Bulletin of commerce

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin of commerce
Uniform Title:
Bulletin of commerce (Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Commerce
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Field Service, Atlanta Regional Office
Place of Publication:
Atlanta, Ga
Creation Date:
1951
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 11, 1947)-v. 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1954).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 7, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1953) misnumbered as v. 7, no. 26 (Jan. 15, 1953).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 3, no. 13 (July 1, 1949) misnumbered as v. 1, no. 13 (July 1, 1949).
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004850614
oclc - 28680692
System ID:
AA00005235:00003

Full Text




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
/ FIELD SERVICE










ATLMTA ). GA. SAVAMM, GA. JACK30AVILE, FLA elllI 2. FLA IISBILE, ArU CHIARLESTONI, 8.C.
60 ilitehL St., LL, noes 2181, P.O. Bldg., 125 Federal Bldg., Os? Seybold Aldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples 81dg,
Tel. YISnt 1)121 X-1)SS T*I. 2-lF766 Tel. )-711 Tel. 9-7638 Tel. 2-86411 Tel. 7771
Birmingham, Ala., Room 319-320, Tampa, Fla., 308-309 Jackson, Mlise.,
Frank NJelson Bldg., 2nd Avenue &c 20th St. WRallace S Bldg., Anner 203 North President St.

YOL. 5, No. 1 JaNuaRY 1, 1951


W~HQEBlE SaIRS CONTINUE~ RISE

FULL-UINE DRY GOODS WHOLESALERS Continued good
Supply of Merchandise on Hand bsns o h
CONTR OFDAY N~kER O D4wholesale trade in
the Southeast wes
no95 indicated in a re"
porb of the U. S*
Bureau of the Cen-
son sus*
Sales in the
South Atlantic re-
so~, gion through Oct-
ober 1950 were 19
per cent greater
than for the cor-
a s .o I responding 10
ILMED DM CMREWn IATE O SatES (SEE TMEL 2) months of 194C9>
and 28 per cent
more in October 1950 compared with the same month in
19c9*
In addition, a 12 per cent gain in sales among such
firms in the East South Central region in the 10-month
period of Jan~uaryr to October 1950 over the same period
in 1949 and a 20 per cent rise in October 1950 over
October 1949 was also indicated*
See WIHOLESALE SALES Page.2
I a
a NIEW OFFICES ARE OPENED I
s The U. S. Department of Commerce has 5
( opened three new offices in the South- 5
east to assist business firms in obtain- 5
s ing information regarding regulations, I
a orders and other actions of its National a
Production Authority, as well as in aqy I
other way in which they may be of help I
Sin the field of business. The new offices a
and their addresses are:
I Birmingham, Ala. Room 319-320 Frank I
'Nelson Building, 2nd Avenue anld 20th Street.
Tampa, Fla. 308-309 Wlallace S. Bldg*, '
SAnnex. .
SJackson, Mi~ss. 203 North President St. *
Arrangements have been made for the fore, 5
going offices to receive a steady flowr of '
information from W~ashington on NPA and a
other activities, and business firmse in '
Those areas are invited to make the full- '
I est use of their service, a


National Production

Authority
Thirteen Southeastern businessmen bare been appoints
ed to industry committees serving in connection with
development of policies azzi regulations formulated by
the National Production Authority of the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce. Those named, with committees to which
they were appointed included:
R. A. Canhon, Atlanta, scientific instrument; Carl D.
Bororein, Tampa, communications equipment; J. Thurston
Roach, MIemphis, converted paper and board products;
Robert L. Churchill, Kingaport, Tenn., rayon yarn in-
dustry; and G. P. Barnwell, M~acon, H~yman L. Battle,
Rockcy Mdount, N. C., E. N. Brewer, Hope Mills, N. C.,
J. Boyce Choate, Charlotte, 0. V. Garth, Hickory, N. C.,
H. M. Jones, Laurinburg, N. C., J. Craig Smith, Syla-
cauga, Ala., H. G. Drake, Hickory Grove, S. C., and
J. A. Cooper, Henderson, N. C., all appointed to mem-
bership on the carded sales yarn advisory committee.
Similar committees, composed of representatives of
firms in many sections of the country were also announced
by NPAP for the gage, copper and copper products, steel,
industrial alcohol, alloy and stainless steel, primary
aluminum, machine tool, and primary copper industries.
Industry committees are playing an increasingly im-
portant role in NPA's program for the diversion of
strategic materials in short supply into defense opera-
tions. In advance of issuance of regulations and orders
designed to effect the diversion process, the advisory
committees are invited to meet in Wlashington with NEA
officials for complete discussions of the situation in
their respective industries, and the development of
such information is used as a guide in the final action
taken.
See NEA Page 2

ITIDBER PRODUCTION SETIRALS

Production of lumber in the third quarter of 1950 set
a new record, the Lumber Survey Comrmittee of the U. S.
Department of Commerce has reported to the Searetary of
Comrmerce in its 78th quarterly report.
During the quarter most mills operated at capacity
output, it was stated, and many operators worked extra
shifts and overtime to enable them to produce the
record-breaking quantity of lumber.
Average prices of lumber increased each month in the
third quarter, but restrictions onl housing credit and a
general feeling of uncertainty caused a reversal upward
tread in October, prices of somoe species dealining.











SOUTERASTP fURNI~mGHIPaETUESEIME OFF

The seven Southeastern States of Alabamna, Florida,
GOeorgia, lieaiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee last year shipped furniture and bedding
valued at $P272,4/e2,000, a 12 per cent decline from
the $P312,640,000 registered in 19148, the Bureanl of the
Census estimated in a report just issued.
The report, one of the Fasts For Industry series,
showed that the value of uphalatered furniture shipped
from the sevenditate area in 1949 was $66,979,000,
nonupholatered, $164,232,000, and bedding products,
$25,076,000.


PIA C~ontinrued From PFame 1
Following were the more recent activities dfP NFA:
I&u2;[
amendment to Erubber Order (MI-2) issued reducing
natural rubber consumption 28 per cent in Januqry and
February from the November level, but maintaining total
airilian rubber consumption at appraimately 90,000
tone a month by the use of increasing supplies of
synthetic rubber.

Notes Copies of these amendment qan
other NPA actions are obtainable through
Your nearest Deparbaent of Commerce field
offic. r t...aharne .... ..
1SPA Order #06 issued providing for continuous flora
of copper scrap into normal channels of distribution.
The order ennaerates the'tyrpes of copper scrap which may
be delivered to refineries, ingot makers, copper wire
mills, brase ills, foundries and miscellaneous produ-
cers.
Canadian Freir~ht Care
Supplement 3 to Order M- issued designed to allocate
steel products froma U. S. suppliers to assist in complet-
ing the present Canadian-governrment sponsored freight
car program, and make steel products available to Cana-
dian warehouse distributed normally supplied by U. S.
mills.
Base eriod Adnast~ments
In Direction No, 2 to NPA Order M-i7, certain base
period adjustments permitted during December were
continued in the first quarter of 1951 for the aluminum
inustry.
Concer Scrar,

a~emt whre specificell aprvdleder An y
in an amendment to HSPA Order gt-16.

Cadmium Industry Advisory Committee discussed with NPA
officials proposed temporary action to provide some
cadmium innediately for certain h glyessential non-
defense uses, and also plans for a longer-range program
to strateh supplies of that commodity to meet both
defense and other importa~aa ntaaaaaa~~~~~~~ requirements.
Indications are that the demand for suilfur in 1951
will' considerably azueed production, NJPA officials were
told by producers of that conaodity at a meeting. It was
believed that formal action would be necessary to assure
an equitable distribution on the domestic market and to
maintain necessary exports to Mdarshiall Flan and other
friendly nations.
etal Canaand Closure
Immediate steps to conserve tin needed for the expand-
ing rearmament program were discussed at a meeting of
IIPA officials and members of the advisory committee for
tidmetal can and closr ingustries.
Photoarachic Equiument
Problems facing the photographic apparatus and equip-


grpa a equipment and ocessorica dere d e used by

valve' and Fittines
A study of availability of composition ingot brass
to determine what might be done toward meeting the
demand for valves and fittings as the mobilisation pro-

a membr of thoe advsr ao te for ~the iustry.


CILI~~~~~~~~ -~ I- -C~3-
North Carolina, whiich led the nation in the value
at su~ch shipmentsinl1948, dropped into second place
in 1949, being replaced in the leadership position by
New York.
The -value of shipmaents by States included North
Carolina, $159,21,2,000 in 1969 and $239,270,000 in
191,0, a 17 per cent decline; Santh Carolina, $P9,892,-
000 and-(t.1,~L 016 per cent down, Florida,
$9,037,000 and ,000,7~00 15 per cent off; Tenness-
ee, 851.,235,000 an4 8451.9,000, a 6 per cent drop,
Georgia- $30,661,000 .and- $30-,072,000, up-2 per cent;
and Mi~ssiesippi, $1,519,000 and $3,861,000, a 58 per
cent decrease. -



Aiorpaut ontrue and development in the South ,
east progranmd in the 1xat-three years of operation
at the Fedefarl Affgrt got-represented~e a total outlay
in funds of $30,02,1,000, and the region still needs
an exrpenditue at $97,658;P00 for that pizrpose in the
next three years to bring its airport facilities up
to requ$.ements, according to ah estimate made by the
Civil Aeronen~ttics Adminintstraion, U, S. bepartinent of
Ca~merce,
The cost at projects programmed in the Southeast
2*om 1947, when the airport act became operative to
June 30, 1950,- included $8,254000 in Florida; 8b8,-
18000 in Geo gi; $2,200s000 in North Carolina;
8,6,000 in South Caroliral $3s077 000 in Alabam~a;
ee. Of that amount, $23,980,000 was in Federal Funds
and the remiainde rwas popted by local sponsors'
Ini its sumpary abaheses far the nsam 3 years, CiaA
said the constructionn of .aer. airparts and imprrovement
of present ones int larda would requie S2,3,716,0000;
Georgia, $i15, Nixr00~ th Carolina, ,?911,0003
Boath Carolina, ~2531,000; AIlabamPa,0,000; 00
Mbississippi, -89, 0,000; and Tesnnessee, 6100.

WhGLESALE S~laiS Cnat~inued From Parte 1


plumbing arid heating supplies, refrigeration equippent
and paper andd its products were factors in the overall
increases far the two periods
The increases in the South Atlantic region were
somewrhat _greaiter: than the gains of 14 per cent for
the 20-aon~th period sad 23 per cent in the year-to-
year month27 comparison nationally, while those in the
East South Central section were lightly -below.


This report, Household Furniture and
Bedding Products. 19A9. Series M54A-09,
is available without charge at all
Deverbeent of Comeme 1e2d offices


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





(For Further Details Of Any Of These Itemas. r sk The Near-
est U. S. .Decatmn of Commerce Field Office For Cooies
Of The Releases)


Sales of large independent retailers wrere 6 per cent
higher in november 1950 than in November 1949, but
November sales were 4 per cent short of the October
dollar volume in 1950, the Bureau of the Census announced.
November 1950 sales of Inmber and building materials
dealers were 17 per cent higher than in 1949. Sales of
hardware stores increased 13 per cent; general aborea,
10 per cent; an~d dry goods anid general merobandise
stores, 10 per cent,
w +
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers in
Getober 1950 were estimated at $7,1410 million, which,
after adjustment for seasonal variations, were 2 per cent;
below September 1950, with both durable and nondurable
goods sales contributing equally to the decline.
+
Business outlays for new plant and equipment p~lanned
for the first quarter of 1951 were expected to exceed
any previous first quarter, and, after seasonal adjust-
maent, were expected to be at the highest rate on record,
according to the latest survey of capital outlays made
public jointly by the U. S. Department of Commerce and
the securities and Excchange Commission.
+ *
Personal income continued to move upward in'October
1950 at an annual rate of $230.1 billion and was $1..4
billion higher than in September 1950. The rise was
accounted for mainly by increased wage and salary re-
ceipts, which together with higher farm proprietors'
incomes and transfer payments more than offset a drop
in corporate dividend diabursements.

i ass d vienre pa met of me can co p tions
October 1950, or 5 per cent more than the $466 million
paid out in the corresponding month of 1949.




China, Hong Rong and Mdacao. The penalty for violation
is a (10,000 fine or a year's imprisonment or both.


for the 1950 period in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
easee totalled $~2,473,287,000 against $2,512,755,000
in the corresponrding period in 1919.
Returns from crop products in the region were off
needly 1 per cent, or from $1,745,095,000 in 1969
to $1,728,429,000 in 1950, and a drop in receipts
from Livestock and its prodiiata of 2 per cent was
recorded, or from $767,660,000 in 1949 to $7441,858,-
000 in 1950.

SOUTHEAST ROABD WIDINdIIG ACTIVE
Active Federal-aid highway construction operations

ofa bilmo dolr t th enda 0 Ocoakr 195r
the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department of Com-
merce has announced.



p~ogarammed; .849,777,000 in approved plans on which
construction had not been started; and $12,5514,000
on projects on whlich construction was under way.


I


Get the Latest Opali Income Taxr Infor mats'on

SEVERAL IMPORTANT CHANGES in the Federal Income Tax Law were
recently enacted in the Revenue Act of r95o. These changes, which affect eve
citizen who fdles a tax return, have been incorporated in the text of the otficial reso
edition of "Your Federal Income Tax." In addition to the information on the
latest tax law, this booklet covers, in a serie of short article, all questions which may
come up concerning your tax return, other important laws, rulings by the Bureau of
Internal Revenue, and court decisions. It also contains chapter concerning install-
ment sale and the important appeals procedure. The detailed inder will enable
you to fmnd the particular information you want quickly and accurately. Facsimiles
of the various tax fonr msre also included.
Among the many subjects covered in this book ambln a rturn; nontaxable
income; deductions allowable; family. exemptions; new regulations set forth in the
Revenue Act of r95o, and many others of vital interest to you la filing your tax return
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RE VISED 19 5 EDITION




1011r Federal

Incm T x





~PER
COPY
954,


GASE FARM4 DJ1005 STEALDI
Cash Farm Income
Quarterly Cash Receipts


The
U.AlR first10
Isoo mOnths Of
195i0 ended
with a 1
per cent
decline in
cash farm
V~oo income for
farmers of
the South-
east com-
pared with
the same
onperiod in
1949, so-
cording to
a Burean
of Agria-
a ltural
Economics
report.
Receipts


MH.U0N OF DOL
I


+.



+ + +YmX + + + M~t
+ + + + +




1948 1949 1950 1951
Source: GeorPia BusiLneps


GBDER FROM P008 lIEAREST U. S. DEPARTEET OF 00r~1BERE FIELl) OFFICE


BULLETIN OF -COMMERCE


PAGE 3





sournESmHLN URBAN AREAS EXPAND
The urban areas of the Southeast have come a long
way since 194e0. Bureau of the Census final Preliminary
reports now being received in Department of Cormerce
field offices from the 1950 Census of Population show
that there are now 57 oities of 25,000 or more popula-
tion in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miassissippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee than there were
in 1940.

Notes The following Census Bureau reports
have been received in Department of Comaeroe
field offices and are available for distri-
bution. Ma~rk the document, or documents in
the space provided and return this page with
your selections. Your name and address are
shown below:
Population of 25,000 or loore (PC-3,#6)
Popullation~of ,MetS9o han~treas ~ PC-3,#~3)
Population of Congressional Dists.(Po-3,#2)
Population of Counties (PC-3,#~4)
tPopulation of 100,000 or more cities
by wards (PC-3,#i5) *

Alabama increased its number of cities of 25,000 or
more from 6 in 1940 to 7 in 1950; Florida, from 8 to
16; Georgia, from 6 to 8; Mi~ssissippi, from 2 to 6
North Carolina, from 9 to 11; and Tennessee, from to

The final re~liminnary figure also showed
the addition of three areas in the Sou~th-
east to the rapidly-growing number of
metropolitan areas with greatly developed
population. Two of them Greenville
S. G., and Orlando, Fla.,-- moved int'
the more than 100,000 class with popula-
tionsB of 167,118 and 114,114, respective-
17. This was a gain of nearly 200 per cent.
Another sharp rise was in Gadeden, Ala., which
upped its population from 55,528 in 1940 to 93,857 in
1950.
Also now being received in Department of Comnnmere
field offices are special reports of the Census Burean
on housing for certain cities in the region. Received
thus far are those for Augusta, Ga., Athens, Ga.,
Florence, Ala., and Goldsboro, H. C. These reports
likewise are available for the asking.


GRD)ER. HMEX FOR PH~BICATIONS & REPORTS

(To Obtain Contes QP This Material. Check It In The
Space Provdded and Send Thia Page Of The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The Nearest Donartment of Commerce Fied
QOrdioe, Pqur Name ard addresp Ar~e Shown Below. Mqare

Of The United States. Items Not Priced Are Free.)
/7Monthly Wlholesale Trade Report
(Place Mr Name On The Mailing List).,...........
Your Federal Income Tax, 1950...............,..,...250~
Household Furniture & Bedding Prods.FF~nIM54B-09.....
mrional Production Authority:
Amendment to R~ubber Order 2-2 D Order M-16
LLSupplement 3 to Grder E-1 Direction 2.0rder M-7
SAmendment to NEa Order L5-16 f Order M-2
B~nthly Report on Labor Force, Nov. 1950 P-57,#101..
Report on Cotton Ginning, Prior to Dec. 1, 1950.....,
Gotten System Spinning Activity, Got. 1950e......
Heating & Cooking Equipmnent 1949 FFIM5In-09.........
Gray Iron Castings, Sept. 1950 FFIMd21A4~0.,.........
Cotton Broad Noven Goods,3rd Quarter 1950 FFIEL158-3-0
Mense Apparel, Sept. 1950, FFIM67B-90. ..............
Fats & Oils, Oct. 1950, MI7-1-100. ..........,.......
Rayon & Related Broad woven.Goods,FFI ML50-3-0.....
Seaplane Facilities, CAA, ..,.......,......... .....259
Proceedings of Symposium on Improved Quality
Electronic Components, NEBS............E03.50
Nuclear Data, NBS, Ciroular 4699.........,,...54.25~
1/Heat Treatment & Properties of Iron & Steel,
NBS Circular 495...................256
Bibliography of Electron tieroscopy, NIE Cir. 502. 254
Survey of Food & Nutrition Research in U.S.,0rS,$1.75
Drugs & Pharmaceuticals, Soape & Toiletrica,BIS..200
Sales of Lubricating Oils & Greases,1947,BIS,.....150
8 Business Aida:
Results of Inadequate Management Planning #236,..
Simplifying Stock Room Problemls #237.............
Some ways of Reducing Lumber Yard! Expenses #238..
How To Save On Shipping #260...........
A Merchandising Program for the SmalLer Store #242
Developing Prospect Lista #l244 .,....,........,,..
How The Retailer Determines Customer wants #24~9..
Make Your ads Pay Off #252,.....,.........,..,,,.
Modernizing the Jewelry Store Front #f253.....
Meeting Jewelry Store Competition #f254...........
The Reduction of Distribution Costs #r256.,......


GPO 83-100296


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT PSO~ E $300
UN\V. OF FL Li -
DO~cU

he' n -

u.S. DEPOstTORY



UNIVERsITy OF FLORID;A
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FL;ORIDA


UNIVERSITY1111 OF11 FLORIDA1111 11 1111111 11


PAGE 4


BULLETIN


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 5, Nuhmber 1, January 1, 1951

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE--

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JP









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE







Charlotte, N. C.,, Chattanooga, Tenn., Telephone RI~rmingham, Ala., Telephone
302 S. CClleg;e St. 8th & Broad Ste. 7-5673 2n~d Ave. &t 20th st.53-31,21,Ez355
AITLMTAr 3,~ GL SAVM, Ge JUKSDVLrLUE, FLA IIIMI 36 FLL IIDBILE, ALL CARLESTON, S.C.
10 tIhitehall St., LL, bAg 218, PO. Bidge 42 Federal Bldg., 94 Serld $1dg., 308 Federal Bldg., 810 Peopies B~ld,,
Tel. YIIIlat 1821 E-1563 Tel. 2-576 Tel. a*7111 Tel* 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771
Colulmbia, 8. G., Telephone Jaolason, Mitss., Tampa, Fla., Telephone
Sumter & Pendleton Ste. 3-1185 1,26 Yascoo St. 608 Tampa St. 2-3880

VOL. 5, NO. 2 JANUARY 15, 1951
0 ta91 mnCo110ME Af*PYF RRYvurRD I.~


INDUSTRILr PRODUCTION The pear
&o (fESNLY DUTD 935-39*109 1950 Just
closed wa.
250~~ ..MsOne at top
1----- / eonomie
activity?
which at
Iso-- uU the end of
.m .. ... ... I.. ..I ... ... I. .. t~he year
see IH IHI r*o ached
wartime
peak levela, Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer said
in a review of the year's developments in the field of
bainees*


The total output, or gross national product, apprazi"
mated $280 billion, about 9 per cent above 19469*
While higher prices accounted for about a fifth of
the rise in dollar value, the physical volume of out-
put was substantially higher than any year other than
the two peak war years. In the first half of the year
the rise in volume accounted for all the increase in
value of the national product, whereas in the second
half the artensive price advance accounrted for half of
the total increae* ,
See NATPION'S EDONIOMP page 2

NEW COIBTRUCTION3 SQABS INJ 1950

The estimated dollar veale of new constnrution in
t.1p Southeast in the first nine months of 1950 was
nearly $3.7 billion, a substantial increase over the
*29 billion registered for the corresponding period in
194c9, sooording~ to the November 1950 iaeue of the De"
apartment of Comrmerce Industry ~Report Const~ruction and
Construction Mdaterials"
See CONSTRUICTIONP Page 2


Establishment of air new branch offices of the U. 8.
Department. of Comm~ere in the Southeast to assist in
adnministration of the National Production Authority pro-
gram in their respective areas has, been announced.
The new offices are located at Obarlotte, Chattanooga,
Biraingham, Tampa, Columbia, S. C., and Jackson, Mdiss,
Two additional offices will be opened in the near future.
In addition, personnel of the regular district of-
fices in Savannah, Charleston, Mobile, Jackson and Miami
has been and is being exp~anded to take on the newf duties
of representing NSPA in the field and in assisting busi-
neassen in their efforts to participate in procurement
operations being conducted tar the Federal Government.
While primarily designed for HPA activities, the new
offices will also assist busineeamen locally in connect-
ion with other Department of Compmerce program, partion-
larly the procurement program by which all business firms
are given equal opportunity to participate in Federal
Government purchase operations.
District managers in charge of the newr offices in-
clude Edward W. WIitt, Obarlotte; William Worthy, Colum-
bia; Jhrwin L, Gulledge, Jackrson; and Obarles Ilbirhead,
Tamps; Adrian & Rottier and Charles Jordon have been
named, respectively, as compliance investigators at the
Birmingham and Obattanooga offices,
See NPA Page 2
SOUTH'S YOUTH POPULATION HIIGH

There are more persons under 21 years of age in
the South than in any other region in the country, the
Bureau of the Census has estimated in a report just
issued entitled Children and Youth. 1950.
The report lists 19,050,000 persons under 21. in the
South in 1949 compared wilth 15,394,000 in the North
Central section; 12,678,000 in the Northeast; and 6,-
807,000 in the West.
See YOUTH Page 3


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c /S,


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Authority








rAVL L


Rygl, LIlQUOR SAIFS SKIR00KET

Sales in retail liquor stores in the Southeast have
increased 583 per cent since before World War II, the
Bureau of the Census has reported in final returns
from its 1948 Census of Business,
In figures long awaited by dealers in the trade
field, the Gesuss bureau arnnouced that retail liquor
sales in Alabama, Frlorida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee in 1948 appraz-
imated $274,625,000 compared with $40,197,000 in 1939.
Even dry" M~ississippi reported sales of $575,000
in 1948, with 19 establishments empiloying 15 workers
with a total payroll of $29,000 participating in the
operations .

These final reports are now being re-
ceived for the retail, wholesale and ser-
vice trades in leaflet form for the U. 8.
and the various States, and in detailed
form for each State and the U. S. A small
charge is made for the State and U. S.
reports. Consult your nearest Department
of Conmmerce field office,
Other retail liquor sales in the region, by States,
included $46,138,000 in North Carolina in 1948 and
$5,747,000 in 1939; south Carolina, $40,763,000 and
$8,242,000; Georgia, $45,989,000 and $6,982,000;
Florida, $55 094,000 and $5,999,000; Tennessee, $842,-
844,000 and ~4,107,000; and Alabama, $43,222,000 and
$9,120,000.
Other early final reports indicated tremendous ex-
pansions also in receipts in motion picture theaters
in the region; receipts in cleaning and dyeing plants;
and sales in hardwvare stores.

SITIONCS GC0NOMY Continued From Page 1

During the first half of the year, economic activity
was in a phase of cyclical expansion which had begun in
the latter part of 1949 and promised to continue, the
Secretary said. In the second half, however, the pace
of activity was sharply accelerated by the impetus of
the steppedanp defense program which followed the
Korean war, with an accompanying harp rise in prices.
In keeping with this pattern of expansion, business
investment showed a marked abange during the course of
the year. Unlike 1949, when business inventories were
drawn down in the business recession of that year, in-
ventor-ies were increased in 1950 in each quarter az-
cept the third when the post-Korean buying wave cleared
dealers shelves and produced a temporary decline in
stocks of some types of merchandise.
Business expenditures on new plant and equipment
were substantially lower during the first half of 1950
than a year earlier, but were markedly higher in the
second half. For the year as a whole these expenditures
were about the same as in 19419, $18 billion.
Residential construction was booming throughout most
of the year, with purchases of new houses facilitated
by easy credit terms and greater availability of units
in the lower-price brackets. New nonfarm dwelling units
started in 1950 were 40 per cent above 1949. The peak
rate in starts was reached in the summaer after which
some slackening occurred, due in part to new government
regulations providing for more stringent mortgage termPs.
Consumers in 1950 also purchased a record volume of
such important durables as passenger cars, television
sets, refrigerators and frnmiture. The sharp rise in
expenditures for such goods, salng with a more moderate
increase in purchases of services and nondurables,
brought total personal consumption spending to about
$190 billion, s:me 7 per cent above 1949.


IPb Contioned From Page 1

In sweeping action to prevent the hoarding of scarce
materials whiich may be needed in the defense effort,
HE& issued Notice Hrumber 1 pointing out that such action
would be in violation of the Defense Production act of
1950. Familiarly referred to as the 'anti-hoarding"
order, BIA called attention to provisions in the Defense
Production act that hoarding of important materials any
be either those which are in excess of the reasonable
demasas of business, personal, or home consumption, or
for the purpose of resale at prices in anness of pre-
vailing market prices of materials, the supply of which
would be threatened by such aconaulation,

Note: Copies of the foregoing harder ean
others issued by MPA are available without
charr at Denartmen of Gornmorce field offices.

Other important actions recently tak~en bry EA~ include a
Isanance of an order to assure the distribution of
certain electrical coamnonents for both defense and main-
tenance of the nation's communication system, aircraft
safety and other essential users of electronic equipment.
(Order B-17).
Acted in an amendment superseding Order M-8 to assure
4A suadlies for the rearmament program byr providing for
equitable civilian distribution of the remaining supply
and encouraging conservation of the scarce metal.
Delegated to the Secretary of Interior authority to
serve as claimannt for certain production facilities for
minerals and metals and allocation powers over certain
minerals and orade and intermediate metallic products,
(MT Delegation 5).
Issued Order K-18 to prevent diversion of the supply
of hog bristles from normal channels of distribution by
providing that no person shall sell bristles aexept to
a dealer, dresser of bristles, or to a manufacturer of
brushes or other products containing hog bristles.
Issued Dzder M6-19 prohibiting the use of cagiggg for
any purpose or for any product not listed, and limits
cadmium inventories to a 30-day supply.
Modified Order M-7 to permit an increase in the amount
of alumirrnu that can be used in the m~anfacture of
strictly fooctional component parts during March.
Issued an amendment to Runbber Order M-C2 assuring the
flowr of imported rybrinto this country through a
single channel, effective December 29, 1950.
Ordered a virtually comlrPete allocation of all forms of
in an amendment to HIPB Order M1-10.
In Amendment I to Order M-12 established a procedure
governing the use of gggggy in the manufacture of a wide
range of products,
Granted the Department of Defense in Aae~ndmennt to Dele-
gain1 anthority to issue defense order ratin~es for
contrutio eaitmntfor use in overseas projects.

303STUCTON- Gantinued From Page I

New private construction in the region in the first 9
motsof 1950 was estimated at $2.6 million as compared
ith $2,1 billion in the same period in 1949 and new public
contrctin as placed at $2.9 billion and 798 million,
epetively.
In the seven States of Alabama, Florida, Georgias Idi*"
Laippi, cNorth Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee,
newr public constrnotion from January to September, in-
clusive, last year was estimated at $1.0 billion, a sharp
gain over the $472.5 million of the previous period. few
urban building in the same seven States in the first 9
months of 1950 was placed at $839.3 million, also a sub-
stantial rise over the $57~4.1 million registered for the
same period in 1949. State and local public construction
"as839.9 oa 29*8 million, respectively.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





R~aBTO0D FREIGBS REVENU~B RSES


EI[GI(LIGIRfS OF THE BUSINESS WORLD

(For Further Details Of Agy Qf These Items, Ask The

For Conies 07 Te Rdpeleasea)



The international financial position of foreign
matione improved sharply during the thir quarter of
195i0, according to estimates of the United States
balance of international payments released by the
Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of
Commerce. The i~mprovement was mostly the result of
a rise in U. S. imports of goods and services from
$2.7 billion in the second quarter of the year to
$3.4 billion in the third, and by an increase in the
outflow of U. S. private capital from about $100 mil-
lion to over $b600 million,
?s w *
Total sales of retail stores amounted to $1,650
million in November 1950, or 7 per cent above the
same month a year ago, After adjusting for seasonal
factors and trading day differences, the dollar value
of November sales was about 3 per cent belong October.

A record volume of new construction work was ac-
complished in 1950, the Departments of Comrmerce and
Labor reported. Outlays for new construction put in
place amounted to a record-breaking total of almost
$27 3-4 billion, the number of new housing units
started far surpassed any previous year's total, em-
ployment in contract construction reached an all-time
peak, and ouatput of many building materials broke all
prrevious records.
+ + +
Business spent appr~oximately $84 billion in the five
postwar years of 19146 to 1950 inclusive, the Office of
Business Economics reported. Of that total, $37 bil-
lion, or 1.4 per cent, was spent in expansion, improve-
ment, or replacement of the manufacturing plants of
the country, with a resultant large increase in the
country's capacity, and a great improvement in techno-
logical resources.
*
Chain store and mail-order sales in November 1950
amounted to $2,522 million, about 8 per cent above the
same time in 1949. After adjusting for seasonal factors
and trading differences, sales of all chain stores in
November 1950 were unchanged from October 1950, but
substantial variations in movement were shown among
the various lines of trade.
+###+
Twenty-four patents owned by the Atomic Energy Com-
mission have been made available to the public for use
on a non-exclnsive, royalty-free license basis, the
Commerce Department's Patent Office announced.
+++##
Employment continued dowpnward between November and
December as large numbers of farm workers left the
labor force at the end of the crop season. Total civil-
ian employment was estimated at 60,308,000 in the week
ending December 9, or 1 million below the November level.
+ + +
Business is planning to expand at a record rate of
$21.9 billion in 1951, the securities and ExE~change com-
mission and U. S. Department of Commerce reported
jointly. This is 21 per cent higher than the estimated
outlays for 1950 and about 14 per cent higher than the
peak outlays in 1948. Allowing for the rise in capital
goods costs during 1950, the physical volume of outlays
in 1951 is currently anticipated at about 17 per cent
above actual expenditures in 1950.


