
,Office of Busines Economics, U. S. Department of ,
'Conmmrce in the JulY National Incape Number of the ,
'Surser of Qurrent Businsess now available through a
(anY Department of Commerce field office. Price 30 ,
'osnts each, or $13.25 a year. a


THE ~P~fIn two sweeping actions, the
National Production Anthority eased re-
striotions on the use of copper and
Ncltincrl aluminum in aoonsemr goods and in
CO CICL) construction operations.
Through amendments to Orders ll-47A
and Y-478, decorative use of copper
and aluminum in the manufacturer of
P gg (ggyiong conuserr goode will be permitted.
By amending CMP Regulation 6 and
Orders Y-100 and 11-77 and revokring
Auth rity Order Y-74, NPA increased quantities
11% I~i@P of copper and aluminum which may be
self-authorized for all construction
except reoreational, and removed limitations on the use
of these metals in construction.

Notes Ask your nearest Department of
Commerce field office for copies of these
amendments and revoastion1.

STgELQ-FOURh .QUARTER
Producers of iron and seerl products are required to
reserve certain percentages of their production for mrili-
tary, atomic energy, maobine tool and military component
orders, commenoing with the fourth quarter of 1952, under
an amendment to the basio steel order Y-1. Asl an implement-
ation to this action, NPA also issued Direction 6 to
that order, which changes lead tiaea temporarily for
acceptance and delivery of purchase orders.

S FLORIDA FIRMS ARE CHARGED
S Complaints alleging unauthorised and improper
Suse of controlled materials haer been filed
Against three Florida resort firms --- Treasure ,
SIsle Pool and Cabanae, Inc., Evelyn Homes, Inc.,'
'and White Star Realty company, Ino., all of
Miami Beach. They are charged with exceeding
Sallotments in construction of a swimming pool,
Cabanas and bathhouses in Dade county.
'The complaints will be heard by a hearing com-
pi aisioner later in the month. NPA will ask for
Sa suspension order withholding priority assisrt-
'ance, allocations and allotmentsr, and prohibit-
Sing the acquisition, use and disposing of mater-'
ials under NFA control.
PA~PER. PAPERBOARE
A reduction in reserve percentages of certain grades
of paper and elimination of other grades of paper and
paperboard wa ordered in an aendment to Order 1-36.
(SEE NPA CONTlINUED ON PAGE 2)


AUGUS'P 15. 1952


yarging antage 16


Birmingham, Ala.,
.246 Ferderal 814g.,
Tel. 53-3421


Charleston, S. C., Columbia, 8. C.,
8gt. Jasper BldgJ., 1310 La r St.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Mise.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Jackesnville, Fla.,
42$ Federal Bldg.,
T*1. 4-7111


Atlanta, Ga.,
7th Floor, Foreytb Bldg.,
Tel. WAA-W12,EZ. 453


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


M~iami, Fla.,
947 Seybold B1dg~.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Alar.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641/206 ~





SOUTH LEADS NATION IN HIGHWAY BUILDING

The South with a total expenditure of $173,908,000
led the nation in dollar value of highway construction
work conducted in the first 4 months of 1952,according
to a current issue of the Department of Commerce 16-
dustry Report CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MABTERIAS.
Expenditures in the region included $71,337,000 in
the South Atlantic States of Florida, Georgia, the
Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland, Delaware and the
District of Columbia; $31,959,000 in Alabama, Kentucky,
Mississippi and Tennessee, comprising the East South
Central section; and $70,612,000 in the West South
Central area of Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas.

Construction and building materials firms
are making a mistake in not getting this
Industry Report regularly. It contains a
wealth of valuable information on all phases
of the construction industry. Available
through all Department of Commerce offices
for 25 cents a copy or $3 a year.

The contracts awarded in the South constituted 31
per cent of the national total of $560,863,000.
Expenditures in the South Atlantic region alone were
the second largest regionally of all sections of the
country, being exceeded only by the $122,126,000 ex-
pepdad in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania in the
Middle Atlantic area.
In the South, the total spent from January through
April of this year included $12,278,000 in Florida;
$14,205,000 in Georgia; $16,084,000 in North Carolinal
$7,983,000 in South Carolina; $7,156,000 in Alabama;
$6,091,000 in Mississippi; and $10,036,000 in Tennessee.
Despite a $6 million drop in dollar value of such
work in the South Atlantic area in the first quarter of
1952 as compared with the same period last year, the
South as a whole ended the period with an increase of
some $17 million by virtue of substantial gains shown
in the East and West South Central sections.

DPA APPROVES $62 MILLION IN PLANT EXPANSIONS

Approval by the Federal Government of plant ex-
pansion operations in the Southeast to cost more than
$62 million, and denial of 11 applications which would
have meant the expenditure of $226 million in a further
development of the synthetic textile industry in the
area has been announced by the Defense Production Ad-
ministration .
The action was taken in connection with issuance of
certificates of necessity calling for tax amortization
privileges on the expansion work for furtherance of the
national program of d~fense.
At the same time, DPA said of an estimated cost of
$878,646,000 in plant expansions in the region author-
ized by that agency as of March 31 of this year, ex-
clusive of transportation and storage facilities, the
value put in place totalled $366,599,000, or 42 per
cent of the amount authorized.
The 11 applications for certificates for further
development of the synthetic textile industry in the
Southeast were denied, DPA said, because the govern-
sent'sa expansion goal for the production of 300 million
pounds of non-cellulose fibres by 1956 had been
achieved. One such application, however, that of E. I*
du Pont de Nemours and company for plant improvements
in Chattanooga to cost an estimated $22 426,000 for the
production of 40 million pounds of the fibres was ol.'d*.
The applications denied affected Camden, South
Carolina, Kinston, N. C., Waynesboro, Va., and other
sections of the Southeast.


}HM. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT
To forestall interruptions in mobilization production,
HPA has given notice it will BS} reschedule manufacturers
delivery dates on certain major electrical equipment items
except in cases of defense emergencies and issued Direction
1 to Order 11-44 for the guidance of claimant agencies,
manufacturers and purchasers.
AIRCRAFT qUALITY STEEL
In Direction 1 to Schedule 1 of Order M-6A, NPA prohibited
delivery and acceptance of delivery of any item of aircraft
quality steel from distributors where the customer has,
during the calendar month, received a total of 5,000 pounds
or more of the item from all sources.
ALUMbINUMb FOIL
Removal of all end-use restrictions on aluminum foil
for packaging and similar purposes was ordered by NPA
by revocation of its order MI-67.
STEEL DELIVERIES
In Direction 5 to NPA Regulation 2, producers of steel
and steel products who received individual directives from
NPA were given permission to postpone specified delivery
dates where the dates cannot be met because of the work
stoppage in the industry.
CONSUMER DURABLE GOODS
Makers of consumer durable goods listed under Order YI-47B
were permitted for the first time to use their controlled
materials allotments with complete interchangeability
in a third quarter amendment of the order.
STEEL
To utilize diminished warehouse stocks, to help avert
some shutdowns in the nation's manufacturing plants and
minimizee further unemployment, NPA issued an amendment to
Direction 12 to CHIP Regulation I authorizing manufacturers
of consumer durable goods to accept delivery of those
particular types of the limited stocks of steel controlled
materials now held in warehouses but not needed for military
production .
INTERPRETATIONI
Manufacturers cannot be considered producers' under the
Controlled Materia~ls Plan unless they convert controlled
materials or A products into Class B or other Class A
products in an interpretation of Direction 1 to CMP Regula-
tion 1 just issued.
OIL COUNTRY GOODS
Temporary restrictions on delivery of oil country easing
and tubing were invoked in Schedule 2 to Direction 1, Order
M-6A to assure the use of this material to meet exploratory
drilling and normal military and defense rated orders only.
BRASS COPPER MILL PRODUCTS
Distributors of brass and copper wire mill products now
are able to reestablish their inventories on a progressive
basis until their historical inventories during the base
period are reached in amendments issued to Orders r-82 and
M-86.
CANS
To insure a maximum number of cans for packing the 1952
perishable food crop, an amendment to Direction 4 to NPA
Order Y-25 was issued clarifying the previous direction to
can manufacturers requiring them to use all available tin
plate, or tin plate that may become available, to fill orders
for cans for packing perishable foods.
COPPER IN LIGHTING FIXTURES
Limitations on the use of copper and copper base alloys
in the manufacture of lightingt fixtures were discontinued by
NP through the revocation of Order M-97.
TIN
Use of a limited amount of tin for products and processes
prohibited was permitted under an amendment to NPA Order


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





r~as~ ore detailed
Information on
the highlights
--- of the News in
the Field of
Business is Available at all Department of Commerce
Field Offices.


Employment dropped only slightly between June and
July, but there was some slackening in farm activity
and mn~ry persons were absent from their jobs because
of strikes and vacation, according to the Bureau of
the Census. Estimated at 62,234,000 in the week ending
July 12, total civilian employment was only some
350,000 under the June level, it was stated.
*
Manufacturers' sales declined and inventories were
down moderately during June while new and unfilled
orders increased substantially, the Office of Busi-
ness Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce reported.
Deliveries of manufactured products were 5 per cent
below May after seasonal adjustment, the decline occur-
ring entirely in the durable-goods industries.
*
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing
public reports in June amounted to $1,176 million,
4 per cent above the $1,134 million paid out in tie
same month a year ago. The dividend rise in June ---
typically a heavy-payment month --- was largest in
oil refining, where payments increased $22 million,
or 11 per cent over June 1951.


i


10T Obtain Copies of
filc N B()(KS -4 pThi s terial Cheek
~s~3~4~It In Space Provi-
AN[ (E]P()IllS ded And Send This
il-1 --/\ Section of the
Bulletin of Com-
wae~e o the NFearest Department of Commerce Field Of-
fice. Your Name & Address Are On The Opposite Side.
Nake Remittances for Sales Mlaterial Payable to Treas-
urer of the United States. Unpriced Items Are Free.



1951no ene llodF 13--,1Pd r15 National Income & Products Report, 304,$3.2Yr.
Latest National Production Authority Mlaterial:
LL Order YI-L7 A Amended Order M-478 Amended
LLOrder M-100 Amended Order 1-77 Amended
CMP R~eg. 6 Amended Order 1-74 Amended
Order M-1 Amended / direction 6 to Order M-1
Order M-36 Amended L/Dir. I to Order P-44
Dir. 1 to Schedule 1 of Order M-ba
LLOrder Y-67 Revoked a( Dir. 5 to Reg. 2
LLOrder Y-47B Amended L/ Dir. 12 to CMP Reg.1 Amended
Interpretation of Direction 1 to CKUP Reg. 1
Schedule L to Direction 1, Order Y-6&
Order M-82 Amended 170rder M-86 Amended
Direction 4 to Order M-25 Amended
Order M-97 Revoked' ffrder M-8 Amended
Construction & Building Mlaterials Industry Report,
25e, Year's Subscription, $3
CI anned Food Report, July 1, 1952
/ School Enrollment, October 1951, P-20, 140
/1 Trends in the Tobacco Trade, May 1952
Trends in the Grocery Trade, May 1952
Trends in the Dry Goods Trade, May 1952
STrends in the Drug Trade, Mlay 1952


Sales of retail stores in June were about 1 per cent
above the same month a year ago. Trade activity on the
whole was steady. Total sales, after adjustment for season-
al factors andl trading day differences, were down about 1
per cent in June from the May high for the year. Sales of
the automotive group declined 8 per cent from May to June
after seasonal adjustment, but increases of 6 to 7 per cent
were registered in the building material add hardware and
home furnishings groups.
w
New construction outlays in the first half' of 1952
reached a record totarl of nearly $15 billion, according to a
joint report of the Departments of Commerce and Labor.
Moderate expansion of most types of construction activityJ
took place in June with new construction totalling almost
$3 billion, up 7. per cent over May and 6 per cent above June
1951. Private outlays of $1.9 billion in June were about
the same as a year ago, while public construction expendi-
tures of nearly $1.1 billion were 23 per cent larger than
in June 1951.
+ + +
Personal income in May 1952 was at an annual rate of
$2633 billion, $1 billion higher than in April. The May
total was $12i billion higher, at an annual rate, than that
of a year earlier, but unchanged from December 1951.
e
Total wholesalers' sales in May 1952 were estimated at
$8,087 million, which, after allowances for seasonal varia-
tions, was 4 per cent below April. Sales of duraole goods
at $2,656 million and nondurable goods at $5,431 million
decreased after seasonal adjustment by 2 and 5 per cent,
respectively. *
Total business inventories at the end of May 1952 were
estimated at $70.2 billion.


School Enrollment ,of Workers, October 1951, P-50,#41
Annual Report on the Labor Force, P-50, #40
Mobility of the Population for the U. S., April 1950
to April 1951, P-20, 39
Public Employment in April 1952, G-GE52-#2
Compendium of State Government Finances in 1951, 354
Facts For Industry Reports:
Lumber Production & Mill Stocks,1950,M13C-00,154
SLumber Production & Mill Stocks for the Western
States, 1st Quarter 1952, M13G-1-2, 104, 704Yr.
Commercial & Home Canning Closures, 1951,104,81 Yr.
Shoes & Slippers, 1951, M681-ol,10 ,$1 Ir.
Cotton System Spinning Activity,Mlay 1952,8I5-3-54, 504Yr.
Pulp, Paper &~ Board, May 1952,M14A-52,101, $1 Yr.
Clay Construction Products, May 1952,ML268-52,104,$1 Yr.
Superphosphate, May 1952, 5p, 504 Yr.
Cotton & Linters, June 1952,Y115-1-11-52,10Q $1 yr.
SllBusiness Aids (eu)
A Merchandising Policy for Manufacturers, #26
Case Study Developing Competitive Advantages in a
Retail Furniture Store, #128
Layout & Operation of a Location System, #Y31
Points to Cheek in Your Sales Force, #32
Packaging for Consumer Appeal, #33
Take the Trade-In But Don't Take a Shellacking, #34
//Appliance Delivery & Service, #36
Defense Production Aids:
Selection, Care & Maintenance of Abrasive Iheels, #8
Machining of Stainless Steel, #9
Defense Loans for Small Business*, #10
Converting to Military Production, #11
Simplified Practice Recommendation 2lc6-51, Wooden Kegs
For Nails, 54
/ Molecular Microwave Spectra Tables, NBS Cir.518, 65#
SThe Shield' Against Aggression -- 6th Quarterly Report
to the President by the Director of Defense Mobiizsation,30e
7 Amendments to Defense Production Act, 1952, 54


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





TAMPA OFFICE WIL BE CLOSED AUGUSBT 29 '
SThe Tamps, Forida, aoffice S~l~~nof h .S eprmn
Comerce will be closed August 29, 1952. the closing is *
dru to the fact that a reduced appropriation for operation *
of the Departme~nt' s Field Servies for the ourrent fiscal '
year will not permit its retention beyond the foregoing '
dash, *
r Business men and othersr needing the services of the De- '
parrtant of Comeroe after August 29 in the Tasps area *
should sormunicate with either the Departpmet of Comeurce
District Office in Jacksonville, or the Atlanta Regional
Offio*, Other field offices are also in operations in '
M~isa, Savannah, Columbia and Charleston, S. C., Sirming- *
has, Mobile, Jacokson, Miss., and Memphis and Nashville, '
fT08, '
SOUTHEASTERNi TAE DOLLAfr LARGELY FOR EDUCATOION-
The biggest part of the taxpayer' s dollar in the Southeast
gyoes for education, secordingl to a study made of the 1951
issue of the Coanqendius o tarte Governmen~t Finnces released
by the Bureau of the Genss.
The report, which refloots a detariled and itemized list
of revenue and expenditures of all State goverinments in the
country, showed that of a total of 41,636,406,000 expended
by the governments of Alabam~a, Florids, Georgia, Missiusippi,
Tennessee and the Carrolinasr in the fiscal year 1951, $614,-
346,000 went for educational purposes, or about 37 oents on
each dollarr. This included the disburselment of $85,301,000
in Alabass; $85,418,000 in Floridai $682,854,000 in Georgia;
$51,681,000 in Yississippi; $171,117 000 in North Carolina;
$56,064,000 In Slouth Carolinai and $8e1,91,000 in Tennessee,
Copies of this Compendiun of Statt..Govern-
nat~id.nannag are available through all De-
partrment of Conmerce field offices for 35#
Saailr
Highways took the next largest slice of the southeastern
taxparyer' dollar with an expenditure in the seven-8tate area
of $436,941,000, or 26 aents on every dollar.
Contrary to popular belief, the public payroll, or general
control" as it is known in theo report, wasr one of the least
items of expense, totalling only $33,121,000, Other expenditures
incaluded public welfare, $)235,1071,000; health and hospitals,
$118,397,000, and natural resources, $66,541,000,


$50 MILLION IN GOODS,8ERVICESl SOLD SY FI~d8 IN REGION
Southreaster business firms in July beefited from Federal
Government purchase operations in the region to the tune of
some $50,789,500, sooording to an analysis of daily liate
of contract awards received in Department of Comerroe field
offices for distribution to local businessams.
Contracts with a dollar value of $4,445,971 wrer let in
Alabamai $016,222,731in Floriday $9,273,593 in Georgiai
$)349 538 in Mississippil $1(6,129,794 in South Carolina;i and
$4,367,879 in Tennessee.
These lists are available without charge at
any Departme~nt of Commerce field office and
cooperating offices such as local Chambers of
Canmeroe and .similar seenoais.
In addition, two contracts let in Georgia wrer recorded
as "xceding $250,000" and in Tennessee, five such awards
were adsd, bringing the dollar value for those tates and
the total for the Southeast to well over the $50.7 million
mark.
Margr of the awards were for construction operations,
such as rehabilitation of buildings, additions to others,
highway work, and so forth. In other instances, goode were
purchased, including, for examlper, $2,342,650 paid in
Alabas for shells, and twro in South Carolina of $1,698,431
and $3,78/e,218, respeatively, for cotton duck, with lesserr
lettings for such commodities as pallets, coal, other types
of cloth, generators, fiberboard, petroleumn products, rain-
coats, and others.
Several outstanding construction jobs wresr undertaken.
Contracrts for such work eare let in Florida for $1,854,257
for a hangar at Cecil Field; $2,374,365 for airfield develop-
sents in JackonvilleU; and $1,217,387 for a waterfront improve-
aont in Key West.
Two universities parrticipated in the awards. Univrerity
of Miami received a contract for $66,508 to prepare survey
of he~y West harbor and its seaward approaches, and Eaory
University in Atlanta will conduct an "acoustomisation"
study of quartermaster equipment for $25,222.
Not only did Florida lead in dollar value of contracts
awarded in the various southeasrtern State during the month,
but also in number of contracts with a total of 70. Alab~am
received 29) Georgia, 591 South Carolina, 461 Tennessee, 34;
.and Mississippi, 5* epo es-sessa


U. 3, OEPARTMENIT OF 00MMEOE
FIELD SERVICE
A'TLANTA, GA.
718d Forsyth Blds.
Tel. WA-4121 ~Est. 453
OFFICIAL BS~IsNESS
PERMIT No, 10
Volum 6, Na~ber 16 August 15, 1932


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

lIlII Illlllilill lllli llI IIIlIlI ll I I lIII l ||llIIII 11
BULLETI 3 1262 08748 8945


PAGE 4


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE.SeOO


UNIV.! OF FL LIS.





U.s. DEPO91~TOY


tt~~


T'rucr31IS YT OF LORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIICS
GAINESVI.LLE, FLORIDA


REVINU








UNTE STTE DEATMN OF COMMERCE






FIELD ERVIC


MULOV E 6, NUMBER 17 2


SOUTtIEASTERNI INCOME IN 1951 834.3 BILLION

DouLARS South-
exe ~~1940 PER CAPHTA INCC ME esen
residents
in 1951re
soo ceived i-
come from
19410U.Si.AVEDGE INCO>ME al1 sour-
soot -Jces esti-
mated at
$34,346,-
4001 I$ R__I g li il ~q- ~ J~41 000,000,
more than
4 billion
no W iEFi~~~~i dollars
~more than
they re-
o ~ceived in
Source: Office of Business Economics, 'l950, ac-
U. S. Department of Commerce 'cording to
the annual report of the Office of Business Economics,
U. S. Department of Commerce entitled "Income Payments
to Individuals."
The report, being carried in detail in the August
1952 Edition of the Survey qf Current Business publish-
ed by OBE, estimated that the total income received by
southeasterners last year represented an average of
$1,075 for everymann, wloman and child in the~seven-
State region of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippis
Tennessee and the Carolinaa*

Copies of this issue of the Survey of Current
EBusines are available through any Department
of Commerce field office for 304 a copy', or on
a yearly subscription basis for $).25*

Last year's income to individuals also abowed a rise
of more than $25,600,000,000 over 1929*
The income is defined as payments to individuals in
the form of wages and salaries; net income of proprie-
tors, including farmerag dividends, interest, net rents
and other items such as social insurance benefits,
relief, veterans' pensions and benefits; and allotment
payments to dependents of military personnel*
By States in the region, income payments in 1951 in-
cluded Alabama, $2,890,000,000; Floridas $3,801,000,000;
Georgia, $3,844,000,000; Mississippi, $1,689,000,000;
North Carolina, $4,350,000,000; South Carolina, $2,131,-
000,000; and Tennessee, $3,530,000,000*
South Carolina, with an increase in 1951 over 1950
of 21 per cent stood second in the nation in percentage
gain in total income.


N1PA ALLOTS ADDITIONAL CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS


For copies of the regional re-
lease, NPA 52-43, listing these
projects in the Southeast get in
touch with the nearest Department
of Commerce office.


nr\rmm L ~nnlP~Dn


IOC-)


Atlanta, Ga., BrigaAa,
7th Floor, Forsyth Bldlg., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. W~A-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Charleston, S. C., Columbia, S. C., Jackson, Miss.,
8gt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


M~emphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Mdiami, Fla.,
947 Se~ybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, ala.,
.308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,X-206


Nashville, Tenn., Savannahr Ga.,
662 U.S. Court 218 P. 0. Bldg.,
H~ouse,Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755


Allotment by the National Pro-
duction Authority of materials for
the third quarter of 1952 for the
.. construction of $155,614,200 worth
.of industrial projects in the South-
'east was announced.
(g) Eighteen projects, 13 of them new
and five a continuation of work pre-
vionaly begun, were included in the
list, which supplemented allocation
ti()E made recently for the third quarter.