Railroads serving the South continued to exper-
leane the rise in freight revenne which took place
in recent months, and in the first 10 months of 1950
expqerienced an increase in unaulative reveume of
that kida of nearly 10 per cent over the corresponding
period in 1949.
In a report issued Igr the Association of American
Railroads, freight revenue of seathern region 111-
roads from January to October inclusive of last year
was given as $899,013,31,0 compared with $812,886,242
.in the same period in 1949.
Passenger revenue, however, conrtinued the decline
which started some time ago, and southern railroads
wound up the ten-mlonth period with a decline of some
$9,000,000 in that type of return.
Net railway operating income, however, at the eid
of the ten-month period was well above 1949. The
figures, as supplied by AAR, were $b122,236,280 and
$b82,068,341, respectively.

]N)U[TRY.EGG 71100148 HIGH IN SOUTHEAST

A relatively high rate of income from poultry and
eggs sold by southeastern farmers is reflected in a
report just issued by the U. S. Department of Agri-
culture's Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
The report, for 1949, shows that in Georgia 13
per cent of the total farm income was from poultry
and eggs, 10 per cent in Tennessee, 9 per cent each
in North Carolina, South Carolina and Alabamla, 7 per
cent in M~ississippi, and 5 per cent in Florida.
The average for the nation as a whole was 1l per
cent.
The value of poultry and egg sales in the seven-
State area in 1949 was placed at $348 million, in-
cluding the output consumed on farms where produced,
and the value of all farm cormmodities was listed as
$93,828 million..

10Qtyl[ Continued From Pag~e 1

In the South, the white persons under 21 ~numbered
24,281,000 and nonwhite, 4,769,000.
Barring physical disabilities and other disquali-
fications, the report, in effect, showed that if 18
year olds are taken in the defense program, the South
may contribute more than, any other section of the
country. There were 2,214,000 18-to-20-year-olds in
the south, 1,595,000 in the Northeast, 1,872,000 in
the North Central section, and 790,000 in the West,
The report also showed that there were 7,000 per-
sons 14e to 15 years old who were heads of households
in the South, and 8,000 16 and 17 years old in that
category.

IdEAL CAN SETPMENTS INCREASE

A total of 132,860 abort tons of steel were con-
sumed in the ma~nufacture of aetal cans in the South
Atlantic area in the third quarter of 1950 compared
with 125j,682 tons in the same period in 1949, accord-
to a Bureau of the Census Facts For Industry e-
port. In the East South Central section the comsump-
tion totalled 15,385 and 14,371 tons, respectively*
The South Atlantic area stood thizd among other
regions in total steel consumed for such purposes in
the third quarter of 1950, being exceeded only b7
the East North Central region with 414,494 tone and
the M~iddle Atlantic area, which registered a consumP"
tion of 21.2,868 tons*


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





SOUITHEAST' GEIlp FO DEFENSE

Full speed ahead in the nation's preparedness pro.
gram was asked ly the Blmitions Board and during the
month of December 67 contracts were let to 53 firms in
the Southeast in purchase operations conducted by the
Federal Gove rnment.
The contract awardss wrere reflected in weekly lists
received in Department of Conmmerce field offices, local
Obambers of Commerce, State offices and trade associa-
tion headquarters and m~ade available to businessmen for
possible subcontracting purposes.
The dollar value of the December awrards in the South.
east apprcazmated $19,518,700, including $4,000,000
distributed among six Georgia firmse; $b8,1$84,587 among
16 firms in Tennessee; $2,492,905 among seven in Ala.
bama; $2,253,878 among ten in North Carolina; $495,737
among six in Florida; $886,311 among four in Missise.
ippi; and $900,874 among the same arnaber in South Caro.
lina.
na state of national emergency az8stse, the Muni.
tionls Board pointed out. Stocks of msany major itean
of equipment are loR. The need for immediate speedup
of procurement of such items is manifest, and there is
urgent need for utmost effort to obtain the fatest
practicable delivery of major items of equipment, with
long production lead times, in order to equip and main.
tain the force strength approved for the iamediate
buildup in the shortest possible time..
Larger contracts awfazded in the Southeast included
the purchase of 50,000 linear yards of woolen velour
oloth from the Peerless Woolen Mlls, Roseville, Ga.,
for $2,831,175; 2,132,500 linear yards of cotton duck
from Atlas Mill, Inc., MempIhis, for $1,783.,383; and
180,000 paired of service boots, purchased from the
General Shoe Corporation, Nashville, for $1,575,000.


CIpER BIANKg FOR PUBLICATIONS & REPORTS
(To Obtain Copies Qf This Mlateriale Check It In The
Space Provided And Sendi This Pare Of The Bulletin Qf
coom~erce To The Nearest Decartment of Conmerce Field
Office. Your N~ame And address Are Showrn Below. M~ake
Remittances For Sales MYaterial Payable To Treasurrer


Of The United States. Items Not Priced Are Free.)


s This is the last opportunity given ,

Sedito onf Your eed rto Ioow Tth190
Booklet now on sale at all Department ,
Sof Come~ree field offices. Also avail- 4
' abl are fou athe publicatin pre a

' tarap, Aek about them ,



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE


Survey of Current Business......,............$~3 Year
Construction & Construction Materials In1d.Rpt.$3 Ir,
Children & Youath..Serice P-20,#32..............*
19Cenests of Busineess
Bardware Stores BC-2-R-1 L7 Liquor Storeir BC-2-R-2
Claig& Dyeing B0-20~-3U Motion PloeaBC-24S-2
asmeements B0-2S-23 & Pur~ture Stores BC-2-R-23
Department Stores BC-2-R-5 U Jewrelry~torea 2-83-
hoeaeTobacco Distributora 2-1-1 f Personal,
Business & Repair Servrices 248-0
U. S. Surmary, Retail Trade 2-R-0
U. S. Surmary, Wholesale Trade 2-W-0
Iletal Cans, September 1950..Krl tr/5D-90...........4
Your Federal Income Tax 1950...................;...25g)
.onal Produot~on authority Materials
QMer lb-17 1/ 4mra to Ccer Y-
Delegation 5L fOrde M-18 LJ Order M-19
Order M-7 Yodified Or(der Y-2 amended
Order M-10 Amnrded Order M-12, A~neanlmat #1
Delegation 1 Amended
Gross Changes in Labor Force, Oct,-Nov.1950 P-59,#22
Report on1 Cotton Ginning.............,........ ...,...,
Pahlic Employmoent in October 1950...G-4E50-Norb....
Export Control 23th Quarterly Report ly Secretary
of Commerce. .....................151)
L7A Selected &t annotated Bibliography. of Recent Air
age Education Textbooks..............300
S1 Business Aide:
Simplifying Stock Room Problems #237
Some Ways of Reducing ILuaber YPa ezdee 988 258

a le kadiing Prgram f the Smaller Store #2Z1,2
Developing Prospect Lists
How the Retailer Determinee Customer Wants #249

Ydrd isng the owrlr 2 ore Front #1253
MYeeting Jewrelry Store Competition $;254
The Reduction of Distribution Costs #256


PENA TL~PI~ E USE TO AVOID
9l VN'. OF FAn~k N ~OF STAGE $300





DPEPOSTOR



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALMS
DEPARTMENT OF ECON0H6ICS
GAIMGggygggg FLRD


Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSlNrESS .


PERMIT to 10

Ilolume 5, Number 2, January 15, 1951


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -1

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4





covWarsu coWTRags IN soUTHEAST HIoG


IMIPORTAIT NOTION
Anyone failing to receive promptly the mater-
ial needed to bid on the goods and services list-
ed in the releases issued daily by the Department
of Commerce should advise the nearest Department
of Commnerce field office or the Offtice of Small
Business, National Production Authority, U. S*
Department of Commerce, wlashington 25, D. C.,
giving full particulars as to bid -invitations
number; procurement office; date of request; sand
other pertinrent data
The contracts awarded in the Southeast included
those for commodities produced in the region ranging
from insecticides to textiles. Fruit juice produced in
Florida; tobacco products in North Carolina; textiles
in Georg~ia; lumber in Mdississippi; and many varieties
of goods in the other States were involved in the con-
tracts*
SES GOVERERENT PORCHASES PM~ 2


National Production

Authority
Ilany proposed new building operations for commercial
purposes planned over the Southeast were affected ,by the
recent National Production Authority ozder stopping such
construction activities except under certain conditions.
Under the NPA action, the Atlanta Regional office of
the U. S. Department of Cormmerce wras designated to pro-
cess applications setting forth alleged nhardshipen and
other reasons for special aurthorisations under the order
and the necessary forms for that purpose are available
at that office, as w~ell as at the other field offices in
the Southeastern region, including Raleigh and Charlotte,
North Carolina; Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina;
Chattanooga, Tennesseet Savannah, Georgiai Birmingham,
Alabama; Jackson, M;issiesippig Mobile, Alabama; and
Jacksonville, Mi~ami and Tampa,Florida.

Copies of this order, 8I-4, as amended January
15, 1951, as wrell as copies of all other orders,
regulations, directives, and so forth mentioned
in this column are available without charge at
any of the foregoing field offices of the De-
armost of Gawronre.
No figures were available on the amount of colmmer-
cial building authorized in the Southeast which may be
affooted byC the new order, but latest data from the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. DeparItment of Labor,
showed that in the first 10 months of 1950, the value
of new urban building authorized for nonresidential
structures, hotels, dormitories, tourist cabins and
other nonhousekeeping residential buildings in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mlissiesippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
lines amounted to some G313,816,0000.


WVHOLESALE.RETAIL TRaDE TP IN1 1950
Stepped up buying activities in the Southeast super-
induced by the international situation brought general
advances in both the retail and wholesale trade fields
in the region, according to monthly reports issued by
the Bureau of the Census.
At the end of the first 11 months, retail sales in
Birmingham, for example, were up 19 per cent over the
corresponding period in 19491 15 per cent in Atlantai
24 per cent in Biloxi; 25 per cent in Augusta;i and 22
per cent in Columbus, Ga., while wholesale sales rose
13 and 16 per cent, respectively, in the twao regions.
SliS TRADE ACTIVITY pae


ATSBUS NDARD HOUS T


Atlanta, Ga., Savannan, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla., MiUami, Fla., Mobile, Ala.,
50 Whitehall St.,S.I., 218 P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldgas
Tel. W8lnrut 412,X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3&61,X-206


Birmingham, Ala.,
319 Frank NJelson Bldg.,
Tel.53-34621,I-355


Charlotte, N. C.,
401 Chatham Bldg.,
Tel. 6-24+88


Chattanooga, Tenn, Columbia, S.C.,
723 James Ridg., Cornell Arms,
Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185
Raleigh, N. C.,
2620 H~illsboro St.


Jacksron, Misie,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 34972


VOL. 5, N1O. 3


FEBRUARY 1, 1951


Contracts for goods andl services
with a dollar value of nearly $b50
million have been awarded by the
Federal Government to Southeastern
firms since the beginnirng of fiscal
year 1951, according to a compila"
tion made in the Atlanta RLegional
office of the U. S. Department of
Conmmeree*
The awards included $9,915s425
in Georgia; $5,228,903 in Alabeamal
$2,774,130 in Florida; $3 759,776
in EMssissippi; $9,012,656 in
NTort~h Carolina; $2,1196,060 in
South Carolina; and $14,484,292 in


Tennessee*


More than 40o per cent of a total of 4119,722 dwelling
places in 19 Southeastern cities last year were sub"
standard, according to a compilation of reports issued
by the Bureau of the Census*
The reports wrpre for Florence, Alabama; Augustas
Athens, Brunswick, Albany, Decatur, Mlacon, Savannah
and Atlanta, Georgia; Goldsboro, Raleig;h, Lumbertons
Clinton, Concord, Jacksonville, Greensboro and Durham>
North Carolina; Mlemphis, Tennessee; and Columbia, Scouth
Carolina*
SEE HIOUSING PW 3


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE


Charleston, S.0.,
No.6 Hludson St.,
Tel. 7779

Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880





OFJWABL AZQ~S B~ItartSUINES.P NO)T


General stores,. that nrral establishment which
aells everything from pine to plows, is grossing more
than a quarter of a billion dollars annually in the
SSoutheast now, reports just issued from the Burean of
the Censue indicate.
The reports, compiled' from the Burean's 1948 census
of business, show that, among other things, total
Sales in general stores in Alabama, Flo~rida, Georgia,
Mlississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee in 1948 apprazimated $255.6 million, a 413 per
oent increase over the $178.4 million recorded for
1939.

These reports, which cover a variety of
trade, are by States and the nation, and
are obtainable without charge through any
D~eDartment of Copmmerce field office.
Other highlights of the reports for the Southeast
are a
Department stores. sales up 233 per cent in 1948
over 1939, or from $244l.1 million to $813.7 million,

advanced 282 per cent, from 67 million in 1939
to $1.85i.1 million in 1948..
Funeral service receipts increased from $19.6 mil-
lion to $655.9 million, or 185 per cent.
News dealers and newse stands sales rose from $2./+
million to $61.1 million,~ or 35 per cent.

GOPERMENT PURICHASES .Ahrrtanast.Imengl.le 1
The awfards, reflected in liate now artilable for.
subcontracting purposes at field offices of the Gam-
merce Department,. hundreds of local Chambers of Com-
merce and other outlets in the Southeast and other
sections of the country, were part of a total of $,3
billion worth of goods and services bought by the De-
partment of Defense from samll business firms over
the country since the fiscal year began, sooording to
an announcement made by that agency.
Acktally the Defense Department .stated, of 1,736,-
882 purchases of supplies, service and construction
made by the military services 1,267,000, or 13 per
cent were small business transactions. Small firans, it
was stated, contracted for about 79 per cent of the
value of clothing purchases made, 73 per cent of con-
tainer purchases, and 65 per cent of building mater-
ials, includig 82 per cent of the lumber.

TRAD.E.ACTIVIITY Coautinued..From Paeme 1

The trend in retail sales for the 11-month period
also showed gains of 16 per cent in Savannah and
Johnson City, Tenn; 13 per cent in dacona and K~inge-
port, Tenn; 14 per cent in Gulfporti and 12 per cent
in Asheville and Greenwood, South Carolina,
The rise bf 13 per cent in wholesale sales in the
East South Central region and 16 per cent in the South
SAtlantic area was due primarily to a greater demand
for such good asr lumbers building and construotion
materials, electrical goods, automotive and wriring
supplies, and appliances and specialties. Other sharp
advances were observed in sales of ilu~mbing~ and heat-
ing supplies, refrigeration equipment, and paper and
its pr~oducte*
Inoreasea of a lesser degree were also reflected in
retail sales iti November 1950 over the corresponding
month in 1949, and heavy increases also were shown in
wholesale sales in the two southeastern regional for the
same comparable month.


Plle Contirnued From PaPre 1

The effect of this order is to stop all newP comrmer-
oial construction until February 15, 1951 during which
time the NPA wfill paseo upon requests for ~authorisations
to carry out such building. The order itself, however,
will continue to operate after February 15 until re-
soined. NPA's authorizations will be for work that
Further the defense effort, is essential to public
health, welfare or safety, or that which may alleviate
or prevent a hardship to a particular community.
In other action just taken, MY:
Amended ita QBDDER 8-8 to assure a amxndanm use of
tin soran, in the production of al 4u.
Amended Notice Number 1 to add industrial ethr1.
,agchol, .ablarnd, sa. lue e~ZI a~d na uagg ,gg
synthetic rubber. JAMI.Ag (-h~esiaTesian),cotto suBh
.tenacity EGE28~ SIgrs 29yla sagg anid.EL9 filament
SIaPto the anti-hoarding list.
Isatted Order M-12 permitting the use of only the
so-called "paint remover grade" of methylene chloride
Sfor making paint reamoverr and dry c-leaning aide tur-
assure supplies of methylene chloride for the ma~nufact-
ure of photographic and X-ray film.

Defense Production Aid Number 5 has
been issued by NEA. It is entitled
"Better Flant MIaintenance Increases
Production and Profitsn and is available
without obarge at any Department of
Goalmerce field office.
In Amendment 3 to Regulation 2, it anrthoriz~ed the
use of nggnza~tions carried by defense orders to FPro-
mre sooessories for production equipment for companies
working on rated orders,
Took further steps to conserve hosn bristles for
defense and essential civilian needs by amendring Order
8-18.
lesued NPA 8-23 Order providing for the equitable
distribution of defense rated order among producers of
carded cotton s~ales ar the purpose of which is to
minimi~se the impact of rated orders on individual
producers and thus prevent disruption to normal civil-
ian distribution.
In Order 1U-22 it' took measures to conserve aluminum
ASI;8g and insure its order3,y flow into the heads of
approved smelters and fabricators.
Amended Order M-15 adding some definitions to the
r ~Pevich~a stieer ccinering 'the 'd~tiiati~ti~ ttiion ofM.''
Joined with the Petroleum Administratioli for Defense
in isaning a memorandum of agreement dealnag w9ith ad-
ministrative juriodiotion over the production and dis-
tribution of certain petroleum and gae ar~oducts and
certain products and equipment used by the Detroleurm
industry.
Issued an amendment to Order Md-1, Supplement 1 to
establish a procedure to assure prompt delivery of
steal products needed for the production of new freight
oara.
Promuxlgated Ozder 8-28 to provide for equitable
distribution among 1Sat9er producers of defense rated
orders for certain types of leather,
lasued Order M-~29 resegring for "DOn defense rated
orders that portion of the supply of leathe produced
from horsehide fr~rots and deerekins which meet Federal
specifications .
In Order 86-30, action was taken to conserve inneaten
and to provide for its equlitable distribution in the
best interests of national defense.
Amended Ozder M-1 to adjust its basic steg order so
as to meet changing steel requirements caused by the
expanding rearmament program.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








SEC~I~M OULBD ~SI~PBL~SI~) I


The Department of Conmmerce has- established a service
designed to protect businessmen in the Southeast,
State and local officials, organizations and private
citisoens from the release of technological information
that would endanger the national security*
The.>LewP service, placed~in the Departmenit's Office
of Technical Services, wfas.announced -by Secretary of
Commerce Charles Sawyer who said its establishment
followed a study and recommendations made by the
Interdepartmental Committee on Internal Security, a
committee of the NJational Security Council*
Under the ner3,y-established facility, those con-
cerned may seek guidance as to whether specific tech"
nological information not subject to formal security
regulations should be released, withheMd, or given
on27 limited distribution*
Types of information over which such voluntary pub-
lic guardianship is invited include technical data on
advanced industrial developments; advanced production
"kn~ow-howy" a trategi~erequpment; special installations;
and significant' integration of previonaly scattered
groups of information*
The Government has been receiving many such requests
and the new service merely sets up a central location
to which those interested mlay write for advice*
Inquiries abould be addressed to the Office of Tech-
nical Services, U. S. Department of Commerce, W~ashing-
ton 25, D. G. GI1S will then check them with the aplPro-
priate Government specialist and agencies, and the
expert opinion will then be forwardled to the inquirer
for action upon it if he chooses*

Hpr m Contioned From Pare I

F~ro 21.8 per cent of 650 substandard dwelling
places in Clinton, N. C., to- 58.1 per cent of 8,541 in
Columbia, S. C., are considered "dilapidated," the
Census Burean reports abowed*
A substandard" dwelling place is defined by the
Public Housing Admitnistration as one that is either
dilapidated or does not have flush toilet and bath
inalde the structure for the unit's exclusive use and
hot running water. It is "diLapidated" when it has
"serious deficiencies, is rundown or neglected, or is
of inadequate original construction so that it does
not provide adequate shelter or protection against the
elements or it endangers the safety of the occupants.
Those without piped running water range from 3.1 per
cent of 9,050 substandard units in Durham, N. C., to
as high as 69.3 per cent of 1,149 in lamberton, N .0,
those writhout flush toilets include 12.9 per cent of
6,494 in Greenaboro, NV. C., to 73.2 per cent of those
in Inmberton, and those without bathtub or shower vary
from 42.4 perseent of 37,008 in Atlanta to as high as
79*3 per cent in Inmberton*


I


First preliminary reports from the 1950
Census of Agriculture bare been received in
Department of Commerce offices. They are for
counties in Nevada. Additional reports for
,other sections of the country are expected
ab portly. County releases will be issued first,
then those for Stateas. and then the United
States. No charge will be made for one copy
of a release for a single area. Single copies
of releases for other Statpa or counties will
be furnished at a charge of 20 cents for lots
of 10 or ferrer reportp,


Business is p;lanning to expand its plant and equip-
ment at a record rate of $21.9 billion in 1951, accord-
ing to a special survey of business p~lans made public
jointly by the Department of Comrmerce and Securities
and Excchange Commission. This is one-fifth higher than
the estimated outlays for 1950 and about one-seventh
more than the peak outlays in 1948.
++e++
While malnufacturers' sales during November 1950 were
maintained at the October 1950 rate, unfilled orders
and inventories continued to rise. Salb~s of producers
of durable goods were up 3 per cent over the previous
month on a seasonally adjusted besis, and were 50 per
cent larger than a year ago.
+ *
The value of all business inventories at the end of
November 1950 was estimated at $61.2 billion. After
allowance for seasonal variations, the book value of
inventories increased $1.5 billion from the end of
GOtobeir. Manufacturers' inventories were $1.1 billion
higher at the end of November. Wholesalers stocks
increased about $300 million and retailers' $100 mil-
lion,
++aC+a
Cash dividend payments of United States corporations
issuing public reports amounted to $232 million in
November 1950, up one-fifth from the $190 million paid
out in November 191+9. Half of the $42 million increase
was accounted for by manufacturing, where all subgroups
reported gains.

Personal income continued high in November, amounting
to an annual rate of $231.9 billion as compared to $231.1
billion in Gotober. The rise was not so rapid as in the
previous 5 months, but it advanced the annual. rate of
personal income $173 billion above that of May 1950.
YWave
Sales of service and limited function waholesalelrs
in November 1950 totalled $6,871 million, which, on a
seasonally adjusted basis, were slightly above the
October 1950 level. The 3 per cent decline which occurred
in the durable-goods group was offset by a somewhat
larger increase in sales of nondurable goods.
+ee++
Chain store and mail-order sales for November 1950
amounted to $2,522 million, about 8 per cent above a
year ago. After adjusting for seasonal factors and trad-
ing differences, sales of all chain stores in Nov~ember
were unchanged from Gotober,
avsee
Shoe and slipper production in GOtober 1950, 44 mil-
lion pairs, apprazimatedl the September 1950 output and
was 11 per cent higher than the 40 million paired produced
in GOtober 1949, the Burean of the census announced.
a wess
United States manufacturers in November 1950 consumed
97,515 long tons of new rubber, a decline of 18~6 per
cent from the 119s844 tons reported in Gotober 1950.
Canaumption in November 1949 was 83,557 tons.
+ +-e +
United States exports of rubber, allied gams, and
manufactures in November 1950 were valued at $10,376,097
compared with $8,152,323 in October 1950 and 87,109,904
in November 191C9. Most of the increase in November 1950
was due to a rise in exports of transportation goods,
such as tires, tubes, camelback and tire repair materials,


19% GElpUS OF AGRICULTURE


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





PAG E 4
aNP smaL SOnanEsTERNmES


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
BU L LET~ ~~II lllilllil1111 ll lllllll|111||| U I IlIIIIIII lIIII
BULLETII3 1262 08748 8713

BU'SIN~S E BOOK.aS

A p~;- BcE PO R T:S

(To Obtain Copies Of This Material. Check It In The
Sppoe Provided And Send This Page Of The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The Negreat Departmerit of Commerce Fiel~d
Office. Your Naue BAd Address Are Shown Below,. Miake~
Remittances For 841es Material Payqble To Treasurer
Of The Upited States,. Items Not Pr3,oed Are Free, )


YUNE OURS?
~ce offices in charge '
distribution of the s
Sof Comimerce are nowJ '
irom their m~ailing
lose who have not re- '


LI census of Business, 1948 (Name
Trade In Which Interested)


it
n~
or


The National Production Authority has named 62
Southeastern businessmen to industry comlittees to
advise with that agency on the issuance of orders,
regulations~ and other actions necessary in carrying
out the overall program of conserving scarce materials
for the.defense effort.
The cromnittejes, numbering about 100, are composed of
.representatives of industries of all parts of the
country. They form an important part of NPA activities
since -that agency rarely takes any action affecting
th~e different industries without first consulting the
committees. The names of the committees on which the
Southeast has representation include the following:
Electrical W~iring~ Devices 0. A1. Darsetts Knarville.
Lowf Voltage Distribution Equiprment A. C. Bosanko,
Atlanta.
Barium Carbonate Fred Lester, Gartereville, Ga.
Radio, Television & Household Appliance wholesalee -
A. K;. Sutton, Charlotte, N. C.
Converted Paper & BoagL _-
J. Thulrston Roach, Mdemphis* s BAQVE YOU RF
Hardwood Dimension Production
Lawrrence Fury, Memnphis; David Department of Commer
B. Mlorgan, Jr., Black mountainn of preparation and di
N. -C., and John B. Each, Ash-' semi-monthly 13qlletir
ville, engaged in striking f
Lumber & Allied Products Con- lists the names of th
aentration Yards Wm. B. Byrd, 'trned the cards indj
Augusta; A. B. Carroll, Burrts-' their names be retail
boro, Ala; A. R. Chappell, Pros- 'ceive this publicatic
perity, S. C; T. C. Caze, Jr. yours? If not, your r
Darlington, S. Ci J. S. Dizon' take4 frog the lipt.
Sr., Lake City, S. 0; Ray E. Loper, Fayette, Ala.;
0. R. Mason, Ma~dison, Gai and E. L. PAckett, Amory,Mniss.
Lumber &e Alled Products Non- :arehousing TIholesale -
, D. Burdette, Meridian; R. F. Crutcher, Savannah; A.
L. Foote, Jacksonville; J. Alexander MdclUlan, Charlotte
N. 04 Joe Thompson, Mlemphis; and 8. T. Turner, Spartan-
burg;, S. C.
lumber & A~lled Products Retailers H~arry L. Learson,
EBiami, and George fl. West, Atlanta.
Lumber Idanufacturing Industries C. J. Brown, t.
Dora, Fla; Edwrin L. Douglass, Augusta; Winthrrop U. HIal-
lett, Jr., IMobile; and S. Md. Nickey, Jr., MEemphis. --
Plywrood & Veneer M~anufacturing Industries Norman M.
Mol~nnis, Jr., Stookton, Ala.


N7 ional Production Autligity:
Order M-8 amned // Notice No. 1 Amended
Order MI-12 1/ Defense PrdoinAid #5
Regulation 2, Amendment 3 Order M6-18 Amended
Order !&-23 L/ Order M6-22 Order EE-15 Amended
Onler Md-1,Supg. .1, Amended Order 2-28
Order M-29 ff Order r-30 Order M~-1 Amended
/7Substandard Housing Reports (Name City Desired)


eating a desire that '~ Economic Report of the Presi-
ed on the list to re- de t. ................... ......500
n. Have you returned Mobilising Small Business For
arme wil have to be De ense (Address By J. L. Kelly)...
The deadline is noid L7Industrial Development & Flant
Location. ..............,.... ...100
Home B~usinesses.,.................. ................10Q
1 Outlookr on Paper Restrictions & Controls (Address
by Har-old E. Holman) .......,,.........,.,...,.,
/7Small Business Aids:
SRegulation of Trade Practices #1512
MJ Modern Lighting Increases Retail Sales #523

& Distributors' Credit.Probleals #f515
How to M~erchandlise Infants' Wear #j257
Food Retai'ling #259
Training Program for Smallc Retailers #~260
Getting fHerchandise to Sell #/261
Mien's Store Builds Sales Through Promotions,
Exclusive Styling #Y262 oro sy-looses

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
roF POSTAGE $300


00L -, 2-

go a
i\STO



BC-6-JF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINgSVILLE, FLORIDA


Volume 5, NQumber 3


February 1, 1951


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT NO. 1009


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE (iF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.
























Birming;ham, Ala., Obattanooga, Tenn.,Calumbia, S.C., Jackson, Miss., Tampa, Fla.,
319 Frank Nelson Bldg., 723 James Bldg., Cornell Arms, 1126 Yazoo St., 608 Tampa St.,
Tel.53-34c21,I-355 Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 34972 Tel. 2-3880
Charlotte, N. C., M~emphis, Tenn., Raleigh, N. C.,
401 Chatham E~dg., Maedison at Front, 2620 Hilsborough St.,
Tel. 6-2488 Tel. 8-3426 Tel. 41343-4
YOL. 5_ ~n I


___~___ _~


1


AutnOrity
Four months of operation of the National Production
Authority of the U. S. Department of Commerce in the
Southeast finds orders and regulations issued by that
agency affecting in varying degrees many businesses
selling or using the scarce metals and other materials
that must be conserved for the national program of de-
fense,
To date, pr~imary orders issued by NEA govern the
handling of 19 commodities. They are steel, columbium,
aluminum and aluminum scrap, tin and tin scrap, since,
cobalt, copper, nickel, leather, rayon yarn, rubber,
electrical components, hog bristles, cadmium, methylene
obloride, carded cotton yarn, tungsten, oblorine and
ethyl cellulose.

These orders, regulations and so forth issued
by NPB are free for the asking. Request them
from your nearest Commerce Department field
offices

NEA has ordered stopped all construction for amuse-
ment purposes, and has established a procedure for
clearing through the Commerce Department authorizations
for the commencement of new commercial building opera-
tions so that building materials may be conserved for
essential projects.
See NPB Page 2

U. S. PORC#ASES HELP TEKTILE INDUSTRY
Billions of dollars now being placed by the Federal
Government in goods and services for the remobilisation
program are proving a boon to the textile industry in
the Southeast, according to information on contract
awards now being made available to business firms over
the country by field offices of the U. S. Department of
Commerce, local Chambers of Comrmerce and other,


COTTON DUCK CONTRQIS URCD
~Production
PERCENYT a minimum Of g0
'"o per cent of the total
0 COTTON DUCK _prOduction by weight
of cotton duck pr'o-
.00 ducers in the South-
east and other seo-
vs -tions may be set
aside for military
soC procurement and de-
fense rated orders
asI I -I if a plan now under
way goes through.
a ,, ... The plan was pro-
+Percentage of Broad Floven Goods posed by members of
Source: Burean of the Census the cotton duck in-
dustry advisory committee which met with officials of
the National Production Authority of the U. S. Department
of Commerce for a discussion of how the industry could
support an NEa program to assure that military and highly
essential civilian needs for cotton duck can be met.

For the latest information on the production
of cotton duck and other broad woven goods,
ask the nearest Department of Comrmerce field
office to place your name on the Facts For
Tqiustry mailing l1st. There is no charge,

The committee, which includes a number of operators of
cotton duck and other mills in the Southeast, also re-
commended that NEA require all looms1 producing duck to
continue to be used for that purpose, and that there be
no reduction of operating hours as of a particular date
yet to be determined*
See COTTON DUCK Page 2

SOUTHlfAST UTRBAN Al@BS CROWD
More than four and a balf million persons living in
the Southeast are concentrated in 26 cities in the region
according to information on the nation's urban population
just issued by the Burean of the Census.
The urbanites, numbering 4,541,742, constitute 22 per
oent of the population of Alabama, Florida, Georg~ia, Ms-
issippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.
The urban areas reflect a population of from 68,190 in
Raleigh, N. C., to 502,204 in atlanta, and include the
cities of Birmingham, Mobile and Maontgomeryr in Alabama;
Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, St. Petersburg and Tampa,
Fla.; Jackson, Miss; Asheville, Charlotte, Durham,
Greensboro, Raleigh and Winston-S~alem, N. C., Charleston
and Golumbia, S. C., and Ohattanooga, Knazrville, Mem~phis
and Nashville, Tenn.