10005


No ggn


A E')( 1c


Aut 1(r


A million dollar assembly plant for the General Motors
Corporation at Doraville, Ga; a Portland cement plant at
Harleyville, S. C., to cost $6,350,000; a $12,410,000
project for the production of phosphoric acid, uranium and
phosphates at Ridgewood, Fla.; another to cost $4,500,000
at Nichols, Fla., for similar work; and a $47,915,000
plant at Charleston, Tenn., for the production of paper
were among the new projects for which allotments were made.
CMP SELF-AUTIORIZA~TION GRANTEEH
Some 500 manufacturers of so-called "B" products under
the controlled materials plan of NPA in the Southeast will
be affected by action taken permitting them, in effect,
to self-authorize or calculate their automatic allotments
for steel, copper and aluminum needed in the first quarter
of 1953.
The new procedure will eliminate the necessity of a
large proportion of the region's sMall business firms
filing applications for allotments of controlled materials,
thus saving time, money and paperwork both for industry
as well as the government,
Tentative levels for automatic allotments of copper and
aluminum for the first quarter of 1953 have been set at
100 per cent of third quarter 1952 allocations, up to
40,000 pounds of copper and 60,000 pounds of aluminump.
But the steel strike, which hampered the output of that
commodity to a grave extent will not permit any additions
to the already authorized advance allotment level, which is
60 per cent of the third quarter 1952 quantities.
It was estimated that altogether approximately 10,000
manufacturers of "B" products in the country would be af-
footed by the new atop in addition to some 25,000 eMall
firms previously permitted to self-authorize Materials.
(SK[E NA Continuad on Pare 2)


i@?





CUNGLATIVE SALES DOWN IN SOUTHEAST

Merchants in the Southeast's8 trade field found the
going so rough in the first three months of 1952 that
they ended the first half of the year generally speak-
Lng with cumulative wholesale and retail sales either
off as compared with the corresponding period last year
or at a relatively low level, according to a Bureau of
the Census report.
While in the last three months of the first half of
the year, dealers experienced month-to-month gains as
compared with 1951, the recovery was not sufficient to
offset losses in the first three months.

This Monthly Trade Report of the Census
Bureau is now on a sales basis. The price is
104 for single copies of $1 a year.
In only Augusta and Columbus, Ga., Asheville, N.C.,
and Biloxi, Clarksdale and Gulfport, Miss., were in-
creases shown in retail sales, and in wholesale sales
the South Atlantic region of Georgia, Florida, the
Carolinas and Virginias and Delaware recorded a 1 per
cent drop from the previous period while in Alabama,
Mississippi, Tennessee and Keantucky the situation was
unchanged.
BirmPingham reported a 4 per cent decline in retail
sales, Macon, 3 per cent, Savannah, ~1 per cent, Green-
wood, S. C., 6 per cent, Bristol, Tenn., 4 per cent,
Johnson City, Tenn., 6 per cent, and Kingaport, Tenn.,
5 per cent. The situation was unchanged in Atlanta.
Substantial decreases were reported in the region
in the 6-month period in wholesale sales of furniture,
home furnishings, hardware, industrial supplies, lumber
and building materials, machinery equipment andsples
and plumbing and heating products, dry goods and paper
and its products.

FACILITY EXPANSIONS TO COST $8 000 000

Facility expansions to cost $3,836,700 in Anderson,
S. C., and $1,500,000 in tBatticaburg, Miss., were among
15 industrial expansion projects cleared in the South-
east by the Defense Production Administration calling
for a total expenditure of more than $8,000,000.
The Anderson project provided for expansion of the
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation for the production
of fibrous glass, and in Hattiesburg the Mississippi
Central Railroad company plans to improve its trans-
portation facilities.
The proposed improvements were covered in certifi-
eates of necessity granted BY DPA calling for rapid tax
writeoffs on the projects.

SOUTHEAST ADDS KILLION QUARTER DIRELLING UNITS

The decade of 1940 to 1950 saw the Southeast add
nearly a million and a quarter dwelling units to its
homes and apartment buildings to take care of the vast
influx of residents to the area, according to a study
of current and past Burean of the Census data on hous-
Lng.
Comparing data just issued from the 1950 census of
housing with figures available for 1940, it was found
that in the 10-year period the number of dwelling unite
Ln Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Hissiesippi, Tennessee
and the Carolinas advanced from 4,674,272 to 5,910,635
or an increase of 26.5 per cent.
Florida alone scored one of the highest percentage
gains in the nation with a rise of from 590,451 units
in 1940 to 952,815 in 1950, or a 61.4 per cent jump.
North Carolina experienced a 28.9 per cent increase,
Tennessee, 24.2 per cent, South Carolina, 21.5 per cent,
Georgia, 21.4 per cent, Alabama, 19.1 per cent, and
Missiesippi, 9.4 per cent.


JULL CONTINUE FROMI PAGE 1

STEEL WORK STOPPAGE HIlTS SOUTHIEAST INDUSTRY
The recent work stoppage in the nation's steel mills
will hit a $200,000,000 industry in the Southeast and may
also seriously retard the planting and harvesting of next
year' s crops.
According to NPA, there will be a serious shortage of
new farm machinery to plant and harvest the nation's 1953
farm crop because of inability of manufacturers to place
orders for and get delivery on steel already allotted to
them. It may mean an industry setback of as much as 30 per
cent off 1953 requirements, it was stated.
Last year, the southeastern States of Georgia, Florida,
Alabama, Tennessee, Missiesippi, K~entucky, the Carolinas
and Virginias, Maryland and Delaware produced farm machines
and equipment valued at $)190,130,000, according to Bureau
of the Censps figures just released. This included $162,-
903,000 worth of complete units, and attachments and parts
valued at $27,227,000.
As for next year' s crops, if the nation's food and fiber
needs are to be met, production of farm machinery must be
16 per cent above the 1949 rate, and on June 1 of this year
production was estimated at about equal the 1949 rate, NPA
pointed out.
Some evidence of how southeastern farmers are now de-
pending upon farn machinery to produce and harvest their
crops is shown in the 1950 census of agriculture now being
released by the Census Bureau. According to this census,
some 345,270 farms now report the use of tractors compared
with only 64,609 ten years previously.
OTHER RECENT KPA ACTIONS IN BRIEF
Iron and Steel Scrap: Deleted reference to "automobile
wrecker" in records and reports section of Order Y-20.
(Amendment to Order Y-20).
Electric Utilities: Gave temporary relief from inventory
restrictions on copper and aluminum. (Direction 1, Order Y-50).
Construction: Permitted builders to sell material to
recognized distributors. (CMP Reg. 6 Revised).
Steel: Facilitated the sale of surplus steel controlled
materials in hands of consumers. (Amendment 4 to CMP Reg. 1).
Nickel and Chromium: Clarified use of nickel and
chromium.(Amendment to Schedule C to Order Y-80).
Rubber: Removed restrictions on use of high tenacity
rayon for rubber products and made other changes in control
on synthetic and natural rubber. (Amendment to Order Y-2).
DO Rating List: Added high-tenacity rayon, aluminum foil
and powder and pig iron to list of materials for which DO
ratings may not be extended or offered to obtain delivery.
(Amendment to Direction 3 to Reg. 2).
Ihventgries: Revised it's basic inventory regulation by
removing controls from more than 50 widely-varied products.
(Revision of Inventory Regulation 1).
Aluminum: Eliminated specific restrictions on grade and
weight of aluminum to be used for destructive purposes.
(Order Y-84 Amended).
Aluminum Distributors: Facilitated sale of surplus aluminum
to distributors by manufacturers of aluminum products.
(Amendment to Order Y-88).
Alnminun Foil and Powder: Removed those products from list
of aluminum controlled materials forms and shapes. (Amendment
to CMP Reg. 1, Revised CMP Reg. 6 Amended, Dir. 3 to NPA Reg.
2 amended, YPA Ordere Y-5, Y-84, and Y-88 Amended, and Order
M-9Amendment 2).
Machine Tools: Facilitated maintenance of capacity and
solvency of entire metal-working equipment industry for
defense-supporting production. (Order Y-41 Amended).
Ipeect Wire Screening: Revoked control on this product.
(Order N-42 Revoked).
Agag: Provided emergency steel rations to small bnainess,
military contractors and firms. (Dir. 3 to Order Y-68).
figg: Acted to speed output of reopened mills to defense
program. (Dir. 15 and 16 to CYP Reg. 1, Dir. 6 to Revised CMP
Reg. 6, CuP Reg. 2 Amended, Dir. 4 to CMP Rer. 3 Amended).


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





More Detailed
Information On
The H~ighlights
-1of the News in
The Field of
Business is A-
vailable at all Department of Commerce Field Offices.



Expenditures for new plant and equipment by non-
manufacturing industries as a whole continue at a record
annual rate of $15 billion, although nondefense areas
such as trade and service passed their peaks in early
1951, according to a joint report of the Department of
Commerce and Securities Exchange Commission. The major
area of expansion, it was stated, is in the electric
power industry. Outlays by mining companies are in- .
creasing moderately, while expenditures by other
defense-related nonmanufacturing industries have leveled
off.
*
Total business inventories at the end of June of this
year were estimated at $68.7 billion, which,. after allow-
ance for seasonal variation represented a book decline
of almost $600 million during the month. Stocks held by
manufacturers and retailers' declined $350 million and
$250 million, respectively. No change from the end of
May was shown in wholesalers' stocks. Three-fifths of the
reduction in inventories occurred among manufacturers
and retailers of motor vehicles.
*
Total wholesalers' sales in June were estimated at
b8,1U0 million, which, after allowance for seasonal varia-
tions was unchanged from May. Sales by durable and non-
durable goods dealers were $2,674 million and $5,466 mil-
lion, respectively. *


I


N BOOKS Ii To Obtain Copies
NEW of this Material
~=`'4t AND REPORTS Check it inSpace
~4U Provided and Send
This Portion of
the Page to the
Nearest Department of Commerce Field Office. Your Name
and Address are on the Opposite Side. Make Remittances
for Sales Material Payable to Treasurer of the United
State. Unpriced Items Are Free.


SSurvey of Current Business:
LZAnnual Subscription, $3.25 a Year
SAugust 1952 Issue With Income Payments, 304
Latest National Production Authority Material:
NPA Press Release 52-4 // Order Y-20, Amended
Dir. 1, Order M-50 L/CMP Reg. 6 Revised
Amendment 4, CMP Reg. 1 JAmendment to Schedule
COrder Y-80 Order M-2 Amended
Amendment to Dir. 3, Reg. 2 L~nventory Reg.1,
Revised 90rder M-84 Amended Order Y-88 Amended
CMP Reg. 1 Amended Dkevised CMP Reg. 6 Amended
Dir. 3 to Reg. 2 Amended S Order Y-5 Amended
Order M-82 Amended fOrder M-88 Amended
Order M-89, Amendment 2 fOrder r-41 Amended
Order M-42 Revoked SDir. 3 to Order N-6A
Dire. 15 and 16 to CMIP Reg. 1 ~ir. 6 to Revised
CMP Reg. 6 SCMP Reg. 2 Amended i/Dr. L to CMP Reg.

Monthly Retail Trade Report, 104, $1 a Year


Chain store and mail-order sales in June totalled $2.8
billion, which, after adjustment is made for trading day
differences, represented a 7 per cent increase over a
year ago. Almost all trade groups showed advances from
May to June after adjustment for seasonal factors. Among
nondurable goods groups, June sales were up about 7 per
cent for men' s wear stores and catalog sales of mail-order
houses. Smaller advances of 2 or 3 per cent were shown for
department and general merchandise, grocery, drug, women' s
wear and shoe stores.
++r++
Personal income in June was at an annual rate of $266
billion, or $1) billion higher than in May, the Office of
Business Economics, Department of Commerce, reported. Farm
income accounted for more than half of the Mlay-June rise.
A small increase in private-industry payrolls also was a
contributing factor.
+ + *
Total expenditures for alcoholic beverages, including
public revenues, amounted to $9,150 million in 1951, which
compared writh outlays of $8,760 million in 1950.
+ t
The backlog of patent applications awaiting action by
the Patent Office at the end of the last fiscal year was
the lowest in six years, Commissioner John A. Marsall
reported.
+ *
Expenditures for new construction in July reached the
record total of almost $3.1 billion, the Departments of
Commerce and Labor reported jointly. The record dollar
volume of work put in place indicated the steel dispute
had little adverse effect on the tempo of on-site operations
during the month. Available evidence made it appear that
full effects of the shutdown would not ye felt until later.
+ *
June production of all types of knit cotton and wool
underwear and nightwear registered decreases from the out-
put in June 1951 but showed slight differences from May
1952 levels, the Bureau of the Census announced.
M3 monthly Report on the Labor Force, July 1952, P-57,#121
ZyVacant Dwelling Units in the U. S., by Divisions,
S tes, & Standard Metropolitan Areas, Apr. 1, 1950, 80C-7I,#1
S1950 U. S. Census of Agriculture Horticultural
8 ecaties, 254
Aug. I 1952 Consolidated Cotton Report
Facts for Industry Reports:
Pulp, Paper &l Board, M14A-62, 10Q, $1 a Year
knit Underwear & Nightwear, June 1952, M670-62,54,504 Yr.
Tractors, 2nd Quar. 1952, M37B-2-2, 5p, 259 Ir.
Wool Manufactures, Summary for 1951,Y15H1-01,154, $1 Tr.
Women' 8, Misses' & Juniors' Outerwear, 1951,M67H-01,
_204, 504 Yr.
MZ machine Tools, 1951, M34A-01, .154
L~Nonferrous Castings, Sumrmary for 1951, M24E-01,104,704Yr.
SFarm Machines & Equipment, 1951, M35A-01, 254
Simplified Practice Recommendation, Adhesive Plaster,
85-52, 54
~Commeeria Standard, Steel Fence Posts-Field & Line Type,
(Produced from Hot-Rolled Steel Sections), 184-51, 51
CCommercial Standard, Latex Foam Mattresses for Hospitals,
182-51. 54
Me wasurem~ent of the Thickness of Capacitor Paper, NBS
Circular 532, 154
L7Export Control 19th Quarterly Report of Secretary of
Commerce to President & Congress, 154
L7Small Business Aids (Rerun):
L/Aid to Sell Teen-Agers, #37
L/From a $300 Stock of Sporting Goods to a $7,000 Stock
in Six Months, #38
Stock Control of Phonograph Records, #39
Eight Ways to Strengthen Your Advertising, #140


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





LnUBER EXPANSION PROGRAM ANNOUNCED BY DPA

The Federal Government has announced an expansion program
which vitally affects the lumber and wood products industry
of the Southeast.
The Defense Production Administration would like to see
the industry spend as high as $150,000,000 on newr facilities
and equipment between now and the end of 1954.

Certificate of Necessity information and formal
are available at all Department of Commerce field
offices for the asking.

DPA wants expansion operations to include the expenditure
of $b20,000,000 on sawmills and related facilities; $2,000,000
on dry kilns; $3,000,000 on laminating facilities; a million
dollars on lumber storing and handling; $b6,000,000 on hard-
board plants; $5,000,000 on debarkers and chippers; $9,000,000
on fiber, chip and miscellaneous waste products; $1,500,000
on wood preservation facilities; and $2,500,000 on other wood
products facilities. Conservation is being emphasized.
To achieve this objective, DPA will give careful considera-
tion to applications filed by the industry for certificates
of necessity which would call for rapid tax writeoffs on the
expansion operations. New facilities and equipment or additions
to existing facilities and equipment are being sought.

SII SOUTHEASTERN STATES LEAD IN WEAR PRODUCTION

The six southeastern States of Georgia, Alabama, North Caro-
lina, Tennessee, K~entucky and Virginia produce more knit cotton
and wool underwear and nightwear than any other area in the
country.
This is shown insa current Bureau of the Census Facts for
Industry Report placing the value of such shipments in Georgia,
Alabama, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky and Virginia in
the first half of 1952 at $45,889,000, or 37 per cent of the
national total of $123,955,000.


SOUTHWESTERN REGIONS LEAD IN CONSTRUCTION WAORK

Two southeastern regions in the first quarter of 1952 led the
nation in percentage increases in construction operations as
compared with the corresponding period last year --- the East
South Central region in the value of total new construction, and
the South Atlantic section in value of public construction, ac-
cording to a current issue of the Industry Report Constraction
and Building Materia,1s issued by the Department of Com~merce.

This report, the June 1952 issue, is available
through any Department of Commerce field office
for 256 a copY or $7 a year,

Included were a 10 per cent rise in the value of total new
construction in the East South Central region, comprising Ala-
bama, Mississippi, Tennessee and K~entuckyr, which surpassed per-
centage gains in all other areas, and a 58 per cent increase in
public construction in the South Atlantic section, embracing
Georgia, Florida, the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland, Dela-
ware and the District of Columbia, which also topped the nation.
Increases in the nation as a whole were 3 per cent and 31 per
cent, respectively.
.An analysis showed that the value of-total new construction
in the East South Central section in the first quarter of this
year was $430,200,000, including $220,400,000 in private build-
ing and $209,800,000 in public construction, and expenditures
of $865,000,000 in the South Atlantic, with private building
operations taking $521,200,000 and $343,800,000 spent on public
activities.

SOUTHWEST' S HORTICULTURAL INDUSTRY BIG BUSINESS

The horticultural industry in the South is a $76 million
business, according to a report just issued by the Bureau of
the Census from its 1950 Census of Agriculture.

See List of Publications on Page 3 for ordering
this document.

The 1950 census revealed that total sales in the industry in
the South reached a high mark of $76,031,238, including $43,44~,-
113 in the South Atlantic region, comprising Georgia, Florida,
the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland, Delaware and the District
of Columbia, $13,825,304 in the four East South Central States
of Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentuckcy, and $18,761,821
in the West South Central States of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louis-
iana and Texas.


Value of the shipments from the six southeastern States
more than doubled that for New York and New Jersey, which ap-
proximated $21,434,000, was more than four times that of the
New England area, which amounted to $11,480,000, and was far
ahead of the $31,734,000 worth shipped from Pennsylvania.
Also, it was in excess of shipments from all other areas.
GPC ias*3930


This report is listed on Page 3 for your
convenience in ordering.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
oro


BC-6-JF


BULLETI, ,.v......


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE

ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg. $
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009
Volume 6, Number 17 September 1, 1952


UNIlVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARITMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINUESVILLE, FLORIDA




















VOLUME 6. NUMBER 18 SEPTEMBER 15. 1952


Mobile, Aila., Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga.,
308 Federal B18g., 662 U.S. Court 218 P. 0. B1dg.,
Tel. 2-3641,X-206 H~ouse,Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755

STEEL CHECK IN PROGRESS IN SOUTHEnST


ANOTHER "BREAK[" FOR SbALL BUSINESS PLANNuED


Source: Office of Business Economics, U. S. 'warded by
Department of Commerce 'the De-
partment of Defense.
A cooperative agreement has been entered into by the
Small Defense Plants Administration and Armed Services
under which SDPA business specialists will be assigned
to procurement offices to make "joint determinations
of specific purchases to be set aside for negotiation
only with small business concerns.
In addition this type of procurement will be included
in the lists of proposed purchases and the contract
awarded information distributed each working day by
Department of Commerce field offices and cooperating
agencies, and will be reflected under a special caption
for the convenience of small firns.

Note: Your nearest Department of Commerce
field office has these lists for distribution
to you without charge.

The announcement was made along with a compilation
showing that in August of this year the Federal Govern-
ment awarded 52 contracts for goods and services in the
southeastern States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mliss-
issippi, South Carolina and Tennessee with a dollar
value of $13,701,500. This was a sharp drop from the
value of awards made in the past six months, and with
the exception of January of this year was the smallest
month' s business of the year.
In the August purchases were 9 contracts awarded in
Alabama valued at $1,530,685; 4 in Florida, $1,220,884;
13 in Georgia, $6,471,243; 7 in Mississippi, $2,068,573;
5 in South Carolina, $1,569,253; and 14 in Tennessee
with a value of $;840,889. Voltage regulators, athletic
equipment, petroleum products, wheel clocks and other
products were bought in the region.


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingharm, Alar.,
7th Floor, Forsyth Blag., 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Charleston, S. C., Columpbia, S. C., Jackson, Miss.,
Sgt. Jasper Blldg., 1310 Lardy St., 509) P.O.Blag.,
Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


Me~mphjs, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Miami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg,
Tel. 9-7533 '


Small
business
firms in
the South-
east will
be given
another
breakr" in
a move just
taken to
"earmark"
for them
certain
contracts
to be a-


Compliance investigators of NPA
in the Southea~st are calling uponl
companies using steel in five States
iiHED ,in the region to bring them into
conformity with recent changes in

commodity for defense and defense-
related activities.
The survey is to be carried out
P~oductiamong 15 firms each in Georgia kand
J. 1'ducton Tennessee; 17 in Alabama; 9 in Florida;
and one in Mississippi. Investigators
assigned to NPA offices in Miami,
Auth rit~ Jacksonville, Birmingham, Memphis,
11% I~ri@7 Nashrille and Atlanta are being used.
The change in regulations consisted
of an amendment to the Controlled
Materials Plan Regulation Number 2
revising inventory restrictions on steel by providing that
no user of that commodity may accept delivery of steel if
it would cause his inventory to be in excess of that
amount required for the operation of his plant for the
succeeding 30-day period, or if it would mean an excessive
practicable working inventory, whichever would be less.
Following: were some recent actions taken by NPA:
Machine Tool Finishes: Gave permission to manufacturers
of metal working machinery to apply protective L'inishes
to their product without restriction by revoking Order Y-104.
Line Pipe: Advanced the deadline for filing applications
for priorities assistance in the purchase of line pipe for
small construction and production operations and for use
as MRO in the oil and gas industries. Order M-46j Amended.
Tin: Permitted resumption of p ivate importation of tin
in an amendment to Order M-8.
Iron and Steel: Required producers of iron and steel
products to reserve certain percentages of their production
for military, atonic energy, machine tool and military
component orders in Amendment 1 to Order M-1 and Direction
6 to Order Y-1.
Cqpper & Aluminum: Permitted decorative use of copper
and aluminum on consumer goods in amendments to Orders
M-47A and M-47B. Also increased quantities of those products
which may be self-authorized for all construction except
recreational, and revoked most limitations on use of those
metals in construction in amendments to CMP Reg. 6 and
Orders Y-100 and M-77 and revocation of Order M-74.
Copper Raw Materials: Clarified the definition of brass
mill products to assure uniform operation in Amendment I
to Order 1Y-16.
Polyethylene; Eliminated allocation controls on polyethy-
11ene by revoking Schedule 5 to Order 1-45.
[$Se NPA Cqntinued on Pagre 2)


Sso--


t S--


0-


1951 1952


ClfZ 49 : C, J/


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





NPA Continued From Parre 1

Mill Plate: Removed restrictions on use of mill accumu-
la~tion plate, unassorted temper tin plate, unmenlded senders,
waste-waste and other coated secondaries unsuitable for
defense use in Amendment I to M-24.
Steel Deliveries: Prohibited producers of steel or of
products containing steel from postponing and rescheduling
delivery dates in any directives issued to them on and after
August 13, 1952 in an amendment to Direction 5 to NPA Reg. 2.
Alloy Serap: Required persons who generate alloy scrap
as a result of a production operation to sort their scrap
into groups on the basis of nickel and other alloy content
in Direction 1 to NPA Order M-20.
Platinum Scrap: Permitted manufacturers of jewelry and
other items on the prohibited list to receive from refiners
for reuse all platinum reclaimed from their platinum scrap
materials in an amendment to Order 11-54.
Electric Utilities: Provided full fourth quarter and
advance quarterly allotments of controlled materials for
"minor requirements" of electric utilities in an amendment
to Order ML-50.
carbon Steel. Copper & Aluminum: Held tnat smaller orders
for carbon steel, copper and aluminum need not be reduced
below carload quantities, provided users do not order in
excess of' their authorized allotments in an amendment to
Direction 3 to CMYP Reg. 1.
Cans: Announced can material specifications and quantity
limitations established in Order M-25 no longer apply to the
use of some additional secondaries of tin plate in can
production in an amendment to that order.
Steel: issued Direction 2 to Order M-50 to bring inventories
of steel held by electrical utilities into line with those
held by other industries.
Sulfur: Increased permissible sulfur inventories in hands
of users in an amendment to Order M-69.
Sulfuric Acid: Lifted distribution controls on sulfuric
acid by revocation of Order 1-94.
Railroads: Amended Order M-95 setting up basic reporting
procedures for manufacturers of locomotives and railroad
industrial and freight cars to make it conform to actual
practices.
Carbon Conversion Steel: Freed this product from the allot-
ment restrictions of CMIP in Direction 19 to CMP Reg. 1 and
Direction 7 to CUMP Reg. 6j.
Priorities Assistance: Facilitated interchange of priorities
assistance between Canada and the U. S. by amending Regulation

Brass Mill Products: Permitted distributors of brass mill
products to acquire increased quantities of those products
to strengthen inventories in August and September to meet
increased demands from warehouse customers in Direction 1 to
Order Y-82.
Machine Tools: Removed machine tools, construction equip-
ment and other products from Direction 4 to CMIP Reg. 3,
leaving them subject to other NPA orders in an amendment to
Direction 4 to CMP Reg. 3.
Aircraft Alloy Steel: Clarified restriction on sales of
aircraft quality steel in an amendment to Schedule 1 of
Ordr -6A.
Oil-Country Casing. Tubing: Revoked Direction 1 to Schedule
2to Order M-6A restricting warehouse deliveries of oil-
country casing and tubing on A, B, C, E, Z2 or H2E authorized
controlled materials orders only.
Steel: Authorized steel consumers to acquire and use foreign
caused steel free of allotment restrictions of the CMLP in
anamendment to Direction 4, CMYP Reg. 1.
Zirconium: Increased quantity of zirconium that can be used
insteel production without being recorded on monthly melt-
sheet report in an amendment to Order M1-80.
Columbium-Bearing Stainless Steel: Permitted sale or use
ofcertain columbina-bearing stainless steel shapes and forms
ininventories of producers and distributors in an amendment to
Schedule 5 to Order Y-80.