In the seven Southeastern States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee, textile mills already have been awarded con-
tracts during the current fiscal year with a dollar value
apprazimating $29,865,696,
The contracts include $2,970,872 in Alabam~a; Florida,
$105,200; Georgia, $7,328,155; MIYssissippi, $393,8051
North Carolina, $/5,305,107; south Carolina, $2,172,471;
and Tennessee, $1,590,086.
See TERTILES Page 3


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641',11-206


Charleston, S.C.,
6 H~udson St.,
Tel. 7771


Mdiami, Fla.,
947 Seybold ldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla.,
50 Whitehall St.,S.W., 218 P. 0. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. W~lnut 4121,X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111


Nashrille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 4-2426-7



'FEBUBRu 15, 19)51


Note: This contract award service is free
to all interested firas


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE


National Production









I____ _


RetailDaerchants in the Southeast reported substan.
tial increases in sales in 1950 over 1949, according
to a Burean of the Censue survey.
The gained ranged from 11 per cent in Asheville,
N. C., to 25 per cent in Bilozi, Mdiss. Other increases
included Columbus, Ga., 20 per cent; Birmingham, 19;
Savannah, 16; Johnson City, Tenn., 15; Atlanta, 14)
Gurlfport, Mises. 1; and Macon, Ga.', .Greenwrood, S. C.,
and Kingaport, Tenn., 12.
Corresponding advances were registered in varians
southeastern areas, with Jefferson county, Alabema,
recording an 18 per cent rise; Mlanatee and Sarasota
counties, Florida, and Barrison and Stone counties,
Mtiss., 171 Degalb, Ful~ton and Rochdale counties,
Georgia, 15 per cent; Buncmbe and Madison counties,
North Carolina, and Greenwood and Mlc~ormick counties ,
South Carolina, 12; and Sullivan, Unicoi and Washing.
tonl counties, Tennessee, 11.
Sharp increases were also reported in December 1950
over December 1949, ranging from 4 per cent in Kings.
port to as high as 28 per cent in Bilazi, and substan-
tial seasonal advances took place in December over
November 1949 almost all along the line, Savannah mark-
ing up a 64 per cent gain, Macon, 55 per cent, sand
Greenwood, S. C., 44 per cent*

COTTONJ DUCKC Continued From Page 1

NPA said later that the industry's recommendations
would be considered in the drafting of a regulations
issuance of which may be expected shortly.
Spokesmen for the industry azplained that cotton
duak has been in short supply for some time, while
deman~ds for the material have greatly increased*
Production of a21 types of duck was approximately 300
million yards last year, ana plans for increasing the
production are under way, HPA officials were toM*
Some carpet mills are already converting to duck
production to increase the supply, it was stated. Other
heavy cloth such as twill and drill can be substituted
for duak in some end uses to make duck available for
essential uses, it was explained*
One of the industry's problems, spokesmen said, is
obtaining auffiient carried cotton yarn for producing
duck. NPA officials said if it was necessary to in-
orease duck production, action would be taken to make
additional yarn available*

FOOID Id!ADS~~~~IIIII~~~~IIII AUITO INJ Sld!S

The fact that food is one of the "austan in life
is azemplified in a study made of reports of the Butresan
of the Census just issued on its 1948 Gensue of Busi
nese showing that of billions of dollars spent by
consumers in the Santheast, grocery purchases led with
a total of $2.2 billion and sales of rmotorwehicle
dealers were second with $1.7 billion,

These reports are now available at field
officesof the Detartment of Commeroe.

Nlext in order were sale by gasoline servie stat-
ions, $721.2 million eating and drinking plac~es, $708.1
million; grocery stores without meat, $489.7 million;
furniture stores, $1.6.8 million; and womenrs reatdyto-
wear stores, $325.8 million.
Sharp) increases in the amount of money spent on the
various cormmodities sold at retail since before World
Wiar II were reflected in the analysis. QP some 50
goods and services included, the greatest gain, 1,826
per cent was in sale by floor covering stores,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2


&p Continued From Fape 1
The four-month review shows that NOPA has also issued
a regulation limiting to a "practicable mi~lanimu working
inventory" quantities of ferrous and non-ferrouse metals
and mineral, chemicals, building, textile and rubbe'r
materials, and forest products that may to ordered,.
received, or delivered.
A -ban on 'hoarding" in exness of home consumption
needs, ase ell as for business activities, on certain
building materials, chemical, iron and steel products
and scrap, lumber, plywrood, woid pulp, aluc~minm, anti-
mony, asbestos, cadmium, cerium, ohromium, cobalt,
columbing~ copper, industrial diamonds, lead, maegnesumn,
manganese, aioa, molybdenumm, nickel, platinum, talo,
tin, tungsten, vanadium, sino, sircon, paper, paper-
board and hog bristles has been issured.
Steps to insure supplies of steel products for anal3
business thums were taken when provision was made for
establishing regular allotments to warehouse concerned
to supply the ameall business firms dependent on them
for their steel needed
Following are some high lights of more recent actions
taken by M1Phs CNSRTO
Commerce Department field offices are now taking
applications of those wishing to engage in commercial
and amusement building and the applications will be
processed in regional offices to save t~ime. Mare than
150 million was spent in the Southeast last year on
commercial and a~musement building. Such Building has
been prohibited .by MPAi, ezoept under certain conlditionsr
in Order M- as uaended.

Issued Order 16-31 to assure oblorine supplies for
public health needs and to provide equitable distriba-
tion of defensewat~ed orders among producer.

Announced revision of rules for handling defense
orders for aluminurm under the priorities system to
require aluminum producers and fabricator to accept
a larger percentage of defense rated orders.) amended
Order M-7 to provide necessary savings in civilian
uses; and amended the aluminum scrap order, M-22, to
postpone the effective date of certain provisions
until March 1 to permit inclusion of additional firs
to prooeas aluminapl scrap.

gook Further steps to assure nickel for the expand-
ing defense program and for highly essential civilian
production by amending Order EI-14.
CHEMCALS
Issued a general chemical order, M-32, providing that
producers of othyl cellulose will not be required to
devote more than 40 per cent of any month's scheduled
production to filling rated orders and will not be re-
quired to accept rated orders less than 15 days before
the beginning of the month in which delivery is re-
quested. Rapected to add other chemicals to this order
from time to time.

Issued five orders permitting the use of tin only in
certain products, and limiting its use in others.
The orders included M-8 amended, and from M-24 to M-27,
inclusive.

placed temporary controls on the distribution and
inventories of molybdenum through HPAL-L-33.
IRUON AND STEEL SCRAP
Amended Order M-20 limiting dealers' and brokeret
iron and steel scrap inventories to a 60-day supply.
00PPER.CofFER BALSE AILEIPS
ALmended Order Y-16 regulating acceptance, delivery
and distribution of scrap and base alloy scrap.





souralyEst paqM Iucogs UP streastP

A slight increase in oash farm income in the S~outh-
east in the first 21 months of 1950 over the corres-
ponlding period in 1949 was reflected in monthly figures
announced by the Burean of ALgricutltural Economics, U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
The rise, less than one per cent, was the first az-
perienced in the region as a whole in some time,
Total cash receipts in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Missiesippi, North Carolina, South Carolina sad Tenn-
easee from January to November, inclusive, of last year
was $b2.8 bilion. The totals, by States, were:
Alabaina, first 11 montba of 1950, $296.5 million,
and same period in 1949, $313.5 million, 5.4( per cent
decrease; Florida, $393.4 million and $395.8 million,
six-tenthe per cent down; Georgia, $433.8 million and
$413.0 million, 5 per cent increase; Mississippi,
$400.2 million and $4469.1 million, off 10.8 per cent;
north Carolina, $745.7 million and $666.6 million
up 11.8 per a entt South Carolina, $257,1 million and
$265.1 million, off 3 per cent; and Tennessee, 3363.1
million and $384.5 million, decrease of 5.5 per cent.

TERTLlW. Continured From Page 1
From the Department of Defense came an announcement
of its intentions to buy in the apparel field for the
immediate future to include such goods available and
being supplied in the Southeast as garrison cape,
cotton mohair neakties, cotton underwear, cotton soake
and other products in the huntdreds of thousands and
millions of units,
Recent contract awazda in the Southeast have
totalled more than $3,000,000, bringing the value of
such contract awards during the present fiscal year
moade in the region to well above the $50,000,000 mark.
Those recently awarded included the following:
Andala company, Andalusia, Ala., cotton trousers,
$82,8001 Pasco Packing company, Dade City, Fla., four
contracts for canned fruit juices totalling $532,632;
Clark Manufacturing company, Meridian, Miss., cotton
trousers, $101,8701 Stah1 Urban company, Brookhaven,
Miss., cotton trousers, $73,5253 and E. F. Dyer danu-
facturing company, Houston, Mbiss., pick handles,
$42,200; W. D. Towson Lumber company, Ma~rphy pallets,
$96,340; Obarles D. Roberts company, Greensboro, hammer
handles, $4~3,500; Standard Textile company, Memphis
cotton trousers, $41,850; Slumber Products.Corporation,
MYemphis, cotton mattresses, $83,600; and Stein-Wlay
Clothing company, Johnson City, Tenn., cotton trousers,
$42,400.
PUBLIC 001BTRUCTION ACTIVE

State and local public consizvoction woark aurthorised
in the Southeast in the first 10 months of 1950 almost
hit the half billion mark in value, recording to a
current issue of the Department of Commerce Industry
Report Coqatzryotion aqd ooqs~truction Materals*
The value for the 1950 period in Alabana, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina .
and Tennessee was, placed at $444,5f68,000, a 38 per cent
advance over the $)321,629,000 recorded for the area in
the first 10 months of 1949*
Totals for the Statse in the 10-month period of 1950
included Florida, $b86.5 million North Carolina, $121.7
million; South Carolina, $34.7 million; Georgia, $56.0
million; Alabama, $46.0 million Mbississippi, $j33.7
million; and Tennessee, $65.7 million. Increases over
1949 were registered for all States. Largest share of
the money spent went into highway operations*


l.0USNS TA UU A
A 9 per cent sales increase wras recorded by Large
independent retailers in December 1950 compared with
the same month in 1949, and a 29 per cent rise was
registered from November to December 1950, the Burean
of the Censue reported. Sale of motot*-vehi~cle dealers
nwer 28 per cent higher in December 1950 than in Decem-
ber 1949, a gain of 19 per cent was recorded by lumber
and building materials dealers, and an increase of 16
per cent wea experienced by gasoline service stations.
Sales of hardvwarestores were up 14 per cent.

Man~ufacturers sales in 1950 amounted to $235 billions
an increase of 18 per cent aver the previous year, the
Office of Businese Economios, U. S. Department of Com-
meroe, announced. The advance refleased higher prices
as well as a gain in volume. The durable-goods manufact-
uring industries group gained 25 per cent in dollar
sales and the nondurable-goods pr~oducers 12 per cent.
*
Sales of retail stores in December 1950 were estimated
at $14.4 billion, or 12 per cent above a year ago. The
December sales brought transactions for the year as a
whole to an estimated $140 billions amceeding the 1949
total by about 10 per cent, and nearly 8 per cent more
than the previous high established in 1948.
+ *
The value of investments by American corporations
in their foreign branches and subsidiaries in 1949
totalled an estimated $12.5 billion. The increase in
1950 wras somewhat smaller than in 1949. A little more
than half of the increase in 19469, $700 million, wras
by the petroleum industry,

The real volume of goods sad series produced by
the nation has increased by three-fourths from 1929 to
1950. The increase from 1949 to 1950 was 7 per o ent
and reflected a more than average gain in employment
and productivity.

National income in the third quarter of 1950 was at
the seasonally adjusted annual rate of $244 billion, or
7 per cent higher than the $229 billion rate in the
second quarter. The thizd quarter figure was almost 6
per cent above the previous recordl of $231 billion
reached in the fourth quarter of 1948.
+ *
Chain store and mail-or~der sales for December amounted
to $3,388 aillion,.aboult 10 per cent above December 1949.
After adjustment for seasonal factors and trading day
differences, such sales for December were 6 per cent
above November and only 3 per cent belowr the July peak,
*
November consumption of raw wrool -- soonred basis --
averaged 11.4 million polunds per week, 17 per cent less
than in October, the Bureen of the Census announced.
Consumption of apparel class woul averaged 7.7 milon
pounds per weoek and carpet lass wool 3.7 million pounds.
w *
A move to effect closer vigil over shipments of lubri-
cating oils and other petroleum products to certain Far
Eastern countries was announced by the Office of Inter-
national Trade, U. S. Department of Commeroe. ~Each ap-
plicant for a license to export anoh produate to those
countries will now have to supplement the information
required with a statement giving details about stooks
held and to be received ly the ultimate consignee from
soures other than the applicant.
wasae
Wool yarn production was down 12 per cent in Nov. 1950.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








PAGE 4 -

1950 STATLSTICAL, ABSTRACT ISSUED


(To Obtain Copies Of Thi~s Material. Check It In The
Space Provided bAd Send This Page Of The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The Nearest Department of Commnerce Field
affice. Your Name bad Address Are Shown Below,. Nbke
Remittances For Sales Material Payable To Treasurer
OfTheUnited States. Items Not Priced Are Free.)

A7 Material:
Order M-4 b rer LI-31 Orers M-7 & M-22
Order Md-16 Order M~-32~- Orders MI-24 to ML-27
Order Md-33 L/Order Mr-20 Order MI-16
1950 Statistical Abstract of the United States...$a3
Annual Report of the Secretary of Colmmeroe.......25Q
98Census of Business tae Breakdowns)
Motor Vehicle Dealers Lrug & Proprietary Stores
Men's & Boys' Clothing Barber Shops
Floor Covering Stores A/ uto Repair Servrices
Advertising Agenofes L Photographic Studios
Power Laundries L/ General Auto Repair Shops
Pressing, Alteration & Garment Repair Shops
aTravel Trends Under the 1939 and 1950 Dealaratione
of National Emergency (BIS)..............
DepartmentCttoresGi n ng prior to Jan. 16,1951...104
The Economics of National Defense 5th annual
Report to the President by the Council of
Economic Advisers..............,..,.. ........209
Clay Construction Products, Nov. 1950, FFIM2~6B-110..
Paper & Board Production, 1949, FFIM14DP 1-09........
Malleable Iron Castings, Nov. 1950 FFIM21LB-110......
01eomargarine, Nov. 1950, FFIEIlJ-110 ...............
Fats & Oils, Nov. 1950, FFIM17-1-110...........,.....
Sml Business Aids:
& Post Office Services of Interest to Small Business
/2 App~aising &( Buying A Retail or Selrvice Business
Cheek List For Food Retailing #r263.......#517...
A Survey of Inventory Control in 37 Small Companies
#264.
The Independent Druggist #265......................
The Toddlers' & Tots' Wear #266.....,...............
1 0380 Do's & Donsts in Food Retailing #268.........,.....
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
OF PSTAG $30


Mbore than 400,000 abudents received degrees from
American colleges and universities in 1949.
Nearly 3 million persons wpere receiving veterans'
benefits in form of compensation, pensions, or retire-
ment pay at the beginning of last year, 29 of whom
waere surviving dependents of deceased veterans of the
Mexican war in 1845*
In 1930, American money in circulation totalled a
little more than $4.5 billion. Twenty years later>
the total in circulation was nearly $27.5 billion,
Agricultural imports into the United States amount
to more than $3 billion in value lnlv
National income exceeded $221.5 billion dollars in
1949 compared wilth $87.3 billion in 1929*
The Federal Government owns more than 820 million
aores of the two and a quarter billion acres of land
under U. S. dominion. Nearly 500 million aores of the
public domain are in continental United States*
In 1900, the U. S. death rate was 17,2 per 1,000
population; in 1948, the death rate had dropped to
9.9 per 1,000 population*
These are some examples of the many thousands of
items of information to be found in the 1950 mid"
century edition of the Statistical abstract of the
United States just issued by the Burean of the Censuar
U. S. Department of Commerce
Order this publication through the nearest
Department of Commeroe field office. Price
83 per copy,. buckram bounds
The book contains more than 1,000 tables of statis-
ties on such subjects as population, housing, agricul-
ture, climate, foreign and domestic commerce, manu"
factures, education, labor force and employment, in"
comes, prices, elections, banking and finance, busi"
ness enterprise, government finances, communications,
power, public roads, motor vehicles, transportation
watenrays and water traffic, forests, mines, con-
atruction, and other activities*

ANNUAL REV~IEW NmBER I
The February issue of the Survey of '
Current Business, issued by the Office I
of Business Economics, U. S. Department '
of Comrmerce wAill be the annual review '
number of that Dublication.Watch for itlier as


V~I~VE ~JVV


BC-6-JF


UN l11 sIIVSIT OF FOIDArsililis I


BULLETIN


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 5, Number 4 Februaryr 15, 1951


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FINo
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


~T NEMYA








-~-



U::~E~IPY OF FLCrIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DPgpARTENT OF ECONOMICS
1 GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


























Nashville, Tenn., R
4;10 Nashville Tnzst, 2~
Tel. 4-2426 Ts
V 5, NO.5
ptECSSITPE;S GR SOUIT IASTERNERtS' INCOME


JrL" ,~-I- L -IY IY^ n L ES) ~
su lll

o'MW D
ea .
oo sr"w mc~

so n ... .. .1 ....,


as food and clothing, and much of the remainder goes


aalbe by@ Mh e thea of terate oow Me

Ask the nearest Department of Commerce
field office about, these reports *
The figures show that of a total of some $10.4 bil-
lion paid by residents of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee for about 50 every-day items in retail and ser-
vice establishments, around $4.62 billion, or approxi-
mately 40 cents on each dollar went for such things

E ton tn drinigr i acea took 78. milike*
See CONSUMER DOLLAR Page 2

HICIGIMYS QET QUARLTER OF BIUIONJ

Nearly a quarter of a billion dollars is being spent
on the Southeast's Federal-aid highway program now in
liquidi" form, according to a report of the Bureau of
Pulblio Roads, U. S. Department of Comrmerce*
The amount, totalling $245,343,000, is being az"
pended on projects programmed, those on which plans
haVe been approved, and construction has not been
started, and those on which construction is under waf*
It does not include funds spent on projects completed*
A total of $71s8L8,000 was recorded as in "unpro"
gra~mmed balances."
Emrpenditures made in the "acrtiven program included
Alabama, $29,587,000; Florida, $35,693,000; Mi~ssissip-
pi, $25,107 000; North Carolina, $15,311,000; south
Carolina, $18,826,000; Tennessee, $36,224,000; and
Geoirgia, $54,597,000*
Of the total in the activen program, $120,139,000
were Federal funds. The total mileage in the seven
States represented in the program was 5i,51330*


Authority
Indications are there will be no order, at least for
the peeent, diverting lumber products from civilian to
defense use, because the present output of primary
forest products as a whole is quite ample.
This was the conclusion reached at a meeting in
Washington of officials of the National Production
Authority, U. S. Department of Commerce, with members
of the Primary Forest Products Industry Conmmittee.
Consensus of NPA officials and committee members
was thap oh a'd or increased p ~uton f priar

ties, lumber and palpwfood --- all important to the
Southeast --- to meet defense needs was not necessary
from an overall standpoint shoce current demands are
nowr being met without too much difficulty. But, it wras
agreed, shortages have developed in some particular
lines, especially plyw~ood.

Your attention is again called to the
1ac oh sall orders, reguain an A oo Ma
available without charge at any of the field
of ies of te Depat nt of Comrmerce shownm


The committee was told by NPA that pulprfood, used
in the manufacture of paper, wras prodhoed at a record
rate in 1950, but Further azpansion in production wfas
needed to meet 1951 demands,
See NPA Page 2

P90L~j~TESALE TRD P 9'i0
Southeastern wholesalers participating in a month-
to-month sales survey conducted by the Bureau of the
Census reported total sales in 1950 approximating
$1.3 billion, a 39 per cent increase over that reported
by participants in the 1949 survey, according to a
current Census Bureau release.
Last year, an average of 685 firms took part in the
monthly surveys compared with around 600 in 1949.
The sales trend last year was 17 per cent greater
than in 1949 in the South Atlantic area and 14 per cent
more in the East South Central section, compared with a
15 per cent rise for the nation.
The sharp upward trend in wholesale sales last year
was due primarily to increased interest on the part of
See WHCLESALE TRADE Page 3


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE







Atlantas Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jackcsonville, Fla., Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Charleston,S.Cr
50 W~hitehall st., S.W., 218 P. O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal. Bldg., No. 6 Ihudson St.,
Tel. WP~lnut 4121,X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel.2-3641,I[-206 Tel. T777


Charlotte, N.C.,
1101 Chatam Bldg.,
Tel. 6-2488


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
723 Jamses Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5i673


Columbia, S.C.,
Cornell Arms,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson,Mlsa .,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972

Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa,St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Birmingham, Ala.,
319 Frank~ Nelson Bldg.,
Tel.53-34G21,X-355


aleigh, N. C.,
620 HIillsborough St.,
el. 43~4


MARCH 1, 1951


I


1950


**%."%1* e
very dollar
o'f income

Soute st
ern cronsum.
oer a e
for th


life, such


PERSONAL INCOME
OtLLIB NS OF DOLLARS S T


1947


848 ls9


NatiOR8l Production







I


Contract awards made by the Federal Government in
the Sourtheast from the beginning of the present fiscal
year through the first half of February had a dollar
vale of $5i7,492,977, aooording to a compilation made
in the Atlanta regional office of the U. S. Department
of CoImmer~oe from weekly award lists now available in
field offices of the Commeroe Department,
During the first half of February, purobases of
foods, tobacco produa~te, textiles, fruit juices and
other products made in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Misas-
issippi, North Carolina, South Carolina sad Tennessee
had a value of $6,825,228.

Note: If yoU are interested in this kind
of informations
1. Get the weekly award lists from the
nearest Commeroe Department field office
2. ask your Commerce Department field
office to get you a copy of Federal Ear.
chasineI Direc~tory issued by the General
Services Administration, which is free
3. Get the booklets on how to sell
to the various branches of the Government.
There is a small charge for these.

Dollar value of parobases made during the first half
of February with oumurlative totals for the fiscal year
included Georgia, since January 31, 1951, $567 289 and
$12,1.34845 for the fiscal year; Alabama, $396 036 and
$5,707,7339 Florida, $3,352,1/42 sad $6,658,904; Mi~ss-
issippi, $63,035 and $4,040,4051 North Carolina, $799,-
404 and $~9,8f55,560; south Carolina, $54,101 and $2,550,-
161; and Tennessee, $1,593,221 and $16,245,363.
Awards made since the beginning of the fiscal. year
showr that six educational institutions in as many
States in the Southeast have been given contracts for
the training of naval reserve offers. The contracts
total value of which is $366,742, include Georgia *
Insti~tute of Technology, $81,500; Alabama Polyboohnia
Institute, $61,914; University of Mississippi, $63,035;
Duke University, $44,2463 University of South Carolina,
$b46,244) and Vanderbilt University, $71,805.

CONSUMER DQLLAR Continued From Pane 1

Onr the other hand, the purchase of automobiles sand
their operational expense ran into the billions of
dollars, too. For example, sales by moto~rehile deal-
ers in the region totalled $1.7 billion) aultomobile
repair services and garages took in $146.8 million;
tire, battery and accessory dealers, $b190.4 million;
and gasoline service stations, $b721.2 million.
Sharp increases in many lines of retail and service
business were reflected in the 9 years from 1939 to
1948. For example, a 1,826 per cent advance was shown
in sales in floor covering stores; 1,023 per cent among
advertising agemciesi 902 per cent in sales of men's
and boys olothingi and 829 per cent in sporting goode
stores.


I
s
'

a


_ ______ ___ __


SPECIAL DATB.WEEES.MONTES
The publication Snecial Days. Weeka &
Months in 1951 is now available at all
Department of Commerce field offices,
It is considered invaluable in planning
advertising campaigns. All special days,
weeks and months known to the Department
of Commerce to be of interest to business
have been inoladed Price 154


._ .


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2


CONTRrACT WARraDS NOA $57.4 MILrlos


MA8 Contionuetha Frmao 1
Southeastern producers informed HPA they expected
to continue to keep abreast of demand. Western producers
reported a soaroity of logs in their area and urged that
more government-owned timber be made available for
cutting. Unless this sonroe is developed immediately,
it was stated, there will be a.ahortage of pulp logs
byfanl.
Northeastern producers said they can maintain our-
rent production, but that they could not expand pro-
duction unless more logs are made available.
The committee recommended that timber be imported
from Canada and Alaska to help expand production.
90NESTRUCTIOff
NPA amended its order stopping the commencement of
new buildings for commercial and annsement purposes
exoopt that authorised by angional offices of the
Department of Gommerce to exempt from such ozder build-
ings or structures for radio and television broadcasting,
plants for the primary purpose of publishing newspapers,
and printing establishments operated by publishing com-
panieals. primril fOorpubliction of books and periodi-

action was taken to assure that orders for paper
placed by Government agencies would be distributed
equitably among producers by the issuance of Order
M-36 requiring producers of paper to establish reserves
of designated grades in percentages of their monthly
production to fill qualified Government orders.
OFFICE EQUI~PIENT
NPA regulations were modified to permit the issuance
of defense rated orders for the procurement of commer-
oial office equipment and supplies and certain miscel-
laneous items by the Defense Department, Atomic Energy
Commission, National Advisory Committee for Aeronauties
and the Coast Guard. (Amendments to Delegations 1, 2,
3 and 4).
VOICE OF AM~ERICA
authority was given the Department of State to
assign DO priority ratings for certain materials to
maintain and expand the Voice of america. (Delegation
Number 8).
TEITILE MACHINERY
Members of the Textile Machineryr Manufacturers In-
dustry advisory Committee at a meeting with NPA of-
ficials told the latter that conversion at this time to
other defense production by the machinery producers may
result. in failure by the textile industry to meet
future defense requirements. NPA told the committee
that no measures are being developed at the present
time to specifically limit textile machinery production,
L0# VGLTAGE EQUIPiptiT
The Low Voltage Distribution Equipment Advisory
Committee recommended to NPA that a reserve percentage
of their production be established to spread defense
rated orders equitably among producers. NPA said an
order was being considered which would establish re-
serves intended to fill direct defense and defense-
rated orders.
NEW1 NPA OPFFCIALIS
appointment of Manly Fleisohmann as Administrator
of the National Production Authority sad Glen Ireland
as Deputy administrator was announced. Mr. Fleischman
succeeded William H. Harrison, who was moved from NEa
administrator to the top post in the recently-oreated
Defense Production Administration. Mr. Ireland has
been serving as assistant to the NPA administrator.
A~LUMIYDNU.COPPE~.STEEL
Limitations may soon be placed on the amount of alum-
inum, copper and steel available for passenger ears and
other consumer durable goods.








FPlEGI~ ~REVENUE CONT~INUES UP ,


buyers in full-line electrical goods, wiring supplies
and electrical construction materials, appliances and
specialties, hardware, industrial supplies, lumber and
building materials, plumbing and heating supplies, gro-
ceries and paper and its produate.
End of the year inventories last year were 23 per
cent greater among firae in the South Atlantic area and
35 per cent up in the Best South Central region, apprat-
israting at cost $95,581,000 and $36,622,000, respective-~
ly.

COlETRUCTION UP IN SOUITHEAST IN 1950

A 1.1 per cent increase in construction in the South-
east in 1950 over 1949 was announced by the F. W. Dodge
Corporation, with all of the States in the region shar-
ing in the gains*
The total for Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee last year
was placed at $1976.4 million, compared with $1400.8
million in 19Cc9*

For a combination of statistics on con-
struction activity plus current conditions
in the building materials industry get the
Department of Cormmerce Copatruction and
Construction M~aterials Industry Report*
available on a subscription basis of $3
a ye6e .
Largest increase in the region was in Tennessee,
where a gain of 5;0 per cent was registered. Next in
line was North Carolina with .an advance of 48.5 per cent*
The figures for the seven States wuith percentage in-
creases included Alabama, $176.3 million in 1949 and
$226.5 million in-1950, 28.5 per cent; Florida, $361.9
million and $531.9 million, 47 per cent; Georgias
$215 million and $296.1 million, 37.7 per cent; Mi~ssiss-
1991, $88.3 million sad $103.4. million, 17.1 per cent;
North Carolina, $193.8 ailli~on and $287.8 million, 48.5
per cent; South Carolina, $101.2 million and $134.2 mil-
l31 5 3. Spear cent; and aTnnessee, 264.~3 million sand


lIdications are that railroad freight revenue in 1950
will exceed that of 1949 ta a substantial margin in the
South.
According to the Association of Amlerian Railroades
raloarers erv a the rout ern rego a erene

responding period in 1949
monailroad fre ght revon oa beenshowing month to-

t e ptp ed~u ouigactivit as on the part of consum-
The AAR recorded total freight revenue in the
southern region at the end of the first 11 months of
1950 as $999,51.0,1423 compared with $896,841,696 at the
same time in 1949
On the other htn, passenger revenue continued to
drop in the region. The total at the end of the first
11 months of 1950 was placed at $s92,406,139 against
$101,302,368 at the same time in 1949.
Net railway operating income reflected a substantial
rise for the 1950 period over that of 19k9, or from
$93,070,877 to $10,835,195.
The increase in freight revenue in the southern reg-
ioy in lt seaosoll-maonmth rias has aot 1 per cent


lar st~ruction activity th haur Bu1wson-it
Materials Divir~sion of the U. S. Depart ent' of Comrmerce

Stat etic rpotD jonit y.L torta alue of ne
aostutio nb in c rn aat om t eam uted tor
cent from the December 1950 total.

Employmrent continued its normal midwinter decline
between December and January, with further curtailment
in outdoor work and the usual post-holiday lull in
trade. Total civilian employment was estimated at 59,-
010,000 in the week ending January 13, about It million
less than in the week ending December 9. Even with this
drop, employment was the highest on record for this
time of the year, exceeding last year's January level
by about 2 million.

a hi 0 or andM mail orderbeales for November 1950
year ago. After adjusting for seasonal factors and
string difference, sales of all chain stores in November
were unchanged from Getober, but substantial variations
in movement were shown a ong the various lines of trade,

Cuttings in November 1950 of most types of men's
apparel registered decreases from the October 19)50
levels, the Bureau of the Census reported. The average
weekly beating rates established in November 1950
showed a mixed pattern as compared with the levels
achieved in November 1949.

The output of footwear in November 1950, 38 million
pairs, was 13 per cent under the October 1950 pr~oduction
of /44 million pairs, but 9 per cent above th~e N~ovember
1949 output of 35 million paired, the Bureau of the Geness
anounced.

December 1950 wheat flour production was estimated
by the Bureau of the Census at 19,658,000 sacks, an
average of 983,000 sacks per working day compared with
881,000 eacks per working day in the pr~eceding month
and 885,000 in December 1949. Wheat flour mills in
December operated at 85.8 per cent of capacity, compared
with 76.8 per cent in November.

Personal income in December 1950 wsas at an annual
rate of $21,0.7 billion compared with $6232.9 billion in
November 1950, the Office of Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Comrmerce, estimated. For the year 1950,
personal income amounted to $223 billion, $17 billion
higher than in 1949 and substantially above the previous
anmnua high of $210) billion in 1948.
+++w+
The gross national product increased to $b280 billion
in 1950 as compared with $256 billion in 1949, it was
announced by the Office of Business Economioa, U. S.
Department of Com~meroe. This 9h per cent increase in
the market value of the nation's out ut of goods and
services reflected an expansion of 7L per cent in the
volume of production together with a general price rise
ap~proximating 2 per cent on the average for the year
over 1949.
+ + +a
Appointment of John H. ~ollands, of Buffalo, N. I.
as General Counsel of the National Production Author ty
of the U. S. Department of Commeorce was announced.