SAAI~ES.,WAES IN SOUTHEAST AT HIGH MaHK

A total of $13.7 billion was paid in wages and sal-
aries in the Southeast in 1951, which was 61 per cent
of the $22.2 billion received by residents in all forms
of income, according to an analysis of the annual report
of the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department
of Commerce on income payments to individuals just re-
leased.
The figures on wages and salaries were for the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tenn-
essee and the Carolinas, and they also showed that
income payments to southeastern residents from all
government sources last year approximated $4,238, mil-
lion.

This report is now available at Department
of Comrmerce field offices in the August 1952
issue of the Survey of Current Business for
310 cent a coy.

Other income of southeasterners in 1951 included
$4,946 million to proprietors and $1,928 million to
property owners*
Farmers in the area received an estimated net in-
come in 1951 of $3,010 million, which was more than
they received in 1950 by some 23 per cent.

'COUNTY BUSINESS PATTERNS. 1950 '
Sourneastern business men can DOW obtain '
data for planning their future market opera- '
'tions from a new set of the County Business '
Pattern publications just off the press. Pre- '
pared jointly by the Bureau of the Census and '
Federal Security Agency, this material shows '
the number of establishments and employees, '
with payrolls, in manufacturing plants by '
Regions, States and Counties for the first '
i quarter of 1950, the latest such information '
availaole of that kind. See Order Blank on '
Page 3 for ordering. '

SALES TAX COLLECTIONS UP IN SOUTHEAST

The seven southeastern States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mlississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas in
the fiscal year ending June 30 of this year collected a
total of $355,222,000 in sales taxes, or 27 per cent of
the $1,303,400,000 collected in State taxes from all
sources, according to a current Bureau of the Census
report entitled "State Tax Collections in 1952."

Copies of this report are available at
Department of Commerce field offices. See
Order Blank on Page 3 for ordering.

Georgia, which collected $93,654,000 in its first
full year of sales taxes shown in the report, stood
seventh in the nation in such collections, being ex-
ceeded only by California' s $416,494,000, Mlichigan' s
$245,660,000, Illinois' $191,934,000, Ohio' s $165,246,-
000, Washington' s $135,230,000, and Indiana' s $126,-
746,000.
Other sales tax collections in the Southeast in fis-
cal 1952 were Florida, $54,115,000; North Carolina,
$51,821,000; Tennessee, $50,022,000; South Carolina,
$37,581,000; Alabama, $37,165,000; and M~ississippi,
$30,864,000.

NEWA DEPARTMFEiT- OF COMMERCE PUBLICATION -- See '
Page 4 for announcement, '


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





More Detailed
Information On
The Hlighlinhts
Sof the News in
The Field of

available at all Department of Co~merce F d isA-



Total wholesalers' sales in July of tnis year were
estimated at $8,549 million, which, after allowance for
seasonal variations, was 4 per cent above June 1952.
July sales of durable goods were $2,666 million and
nondurable goods were $5,883 million, increases of
nearly 3 and 5 per cent respectively from the previous
month.
*
Nonagricultural employment turned upward between
July and August with settlement of the steel dispute.
At the same time, however, there was a further decline
in farm employment. As a result, total civilian employ-
ment, estimated at 62,35;G,000 in the week ending Aug.
9 showed little change from the previous month.
+* ** *
Manufacturers shipments declined somewhat more
than seasonally and inventories were further drawn
dowpn in July of this year. Unfilled orders, however,
continued to rise during the month. Sales or shipments
were estimated to have dropped 1 per cent after season-
al adjustment as the continued pickup in nondurables
partially offset the losses due to the lack of steel
production.
*
Chain store and mail-order sales in July were esti-
mated at $2.7 billion or about 83 per cent above a year
ago. Part of this year-to-year increase waas accounted
for by the additional trading day this year compared
with a year ago.


~~~~t~~T OE OK 41 a(btain Copies
NEW BOOKSor this Material
kAND REPORTS Check it in Space
~U I~~i~nProvided and Send
This Portion of
the Page to the
Nearest Department of Commerce Field Office. Your Name
and Address are on the Opposite Side. Make Remittances
for Sales Material Payable to Treasurer of the United
States. Unpriced Items Are Free.



Latest National Production Authority Material:
R evocation of Order M-104
Order M-46, Amendment 1 of July 31, 1952
Order M-8, Amendment 1 of August 1, 1952
Order M-1, Amendmenlt of August 1, 1952, and Order 11-1
Direction 6 of August 1, 1952
Order M-47A, Amendment 1 of aug. 4, 1952
Order M-77, Amendment 1 of Aug. 4, 1952, Revised CMP
Reg. Amendment 3 of Aug. 4, 1952, and Order Y-100,
6mnmet2 efAnhen 11 1952
Od M1, Amnmn fAug 15

orerM24,o ch ndulel50f AO ut 812 1952
Reg. 2, Direction 5, amended aug. 13, 1952
Order M-20, Dir. 1 of Aug. 14, 1952
Or er M- amend d Aug. 14, 1952

CMP Reg. 1, Dir. 3,, amended Aug. 14, 1952


Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $542 million in July compared with
$535 million in the same month a year ago. Dividends dis-
bursed in nonmanufacturing: industries totalled $343 million
up 5 per cent over July 1951. The rise was concentrated in
the communications industry where there was an increase of
11l million as a result of expanded capitalization in the


Total sales of retail stores in Jhly were about 6 per
cent above the same month a year ago. Part of this year-to-
year advance was accounted for by the additional trading
day this month compared with a year ago. After adjusting
for seasonal factors and trading day differences sales in
July were down nearly 4 per cent from the June figures.
+ + *
SIncome receipts from U. S. investments abroad were
$2 billion in 1951, continuing the growth which began soon
after the war. In addition to this amount, foreign subsid-
iaries of U. S. companies had earnings of about $7?00
million which were not distributed and did not enter into
the balance of payments.
Ha+ +
Establishment in the near future of a section of the
Department of Comrmerce devoted to the interests of distribu-
tion was announced by Secretary Charles Sawyer. The element
of distribution has been neglected to a certain extent by
the country in its desire to stimulate production as a method
of raising the standard of living and meeting the problems
of inflation, he said.
s+ **
All types of steel controlled materials coming from
distributors may again be shipped against export licenses
for use in consumer goods production abroad, the Office of
International Trade, U. S. Department of Commerce, reminded
world traders.
a a *
The Department of Commerce with the cooperation of the
trade is now working out a Revision of American Lumber Stan-
dards for Softwood Lumber. It will be available shortly.

//Order MY.-25, Amendment 1, Aug. 15, 1952
SOrder Y-50, Direction 2, Aug. 15, 1952
Murder 11-69, Amended Aug 19, 1952
Order M-94 Revoked
Order M1-95, Amended aug. 19, 1952
Revised CMP Reg. o, Dir. 7, Aug. 18, 1952, and CMLP Reg. 1,
Direction 19, Aug. 18, 1952
Reg. 3, Amended August L0, 1952
Order Y-82, Dir. 1, Aug. 20, 1952
eag. 3, Dir. 4, Amended Aug. 20, 1952
Order Y-6&D, Schedule 1, Amended Aug. 21, 195L
Direction 1 to Schedule 2, Order M1-6A Revoked
CMP Reg. 1, Dir. 4, Amended Aug. 22, 1952
Order MI-80, Amendment 2L, Aug. 25, 1952
Order U-80, Schedule 5, Amended Aug. 25, 1952
State Employment in 1952, G-GE52-Mo. 5
State Tax Collections in 1952
County Business Patterns, 1950, U. S. & Regions,
U. b. Summary, 254, '#est South Central, South Atlantic
& East South Central Regions, 551
L71950 U. S. Census of Agriculture, North and South
Carolina Combined, $3.00
State Tax Collections in 1952, G-SF52-No. 4
Governmental Revenue in 1951, GAF51-No. 2
estimates of civilian Population of Voting Age in U.S.P25#163
population 21 Y ears Old &k Over,8 tateakC itie s,1950,PC 1b4#
Esth ate r a pulat on of states,Julyl,1951 & 1950,P25#62
Area & Industrial Development Publications,#19, 104
;Color is a Supersalesman, SBA #43
A Medical Program for Manufacturers' Employees,SBA#44
Increasing &ai Television Sales Through "Contacts"


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3









1


COMMdERCE DEPARTMENT ISSUES CATALOG AND INDEX

Responding to requests from many sources, the United States
Department of Commerce has just issued a buckram bound listing
of all of its publications by catalog and by index.
Entitled "United States Department of Commerce Publications -
A Catalog tand Index," the new publication as the foreword
states is designed for the use of businessmen, scientists,
research workers, trade and professional associations, librar-
ies, educational institutions and others interested in commerce
and its related fields.

This document, which is priced at $2.75 a copy,
is available through any Department of Commerce
field office,

The new publication includes material which continue to have
research value even though copies are no longer available for
distribution, as well as publications which are now in stock.
The contents deal with both domestic commerce and world
trade.

ADULT FEMALLES OUTNUrMBER MALES INl REGION

Adult females outnumbered males in the Southeast in 1950
by 371,543, according to a current Bureau of the Census report
on population characteristics.
In the last "nose counting" job coulueted by that agency
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the
Carolinas, enumerators found a total of 6,300,076 females of
the age of 21 and over and only 5,928,533 males of that age.

This report is available gratis at Depart-
ment of Commerce field offices. See Order
Blank on Page 3 for ordering.

By the same token, there were only 795,253 males of that age
in 13 major cities in the region compared with 922,049 females.
The figures showed an excess of females 21 years old and
over in all States and cities in the Southeast. In fact, this
situation prevailed throughout the country, except in the Moun-
tain region, where there were more males than females of that

aeOf a total adult population of 12,228,609 in the seven south-
eastern States, 12,168,817 were citizens of their States, lear-
inlg a total of 59,792 who were not citizens. In the 13 cities
there were 18,974 noncitizens of a population of 1,717,302.


SOUTPHEALST PICKS UP POPULATION SINCE LAST CENSUS

The Southeast picked up 336,000 in population between April
1, 1950, when the last regular decennial census was taken and
July 1 of last year.
Bureau of the Census figures just released showed that on
July 1, 1951 there were an estimated 21,258,000 persons in
AlbmFlorida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
lascompared with 20,927,214 in the April 1, 1950 decennial
census.

Department of Commerce offices are now
receiving final reports on the 1950 census of
population as well as special census reports.

All of the southeastern States registered gains in the
yerand a quarter, except in Alabama where a drop of from
3,061,743 on April 1, 1950 to an estimated 3,042,000 on July
1,1951, or a decrease of seven-tenth~s of 1 per cent, was
shown. Florida, with a rise of from L,771,305 persons counted
in the April 1, 1950 census to an estimated 2,961,000, an
increase of 189,000, or 6.8 per cent, stood second in the
nation in percentage inrease in population in the year and a
quarter, and fourth in numerical rise.

REGION'S "ELIGBLE, VOTER" POPULATION EXPkNDS

The Southeast has 668,000 more persons of voting age to
take part in this year' s presidential election than it did in
1948.
Bureau of the Census figures, reflected in a report just
issued,, placed the number of persons of voting age in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas
currently at 12,345,000 compared with 11,677,000 in 1948, a
5 per cent rise in the 4-year period.
But, a lot of residents of the area will not vote this
November due to State requirements as to citizenship, residence,
registration, or payment of poll taxes; many are aliens who
may not yet be able to exercise their franchise; and many
others are confined to penal, mental and kindred institutions.
Four years ago, only 24 per cenlt of the 11,677,000 persons
of voting age in the seven States went to the polls, or 2,887,-
636. Two States, Alabama and South Carolina, were particularly
low in ratio of voters to voting population, with only 13.7
and 12.8 per cent, respectively. In North Carolina, the ratio
of those voting to population of voting age was highest in
1948 with 36.5 per cent. GPO 83-40575


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, CA.
7116 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000
VOLUMbE 6, NUMBER 18 SEPTEMIBER 15, 1952


3 1262 08748 8929
BULLETINU or cumme:nrs:.


PAGE 4


UNIlV. OF. FL LI.
DOCU g. S D





<= 0 9 ***TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





c If 2 6F 4/

UNIEDSTATES DEPAR ENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD S VICE








VOLUME 6. NUMBER 19 OCTOBER 1. 1952
Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S. C., Columbia, S. C., Jackson, Miss., Jacrsonville, Fla.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 509 P. 0. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. nA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-34d21,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111

Yem~phis, Tenn., Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga.,
Madison at Front, 947 Seybold Bcldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 676 U.S.Court 218 P.O. Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206 .Bouse, Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755


DPA AUTH1ORIZES $35.6 MILLION IN EXPANSIONS
Expenditures in the
Southeast of some
'krendal in Plant anal $35.6 million in
Ecpsi~pzrnte Expenditum as p> ~to"n otooher e--
for the national pro-
indessthafl95-loogram of
200 defense
Manufemwing / are re-
17 Candy Mining ..I flected
in a new
list of
if Al Indmiercertifi-
150- cates of
wo- necessity
125 J/LL communicoeiracmd 1 by the
/ Public Utlren ggggggg
an cm I Product_
1"", so- --. ion Ad-
ministre-
I I wreean, tion just
Ps1 I I I I I I I I I I released.
1950 1961 1152 Included
SEASONALLY ADJUSTED sere fai t
na r o wwwnrp r orc onow rpman~soeuwm* improvements
in Columbia, Tenn., for the production of graphite bars
to cost $8,456,000; expansion of the air transportation
system of National Airlines, Inc., of Miaami, costing a
total of $)20,400,000; development of the petroleum pipe
line operations of the Plantation Pipe Line company in
Alabama Tennessee.and Georgia at an expenditure of
around /1,500,000; production of phosphate rock in
Tenoroc pine, Fla., representing an outlay of some
$850,300; and of nitric acid and ammonium nitrate in
Yazoo City, Miss., to cost $i2,856,550.
RETAIL MERCHANTS GET "EVEN BR~EAIn

Retail merchants in seven southeastebycities and
areas in which the Bureau of the Census conducts surveys
reported increased sales in the first seven months of
1952 over the same period last year, while those in
seven other cities experienced declines, according to
the Monthly Retail Trade Report of the Censue Bureau.

This report is available through any Department
of Commerce field office on a subscription basis
of $1.QQ a year.

Gains included 11 per equ~t in Augustai 5 per cent in
Columbus, Ga; 4 per cent in'Clarkedale; 3 per cent in
Bilozi and Asheville; and 2 per cent in Gulfport.


DPA REDUCES STEEL ALLOTHENTS IN 181 QUARTER
Announcement made by the De-
THE fense Production Administration
that manufacturers engaged in
CititItalnon-dequnse activities al the
ceive approximately three-fourths
of the steel allotted them in the
P~odu tion fourth quarter of this year is
A E(( II3tig]1 nt expected to affect the majority
of southeastern business ena
materially because of the self-
Authoritp ~authorization and self-calculationoZram
Ralph S. Trigg, deputy DPA ad-
ministrator for program and re-
quirBRODAs 8814 that While DOD-defenB9 BRnufacturers Will
receive approximately the same allotments of copper and
aLERLEA oDntrolled materials in the first quarter of
next year as were allotted them in the fourth quarter of
this year, due to the loss in steel production occasioned
by the work stoppage in the steel industry it will be
necessary to reduce the steel allotments.
Most of the steel users in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee are manufacturer
of soc-called agn products under the controlled materials
plan of the National Production Authority, and are permit-
ted to self-authorize or self-calculate their allotments
of steel, copper and aluminum needed in the first quarter
of next year.
CHlaNGE IN NPA ADMINIISTRATOR
Resignation of Henry F. Fowler as Administrator of the
NPA to accept an appointment as Defense mobilizer, and
designation of Richard A. McDonald, San Francisco industrial
executive, to succeed him waes announced by Secretary of
Commerce Charles Sawyer. Horace B. McCoy, Assistant Adminis-
trator of NPB and Director of the commerce Department's
Office of Industry and Commerce was appointed NPA Deputy
Administrator.
CONSTRUCTION
.Indications are NPA is contemplating an important step
in the construction field. Proposed relaxation of construct-
ion regulations to become effective April 1, 1953 to permit
recreational construction and increase amounts of controlled
materials that can be self-authorized for most types of
construction were disonesed at a meeting of the Construction
Industry Advisory Committee with NPA officials and the
latter announced that the regulations would be amended "in
the immdiate future" with the relaxation provisions to
bsoom efective Apr 1953.
Deliveries of copper-base alloy controlled materials
failed to maintain the bsase level in the second quarter of
1952 as in the first quarter of the year, NIPA reported.
(SEE NPA CONTINUED Ohr PAGE 2)





TWO SOUTHEASTERN STATES FARK INCOME LEADERS

Two southeastern States --- South Carolina and
Georgia --- were among the nation' a greatest percentage
gainers in cash fara income in the first half of 1952,
according to an analysis of current figures on cash
receipts to farmers of the nation issued by the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture.

1950 Census of Agriculture data are now
being received by Department of Commerce offices.
Complete reports for North and,South Carolina
and Tennessee are already available,

Southl Carolina, with a rise of 31.9 per cent in cash
receipts, and Georgia, with a 23.3 per cent advance,
stood fourth and sixth, respectively, among all States
in percentage increases from January through June of
this year. Leading the United States was Arizona with
47.7 per cent; Oregon, with 38.83 per cent; and Maine,
with 33.3 per cent. Fifth among the leaders was Califor-
nia, with 27.9 per cent.
In the Southeast, increases for all of the States
except Florida and Mississippi were reflected in the
report. In Florida, the cash income fell from $292,-
638,000 in the first 6 months of last year to $283,-
330,000 this year, and in Yississippi the drop was
from $14,671,000 to $139,230,000, due largely to sharp
declines in returns from sales of crop producte-

SATLANTIC STEEL PLANS OPEN HOUSE '

Atlantic Steel Company, of Atlanta, is planning I
an Open House and Trade Show at its plant in Atlan-I
ta, October 31 and November 1. It will mark the '
opening of the firm' s new Warehouse Division build-'
ing. Exhibits and displays will be featured. Cus- '
tomers, suppliers, and representatives of indust-
rial, business and commercial interests are being '
invited. '

SOUT1' S G~IN HIGHI IN "WEAR" OUTPUT

The South last year experienced the greatest per-
centage increase over 1950 in the value of shipments of
knit underwear and nightwear of all regions in the
United States, a Bureau of the Census report just issued
shows .
The report was made in a Facts For Industry release
which said the value of such shipments from the region
last year was $13`2,704,000 compared with $84,020,000
in 1950, a rise of 58 per cent.

These Facts for Industry reports are
available at all Department of Comrmerce
offices fqr a small pharg9,

Southern shipments of the garments constituted some
23 per cent of the $565,150,000 worth shipped in the
nation as a whole in 1951. Shipments in the United
States last year were 24 percent greater than in 1950
when they were valued at $5,215,000.
Last year, the Now, England section shipped goods of
that type valued at $44,693,000, a 29 per cent gain
over $)34,659,000 in 1950; shipments from the Middle At-
lantic section totalled $292,958,000 in 1951, a 13 per
cent increase over the $)259,014,000 in 1950, and last
year the central and west regions shipped goods valued
at $;94,795,000, a 24 per cent advance over the $76,-
522,000 worth in 1950.
Included in the goods were both cotton and wool
underwear and nightwear.


PAGE? 2


NM CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Following were some of the recent actions taken by NPA
on orders, regulations and other documents:
Petroleum and Gas: In order to make certain that petroleum
and gas industries in the United States and Cana~da and
foreign petroleum operations are able to cash all third
quarter allotments of controlled materials, Direction 4 to
NPA Order Y-lr6 and Direction 2 to M-46A were isoned.
"B" Product YMnufackurers: Clarified the automatic allotment
procedure recently established for "B" product manufacturers
for the first quarter of 1953 in an amendment to Direction
18 of CMP Reg. 1.
Rubber: Removed restrictions on the purchase of cold govern-
ment-produced synthetic rubber in an amendment to Order M-2.
Electric UItilities: Cut back copper and aluminum inventories
built up by the nation' s electric utilities in a revocation
of Direction 1 to Y-50.
almnm Authorized accumulation of 60-day inventories of
aluminum controlled materials in the fourth quarter of 1952
in an amendment to CMP Reg. 2, and in revocation of Direction
1 to CKP Reg. 2.
jiteel: Clarified the position of third and fourth quarter
orders on steel producers' schedules during October and
November 1952 and in January and February 1953 in an amendment
to Direction 16 to CMP Reg. 1.
Graphite,Electrodes: Authorized delivery of artificial
graphite and carbon electrodes in the fourth quarter of
1952 to the same persons and in the same quantities, sizes,
and shapes as were authorized in the third quarter of 1952
in Direction 1 to Order Y-66.
Carbon Conversion Steel: Placed restrictions on the recently
permitted purchase and use of carbon conversion steel in
amendments to Direction 19 to CYP Reg. I and Direction 7 to
CMP Reg. 6.
Ste: Authorized producers eligible to apply the Suffix B-5
to authorized controlled materials orders for steel bearing
the quarterly identification 2Q52 or 3452 placed on or
after MYay 1, 1952, but who did not use the suffix to convert
outstanding orders prior to shipment by adding the B-5 Suffix
in an amendment to CHP Reg. 1.
Electrop~latin Mickel: Gave assistance to the abard-hit"
electroplating industry in an amendment to Schedule 1 of
Order M-80.
High Alloy Serap: Made provision for allocation of high alloy
scrap in an amendment to Order M-20.
Construction Mlachinery:Authorized self-authorization of orders
for repair and replacement parts or components by construction
machinery manufacturers and owners in an amendment to Order
Y-43 .
Carbon Cqnversion Steel: Assured a continued supply of finish-
ed carbon conversion steel for construction purposes to gas
and petroleum operators in the U. S., Canada and foreign
countries in Direction 5 to Order Il-L6 and Direction 3 to
Order Y-16a.
Ste: Removed from the temporary "freeze" on warehouses
of secondary and imported steel products, together with carbon
steel hot and cold rolled sheet and strip in an amendment to
Direction 3 to Order M-6A.
Cans: Gave can manufacturers temporary permission to make
unrestricted use of. cans or parts of cans made from emergency
purchases of tin plate acquired by them in Direction 5 to
Order 11-25, and revocation of Direction 4 as amended to
Order M-25.
Tung~sten, Molybdenum: Eliminated allocation control on the
use of pure tungsten and molybdenum in an amendment to Order
M-81.
.Terneglate:.Removed restrictions on the end-use of terneplate
in an amendment to Order Y-24.
Vegetable Tanning Materials: Restored unrestricted use of
vegetable tanning materials by revoking Order Y-57.
Md: Revoked the flood emergency measure of May 1952 by
cancelling Direction 2 to M-6As


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE









I


unrn Detailed turnrmarann on the e


Narq in the Fiel4 of B4siness is Available at all


American business is planning record capital out-
lays of $14.3 billion in the second half of 1952,
the Department of Commerce and Securities and Exchange
Commission announced in a quarterly survey. The survey
indicated that third quarter plant and equipment ex-
penditures will be at the seasonally adjusted first
half rate and that businessmen plan to increase in-
vestment in the final quarter.
+++a +
Net public and private debt rose $33 billion during
1951, reaching $519 billion at the end of the year.
Private debt rose $31 billion, State and local govern-
ments' debt rose $2 1-2 billion, while the Federal
Government net debt showed virtually no change for the
second successive year.
9+ + &**
Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing pub-
lic reports amounted to $231 million in August, 7 per
cent more than the $215 million paid out in the same
month a year ago.
*
International transactions betweenl the United
States and the rest of the world during the second
quarter of 1952? resulted in an increase in foreign
gold reserves and dollar assets of about $380 million.
9as+ *

To Obtain
C es9 of
T is Mlater-
ial Check
SIt in S ce
Provided &
Send This
Portion Of The Page To The Nearest Department of Com-
meprc Field Office.e Yourt Naeand Address Ae0 anThe
Payable to Treasurer ofthe United states. Unpriced
Items Are Free.

Latest National Production Authority Marterial:
UDirection 4 to Order Y-46 and Direction 2 to
Order M-46A of August 27, 1952
CM eg. 1, Direction 18, Amended Aug. 29, 1952
Onir M-2,1A ened 5g R9 ed Ot.1,19

LLCYP Reg. 2 Amended Aug. 29, 1952
UCMP Reg. 1, Dir. 16, Amended Aug. 29, 1952
LOrder U-66, Dir. 1, Aug. 29, 1952
LLCMP Reg. 1, Dirs. 7 and 19, Amended Aug. 28, 1952

0 ~defl BL8O Sc i mne,S 9 18t. 3, 1952
LOrder M1-20, Amat. I of Sept. 4, 1952
0L OdrM Y-,DAmended Sept. 4, 152,adrer




00rder 11-81, Amended, Sept. 12, 1952
Odr Y-7 Rvkd Orer Y-95 Dir. 2 Revoked
/Joton Ginned Prior to Sept. 1, Crops of 1952 and
1951: L7Alabama LIkississippi f Georgia
U& South Carolina STexas f Arkansas


Expenditures for new construction in Augnet rose seaseon-
all by 2 per cent to $3,152 million, the highest figure of
record, according to a joint report of the Departments of
Commerce and Labor. Special investigation into contract
construction employment and the field operations of major
public construction agencies revealed that the steel dispute
had no demonstrable effect on construction expenditures in
that month,
+e+++
Total business inventories at the end of July were esti-
sated at $67.9 billion. After allowance for seasonal varia-
tions, the book value at the end of July was $250 million
below June. Stocks held by manufacturers, retailers and
wholesalers contributed about equally to the decline.
+ +
Personal income in Jul at an annual rate of $264 billion
was $23 billion lower than in June. Effects of the steel
strike were evident in the July total. The decline centered
in wages and salaries and reflected payroll losses in steel
producing and fabricating industries. Other types of personal
income showed little change.
+
July shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear and
nightwear, including knit puterwear shirts, amounted to
$25.2 million, a 7 per cent increase over June shipments,
but 14 per cent under the July 1951 total of $29.2 million,
the Bureau of the Census reported.
+ *
A total of 2,258 million linear yards of cotton fabrics
was produced in the second quarter of 1952, the Bureau of
the Census announced. This was 5 per cent below first quar-
ter production and 15 per cent below that of the second
quarter 1951. Cotton duck production was off 10 per cent
in the second quarter, but was 3 per cent above second
quarter 1951 output.
//Louisiana UNorth Carolina
f) Vacant Dwelling Units in the U. S., by Divisions, States,
anQ Standard Metropolitan Areas, April 1, 1950
Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Aug. 1952, P-57,#122
Report on Cotton Ginning, Sept. 8, 1952, A/CO-10G-3-52-53
roiinlEstimates of the Population of the U. S.,
kpril 1, 1950 to July 1, 1952, P-25, #61
/ / Cotton Production in the U. 8., Crop of 1951, 154
Fa tsoren Isndustrees Jnora' Outerwear, 1st Quarter 1952,
867H-1-2, 10Q, 504 Yr.
a Knit Underwear & Nightwear, 1951, M670-01, lot, 504 Ir.
U_Synthetic Broad Woven Goods, 1951, MI150-01,104, 504Yr.
aperer & Board Production,1951,Y14F-01 10 $1 Yr.
SFlour Milling Products, 1951, MI6A-01, lot, 504 Yr.
HadodVeneer & Plywood,1951,M113A-01, 154, 501 Yr.
SHeating de Cooking Equipment, Except Electric, MI5~N-01,
15P, $1 Yr.
SConstruction Macchinery, 2nd Quar. 1952,M36A-2-2,104, 50QYr.,
LLCotton Broad Woven Goods, 1951, M15A-01, 15 504 Yr.
Fans,Blowers &k Unit Hieaters,2nd Quar. 1952,Y31E-2-2,54
Commercial Standard,140-F Dry-Cleaning Solvent, 51
D/ Ae Po Idustrial Dvelopment Publications,#20, 154

SeetonCare M intenanc of Abrasive Wheels, #8
Defense Loans for Small Business, #10
fIncreae P sdu ion bhru Improved Brazing Techniques,#12



L o Po'at To Opn s ue akt
ibKeeping-Furniture Repossessions at a Minimum, #60
An Accident Precaution Checklist for Fountain-Restaurant
Managers, #63
& P ep kaghn and Refrigeration Cut Shrinkage Loss in


I__ ~) _I IL~_ _n __


Department of Comerce Field Offices.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


BUSI SSESS TRENDS





SOUTH LEADS NATION IN WHOLESALE TRADE GALIN

The South was the only section in the nation showing an in-
orease in wholesale sales in the first seven months of 1952
over the same period last year, according to the Wholesale
Trade Report issued by the Bureau of the Census.

These reports are available without charge each
month at Department of Commerce field offices.
Ash; tq be pLaced on the mailigg list.

The report showed a rise of 1 per cent in the South Atlantic
region; 2 per cent in the East South Central section; and 3
per cent in the West South Central area, while the New England
region was reporting a 3 per cent decline; the Middle Atlantic,
5 per cent; the East and West North Central sections, 3 and 5
per cent respectively; the Mountain cone, a 4 per cent de-
crease; and the Pacific region, a 2 per cent fall.
The South also led substantially.in gains in sales in July
of this year over the corresponding month last year with in-
creases of 17 per cent in the South Atlantic; 18 per cent in
the East South Central; and 16 per cent in the West South Cen-
tral sections. Advances in the other regions in the country
ranged from 8 to 14 per cent.
CALllURNIA COUNlTY LEADS IN COTTONY GINNINGS *

Kern county, California, led all counties in the U.S.
Sin the total quantity of cotton ginned from the 1951 *
Crop, according to the annual booklet of the Bureau of '
Sthe Census, Cot~ton ProdqqtAon in the Ulnited States, '