WHOLESALE TRADE


-Continued From Page 1


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


_ __









SOUTEs~rsTrl EcoNFIC: bjuUS xn~C 61 iui


(To Obtain Copies of This Material, Check It In The
Spqoe Prov3,ded And Send Thsa Pqge Og' The Bulletin 0(
goqqerqq o The Negreat Depag4meqt of 9pperge F),eld


Off ce. Your Name And Address Are Shown Below. Make
44 str4noes For Sa3,9s Eqteeri41 24Yqhle To Treqaurey


There are fourteen economic areas in the Southeast
with a population of more than 1,00,000 each, sooording
to a Burean of the Ceneus report.
The report, taken from figure compiled from the
Census Bureauds 1950 Gensus of Population, is the
joint work of the Bureau of the Census and the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics of the U. S. Department of
ALgrionltmre.
For an explanation of the economic area
setup, population and so forth, get reported
Series Census-BbE, Number 15 and Series
IC-3, Number 7 from your nearest Department
of Comrmerce field office. There is no charge
for theq.
The southeastern economic areas of more than 1400,000
population include one in Allabama; 3 in Florida; 3 in
Georgia; 2 in Mdissiasippig 2 in N~orth Carolina; 1 in
South Carolina; and 2 in Tennessee.
According to the Census Bureau, preliminary population
counts for the 1.1.3 State economic areas used for the
reporting of population and housing statistics from the
1950 census are divisions of States defined jointly by
that bureau and BAE and each such area consists of
"one or more counties with relatively homogeneous agri-
oultua, industrials social, and demographic character-
istics which differentiate them from adjoining counties
in the same State,
Mare than three-fourths of ~the 1,43 State economics
areas had population increases between 191,0 and 1950,
it was stated. There wrere 338 areas with population in-
oreases, of which 220 had gains of 10 per cent or more
and 120 had gains of 20 per cent or more.
The State economic areas characterised by heavy popu-
lation growth werew largely concentrated in the Wlest and
the South, it wars added*


Qg The United States. I~mtiicdemsNtPiedAeFe


L7N iional Production Authority Mdaterials
SInventory Control & Priorities Answers to
85 Questions
b amendment 4 to Order Md-4 Amendments to
Delegations 1, 2, 3 and 4 Delegation #8
L7 Census of Business, 19/48 (Name the Trade or Trades)



Annual Report of Bureau of Public Roads.........2@i
How to Sell to the U. S. Arser.......,...........30f
How to Sell to the U. S. Air Force.........,.. .15k
Basic Facts About Selling to the Government,GSA....
Federal Purchasing Directory Prinoipal Agencies -
Mdaterials Bought, GSA.......................,
Special Days, Wleeks & M1onths, 1951...............15 0
Construction & Construction Mats. Ind. Ript...$3 Year
Population of State Economie Areas, Apl.1,1950,PC3#7
State Economio Areas of the U. S., Census-Bae #15...
Establishing & Operating Your Own Business (Rev.)25%
01eomargarine, Dec. 1950, FFIM17J-120........
Fats & Oils, Dec. 1950, FFIM17-1-120. ...........,....
Nonlferrous Castings, Nov. 1950, FFIMd24E-110....,.....
Memorandum on Local Industrial. Development & Defense
Industries (Revision)............,...,.
/7 National Income Status & Prospects As Seen by an
Estimator Paeer by George Jassi. ...............
Small Business Aids:
ALdvertising for the Small Business #l269.........
How to Mlerchandise Nursery Furniture #F270.......
Check List for Planning a Store-Wide Promotio2n#7
Selecting a Men's Apparel Store Location #/272....
dCase Study M~easuring Potentials Before Intro-
duoing a New Product #273....................


( POUR OijN BUSINESS *
B completely revised version of the '
'booklet entitled Es~tablishinE! and Opera- '
'fige: Your Own Businep has just been is- '
'sued by the Department of Commerce and '
'is now available at any field office. The '
'booklet disonssea many pertinent factors '
'Eogngoje q,_gith.4Esbgagga spZ~r`Btogs,s 25&. '


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office 0,#
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009
Voltume 5, Number 5 Mlarch 1, 1951


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.I


PO 8g-100392


__


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOfD
PAYMENT OF POSWrE $300


BC-6-JP


UI VElsl R SITY1 OF111 FLOR IDA11111111111


PAGE 4


BUL LETIP


UNlIVERSITY OF FLORI~DA
LEaoY 1,. QUALLs
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS









UNITED STATES DEPARTMnENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE








Atflanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla,, MiLani, Fla., MohI.1e, Ala., Charleston, S. C.,
50 mhitehall St., sm.,. 218 P. O. Blag., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybo~d Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 6 Hudson St,.
Tel. Wblnrut 4121,1[-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. -53Tl 2-3641,1-206 Tel. 7771

Birmi~ngham, Ala., Chattanooga, Tenn., Columbia, S.C., Jacksron, eise., Tampa, Fla., Nashrille, Temnn,
319 Frank Nelson Bldg;., 723 James Indg., Cornell rmse, 426 Yazoo St., 608 Tampa St., 315 Union St.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355 T~el. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 2-3880 Tel. 4-21426-7
Memphis, Ternn.,
Mdadison at Pront,
Tel. 8-3426
m70 5, No. 6 Mranc 15, 1951


FEDERAL FURCHASES NEARLY $100 MILLoN
HOURLY EARNINGS AND HOURS IN MANUFACTURING The Feder-
DLLRg HOUR 81 Goven-
**'"" aent is

p^E,,oc.,f""6~/ to purchase
.1.41 LI ~----~-~ -(44 large quan-
an., wa,,,,,, titles at
services in
.m "9 949 ..4 1 es950 195*** th* Sent-
east, re-
ports being received in Department of Calmerce and local
Chamber of Commerce offices indicated,
For extample, in Feb~ruary salne purobases in the re-
gion, which included aine sweepers in Jacksonvilleg
$15.7 million worth of blankets in Roesville, Ga; lao-
quer, trailers, food and paper products, sandbags,
fruit juices, lumber manufactures, rplan hose, tobacco
products and other commodities, had a total value of
nearly $b40 million, bringing the cumulative total for
the fiscal year to almost $100 million.

This information is contained in weely
contract award lists. If you have a Depart-
ment of Commnerce office in your city, they
are available there without obarge. If not,
qak your Chamber of Cormmerce for the litpt,
Culmulative totals for the fiscal year included
Georgia, $~35,389,9001 Alabama, $7,687,800; Florida, $10..
439,8001 Missiesippi, $4~,447,000; Nlorth Carolina, ~,.
550,170) south Carolina, $3,328,600; and Tennessee, 820.
347,200,
HEL FQR SOYTHEIAST'S SMALL.~BUIS.IgESa
The Federal Government is pursuing a five-way ap.
proach to the problems of small bnainese during the
present national emergency.
FirsPPP~~~~PPP~~~t, Wlilliam Barrison, administrator of the De.
fense Production administration has asked the Governors
of all States to appoint a Governor's Commission on
Small Business to marshall community resources for the
full utilisation of small bnariness in the mobilisation
program.
Second, loans for industrial expansion and production
important to the defense effort have been alde avail-
able.
Third, the N3ational8 Production Authority to exertng
every effort to aid small bnainese in obtaining certain
materials in short supply.
Bee SALGL BOSINE~ISS Page 2


Ask your nearest Department of Co~merce
office for a copy of Regulation 4, Direct-
ive 1, for a fnll arplanation of this
"MR~O" nroaram.

"Many business and industrial firms, educational,
health, welfare and prrklio service institutions are at
present having great difficulty in obtaining the mPater-
ias and equipment necessary to continue in full opera-
tion at a time when more and more materials are being
used to build new facilities," said M~anly Fleischmann,
Administrator of NPA, in inaning the regulation. "W~e
cannot let the need for materials and equipment too
bulild new facilities interfere with the mainte~nane of
existing capacity. Wie can afford a few pounds of aetal
today to keep a machine rnnMing rather than several
tone tomorrow to make a replacement machine."
SING DUST
NPA issued Order MI-37 too provide a continued flow
of rawr materials to sino dust pwroucers, the effoot of
which will be to forestaell aexessive conversion of
scrap into alab sino at the expense of the sino dust
surpply.

Mdr la-U we amende to assum the poompta
orderly filling of DO rated orders for high tenaci~ty
rayon and tire cord yarn too met increased defense
requairemaents by requiring producrsr two sooept rated
orders up to 15 per cent of sobeduled monthly entfput,
8%P~ PLQUCTS
SSu~pplement k to Qular -1E was, issued providing far
See HPA page 2


~Qlf~ THE "BO" PROGRAM:
BPainess and other establishments
in the Sou~theast will now be per-
11 itted t0 use priority rating to
obtain equipment and supplies neo-
eeseary for maintenance, repair and
operation of their present facili-
:ion ties under a programs just establish-
ed by the Nlational Production Authar-


THE


ity.
To assure peak efficiency in tbia
rity present national ...rganoJ, set i.-
ened Regulation 4, Directive 1,
giving warehousese, factories, retail
and wholesale stores, service shop,
faras, hospitals, schools, libraries,
churches and Federal, State and local
~B~governmental agencies, when necessary
the right to use a rating designated
obtalning sruch equipment and supplies.


PrOduc


Author






as DO**9 in


:t





NP HELIS TEXTILE INDUSTRY

Recent action of the Nrational Production Authority
making it possible for bnainesses in the Southeast to
obtain materials for the maintenance, repair and oper.
ation of their machinery and equipment will be a boon
to the textile industry, representatives of the textile
machinery industry told NPA officials at a meeting in
Washington,
Anticipated increasing orders for heavy fabric
needed by the armed forces will create greater demand
for textile products, making it necessary for the in-
dustry to be provided with correspondingly large
quantities of accessories, it was stated, jaitifying
operation of WAb's so-called "MIROn order in the pro-
ouresent of materials in short supply so far as that
industry wras concerned,
The armed services have already drawn upon textile
plants in the Southeast for good valued at many ail-
lions of dollars,
The colmmittee conferring with NR, constituting that
agenoy'e advisory committee for the textile machinery
industry, was asked to prepare and submit estimates for
scarce materials for the remainder of 1951 which will
be taken into account in future allocations of mater.
ials in short supply,
The industry manufactures combed, carriers, bobbine
shuttles, needles, spools, tubes, frames, top rolls,
rings, harper and loom beams, reeds and many other
accessories essential to the production of textile
machinery and its operation and maintenance in mills.

SqJ.LL BUINH~SS Contioned From Page 1
A fourth program, which has been under operation for
some time, is that in which daily and weekly liats of
goode for which the Government is in the market and
those currently purchased are made available to small
business through Department of Commesrce field offices
and local Chambers of Commerce for prime and surb-con.
tracting purposes,
Finally, the National Production bAthority is la.
suing a series of ODefense Production Aids" in the
form of ideas and suggestions to small bnainess manage.
ment on the operation of plants, equipment and person.
nel,
In a letter to the Governore requesting appointment
of the Small Business advisory Commissions, General
Barrison of DPA said: "In meeting defense requirements
we are determined to take whatever steps are necessary
to see to it that small business can make the greatest
possible contribution to the mobilis'ation program and
to maintain a high level of production to supply chvile
ian needsea
Regarding the loan program, HR has announced the
lending of $1.2,860,131 to 16 small business firms in
11 State and Alaaska, including one to a Birmingham
firm.


IVPB Continued From Page 1

approximately 9,000 tons of steel products monthly
during the period of April through June for delivery
to United States ship yards for repair and conversion
of seagoing vessels.
OffIMMOS AND IEAD
Provision was made to keep antimony and lead moving
through normal distribution channels for defense and
essential civilian industries in two orders, M-38 and
lr-39 isoned by NPA.
.QMTERUCTION
NPA's program stopping the commencement of commercial
construction in excess of $5,000, except that approved
by the Department of Commerce, wras amended in amendment
5 to Order M-4 permitting an increase in expenditures
for alterations and additions to hotels and office and
loft buildings.
RaeM ER..1EUCTS
Simplification of rubber products as a means of con-
serving rubber for the mobilisation program was ordered
in Supplement 1 to Order M-2,
DEERSKIWS
In Order M-29 as amended, the processing of individ-
Hally-owned deerakina into items for personal use or
for gifts was permitted.
CPER
Revision of the basio copper conservation order to
permit the use of copper held in inventory after March
I was annonunced in an amendment to Order MI-12.
1951 SECOND QUARTER OUTL)OO
NR conducted a survey of the basic demand-aupply
situation regarding the use of metals in the second
quarter of 1951 and the results and outlook were
announced by administrator M~anly Fleischmann in Press
Release Number 291
ALUMINMR WIN~DOWS.AIR DUCTS
Gradual e'limination of the manufacture of alaminna
windows and air ducts as a means of further conserving
the strategic metal for defense was announced in Amend-
aent 3 to Order 1I-7.
TIN IN CAEf
The conservation order regulating the use of tin in
oans to permit the packing of some products not previous-
ly permitted was amended in Order Y-25, amendment 1.
DINDST~IAL~ CHEM~ICAIS
The Secretary of the Interior was given authority in
BR Delegation 9 over the production and distribution of
industrial chemicals used principally in the petroleum
industry,

HPLse basic copper conservation order nr wasodified
in Order M-12, Amendment 1, to permit the use until
April 30, 1951, of copper fins in heating and ventilat-
ing equipment used in home and other construction.
CIEL
Revision of the basic nickel conservation order to
permit the use of nickel held in inventory after Mlarch
1 in the manufacture of certain products was provided
for in I8-14, Amenndment 3.
LEBTEM
Additional steps to assure adequate supplies of
leather to meet increasing military demands for shoes
and other leather products were taken in an amendment
to order Y-35.
BARIUM6 CARBONATE
Order Y-32 was amended to assure equitable distribn-
tion of defense rated orders among producers of barium
carbonate so that no producer will be required to ao-
oept defense orders for more than 20 per cent of any
months scheduled output,
s Copies of the foregoing documenia are avail-
-=8 abl at allComaire Department field office a


__


r I


1950CEW~BS OF HOU~SfING
Special tabulations on the 1950 Census of
Housing are now available for the following a
Savannah, Ga., 26 No. 158
Columbia, 8. C., a 162
Knandale, Tenn., 181
West Pala Beach, Fla., I I 189
Orlando, Fla., a 192
Laela~nd, Fla., a 196
Jacksronville, Fla., I a 199
Miami, Fla., a 203
FO~Lorece Ala., *, a *45
Greeneboro, N. G., a 106
Yarn~a e~nn- I 1 '128


~PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





fLUbIA PRODUCTION CONTINUES UP

Although total production of lumber In 1950 was the
greatest since 1929, and production in the fourth quar-
ter of 1950 was the highest of any fourth quarter of
record, unusually bad weather and Governmrent controls
have left an atmosphere of uncertainty in the industry,
sooording to the 79th quarterly report of the Lumber
Survey Committee made to the Secretary of Commerce,
The general price freese, it was stated, "has caused
confusion throughout the entire lumber industry and
current production is being hampered to some ext~ent by
severe weather and an increasing shortage of manpower.
Following the issuance of Regulation "In by the
Federal Reserve Board and tighter controls" imposed
by the Federal Housing Administration and Veterans .
Administration, applications for mortgage guarantees
were less than half the number received during the
previous quarter, the report added.
nOther restrictions, announced by NEa, will also
affect building," it continued. "Specific restrictions
on the use of copper, steel, aluminum in building have
been issued, and additional metals may soon be included.
Construction of buildings for armusement~purposes has
been forbidden. Construction of commercial buildings has
been restricted until MYarch 15, after which date
licenses rnst be secured.n

SNote: Those interested in the foregoing I
report should ask their nearest Commerce 9
Department to order it for them, I

SOUTHEAST STILI PRE;DOMIbNLUY~I RURAQ

The Southeast, including Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mdississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee is still predominantly rural, but is fast becom-
ing urbanized.
This was reflected in a preliminary report just is-
sued by the Bureau of the Census from its 1950 Census
of Population,

This report is Series PC-3, Number 10,
and is available at any Department of
Compnnroe field office,

In 1930, 70.9 per cent of the 16,558,383 residents
of the 'I-State area were living in rural areas; in 1940
there were 68.1 per cent of its 18,425,162 persons
classed as rural; and in 1950 only 57.5 per cent of the
20,831,570 residents were rural.
Florida was the least rural of all of the seven
southeastern States, that State last year boasting an
urbanized population of 65.4 per cent of its total
population of 2,743,736. In fact, only 12 States in
the nation and District of Golumbia could better that
record. On the other hand, Mi~ssissippi with a low r
count of 27.8 per cent of its population urbanisredf*
offset Floridata showing for the region.

Q1UARTERlldSTER TEXILE; SPECTFICATIONS I;SSUED
Text~ile firms in the Southeast concerned with Federal
Government contracts and which wish to sell to the Gov-
ernment will be interested in a publication fast issued
by the Office of Technical Services, U. 8. Department
of Commerce, entitled Surmmary of Soeeification RBeauire"
ments for Quartermaster Tertiles*
The publication, available through all Comm~eroe De"
apartment field offices for $3.25, was issued for the
first time in 1949 and now incorporates changes in
specification anabers and other specification require-
sents. It also includes all listed specifications of
the Quartermaster Corps on textiles*


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


B ~ )SN S )E

December 1950 cash dividend payments of United States
corporations issuing public reports were $2 142 million,
bringing the total paid during the year to 97,885 milllion
or one-fifth more than the $6,453 million paid out in
1949. December dividend payments were 45 per cent larger
than in the same month of 1949.
*
The business population at the beginning of 1951 ex-
ceeded 4 million concerns, reflecting an increase of
about 50,000 during 1950 and a gain of more than 625,000,
or 19 per cent, from the amn~ber of businesses existing
10 years earlier, according to the February Annual R~e-
view Number of OBE's monthly Sprvey of current Businesp.
*
Business and consumers were in a favorable financial
position at the end of last year, with incomes the high-
est on record and supported by large overall holdings of
liquid assets. holdings of cash and U. S. Government
securities by business corporations expanded by over $6
billion, exceeding by over $3 billion the record holdings
accumulated by the end of World War II.
w++++
Sales of all retail stores in January amounted to
$118 billion or about 25 per cent above a year ago.
Although sales usually decline from December to January
this year's drop of about 20 per cent in daily average
sales was rmuch less than normal. After adjusting for
seasonal factors and trading day differences, sales in
January were up 9 per cent from December.

The value of all business inventories at the end of
December 1950 was estimated at $61 billion, and for the
pear the value increased $9.7 billion, of which about
three-fiftba was due to increased replacement costs.
Manufacturers' stocks accounted for over one-half of
the increase in book value. Retailers' and wholesaleral
stocks contributed one-third and one-sixth.
+ + ++
Chain store and mail-order sale for January totalled
$2,324 million, or about 24 per cent above a year ago.
Daily average January sales were down 34 per cent from
December, a less-than-seasonal drop. Seasonally correct-
ed, sales were up 6 per cent from December. Almost all
lines recorded increased in sales in January after allow-
ances for seasonal obanges.

Construction activity during February 1951 exceeded
all previous February records, the Departments of Com-
merce and Labor reported jointly. Total value of new
construction put in place amounted to nearly $2 billion,
22 per cent more than the February 1950 total. Nearly all
types of structures were being built in larger volume
than a year ago.

Production of woolen and worsted woven fabric in
the fourth quarter of 1950 rose to 122 million yards, 5
per cent above the output in the third quarter and 3
per cent over the fourth quarter of 1949, the Bureau of
the Gensus reported.
+ + *
Shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear and
nightwear in 1950 were valued at $273 million, a 16 per
cent increase over the 1949 total of $236 million, the
Bureau of the Census announced. Production of all types
of knit underwear and nightwear, except union suite,
also registered substantial increases from 1949 to 1950,
*
Production of rayon broad woven goods in the 4th quar-
ter of 1950 amounted to 601 million linear yards.








PAGE 4

EIGiRATIOW6 FROM SOUPTgBAST BGaVI

The' Southeast Blabama, Flarida, Georgtia, M9iessi.
ippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee -
experienoed a loss of 1,882,000 residents through mi-
grations to other territory, according to a compilation
of the Bureau of the Census, in the decade from 1940 to
1950.
Not all of the seven States contributed to that
total, however, Florida reflecting a not in-migration
of 558,000.
Natural increases, however, namely, the ratio of
births over deaths, offset the out i~tions from
the region, and, consequently, the area ended the 10"
year period with a gain of 2,507,000 in population*

Keep in touch with your nearest Department
of Commerce office for the Latest- figures on
the 1950 Census of Population now being re-
oeived.
The mnuber of natural increases in the region totally
3,826,000. Such increases were greater than outb-migra"
tions in all of the seven States, ezoopt in Mdississippi
where out-migrations exceeded the natural increase b
about 5,000*
In the South as a whole, net out-migration amounted
to nearly 2.5 million compared with a natural increase
of nearly 8 million. The South's net increase was
5,531,187, or from 41,665,901 in 191,0 to 47,197,088 in
1950*

a0aai MITAe COWiS ON soUHEAST FARE
There wrere 21 per cent more milk cowrs on farms in
the South At~lantic area this year than the average for
the years 1920 to 1939, the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce, reported. The
number this year, which was preliminary, was placed at
2,171,000 compared with 1,794,000 between 1920 and 1939*
A corresponding increase was also shown for heifers,
1 and 2 years old, and heifer calves under 1 year old.
All areas in the country, except the West North Cen-
tral section also reflected increases in milk cows for
the comparable periods, anrd for the Un~ited Statse as a
whole the gain was from 23, 537,000 between 1920 and
1939 to 24,579,000 in 1951. The number of cowse in the
South Atlantic as a percentage of the U. S. total was
still relatively low, however. GPo es


EUNI[VansITY or~ stean
LEROY 1.. QUALLS

DEB511TOA1 Rmri~~


UNIVERSITY OFFLRD

3 1262 08748 8689
BULLETIN vr Lvr.......

..w NEW BOOKS

AND REPORTS

(To Obtain Conies Of This Materiale Check It In The
Space Provided BAd Send This Paere Of The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The Nearest Department of Commeroe Field
Office. Your Name And Address Are Shown Below. Make

ofTe Uialte sqqe, tes ot riedAreFre.

e A Material ( ~ok Those Desired Bel ~)
Order M-37 Order M-3,~ Amended ~7Order M-1,
Order M-38 Order Sup. 4 ....
Order M-4, Amend. #5 Order M-2, Sup. 1 ....
Order M-29, Amended Order 8L-12, Amended.....
Press Release #291 D1Fer M-7, Amendment #3....
Order M-25, Amendment 1 HPA Del. #9.........
Ozder 8-12, Atlandmnt # Order M-14L, Amendd31,-
Order M-3 5 //OdrM32 .......................
79th Quarterly Report of Lumber Survey Cormmittee..
Series P0-3, #1 ..................
Summary of Specification Requirements for Starter-
(PB98573r) master Textiles...........$;3.25
R7 evenume & Expenditures of Selected States,1950,G4F50
No. 3..
r Population of the U. S., Urban & Rural, By States,
April 1, 1950, Series PC-3,#10....
Monthly Report on the Labor Force, Jan.1951,P-57,#1030
Housing Charaoteristics of the U.S.,Ap11,1950,BC5#Y1
Provisional Estimates of Population of U.S., Ap.1,
1950 to Jan. 1, 1951, P-25,#46..... .
L7Population of Aaerican Samoa, Canal Zone, Quram &
'Virgin Islands of U.S., Apr.1, 1950, P0-11,#2...
Cotton & Linters, FFI, ML51-8-51....................
Animal & Vegetable Fata & 011a,1945-49,M17-1-09.....
A Study of the Effoots of Form Factors on the Trans-
lation of Inheren~t Physical Properties of Textile
Fibers into Textile Structures,PB100 363.....$8.25
Pick~ling g~a l~ocao for a small business, #274
SThere is Money in Saall Towns For Photographers,
#5276
now to Profit as a Retail Florist, #r27
An Advertising Chook List, #r278
Business Pitfalls to Avoid, #r2SL
sign Advertising, #2r82
-oss Revitalise Your Se~lling, #283


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


fi`-----


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009
Volume 5, Number 6, Mdarch 15, 1951


-- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE *-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





PQ* 5, 11o. 7
ETAsiI 80ZIi COIs~BSlHErS RB
DEPARTMENT STORE SALES AND STOCKS Mpn
(ESNLYADJUSTED, 1935-39 100) ORn re a il



meh .
.matd ar.
Seres Suver t CurentBusiess ing aciv*

.I. S. Danartment at Camerc itg which
marked moh at 1950 talloring entbreak at the Kaeen
war witfh attendant international complications,
In a survePy condoo~ted the Burean at the Cnsrus
dealers in 21 oit~ies and areas indicated inreaees i
salee in the first month at 1951 which eren well raboe
the corresponding nmoth of 1950, the gains ranging
from 6 per cent in Asheville, B. C., to as high as 58
per cent In Chilton and Per~ry counties, i~aulaba, with
Savaannh experieu~nch a 51 per cent risei Clarkadale,
45 Per cent; Aurguseta, 41 per cenfts Atlanta, 34 per
centi Coahomar and Quitman coulnties, Miss,, 42 per cents
Earrison and Stone counties, MIss., 40 per cenft; ard
Birmingham, 22 per cent.
Other gains, in peseentages, wreres Qu]port, 28)
lingpaort, Tenn, 121 Macon, Ga, 23; Columbus, Ga.
141 Greenwood, 8. C., 151 Jefferson ~cnn~ L1, Ala as
SPUlIvan, Ilaisoi and Wlashington ooanati~e, Tenn.. 125
Manatee slan Sarasota countiesI la,, 151 Blookey sand
Twiggs counlti~e, Ga., 171 Delalb, ~itlton and Rochdaele
connties, Georgia, 331 Bunocabe and Indison counties
I. 0-, 91 sal Gmaenood and McCormick counties, 8. C.
14 *


APRIL 1, 195L
The st~lantr regional office
of the U. 8. Department of Camree
ht B ao 22 npotiODB fWo
permuissi to repai sher a
NatOnGI senstrust c~amrcial projects
in the Bentheast.
mader ter at an edo issud bq
roducton the Intional PRoduction Ahaotha
stoppiag the somenroemt t all
Iuh rt construction projects oestiaK
bTthe Department of Camro*a and
also mider enta~in other ooaditions.
The iPjuk appre, ho
wee far tbe period at appo~razimel
the middle of Fe~b~ruar to the sam
time in March, inolnded 23~ in Ala
ban~ costing0 aPPrazimately $1128,-
8573 Florida, 64 costasg 3,200,400; Georgia, 62 costing
$2,571,170t MItssissippi, 14 oceting $486,0001 senth8 Caro-
Ilng, 21 ocating $557,7003 and Tennessee, 39 costing
$,161,7457.
Notes IPA has amnsded its designation at
antharity to approved or dey appicartions feo
permission to coasrusrrt Ftae ~this carter to
pealpit the DeParctat of COmers district af*
iioo in sJq~rr Makove en Iiu to
carry onr those functions in addition to the
riatiol afiie la Artlants.
The hPA construction orde~, 1C-4, nampts fre its
proviicas those structzes which forbber the defense
affet, those oesentald to phblie helth, welar an
Suo hPA Page 2


s ADDITIGRAL DEPAB2EH W CCIMIERCE WFEBs peSTAnmD

our ams offow have been established in the Bentheast to render better searise to
I businesemnl in oolnnection with the program at the Departaent of C mrcea rad its
* agency, the National RPrnodtion Awthiy The elobi es a locatM in lanaille, Tenn,
* LAuguta, Ga., and Askan and Barneall, 8. O.-Businessmasn sal others in those azzes
* inteneste in the activities of ths Department of Commsroe are seqested to get in
teach with the staffs at those offices for quick, e-te-rou~d serise. The addressed
* ar shoun at the top of this page of the ~Bulletin gf cggrage
SCzweation a th timour aer afflow ta ~thp region ashs a total at 17 such field effices I
io this alwa which nsourstand smalLy to mande all aid possible i lia adatlstrtion at the I
' MPA and other aroawra eoannoted br the Donarctm a at Camareoe. I


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE




'1M~FC~E&


tisami, Fa,
947 Serbold Eldg.,
Tel. 9-533
Jacksn, Miss.,
4526 Yasoo St.,
Tal. 3-W972
Athen, 8. C.s
1833 Cure 8$*


Atlantr, Ga.,
50 Whitehal St.,S.W.,
Tel. WA-41LP,EE453


Savannah, Ga.,
2L8 P. 0. Eldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


JacksonvPille, Fla,
425i F~erl E(ldg.,
Tel. 4-711


Mobile, Als,
308 F~eral Eldg.
Tel. 2-364C1, 1-%

Tamp, Fla,
608 Tmpr St.,
Te. 2-38800


Charleton, 8.C.,
Iwet End Broed BS.,
Tel. 7771

4110 Mashrille Tprut,
Tel. 46-2426


BiraighamAla., Chafttnooga, Tenn,
319 Ptank Nelson Blds.,7;23 Jama Bldg.,
Tel. 53-342LI-355 Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, 8. C.,
Cornel l rm,
Tel. 3-185


Memphisr, Tenn.,
Madison at ront,
Tel. 8-3426


InU1cavi le, TLn, Aulgus~t, Ga,
219Daylig~ht E4g, Messerll Haone*
Tel. 5-1238


201-203 COunty OfiE*o Eldg.









___.-___~_ __ _._~~~ I


_ .
a


aP comm~rea rrOmL pre 1
safety of a colrmanity, or those whlich will alleviate or
poreent a hardship to a specifleon conity. In addition,
MPA has recently issued several additional amaedents,
and it is advisahle that all who plan to earry ou~t aq~
oonsarnotion pr~ojtec get in t0aoh With their near*st
Department at Com~erce office for guidane.
Under terma of an amendment to HPA Order 5-13 zregla-
ting the sobedallag of rated azders for steel, the
present requirements for acceptance of DO-ated ozders
for earban rad alley plates was set at 20 per cent of
arerage monthly shipmnts beginning in Maoy.
Twentqy-two saelters and 2 fabricators, inclluing the
Zm asel8mting Corporation, Memphis, wer added to the
list of those that wnl be penitated to melt oo Aw~-
wise use auiumbm cranp. (BPA Order M-22, Amend. #2Z).
IE5ECT WIRE SCREFMgIZ0
Action was taken in Chder 8-42 to distribute defense-
rated orders equitahly saong produoers of insect wire

An arder (I43; desge to asurn equitahle ths-
tribution of daefene rated orders among mentfactuarvs
at constrnation mchinery and equipant was announced,

An ramndmnat to Order M-2 wa issued increasing
somwhat the amount of rubber available for civilian
consumtion, effective March 1. The effootive date of
the rubber industry's -reaolmendlations for conservring
natural rubber in a wide variety of products was dclay-
ed until March 15.
BllVI POHE EQUIPME
At planned production program for the heavy power
equipeant industry was established by HPA effectine
March 16 in Ozder Y1-44.
8ma. *OPI It7Ir~ E*C
Action was taken to obtain for defense and defense-
supporting requirements in the second quarter of 1951
an additional million tons of finished steel ~poducts
and further amounts at copper, aluminum, sing, rubber,
nickel and other strategio materials in Ozeer Y-4t7
(Bbe Amadenrt 4 to Order Y-7 (AIlurminn), and
Amndamnt 3 to Order -1~2 (Copper).

Order Y-34 was amended to permit the sale of leather
whole stook through intermediaries in order to maintain
norm1 channels of distribution of whole stock.

Order Y-5 was amended to increase by 5 per ount
effective April 1 supplies of alasminu available to
independent, non-integrated pr~imary aluminna tahrioa-
t~ars to fill DO~aated orders.

In Order YI-48, BPAL placed bisath under strict con-
ervarction control to mreet heavy demands of the rearma-

COPPER AND ALUMINUM
Aurmnant 4 to Order P-7 (Aluminmm) and laendment. 3
to Qrder 2-12 (Coppr) were issued establishing perit.
laduse of oopper and alrmima for the second quarter
Silik casilks TUBNr & 9.8~ PIElI
A prdodution program designed two provide steel

a~eative in April for the oil and gas industries in

COIRAMINRS
In Direction 1 to Qrder Y-25, HPEL assured increased
packs for hardship oases in the oanning industry.