Cron, of 1951, just issued and now available through '
Department of Comerce field offices. That county' s
innings totalled 502,666 running bales, nearly double a
its innings of 1950 and sharply above' those of 1919. *
Freeno county, California, was second last year with '
innings totalling 463,916 bales. In Arizona, Maricopa *
county last year ginned 342,760 bales and Pinal county
301.195. '
SOUTH LEADS IN HIARDWOOD VENEER OUTPUT

Eleven southern States, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississ-
ippi, the Carolinas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoaa, Texas and
Virginia last year produced 60 per cent of the nation' s output
of hardwood veneer, according to a Facts For Industry~ Renort
of the Bureeu of the Censue recently issued.


STATE GOVERNMENT EMPUPLYMENT RISES SHARPLY

State government employment in the Southeast has risen 67
per cent since World War II and monthly payrolls for that pur-
pose, 158 per cent, according to a study of Burean of the
Census reports on that subject.
One of the reports, just issued, and for the fiscal year
1952, showed that State government rolls in ALabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas for that
year stood at 186,000 and monthly payrolls at $38,289,000,
which compared with employment totalling 111,000 in 1946 and
payroll of $38,289,000 monthly in that year.

These reports are available at Department of
Commerce field offices without charge.

The bulk of State employment is in the schools, the reports
show, where in fiscal year 1952 there were 79,787 persons work-
ing, or some 42 per cent of the total employment. In addition,
Morth Carolina, because of its efficient school system, has
five times or more the number of persons on its rolls and its
payroll is that mueb larger than the other southeastern States.
Large numbers of State employees are also in other depart-
ments of government, such as those supervising the operation
of highways, health and hospital systems, and natural resonroes.

STEADY INCREASE IN VACANT DWELLINGS IN REGIONI

There were 64,000 more vacant dwelling units in 23 south-
eastern cities in 1950 than 10 years ago, Bureau~of the Geness
reports show.
In a compilation made by the Atlanta Regional Office of the
U. 8. Department of Comerce as rent control expire in a
number of southeastern cities on September 30, the figure
also showed that in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
South Carolina and Tennessee there were some 190,000 more
vacancies in 1950 than in 1940.
Not all of the vacancies in the States and cities in the
region were available, however, In fact, the 1950 report showed
a decline of 78,800 "available vacancies" in 1950 as compared
with 1940, but in the 23 cities included in the tabulation
there still was an increase of approximately 11,000 "avail-
able" vacancies in 1950 over 10 years previously.
In "total vacancies," including those available and those
not available, all of the six States and 23 cities reflected
sharp gained in the 10-year period.


UNIVERSITY O FLORIDA

lIlIl Il IfI l l fIl l I 111U11111
3 1262 08748 8911
BUILLETIN ur ~vl...,......


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTHEAIT OF CIOMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, CA.
716 Forsth B~ld.
Tel.WA-4121 Ext. 53
OFFICIAL. BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1Q00
VOLUME 6, YIUMBER 19-0CTOBER 1, 1952


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOlD
PAYMENTo OFPOSTAGE $300
Poo


~C-6-JF


UNITVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONJOPICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE








VOLUME 6. NUMBER 20 OCTOBER 15. 1952
Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S. C., Columbia, 8. C., Jackson, Miss., Jackcsonville, Fla.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 509 P. 0. Blag., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111

Memphis, Tenn., Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga.,
Madison at Front, 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 676 U.S.Court 218 P.O. Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206 House, Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755


SOUTHEHSTERN~ BUSINESS' STABLE IN 1ST tIALF OF '52

sear-s~sooBusiness
looA~NaNACTURRK)EMPLOYMNWNT conditions
amiPAraorus remained
no0 rpeou r om-m --- --- generally
,, < m 7 stable in
lso C------~C~-+- -- -' the South-
east in
loo~--4--~Lr~- -. wA--- the first
meanollarml s half of
.. e. i 1. n t 1952, with
ones sese user sese only one
or twso ma-
jor segments of the regional economy reflecting down-
ward trends as compared with the corresponding period
last year, according to the Quarterly Summary of Busi-
ness Conditions in the Southeast prepared by the Atlanta
Regional Office of the U. S. Department of Commerce.

These quarterly reports on business con-
ditions in the Southeast are available for
the asking from the nearest Department of
Commnerce field office. Order on Page ).

Deposits in Federal Reserve member banks in most of
the area at the end of June of this year were 9 per
cent greater than at the same time last year, and loans
were up 5 per cent, with debit transactions registering
a 4 per cent rise. Corresponding increases were also
shown for some trade activities, cash farm income, new
businesses incorporated, electric energy produced, mann-
facturing employment, and important phases of the
area'sa transportation systems.
Two "dark spotan in the picture were urban building,
which reflected a decrease in dollar value, and insured
unemployment, which showed a 16 per cent rise,

SOUTHEAST LOSES 87,000 FARMS IN DECADE

The States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas between 1940 and 1950 lost
a total of 87,000 farms, 26,000 farm operators who were
living on farms, and 17,000 who were not living on farms
while in the same period there was a pickup of 45,000
farm operators working off the farms, according to a
study of Bureau of the Census figures on the 1950 census
of agriculture now being received.
The study also shorred a 2 per cent drop in output of
sheep and lambs, aud a 26 per cent drop in acres of
growing corn for all purposes. A 52 per cent decline in
acreage of white potatoes, and 45 per cent decrease in
'sweet potatoes wars also revealed.


DRIVE ON NPa VIOLATORS CRYSTALLIZES IN REGIOh


The Charleston firm is the Planters Fertilizer and
Phosphate company, whose officials will face accusations
at a hearing probably in Charleston in the near future
that they used more sulfur than they were entitled to
consume during the period of June 1951 to April 30, 1952.
Defendants in the Florida case are the Treasure isle
Pool and Cabanas, Inc., Evelyn Homes, Inc., white Star
Realty company, Inc., Bernard A. K~ornblum, and Irving
Greenfield, all of Yiami Beach, who are charged with using
more copper and steel thlan allowed inl the building of a
pool, cabanas, and bath houses in North Bay Village.
Hearing Compmissioners in tne two proceedings are
Charles J. Hilkey, dean of law at John B. Stetson University
and Russell A. Rasco, dean of the University of Miani Law
School.
CONSTRUCTION RESTRICTIONS RiELARED
NPA has relaxed its construction regulations, effective
May 1, 1953, which, in effect, increase amounts of controlled
materials that magy be self-authorized for commercial and
most other types of construction, as well as lifting the
ban on recreational construction.
A new Direction 8 to Revised CMP Regulation 6, t~he basic
construction order, was issued, Order Y-100, the housing
order, was revoked, and its provisions incorporated in
Regulation 6, and other actions were taken to carry out the
new program.
Affected in the change are recreational, entertainment
and amusement construction, highways, one-through-four family
houses, multi-unit residences, both walkup and elevator
type, and construction involving industrial establishments,
commercial and public buildings, hospital, universities,
schools, public utilities, water and sewage projects, and
transportation facilities.
The only change with regard to industrial construction
is that self-authorisation of one ton of stainless steel
per project, per quarter will be permitted for chanical
plants .
(SEE NIPx CONTINUED 01J PAGE L)


The National Production Author-
ity is intensifying its campaign
in the Southeast to bring into
conformity with its orders aind
regulations firms Tound in viola-
tion.
Proceedings were brought against
a Charleston, S. C., firm accused
of the excessive use of sulfur,
and a hearing was held in Florida
on October 1 in a case involving
five Miami Beach defendants charged
writh using too much copper and
steel, all controlled by NPA
orders.


Nati0nc




Pro ggg )og



11 1()Z F





STATE, LOCAL PUBLIC CONSTRUCTION DECLINES

The value of State and local public construction in
the Southeast fell off $8,768,000 in the first five
months of 1952 as compared with the corresponding per-
iod last year, according to figure contained in the
Construction and Building Materials Industry Report of
the U. S. Department of Commnerce.
The total value of such construction in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mlississippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas at the end of May of this year was placed at
$276,636,000, while at the samue time last year it was
estimated at $285,404,000.

This report, issued monthly is available
through any Department of Commerce field
office ~for 25 cents a copy, or on a subscript-
ion basis of $3 a year.

Increases of front $46,401,000 to $48,273,000 in
Georgia, $27.227.000 to $34.450.000 in Alabama, and
$46,224,000 to $49,216,000 in Tennessee were offset
in the region by declines of from )54,189,000 to 851,-
047,000 in North Carolina, $28,127,000 to $25,822,000
in South Carolina, and )26,056,000 to $22,348,000 in
Yississippi .
Biggest drop was in educational facilities, which,
in the ?-State area declined by $15,537,000. Construct-
ion of hospitals, administration buildings, penal and
corrective facilities, and miscellaneous non-residential
activities decreased by $15,109,000, utility construct-
ion was off 8349,000, improvements in sewage systems,
83,160,000, and development of water supply facilities,
82,882,000.

I CORECiiTiON, PLASE! *
S In the October 1, 1952 issue of the Bu AttiB I
of Commerce, Page 4, it was inadvertently stated I
r that the monthly payrolls of State employees in a
the Southeast in 1946 totalled $38,289,000. This :
was in error, and should have read $14,797,000. I
The total in 1952 was correctly stated at $38,-
289.990, a

CONFETION SALES RISE IN SOUTHEAST

Sweet-toothed southeasterners were so active last
year in buying chocolate bars and other confection that
manufacturers of those products in the area were able
to register sales totalling some $70,200,000, about
)5,000,000 more than they received in 1950, according to
a report of the Bureau of the Census.

Note: These figures are reflected in a SIgg
For Industry Report on manufacturers' sales of
confectionery products for 1951, available
through any Department of Commerce field office.
See Page 3 for ordering.

Manufacturers of the products in Georgia and Florida
sold $14,548,000 worth in 1951 compared with $13,521,000
worth in 1950, sales in Tennessee, Alabama, Missiasippi,
and kentucky amounted to $14,837,000 and $13,956,000,
respectively, and in the Carolinas, Maryland, Virginia,
best Virginia and the District of Columbia receipts were
$13,146,000 and $12,200,000,
While no figures were available regionally on which
was the most popular confection, nationally it was bar
goods by nearly three to one. That type of candy brought
a total of $327,729,000, while package goods produced
only 8108,188,000, and bulk goods, $68,091,000. "General
line" products yielded $142,478,000.


]gy, CONTINUED FROMY PAGE 1

RE~jIGH~__WIAL~ COUPLE HE SAVE STEEL
Seven million pounds of steel were saved for the nation-
al program of defense and related activities by compliance
investigators of the National Production Authority in their
first 30-day period of a checkup of inventories of firms
in the Southeast.
The firms are located in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee.
The investigation was called by NPA in Washington as
part of a nationwide survey to keep steel supplies flowing
into proper channels as a result of the recent work stoppage
in that industry. Specifically, the checkup was directed
toward Controlled Materials Plan Regulation Number 2 re-
vising inventory restrictions on ateel by providing that
no user of that commodity may accept delivery of any item
if it would cause his inventory of the item to be in excess
of the amount required for the operation of his plant for
the succeeding 30-day period, or if it would mean an ex-
cessive practicable working inventory, whichever would be
less.
The saving on steel was accomplished through action of
the compliance investigators in determining excessive
orders on a firm's books and obtaining its voluntary action
in cancelling or rescheduling the requested delivery date
to a time when receipt of the steel would not cause an
excessive inventory.
This action is releasing steel and transportation space
to firms actually in need of steel which had been unable to
obtain mill acceptance due to prior commitments, and, at
the same time,~ is not working a hardship on firms found to
have excessive steel on order, as steel mills are in full
cooperation with the program.
NEW FORM TO SjPEED UP aID TO BUSINESS
A new move to help southeastern manufacturers, worried by
production shortages, to obtain materials or equipment need-
ed in the operation of essential businesses has been taken
by the National Production Authority.
A new form, known as N3PAF-138 Revised, has been designed
explaining in simple language how the business man asy
secure the necessary assistance. Copies are obtainable from
Department of Commerce field offices in the Southeast.
The assistance is given in cases where the manufacturer
is producing a commodity or rendering a service essential
to a military or Atomic Energy Commission contract or pro-
gram, where the special aid would prevent serious delay in
completion of an important industrial, public utility or
construction program, where it would carry out a program or
activity essential to the health, safety or welfare of the
community, or where it would overcome nan unreasonable,
azceptional and proved hardship," such as, where the item
needed is to replace equipment destroyed or worn out.
OTHER IPA ACTOIONS
Other recent NPA actions included the following:
REERIlls:All consumers of cryolite, except producers of
primary aluminum and insecticide-grade cryolite, were permit-
ted to use up to 125 per cent of their actual first quarter
1952 consumption of cryolite in any calendar quarter watering
with the fourth quarter of 1952 in an amendment to NPAi Order
Y-99.
Graphite .Eleptrodes:Controls on artificial graphite and carbon
electrodes used primarily in electric-are furnaces and
electrolytic cells in metallurgical and chemical industries
were removed with revocation of Order Y-66 and interim
Direction 1 to that order.
Aluminum 89raps Owners or generators of aluminum scrap are
no longer required to file Form lPaF'-152 with NPA when making
deliveries of quantities of scrap totalling 20,000 pounds
or more under an amendment to Order 11-22.
Tin: Use of body solder in the production of automobiles and
trucks is permitted in an amendment to Order Y-8.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE











_ __ __ __


rfor 4urtgr
Details of
Any Of These
Hiahlinhts in
The Field Of
Business Get
In Touch With
The Nearest Depar ~equt of Commerce Field Office.


Total employment remained almost unchanged between
august and September 1952 despite the usual exodus of
students from the labor force at the start of the
school terse. The estimate for the week ending Sept. 13
wass 62,260,000, or about the same as a month earlier,
the Bureau of the Census said. Nonagricultural employ-
ment, however, dropped by roughly 700,000, falling to
an estimated 54,712,000 in September from 53,390,000
in August.
*
Individuals in the United States in the second quar-
ter of 1952 saved $1.7 billion in liquid form, the
Securities and Exchange Commission reported. This rate
of saving compares wlith $2.6 billion in the first quar-
ter of this year and $3 billion in the second quarter
of 1951, it was stated. Individuals continued to add
to their saving in more permanent types of investments
such as insurance, time and savings deposits in banks,
shares in savings and loan associations, and also sub-
stantially increased their holdings of corporate and
municipal securities.
9++a**
Manufacturers' sales, inventories and backlogs in-
creased moderately in August of this year, while new
orders rose more sharply, the Office of Business Econo-
mies said. Sales increased 2 per cent over July, after
seasonal adjustment. Durable goods were up 7 per cent
due entirely to sharp recoveries in the primary metals
and motor vehicle industries.
"++++


NEW BOOKS & To obtain coo-
ies Of This Mat
AND REPORTS *rial, Check It
0 /A n Space Prqvi-
ed & Send This
Pe-tiot Of The rage Tri Thedearest Atsytment of Com-


I


r


merce F~ield Off ce Ait Re it nee.

SSummry of Business Conditions in the Southeast
in the First Half of 1952
/7Construction & Building Materials Industry Report,
Single Copy, 254, Yearly, 83

1950 Census of Population, U.S.SuerummaretonrSumr fr151 FYP-Al, 10
Number of Inhabitants,Regions, States, Cities,Etc.,40#
Catalog of U.S.Census Publications,Jan.-June,' 52,300
Report on Cotton Ginning,A/00-100-4-52-53
Lumber Production &( Mill Stocks,1st Quar.1952,FFI,
Y13G-1-2, 104, 704 Yr.
Latest National IPrqduction Authqrity Maera:
Order Y-100 Revoked, Oct. 3, 1952
Revised GMPI Reg. 6, Dir. 2 Amended, Oct. 3, 1952
Revised CMP Reg. 6, Dir. 8, Oct. 3, 1952
Revised C1P Reg. 6, Dir, 5, Amended, Oct.3,1952
Del. 14, Amended, Oct. 3, 1952
Revised CMP Reg. 6, Amended, Oct. 3, 1952
Order Y-99, Amended, Sept. 18, 1952
Qrder Y-66 Revoked, Sept. 22, 1952
Order Y-22 Amended, Sept. 24, 1952
Order Y-8, Amendment 2, Sept. 23, 1952
An Ultraviolet Multiplet Table, the Spectra of
Chromium, Manganese, Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, ,
Zinc, Etc., NBSCir. 488, Soc. 2, 604


bjales of all retail stores in August were unchanged
from a year ago. Aggregate sales were generally steady.
After adjusting for seasonal factors and trading day
differences they were down about one per cent from July
to August. On a seasonally adjusted basis, almost all non-
durable goods groups showed small upward movements in
August. The increase for the entire nondurable goods group
was about one per cent.

Expenditures for new construction in September of this
year totalled $3,112 million, about the same as in August,
the Departments of C~ommerce and Labor reported jointly.
Dollar outlays exceeded the $3 billion mark for the third
consecutive time in September to round out the largest
quarterly volume on record, $9.3 billion, in contrast to
$8.7 billion in third quarter 1951. In most major categories,
activity in September continued at high levels, which is
usual for this time of year. Private expenditures totalled
$2,037 million and public, $1,075 million.
+ + +t
Private capital moving from the United States continued
to play an important part in the development of the natural
wealth and industrial potential of foreign countries in
1951 and 1952, the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Del-
partment of Commerce, reported in a current issue of its
Survey of Current Business. About $1.3 billion was added to
U. S. direct investments abroad in 1951, mainly in foreign
branches and subsidiaries of American companies. Of this,
about 5600 million was capital from the U. S., and $700
million was reinvested earnings of foreign-incorporated sub-
sidiaries.
+xetw
Aviation war risk insurance for international airlines
to be made available under legislation enacted by the last
Congress seems now a certainty following agreement by the
President and Secretary of Commerce Sawyer that it should be
applied. Sawyer announced he was establishing such a program
in the Commerce Department and that it would be in operation
in the next ineveral months.

/_ United States Department of Commerce A Catalog &
Index, Bueara. Bomed, 82.75
W7 ool Felt A Recorded Voluntary Standard of the
Trade, Com. Standard 185-52, lo#
/- Extension & Dissemination of the Electrical and Magnetic
Units by the National Bureau of Standards, cir.531, 254
Facts For Industr Reporta:
Children' s & Infants Outerwear, 1951, M67K-01,104
Steel Forgings, July 1952, M220-72, SC, 504 Yr.
Nonferrous Castings, July 1952, M24E-72, 54, 704 Ir.
Cotton System Spinning Activity, Aug. 1952,Y15-3,5#,504Yr.
Clay Construction Products, July 1952,M126B-72,10t,(1 Yr.
BUREaUI OF THE CENSUS YATERHIAL
1950 Census of Population perf haiat
Pa-2, Alabama, 204 PL A-10, Florida, 204
PA-11, Georgia, 254 PA-214 Mississippi, 154
PA-33, North Carolina, 20p USouth Carolina, PA-40,154
U PA-42, Tennessee, 204
1950 Census of Pgpulation General Carceiic
PB2- Y aseissippi, 604 PB33, North Caro., 654
LPB-40, South Carolina, 5049F'lorida,P~l0,60Q
1950 Census of Eqpulation Census Tracts
Census Tracts
PD-5, Birmingham, 154 PD-9, CGhattanooga, 151
195 cnss f grcuture Fal on-B ou
Part 20, Tennessee, $1.50 L/art 16, North Carolina
and South Carolina (Combined), $3.00
195 Gesusof ousng- Bloqk Staitc
BE-9, Atlanta, 304 UHE-11,augusta,15#
HE-20, Birmingham, 354 UIBE-;IO, Charleston, S.C., 154
tIE-32L, Charlotte, N.C.,204 UColumbia,S.C. ,HE-40, 154
HEE-41, Coluabus, Ga., 15# L/ HE-92, Knoxville, 204
D& HE-104, Macon, Ga., 15C 9 HE-110, Memphis, 35#


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





GOVERNMENT SPENDS $15 MILLION FOR GOODSSERVICES

Fifteen million dollars worth of goods and services were
purchased by the Federal Government in the Southeast in the
month of September, according to a tabulation of purchases
abown on day-to-day lists of contract awards made available
to business men at Department of Commerce field offices.

These day-to-day contract award lists are
available to all businessmen upon request and
without charge.

The dollar value of September' s contract awards included
$$75,502 in Alabama; $11,505,230 in Floridal $380,978 in
Georgia; $651,921 in Mississippi; $1,415,162 in South Carolina;
and $537,954 in Tennessee.
Fifty-four contracts were let, including 12 in Florida
calling for construction operations running well into seven
figures .
Trousers in Alabama; a jet engine test stand in Florida;
sugar and lumber in Georgia, boxes for shells in Missiebsippi,,
cotton webbing in South Carolina, and rubber finger pads and
black pepper in Tennessee were among the purchases made.
Included in the listing were only those goods and services
bogt on an unclassified negotiated and formal advertised
contract basis.

METALS SIPMENTS HIGH IN SOUTHEAST IN 1951

The Southeast last year shipped 2.5 million abort tone of
gray iron castings to market, some 187,500 tons more than
total shipments from the area in 1950, according to a Fagete
For industry report of the Bureau of the Consus.
Last year' s shipments included 52,429 tone from Nlorth
Crln; 30,485 from South Carolina; 44,705 from Georgia;
1,396,678 from Ala'bama; 324,545 from Tennessee; and 244,537
from Yississippi and Kebtucky. Florida shipped 4,907 tons.
In addition, Georgia and Florida shipped 4,262 abort tonal
of steel castings, Alabama, 12,314 tone, and Tennessee, 7,803.
An increase in shipments of steel ingota last year over
1950 from the region was also reported. Shipments from the
ouhAtlantic and East South Central areas last year totalled
1,869,615 short tons compared with 13,350,132 in 1950.
The Statistical abstract of the United Statse for '
1952 will be off the press soon. Watch for it and
n96 your order in early.
ero ea-usess


SOUTHEAST LEADS OTHER REGIONS IN LUMlBER OUTPUT

Regionally, the Southeast wras far ahead of all other regions
in the eastern half of the United States in the production of
lumber in the first quarter of 1952, according to a Facts For
Inutyreport of the Bureau of the Census just issued.

This report gan be ordered qn Page 3.

The combined output of the South Atlantic and East Gulf
States totalled 2,457,340,000 board feet. In the New England
and Middle Atlantic States the total was 4(T/,063,000 feet, in
the Lake, Central and Prairie Statse, 818,006,000, and in the
Lower Mississippi, 967,309,000,
Total production in the eastern half of the continent, ap-
proximating 4,649,718,000 feet led the western half by nearly
a billion feet where 3,853,837,000 feet were produced. Oregon
and lashington were the largest individual producing States in
the nation with an output of 1,979,806,000 and 785,514,000
feet, respectively. Georgia led in production in the eastern
half with 635,177,000 feet, some 100 million feet more than
the production in North Carolina, second leading eastern State.
Nationally, the North Pacific States led regionally with
765,320,000 feet.
a CHRlSISTMAS GIFT'.
It' s Christmas gift buying time again for
residents of the Southeast, particularly those *
planning to send gifts abroad, and from the
Regional and District Offices of the U. 8. De- *
apartment of Commerce come the annual word 6f '
caution against attempts to send packages to a
friends and relatives in foreign countries with- '
out regard to import regulations. *
Every country in the world, they say, has *
some kind of regulation governing the receiving '
of gift packages from the United States, and all '
who send such packages have been urged to obtain '
i eqpies of the regulations, which are gratis. *
ADDITIONAL FACILITY EXPANISIONS APPROVED
Plant and facility expansion operations in Florida, Georgia
and Tennessee to cost an estimated )13,021,300 were approved by
the Defense Production Administration. Included was a project
calling for the production of phosphate rock in Polk county,
Florida, to cost nearly )8,000,000. Previously, DPA cleared
other exoansions in the region calling for the expenditure of
$80 million primarily on natural gas development operations.


U. 3, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, CA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000
Yolulme 6, Nuaber 20 October 15, 1952


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


UNIV. OF FL LIB1.
,71_.1laal FO.~ PRIVATE USEi TO AVOID
PAY ENT OF qPOTAGE $800



U~.5 DEPOSITORY


BC~6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALMS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





















ON VEMBER 1 1 2


MULOV E 6, NUMBER 21 5


ADDITIONAL CONSTRUCTION APPRHOVD BY NPA


PLANTI EXPANSIONS IN SOUTHEAST $1.7 BILLION


New plant conspletiest ,,

Bilions of Dolars (Cumdaive)
STax-aided Proieck 20
Appaved though ::
S6/30/52 15
SS88


10


The Nationa3 Production Author-
ity has approved construction pro-
jects in Alabrama, Floridai, Georgia,
Ivississippi, South Carolina and
Tennessee calling for the expendi-
ture of @9,741,767.
TIhe approvals were given in the
form of allotments of materials for
the construction work for the re-
mainder of 19:2 and first and second
quarters of 1953.


19e 195 vs5 I 0


bore Defens tllililli ion ice l


The projects included a r3.6 million hotel in Sarasota,
F'lorida, a 41.4 million hotel in Mbiani Beach, and a mil-
lion dollar steam heating plant in Nashville.
Expenditures on the projects included $929,877 in
Alabama; 45,046,100 in Florida; $416,937 in Georgiac;
$604,122 in Mississippi; 1519,686 in South Carolina; and
52,198,045 in Tennessee.
The projects cleared in the six southeastern States
totalled 63, with 58 allotments of materials, three ap-
provals where allotments were not fornd to be necessary;
and two exemptions where the projects were exempt from
the controlled materials plan of NPA.
"HARDSHIP ACCOUNT" AAIUN ATAILABLE
All small southeastern businessmen who have had
trouble operating because of NPA' s restrictions on mater-
Lals were again invited to apply for relief under the
so-called small business "hardship account."
The hardshipu program is beidig continued in effect
for the fourth quarter of the year, r~hich began October 1,
and the same criteria will prevail as in the third quarter.
To be eligible for aid under the program, a firm must
be classified as a small business, must be producing
civilian-type products primarily, must be suffering "hard-
ship" resulting from production Limitations because of
quantities of controlled materials allotted, and also
must be unable to continue normal operations using sub-
stitute materials. Materials from NPA'sa general reserve

n1t behpr d aniia d tat ayb equeet sfoinrelief
Southeast after applications for supplemental allotments
of controlled materials under other forms of relief pro-
vided are processed,
SEE NPA CONTINUED ON PAGE 2


duction Administration in the first two years of the
Korean war, according to a compilation released by DPA.
I'he expenditures included 51,067,682,000 in the South
Atlantic States of F'lorida, Georgia, the Carolinas and
Virginias, Maryland, Delaware and the District of Colum-
bia, and $697,161,000 in the East South Central region
of Ailabama, Tennessee, Mbississippi and Kentucky.
T~he money spent and being spent on those operations
in the tw~o southeastern areas combined was the fourth
largest for aLl regions, and was exceeded only by
83,568,830,000 in the East North Gentral section, $2,.
823,553,000~ in the Middle Atlantic, and 4$2,552,913,000
in the West South Central area.
The expenditures were exclusive of those for trana-
portation and storage projects.

RTA~il~ SALEs; COSTLY DOWnN IN SOU'tHEAST

Only five of 13 cities and areas in the Southeast in
which the Bureau of th~e Census conducts monthly surveys
reported increases in cumulative retail sales in the
first 8 months of 1952 as compared with the correspond-
Lng period last year, according to the bureau' s Mbonthly
Retail Trade Report for August 1952.
The gains included 10 per cent in Augusta; 3 per cent
in Columbus; 5 per cent in Clarksdale; and 1 per cent in
Bilozi and Asheville. On the other hand, Birmingham and

O Iton and Perenacountepe aelabama,8per cpe ent; n con'
Ga., 4 per cent; Savannah, 2 per cent; Greenwood, S. C.*
and Bristol, Tenn., 5 per cent; and Kingsport, Tenn., 3
per cent. In Atlanta and Gulfport, Miss., the situation
wras unchanged.


RmrnCC~ L 1~RP~P 1~


RLIY~-~nCln L~ L~7L


Charleston, b. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


Columbia, 8. C., Jackson, Miss., Jacksonville, Fla.,
1310 Lady S~t., 509- P. -0. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111


Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg.,
'Pel. RA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355


Mlemphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


M~iami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg*,
TPel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
3083 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-36L1,Ex.206


Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga.,
6i76 U.S.Court 218 P.O. Bldg.,
House, Tel.42-9651 Tel. 2-4755


Plant fac-
ility expan-
sions and
improvements s
in the South-
rast to meet
the require-
ments of the
national pro
gram of de-
fense cost-

ma ea $18
764,843,000
were aphrov-

Defense Pro-


THE:.


NCL 1(HCl


Product.


~ru~rvrrr y For a complete list of these
projects in the Southeast ask
theneaestDepartment of Commerce field office for
Pe leleast 2-


LNITEillil STlowllif ChilitRTMETlibl C)F ICCIAA/tilCE

FIELD SERVICE









BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

N CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Other recent actions by NPA included the following:
Printing Plates: Limitations on the length of time obsolete
printing plates can be held by various printing establish-
ments were lifted through the revocation of Order M-65.
Gil & Gas: Materials controls for the petroleum and gas
industries in the United States and Canada were eased
through amendments to Orders d-46j and M-468.
Cans: Greater freedom in the use of tin plate and complete
freedom in the use of terneplate are permitted as a result
of changes made in metal can controls. The changes were
made in an amendment to Order M-25.
Aircraft Alloy Steel: Emergency limitations on deliveries
of aircraft alloy steel by distributors to not more than
5,000 pounds a month to any one customer was eliminated in
an order revoking Direction 1 of Schedule 1 of Order M-6A.
Copper Raw Materials: Direction 1 to Order M-16 was amended
permitting brass and bronze foundries, wire mills, brass
mills, and miscellaneous users who receive quarterly allo'
cations of copper raw materials to place advance orders for
delivery of such materials.
Brass Mtill Products: Distributors of brass mill products
now are able to sell and accept orders for increased amounts
of their products on a single sale and for any item ordered
under an amendment to Order M-82.
Alloying Materials: Allocations of alloying materials to
melters and processors were changed from a monthly to a
quarterly basis under an amendment to Direction 1 to NPA
Order Mu-80 and behedules 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.
,Porcelain Enamel: Prohibition against the use of cobalt and
cobalt derivatives in the production of porcelain enamel
signs is removed in an amendment to Schedule 2 of Order
ad-80.
Alloy Scrap: Firms are permitted to report alloy scrap in-
ventories by their locations in individual plants, rather
than in an accumulated inventory for the firm, under an
amendment to Direction 1 of NPA Order M-20.
Textiles: The last emergency control in the textile field
was removed by NPA through the revocation of its Order M-13
dealing with high tenacity rayon yarn.
Copper and Copper Base Alloys: Order M-11 permitting copper
controlled materials producers to obtain supplies of other
materials, such as steel, aluminum or other copper con-
trolled materials by means of self-certification, without
having to file separate applications for those materials with
NPA was amended.
Domestic Communications: Order M-77 wacs amended permitting
domestic telephone and telegraph companies increased self-
authorization privileges.
PHOSPHATIC FERTILIZERS
The Phosphatic Fertilizer Industry Advisory Committee
recommended to NPA that the agency could appropriately es-
tablish a cut-off date of December 15, 1952 on new applica-
tions for certificates of necessity for new facilities for
normal and concentrated superphosphates for inclusion in the
phosphatic fertilizer expansion goal.
SULF UR
The Native Sulfur Industry Advisory Committee at a meeting
with NPA officials recommended that NPA modify its Sulfur
Order M-69 to eliminate present use restrictions but to
retain the order' s reporting requirements.
NITROGEN
Current and projected expansion of nitrogen production
capacity will be sufficient to meet military, industrial and
agricultural reqluirements in the event of full mobilization,
the Nitrogen industry Advisory Committee told NPA officials
at a meeting with them in W~ashington.
CON~l'hUCTIONl MACHiNEHY
Orders for construction machinery continue firm and the
supply of most items, except Class I and Class II crawrler-
type tractors and certain other kinds of machinery is about
normal,manufacturers reported to NPA.


SOUTH STILL PACES F'ILLD IN WHOLESALE SALES

The South continued to lead the field in percentage
increase in cumulative wholesale sales in the first 8
months of 1952 as compared with the corresponding per-
iod last year, according to the Monthly Wholesale Trade
Report of the Bureau of the Census for August 1952.
Gains of 1 per cent each were recorded for the South
Atlantic and East South Central regions and 2 per cent
in the sest South Central area while the New England,
East North Central and Mountain sections were reporting
a 3 per cent decline, the Middle Atlantic, 5 per cent,
the West North Central, 4 per cent, and tbe Pacific
area, 1 per cent.
Factors in the rise in the South in the 8-month per-
iod were increased sales of some electrical goods, re-
frigeration equipment, drugs and sundries, fresh fruits
and vegetables, tobacco products, wines and spirits,
and some lines of groceries.

NE;( 00NbTRUUTAUNU IN REGION $3.1 BLLON

The value of all newr construction in the Southeast
in the first half of 1952 amounted to $3,117.1 million,
according to a tabulation contained in a current issue
of the Construction and Building Materials Industry
Reor of the Department of Commerce.
Included were $1,689.2 million put into private
building operations, and $1,427.9 million into public
structures .
New private residential building cost 3825.1 million,
nonresidential, $326.9 million, and public utility,
$387.8 million,
Florida spent $375,900,000 in all new construction;
Georgia, $250,000,000, and Tennessee, $281,600,000. No
estimates were given for the other southeastern States
individually in total new construction, but in public
construction, North Carolina spent $125,300,000, South
Carolina, $303,100,000, Alabama, )100,000,000, and
Mississippi, 851,000,000.

F~EDErL RcEVENUB COLLECTION UP IN SOUT~mBT

Federal revenue collections in the Southeast in the
fiscal year ending June 30 this year totalled $4,038,-
681,477, a gain of 25 per cent over the previous year,
but the percentage increase still was 3 per cent short
of that for the United States, according to figures
supplied by the Bureau of Internal Revenue in Washing-
ton.
The increase in Federal income rates effective #last
year brought a gain of from 21 per cent in North Caro-
lina to as high as 37.8 per cent in South Carolina,
with South Carolina ranking second among all States in
the country in percentage gain,
Collections in the region included $928,428,626
from corporations in income and profits taxes.

ANNEXATIONS AFFECT 101 PLACES IN.REGION

A total of 101 incorporated places in the Southeast
experienced shifts in areas between April 2, 1950 and
April 1, 1951, and 120 separate annexations or detach-
ment actions were involved, according to a special re-
port of the Bureau of the Census just released.
Twelve places in North Carolina, 9 in South Caro-
lina, 10 in Georgia, 7 in Florida, 12 in Tennessee, 6
in alabama, and 1 in Mississippi were affected, and sep-
arate annexation or detachment actions included 21 in
North Carolina, 12 in South Carolina, 51 in Georgia, 14
each in Florida and Tennessee, 7 in Alabama, and I in
Mississippi.


PAGE 2





1


I L or further
., Details of
Any Of These
H Iighliahts in
The Field Of
Business Get
'In Touch With
The Nearest Departmenlt of Commerce F~ield Office.

Cash dividend payments by United States corpora-
tions issuing public reports amounted to $1,158 mil-
lion in September, 1 per cent higher than in the same
month a year ago, according to the Office of Business
Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce. The dividend
rise in September, typically a heavy payment month,
was restrained by scattered declines in extra and
special dividends as compared with September a year
ago.
*
Total wholesalers' sales in August were estimated
at $8,700 million, which, on a seasonally adjusted
basis, was a decline of 4 per cent from July. Part of
the decline probably reflected the shorter number of
working days in August. Sales by durable-goods dealers
at $2,590 million and by nondurable-goods dealers at
$6,110 million showed seasonally adjusted declines of
11 and 1 per cent, respectively, from July.
+*++
Total business inventories at the end of August
were estimated at $68.6 billion. After allowance for
seasonal variations, the book value was $100 million
above July. Manufacturers' stocks were $700 million
higher than at the end of July, with two-thirds of the
increase occurring in the durable-goods industries.
*
Personal income in August wass at an annual rate of
$267 billion, or $3 billion higher than in July. The
increase reflected primari~lythdie edn of the labor-


To Obtain
Copies of
This Mater-
ial Check
It In Space
'1Provided &
Send This
Portion Of The Page To The Nearest Departme'n;t of T Com- -
merce Field Office. Your Namne and Address Are On. Th


I


opposite yide. Malae remittances for gates Pater~ial


Payable to Treasurer of the United States. Unpriced
Items Are Free.

Press Release 52-50 (NPA construction Projects)
Wholesale Trade Report (Place on Mailing List)
1/Construction & Building Materials Industry
Report, 83 a Year
Latest National Production Authority Actionst
Order M-65 Revoked, Sept. 25, 1952
Orders M-16 and M-46B Amended, Sept. 30, 1952
Order Y-25 Amended, Oct. 2, 1952
Order M-6A, Dir. 1 to Sched. 1 Revocartion,0ct.1.
Order M-16,Dir.1, Amended Oct. 1, 1952
Order Y-82 Amended, Oct. 2, 1952
IDir. I to Order M-80 and to Schedules 1,2,3,4 &5
October 3, 1952
Order M-80, Sched. 2, Amended Oct. 3, 1952
Order M-20, Dir. 1 Amended, Oct. 15, 1952
Order M-13 Revoked, October 17, 1952
Order M1-11 Amended Oct. 17, 1952
Order M-77 Amended Oct. 17, 152
L7 Large-City Finances in 1951, 300


management dis~mte in the steel industry and was concen-
trated in the commodity producing industries, which had
been materially affected by the steel work stoppage.
*
Approval of a tentative long-range program for the
examination and analysis of major transportation policy
problems was announced by Under Secretary of Commerce for
Transportation Jack Garrett bcott. T'he program was evolved
after consultation with other agencies of Government, the
Transportation Council of the Commerce Deparrtmenlt and others.

August shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear and
nightwear, including knit outerwear shirts, amounted to
$33.8 million, almost a third more than July shipments, but
22 per cent under the August 1951 total of $43.5 million,
the Bureau of the Census reported.
S+ + *
Continuance until the latter part of July of the steel
strike resulted in further increases in consumers' stocks,
the Bureau of Mines, Department of Interior, announced.
Purchased scrap stocks held by consumers totalled 4,724,411
gross tons, increasing for the seventh consecutive month
the largest quantity of this material held by consumers
since January 31, 1944.
+ + *
Shipments of the women' s, misses' and juniors' outerwear
industries totalled $585 million in the second quarter of
1952, or about 7 per cent more than in the second quarter
of 1951, the Census Bureau said.
+eea*
Average weekly cuttingS in August of most types of men' s
apparel continued above August 1951 levels and were substan-
tially higher than in July of this year, according to the
Census Bureau.
+ + *
The Census Bureau also reported that an average of 9.9
million pounds of raw wool (scoured basis) was consumed
erweek during August on the woolen and worsted systems.
Tiwass 30 per cent above the July figure and the highest
since June 191
/7Estimates of Population 5 to 17 Years Old, By States,
July 1, 1950 and 1951, P-25, #64
SMunicipal Annexations & Detachments, Apr. 2, 1950-
Apr. 1, 1951, Gr;O, #3
SHousing Characteristics for South Carolina, Standard
Metropolitan Areas & Urban Places of 10,000 or More,
Apr. 1950, EC-8, #40
_~ Public Employment in July 1952, G-GE52-#3
/ 1950 U. s. Census of' Population, General Characteristics,
Florida, 60C
Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Sept. 1952, P-57,#123
Average Size of American Households Drop Sharply,P-20,#41
Census of Manufactures, 1947, Indexes of Production,
Buckram Bound, $01.75~
UJ 1950 Cens~us of Agriculture, Counties and State Economic
Areas, UJaississippi, $1.50 Sxlabama, $1.25
Hydraulic Research in UI. S., NBS MP 205, $1.00
Population Forecasts of the New England-New York Area,
Business Information Service, June 1952, 250
Facts For I~ndustry Reports:
Pulp, Paper & Board, Aug. 1952,M1WA-82, 10#, $1 Yr.
Wood Pulp, Paper & Board, 1950, M14D-00, 150, $1 Yr.
Men' s & Boys' Apparel, 1951, M66721-01, lot, 504 Yr.
Fatal & Oils, Consumption By Uses, Aug. 1952,817-2-82,
10l, $2 a Year
L7 Steel Mill Products, 1951, M22B-01, 154
Small Business Aids (Rerun):
Wage Incentive Plans, #70
Training Electrical Appliance Salesmen, #71
Case Study Estimating and Bidding, #72
Store Lighting to Sell Stationery, k73
A Model System for Handling Mail Inquiries, #74
U Following Up Mail Inquiries, #75


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





NUMBER OF' CHILDREN OF SCHOOL AGE RISES IN SOUTH

The Southeast picked up some 92,000 school students between
July 1, 1950 and the same date last year, but indications were
that not all of them are going, or will go, to school.
Final Bureau of the Gensus figures on the 1950 census of
population now being released indicated a lot of "saty-at-
homes" among the South' s younger generation.
a study of the bureau' s figures showed that in final
reports on the characteristics of the population of Florida,
Mississippi and the Carolinas for 1950 Sust received a total
of 216,315 persons aged 25 years and over were shown as not
having gone to school at all. F'lorida had 41,955J Mississippi,
47,300; North Carolina, 74,125; and South Carolina, 52,935.
Earlier, the Census bureau reported a total of 2,360,000
persons of the age of 5 to 17 years old in the South as not
enrolled in school.
Between July 1, 1950 and the same date last year, all of
the seven States in the Southeast except Alabama experienced .
an increase in the number of persons 5 to 17 years old, the
school age. In Alabama, there was a decrease of 3,000. Other-
wise, North Carolina recorded a gain of 13,000; South Carolina,
6,000; Georgia, 15,000; F'loridat, 35,000; Tennessee, 16,000;
and Mississippi, 10,000).


SOUTHEASTT LEADS IN FERTILIZER USE

The Southeast in the fiscal year ending June 30 of
'last year consumed 43 per cent of the commercial fer-
Stilizer used in the nation as a whole, according to
'a Department of Agriculture report.
Consumption in the South Atlantic States of Georgia,
'Florida, Virginia and the Carolinas alone totalled
'6,004,426 tons and in the East South Gentral States
'of Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky,
'3,206,314. In the United States, consumption totalled
S20,988,740 tons.
The aouth Atlantic region led all others in total
Consumption and the East South Gentral section was
Third in usage. Consumption in the liew England area
Swas 456,667 tons; Middle Atlantic, 1,956,283; East
'North Central, 3,979,359; West North central, 1,500,-
'798; West South Central, 1,463,858; Mountain, 280,878;
'and Pacific 1.659,037.


SOUTH IS LEADING PirOUJCER OF PULP.PAPER

Georgia and Florida were among five States in the nation
producing more than a million tons each of wood pulp in 1950,
and the South was the leading region with an output of more
than 50 per cent of the entire production in the United States,
a report of the Bureau of the Census shows.

Note: This is a Facts For Industry Report
entitled Wood Pulp. Paper and Board. 1951. See
Page 3 for listing in Order Blank.

At the same time, the report showed that of a total product-
ion of 24,375,083 short tons of all grades of paper and board
in the country, 33 per cent, or 8,217,625 tons came from the
South, and of the South' s production, some 72 per cent, or
5,976,313 tons, originated in the South Atlantic and East
South Central States, with Florida and Georgia again leading
regionally in that output.
In the South, 8,119,242 tons of wood pulp were produced,
including 4,611,508 in the South atlantic area, 1,502,966 in
the East South Central, and 2,004,769 in the West South Central
section. Nationally, 14,848,951 tons were turned out.

SOUTH CONTINUES TO PACE NATION IN TEXTILE OUTPUT

Further evidence of the vast strides the South has made in
the textile field is shown in a series of Bureau of the Census
reports crediting the region in 1951 with the sale and shipment
to market of three types of garments alone valued at nearly
$175,000,000.

These are Facts For Industry Reports. Copies
are available at nominal prices from Department
of Commerce field offices.

The reports were for women' s and children' s woven fabric
underwear and nightwear, knit underwear and nightwear, and knit
outerwear.
The 1951 shipments, incidentally, were 39 per cent greater
in value than in 1950 when the valuation was placed at $125,-
280,000.
Sales of women' s and children' s woven fabric underwear and
nightwear in the region in 1951 totalled $28,617,000, the value
of shipments of knit underwear and nightwear was $132,704,000,
and shipments of knit outerwear, including woven swimwear, was
$12,833,000. All but knit outerwear exceeded the 1950 value.
Shipments of the latter declined 15 per cent.


Sro n1-ss.*


U. 3. OEPArRTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
416 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


VOLUMLE 6, NUMbERF; 21 NOVEMBERH 1, 1952


BC-6-JF


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U~d~y OP L L~.FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
[)0' 5 E pPAY" N OF POSTAGE 5300




U.S. D)EPO91TORY


UNIVERSITY OF FLOREIDA
IsfROT I,. QUJAZIS
DEPARfTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAIN~S~VILE, FLORIDA







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMlVERCE

FIELD SERVICE


CONSTRUCTION VIOLATIONS TO BE INVESTIGATED

mannaField offices of the National
THE 6it Production Authority in the South-
Seast are preparing to move against
violators of Controlled Materials
Natincr Plan ]Regulation Number 6 dealing
With CORstPrCtion &ctiVitie8, m&HS
of wrhom are proceeding on the be-
Produ tion lief that the regulation has been
gy)(t],3ti)El revoked, when, in fact, it is still
in operation.
Yany of those violating the
Auth~ity regulation are doing so unwittingly
11% I~ri@? because they are of the opinion that
NPA has revoked the regulation con-
trolling the use of steel, copper
and aluminum in construction work, when actually it was
decided only to adjust the amounts of materials which may
be self-authorized, beginning next Yay.
Recently, NPA announced the relaxation program, ef-
footive next MYay 1, which provided only that on that date
construction projects for recreational, entertainment and
amusement purposes, highways, one-through-four family
houses, and multi-unit residences of both walk-up and
elevator types would be allowed limited additional amounts
of materials on a self-authorisation basis.

'NON-MILITARIY STEEL USERS ARE AIDED
SThe National Production Authority has establish- '
i ed the period of November 17 to November 28., 1952
as one in which persons placing fourth quarter
non-military authorized controlled materials (ACM) '
orders for steel calling for delivery in February
1953 will be accorded the privilege of having
such orders scheduled for delivery in advance of
those bearing first-quarter 1953 identification
eyabols and calling for delivery in the same
month. The action wras taken in an amendment to
Direction 16 to CKP Regulation Number 1.


SOUTHEAST PRODUCES HIIGH VOLUME OF CLAY PRODUCTS


PRODUCTION OF CLAY
00NSnalCTICH4PRODUCTS

,W NGLAZED BICK Q


reo


Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miesissippi, Tennessee, Ken.
tuckyr, the Carolinas, Virginias, Maryland, Delawrare and
the District of Columbia shipped to market a total of
nearly 2 billion brick, rhich was some 31 per cent of
all shipments in the United States, which totalled
6,306,561,000.

These Facts For Industry Reports are avail-
able at all Department of Commerce field of-
fiqea on a nominal sales basis.

The value of shipments by States in the region in-
oluded Georgia, $6,360,000; North Carolina, $11,408,000;
South Carolina, $3,385,000; Tennessee, $4,250,000;
Alabama, $4,421,000; and Missiasippi, $2,909,000.
The two southeastern regions led all other areas in
the country, both in production and shipments of brick,
as well as value of the shipments.
In addition, the Southeast shipped 288,258 short tons
of unglazed structural tile valued at $2,914,000, and
42,963 tons of hollow facing tile with a value of $2,-
433,000, and from the South Atlantic section went 106,-
915 tons of vitrified clay sewer pipe with a value of
$2,900,000.

' GOVERNMENJT-0WNED PATENTS AVAILABLE FREE ,

SDepartment of Commerce offices in the Southeast a
( have just received card listings of more than r
3000 Government-owned patents which are being ,
Offered to business men on a non-exclusive, royal- ,
ty-free license basia. The patents, which deal ,
with a crose-section of industries, were developed a
in a vast research prqgram. *


SECOND QUARTER 1953 APPLICATIONS MAILED


Atlanta, Ga.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg.,
Tel. WlA-4121,Ex.453

Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Charleston, S. C'., C
Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 3
Tel. 7771 T

Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206


Birmingham, Ala.,
246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355

MIIami, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


)olumbia, S.C.,
1310 Lady St.,
~el. 3-185


Jackson, MYiss., Jacksonville, Fla.,
509 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111


Nashville, Tenn.,
676 U. 8. Court
House, Tel.42-9651


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


NYOVEMLBER 15, 1952


YOLURE 6, NUMBER 22


One of the biggest I
businesses in the S uh
east is the clay con-
struction products in- I
dustry, Bureau of the
Census figures just re-
leased show.
This industry last
year shipped unglazed
brick from its south-
eastern plants valued
a~t $48,250,000, and
other clay products
valued at varying a-
mounts .
'One hundred and sixty-
'six plants located in


Source: Facts For Industry,
Bureau of the Census


CKP-4B applications for controlled materials for the
second quarter of 1953, together with instruction sheets,
have been mailed by NPA to southeastern neers of those
Products. Final date for the submitting of applications
is December 1, it wras emphaesied.
The forms must be transmitted to HPA in Washington,
or to the office which has been designated in specific
written instructions. Few changes have been made in the
form, with the exception of self-authorization or auto-
matic allotments.
(SEE NPA CONTINUED ON PAGE 2)





SOUTHEAST PLANT EXPANSIONS COST NEARLY BILLION

Plant expansion operations cleared in the Southeast
by the Federal Government to meet requirements of the
national program of defense from the outbreak of the
Korean war through September 5 of this year had a
dollar value of nearly a billion dollars, according to
a summary issued by the Defense Production Administra-
tion.
The expansion activities, approved by DPA through
the issuance of certificates of necessity, were valued
at $992,079,000 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mlississ-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas, exclusive of hun-
dreds of millions of dollars put into improvements in
storage and transportation facilities, which are inter-
state in character and could not be assigned to any
one State.
Alabama, in the some two years and five months, was
far in the lead in value of the expansion work in the
seven-State area with a total of $256,798,000, and, in
fact was one of the leading States in the nation. The
total spent and being spent in that State exceeded
that of 32 other States in the nation.
Other totals in the Southeast were Florida $135,-
696,000; Georgia, $133,816,000; Mississippi, 8149,-
207,000; North Carolina, $98,918,000; South Carolina,
$51,781,000; and Tennessee, $165,863,000.

ROAD-BUILDING OPERATIONS IN REGION $~334 MlILLION

Road building operations planned and under way in
the Sanltheast on September 30 of this year had a value
of $334,178,000, the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S.
Department of Commerce announced.
Alabama led with $61,744,000 being spent and to be
spent on its roads, and Georgia was a close second with
$60,496,000.
Value of the operations in the other States included
Florida, $39,221,000; Mississippi, $34,735,000; North
Carolina, $55,242,000; South Carolina, $30,496,000; and
Tennessee, $52,244,000.
Involved in the activities were 6,410.2 miles of
road, including 967.2 in Alabama; 594 in Florida;
1,034.2 in Georgia; 1,076.2 in Mississippi; 961.2 in
North Carolina; 794.6 in South Carolina; and 982.8 in
Tennessee .
Of the total spent and being spent, $166,739,000
was Federal aid.

CASH FARM INCOME UP IN SOUTHEASTERN AREA

Cash farm income increased 4.5 per cent in the
Southeast in the first 8 months of 1952 as compared
with the corresponding period last year, according to
a report of the Bureau of Agriuultural Economics, U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
The rise came in spite of decreases of 10.7 per
cent in Florida and 2 per cent in Tennessee that took
place during the period.
To offset these declines, however, were sharp in-
creases developing in Georgia, Mississippi and the 'wo
Carolinas. In Georgia, the percentage gain outstripped
that of all other southeastern States, was second high-
est in the South as a whole, and was sixth among all
States in the nation,
Totals for the seven Statse in the 1952 period were
Alabama, $189,904,000; Florida, $329,954,000; Mississip-
pi, $189,734,000; Georgia, $356,882,000; North Carolina,
$285,495,000; South Carolina, $182,637,000; and Tennes.
see, $254,160,000.
Oklahoma led the nation in percentage increase this
year with 41.4 per cent as compared with Georgia'sa 20
per cent.


(NPA CONTINUED FROMI PAGE 1)

TEXTILE INDUSTRY FREED FROM NPA CONTROLS


The Southeast's textile industry has been freed from all
National Production Authority restrictions imposed after