Parther effrts o the Fearl Govamarlt to speed
ap its rearamat program we awflooted in an maanoune,
ant ad* t the Defense PRaodution ~admni~straion that
owhificates of aeceity permitting rapid tax write,
etts ra atlays for S~pabao R a defense prodnetion wre a
Lssued from Jamary 25 through March 7 to 22 Sanrthaeat-
war firm involving p~ojects with an eatiraed cost of
$117,238,0000.
Altogether DPA irssud owhtificates to 231 oampanies
looted in the Uaited States for 323 projects with a
estimatd cost of $,183,424,159.
Main objectina o the Pr~ogre is to accelerate ea,
pension in the axwa o th e orntryls soonomyr in which
it is oded, rad to get such expansion br encouoraging
business to take the initkiatin ith a minimal of
Gerarnment intervention and assistance.
The Southeatern firms reeiving the write-aff
grants holdade tbe Georgia, Florida and Alabsen Rail.
road comPany, railway transportation, $72,~000; Sabor~d
Aiirlina* Rilroad conquy0 Atlnt to Birmingham, rail.
way trnanportation, )2, ~,1421 Union Bag and Pape
Capaqy Bavmannh, cerzagated base, paper and wazd
paperr, 9,000,000i 8$*4 Briquette Corparation, AS,
lants, stel eorap, including tin oan hriquettes, $35,.
000; Wacon Iron and Paper corrmpaq Maon, wast paper
sad steel serap, $38,000.
Isrh Amerisan Baron comrpay, Childerrsbrg, Ala,
aYQon pars, $18,799,098) lahigh Partland; Geant Com.
pany, Bennell, Fla, Portland smant, $1,062,290)
Armour andr C bompaq B bew Fl. uphris aid and
tripe suphu phophat, 6975,500; Biegel Paper
Corporation, Calnambu county, North Carolina, pine,
gPlp sad hadrwood pulp, $13,807,500; Barth Carolina
Rilp, Flymonlth, H. C., sei-dChmioal pulp, $1,051,713)
Boollagsworth and Witney, lMobil, pulp rad specialty
paes,$3,800,000; Zeate Corporation, Kingaport,
Ten. ood palp sods, $4,25i8;000; DeBardaleben Coal
Corporation, Rivar Blrff, Ala, sel transrportation,

Super Servies Motor Freight cormrPa, Ibahrile,
taa tranpspotation, $470,000; St. Joe RPapercomaq
Pert St. Jo, Fla, Kraft container board, 2,1,5
Ideal Caesnt omalrrn, Pobile, Parhland oement, $9,996E.
554) Carolina Giant Gement compapy, Euayrlille, 8. C.,
Perbland and masonry oemen, $4,~67,310t Seaboard AIr
ILine Railroad eempany, Savarnnh, Ga., to Mobile, Ala,
sailway transporftation, 319,0001 L. F. A. Oil cormpa,
Memphiss gasaline, $1,7,0,000; International Mlinerals
cad Chemioals Corpoantion, Melberry, Fla., oesaicals,
$6s600,000) and Interational Paper company, Natches,
Miss., bleached dissolving pulp and bleached pulp,
)2,034,300 ad $2,937,658, rspaectively,
GIFT FACEAGE% EBTRICTIOWP IFTED

Gift peehages that do not eoat more than $25; ean
aew h be at to any coruntry in the world, azoopt China
and North Korea withesrt the necessity at obtaning a
li a Coe One of Interntion Trade, U. 8. De"
The package rat contain ony such itma u as wld
analrlly go into a glin peaolag, such a reca, noathsag,
annes and musainals, and ast be addamasM hT a in-
dividual donor to an individualL donee. If sent through
-;*:.-ii **- obg ift P el ra ,ea a rr id te
lot ore than one package am may be sent by a
dornor to a single donee, and the sender is required to
enter the words "Gift Pareel" on the address side ofC
the package and on ray forms requird for custom pr-
poew.


eruca mar zam am w


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





spmmER manzB amm~nr m~laPSm


Action lay the Federl Government to provide the law
ber industry of the South and other sections of the
country with sufficient operating facilities to enable
it to cope with current national rearmamnt needs for
snah products was announced*
The National Production Authority of the U. 8. De"
partment of Goamerce called upon the U. S. Forest Ser"
vice to conduct a nationwide survey to determine the
amount of equipment, operating supplies and annpowrer
used in 1950 la primary forest industries, sawaills rand
round wrood concentration yards so that defense agencies
any be guided in actiol ns neessary to provide them with
the equipment necessary to meet the high level of ~eme
genoy requirements for forest products*
All important logging industries are to be covered
in the survey, including produers of sadlogs, veneer
logs, pulpwood, poles, piling, mine timbers, chemical
wood and miscellaneous bolts. Sawaills and oonoontra"
tion yards handling poles, piling and other rorund tia-
bers will also be covered to determine usage of oritical

formation on equipment and amoanoer requirements obtain-


offies throughout the United Statse and Alaska, who
will visit carefully selected samples of plants in the
various wood-42ing industries to determine use atxl
source of primary forest products. In the case of saw
ills sad around wood conoontration yards, acftual se


visited next to determine usre of equipment, supplies
anid manpower in log harvesting and transportation*

SQIPBBS ggYW hgCCR ShT

Customs districts in the Southeast last year *etab.
lashed an all-time high in total dollar value of goods
imported into this country.
Approximately $279.8 million worth of imports were
recorded for ports in the districts of Florida, Georgias
North Carolina, South Carolina and Mobile, a substantial
increase over the $213.2 million for 19469 and far ahead
-of the value of such importa in previous years.
By districts in the region, the dollar value last,
year included North Carolina, $33.6 million; South Caro.
Ilna, $38 million; Georgia, $48.6 million; Florida,
$110.6 million; and Ilobile, $49 million. The region
kept pace with the nation for which an increase in the
dollar value of imports from $86.5 billion in 1949 to
$8.7 billion last year was registered,

DPA AN~NOUNDEgS MIERAIS.MEAIrls AWRBD
The Defense Production Administration has announced
that $010,000,000 will be used to encourage the miningr
and production of certain minerals and metals bodly
needed in the national program of defense.


metals or minerals as antimrony, aabast~os, beryl, bis-
m~th, serium and rare earth ores, chrome, oobalt, calua-
bina, copper, oryoli';e, fluorspar, graphite, including
ormo~ihe flakes, ]qanite and other refractories, lead


Maintracturers, shipmats~~EEEE~~~EEEE~~~ and new orders expanded
sharply in Jamtary, and inventory book values increased
nearly a million dollars. A apart in consumer buying
and celebrated defense procurement wre both factors
in the advance of mamfacturing activity. Ualo, higher
prices were a parvasine factor in the dollar figures.
*
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers in
January were estimated at $7,423 million, or 15 per cent
above Deooabr 195;0 on a seasonallr adjusted basis.
Higher prices contributed to the increase. D~urah1 sod
sales were $2,655 million in January, 16 per cent higher
than the previous month, after adjustment for seasonal
differencess
** **
Total business inventories at the and of January aere

January was about $1.8 billion above Deoeaber with some-


aillion higher than the previous month, while retailers*
awd holesalers, tooks rose $600 million and $400 mil-

Personal income in Jausary was at an annual rate of




employment showed little change between Jaumar and
February, scording to the Bureau at the Consus. Esti-
mated at 58,905,000 in the weak ending Feb~ruary 1o,
total civilian employment, however, was m~ah the highest
ever recorded for this tims of year.
*
A sales increase of 14 per cent was registered by
large independent retail stores in February 1951 com-
pared with February 1950. Their February sales wren 11
per cent short of the January 1951 dollar volume, how
ever. Halrdware stores and lumber and building materials
dealers recorded respective gains of 30 per cent and 26
per cent and department store sales were 18 per cent
higher.
+ *
Secretary of Commeree Charles Sawyer announced that
the Department of Colmmeroe is contracting with the Mobil-
isation Anlalpsis Center of the Earvard Business Bohool
for a review of United States international aviation
policy in the present national emergency. The project is
being: undertaken with the cooperation of the Department
of State and the Civil Aeronauties Board.

Cuttings of most types of men's apparel during 1950
were considerably higher than in 1949, the Census Burearn



Cras foreign aid extended by the Taited States Goa-
ernment in the foray of eash or goods and sorrices in 1950


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 8











Pepor io amr ian or ammsl are norrl

sax. in Depart..af or -~ ob. or ion tra.sa 1948
Cemsuse of Businaes in the holesle, Retail and S~e-
rio* trade fields. Some of the are listed below. Chck
the title doeired and send this 9age of the Ba~llatn at
Camero* to the neezet Departmnt of Commeroe amofi*
and the report will b esent to ym*
Be-2-R-1 n. 8. Samary 37BC-2LI-R- Bardware~toes
B0-2-2-2 ILqur Stonre B0-2-8-3 Jewelry Stores
BC-2-R-4 Imber Isdrs & Baling Mterials
B0-2-8-5 Dept. Stores U -2-8-8 Dairy Prods.
BC-2-R4g Bensehold ArPple Bo-24~-10 Book Store
Be-2-R-11 Sporting Goods BC-2-R-12 Flonrist
BC-2-R**3 Clgar Stores BEj--814 Iew Dealers
BC0-221~5 Gift,Boaelties,ate. Maio Storoes
BC-2-R-17 Gaso11ae nSerr Ugooas Stores
B0-2-8-19 Mieas,Fail Wear.L EquptDalre
BC-2-R-21 Variety Stores UJtor Vehice Dlrs.
BC-2-8-23 Furnittan Stemw LBaBtt~Y9~.&eD1.
BC3-2-R-5 Floor ca iS0r. sting & Drinking.
BC-2**-27 Shoe Stres 2 Drug & Prep.Stre
BC-2-R-29 Fuel 011 & 1** BC-2-R-30 Bakery gtarW
B0-2-a-31 Fud & ar &h Ga stenr Stpp~ly Stores

BC-2-W-0 U S.eiar ECI-2+1 Tobcc Dths.
80-2+2 8taton~ers Z-2-W*3 Wallp a per Pe
fj 0-24-4 Flrit S.BC~l~B -2-W-5 theoroa & She Ng
BC~-2--6 Amsent Sporklag Gbrs B-24- Cam'1
Afirigeration squipmet
80-25-8 utootiv Sus -2WS ptioal Gds.
B0-2-5-10 Bar De---1Confectionaers
B0-2-5-12 Yeat *2Bookrs &r Perioodicls
B0-2+14~ Eleotrical Goods Grooery
Bo-2-W**26 Wines & Spirits 241 Voluntary
Qron~Toa e
BC-2-WI-18 Coal ~7B -248-19 Construction Holr.
BC-2-WI-20 Jewelry LB-2-W-21 Petroleum Bulk
BC-2-W-22 Food Brokes L/BC-2+l23 Surgical, Medi-
cal, Bospi supply Houses
BC-2-W-2 Furniture Paint B0-2-V25
BC-2-W-26 Ietals, Metal Work Dia p.
80-2-5-27 Country Grain Elers LB-2-il29 Barber
& Beauty Supply Hous P
L7 0B-24-30 Sohool 8gpl Houses LB-2-Wl-31 D~ental
Supply~J House LJ0-2+l32 lauxlry Supply J
L70-C2-5-33 Idustrial Chemicals Distributtor re bp 3


NE WV BOOKS

~AND REPORTS
(to Obtain Coniw of This Material. Check It In The
Smooe Provided And Send This Fane Qf The BUlet~i Qf
Cameurce To The Nearest Deartment of Coameroe Field
Offie. Your lnam ~ad Addressr Are Shown Belor. u3e
Qf The Unrited States. ItemsO Not. Priced AreQ FZQree
Por~ ~ ~ iE anl Hni san
F inancing a New Small Business.............
SSmall Business & Regulation of Pricing
PratlOices............................ly
Betal Policies Their Seleotion & Aipplioation 20g)
The Small Busineessan &r His Bank~...... .......150
8m11l Business & Government I~icenses...........1
Small Business &r Government Regulation.........1
Rooord Pieping for Retail Stores...........,.15P
Becord Keeping for Small Stores.... ............6@
The small Businessaen & Sources of Loans.......10p
The Smlall Busineessmn & His Financia Statemesntslfi
Sllggestd Research Prohleas Business Boonomics5%i
anel1 Business & Trade Marks,.........,. .......15
Litigation of Failurres of Whit.*Coat Flaster...25%
Inceof Families & Persons in U. S., 1949..........
igCharacteristics of U. S., Aipril 1, 1950......
rosChanges ia labor Faroe, Deo.1950~4an1951.....
rriig- Valume & Expendi~turea (Bef. Sources).10g
I dent'ss Water Iblreoures Policy Comidssions
VolJ.1 A~ Water Policy for the American People....$3.25
Vol.2 Ten Rivers in America's Pature............$6.00
V 3 ater Resources Law.................,.....$C2.25
AStudy of the Effoots of Forn Factors on the Trans-
lation of the Inherent, Physical Properties of Tect~ile
~Pbre Into Tretile stnrcture, Paloo 363.........58,25
SStudies in the Fbysiology of Valuntary Food Intake $5
M othproating Algents ?8102 173...$1.25 PB 100 lotC
Small Businessr Aids a
Betail Salesmanship ...........,..............,.
Specific Things to Consider in Choosing a Store
ELoation............................,,
Buying to Sell ProfibL~t ahly.....................
How two Open a Record Store...................
Pricing Merchrandise Propedly.. ............,....,
The Meaning of Stock-TrnP~. ................... ..
-1oos39


~as~ PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300








i ~POSITORY

LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


BC-6-JF


lilli11111i lll l IlIlIIIIII I Ili l I IIIIII 111111 1111111i i

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NrO. 1009

ol~ame 5, No. 7 Aipril 1, 1951.


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.1






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE


_ \___


,


1950 ANOTHER "BBANNERn IEAR

AIRLINE FREIGHT CARRIED Another "banern year
Ton Miles Flown Quarterly by Selected frSuhatr uies
was indicated in the
Airlines In southeastern state summary of business con-
ditions in the region
just released by the At-
lanta office of the U. S.
Department of Commerce*
IOUARTERLY AVERAGEI The sHEmmry, for the
year 1950, and for the
State of Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mississip-
pi, North Carolina, South
Carolina anrd Tennessee>
showed a rise of 9 and
25 per cent, respectively
in bank deposits and
ij~~~Iloans in Federal Reservpe-
member banks in the areas
a gain of 16 per cent in
bank debits, increases
of from 7 to 25 per cent
mmm in retail trade in 20
1939 1944 1948 1949 cities and areas, 1 to
*Includeake~lgh od apres. 18 per cent in depart"
sounc; u.S.Clrln I.r...uti.. ..w, ment store trade in 23 cities,
and a regional rise of 17 per
cent in wholesale trade in the South Atlantic section
and 14 per cent in the East South Central area*

Copies of this report are available upon
request at any of the above Department of
Commerce field offices.


THE Six months of operation of the
National Production Authority, U.
-4 8 Department of Comrmerce have
Ncrtonc l vlvig sbr oughtatgcrffrr~t conservation measure in-
materiale directly and indirectly
Produ tion affecting Southeastern industry.
In addition, other NEA action to
co~nervre materials for the nation-
al program of defense has resulted

multi-million dollar construction
operations.
To date, NPA has issued orders
rolling for the allocation for
defense and civilian production
p of the nation's supply of iron,
steel, rubber, columbium bearing
steel, tantalum, aluminum, tin,
sino,oobalt copper and copper base alloys, rayon,
nickel, electrical components, pig and hog bristles,
cadmium, methylene oblorides carded cotton sale yarn.
tin and terne plate, sans, tin-plate closures, collap-
aible tubes, leather, horsehide fronts and deeremine,
tungsten, chemicals, molybdenum, castle hides, onlfarkine
and kips, !sino scrap, lead, antimony, metalworking
machinessinsect wire soreediing, construction machinery,
power equipment, bismurth and cotton duck.


.


Atlanta, Ga.,
50 Whitehall, S.W.,
Tel.Eg-421,X-lc53


Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville,Fla., Milami, Fla.,
218 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel.2-3641,I-206

Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Charleston, S.C.,
Sgt.Jasper ALpts.,
Tel. 777

Nashr~ille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Birmingham, Ala., Chattanooga, Tenn.,
319 Frank NJelson Bldg.,723 James Bldg,,
Tel. 53-3421,X-355 Tel. 7-5673


Colubmbia, S.C.,
Cornell Arms,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Misse.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Memphis, Tenn.,
Mladison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Kna~rville, Tenn., Au~gusta, Ga.,
253 Daylight madg., shzwrell House,
Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 2-8394


Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curvre St.,
Tel. 1060


Barnwell, 8. C.,
201 County Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292


voL, 4. No. 8


I'A RTE 1's 1991


,


Notes For copies of these orders and other
NEA action get in touch with your nearest
Department of Commeroe field office listed
above. There is no charre for single oonies.


One or more of the orders conserving the metals and
other rawf materials for defense will and are affooting
Southeastern industries, but every effort is being made
to ouahion the shook as unch as possible. Thus far,
there has been no noticeable diminution of goods avail-
able for civilian consumption.
Qf prime interest in the region right now is NPk's
order stopping the commencement of commercial building,
except that specifically exempt and that approved by
the Commeroe Department. During the first 11 months of
1950, $b122,523,000 worth of commercial building was
done in the South Atlantic region, a 23 per cent gain
over the same period in 1949, and in the East South
Central section the dollar value of such building was
41~,868,000, a 24.7 per cent rise.
See NEA Page 2


Outbreak of the Korean war with an acceleration of
carer" buying, attendant international complications,
and increased government purchase operations were given
as primary reasons for the increased activity*
The report showed also that for the first time in
about two years Southeastern farmers experienced a
alight advance in cash farm income, or a little better
than 1 per cent*
Other gains included new business incorporations, 6
per cent; business and residential telephones, 6 and 9
per cent; new construction, 41 per cent; new urban
building, 37 per cent manufacturing employment, 4 per
cent production of electric energy, 13 per cent; rail"
road freight r avenue, 12 per cents and airline pasrsen-
ger, freight and express revenue, 18,30 and 27 per cent.





GOVPErrHMSW UPING..EH II .SQUTEBAST


MA~ Continned From Page 1
S"MROn VILABTIOWS GBOSERVED r
A recent regulation of ~the National PRodut- '
ion Authority giving Santheastern business
firas, institutions anrd government agenotes s'
the right to obtathi materials for maaintenance, '
'repair and operation of existing facilities
'is being aiainterpreted tar some suppliers of
'materials.
SSome firms are using the regulation to at* '
S tempt to build up their inventories, and
others are failing to give the rating used
under its provisions equlal treatment wifth
I other ratings, resulting in denials of the '
Materials to firms needing them and a third
group are recognizing the rating only after
qunestioning the needs of the firs using it.
The purpose of the regulation is to maintain t
present equipment at peak efficiency, sad ifi
some firms fail to recognise the fact that
the writing sed is to`~be givejn eqtiial ~treatL ~,-
ment with that used in the purchase of de-
fense goode it may defeat the purpose of the
) entire prory*R4, '
COTTON DUCK[ GRDER ISSUED
The Imultimirllion dollar textile business of the
Southeaset was affected wrhen NPA took action to issue
an order setting aside 80 per cent tgr weight of the
scheduled production of cotton duck and establishing
monthly reserves for carded cotton sales yarn,
The cotton duck order .effective April 1, also pro-
vided that all locas maki~ng that product during the
me fJanuary 1 95 ay ao b sedi dhe maunn-

prevent any loss of output as a result of manufacturers
shifting from duck weaving to the production of other

Earlei N sued an order channeling 10 per cent
of the monthly production of oarded cotton sales yarn
into defense use, and shoe duck is dependent on that
product the order was amended establishing monthly re-


groups of yarns on Mdarch 12, 1951 may not be used for
producing other carded cotton yaras.
FARM EQUIPMENT 00TPUIT FACIITATED
NE&B has acted to fthoilitate thexcontinued output of
fiarm' equipment in the Southeast, a $56 million industry
in the region.
Producers of the equipment have been given authority
to use defense priorities to obtain materials needed tar
the industry for its June 1951 production.
At the same time, NPB moved to avert a threatened
shortage of tires and tubes for farm equipment and
essential trucks sad tractors by ordering a further
limitation on the use of nrbber.
In its order designed to speed up the production of
farm equipment in the Southeast, NEL gave manufacturers
the right to apply ratings on their own certification
to obtain materials or component parba required in June
at a level equal to the average monthly consumption in
the first half of 1950, thus assuring farmers continued
supplies of equipment needed in the essential production
of farm products. Manufacturers are permitted to extend
the ratings only to their regular suppliers of the past
two years, and the suppliers are permitted to extend
the orders where necessary.
In 1949 the output of all firms of such equipmer, za
Alabama, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee sad North Caro-
lina was valued at $56,450,833, including $4r9,658,1;25 in
complete units and the remainder in attachments, and parts.


Millions of dollars in Federal Government dontracts
are still being poured into the Southeast as the United
States continues to prosecute its national program of
rearmament, according to weekly synopses of contract
awards received in Department of Colmpmee field offices,
local Chambers of Commerce and other outlets for such
,informations
During March, a total of 15i2 contracts wrere awarded
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mis~siasippi, Tennessee and
the twro Carolinas for goods and servicles ranging from
pesticidea to heavy durable goods.
Textiles, thousands of oans of fruit juies, canned
foods, lumber manufactures and other products important
to the region were included in the contracts.
Following a recent change in policy, the Department
of Defense has discontioned for aeourity reasons publi-
oation of the dollar value of the contracts let, but
the Department of Commerce estimated that those let in
March would send the total value in the Southeast for
the present fiscal year to well above the $1~0,00,000,00.
mark.

E p~ SBLE 00HINU UFPTARD IN SOU~TIEBSAST
All oities sad areas in the Southeast reporting to
the Bureau of the Consue on month-to-month retail sales
aserienced increases in such sales at the end of the
first twro months of 1951 over the corresponding period
last year, and all but three reflected gained -in Febra-
ary of this year over the same month last year, accord-
ing to the Monthly Retail Trade Recorb for the South
Atlantio and East South Central Regions, just released.

Ask the nearest Department of Com~merce -
1eld office to place your name on the
mii liat to receive these report

Cumulative sales for the first two-month period
showed increases in the region ranging from 4 per cent


25 per centt Columb~us, Ga., 23 per centi G~ulfport, 22
per centi and Birmingham, 15 per cent,
Among the areas, Barrison and Stone counties, Mliss.
reported a 27 per cent ries; DeKalb,-Fulton.and Bok~-._. .
dale counties, Ga., 26 per centi Bleakley andl Twiggs
countiesr, Ga., 23 per cent; and Manatee and Sarasota
counties, Pla., and Coahoma and Quitman countiesr, Misa.,
21 per cent
Gains in February 1951 over the ease month last year
included 1.0 per cent in Mlacon) 38 per cent in Augusta;
29 per cent in Columbust 19 per cent in Atlantal 18 per
cent in Bilazig 17 per cent in Gulfporti 11 per cent in
Savannah) 10 per cent in Clarkedalei and 9 per cent in
B rinham
In aoet instances, the advances in the region xc-
oeeded those for the nation as a whole.

a BUILDIWO AMERICA'S M2DM *
This is the title of the report just made tarT a
' Charles E. WPilson, Director of Defense Mobili- ,
satin to the President on the action taken la I
the United States to date to combat coommunism. I
It is one of the most comprehensive reports at a
' its kind to be issued and copies may be obtained I
from Department of Commerce field offices for ,
25 cents a copy. Use the order blank on Page 3 ,
11aor ordering. *


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





BUSI TRENDS

Sales of all retail stores in Feixnrary amounted to
$10,790 million, or about 16 per cent above a year ago.
After adjusting for seasonal factors and trading day
differences, sales in February were down 3 per cent from
January but were higher than in any previous annth.
*
Continued expansion of both civilian and government
demand during the opening months of 1951 raised total
output of the econogr above the peak rates prevailing
at the end of last year. The actual and prospective
growth in defense spending was an increasingly import-
ant factor in the economic pattern, which was reflected
thus far this year in a rising abare of the expanded
national output going into Government use.
*
During the fourth quarter of 1950 foreign countries
were able to increase their gold and dollar assets by
about $920 million through transactions with the United
States, bringing the total accumulation of gold and
dollar assets of foreign countries through transastione
writh the United States -to about $2.5 billion since the
comnmnist aggression in Korea, and to $03.6 billion for
the oalendar year 1950.
*
A sales increase of 14 per cent was registered by
large independent retail stores in February 1951 com-
pared with February 1950. Their February sales were Ll
per cent abort of the January 1951 dollar volume, how-
ever. This was the report of the Burean of the Census,
which also stated that hardware stores and lumber and
building materials dealers recorded respective sales
gains of 30 per cent and 26 per cent in February 1951
over February 1950. Department store sales were 18 per
cent higher.
*
Construction activity rose seasonally in March to
round out the largest first-quarter volume of new con-
atmrotion on record, the Departments of Commerce and
Labor reported. The total value of new construction put
in place in Mlarh was estimated at $2.1 billion, 10 per
oent above the February estimate and 21 per cent more
than the total for March 195i0.
*
Sales of service and limited-functiion wholesalers
totalled $6,608 million in February, which, after allor-


ing for seasonal variations, reflected a decline of 6
pe* **=t fro Janary b*= rer 31 per --n hihe ** *= *
a year ago. Both durable and nondurable goods gramps
shared in the month-to-month decline.
aa *
American business is planningn to spend a record
$23.9 billion in 1951 for new plant and equipment, the
Securities Exobange Commission and Department of Com-
merce reported. The anticipated rate of capital expan-
aion this year exceeds by 29 per cent the capital ex-
penditures made in 1950, and by 24 per cent the previous
peak in 1948.
*
Chain store and mail-order sales for February total-
ed $2,174 million, about 15 per cent above a year ago,
After adjustment for seasonal factor and differences
in number of trading days, Februaryr sales were down
about 4 per cent from January, but still ezoeeded all
other presvious months.
*
Cash dividend payments of United Statse corporations
leaning public reports amounted to $493 million in Jan-
uary 1951 and 219 million in Febnrary 1951. Taken to-
gether, 1951 payments were down 4 per cent from the
$743 niillion paid out in the same twro months in 1950.
February payments were somewhat above those made in
Febarary 1950.
*
Emrployment awung sharply upwazd in March as expand-
ing defense and seasonal activity brought an end to the
midwinter lull. Estimated at 60,179,000 in the week end-
ing March lo, total civilian employment was ~li million
above the February level.
*
Shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear and
nightwear in January 1951 were 13 per cent over Dec.1950.

PrLASEQdBDR PROFERLZIr I
SSome recipients of the Builletia of Cormerce are
a ordering the material listed in the "New Books & r
a Reports" column and are tearing the order off so
that their name and address are not shown on the
a opposite side. We have one order for the Statisti-
a cl Astactof heUniedStates for 1950. with '
a remittance of $3.00 which does not show the name
of the sender. P,1Ltht aanger dlaeietiy *a
ag9. Mdeanhile, we are reverting to Page 3 of the
Bulletin for our "Newr Booken colurmn, which abould
remeds situations of this kind.


I


(To Obtain Capien Of Thin Material t Chnak It Tn The
Szane Provided 4ad Send This Section Qf The Bulletin Of
Com~merce To The Nearest Department of Commerce Field
Office. Your Name And Address Are On The Onoosite Side.
Makie Remittances For sales Nterial Parable To TReasure
1950 Summary of Bus~ihess dondifions in boutheast****
Building B~rica's Migbys....................2
L/amended Ru~bber QaeCtoj
L7 Outline &e Sourcei material for -small Businjae '
Eduatei~ ive; 95s0.143.5...'i3 ~
Confectibners' Materials ( 183) ... ......5L.LL ***
Mahining of Stainless Steel, dbase PrA.Aid#9****
SSelection,Care & Maintenance of Abrasive Wheels,
Defense Production Aid #18*******


Coto inned) CroPe 1950,191C9 &i1948...............
State Distribution of Purblio Employment, 1950.....
Gross Changes in Labor Force, Jan.-Feb. 1951.......
Cleomargarine,. Jan. 1951 (FFML7J-1) ...,...........
Construction Mdaohinery, 4th quar.1950 (FraeD6BA-O-).
Fate & Oils Jan. 1951 (FFIM17--11)...............
Cotton & Linters, Consumption, Etco., (FFIM15~-1-7/51
Pulp, Paper & Board, Jan. 1951 (FFIM4A-11)........
Superphosphate, Jan. 19 51 (FFIM19D-11)...... r.......
Clay Constnrution Produate, Jan. 1951 (FFIM26B-11).
Rubber, 2nrd Annlual Report by Secretary of Comm~eroe20~
The Role of Starch in Bread StalingPB8~9296,.... .(3
Electronlio Equipment Construction New Objectives,~
N9ew Techniques, Newn Components, P 0 4...$
Battery Addit~ives,NBS Cir .504r...............159
WRet Venting of Plumbing Fixturea,BB119,NBS .....20p
*? W Bsiness aide s
i Retailin~g Produce, #C294.~............ .......~....~
Using the Model Stock mlan in a small Store, #295i.
Effective Use of Floor Dein Furnifture Store
A OCase Study, # r............,.,,,,.
B eatenrant Sanitations #297... A.......... .......
4; Itaeioal Instnrumnt Repair Shop, #1300...r~.......


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3






PAGE 4


PUBLIC PAPRO.GL UP IN SOUTHEAST

A 6 per cent increase in State and local government
employment in the Southeast in 1950 over 1949 was re-
flected in a report just issued byr the Bureau of the
Cens8us
The report, entitled Stt itiuino ulc
Employmeat. 1950. abowred that such employment in l-
bama, Florida, Georgia, Mlissiesippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee last fiscal year totalled
506,264 compared with 477,797 in 1949.
A total of 204,546 Federal employees waes on the
payrolls of all seven States*
Georgia led in total number of all such employees
last year with 123,001 and Florida was second with
118,446. The other wpere North Carolina, 117,7435
Tennessee, 114,321; Alabama, 104,192; Mdississippis
66,995; and South Carolina, 66,112*
19AS8 IWHOLESBAE.SERVICE TRADE DATA


BULLETIN 26 84886


Final reports from the 1950 Census of Population
conducted byr the Bureau of the Census are now being
received for the Southeast.
The first such report has been received for Florida
giving that State an official 1950 population of 2,-
743,736, which was 27,569 more than was reported in
the preliminary release.


The final Florida report gave that State a 44.6 per
cent increase in 195i0 over the census taken 10 year
ago, oz on April 1, 1940, which was one of the highest
rate of increase for the country as a whole. All
counties in Florida except two showed an increase in
~~rl tirr I ths fi l tsrr thrs + nli ina


Those interested in the 1950 census of
Population, Final Figures, should get in
touch with their nearest Department of
Commerce office They are eratio


The following reports from the 1948 Gensus of Busi- p~LL~VI Y IC ~~L~N~ Y~U~~C~UL~;
neas Wholesale and Service Trades are available at all report issued some time ago.
D grmnt of Comrmeroe field offices without charges
Swolesale Trade: ST ATE SATIES TAXES
Farm Supplies ..........................BC-2-W134
Restaurant,H~otel Equipt. Houses...,....,.BC-2-[3 5 Georgia has been added to the list of Southeastern
Home Furnishing ..............,...........BC-2-Wi36 Statse now collecting taers on goode sold within those
Plumbing, Beating Goods Distributors....BC-2-W'37 States at retail, Georgia's tax, 3 per cent, became
Clothing, Furnishings, Footwear.,,...,,..BC-2-W38 effective April 1.
Construction Materials, Except Lumber..BC-2-W40~ Last fiscal year, five States in the region ---
Industrial Machinery, Eqpt.&: Supply D~rsBC-2-WI41 Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina and Tenn-
Transportation Equipment Supplies.,......BC-2-W42 essee --- collected a total of $165,022,000 in sales
rf Service Trades: taxes, including $b32,662,000 in Alabama; $23,569,000
Personal, Business & Repair Services..... .BC-2-SO in Florida; $24,438,000 in Mlissiasippig $41,848,000
Hotels ......,............. .........,.....BC0-2-81 in North Carolina; and $4i2,505,000 in Tennessee.
Motion Picture Theatres ..................BC-2-S2 The addition of Georgia now makes 30 States and the
Cleaning & Dyeing Plants............ .....BC-2-83 District of Columbia collecting sales taxes. The others
Bowling Alleys............ ...............8-2-84 are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connectient, Illi-
Pressing, Alteration &: Garment Repaina...BC-2-S5 nois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Mlich-
Electrical Repair Shope. .................BC-2-56 igan, Missouri, New Mbxico, North Dakota, Ohio, Okla-
Advertising Agencies.......,............ ..BO-2-57 homa, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, WPashington,
General Auto Repair Shops.......,........BC-2-58 West Virginia, Wyoming and Arkansas.
Funeral Servicoe. .................. .......BC-2-S9 According to the Bureau of the Census, which collects
Shoe Repair Shope.......................Bo-2-810 data on all types of State taxes, nationally, sales and
Watch, 01ook, Jewelry................... BC-2-S11 grose receipts taxes collected last fiscal year total-
Photographic Studios............,....... .BC-2-812 ed $b1,678,571,000. Largest amount collected for any
Barber Shop .,.........,........ .........BC-2-S13 one State last year was in California where the tax
Barber, Beauty Shope............. i......BC-2-S14 yielded $321,560,000.
GPo 83-loon~6


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
EY~J~:C~ FT$ 5 St 300---



U.S DEP TC


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 VWhitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERNUT NO. 1009
Volume 5, N~umber 8 April 15, 1951


+s~"~E
~;L~S~a~'
~2~c~'


DBlanetg .,~ b~6Idl~

OArsreLLE, pt~atBaa


BC-C*II


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOUl WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.



