the outbreak of the Korean war to conserve products for the
national program of defense.
WAith the revocation of Order M-13 dealing with the high
tenacity rayon industry, NPA dropped the last restriction.
Lesued December 2, 1950, to spread the load of defense orders
equitably over the rayon industry, the regulation was found
bo be no longer necessary because of the small volume of
rated business now being placed. Originally, it limited the
amount of defense-rated orders a producer could accept to
LO per cent of his scheduled monthly production. The percent-
rge eventually was raised by successive amendments to 30
per cent.
At intervals since NPA took over the task of conserving
materials for the defense program, the industry has exper-
ienced the imposition of restrictions on certain of its
products. On November 6, 1951, an order was issued limiting
the amount of defense orders a producer was required to
accept, and in September of last year a similar restriction
wras placed on cotton duck. Both of those orders were pre-
viously revoked.
In addition, restrictions have been placed and subse-
quently revoked on related textile activities, including
one reserving for military use and stockpiling waterfowl
feathers, and another dealing with inventory controls on
binder and bailer twine.

LATEST ACTIONS BY NPA

Here are the more recent actions taken by NPA affecting
various industries:
Aircraft Materials: Delegation of authority to the
Secretary of Defense was broadened to permit scheduling or
rescheduling of deliveries of orders for APRA (Aircraft
Products Resources Agency) B products placed in support of
the military aircraft program. (Delegation 1, Supplement 1,
as amended Oct. 23, 1952).
Clad Steel Products: An increase in the lead time of
clad, or coated steel products, principally sheet, strip
and plate, by an additional 45 days wass authorized. (Amend-
ment 2 to Order Y-1).
Rubber: Restrictions on the use of crepe rubber were
eased and a provision requiring marking of butyl tire tubes
was reinstated. (Amendment to Order M-2, October 28, 1952).
Automatic Allotments: Automatic allotment limits on the
procurement of steel controlled materials by producers of
Class B products in the second and succeeding quarters of
1953 were revised upward. (CMP Reg. 1, Direction 18, amended
October 29, 1952).

NPA INDUSTRY COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Manufacturers of silicon carbide grinding wheels assured
NPA their products could replace scarce diamond grinding
wheels in as high as 90 per cent of all tungsten carbide
tool grinding operations.

The Herbicide and Defoliant Chemicals Industry Advisory
Committee recommended that NPA make appropriate representa-
tions to other government agencies to obtain more definite
information on exported weed killers.

Gage manufacturers of the United States reported that
difficulty in recruiting and training workers is the chief
problem to overcome in planning for an .expansion of the
industry'sa productive capacity.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





I


T


To Obtain

This Mater-
ial Check
Sit In Space
Provided &
Send This
Portion Of The Page To The Nearest Department of Com-
mero il O fie. YourN and Addres Oireb h


a Ge af ss t e cr tel


Payable to Treasurer of the United States. Unpriced
Items Are Free.

/5 State highway user revenue, disbursement and other
tabulations prepared by Bureaul952Public Roads,

r/Defense Programs Federal Aids for Facilities
Expansion, Oct. 10, 1952
Recent National Production Authority Actions:
2 DeldegatordrYl mnmn ,Ot 3 92eean 1, Supplement 1, Amended Oct.3,1952
Amendment to Order M-2, Oct. 28, 1952
CMLP Reg. 1, Dir. 18, Amended, Oct. 29, 1952
Fa Foay Cdnstr cR porPs ducts, Summary for 1951,
M26B-01, 100, $1l a Year
/' Cotton &k Synthetic Woven Goods, Finished, 1951,
M150-01, 10#
SLumber Production & Mill Stocks, Western States,
2nd Quarter 1952, M13G-2-2, lo#
Fate & Oils, M17-1-92, 100, $2 a Year
01eomargarine, Y17J-92, 5Q, 50Q a Year
Cotton System Spinning: Activity, 5Q,504Yr.M15-3-2


months, the Office of International Trade, U. S. Department
of Commerce announced. A substantial reduction in the large
excess of exports over imports which had developed during
1951 was also reported.
+ *
The pace of economic activity quickened during September,
due to the usual seasonal pickup and the recovery of indust-
ries affected by the steel shutdown, the Office of Business
Economics said. Industrial production extended its recovery
with ateel and automobiles making substantial gains. Total
employment continued at peak volume while prices, except for
farm products and foods affected by seasonally heavy market-
ings, continued generally firm.
+ *
Gross foreign aid extended by the United States Govern-
ment in fiscal year 1952 amounted to $5 billion, bringing
total assistance in the two years since the outbreak of
hostilities in Korea to $9.8 billion. Military aid rose
rapidly following the invasion of Korea, accounting for 38
per cent of gross foreign aid in fiscal year 1952 as compared
with 24 per cent for 1951.
+
Resignation of Ray WA. Ireland as administrator of the
Defense Air Tran'sportation Administration to devote full time
to his post as vice president of United Airlines was announced
by Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer. No successor was
immediately designated.
+ + +
A total of 4,926,963 bags of rice has been exported or
licensed for export since August 1, 1952, the beginning of
the current crop year, according to the Office of Inter-
ntional Trade, U. S. Department of Commerce
+ + w
The New England-New York area of seven States can look
forward to a population growth of about 4,600,000 by 1975
or a 19 per cent increase over the 1950 population of 24,-
144,645, according to estimates of the Department of Commerce
in a report prepared for use by the New England-New York
Iter-Agency Committee.
Report on Cotton Ginning,0ct. 27, 1952,A/C 0-10G-6-52-53
Population of the U. S., By Age, 1950, PC-14,#5
Cotton Ginned Prior to Oct. 1, Crops of 1952 & 1951:
ennessee 4exas 27Louisiana North Carolina
eorgia ~outh Carolina 17ississippi
Alabama Urkansas 2/Specified States
i7Summary of Housing Characteristics for Selected Cities,
April 1950, HC-9, #2
Population of Congressional Districts, Apl.1,1950,PC-9,#5
Ce au ofaPo ulation*General Characteristics, 1950:

Census of Housing: Block Statistics, 1950:
r~iami, Fla., HE 111, 30q# mobile, HE114, 204
~lontgomery, HE115, 154 UNashrille, HE118, 204
LLrlando, Fla., HE137, 15# 4St.PetersburgFla. ,HE167,20p
USavannah, Ga., HIE175, 204 L/Tampa, 88192, 254
.Sapis ed ri ive rBaecn Denelo ment P52 mrg2541
Gause 5#
Simplified Practice Recommendation 146-52 Corrugated and
Solid Fiber Boxes for Canned Fruits & Vegetables, 54
mllBusiness Aids: (Rerun):
Short Change Swindlers, #876
Lumber Retailers Sell Builders' Hardwrare, #78
paghDeale hph aMoetality Mus Result From Over-
Ways to Gain Good Will, #82
Remodeling Reminders, 1#83
Food Plant Sanitation, #85
Defense Production Aids:
/A Checklist for Small Plant Housekeeping, #14
Htowr the WAalsh-Healy Public Contracts Act Affects
Government Supply Contractors, #15
3p' Lubrication of Machine Tools, #16


r'or furiker
Details of
kny Of These
Hirrhlights in
The Field Of
Business Get
In Touch With
'he Nearest Departmenlt of Commerce Field Office.


Manufacturers' shipments and orders rose substan-
tially during September while inventories were increas-
ed slightly from August totals, the Office of Business
Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce, reported.
Sales rose 7 per cent after seasonal adjustment to
almost equal the high of April 1952. The advance in
deliveries was widespread throughout industry but the
sharper rate of increase occurred in durables. Sales
by producers of hard goods rose 9 per cent over the
September rate with all industries in the group par-
ticipating in the increase. However, notor vehicle
and nonelectrical machinery producers accounted for
more than half of the increase in sales.
*
Sales of all retail stores in September amounted to
$14 billion, about 7 per cent above the value for the
same month a year ago. Reflecting for the most part
the rapid advance in sales at automotive dealers as
passenger car production moved sharply upward from
previous lows, total sales after seasonal adjustment
were up by about 4 per cent from August to September,
only slightly below the June high point.
*
United States trade with the Latin American re-
publics in the first half of 1952 wass marked by a
continued high level of exports and a recovery of
imports from the low volu~me of the preceding six


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





BIRMLINGHAM,ATLANTA LOW IN GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES
Birmingham and Atlanta in 1951 were the lowest in general
city government expenditures of eight large southern municipali-
ties, according to a report just issued by the Bureau of the
Census entitled "Large-City Finances in 1951."
Note: This report, entitled "Large-City
Finances in 1951,n is Series G-Cr51-No. 3,
dated October 1952, and is available at all
Department of Commerce field offices for
30 cents a coy.
Birmingham' s general expenditures were listed as $11,395,000,
and Atlanta' s, $20,285,000.
A study of the report, made by the Atlanta Regional Office
of the Department of Commerce, was for Atlanta, Birmingham,
Houston, New Orleans, Dallas, Memphis, Louieville, Fort
Worth.
In Atlanta, general expenditures were reduced in 1951 from
1950 by 12.3 per cent, which was exceeded only by Los Angeles'
14.3 per cent. Birmingham's were reduced by 4.7 per cent, but
otherwrise increases were shown in the region, including houston,
1.1, New Orleans, 4.8, Dallas, 12.5, Memphis, 17.4, Louieville,
7.1, and Fort Worth, 22.9.
In the South, Birmingham had the smallest debt outstanding
at the end of the fiscal year.
SOUTHEASTERNERS GET CERTIFICATES OF MERIT '

Certificates of merit for "a splendid job well done '
in the nationwide iron and steel scrap campaign con-
ducted last year have been awarded to 15 southeastern
business men by Edwrard W. Creb, Program Executive '
for the Salvage Metals and Minerals Bureau of the
National Production Authority. The recipients were: *
Joseph H. Altfater, Memphis; Joe Bartleys Jackson- '
ville; Sam Crane, Atlanta; William Freidman, Green- *
ville, Miss; Harold hendricka, Mobile; Charles Kim- '
merling, Birmingham; Robert Mdlillen, K~noxville; '
E. R. Miller, Tampa; Chester F. Sadler, Nashville; '
George Reese, Savannah; Maurice Weber, Chattanoog~a; '
Sam H~yman, Golumbia, S. C; Frank Nowlin, Miami; '
John T. Gibbs, Augusta; and L. P. Hlendrix, Charles- '
ton.


THREE SOUTHEASTERN STATES HIGH IN COTTON GOODS OUTPUT

Three southeastern States North Carolina, South Carolina,
and Georgia produced 38 per cent of the United States total
of finished cotton woven goods in 1951 with a production of
2,580,957,000 linear yards, according to a Facts Fqr Induetry
Report issued by the Bureau of the Census.
See listing on Page 3. The report is entitled
"Cotton & Synthetic Woven Goods, Finished, 1951,"
and sells for 100. Available at all Department
of Commerce field offices.
The national total was 6,676,499,000 yards.
South Carolina led the nation writh an output of 1,218,821,-
000 linear yards. The second highest production wras in Mdassa-
chusette where a total of 1,069,070,000 was produced.
Following a national pattern, however, production in the
region as a whole declined from that of 1950. In the three
southeastern states, North Carolina' s output went from 959,-
168,000 yards in 1950 to 977,259,000 in 1951, but South Caro-
lina' sl951 production compared with a total of 1,251,492,000
in 1950, and in Georgia the production in 1951 wras 381,877,000
yards against 425,022,000 in 1950. In the United States, pro-
duction in 1950 was 7,036,046,000 yards.
The Southeast was also fairly active in production of syn-
thetic wroven goods in 1951, producing a total of 291,465,000
yards. The principal producing States were Virginia, with
150,090,000; North Carolina, 109,814,000; and South Carolina,
31,561,000; here again, the 1951 output was off sharply as
compared with 1950 when the three States produced 323,178,000
yards .
I TWAO NEW COOPERATIVE OFFICES DESIGNATED (
'r
'Designation of the Chambers of Commerce at Greenville,
'8. C., and Key West, Fla., as cooperative offices of the
'U. S. Department of Commerce has been announced. Five
others were already in operation, including Chambers of
'Commerce at Sumter, S. C., Augusta, Ga., Birmingham, and
'Yontgomery, and the Missiasippi Agricultural and Indus-
trial Board at Jackson, M~iss. They will cooperate in sup- '
plying local business men with on-the-ground data needed
in their business operations.
POr 85-44$64


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, CA.
716 Forsyth Blds.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Volume 6, Number 22 November 15, 1952


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

XIAMIIIMMYW1
BULLETI 3 1262 08748 9182


PAGE 4


TOAVOID


41~4
~;k;


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L, QUALLS
DEPARTMdENT OF ECONOMICS
GAI.NESVILLE, FLORIDA





















Atlanta, Ga., BirmPingham, Ala., Charleston, S.C., Columbia, S.C., Jackson, Miss., Jacksonville, Fla.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,1310 Lady St., 509 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111

Memphis, Tenn., Mliami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga.,
229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 676 U.S.Court 218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426 Tel. ~9-7533 Tel.2-3641,Ex.206 HouseTel.42-9651 Tel.2-4755
VOLUME 6. NUMBER 23 DECEMB~ER 1, 1952


STEEL DISTRIBUTION PLAN ANNOUNCED BY NPA

The National Production Authority
-.has announced plans for distribut-
THE! ing: among manufacturers the addition-
al 1,395,000 tons of carbon steel
Ncrtinal products allocated NPA divisions by
CL ([tc[ the Defense Production Administra-
tion.
For the industrial divisions, and
Producti. also the Motor Vehicle Division,
(0( ggy ()gh supplementary steel wrill be allotted
on the basis of applications already
submitted in an effort to meet clealr-
Auth rity ly determined program deficits.
11 ICE ]F For the civilian goods industry
divisions, additional steel will be
distributed on the basis of supple-
mental 4-B applications to be submitted. Manufacturers
in these industries were urged to appraise their atddition-
al needs immediately after receiving their initial first
quarter allotments. Upon receipt of these supplemental
applications, NPA will make an equitable distribution of
available materials.
At the same time, the Defense Production Administra-
tion approved the distribution of an additional 1,480,000
tons of carbon steel to assure maximum steel production
and to meet the most pressing needs of industries for
first quarter 1953 steel.
The allotments will be made as follows: Agricultural
machinery, 37,150 short tons; aircraft, ordnance, and
shipbuilding, 100; building materials, 62,800; Canadian,
17,000;i communications equipment, 1,550; consumer durable
goods, 1 9,200; containers, 560,800; electrical equipment,
20,750; electronics, 8,000; engine and turbine, 5,000;
general components, 110,000; general industrial equipment,
35,000; leather, 550; lumber, 250; metalwrorking equipment,
14,000; motion picture and photographic products, 200;
motor vehicle, 336,950; printing and publishing, 2,300;
rubber, 5,000; service equipment, 12,500; and small busi-
ness hardship account, 5,900.

PULP, PAPER AND PAPERBOARD
Recommendation has been made by the Pulp, Paper and
Paperboard Industry Advisory Committee that NPA revoke
its Order Y-36 dealing with the distribution of Govern-
ment orders for paper. The order requires paper and
paperboard manufacturers to establish reserves of desig-
nated grades of paper and paperboard according to speci-
fied percentages of their monthly production to fill
Government orders.
The committee agreed that there is no longer any need
Sfor the order, and recommended its revocation.
(See NPA Continued on Page 2)


CONTINUED HIGH BUSINESS LEVEL SEEN FOR 195)
If the Southeast
STEEL WORKS AND follows the nation-
ROLLING MILLS al pattern -
MILUIONS OF OOLAIRs and some thinc it
2,400 ACGuIL., w 1 ill even exceed
""~"' I it the first
half of 1953 will
bring a continued
PUoo ---- CU ULATVE JE high level of busi-
WERu~ DOSs &ctlVlty in
the region, accord-
vr ic? ing to reports re-
'poo aii2 aT7~-~-i- ceived from Federal

\r Government agencies.
\ The agencies are
the Office of Busi-
ness Economics and
National Production
i soLLI Authority of the
o .4unS il I III U. S. Department of
1951 1952 19533 1954 195 *Cmeceadte
Defense Production
'Administration*
Source: Defense Production Basing their pre-
Administration diction on the pre-
sent and past general situation in the field of business
indications are, they saly, that the following will pre-
vail,.at least in the first half of the coming New Year:
1. Federal Government purchasing will remain brisk*
2. A further rise will come in non-defense purchases
of State and local governments*
3. There will be a continued high rate of expendi-
tures for plant and equipment*
4. A high level of unfilled orders on manufacturers'
books wilbehe ed relation" of inventories to sales
is a factor*
6. A continued acceleration of consumer buying result-
ing from an all-time high in employment with rising
consumer incomes.

FEDERAL DEFENSE PURCHASES CONTINUE HIGH

Southeastern business men from the beginning of the
Korean war through June of this year have sold to the
Federal Government for the national program of defense
goods and services valued at $2,61),438,000, according
to a report of the Munitions Board*
Value of the purchases included $365,909,000 in Alla-
bama; Florida, $222,120,000; Georgia, $429,206,000; Mia-
siasippi, $167,768,000; North Carolina, $645,31,000;
'South Carolina, $295,134,000; and Tennessee, $4871,990,-
000.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





WHOLESALE SALES UP;RETAIL SALES "SPOTTY"

The South continued to pace the nation in wholesale
sales in the first 9 months of 1952, but in some sec-
tions of the region, retail sales were off sharply,
while in others they were on the uptrend, according
to monthly reports issued by the Bureau of the Census.
Gains of 2 per cent were registered in wholesale :
sales in the South Atlantic and East South Central
regions and 3 per cent in the West South Central area, I
but in other regions of the country decreases were re-
corded.

Note: These monthly reports on sales
trends in the wholesale and retail fields
are available at Department of Commerce
field offices on a nominal subscription
basis.

Retail sales were off 5 per cent in Birmingham; 3
per cent in Macon, Greenwood and Bristol; and 2 per
cent in K~ingsport, Tenn, but were up 1 per cent in
Atlanta, Biloxi, Gulf port and Asheville; 10 per cent
in Augusta; 3 per cent in Columbus; and 5 per cent in
Clarksdale. Also, Manatee and Sarasota counties, Flor-
ida reported a 9 per cent rise. In the nation, a 3 per
cent rise was recorded.
Declines in the wholesale trade field included 1
per cent in the New England region; 4 per cent in the
Middle Atlantic; and 2 per cent each in the East and
West North Central sections and in the Mountain area.

SWEET-TOOTHED SOUTHIEASTERNERS e

Sweet-toothed southeasterners went for con- '
fectionery in a big way in the first 9 months '
of 1952 and as a result manufacturers in the '
region reported much better sales than in the '
corresponding period last year. '
In fact, those in Alabama, Mississippi, '
Tennessee and K~entucky led the nation in per- '
centage increase with a 9 per cent gain. In '
Georgia and Florida the rise was 7 per cent, r
and in the Carolinas, Virginias, Maryland and '
the District of Columbia it was 8 per cent. '
For the nation. sales were 1 per cent down. I

STATE,LOCAL PUBLIC CONSTRUCTION OFF

State and local public construction in the Southeast
fell off by $80,981,000 in the first 7 months of-1952
as compared with the corresponding period last year,
according to a current issue of the Construction an
Building Materials Industry Report of the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce. *
The value of that type of building activities at the
end of July of this year in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas was placed at
$389,107,000 against $470,088,000 for the same time
last year*

This publication, of great value to the
construction industry, is available at all
Department of Commerce field offices for $3
a year*

All of the seven States except South Carolina regia-
tered declines, some of them substantial. A rise of
from $37,793,000 in the 1951 period to $42,694,000 in
the first 7 months of this year was abown for South
Carolina .
Sharpest drop of all was in residential building,
which went from $;128,017,000 in the first part of 1951
to $b77,950,0b0 this year.


GP0 81100550


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


N CONTiNUED FROMU PAGE 1

Following were recent actions of NPA affecting various
industries:

PACKAGINGC CLOSURES: Restrictions on the use of "menders"
in the manufacture of packaging closures were lifted. (Order
M-26 Amended Oct. 30, 1952) .
STEEL DISTRIBUTION: Steel distributors are required to
make certification that steel received from mills is to be
used only for watrehousing purposes. (Order MJ-6A Amended
Oct. 30, 195r) .
JACKS: Requirements that mechanical, hydraulic, air, and
electrically-operalted jacks be standardized and simplified
were revoked.
CONSTRUCTION MACHFINERY: Responsibility for sponsoring
priority assistance applications to obtain construction
machinery for Department of Defense programs was transferred
from the Department of Defense to NPA' s Civilian Require-
ments Division. (Order Y-43 Amended Nov. 5, 1952) .
ALLOYING MIATERIALS: Persons ordering alloy products or
processed products from melters or processors are required
to certify that transactions involved are in accordance with
Order Y-80. (Order M-80, Amendment 4, Nov. 5, 1952).
SULFUR: Limitations on the use of sulfur were revoked
and inventory controls eliminated. (Reg. 1 Amend. 1, Nov. 7).
CONSUMER DURABLE GOODS: The consumer durable goods order,
YI-178, was revised to provide flexibility for the first timb
in the use of controlled materials for repair parts product-
ion, to drop the requirement for filing a form, to make
quarterly changes in the order' s listings and to bring it
into conformity with other regulations. (Order M-478 Amended
November 6, 1952) .
RAILROAD EQUIPMENT: Railroads are now permitted to
acquire and use foreign and scrap steel without charging
it to their allotment and to accept rails and track accessor-
ies on a seasonal basis in an amendment to Order M-73, which
also makes other changes in the order as originally issued.
(Order M-73 Amended November 7, 1952) .
FOREIGL MIRO SUPPLES: Mlanufacturers were authorized to
accept unrated orders for foreign MRO items in excess of
export quotas established under Order M-79. (Order M-79
Amended Nov. 7, 1952) .
BASIC RULES OF PRIORITIES SYSTEM: Regulation 2 has been
revised making the basic rules of the priorities system con-
form to recent developments. (Reg. 2, Dirs. 1 & 2 Revoked)
(Reg. 2 Amended Nov. 10, 1952).
CONTROLLED MATERIALS INVENTORIES: Users of controlled
materials were given the option of maintaining inventories
on a class or item basis. (CMLP Reg. 2 Amended Nov. 10, 1952).

CONSTRUCTION

A recommendation that relaxation of construction regula-
iosscheduled for Itay 1, 1953 be advanced to January 1,
1953 in view of the rapidly easing steel supply situation
was made to NPA by a task group of the Construction Industry
Advisory Committee.

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY

Production of and demand for all types of heavy construct-
ion machinery will be better balanced in 1953 and repair
parts should generally be available in sufficient quantity,
the National Production Authority reported

FIRST CRIMINAL CONVICTION

The first criminal conviction for violation of NPA regn-
lations was recorded in Houston, Texas, against W. A. Redding,
doing business as the Houston Blow Pipe and Sheet Metal Works
wowas sentenced to pay a fine of $1l,000 within 30 daya, and
agis elton Iron and Supply company, which was fined $b5,000.





,J For Further
Details Of Any
Of These Items
Get In Touch
with The Near-
est U. S. De-
partment of Commerce Field Office.



Cash dividend payments by corporations issuing pub-
lic reports in October 1952 amounted to $523 million,
which was 2 per cent less than the $534 million paid
out in the same month in 1951. The decline in October,
which is not a heavy payment month, was centered in
the manufacturing industry where scattered changes in
dividend payment dates were a significant factor. Ag-
gregate manufacturing dividends were down $12 million
from the $213 million paid out in October 1951. Pay-
ments in the nonmanufacturing sector totalled the
same as in October 1951.
*****
Total business inventories at the end of September
1952 were about $500 million above August on a season-
ally adjusted basis. Retailers' inventories increased
$400 million, while manufacturers' and wholesalers'
stocks were up slightly. The rise of less than one per
cent in September brought the total value of inventor-
ies back to about the June 1952 total.
*****
Total wholesalers' sales in September 1952 were
estimated at 89,600 million, which, on a seasonally
adjusted basis, was an increase of 9 per cent over the
previous month. Sales by durable-goods dealers at
$2,980 million and by nondurable-goods dealers of
$6,620 million showed seasonally adjusted increases of
12 and 8 per cent, respectively, from August.
*
Expenditures for new construction in October 1952
declined slightly from $3.1 billion to $3 billion,
the Departments of Commerce and Labor reported.


I


TeSeptember-October decline was somewhat less than ex-
peted for this time of year largely because private buil-
digconstruction held about even with the September dol-
lrvolume. October marked the fifth successive month in
wihtotal dollar outlay for new construction was 5 per
cet or more above the year-ago monthly total.
+ + +
Personal income in September 1952 was at an annual rate
of 273 billion, 33 billion dollars above the revised
Auuttotal. Almost half of the August-September increase
entered in wage and salary disbursements by private in-
Sutry. Increased proprietors' income, both business and
agicultural, largely accounted for the remainder.
M+ + sa
Unemployment dropped to a new post-World War II. low in
October 1952, the Bureau of the Census reported. The esti-
ate for the week ending October 11 was 1,284,000 as com-
ardwith 1,438,000 in September and 1,616,000 in October
Year ago. Only about 2 per cent of all civilian workers
weeout of jobs in October, one of the lowest percentages
onrecord during World War II.
+++++
Appointment of Robert L. Turner, Vice President for
Traffic and Sales for Northeast Airlines in Boston, as
Acting Administrator of the Defense Air Transportation
Administration was announced by Jack Garrett Scott, Under
Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. He succeeds Ray
W. Ireland, who resigned recently to return to his job
as Vice President of United Airlines.
++++s
September shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear
and nightwear, including knit outerwear shirts, amounted to
$33.8 million, the same as August shipments, but 6 per cent
under the September 1951 total of $35.9, the Census Bureau
announced .
+ +
Average weekly cuttings during September 1952 of most
types of men' s apparel were considerably higher than in
September 1951 but showed no general trend in comparison
with August of this year, according to the Bureau of the
Census.


Enamelled Cast Iron Plumbing Fixtures, 154
Production Allocation Manual, 454
Small Saswill Operator' s Handbook, 654
National Income Issue of Survey of Current Business, 304
Income Payments to Individuals August 1952 Issue of
Survey of Current Business, 304
Compendium of State Government Finances, 1951, 354
Cotton Production & Distribution, July 31, 1951, 204
Special Days, Weeks & Mlonths in 1952, 154
Emergency Defense Activities Handbook, 254
Annual Inventory Report, 1951 Dollar Volume of Year-End
Inventories, Sales-Inventory Ratios, and Percentage
Change in Inventories, 101
L950 U. S. Census of Ponulu~nt= -- ansus Tracts:
~Atlanta, Ga., Bulletin PD-2, 254 Liami, Fla. Bull.PD-31, 201
housing g Characteristics for the State, Standard Mletropolitan
Areas & Urbasn Places of 10,000 or more, April 1950,Mississippi
150 Census of Agriculture:
SAlabama, Vol. 1, Part 21, $1.25
Mississippi, Vo. 1, Part 22, $1.50
North and South Carolina (Combined), Vol.1,Part 16, $3.00
L/Tennessee, Vol. 1, Part 20, $1.50
Pacis For Industry Reports:
J Confectionery, Sept. 1952, MI60-92, 54, 504 Ir.
L~Hardwrood Veneer & Plywrood, 2nd Qr. 1952 M13A-2-2,104,504Yr.
SFats & Oils, Consumption By Uses, Sept. 1952,Y17-2-92,104
mllBusiness Aidas
Using Super Market Methode in a Medium-Sized Grocery,#86
Successful Electrical Appliance Window Displays, #87
Banks Profit Through Glamour, New Services, #88
&J Case study A Successful Retail Florist Business
.Catering to a Discriminating clientele, #89
[ 'Are You Rea'dy to Sell Appliances Again, #90
GPO 81100530


Monthly Wholesale Trade Report, U. 8. & Regions
Monthly Retail Trade Report, 104, $1 a Year
Construction & Building Mlaterials Industry Reports
$3.00 A Year
SLatest National Production Authority Actions:
SOrder 11-26 Amended Oct. 30, 1952
ffOrder M(-6A Amended Oct. 30, 1952
Order Y-43 Amended Nov. 5, 1952
/ Order M[-80, Amended Nov. 5, 1952
f Regulation 1, Amendment 1, Nov. 7, 1952
urner a-478~ Amended Nov. 6, 1952
Order Y-73 Amended Nov. 7, 1952
Order M1-79 Amended Nov. 7, 1952
Reg. 2, Dirs. 1 & 2 Revoked
Reg. 2 Amended Nov. 10, 1952
CMLP Reg. 2 Amended Nov. 10, 1952
Provisional Estimates of Population of U. S., Apr.
1, 1950 to Sept. 1, 1952, P-25, #65
t7Report on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 10, 195i2,A/C-0-100
L7Selection of Hearing Aids, 15#


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


To Obtain This
r NEW BOOKS M material Checkr It
~~ 3~~3 AND REPORTS In The Space Pro-vde a Sn
~u ~rY/AThis Portion Of
The Page To The
Nearest Department of Commerce Field Oraice. Your
Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side. Make Remit-
tances For Sales Material Payable To Treanlsure Of The


United States.





MANY FAMILIES IN SOUITHIEST STILL OFF IN INCOME

There are 65,465 families and unrelated individuals in five
major cities of the Southeast Htlanta, Birmingham, Chatta-
nooga, Muemphis, and diami -- that have incomes of less than
/6500 a year, according to "Census Tract" reports for those
cities just released by the Bureau of the Census from its 1950
;ensus of Population.

These "Census Tract" reports are available for
a nominal charge at all Department of Commerce
field office. Additional reports of a similar
nature are being received almost daily.

At least, that was the case in 1949 when Mlemphis led in
number of these "low income" persons with 17,360 families and
individuals; Atlanta wras second with 15,835; and the others
were Miami, 13,810; Birmingham, 12,595; and Chattanooga, 5,865.
In the same five cities, 20,055 persons 25 years of age
and over reported they had not completed one year in school.
Also, there were nearly 100,000 more females than males in
the five-city area; nearly 90 per cent of the married couples
had their own household; and natives of the U. S. S. R., and
Italy predominated among the foreign-born citizens of the
five cities.

ALIRLINtE PATRONAGE HIGH IN SOUTHF~aSTERN AREA

Commercial airlines in the Southeast last year carried a
total of 2,817,518 passengers bound to points within the
United States, 10,165.7 tons of air mail; and 16,943 tons of
cargo, according to a report issued by the Civil Aeronaintica
Administration from figures compiled by the Civil Aeronautics
Board.
Florida, with a total of 908,390 passengers, led the South-
east and stood seventh in the nation, being exceeded only by
New York, California, Illinois, Texas, the District of Colum-
bia, and Ohio in the order named.

Copies of this report are available at
Department of Comnherce field offices for 15
cents .

Georgia, with 674,754 passengers stood eleventh among all
States .
In air-mail tonnage, Georgia was ninth in the nation with
3,224.5 tons, and Florida was tenth with 2,593.2 tons. In air
cargo, Georgia was twelfth, and Florida was fourteenth.


SOUTHEAST GETS $76.6 MILLION FOR HIGHWAY WORK

A total of $76,657,170 has been apportioned by the Federal
Government as aid to the southeastern States for highways in the
fiscal year beginning next July 1, the Secretary of Commerge has
announced.
The funds are to be used on road work in what are known as
the Federal-aid primary highway system; secondary or feeder
roads; urban highways; the interstate system; and national for-
ests in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinas.

Publications now issued by the Department
of Commerce dealing with highway construction
operations include Public Roads, published
by the Bureau of Public Roads ($1.00 a Year)
and the Construction and Building Materials
Industry Report ($3.00 a Year) .

National forest highways will receive $667,193, and the
remainder will be used on the other roads.
Alabama will receive $11,551,891 for the primary, secondary
urban and interstate system highways and $64,403 for national
forest road work; Florida 89,259,517 and $130,667; Georgia,
$13,260,893 and $718,894; Mississippi, 89,177,421 and $106,219;
North Carolina, $13,561,380 and $137,921; South Carolina, $7,-
276,763 and r$73,755; and Tennessee, $11,902,112 and 875,334.
REGION LEADS NATION IN HARDWOOD VENEER OUTPUT

The South is the most prolific producer of hardwood veneer
and plywood in the nation.
According to reports of the Bureau of the Census, the 11-
State area of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana,
Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas, Virginia and the Carolinas, in
the first balf of 1952 produced 3,242(,876,000 square feet of
hardwood veneer, which was 63 per cent of the national total of
5,075,843,000 feet.

These figures are reflected in Facts For
InutyReports for this industry. See your
nearest Commerce Department field office for
more details.

The reports credited the 11 Southern States also with the
greatest consumption of veneer logs and bolts of all regions
with a total of 356,411,000 board feet, or 72 per cent of the
consumption for the nation as a whole.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
L6PO


GPO BS*4501


UNIV\\\\\\\\ERi~i~i~i~slTv OF~FL~~!IL~:~:,


3 i262 b8748 9174


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
ATLANTA, GA.
716 Forsyth Bldg.
Tel. WA-4121 Ext. 453

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000

Volume 6, Number 23 December 1, 1952


UNIVElRSITY OP LORIDAL
LEROY ,. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINOESVELLE. FLORIDA





















VOLUMdE 6. NUMBER 24 DECEMBER 15. 1952
Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, S.C., Columbia, S.C., Jackson,M~iss., Jacksonville,Fla.,
7th Floor,Forsyth Bldg., 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 509 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. RA-4121,Ex.453 Tel. 53-3421,Ex.355 Tel. 7771 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 4-7111

Memphis, Tenn., Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Nashville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga.,
229 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 670 U. S. Court 218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,Ex.206 House .Tel.12-9651 Tel. 2-4755


1.2 BILLION INVESTED IN NEW PLANTS.EQU1PME;NT MA~TERALS DENIED THREE MIAMI BEACH FIRMS


RATE OF COMPLETION OF
TAX-AIDED EXPANSIONS
Southeastern manufacturers
*last year put an estimated $1,-
211,0581,000 into new plants and
equipment, 15 per cent of the
$7,781,731,000 invested in such
operations in the nation as a
whole, a report just released
by the Bureau of the Census
shows.
In the States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
~the Carolinas and Virginias,
Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware
Source: Defension and the District of Columbia,
Production Record a total of $859,971,000 was paid
'for new machinery and equipment,
and $351,087,000 for new structures and additions to
plants.

This report is available at all Department
of Commerce field offices at 15# a copy.
Order on Page 3.

The total spent in the~ combined regions of the South
Atlantic and East South Central sections, representing
the entire southeastern part of the United States was
the third largest sum expended regionally in the nation
and was exceeded only by the $1,743,087,000 invested in
the Middle Atlantic States and $2,456,896,000 spent in
the East North Central region.

GOVERNMvENiT PURCHASES IN S.E.HIH I NVEMER

Business men in the Southeast last month sold more
than $36,600,000 worth of goods and services to the
Federal Government, according to daily lists of con-
tract award information made available to business
firms in Department of Commerce and cooperating offices.

The lists named in this story are available
without charge and are used for possible sub-
contracting purposes by small business firms.

Purchases by the Department of Defense and General
Services Administration in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee totalled $36,-
651,209, with Tennessee contributing some 64 per cent
of the total, or $23,556,507, by virtue of a contract
for $19,480,982 let in Kingaport for ordnance.


bon steel and 340 pounds of copper in constructing a
swimming pool, cabanas and bathhouses at North Treasure
Drive and Hispanola avenue, North Bay Village in Dade
county, Fla., when NPA regulartionls permit the use of
only two tons of steel and 200 pounds of copper in such
construction .
It was found, however, that violation of the regula-
tions was not willful.
Also named respondents in the proceedings were B~er-
nard a. Kornblum, president of twoe of the firms, and
Irving Greenfield, vice-presidenlt and treasurer of one
and secretary-treasurer of another.
Under the order, all priority assistance, allocations
and allotments of materials under NPA control, use of
such materials in possession of the respondents, and
all privileges of self-certification and self-authoriza-
tion were withdrawn and withheld for the 90-day period
beginning October 1 of this year,

CHARGES DIS~IbSED AGAINST CHARiLESTON FIRM

Dismissal of charges alleging violation of National
Production Authority regulations brought against the
Planters Fertilizer and Pnosphate company, of Charleston,
8. C., was announced.
The company was charged with having unlawfully used
1,262 short tons of sulfur between June 1951 and April
30, 1952! in violation of Order M-69 covering the use of
that product. The government agency asked for a sus-
pension order denying the firm priority assistance,
allocations, allotments and privileges pf self-authori-
sation and automatic allotment, and also prohibiting it
from acquiring, using or disposing of materials under
NPA control.
(&EE NPA L;ONTINUED ON PAGE 2)


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICES


Three Mdiami Beach, Fla., cor-
portations --- Treasure Isle
Pool and Cabanas, Inc., Evelyn
SHomes, Inc., and White Star
S Realty company --- with their
controlling officers have been
L1 prohibited from using materials
controlled by the National Pro-
duction Authority for 90 days
i under an order issued by Russell
101 Rasco, NPA hearing commission-
er.
The order resulted from a heair-
tYing held in Coral Gables early
Sin October in which the respon-
dents were charged with having
unlawfully used 21 tons of car-


TEIE


Alid11i





SOUTHEAST'S HIGHWAY MILEAGE NEARLY RALF MILLION

The Southeast last year had nearly balf a million
miles of highways for its nearly 6 million motorists
to run around on.
Figures compiled by the Bureau of Public Roads from
State reports showed a total of 475,020 miles of rural
and urban roads in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississ-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas with Georgia leading
33 other States in the nation in total mileage.
Alabama had 61,838 miles; Florida, 52,989; Georgia,
97,087; Mississippi, 65,829; North Carolina, 73,404;
South Carolina, 51,5583; and Tennessee, 69,315.
Only California, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan,
Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota,
Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Texas could point to
more highway mileage than Georgia.
Fifty-seven per cent of the total mileage in the 7_
State area had been surfaced, including 45,392 miles
in Alabama; 28,462 in Florida; 30,689 in Georgia; 38,_
078 in Mississippi; 53,629 in North Carolina; 20,982 in
South Carolina; and 57,822 in Tennessee.
Incidentally, some 90 per cent of the roads in the
region were classed as rural. Of a total of 428,564
miles of highways in the area, morph than half, or
240,680 miles were surfaced.

NOTICE TO SUBSGRcIBERS ,

Believing that the Defense Production Record a
'has served its purpose in the defense expansion '
Effort, the U. S. Department of Commerce wrill a
discontinue its publication with the issue of Jan.'
i 1953. Refunds on the unexpired portions of '
'subscriptions will be made automatically by the '
SSuperintendent of Documents, Washington 25, D.C. ,
SThe refund operation will require about one a
'month, a
S THREE WAYS TO CONTINUE RECEIVING MATERIAL ,
RELEASED BY THE NATIONAL PRODUCTION AUTHORITY, ,
SU. S. Department of Commerce: a
i Orders and regulations will continue to '
abe available on a subscription basis. Mailings ,
Share made from two to three times each week. The ,
Cost of this special service is $11 a year. ,
SChecks should be made payable to the Treasurer a
'of the United Statse and forwarded to any De- a
Apartment of Commerce field office or to the Super-s
'intendent of Documents, Washington 25, D. C. ,
2. The Business Service Cheek List, published ,
weekly by the Department of Commerce, lists all ,
material published by the Department, as well as a
news releases, orders and regulations issued by '
other defense agencies, except the Department of a
Defense. It costs $1.50 per year. Checks should ,
be made payable to the Treasurer of the United a
States and forwarded to atiy Department of Com- a
merce field office or to the Superintendent of ,
Documents, Washington 25, D. C. .
3. Single copies of news releases, orders and a
'regulations of the National Production Authority ,
Swill continue to be available free through the '
'News Rooms of the National Production Authority, ,
Sthe Department of Commerce, and all of the Depart-,
Sment's field offices. '

1950 CENSUS OF POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS
The General Characteristics of the 1950 Census of
Population for all southeastern States have now been
received and are available at all Department of Com_
merce field offices. Publication of the Georgia repor
completed the list for the region. (See Page 3 for
prices of eachh.


NPA CONTIhUED FROM PAGE 1

The dismissal was ordered by Charles J. Hilkey, NPA
hearing commissioner, after the respondents had cited the
fact that the order had been revoked, and that the evidence
as presented by NPA had failed to show any wilful intent
to violate the order.

MISSISSIPPI MAN AP~POINTED TO NPA POST

Appointment of Philip Hoel, Vicksburg business man, as
Assistant Director of a newly-organized division of the NPA
to be known as the Agricultural, Construction and Mining
Equipment Division, was announced. Mr. Hoel formerly served
as Assistant Mississippi Division Manager of the R. G.
LeTourneau company. Previously, he hard been Deputy Director
of the Construction Machinery Division of NPA which, with
the Agricultural and Mining Machinery Division was consoli-
dated into the Agricultural, Construction and Mining Equip-
ment Division in the interest of economy. As Assistant
Director, Mr. Hoel will have charge of the programming and
allowing of materials affecting the construction machinery
industry,

RECENT luPx ACTIONS

More recent NPA actions included the following:
CONSTR(UCTION: The construction industry was notified that
fourth quarter non-military authorized controlled materials
orders for steel placed between November 17 and November 28,
1952, and calling for delivery in February 1953 will be
scheduled for delivery in advance of those bearing first
quarter 1953 identification symbols and calling for delivery
in the same month. (Revised CMP Reg. 6, Directionl 6 as amended
November 14, 1952).
RbACHINE TOOLS: Action was taken to change the percentage
split of machine tool production between military and civilian
.purchasers from 70 per cenrt military and 30 per cent non-
|mltary to 60-40, except as to those critical tools listed
inExhibit D of Y-41, and also in the 40 per cent group for
civilian customers, NPA granted more freedom to producers of
acietools to ship on unrated orders. (Order M-41 as
aeddNovember 17, 1952).
BASIC RULES: As an aid to industry, NPA reprinted CMP Reg.
1, combining in a; single document all of the amendments and
editions to that regulation which contains the basic rules
of the Controlled Materials Plan. (CMP Reg. 1 as amended
Nov. 18, 1952) .
CHLORiINE: Chlorine delivery provisions and percentage
ceilings on marketable production were eliminated.
COPPER RAWA MAiTERALS: Approximately 1,000 small brass and
bronze foundries will be permitted to self-certify their
oresfor copper raw materials they need to fill authorized
controlled material orders from their customers. (Order M1-16
asamended November 20, 1952).
METHYLENE CHLORIDE: Elimination of allocation controls on
mehlene chloride was announced.
CONSTRUCTION: Revised Controlled Materials Plan Regulation
6was amended to make its Table III conform to listing of
cotrolled materials in CKP Reg. 1 issued November 18, 1952.
(evised CMP Reg. 6, Amendment I of Nov. 28, 1952).
AUTOMATIC REVALIDATION: Permission to receive delivery of
autoriedcontrolled materials in the calendar quarter followp-
ngthe one for which authorized was granted to the construct-
inindustry. (Revised Cb(P Reg. 6, Directionl 9).
STEEL DISTRiLBUTORS: Distributors of iron and steel products
weeordered not to sell certain semi-finisned steel products
gast authorized controlled materials. (Order M-6A, Schedule
Sof December 1, 1952).
DELEGA~TION 5: Delegation 5 was revised to clarify the joint
allocation and claimant agency responsibilities of NPA and the
defensee Materials Procurement Agency with respect to specified
materials. (Delegation 5 as amended December 2, 1952).


OPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





PAGE 3


apartment of Commerce Field Office.


To Obtain This
r~t N- I)()(KS II/ Material Check It
)li IRE:P()ItTS InTheaSpacenFro-
P~/ This Portion Of
The Page To The
Nearest Department of Commerce Field O~ffce. Your
Name and Address Are On The Opp~osite Side. Make Remit-
Uanned StatSales Material Payrable To Treasurer Of The


Stocks of ferrous crap held by consumers at the end
of August continued to increase and totalled 6,274,06i3
gross tons, the Bureau of KYines, Department of Interior
reported.


For Further
Details Of Any
Of These Items
Get In Touch
With The Near-
est U. S. De-


+ + *
Profits after taxes of U. S. manufacturing corporations
in the second quarter of 195L were about the same as in the
preceding quarter, according to a joint report of the
Securities Exchange Commission and Federal Trade Commission.
Pits before income and excess profits taxes were 5 per
cent lower than in the first quarter.
+ +
Total sales of all retail stores in October amounted to
$15 billion, about 9 per cent above the same month a year
ago. All the major groups of establishments abowed advances
for the month, with the automotive group continuing to lead
by a substantial margin as production of passenger care
oved further upward from earlier low points.
+ +
New construction activity in 1953 is expected to reach a
new peak, perhaps rising about $)1 billion over the $32 1-3
billion apparent for 1952, according to a joint report of
the Departments of Commerce and Labor. Some expansion is
Likely in the coming year in both private and public con-
struction. The outlook for record construction activity in
the coming year assumes that business will remain good,
buydin part by increasing defense expenditures, at least
in the early part of the year.
eae we
Employment in November 1952 hit a newr high level for the
mont, about a million above the previous record November
level. The estimate of total civilian employment was 62,228,-
00during the week ending November 8, not significantly
geter than in October, but 900,000 higher than in November
1951. Nonagricultural employment swung sharply upward, ad-
vcigby 900,000 between October and November to reach a
lee of 55.454,0000 also a new all-tiehg q oebr
Pulp, Paper &r Board, Sept. 1952p/14A-92,10Q,$1 Year
SCommercial & Home Cann ngrClosures,Sept.1952,M75C-92,

Clay Construction Products, Sept. 1952, M26B1-92,10e,$1 Yr.
superphosphate, Sept. 1952, M19D-92,5Q, 504 Tr.
Iron 6 Steel Castings &r Steel Ingots ,Sept.1952,M21-1-92,
51, $1 Year
SIron &r Steel Foundries &r Steel Ingot Producers, Report
on Products Shipped &r Materials Used, M21C-72,10e,$1.25 Ir.
7Low-Temperature Physics, National Bureau of Standards
Circular 519, B3uckramn Bound, $1.75
/7Opportunities in the Bureau of Public Roads for Young
Engineers
/rCommercial Standard 31-52, Wood Shingles, (Red Cedar,
Tidewater Red Cypress, California Redwood), 54
/7New Defense Production Facilities in the Missouri River
Basin, December 1952, 304
Small Business Aids (Rerun):
Advertising to Pre-Sell, #92 20
The Employee Suggestion Plan, #93 20
Why Not Take Carpet Displays.Off The Floor? #94 17
Colored Stones Displays Increase Jeweler' s Sales,#95 27
Public W~arehousing and Air Cargo, #96~
Suggestions for Seasonal Sales, #9 &I
Improving Salesmen' s Morale, #98
Defense Production Aids:
V-Lotlns for Defense Production, #17 /2
Reclamation of Tools &r Workpieces, #18 L7
Tool Conservation in Machine Shops, #19 20
~iSimplified Practice Recommendation 245-51 Weedless
Chain &r Chain Products 104
D1 Simplified Practice Recommendation 248-52 Packaging
of Standard Malleable Iron Screwed Pipe Fittings,
Black or Galvanized (for 2-Inch Pipe Size and -Under)

L7 Housing of Non-White Population, 1940-1950, 254


The capital program of American manufacturing con-
cerns involved the use of almost $90 billion of funds
over the 6-year period from 1916 to 1951 with more than
half spent on fixed capital. Of business' requirements,
$56 billion was obtained from current operations,
either through retention of earnings or depreciation
allowanIces. From outside sources, through borrowing
from banks or the issuance of securities, $13 billion
was raised. The remainder came from increases in trade
payables and other current liabilities.
*
Commercial production of salad dressing, mayonnaise
and related products in the United States rose in vol-
use to 97,200,000 gallons during 1951 from a production
of 94,600,000 gallons in 1950. National per capital con-
sumption in 1951, estimated at 5 pints, showed a
slight increase over the 4.9 pints in the preceding
year.
+.+ + *
The market value of the nation's production of goods
and services, as measured by the gross national product,
was at ain annual rate of $343 billion in the third quar-
ter of 1952, showing a small increase over the second
quarter, the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce announced. The steel strike and its
subsequent settlement made for an uneven flow of econo-
mic alctivity during the quarter.


1 Census of Population General Characteristics
orgia, $1.00 if~abama, 554 27Florida, 600
isisppi, 604 22horth Carolina, 655
ouhCarolina, 504 2Tennessee, 604
better Population Forecastings for Areas &~ Communities,
254
C7Principal D~ata Collection Forms Used In The 1950
Censuses, 25#
1950 Census of Housing General Characteristics:
SSouth. Carolina, 45Q LTVirg~in Islands, 15#
S/eport on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 10), 1952, A/C 0-100-7
S/onthly Report on the Labor Force, Oct. 1952, P-57,#124
Summary of City Government F'inances in 1951,G-CF51-~1
10#
Z JEstimates of Population 65 Years 01d and Over, by
SStates, July 1,1951 & 1950, P-25,#R66j, 5#
/ 71951 Anlnual Survey of Manufactures Manufacturers'
Expenditures For New Plants and New Equipment in the
U. s., 1951,1950,1949kla947, MAS-51-1, 150
Facts For induatgry reports:
//Animal & Vegetable Fats & Oils, 1951,M117-1-ol, 40#
Construction Machinery, M36k-3-2, 10#, 504 Year
L7 Womenls, Missess at Juniors' Outerwrear,2nd Quar. 1952,
M6~7H-2-2, 10Q, 50#Year


GPO 81100550


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





2.8 BILLION POUNDS COTTONI BYPRODUCTS PRQDUCED

Cotton oil mills of six southeastern States Alabama,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas -- last year
produced 2.8 billion pounds of crude oil, cake, meal and hulls
from the seed taken from the region's cotton acreage, according
to a Facts Fqr Industry report for the animal and vegetable fats
and oils, industry just released.
This was some 150 million pounds more of these by-products
than were produced in 1950.

This report, for 1951, is available through
and at Department of Comrmerce field offices.
See Page 9 for listing.

The report also showed that the ills produced 549,574 rnlning
Bales of linters from the seed, around 25,000 more than the out-
put of 1950.
To produce the byproducts, the mills used a total of 1,709,-
070 tons of cottonseed, or around 100,000 more than were crushed
in 1950.
Included in the 1951 production were 530,694,000 pounds of
crude oil, 1,568,622,000 pounds of cake and meal, and 754,670,-
000 pounds of hul1s.

LICENSED EXPORT PACKLAGES MUST BEAR NUMBER e

Business men and other residents of the Southeast who '
send packages abroad requiring a validated export license '
must now write the license number on the wrapper. *
This to required, because the license number must be
written on the package by someone, and post office clerks '
oftentimes are too busy to do it, with resultant delays
and confusion. Consequently, if the package reaches an '
international mail depot without the number, it might be '
returned to the sender for lack of evidence as to the '
license. *
The requirement was made by the Commerce Department' s '
Office of International Trade, which said senders must '
identify the number on the package as the license number '
so that it would not be confused with the registration '
number or other identifying symbols. Also, when they send '
the package they must surrender the license. '
S Department of Commerce field offices have additional '
information. '
are ssarss**


"OLDER FOLKS' POPULATION ON INCREASE IN SOU1THEAST

The older folks" sort of like the Southeast.
This was indicated in a recent report of the Bureau of the
Census which showed an increase of 3 per cent in the 65-years-
old-and-over population of Alabama, Florida, Georgias Mississ-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas between April 1, 1950, when
the last decennial census was taken and July 1 of last year.
The report revealed a rise of from 1,383,927 in the popula-
tion of that age in the 74tate area recorded April 1, 1950 to
1,435,000 on July 1, 1951, with all of the States reporting
gains .

A copy of this report ~is available at all
Department of Commerce field offices. It' s listed
on Pare 3.

Florida was one of the nation' s leaders. That State' s
6 per cent iixcrease was exceeded only by the 6.1 per cent in
Wyoming and New Mexico; 7.1 per cent in Nevada; and 7.5 per
cent in Arizona.
The population of North Carolina'sa 65-year olds and over
went from an actual count of 225,297 on April 1, 1950 to
an estimated 235,000 on July 1, 1951, an increase of 4.2 per
cent; South Carolina, from 115,005 to 119,000, 3.6 per cent;
Georgia, 219 655 to 227,000, 3.5 per cent; Florida, 237,474
to 252,000, a per cent; Tennessee, 234,884 to 242,000, 3 per
cent; Alabama, 198,648 to 204,000, 2.7 per cent; and Mississ-
ippi, 152,966 to 156,000, 2 per cent.

HI~IGHWAY DEBT AT END OF 1951 HIIGH IN REGION

Six southeastern States Alabama, Florida, Mlississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas at the end of 1951 had a total
net highway indebtedness of $435,682,195, which compared with
obligations outstanding at the beginning of the year of
$393,262,250, according to reports of State authorities to the
Bureau of Public Roads of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
The net idebtedness at the end of the year included $i17,-
848,411 in Alabama; $66,874,707 in Florida; $69,859,003 in
Mississippi; $194,754,275 in North Carolina; $60,042,057 in
South Carolina; and $26,303,742 in Tennessee.
Georgia' s constitution prohibits outstanding State obliga-
tions.
General highway bond issues, special State issues for
bridges and grade crossings, special construction ieaues,
those for toll roads, bridges and so forth were included.


VOLUMYE 6, NUMBER 24 DECEMBER 15, 1952


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



BULLETIP3 1262 08748 9166


PAGE 4


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