_ ___ __


nQ0NTR(Z ED MALTERIIA@ PONn ANNOUNCED BY NATIONAL PROD)UCTIONJ AUTHOIRITY


NEWI PROGRAMd TO BECOME EFFECTIVE JULY |

THE The National Production Authority
of the U. S. Department of Commerce
has announced the institution of a
National Controlled Materials Plan" on three
0 iOHGof the nation's basic metals, steel,
copper and aluminum, effective July 1
Produ tion of this year.
T~dutionTh* plan is being established for
defense production and certain de-
fense supporting activities vital to
Wuh rt the national rearmament program.
.t*Lutority Under the program, the three metals
affected wrill be allotted directly to
producers on the basis of detailed
requirements submitted in advance for
the manuftacture of goods which the
government needs for the defense pro-
gram, according to Manly Fleischmann,
NPA administrator, who outlined the
purpose and objectives of the plan at a press conference.
Producers of scores of commodities distributed in the
Southeast and other regions will be given until the ef-
footive date of the plan to file application forms setting
forth their detailed requirements. The forms wil 1xa avail-
able in May, after whicch specific amounts of the materials
will be allotted producers starting July 1 when the neces-
sary production programs are determined by the Defense
Production Administration,
coM~PLaTMcF, PROGRAM OUTLINED
nIntensified measures" are to be taken to effect com-
pliance wRith orders and regulations issued by the NPA
designed to conserve the nation's materials in short
supply for the defense effort.
The compliance program in the Southeast will include
expansion of industrial surveys and spot checks on com-
pliance, "vigorous prosecution" of willful violations,
and broadening of NPAls cooperative efforts to assist
industrry in conforming with its regulations.

Appointment of William H. Nlewbourne, At-
lanta attorney, as regional counsel for the
Southeast in enforcement of NPA orders and
regulations has been announced by Regional
Director Merrill C. Iroffon,

Federal Trade Commission investigators have already
See NPA Page 2


PULPWOOD INDUSTRY EXPANDS IN SOITH


This report, is issued quarterly and is avail-
able at all Commerce Department field offices
0q a subscription bgaia of 75 cents a year

last year, the report stated, an estimated 11,-
496,000 standard cords of pulpwood, roughwood basis,
were consumed in the South compared with 6,227,000 in,
1941, and the 1950 consumption in the region was 48
per cent of the 23,656,000 cords used in all mills in
the nation.
Growth of the industry in the South in the past
decade has been gradual throughout the period, the
report showed. Each succeeding year since 1941 re-
flected a rise in consumption, except between the
early war years of 1942 and 1943 when a slight de-
cline was indicated.

SOUTHEASTERN FARILS ON DECLINE

A 4 per cent decline in the number of farms in the
Southeast last year as compared with 5 years ago was
recorded by the Bureau of the Censue in its 1950 Cen-
sus of Agriculture just released.
Last year's count of farms in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, 1Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee was shown by the Census Bureau to be 1,-
3746,96;2 against 1,443,543 in 1945 when the last pre-
vious nationwide agricultural census was taken. The
Bureau used a slightly different criteria in comparing
farms now with those in 1945, however.


le~F~ / ~r I


MobieAa.,Charles ton,S .C0.,
Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., Sgt.Jaser Ap~ff.4c
Tel. 2-3641,X-206 Tel. "

Miss., Tampa,Fla., Nashville; .,"i
St., 608 Tampa St., 315 Union; .
72Tel. 2-3880 Tel. 42-

C., Barnwell, S. C., r-
e St., 201 County Office Bldg.,- as
Tel. 292 il


Atlanta,Ga., Savannah,Ga., Jacksonville,Fla., Mdiami,Fla.,
50 W~hitehall,3.WV., 218 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold
Tel.WAB-W.21,X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533


Birmingham,Ala., Chattanooga,Tenn.,
734 Frank Nelson Bldg.,723 James Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,X-355 Tel. 71-5673


Columbia,S.C., Jackson,
Cornell Arms~, 426 Yazoo
Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-49


Memphis, Tenn.,
Mladison at Front,
Tel. 8-326


K~na~ville, Tenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1338-9


Augusta, Ga.,
Maxwell House,
Tel. 2-8394


Aiken, S.
1833 Curv~
Tel. 1060


7- 94)


--- ......


I


VOL. 5. NO. 9


MdAY


Ten years of opera"
tion of the pulpwpood
industry in the South
have brought an 84 per
cent expansion in the
consumption of that
product and today near-
17 50 per cent of the
pulpwood used in the
nation is consumed 37
southern mills, accord-
ing to a current issue
of the Paln. Pater and
Board Industry Report
of the Department of


Commeroe*


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





58 SOUITHEASTERN FIRIYB GET CERLTIFICATES

Fifty-eight Southeastern firms would like to eskhblis]
new or expanded facilities coating an estimated total of
$287,878,426 so that they may participate in the nation-
al program of defenses and the Defense Production Admin-
intration has extended benefits: of the Federal tax amor-
tis~ation program to them so that this can be done,
The firms included nine each in Alabama and Georgia,
seven in Florida, two in Miasasiippi, eight each in
North Carolina and South Carolina, and 15 in Tennessee.
The approximate total cost by States was Alabama,
$78,167,916; 'Georgia, $27,059,439; Florida, $61,673 74e8;
Mi~sissssippi, $42 971,958; North Carolina, 6465,927,864;
South Carolina, 10,375,865; and Tennessee, $b21,701,636.
The 58 firms, included among a total of 396 over the
nation, were granted certificates of necessity by DPA
to encourage establishment of the proposed facilities
where a check revealed there was need for the expansion.
The certificates anthorise the holders to deduct
from taxable income from 40 to 100 per cent of the cost
of the facilities during the next 5-year period. The
normal period for amortization of facilities allowed by
the Bureau of Internal Rlevenue for tax purposes is 20
to 25 years. ,
The program was fanthorised by Congress in the revenue
act of 1950. Its purpose is to provide an incentive for
quick expansion of the nation's productive capacity
where it is not sufficient to meet defense needs.

SOUTHIEAST GETS $2118.6 MILLION

The Miunitions Board has announced that from July la
1950 to Jarnuary 31, 1951, prime contracts with a dollar
value of $248,677,000 were awParded to firms in Alabama>
Florida, Georgia, Mdissiesippi,.North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee for the supplying of goods and
services to the Arm, Navy and Air Force*
This total represented 2.8 per cent of the total dol-
lar value of all such contracts awarded in the nation
during that period, which amounted to $88,927,4C07,000*
The contracts, which included those with a value of
$5,000 and over, awarded by the Armyr and Navy, and
$10,000 and over by the Air Force, consisted of $169,-
786,000 let by the Arang $50,749,000 by the Navy; and
$28,142,000 by the Air Force*

For wReekly lists of contracts awarded in
all regions in the country invTolvin8--
$25,000 or more, oronsult the nearest De"
apartment of Commerce field office or local
Chqmber of Commatoes

By States in the Southeast, the total value of the
awards for the foregoing period included $b37,364,000 in
Alabama; $15,915,000 in florida; $b37,537,000 in Georgial
$16,186 000 in Mi~ssiasippi; $390s?22,000 in North Caro-
lina; $16,423,000 in South earolina; anld $34,530,000 in 1
Tennessee*


NP Conti~nued From Page 1

completed a compliance survey over the country covering;
more than 300 members of the aluminum industry, and
that agency is starting a second such survey involving
some 300 prroducers of copper and copper-base alloy
products. In addition a compliance survey of a cross-
section of ea~h industry affected by NEPA controls in
the United States and covering 25 business concerned in
each field, large, medium and anall, will be started
soon on a broad basis of geographico distribution.
To date, a total of 648 cases of noncompliance in
the nation as a whole has been reviewed` by NPA rep-
resenting alleged violations arising in the ear37
'months of production controls, and an acceleration of
compliance action may be expected as the defense pro-
duction program expands.

In Amendment 3 to NPA Order M-8, all domestic users
of pig tin were placed under. allocation control effoot-
ive May 1, and a temporary, seasonal increase was made
in tin allocations in the second quarter of 1951.
COPPER AND COPPER-BASE ALLOS
automatic adjustments in base-period consumption
was extended to companies engaged in production opera-
tions of a33. kinds which experienced shutdown of more
than 15 consecutive days in the first half of 1950.
(Direction 1, NPA Order M-12).

The use is broadened to permit utilization for
dental purposes and in gold alloy and gold filled
spectacle framnes. (Amendment to Order M-19).
CHEMdICAIS
Mechanism for allocation established to assure vital
chemicals for critical points in adequate quantity to
provide for defense and essential civilian needs.
(Order M-45).
COULUBIUM AND TANTALUMI
Delivery prohibited except as authorized by NPA.
(0zrler MJ-49).
JIdBTAL CONTAINERS
Sufficient supply for packing of all perishable
foods provided for in plan announced'.
CONSTRUCTION
Provision is made in Construction Ozder to permit
alteration or improvement in spatoe in department stores
at 25 cents a square foot of the occupied space within
12-maonth period. (Amendment to Order Md-l).
ELECTRICAL CONDUIT
manufacturers are authorised- to reject rated orders
when they exceed 25 per cent of their monthly output
so as to encourage distribution of defense orders.
(Amendment to Ozder M-17).
t MINIUM
Producers and fabricators required to reserve an
additional 15 per cent, and distributors and jobbers
an additional 20 per cent of products for filling rated
orders. (Amendment to NPA Order m-5)~.
4GQLEDERIN~
Monthly allocation of molybde~num, ferromolybdenum,
molybdenum aside (roasted mo3,ybdenite), calcium molyb-
date and other primary molybdenum alloys and Chemicals
on the basis of end-42se essentiality provided. (M1-33).
H00 BRISTLES
Controls tightened on end- and on manufacture and sale of painters a brushes.
(Amendment to M-18).
NAPHERENIC ACID
Allocation control announced. (Schedule 1 to M-45).
MIQLIEDENUMd
Further action taken to conserve supplies by reduct-
ions in percentages to be used in certain stainless
steels. (Order M-52).


annunan --- ----
CEECK 2


---- -....,- L
S---


s


nll__


'


Expansion of the Business Sevi~c~he- ChckIdt
issued by the Department of Commoerce to include
publications and releases of special interest
to business and industry published by the new
defense agencies is announced. The subscript-
ion price to this publication, published wneek"
ly,has been increased to $1.,50 a year. Material
of all of the newn defense agencies, except the
Department of Defense wsill be ~iholuded. Order
the 'Cheek List" through the nearest Depart"
ment of Commerce Field office.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF -COMMERCE







I -


The Defense Production Administration has. made
available approximately 1.1, million product-tons of
steel for the month of June for 26 special prograrpe
needed to expand production for defense-supporting and
essential civilian needs. They included freight ears,
locomotives, oil country tubular goods, the Defense
Power Administration, heavy power equipment and Mari-
time ship construction.
+ +
Sweater production during 1950 increased 17 per cent
over the 194c9 level, the Bureau of the Census reported.
Shipments by firms reporting in a survey of the knit
outerwear industry amounted to $212 million in 1950, a
15 per cent increase over 1949.
+ +
A task force to recommend pulp conservation measures
has been appointed by the National Produotion Authority,
U. S. Department of Commerce. The appointment was made
at a meeting of the K~raft Paper Mlanufacturers Industry
Advisory Commnittee, which includes J. W. Wlarner, Rusca-
loosa, Ala.
+ + +
Sales of tobacco wholesalers in February were 5 per
ceht below the level of the previous month, but showed
a gain of 7 per cent above February 1950, the census
Bureau reported. Curmulative sales for January and Feb-
muary 1951 we're 10 per cent above the. same period in
1950.
S+ sa w
Indications are the demand for container and pack-
aging materials during 1951 will continue to be in excess
of production, according to th~e Industry Operations
Bureau of the Department of Commerce. The demand for
such products in the latter part of 1950 far exceeded
production even though defense requirements were gener-
ally not heavy, it was stated.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


EUIE S
Total business inventories at the end of February
were estimated at $65.1 billion. After allowances for
seasonal variations, the book value was $1.1 billion
above January, Considerably more than a half of the
increase was due to higher valuation. Manufactuireral
inventories increased about $600 million while retail-
ers'l and wholesalers' inventories rose $i400 million
and $150 million, respectively,
*
Manufacturers' shipments in February remained close
to the January peak rates while unfilled orders and
inventory book values continued to rise. Continued
expansion in shipments of defense industries was
observed, although other shipments eased off slightly,
Some let-up in consumer buying, and work stoppages in
textile plants lowered sales volume of soft, goods,
*
A sales increase of 10 per cent was registered. by
large independent retail stores in March 1951 compared
with the same month last year, and their March sales
were 12 per cent above the February 1951 dollar
volume, the Bureau of the Census announced. Substantial
sales increases were recorded in March 1951 over March
1950 by lumber and building materials dealers, hard-
ware stores, dry goods and general merchandise stores
and jewelry stores,
The Department of ~fe else duringg the first 9 months
of the current fiscal year obligated $24.1 billion for
the procurement of major equipment, supplies, military
construction and expansion of production facilities.
The obligations included firm contracts, financed port-
tions of accepted letters of intent, and other instru-
ments .
MW W WM





SOUTH'S LABOR FORCE INCREASES

The South last year had a labor force of 17,527,000
persons of which nearly 95 per cent, or 16,516,000 were
employed, according to a report just issued by the
Bureau of the Census.
Of the number employed in the civilian labor force,
16,090,000 were at work and the remainder had jobs blt
were not actually working.
The term "labor force" included all persons 16 years
old and over.

(Copies of this report, Employment and Iqcome
in the United States. By Regions, 1950 are
available without charge at all Department
of Commerce field offices).

The total in the South's labor force was just short
of that for the North Gentral region, which was the
leading section in point of employment. Also, it was
approximately 45 per cent greater than the number of
gainful workers recorded by the Bureau in the South
30 years ago when 12,037,299 persons were placed in
that category.
Of the total labor force in the region in 1950,
12,908,000 were males and the remainder females.

SOUTHEAST FARU INCOME RISES

Cash farm income in the Southeast was 26.4 per cent
greater in the first two months of 1951 than for the
comparable period in 1950, according to the Bureau of
Agricultural Economies, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
Such income in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Msispi
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee in Jaar
and February of this year totalled $393,775,000 compared


STATE GOVERNMENT: EPENDITURES RISE


General expenditures of State governments in the
Southeast in fiscal year 1950 totalled $1,499,939,000,
an increase of some $b100,000,000 over the total of
$1,381,5r63,000 expended in fiscal 1949, according to
a report just issued by the Bureau of the Census.
The report, for Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississ-
ippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee,
also showed a substantial increase in revenue in fisea2
1950 over 1949, or a rise of from $b1,296,682,000 to
$b1,391,969,000.

Copies of this report are available
w~ithorut charge at all Department of Com-
merce field offices.

By States, general expenditures in fiscal 1950 as
compared w~ith 1949 included Alabama, $190,119,000 in
1950 and $b199,954,000 in 1949; Florida, $235 999,000
and $225,164,000; Georgia, $b204,047 000 and 1b81,950,-
000; Elississippi, $140,673,000 and 315,386,000; North
Carolina, $b341,1i9,000 and $269,291,000; South Carolina,
$150,801,000 and $146b,438,000; and Tennessee, $236,881,-
000 and $223s380,000.
Revenue included Alabama., $191,156,000 and $178,916,-
000; Florida, $230 272,000 and $194,920,000; Georgia,
$201 589 000 andl $176,784,000; Misasissippi, $10,656,000
and 0,46:8, 000; North Carolina, $6286,947,000 and
$~279,801,000; South Carolina, $129,266,000 and $b128,-
645,000; and Tennessee, $222,083,000 and $207,148,000.
The report also showed that aid from the Federal
Government for the seven States in fiscal 1950 totalled
$268, 587, 000.
SSOUITHEASTERN MPOPIATION "UPP Du


'
s, n, 3 94 A substantial increase in the total tion in
*


1 ___


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

lllllll illll lllllil ililllll 1lll11 I li lli I II II1 I III 111 1
BULLETil 3 1262 08748 8655


PAGE 4














~uow o~ cg~~wsE


.ru 11 YI ,L e c


BGIONAL CON'j'OLJJD ldTERTAfB PIAN GETTING CALLEDs FOR bTIANTB. MONDAY MAY 21

Businessmen in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, South Carolina and Tennessee are being urged to attend
a meeting to be held in Atlanta, Monday, Mday 2L, beginning at 10 o'clock, to hear the Controlled Materials Plan
of the National Production Authority, which becomes effective July 1, explained and to give them an opportunity
' to ask questions concerning its operation and applicabil: ty to them.
The meeting, to be held in Erhibit Hall Number 1 of tle B tlanta Municipal Auditorium, will be open to all
" who wish to attend, and will be led by three NEAL afficia' s and a representative of the Department of Defense.
Those who will represent the NYA include Bertram H.
NlEW CONSTERUCTION IN SOUTHEST $5 BILLIGN W iimer, Consultant, Production Controls Staff; E. D.
Kelly, Deputy Director, Rtubber Division; and. Walton C.
C~sl~e o C~elcr~ont~uclonGroce, Acting Director, Priorities and Directives Div-
Walueof eo Sntrucion ew construct- ision, Policy Coordination Bureau. The Defense Depart-
In Current Prices, 1915-1951 ion and improve- ment representative will be Colonel A. J. Mandelbaum,
mooNsor couas asnd operations Chief of the Materials and Products Section, Production
so ......in the Southeast. Branch, Procurement Division, Department of the Ar~g,
last year cost an ll are experienced both in the field of business
so estimatedd total as wel a in Government procedure,
of $5,069,300,000 The Controlled Materials Plan is being applied for
or a 25 per cent the present to the nation's three basic metals, steel,
2o increase over the copper and aluminum. It is estimated that its operation
84,054,600,000 will affect some 50,0030 manufacturers directly and
expended for suhhundreds of thousands of other indlirectly.
Is purposes in 1949, The Atlanta meeting will be one of a series of 20 to
TOT~l.according to the be held over the country in a campaign instituted by
March issue of NHb to see that every businessman affected directly and
to the publication indirectly by CMdP is made familiar with how it operates.
I Costrutiol sadCONSTPRUCTION ORDER AMSENDED
PRIVATEConstruction Mat- In important action just taken, NPB amended its basic
S/P ..*a~ 1 / A upt construction order to require authorization for con-
,.. >-** ,,Report issued by' struction of large apartment houses, "luxury" residences
n o' the U. S. ear-and all industrial facilities and public and private
1915 1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 mORA Of Commerce* construction projects requiring the use of more than 25
SOURCES ~~~Th USta Deatetso ors n abr4. f teel.
spent in 1950 i- The amendment to Order M-4 also made allowances for
elnded $3,577,900,000 in the South Atlantic region, a certain personal property equipment and changed the
26 per cent gain over the $2,8471,800,000 disbulrsed in definition of when construction is commencedd"
1949, and $1,491,400,000 in the East South Central As originally adopted on October 26, 195i0, Order M-4
area, which was 2G per cent greater than the $1,206,- banned only the constriction of new buildings for
800,000 pent in that section in the previone year* amursement, recreational or entertainment purposes. In
January, 1951, the order was amended establishing a
This report is available on a subscription system under which virtually all new private commercial
basis at any Commerce Department field office* construction was made subject to specific NHB authorisa-
Pice 89 a yeal.t* tion.


private construction, including residential building
took $b3,658,100,000 in the area as a whole last year,
and $1,410,900,000 went into public building activities*
The latter included $b2,652,800,000 in private projects
and $8925,100,000 in public building operations in the
South Atlantic section, and $1,005,600,000 and $485>"
800,000, respectively in the East South Central area.
FIVE; SOUTHEASTERN GOVERNQRS COOPERATING
Five Southeastern States -- florida, Georgia,
Tennessee, NIorth Carolina and South Carolina --- bare
responded to a request from the Defense Production
Administration to establish commissions for the mar-
shal~ling of community resources to aid small business
in the mobilization program. The five State have either
appointed commissions or delegated the function.


c/ /S~


197
'
h No 10


gY 15 1951


WRATERFOWL FEATHERSj
In 0zder M-56, NEA took action to reserve virtually
the entire supply of goose and duck feathers and downm
to meet defense requirements. The only exception to the
order wrere heavy-spined flight feathered which have no
natural ourl and which are not suitable for defense
purposes.
CA~NADIAN PRIORITIES
NER Regulation Number 3 was amended extending to
Canadian companies the right to apply for MlRO assistance
and designated Canadian distributors and iaporters" as
eligible for priority aid.
TANNING MYATERIAL
In Order M-57, steps were taken to guard dwindling
supplies of tanning material of vegetable origin by
designating the uses to be made of that commodity,
See NHA Page 2


UjNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FILD SERVICE





SOUTHEASTERN PUROBASES 90NTINUE HIGH


Nearly 100 contracts for goods and services were
awarded Southeastern firmsr by the Federal Government
in March, according to an analysis of weekly contract
award lists received in Department of Comrmerce field
offices'
The awards included 20 in Georgia; 15 in Florida;
10 in Alabama; 27 in North Carolina; 3 in South Caro-
lina; 23 in Tennessee; and one in Mi~ssiasippi.
Note: These contract award liate are
available without charge at any Depart-
ment of Comlmerce field office'

The contracts awarded in Mdarch were for a variety of
commodities ranging from fruit juices in Florida to
steel in ALlabama and Georgia*
The dollar value of the contracts was withheld for
security reasons, but an announcement recent maede by
the hmnitions Boazd stated that between July 1 of last
year and January 31 of this year, contracts awarded in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Misisissippi, North Carolinas
South Carolina and Tennessee totalled $21c8,677,000, or
2.8 per cent of the total for the nation*

SMALL BUSINESS P00IS ENCOURAG~p

The Defense Production Administration is ready to
encourage the formation of IPoduction pools of small
business firms in the Southeast for the purpose of ob.
training prime and subcontracts From the Federal Govern-
ment if it will Further the defense effort.
DPA has made it olear, however, that Wiorld War II
experience indicated that success comes most often to
pools headed by one individual or organisation capable
of obtaining and maintaining the respect of members.
nThis management factor is important to Federal
procurement agencies because it enables them to look
to one person or organisation for responsibility in
completion of a prime contract, n it was explained,
"MIoreover, in obtaining subcomb~acts, the pool has more
bargaining power with prime contractors than has an
individual small firmrqn
DPA's announcement came following the formation of
a pool in Omaha, Nebraska,
For such a cooperative effort to become successful,
groups of that kind need stayingn qualities to cover
the period from organisation until the first contract
is obtained, which sometimes takes months, it was
stated.

80I CONSERVATIONI PAYMENTS INCREASE

Twenty per cent of the payments made by the Federal
Government for soil conservation purposes last yeear
were paid to farmers in the seven Southeastern States
of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mdississippi, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina and Tennessee, according to a
tabulation of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics
U. S. Department of Agricul~ture.
The payments made in the Southeast totalled $50,288,-
000 of a grand total of $245,839,000 made in all Statees.
By States, the payments included Nortuh Carolina,
$)8,800,000; South Carolina, $3,830,000; Floridas $2,-
317,000; Tennessee, $6,735,000; Alabama, $8,105,000*
M~issiesippi, $9,921,000; and Georgia, $10,580,000. *
The payments represented considerations of the Fed-
eral Government for various soil conservation activities
conducted by farmers, including the substitution of
certain soil-conservring plant life for soil-consuming
orope, laprovenants to farms, and other programs.


(Continued From Page 1)


THE


MRO AM~END~j
Nationa Certain scarce materials were re-
GliORC11moved from the list of products
which business firms, institutions
and Government agencies obtain by
Produ tion using a defense order rating for
Y~du li~ maitenncerepair and operating
supplies. (mandment to Regulation

A authority Ths sfo~roiy ts p aaced underUFIRCAI
limited allocation wrhen NPA, in
Schedule 3 to Order M-465 required
specific authorization to deliver
or use it in the States of Washing-
Stons Qregon, California, Ariz~ona,
Newf Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Colordo,
WRyoming, Idaho and Montana.
BINDER, BBF; IE
In Order Y-58, HPA took steps to preent hoardin
of binder and baler twines needed in harvesting the
nation's orope. The order limits distributora' and
farmers inventories to 60 days supply or a minimnn
practicable working inventory, whichever is less.
BLUMNTUM~
An amendment to the basic aluminum order to permit
limited use of that metal in May and June in the mann-
facture of more than 200 consumer items in which the
use of aluminum wras to have ceased Maey 1 was announced.
(Amendment to Ordler M-7).

The amounts ofpaper that ills are required to set
aside for filling essential Government orders were
revised in an amendment to Order M-36.

In amending Order M1-47,lP epedfecae
gories of consumer goods from the 80 per cent restriction
on use of iron and steel. They include medical, dental
and hospital specialties; pens and mechanical pencil y
tale tope for kitchen, dinette and breakfast tables;
ornamental lawn fence and railing; and miscellaneous
items such as shoe trees.

A three-man boazd to hear appeals for adjustment
under NPA orders and regulations wras established by
Manly Fleischmann, NEA Admifnitrator in Regulation 5i.
CONTAINERSj
Preferential status was granted in the production
and delivery of small black plate contaihpra for pack-
ing whole, dried or skiamed milk in an amendment to
Order M-25.
.Q~bag
Three new perinitted uses of cadmium for defense pr~od-
notion were announced by NPAL in an amendment to Order
8B-19. They include ferrous alnts, bolts, screws and other
threaded parts, warshers, hi-shear rivets look bolts and
cotter pins for use in aircraft; parts ohautomotive
and aircraft th~el pumpe coming in contact with fuel;
and aircraft battery hold-down bars.

A procedure for more complete reporting of inventories
of codlmbium and tantalum was established in an namnrlant
to Order 1-49 to assure efficient use in the interest of
the defense program.

The Department of Agriculture was given authority to
exercise certain allocation and priority functions over
foods which have industrial uses in NPA Delegation 10.
MOLIBDENUM
In an amendment to Order 86-33, the lead thme on
applications for allocation of most forms of mpolybdernum
was reduced.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2






__ __


BUSINESS TRENDS


Cash dividend payments of United States corporations
issuing public reports amounted to $1,050 million in
March, up 28 per cent from the $818 minlion paid out in
the same month last year. In the first quarter of 1951,
publicly reported cash dividends aggregated $1,758
million, about 13 per cent more than the $1,562 million
distributed in the same three months of 1950.
*
Marnufacturera sales expanded more than seasonally
in March, but did not keep pace with the infloor of new
orders, so that nearly $5 billion was added to back-
logs. Inventory accumulation continued at a faster pace
than in February.
*
Profits soared for U. S. manufacturing corporations
in 1950, according to combined quarterly estimates made
public jointly ly the Seoarities and Exobange Comomission
andl Federal Trade Commission. It abowred that the 1950
net income of the corporations before payment of federal
tezes was 61 per cent higher than in 19469, or $23.2
billion, compared with $/61,. b~iin.

American business expects 1951 sales to be about 10
per cent above the high dollar total of 1950, according
to a Department of Commerce survey. Most firms are az-
pecting their 1951 sales to be higher for the year, but
aznect them to be moderately above the too rates pr~e-
vailing in the fourth quarter of last year as wrell,










(To Obtain Copina Of Thin Materinl y Cheonk Tt In The
Stace Provided. And Sand This. Section Of The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The Nearest Department of Commerce Field
Office. Your Name And Address Are On The Onrosite Side.
Make Rem;LttancesFor Sales Material Payable To Tregaurer
OfThe United States, Items Not Priced Are Free.)
onstruction ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 & osrcindtraaRpr.g ear
Orders, Regulations, Eto*>
Latest Ameaendt to Construction Order M-4
Order M-56 i Regulation No. 3
Order M-~57 Latest atto Regulation 4t Ore 3
Schedule 3 to Order M-4C5 order Md-58
Amendment to Order 9I-7 Aedett re -6
Amendment to Order M-A7 Regulation No. 5
Amendment to Order E-25 namnt to Order M-19
Amendment to Order I2-49 Delegation 10
Amendment to Order L**33
Brisiness Service Check List************** $..1. 50 Yr.
Defense Production Record.......... .....,....2.50 Yr.
ADD:'s of CMP..........o..........
Facts For Industry-Fata &r Oils-Feb.1951417-2-21***** .
a Cotton System Spinning ML5-3-8-51
City Employment in 1950 G-GE50-No.6. *******...,...
Monthly Report on Labor Force, Mlar. 1951-P-57,#4105,...
Fruit Spread Production in 1948 and 19469.........25#
Community Industrial Development in the Defense
Perilod......................15#
Atomic Energy Bere To Stay......................100
Measurements of Radioactivity...............,....35#
Medical Aspects at Atomic Weapons.............,..10#


Bales of retail stores in March were e~~Ia~tisa~ted
$12,620 million. The gain in dollar volume From the
prviu mont ...n. sma...1 thnusa or M...x, pa.,ss.-
ularly in view of the early Easter. After allowance
for seasonal influences and trading day differences,
sales were down 5 per cent from February. Compared with
March 1950 there wfas little or no increase in unit
volume, and price rises accounted for practically all
of the 11 per cent increase from March 1950.
+ *
Total business inventories, despite a substantial
rise since the outbreak of hostilities last summer, now
bear about the same relation to sales as in prior per-
iods of high business activity, the Office of Business
Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce, reported, Hows-
ever, the present inventory position varies from one
industry to another, and in certain areas -- especially
retail trade --- stocks are comparatively high.
*
Appointment of Delos W. Rentsel as Under Secretary
of Commerce for Transportation anoceeding Philip B.
Fleming, appointed Ambassador to Gosta Rica, was,
announced by Secretary of Commnerce Charles Sawyer,
Mlr. Rents~el previously had served as administrator of
Oivil Aeronenrties and then as Chairman of the Civil
Aeronautics Board.
*
Employment showed little change between March and
April, as a post-Easter drop in trade activity offset
gains in other aeotors of the econoow. Total civilian
employment, estimated at 60,01,,000 in the week ending
April 1L4, wras at rmch the same level as in Mlarch, but
stood 1 1-2 million higher than in April 1950.
+++++
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers in
March 1951 totalled $6,9511 million, which, after allow-
ing for seasonal variations, was a decline of 3 per cent
from Febr~ualry. Durahle-goods sales were $2,706 million
or unchanged from February after seasonal adjustment.

Light Framehouse construction...................45
Bardwood mPlood.................................109
Wall Pleater:Its Ingredients,Prepar~ation &
Properties................20EO
Recommended Mininmm Requirements for Plumbing....750j
Business Lease-Hold Ohligations.................1
Check List to Help lou Introduce Your New Industrial
Product....................100
Distribution Cost Analysis......................20~
l~ietail Policies Their Selection & Application..20e
Financial Considerations in the Establishment of
a New Small Businese..................15
The Retailer Looks at Packaging,.................r104
Television As An Advertising Mledium..............60S
Copyright Laws of the U. S. ......,...............15
Lawfs Relating to Veterans........................$S1
Bureau of Gensus Manualn of Tabular Presentation..S1.50
National Forest vacations .................,......25#
Publications of the National Bureau of Standards.754
Statistical Abstract of the United States,1950..$3.00
Consumers Prices in the United States, 1942-48 -
Analysis at Changes in Cost of Living....350
f3The American Family A Factual Bac~kground.....$1.25
Recreational Areas of the United states...os.....25
Si Business Aidesr
a ct Noer To Increase Your Frosaen Food Sales #314....
1 4 Million Negro Customers a Rich, Neglected
Market #31~7...........
Modernisinrg the Wholesaling of Perishable Fooda#318S
Bottlers Gain By Leasing Trunks #319............r..
The Independent Grooer (A Study of Operations9) #320
Building a Mailing List #322.....................
Selecting a Branch Len~dryr Site #~323............
jSeven Ways for Superviisors to Build Marale #3264....


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





PAGE 4

SCRAP SBVAQE ASKap GP GOVEINJlp


Governors of the six southeastern States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mirssissippi, South Carolina and Tenn-
easee have been asked by the Nlational Production
Authority, U. S. Department of CoI~merce, to take of-
ficial action to assist in a nationwide drive to sal-
vage fron and steel scrap as a move to meet the present
national shortage of that commodity.
In letters to the Governors, Many Fleischm~ann, HPA
Administrator, urged that they direct a survey of all
State properties, including the highway department, for
sources of dormant scrap and to arrange for its col-
leotion and disposition "at as early a date as possible!
The chief executives were also asked to call upon
Mayors and County Commissioners to participate in the
drive.
Additional supplies of anymp anas be smooeived if
production schedules of iron and steel for the defense
program and civilian allowances are to be maintained,
Mr. F~leischmann csantioned. The flow of those products
to mills and foundries is not presently keeping pace
with consumption, and inventories are falling below
safe working levels, he stated.

t SAWEER TO SP~fAK INi ST. IdillS
SCharles Sawyer, Secretary of Commerce, will be ,
I the principal speaker at the 47th arntnl conven- '
tion of the Advertising Federation of Am~erica,
to be held in St. Loais-, June 10 to 13. His tearb, *
will be in keeping with the general theme o~f the '
convention, 'Advertising's Opportunities 1 a '
D Mobilization Economy.D He is scheduled to speak *
' at the 14ncheon session on MIonday, Jyn~e 11s *


Savannah,Ga. ,
218 P.O.Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


__ __ _


*~






This year's observance of World Trade Week, May 20
to 26, will be the 17th to be sponsored by the Chamber
of Commerce of the United Statses wth the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce cooperating. The week included National
Maritime Day, May 22, to colm~eorate the sailing of the
S. S. Savannah from that port in May 1819.


FIELD OFFICES OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE IN REGIO V


Atlanta,Ga. ,
50 Whitehall,S.W.,
Tel.WQ-4121,X-453


Jacksonville,Fla., itami~,Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533


Noble, Ala., Charleston,S.C.,
308 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper ALptas.,
Tel. 2-3641,X-206 Tel, 777


Birmingham,Alla. ,
734 Frank Nelson Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,X-355


Chattanooga,Tenn., ,
719 JLames Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673


Columbia,S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 eazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


NJashrile, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel, 42-2426


Mdemphis, Tenn.,
MIadison at Front,
Tel. 8-34126


K~noxville,Tenn ,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Augusta, Ga.,
Maxwrell House,
rTe. 2-8394
GPO 83-101


Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Barnwell, S. C.,
201 County Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


PERMIT NO. 1009
Volume 5, Number 10 Mday 15, 1951




SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BULLETIl 3 1262 08748 8648

frade abroad...

g .li~ at home!


se-P~






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE







VOL, 5, NO, 11 Ul115
CONJTROLL~ED NTERIALS PLAN EX(PLAINED) AT LIMETN OF SOUTHEAST BUSINSSMEN

An estimated 1,200 southeastern businessmen met in Atlanta, Mlay 21, to hear the newily-established
Controlled Muaterials Plan of the National Production Authority explained, and to ask questions concerning
its application to specific business operations. MIore than 200 questions were asked, and answered to the
apparent satisfaction of those seeking the information.
Brief talks weremade by representatives of NEAB and the Department of Defense on the practical operation
of the Plan, its purposes and objectives, the execution and disposition of forms, and other matters. The
speakers were Bertram H. F~limer, Consultant, Production C ntrols Staff; E. D. Kelly Deputy Director, Rubber
'Division; and Wlalton C. Grooe, Acting Director, Yriori-
VIOLESALE SAILES UP SHARPLY IN REGION ties and Directives Division, Policy Coordination Bureau,
Southeastern all of the NEPA; and Colonel A. J. Mlandelbanm, Chief of
FULL-LINE DRY GCODS WHOLESALERS whonlesalers exper-l the Materials and Products Section, Production Branch,
Supply of Merchandise on Hand ienced increases Procurement Division, Department of the Army,
lukBER OF DAYj HUNBER OF DAYS Of frOM 29 tO 34 The Atlanta meeting was one of a series of some 20
m 1055 s n cent in sales held at strategic points over the nation, all with the
Eg]95 1s lin the first 3 one objective, namely, to educate the business public
monts of1951 to the Controlled Mlaterials Plan.
on --------------- o oerthe correa- MAINTENANCE. REEAIR & OPERA~TI0E
pondng priodLimitations on the use of a defense order rating
latyear t~he (10097) for maintenance, repair and operating supply
Bueuof the Ce-items have been adjusted by NEA to compensate for in-
so sus reported, creased prices and accelerated programs. The action
The increases reflected in an amendment to NEA Regulation 4, permits
inluded a 29 per use of the rating for up to 120 per cent of the amount
cent dvane in spent on such IMRO items during the base period. The
SheEa~st Sout h limit had been 100 per cent.
a as .. 0 Central region In justifying issuance of the amended order, IJA
and 34 per cent in the South Atlantic area. In Mlarch, explained that prices on UidO items have increased
East South Central wholesalers found their sales 11 per about 10 per cent over the base period average, and
cent more than in the same month last year, and South expansions and increased use of available facilities
Atlantic dealers recorded a 3 per cent rise for the created a demand for more MIRO items at thle time or-
same month. ganizations were getting less because of the price
In the first quarter of 1951, tremendous increases factor,
in sales in the Southeast as a whole were reflected for STEEL STRAPPING
automotive supplies, electrical goods, hardware, in- In a move to consemre supplies of steel strapping for
dustrial supplies, jewelry, lumber and building mater- defense, NEA issued Order M1-59 listing acceptable uses
ials, plumbing and heating supplies, refrigeration for strapping and limiting inventories.
parts, surgical and medical equipment, dry goods, and -
paper and its products. Use the order form on Page 3 for ordering t


P oders. regulations and other actions.
CHEMJICALS
Several chemicals were added to the basic order which
provides a system of equitable distribution of defense
rated orders among producers to prevent order pile-up~s
and bottleneckrs. In this action, Order 81-32 amended,
the DO ceiling applicable to DDT was also changed,
CAME
En an amendment to Direction 1 to Order 5-25, pro-
visions prohibiting any packer's consumption of oans
made of tin or terne plate from exceeding that of the
base period rate provided for by the order were tight-
ened.
RWBggg
An increase in the production of many rubber products
for civilian use, including important industrial, com-
mercial~and medical items was made possible in the Lly
rubber allocation contained in an amendment to Order M~-2.
IYIR
In further action under the MIRO program, NEA moved
to permitt exporters to use the DO-937 rating to enable
theml to get replacement parts and accessories for mach-
inery and equipment for foreign shipments.
SEE NE& Pqgg g


Use the order form on Page 3 for order-
ing this report
La March, 539 firms doing business in the South At-
lantic region reported sales approximating $101,779,000
and in the East South Central area 208 firms did a
$35,874,000 business.


, 44,


MOBILIaTION GUIDES FOR SMALL BUSINESS
SSoutheastern businessmen interested in sell-
ing to the United States Government will find
information on how to go about participating
in current Federal Government purchasing oper-
nations in a handbook just issued by the De-
fense Production Administration entitled
Blobilization Guides For Small Business. The
Publications, available without charge, gives
detailed pointers on sources from which mail
information may be obtained and summaries
'4 e assistance available. wth other rl $a





PROCUREiGENuT LUEGRMATION EXPANDED


In a further move to help small business firms in
the Southeast to participate in Federal Government
purchase operations, the field offices of the U. S.
Department of Commerce and the many cooperating of-
fices beginning June 4 will include advance informa-
tion on proposed negotiated contracts of $10,000 or
more in the daily lists of invitations to bid on de.
fense requirements now being made available to busi-
nessmen locally.
The change in procedure was authorized by the
Munitions Board. It calls for publicis~ing every pro-
curement of $10,000 or more where security consider.
tions permit when the closing date for submission of
bids or proposals is 18 days or more from the date of
issuance .
It ij cati-ated that about 95 per cent of all pro.
curement actions are unclassified and unrestricted by
security officers,

Those wishing this type of information
should get in touch with their nearest De.
apartment of Commerce office or local Cham-
ber of Commerce.

Heretofore, no negotiated contract information has
been included inl the daily lists of bid information
suppied by the Federal Government.
The Commerce Department has been making available to
busine-ssmren for the past year the daily lists of pro.
posed contracts under the defense program through its
field offices and s several thousand local Chambers of
Commerce, State agencies and trade organizations.

UNIZARIES WALES EXCEED FEMALES

There are nearly a million more unmarried males in
th~e South than females, the Bureau of the Census re-
ports in a current release. The release showed that in
1950 there ;;ere 4,198,000 single males 14 yeaze old
and over and 3,285,000 unmarried females of the same
age*
The statistics were a continuation of the Bureau's
studies of the population characteristics of the nation
taken from its census of population conducted in 1950*


ELECTRIC UTILITIES
yggs In an amendment to Order 1,-50,
N~k extended to June 1 the right

use materials now on hand in mak-
ing major plant additions without
specific approval of the Defense
P~oductio l~ectric Powr AdintrrationI!IMb
Manufacturers of certain types of
prime aluminum windows and frames
Auth rity will be permitted during May and
ill I~ri~f June to use 65 per cent of their
monthly average consumption of
the metal for the first half of
1950 in an amendment to NEA Order
a M-7.~
~3 Acting to obtain more steel for
defense and defense-supporting
activities, NEL, in amending Order M-47, reduced the
use of steel for the manufacture of passenger automobiles
and station wagons for June from 80 to 75 per cent of
the rate of usage in the first six months of 1950.
CLOSURES
Packers using aluminum lide or other types of alumi-
num sealing devices ~ust include in their inventory
count all closures in their possession or held by others
for them, the NEA held in issuing Interpretation 1 to
Order Mu-26,


CONJTROLLED LULTERIALS FLAN


SControlled Materials Plan Regulations
1, 2, 3 and II are now available. Regulations
1 and 3 set the basic pattern for operation
of the Plan's CMP application forms. Regula-
tion 2 sets limits on the amounts of con-
trolled materials a user may have in inven-
tory, and Regulation I establishes rules
for delivery of steel, copper and aluminum
by warehouses, jobbers, dealers and retail-
erse


Use th~e order form on Page 3 in re"
cuestinE this releases


POLYETHYLENE
Allocation of polyethylene, effective June 1, to
conserve its short supply to meet increasing military
and essential civilian needs woas announced by NEA
in Order Mr-45, Schedule 5.

An amendment to Order Mr-35 was issued designed to
prevent possible misunderstandings regarding what is
considered a practicable minimum working inventory
and on applicability of defense order ratings for
cattlehide, calfskin andl kipskins.
COLUEIBIUM & TA~NTA~LUM
In further action affecting columbi~um and tantalum,
NEA, in an amendment to Order M-3, made more flexible
restrictions on the use of those products to assure
higher production of steels containing those alloys,
RESORCINOL
Allocation of resorcinol, a chemical writh a variety
of important uses including the manufacture of high grade
water resistant adhesives and tires, was announced in
Schedule 6 to NEA Order MI-45.
htSCELLANEDS EIIDES.8KINS
Restrictions were placed on the processing of horse-
hides, goatakins, cabretta, sheepskin, shearlings and
kangaroo skins to assure equitable distribution of the
available supply through normal channels. Order ME-62
SOFTWOOD PI~trOCOD
danufacturers were instructed to set aside each month
20 per cent of their average monthly production, base
period output, as a reserve for defense orders. Order NH63*


Other highlights of the report dealing with the
South were:
There were 10 per cent more persons 5 to 24 years
old enrolled in schools last year than in 19)40 and an
increase of 12 per cent was reflected for non-wrhites*
Of the 47,197,000 persons in the South last year
10,316,000 wJere non-white, of whom 108,000 were other
than Naegroes*
A total of 735,000 whites were foreign-born, about
100,000 more than in 1940*
The N~egro population in the South has increased
abou-; 3 per cent in the past 10 years, or from 9,904,-
619 in 191+0 to 10,208,000 in 1950*
Deaths and divorces are making greater inroads into
the region's marital life now than 10 years earlier
because 18 per cent more persons widowed or divorced
wlere recorded last year than in 1940. This, however>
is proportionate to the increase in population'
The importance of schooling bas become more para"
mount. In spite of the increase in population, nearly
a million fewer persons were recorded as not enrolled
in school last year th:an was the case 10 years ago.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





B~~~~~~~ U PS1TRENO

Little change in retail sales nationally in April
1951 as compared with April 1950 was reported by the
Bureau of the Census after its regular monthly sumrey
just released. A drop of 10 per cent in April 1951 sales
from those of M~arch 1951 was also recorded. In April of
this year, sales were up 19 per cent for lumber and
building materials dealers and 13 per cent for hardware
stores over the same month last year.
++++
Offerings of new securities by U. S. corporations in
the first quarter of 1951 amounted to $1.8 billion,
the Securities and Exchange Commission reported. This
rate of financing was $250 million higher than the
offerings in the fourth quarter of 1950 and $400 million
higher than the first quarter of 1950.
*
Chain store and mail-order sales for M~arch 1951
totalled $i2.7 billion, about 19 per cent above a year
ago. While sales in MIarch were up from February 1951,
the increase was somewhat less than usual in view of
the early date of Easter this year. After allowance for
seasonal factors and trading day differences, M~arch
sales were 4 per cent below February, 1951.
# MMM &
Total dollar outlays for new construction rose
seasonally to g2,353 million in April and set a new
,record for the month, the Departments~of Comm~erce and
Labor announced jointly. At the same time, evidences
were reported that at least some types of construction
activity have reached a turning point which will be
reflected in future trends as the effects of materials
shortages and various restrictions begin to appear.
++ ++ %


1


(To Obtain Copies Of This MIaterial. Check It In The
Space Provided And Send This Section Of The Bulletin Of


Commerce To The Nearest Department of Commerce Field


Office. Your Name and Address Are On The Oposite Side*
M8ake Remittances For Sales M~aterial Payable to Treasurer


of the United States. There Is No Charge For Items Not


Cotton innings for the crop of 1950 totalled
9,907,918 running bales, or 8,501 greater than the
preliminary figures issued by the Bureau of the Census
on March 20. Ginnings for the 1950 crop are equivalent
to 10,011,924 bales of 500 pounds each.
+ +
Personal income in Mlarch was at an annual rate of
$242.5 billion, lightly higher than the February
total of $b2L1.3 billion. The February-Marrch rise in
personal income resulted from the continued increase in
wages and salaries which more than offset a slight
decline in nonfarm proprietors' income.
+ + +
The Federal Government has issued formal rules and
regulations providing for a uniform policy for the
government with respect to inventions ~of government
employees and to the administration of that policy as
a move to protect the government's rights and those of
government-employed inventors to inventions made while
in the service of the United States.
+ +
Shipments of the women's outerwear industries total-
ed $2.5 billion in 1950 as compared with a 1949 total
of $2.7 billion, the Bureau of the Census announced,
Cuttings of principal garments as compared with 1949
ranged from an 11 per cent decrease in unit price
dresses to an 8 per cent increase in suits.
++++w
Shipments of knit cotton and wool underwear and
nightwear were valued at $29.1 million in Miarch, 55
per cent more than in Miaron 1950 shipments of $18,8
million and 10 per cent over the February 1951 total
of $26.4 million, the Census Bureau reported,
+ +
Manufacturers' shipments of farm machines and equip-
ment in 1950 amounted to $b1,794 million.
++e ws


SPowrer eanndries, 01eaning & Dyeing Flants & Related
Services, Receipts By Major Sources BC-3-S-80F.
Merchandise Linen Sales, Furniture, Furnishings,
Appliance Group Retail Trade BC-3-R-20A,.....
Sales Siz~e Retail Trade BC-3-R-2.............,
Laundries, Cleaning, Related Services BC-3-S-80F.
Rosielry, Underwear Wholesalers, BC-2-W-48..........
Faqts For Industry Series:
SFats &.0118 Consumption By Uses,Mdar. 1951
5617-2-31 *****************************
Superphaspna e)o ada, M 51,1M19D-31..1, ....

Mechanical Stokers, Mar. 1951, M651B-31.........
01eomargarine, Mar 1951, M17J-31........
Confectionery, Mar, 1951, rm160-31. ....,..
;Men's Apparel, Feb. 1951, M-67B-21..............
/ 7 Coununnity Industrial Development in the Defense
Period..................................15
S Commercial Standards Alphabetical & Classified
Lists Revised to March 1, 1950.........,........
Defense Production Record. ...........,.... ...2. 50 Yr.
ABCs 18of CMP .,,..,,, ,,,...,..
Scrap for Steel for Defense.............
The Controlled Materials Plan (Leaflet).............
State Economic Areas Description of Procedure Used
in Making Functional Grouping of Counties.....$1
Thermal Insulation of Buildings, Cat.013.41:376...5Q
Underground Corrosion, Cat.H~i.9,/a:2. ...........100
Report of Uniform Plumbing Code Comrmittee,018.27ir13
8 Business Aide: ************AD#
BIow Retail Grocers Can Meet Price Competition, #325
Location & Appearance of the Retail Paint Store,#328
Things to Watch for in Cashing Checks, #r329.........
Keeping a Balanced Grooery Inventory, #330..........
Ten Commandmerks for the Grooer Today, #332........


Priced.)

Mobilization Guides for Small Business**************
NAManthlylWholesale Trade Report (Please Put On List)*
NPA~~~ Maei
D E Regulation 4 as last amd 17 Order 21-59
Drder tI-32 as last amended Dir. 1 to Order M-25
Drder M-2 as last amended Order M-50 Amended
Order M-7 as last amended Order M6-I7 Amended
Enter. I to Order M-26 Sched. 5, Order M-45
CMIP Regs. 1, 2, 3 & It Order M6-35 Amanded
Drder M-3 as last amended JSched. 6, Order M-45 S
Drder M-62 D} Order M-63
American Children:Economic Characteristics of Their
Families, Series P-60,#8.......
L7 Provisional Estimates of the Population of Regions
Division & States, July 1, 1950,P-25,#50.
L7 Shrital & Family Characteristics of the Labor Force
in the U. S., M~arch 1950, P-50, #r29........
198 ensus of :Business:
19 Sales By Class of Customer Wholesale TradeBC2W4lc..


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3







SHALL BUSINESS LQANS FACILITATED


____ _____


Drur:'ug the first three months of operation of the
order of the National Production Authority restricting
certain commercial building activities, approving of-
fices of th~e U. S. Department of Commerce in thle South-
east, now located in Atlanta, Miemphis, Jacksonville and
Miami, have approved a total of 4129 applications for
permission to construct under terms of the order,
The approvals included 48 applications in Alabana;
121 in Florida; 119 in Georgia; 32 in Miiississippi; 47
in South Carolina; and 62 in Tennessee.
Dollar value of the structures totalled $14,989,418,
with Alabama recording $31,659,220; Florida, 34,433485;
Georgia, $4.,085,108; Mdississippi, $1,348,862; South
Carolina, $1,198,766; and Tennessee, $2,263,977.

SOUTBEASTELRN FIRE GRANTPED LQAN

Two southeastern Firms have been granted emergency
loans for industrial expansion important to the defense
program, the Defense Production Administration announced,
They Included $a300,000 to the Southland Oil Corporation,
Savannah, for erection of facilities for storing petro-
leum products for the armed services, and the D~iami-
Key W'est Barge Line, Inc., $20,000 to be used towrardI
the purchlase of" twoo lift tnrckrs and to pay an insurance
premium on a tug boat to be leased from the Navy

DEFENSE PROIDUCTIONI RECORD
'The Defense Production Administration ha~s announced'
the issuance of a new publication Defense Product-'
ion Record surmmarising week-to-week developments '
in defense production. It will reflect a compact
roundup of official actions of DEa and other agen-
a cies, It will be available for $2,50 4 year, '


A pickup in bank loans to small business firms in
the Southeast is expected as a result of action just
taken in Washington to remove a deterrent to such ao-
tivities,
President Trunan has signed an amendment to the as-
signment of claims act facilitating the granting of
guaranteed loans to small firms engaged in or converting
to defense production.
Previously, banks were virtually co-signers with
borrowers under the guaranteed loan plan. Also, they
were not only7 expected at times to advance funds to
bu~sinless firms, but also were liable for tax deficien-
cies, renegotiation claims and similar liens filed by
the government. As a consequence, they were reluctant
to participate actively in the V-type loan.
These difficuilties have been removed and it is ex-
pected that not onl will. faster action result on pend-
ing loans, but the loans themselves may total up to a
billion dollaze because it will give renewed impetus to
the initiative of southeastern businessmen to partici-
p-- ate in defense production and paves the way for great-
ly accelerated financing on a local scale for defense
purposes*

,POPULATIONJ OF SOUTBAhdT IS rU3PPEDW

The pop~ulation of the Southeast Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississi~ppi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee increased three-tenths of 1 per cent between
April 1, 1950 and July 1, 1950, according to a provis-
ional estimate of the Bureau of the Census made as of
July 1, 1950.
The population of the 7 States on April 1, 1950 was
given as 20,927,214 and on the later date it was esti-
mated at 20,992,000. All States shared in the gain.


- ------ -- --- -~~--- --~--- ----------~- ~- ~ -~--~-- -~------i~i~ii


Savannah,Ga. ,
218 P.O.Blag.,
Tel. 2-4~755


FIELD OFFICES OF THE N V


Atlanta, Ga.,
50 W~hitehall,S.B.,
Tel.lHi-411,-453


Jacksonville,Fla., M~iami, Fla., Mlobile, Ala.,
425 Federal Bldg., 91c7 Sey~bold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,X-206


Charleston, S.C.,
No. 6 Bh~dson St.,
Tel. 777

Nashrille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Ohattanooga,Tenn. ,
Columbia, S.C.,
Tel. 7-56~73


Columbia, S.C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185

Augusta, Ga.,
EHarwell House,
Tel. 2-8394


Jackson, MLiss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972

Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Tamlpa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Birmingham, Ala.,
731t Fankr Nelson Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,X-355


Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Kn~ocville, Tens,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Barnwell, S. C.,
201 Counlty Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292 GPo 83-11734


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID


BC-6;-JF


LECIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONIOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITYOFFLORIDA

lillilllillilllllllllIIIlillllllillIllilllllIll||ll
BULLETIP 3 1262 08748 8630
9 24 CONSTRUCTION APPLIbanuan Arenuvau


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICI,4L BUSINESS~ .
PERNUT NO. 1009

Volume 5, Jumber 11 -June 1, 1951


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.

CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.



























I __ _


SOUTgBASTHERN FIRE GET OVER 100 CONTIRACTS FROM DEF~EB DEFAWH~EN'I IN RIL
AWARDS GO TO NYI~J SMAL BUSINESSES FUIR


COqTRUCTIONJ FUWE~HER DXECEITRAIZED


Ina farte moet elnrl

GliO~tG1the order of the National Production
authority restriateing the 00mrenaibg
of new building operations, NPA has
Productidesig~nated seven additional field
I'Oucton aroffo or te. U. S. Depart..as o
Commerce to process the applications,
including three in the Southeast.
Auh rt Thosue t Briga obl dhs designated in the Southeast
Chattanooga offices, which now are
empowered with authority to approve
or disapprove applications for the
crommenoeaent of ner cronstruction
which maey be handled in the field,
IlSeo, NPa 81201480800817 8DROUnced
the dOsign B Of eight additional
Federal Government agencies two act on applications for
e ludeoti r ai oaegoresi nde tei Aui d -ton




Spotinlige htedb reencodera Sarti geons gveern b MPA to
conditions Hring individual indusres weeny he ltmber nd
pupwodidstrito n eens, o Tanstelyiportato arn-t ation the
NPrA o advbise the disoryS Dprmeto CommieeorWs e Paer
Delesthatl amng order ilbe aiossue suhorutly liti ng
the use iof pulp n poaperg mauaturte, beeaecauset suplesc
pulp areiy all probesabilioty oingto decline furbbteron
At uthesm tmmebr of theos lbae ardvhsits ary Comitte

forithen Lube MandiufactuinIndustrye radved P the ubrat
the oo industry hsonhd, with ex~epti imon fan fw ithes

an mpe usup of lupi amber mtforcturrent bande anticiped
defense inees al -rbblt gig doi frh


mare than 100 contracts for defense goods and ar-
vices were awarded to southeastern firae during May, so-
cording to the weekly lists of awrards received in Depart-
'etL0NOS OF DOLLARS mORA Of COR-
0OOD UNILLD ODER I fies cn o-
4o -I operating local
Chamber of Com-
z, aeroe and other
se~ ~ ~ ~ ofcs
The awards
24 a =" M iS
e4 Alabama, 16 in
Florida, 1.0 i
16 t- -I eorgia, 5 i
Imacissippg, 7
e ... s.. .J. ... .n. 1 .. .. 1. .. in South Caro-
1948 1949 1950 1951 ln d i
M.S OParTMIENT O COMMERCE, O~FFCE OF BUSINESS ECONOMIC Tnes
The awards were m~ade
,' *."s "\ .': i t Dprmn Dfrr ad adkein ih a~o






Wha olealeealesion juthIle Sotheas reportmedt inceeas
in saloes int ur the first 40 months of19Lve the coresen
poningpeio ls year, r oa f~ang bingfom 2d per ent oin He
Cenralsoin the Bureeen o an of he Cientsus announced.
Correspondtciong ains of 15 per cen in the Sout facltlan
Toi ancldd 9 per cent n the East South, Centra area wer
inr 1950 Deines, however of 1 and 13roea per dcet res*
E.9 peively came inApiltr of this year asd coared ith e

Mn arch. Soth Alni firsImots reorde d1ollar volue salres
pning Aprilof hist year aproiating $84, 9300 we eti hle

sioales e cn in the East South Central totlle $2968,00.


Birahgham, Ala.,
734 Frank NJelson Bldg.,
Tel. 53J-342L,I-355


Chattanooga,Tenn.s
719 Jamles Edg,
Tel. 7-5673


Colum~bia,S.C, Jackson, MIiss.,
1310 Lady St., /,26 Issoo S$*s
Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.s
Tel. 2-3880


Nashvoille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Mermphis, Tenn.,
Inadison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Enaarville, TEenn.,
253 Daylight B;lag.,
Tel. 5-1138-


Aulgusta, Ga.,
Maexwell Hoause,
Trel. 2-8394


Aikren, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Barawell, S. C.,
201 County Graoe Building,
Tel. 292


YOL. 5 HO- 12


JUNE 14- 1941


. .H *


UNIED'STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE







Atlanta, Ga., SavannahGa., Jacksonvpille,Fla., mtani, Fla., M~obile, Ala., Charleston,S.C.,
50 Wlhitehall,S.W., 218 P.O.HRdg., 1,25 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybald Edg., 308 Federal Bldg,, No. 6 Hudson St.,
Tel.WA-412,1,453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel, 2-3641,1-206 Te.71






__


25 SOUT~HBASTERN F~iRW TO WFAW

Twenty-fivea souheastern fitae have Mindated an in,
tention to aspenad their facilities t~o meet the defense
effort at a coat of $63,908,269 and the Defense Product.
ion administration has granted them oerbitioates of aelo.
easily entitling them to sooelerated tax amorbisation
benefits for that purpose.
The firms Analated 8 in Alabamat 4 in Florida; 5 in
Georgia; 2 each in Pississippi and South Carolinai and
the other 4 in Tennes~see.
A DPA co~piilation showed that up to Mayg 7 of this
year, 60 firs in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Misrsiesippi
South Carolina and Tennessee had applied for the ftax
amortisation certificates covering new and expanded
facilities coating a total of $376,244s000. This inchnde,
d 8 firms in South Caroina with projects totalling
$17,414,000) 7 in Georgia, $1.6,963,0001 6 in F~lorida,
$88,065,000) 18 in Alabean, $1530028,0001 4 in Mlississipi
pi, $45,249,000) and 17 in Tennessee, $25,525,000.
DPA also announed that a survey of all companies re-
oeiving the certificates is now being coddnoted to gage
progress of the indstrial expansion pr~ogram. Quarterly
report forms are to be exeonted showing location of the
new facility, constnrution contracts awarded, sad other
data.
DPA also said that as of June IC, 195L, a total of
1,512 certificates had been issued calling for a total
expenditure over the United States of $5,864,342,661
in new and expanded facilities for defense purposes.


s M1W BOOK ON WHOiLESA~LIE~ ISSOg a
IWhalesalers in the Santheast will be inter a
eated in a new booklet just issued la the a
I U. S. Department of Commerce entitled ]hiteB. s
a imine and Oaeratine Grocery Warehouses, a
The pahlication, issued at the request; at
Sthe National-American WRholesale Grooera a a
Association and U. 8. Wholesale Grooers a a
s Association embodies a study of modern porao.
i tioes in stream ning and operating wholesale s
a grooers who operate in old whistlory build. s
Sings and wlah to lowfer their operating costs 5
through improved methods. The booklet is a
Priced a 25t, I

glHE SOUITHEASTEqN BUJSI~NESSMEN AFFOIrtm


dustry advisory coommittees to assist the National Prod-
action Authoriiqr in carrying out the work of oanserving
the nation's raw matferials in short supply for the
national program of defense was announced. They are:
A. J. Wloodraff and Boward Thranharat, Atlanta, com-
anttees for the eantomotive engin and engi~ne parts re-
bu~ilders and arthopedio and prrosthetic appliance in-
dustries, respective]7*
& H. Meddaay Wara Springs, Ga., and Cariton Fillaners
Chattan~ooga, arthlopdio and pecsthetic appliane Ocmit-
te*
l~eonard & Steidel, Memaphis, and Darld J. WIliams,
Shelterville, Tenn., tight oooperage committee*
P. J. Rice, business manager, Au~sgusta Chranicle*
Augusta, Ga., newspaper oolmittee*
L. E. Morningstar, Ehrhardt, S. C., slack coopenage
manufacturing committee*
*. L Seeves, Memphis, pum~p industry com~littee*
The committees meet with NPA officials and disonse
conditions in their respective inustries to determine
if any acrtion is necessary to set aide portions of the
outprt for defense purposes*


]|S Contioaned From thao 1
Discussing the proposed limitation on pulp, the
advisory committee for the waste paper dealersr said
the proposed RPA harder would be ineffootual unless the
use at certain types of waste paper, which can be
aubstituted for pulp is similanrly limited,
Lum~ber industry representatives wrere sold taat
direct requlrem~ents for the next fisoal year, beginning
July 1, would total 1,800,000,000 feet of lumber of
hardwood and softwood types excluding the requiremaento
of plgwood, oross-ties, poles and piling. Defense re-
quiremrents for the current fiscal year call for a
billion and a half feet of hardwood and softwood types,
RAY[ON TARNS
Action wnas taken tar IYPA to distribute increasing
defense demand for high tenacity ragon yarn equitablg
among producers to prevent disruption of production
schedulles.(A~endmrent to Order Y-13.)

In an amrendment to its Order p-2, RPA clarified
previous action applicable to the use of rubber.
ill8~J
The basic steel order (IE-1) was amended to assure- -
equitable distribution of iron and steel among co~nvert-
ers to serve best the interest of national defense
and fill essential civilian needs.

In an amendment to Regulation As action was taken
to adjust limitations on the use of a defense order
rating (Do-97) for maintenance, repair and operating
supply items to compensate for increased prices and
accelerated programre.
MINING MACHINERY
Delegation 5 was amended to remove references to
mining manhinery.


FRIORITI .SISTEMI
The delegation of authority to the Secretary of
Defense under the basic priority system was azpndled
to permit resobeduling at deliveries of instrument
bearings for military aircraft production.
EXPORTERSS
So that licensed exporbers of controlled materials
may obtain a position in producers' third quarter pro-
duction sobedules, hpA delegated authority to the
Office of International Trade, U. S. Department of
Commerce to assign DO ratings far praocrement of such
materials. (hPA Delegation 12).
COWGTRUCTION CRITERIA
Criteria for processing applications for NPA oan-
struction authorisation under Order YWA was made pnhlic


In amending Order 1-38, action was taken to increase
t~he availability of lead for the nation's exp~anding de-
fense program lar increasing the required anooepance of
defense-rated orders from 20 too 25 per cent of a
dealer's anticipated monthly production of lead products.
BBII & luagg
Order 1-64 was inaued to restrict deliveries of used
rails and azles so that anch products might be diverted
into channels of reuse or conversion during the present
shortage of iron and steel scrap.

Revision of she Ordere g-9 and 15~ was announced
to direct a larger share of the available supplyoaf
special high grade sino too America's defense program
and to essential civilian production,
SCHOOL COWSTRUCTION
To provide for desha and seated needed in new school
cols~tcration, restrictions were removed on the use of
iron and steel in such eapn in .~an~h ane t to
HPA Grder -4C7. Mlanufacrturers had been limited to 80
per cent of consumprtion in the first half of 1950.


BULLETIN OF .COMMERCE


PAGE 2







-- ain the week ending Maey 12 as compared with 60,041Cs000
I i~~or the week ending Apil 6;


___ __ 1_ Y__^


The first post-war census of American direct irnvestG-
ments abroad is now being conducted by1 the Balance of
Paymenta Division, Office of Businese Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerce, and the information published
from it will provide statistical material userful in
planning foreign operations. The last such census was
conducted during World War II by the Treasury Department
after previous surveys undertaken by the Department of
Colmeroe in 1929, 1936 and 194~0.
+ + +
larn production on the woolen and worsted systems in
March averaged 14.5 million pounds per week, the Cenous
Bureau announced, which was 3 per cent belowr the Feb-
ruary level and the same decrease from March of last year.
*
Factory employment in the eight southeastern Statse
of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Caro-
Ilnas South Carolina, Tennessee an~ Virginia declined
465,500o from Mdarc~h to Aprl as approximately 38,000
textile mill workers were idtled by scattered strikes in
six of the States, the AL~ttlatattttttttttttttt regional office of the
Bureau of Labor Statistice, U. S. Department of Labor,.
reported.
+ *
Retail prices of goods and services bought by
moderate-income urban families remained virtually un-
changed on the average between March and April, the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor,
found in a survey. All major groulps rose fractional27
except food and fulel, electricity and refrigeration.
+

A~n average of 10.2 ai'llion pounlds of tra wool,
scoured besia, was consumed per week during Mlarch, the
Census Burean announced. This was 5 per cent bator the
February level and 17 per cent belowr parch 1950.


Total volume of output is being sustained at the
high rate of the first quarter of 19%L, the Offie of
Business Economies, U. 8. Department of Coamerce, re-
ported. In its May ieene of Surver at Current Business.
OBE found that ourtailment in retail buying from the
. high rate at the beginning of the year had brought
aggressive sales promotions by many morobants who found
their inventories high in relation to sales.
*++ **
Total sales of all retail stares in April amounted
t~o $11,510 million, about 4 per cent above a year ago.
The downtrend in sales from the peak reached in Jan-
mery continued in A~pril although at a reduced rate.
AFter adjusting for seasonal factors and ~trading day
dife-de;ifeisles in April were down 3 per cent from
March, which crmpaered with a decrease8 of .early 6 per
cent that had been recorded from Febrary~ too MYarh.
*
Chain store and mail-order sales in April totalled
*$2.4 billion, about 3 per cent above a year ago. April
'seasonal27 adjusted sales of chain stores were un-
changed from the previous month in contrast, to the
deolinesr in February and Merob. although seasona~lly
adjusted durable goods sales contimed downward from
March to *April, the improved sales in a anaber of noan-
durable categories served to bolster the total.
+#w@cw
Em~ployment in the Ulnited States advanced by one
million between ~April and May with the usual aid-spring
expansion in farm activity, the Census Bureau reported.
Total civilian employment was eatisated at 61,193,000


ff neezerg unaerwrear arno.Iesalers, au-;-a-44rL
&f Power ILaundries, Cleanling & Dgeing Flants & Related
Series, Beaeipts by Majar Sources, BC-3-a-80f.....
Merchandise Line Sales Apparel Group, BC-3-R-19.....
Merchandise Inventories, BC-3-R-10A....... ........
Merchandise Line Sales lumber, Bulilding, Hardware
Granp, BC-3-R-22A.... ........
Lf Merchandise Line Sales Eating & Drinking Flaces,
BC-3-R-17A....................
Psrlo Mercha atoe-&erhndise Line Salses Food Group, BC-3-R-14a.......
& Petoleu Bul Statios-&-Terminds--Storage-Capeatty
C terist of the t rio pi 1950s

ana etropolitan Area~ MIm metropolitan Airea
tropolitan AIrea fBal reetropoli-
t tn ran hral .. Ar an ntonio
Area MYetropolitan Ae
Metropoltan Area ayo etropolitan ALrea
higoD. C., Mietropolitan Area
8Business Aslda
Self-Gervice Selling of Propeakaged Fresh Yeate,#8333
Classified ALdvenising...#334................,.....
Fz** heraih~13~...#339.,...............u
Prietag Prac~tices..#341............................r
UnfaB~irCOmpetfiti Prqutsices~J4.,#..................
Dire~t-Mail ALdverbiaing.d#363......i..............
1A Check List on Sanitation for Places Serving
Food..#31a
r0 Selling in the Retail Pint Sore,35......

Aidministration, Department of Coasteree..25
L7 Aphalt & Tar wanting &r 83ding Produtsot, 1950,M26D10o
-Fana, mowers & Un~it Ibeater, 1950, 101200............


L7 Monthly lholesale Trade Rleporb (Please Flace on
MIb(ling List)**************************
Modernizing & Operating Grooery Warehouses.....250
Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Taehnical Semi~nar
for Stfate Planning & Development ALgenciFes.$1.50
I 1a t national Produtioi n 4athority Material:
a R mM to Mep s t
ICU Y2 j-1 g; M 38


Degleation 12s f C~ons~traucnd`oltion Crit rita
Ema27l Report an te Labor Force, April, 195;1.....

C roae Chre ii t he labor Forces, ..MY.*pr.1pg*"*
legbal Pora ofs Oganisation, BC-3-R**60.;:,1,.***"


BUL:LETIN 'OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3






PAGE 4


800ITEIBASTERN~ 80[ 00270 INTCRASLS

A 30 per cent increase in shiplents in the wooden
bapr and shook industry in the Souatheast in the first
quarter of 1951 over the corresponding period last year
was shown in the 80th Qzarterly Report of the ~umber
Survey Committee of the Secretary of CoPamere.
Sixteen southeastern ills reported shipments of
20,358,978 thousand board feet in the first quarter of
1951. as compared with 15,649,lf6 thousand feet in the
same period Last year*
In disonesing the situation generally in the lumber
indnetry in the first quarter of 1951, the committee
Shrormed the Secretary of Camesrce that production of
9,05;6 million board feet in the quarter was the high-
est of say first quarter of record.
MA continuing demand, coupled with favo~rae weather
and an laprovemaent in the Freight car situation en-
couraged capacity pr~oduckton of operating mills and the
reopening of ills which had been closed," the report
pointed out,
Denmnd for lumber to meet requirements for honaing,
defense purposes and industrial uses continued at high
levels in the first quarter, newr orders exeeding
production by 10 per cent, it wars stated*
"Bowever, a gradual softening of the market began in
March and continued through April and Mlay. Buyers have
becomoe more selective in their purchases, but the demand
for upper grades is' still good. Although average prices
of lumber aliasbed 4 per cent from D~ecember to Marchs
they levelled off in April,*


BULLI 312207862


Apple jelly constituted 46 per cent of all jellies
producaed in the Souath in 1948 and 1949, the Office of
fIdndstry and Commaercre, U. S. Department of Coamerce
P~annoued following a speelal study of fruit spread
producotion over the nation for the two years.
The survey, conducted tar the Food Division of 010,
also showed that 38.3 per cent of all fruit spreads
produced in the south in 1949 were preserves Pad jame,
4C2.8 per cent were jellies, and 14.4 per cent fruit
busters. Only 4.5 per cent of the. apreade were earsal-
ades.
In the field of p~researves and jams, 27.2 per cent
was strawberry in the South.
Among other jellies produced in the region, 23.5
per cent were grape, and 10 per cent apple abboxtres
other than apple je127.
Of the uaermlades, orange la the most popular in
the South, that type registering 87.5 per cent of the
total outpurt.

SOUTHEA~gST'S FULAHE REG]STRATIONS OFF

A deoline of nacady 2 per cent in airplane registra-
tionse in the Santheast was reflected in a compilation,
at the anaber~ at oivil aircraft in the various States
at the nation isaned by thie Civil Aeromantica Adlmini-
stration, U. S. Department of Conmerce,
This year's registrations in Allabama, Floridas Geor-
gia, Mlissiesippi, South Carolina and Tennessee were
placed at 7,105 compared with 7,237 in 1950.*
Only Florida and Mli~ssissippi showed increases in
registrations this year over last. Totals for the two
years included 907 in Alabama this year and 926 in
1950; Florida, 2,556 and 2,548; Georgia, 1,212 and
1s264; Missiasippi, 728 and 690; Soruth Carolina, 678
and 705t and Tennessee, 1,024 and 1,106.
Incidentally, CAA also mannunced that Florida led
all States in 1950 in installation of air markers with
165 new ones. Alabelma was secold, reporting 141 new
markers; Nebraska was third with 140O; Wisconsin, fourth
with 118; New York, fifth with 115; and Mibnnesota, sixth
with 109.
In effortp to get all compmnities air marked, CAA
has been cooperating with many groups of local residents
and official State aviation 'commaissions and departments
on the theory that the air marker is the pilot's best
friend.


.


2 61


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300 i
UNIV. OF FL UB~.
DOCUMIENTSDE.




U.S. DEPO9TORY


"BISD ON SUBSCRIPRION BASIS
The Business Information Service of the
U. S. Department of Commerce is being placed
on a subeaription basis. Offered anatly with"
out charge, this servie, which provides mney
sources of information on specific subjects
offeative Jurne 1, 1991, is being issued in two
parts on a subscription basis. Part 1, the
Domestic lrane, will be at a rate of $)3 per
annum,~ and Part 2, Foreign, will be $5i per
anulm*
The service is not intended for the average
sal bus nsesm an bcu is aot bt are
ness. No commitment is made as to the ranaber
of issese or contents in the new setnn


sPO 83-1


PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 5, Nuhmber 12 Julne 15, 1951.


- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE Y.0U WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE _, F

Atlanta Regional OfficeIEL SRI .W
50 Whitehall Sre ..
Atlanta 3. Georgia sY
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .


UIEASITy OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUIAtL
DP.ARTIENT gp ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA





























___/ ____ ___ __


~~, ~


7W J, ,V ,


SOUT)IESTFRI BUSINESS REGISTERtS SHABRP ADVANCE

YAILUE OF MANUFACTURERS' SALES AND INVENORIPs Sharp increases
l euams a ~s. casesAONAL DUSTD in IlBy linOs of
business in the
2s--- -- soSoutheast in the
first quarter of
20 -- gg,, so1951 ascomared
.. with the correspond-
....ing period last yea
asfE!Pma~ny of the gains
.. .. .. exceeding those for
the nation wRere re-
flected in the regular quarterly sum~mary of business conditions
in the region released ly the Atlanta office of the U. S. De-
partment of Commperoe*


001ETRUJCTION INDUISTRY IN nOMPn


Gains in the field of finance, industry and agriculture
were substantial, with only a few segments of thle econogrt re"
flecting declines*
Deposits in Federal Reserve member banks in Alabama, Foia
Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee were up 6 per cent and loans
24 per cent, and debits in 45 southeastern cities rose 27 per
cent, or 3 per cent more than for the nation.
Retail, wholesale and department store sales were up in most
of the cities and. areas surveyed, eash farm income advanced 26
per cent, the number of residential and business telephones in
operation 8,7 and 6.5 per cent, respectively, and manufactur-
ing employment, 9 per cent. The number of unemployed workers
drawing compensation dropped 47 per cent*
Electric energy rose 11.7 per cent, railroad passenger re-
enue, 13.3 per cent, and freight revenue 22 per cent. Urban
building and airline passenger and freight revenue were also uc

SmgSOTHEs's qg"'LE POPULATION INCREASES

Substantial gains in the battle industry were made by~ the
Southeast in the past 10 years, according to recozda of the
Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Commeree, and Burean
of Agricultural Economies, U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Paced lyFlorida, Alabama and Georgia, whose percentage in.
creases in the decade were among the five top State gains in
the nation, the South Atlantic and East South Central regions
combined registered an advance in the number of battle and
oalves on farms of 56.9 per cent, their nearest competitor, the
Mounltain region coming close behind with a 53.5 per cent ex-
pansion.
Florida led the nation in percentage increase in the 10-year
period with 108.5, or from 721,000 anitmals on its farms in 1940/
to 1,503,000 in 1950. |


WRorries of the construction industry in
Nainl the Southeast that sources of certain mater-
A Gli~ntiials might be disrupted July 1 when the
nControlled Materials Flann goes into effect
were somewhat alleviated with an announce-
P~odu tion ment from the National Production Authority
A T~d ctionthat the plan itself would be open to the
industry if it so desired.
Auth rity In Regulation Number 6 just issued, NPA
O T to obtain construction materials under CMP
procedure, but at the same time it was
pointed out that they would not be required
to do so.
The regulation, with insnructions CMIP-40C
^'on how to apply for authorized schedules
and allotments of steel, copper and alumi-
nuincluded in the Plan, spell out in detail the steps to
us nuen ty owners and contractors to obtain authority to com-
mence construction and if they wish get materials needed to
complete approved projects.

Copies of the regulation and instructions are
available at q11 Cozqigerce Depqrctment, field office,

The regulation sets forth procedures to be followed in apply-
ing for controlled materials and so-called "A" products. "B"
products and other materials needed for approved construction
may be obtained by use of the priority rating which will be
assigned to projects for which allotments of controlled mater-
ials are made.
3~B BUSINESS TAKEN 0@R OF
A procedure by which certain southeastern manufacturers can
obtain steel, copper and aluminum under the uControlled Mater-
ials Flan" was also established by NPB just before the Flan
went into effect.
Designed especially to help mall business from going un--
der in a competitive scramble for scarce materials," as NPA
Administrator M8anley Fleischmann expressed it, the procedure
involves the use of a new order known as M-4r7A, which also
became effective simultaneously with "CLIP.n
An end-product producer maxrimum use of steel, copper and
aluminumm was specified either by his nOMlP" allotment or, if'
he does not receive an allotment, by the classification of
his producer under the M-47A ozder, exocept for copper used in
builders' materials, which will be handled separately.

Note: Consult your nearest Department of
Conmmerce for details of this procedure.

(SEE NPA CONTINUED ON PAGE 2)


c /S: z ~'I:


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah,Ga., Jacksonville,F~la., MYlami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Charleston, S.C.,
50 Wlhitehall St.,3.W.-, 218 P.O.madg., 1,25 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold B~lg., 308 Federal Bldg., No. 6 Ihudson St.,
Tel.WA-4121,I-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,1-20 Tel. 7771

Birmingham,Ala., Chattanooga,'Pen., Columbia,S.C., Jackson,Mdiesa, Tampa,Fla. Nlashrille,Tenn.,
,731 Frank Nelson Bldg.,719 James Bldg., 2310 Lady St., 1426 Yaz~oo st., 608 Tampa st., 315 Union St.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355 Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tel. 2-3880 Tel. 42-2426


Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curvpe St.,
Tel~ 1060


Barmnell, S. C.,
201 County Officre Bldg.,
atel 292


Memphis, Tenn., KnozvilleTenn., Augusta, Ga.,
Madison at Pront, 253 Daylight mag., Maxwell House,
leT MS Tel 5-1138-9 Tel 2 4


JULY 1. 1951


10 5 NO 19


THE


Copies of this repor s


~g~i, ~n_ Od&
w


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE





TWIO-PROWEDI PROOGRA FOR SNAIL BUSINESS

In moves in two different direeions, the Federal
Government recently paved the way for an sooeleration
of participation byr samll business fiirms in purchaes e
being made for the defense effort and for the civilian
departments.
In an action taken by the Department of Defense
through the litanitions Board, it was decided henceforth
to inolute la the weekly contract award lists made
availahle to small business fitas through Department of
C~amercre field offices and other distribution centers
information regarding the dollar value of such contracts
up to $250,000, and where the value exceeds that figure
it will be so indicated on the list. sAo given will be
the name of the them receiving the contradt and quasn.
tity at the Ipoduct purhaesed This will be to facili-
tate subasantracting activities.

These lists are available writhout charge
at D~epartmPent of Cammerce field offices and
some 5,000 local chambers of Cam~erce and
other points of distribution over the nation.
Quantities of the purchases made will not be included
where the contracts anneed $250,000 for security reasons,
Also inaladed in the daily lists of information re,
garding the types of camnodities for which the govern.
ment is in the market will be unelassified negotiated
and advertised porrobases exceeding $b10,000 where the
bide are to be opened 18 days or more from date ofiee
The other move to help saell firms came from the
U. S. Department of Labor where Seoretary of Lebor Mam-
rice Tobin eliminated the requirements in operation of
the WRalsh-Bealey Public Contracts Act that contracts
awarded under that act be limited to Dmaanfactureran 4,
"regular dealers" so that organizations formed by small
manufacturers may receive direct awards. Theelmaio,
the Secretary of labor pointed out, was, nin the interest
of obtaining maxinma participation by segments of all
American industry, small and large, in the government a
proc~urement program

WEPOS 40IOIl0NSI BY MABIL PLUGGED

by ient af th Sot s who send packages a ra



permitted, that fact must be so stated on the package*

The new regulations were paonulgated following action
by the Office of International Trade, U. S. IDepartment
of Comec o n 1 Post Office Devitmn to n t f eqat n

trol regulations by exporters using that avenue of ship"
men t avoid the nee sity of clearing such shipments

Only miail to Canada is not covered by the new rule*
The majority of mail abipments do not require an
export license. For example, individuals are permitted
to send gift pecuels not esneeding $25 in value without
a validated license to any destination except China and

13cense Not Required" on the address side of the wrapper
and the wrozd "Gift" on the customs declaration*
It is the responsibility of the shipper of the pack-
age to determine whether the shipmnent requires a licenses
and help may be obtained at Commaerce Department offices.


mB1 ~onftment From Page 1
Recognising the importance fte lumber industry in
the Southeast, MPA has moved to, establish specialist in
the lumber fiald to handle the problems of that industry
in air of its southeastern field office, ALtlanta, Mea-
phis, Birmingham, Mobile, Jackson~vile and Golumbia, S.C.
The responsibility of these specialists wrill be to handle
on*4he-grotud matters arising in connection writh NPA's
program of ooneerving raw materials for defense product-
ion. Already, decentralisakton operations are working
with respect to priorities, the controlled mlateriale
plan, cons~taction and other important phases of EIPA
operations.
PETROLEUM~.GAS STORAGE
The Petroleum Administration far Defense was delegated
with authority to assign defense order rating (D0-48) to
purobase orders for steel requied in construction at
petroleum and gas storage facilities. Delegation #13.
1951 MILK PACK
HPAL acted to protect the bulk of the 1951 mlilk peak
providing more adequate supplies of tin plate for cans
holding less than five gallons of pondered whole milk.
Amendlment to Order I-25.
MSGTAL 001WERVATION
In a more to conserve furbber supplies of copper,
alumi~na, sino, chromiumm and nickel, Order M-i65 was
issued to effoot the recovery of obsolete metal printing
plates,
ARTnIFICIA GRAPHITE & CARBON ELECTROD)ES
Beginning July 1, arbiticial graphite prodtote and
carbon electrodes will be placed under allocation to con-
serve and distribute available supplies in the best in-
tereste of national defense and essential civilian prod-
notion. Order M-66.
aUlTOB & STATIONS WAGOfB
With the viewr of equalising the use of steel by mranu-
facturers of passenger automobiles and station wagone
during the second. quarter of 1951, NPb issued an amend-
ment to Order M6-47 limiting the sea of iron and steel by
manufacturers and assemblers of hundreds of consumer
durable goods.
00]pUMaER DURABLES
As a part of the transition to the second phae of the
nations defense program, an order was issued setting the
use of iron and steel in the manufacturers at most consumer
durable aod in thea thr Mat of l95 a 7 e aet




PETROLEUM & GALS


eroemand gas industries in the U. S. and Canada.
POWER FACILITIES
iBy amending electric utilities Order M-50, NPB anutar-
ats e b euel o ap aanmately 270,000p vtan f steel prod-
fr main eace and ex~pansion of facilities duringF co,

PASEER~ CAR .PRODUCTION
To conserve critical materials needed for defense e
armament, NE&L announced a further reduction in mase gre
car production for the third quarter of 1951. Order 48*~

su*11 8 l er new oderedf a ohi sullr onlyl ihetn
to 100 per cent of last year's rate of aosmto in
Order N~umber M-F69 osmt ni
CJ* 0 li
In amending Order M-m NE took action to liait the
aeof aluminum cape by beverage producers.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2































































ITrl NIOT PRIED. )

Summary of Business Conditions in S.E,1st Quar....
ona Productioa Aulthority Materital:
CMaP Reg. #6 U OrdE M-47A ID nation 13
Order M-25 Amended Or01der M465 LOrder M66
Order M-47 AL~ended L Order M-67 L Order
m|*46 Amended f Oxzer M-6j7 ~Order M-50 Amended
L/ Order aa-68 L/Order M-69 ffOrder M-26 Amended
L7Building Materials & Strnotures Report 123 Fire
Test of Woood-Framed Wahlls & Partitions With Asbes.
tos-Gement Facings, Nat. Bureau of Stda..r.......15c
L7Building Materials & Structures Reporb 126 Fire-
Test of Steel Columns Protec~ted With Siliceous
Aggregated Conorrete, Nat. Bureau of Stde,..,.....15c
L7Fire Tests of Bulb-Type Carbon-Tetrachloride Fire
~Etinguishere, Nat.Burrof Stas.MlV~97..........10o
Monthly Report on Labor Force,Maey 192.......,...


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


Tobal business inventories at the end of April were
estimated at $68.7 billion. after allowance for season-
al variation, the book value of inventories at the end
of April was almost $S1.9 billion above March. Mann-
facturers' inventories increased $1.3 billion while re"
tailers' and wholesalers' inventories each rose abort
$250 million, ,




thi time1- of lin year Depastent ofC~sc

Maidnufactuendtrs' Apri eles a nI~ew dordeurs delnd


from the March peak rates, but inventories and onler
backloga contained to rise, the Office of Busineass
'Economies, U. S. Department of Commerce, announced*
The value of shipments by the nation's manufacturers
was down about 5 per cent from March but was a third
larger than a year ago.
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers
totaled $6,293 million in April, which after adjustmesnt
for seasonal factors was about 6 per cent lower than
in Mareh. Durable goods sales wlere $2,509 million, a
decline of 8 per cent on a seasonally adjusted basia*
all major groups in this category showed lower sales
in Apri.


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(TO OM'AIN COPIES Q T)IIS MaTERTALL CI(Fp TT TN THE


SNCE PROVIDED A N


aF COMM~YERCE TO THE lEAREST DEPARTMENT OF COB~IERCE


@ HE P I


SIDE, MAKE REMITTANDES FOR SALE-M
TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR


Consnaer boaig and eworders Placed by business in
May were appreciably below the peak rate attained in the
first quarter at 1951. Since personal income was still
rising, the reduction in consumer expenditures wras accom-
panied 17 a sharp advance in personal saving. The major
obaracteristio of business activity in the second quar-
ter weas its overall stability at the high rate of the
first quarter.

World production of natural rubber increased 172,500
long tons in April 1951 from 160,000 in March, according
to estimates of the Secretariat of the Rubber Study Group,
Output in April 1950 was about 142,500 tons. In the first
four months of 1951 production totaled 642,500 tons against
515,000 tons in the corresponding period of 1950.

M ponmn ry tro in ddition mled 8erzto hso adetsn
C ales Savgr They are Arthur M.Iotley peient of



Pitney-Bowes, Inc., Steaford, Conn.
+++++
Production of cotton broad woven goods in the first
quarter of 1951 totalled 2,835 million linear yards, whiob
was 7 per cent above the fourth quarter 1950 yardage and
was the largest quarterly figure reported since 1943. Tire
cord and fabric production was lightly larger than in the
fourth quarter of 1950.
+ + +
At the same time, the Burean of the Census also annorunced
that in the first quarter of 1951 production of ragon broad
woven goods amounted to 630 million linear yards, the high-
est production of record for any quarter. A total of 220
million pounds of yarn was consumed during the first quar-
ter in these fabrics, of which 194 million pounds was rayon,
7 million qylon and 19 million other fabric.


19k8 Censue of Business:Retail Trade:
L/ Mercandis. Line Sale. Jemierg Stor.., Book and Sta-
tionery Storea, Florists, Liquor Stores, Cigar Stores,
Fuel & Ice Dealers, Feed, Farm & Garden Supply Stores,
Second-Hand Stores & 06her Retai1 Kinds of Business....
t~Merobandise Line Sales General Merchandise Group,
General Storea.....................................
SMerchandise Line Sales, Automotive Group, Gasoline Ser-
vice Stations.................................
Merchandise Line Sales Drug & Proprietary Storea.....
Motion Picture Theaters...................... .........,
Legal Form of Organisation. ...............,.. ...........
Obaracteristice of Population for MdetropolitaL Areas, April

Albany-S3~0 netd- of entown-Bethlehem
Boston o .01*ar eston, W. Chicago I
Cincinnati 1 and enver etoi
Dulath-Cuperior inpoi bsow
Kansas City .o Angeles vl~
Viwake 2tdnapoli-4 Paul hil
New Orleans Om aha y Pittsburgh
Smeae. Business Aids:
ff Seven Important Factors in Modern Grocery Store Lay-
out, #348......................................
What Plant Foremen Should Know About costs, #349......
SRetailers' Preferences and Practices in the Distribut-
ion of Dry Goods, #350................................
GoodY~Prcn oice asn DsrbtonCsaGo Display Increases Meat Department Profits, #35,..
#352.........................................
Discriminating in Sales Tezes, #353...................
./Teen-Agers ? Potentially Big Market, #356...........


~~BlU ~Ylllll:I ~N1 iLCII1I)


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I










I


SOUTiHFAST'S RETAL SALES FLUCTHATE

The high level of consumer buying which the Southeast has
experienced of late has become somewhat "spotty' over the re-
gion as 1951 advanced, the monthly survey of the Burean of the
Census indicated*
The Census Bureau report showed declines in sales in April
of this year from the same month last year in six of 12 cities
and four of eight areas in the region, while five cities and
four areas experienced increases*
At the same time, however, all cities and areas in the re"
gion in which the survey is conducted, except two, reported
decreases, some substantial, in April sales as compared with
the Easter month of Mdarch*
High levels of retail trading conducted during the earlier
part of the year, however, were sufficient to withstand the
impact of later declines with the result that clnsulative sales
in the area in the first four months of 1951 were higher in
almost every city and area than in the corresponding faur-
month period of 1950*

ELEVEN SOUTHpEASERS GET APPOINTENTS

Appointment of eleven southeastern businessmen to Industry
Advisory Committees was announced by the National Production
Authority. The committees advise with NEa officials regarding
conditions in the industries they represent in the considera-
tion of possible control measures. Those just appointed fol-
lo7:
L. H. Dur~den, C. S. Northen, Jr., and F. W. Sheppard, of
the Dixe Bronze company, Inc., Sloss-Sheffield Steel and Iron
company and W~oodward Iron company, respectively, to the
brass and bronze foundries and merchant pig iron committees.
W. R Beaz;ley, Beazley Power M~ower company, St. Petersburg,
Fla., lawn mower committee.
A. G. Bosank, walker Electrical company, Inc., Atlanta,
low voltage distribution equipment committee.
Christopher F. Hammond, Jr., The Steel Products company,
Inc., Savannah, thrck trailer manufacturers committee*
John Evans, John Evans M~anufacturing company, Sumter, S. C.,
truck trailers manufacturers committee,
shoenry m. Boyd Jr. General Shoe Corporation, Nashville'
L. E. Salmon, Tennessee Valley Electric Supply company,
Mbemphis, electrical apparatus and supply distributors committee
Shannon Mb. Gamble and L. C. Train, Chattanooga, combed cot-
jum-sales yarn and boilers and related equipment committees.


TWO SOUTHEASTERN AREAS IN 'CRITICAL' ZONE


Two southeastern areas, one in Georgia and the other in
Tennessee, have been designated as critical defense areas
for housing by the Defense Production ~Adninstration.
The areas, including Valdosta, Ga., and Tullahom~a, Tenn.,
were designated by DPA on recommendation of its inter-agency
committee on critical defense areas.
Valdosta was selected so that housing could be provided
for civilian and military personnel attached to Moody Air
Force Base, recently nativated as a base of the Strategic
Air Colmmand.
At Tallahompa, additional housing was found to be needed
for military personnel stationed at the Arnald Engineer-
ing Development Center, and in-edgrant defense workers,
especially skilled workers, employed at the center, a
permanent installation now under consetruction on a site
occupied by Camp Forest in Wlorld WRar II. Incidentally, the
Arnold Enlgineering Development Center will be the leading
aeronautical engineering and~ testing center in the world.

~DIMFOTS IN REGION 05r INcRfASE

a 5 per cent increase in the value of imports passing
through customs districts in the Southeast in the firay
quarter of 1951 over the corresponding period last yeap,
and a 42 per cent advance in 1951. over 19469 were shown
in a tabulation.
At the end of March of this year, imports valued at an
estimated $75,400,000 were recorded for customs districts
of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and
Mobile. This compared with a total of $71.3 million for
the same period last year and $53.1 million -in the first
three months of 19469.
Another tabulation showed that exports passing through
the same customs districts bound for foreign countries
were valued at $b117.1 million in the same period.

FOUR SMALL SOUTHEAST FIRllB GET CONJTRBCTS


Frour thea eastern f rnatm oeenl .0eie tracts
ients, all small business firms, were among 102 receir-
ing such contracts in the nation. The southeastern firms
included Augusta Iron and Steel W~orkEs, Inc., Augusta, Ga;
Jafa Inc. MLami) BusbhneT11 Sel Co., Jacksonvle 3e-1


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

S""UNIV. OF FL L$




TO~



S:


U. 3, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oflice
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009

Volume 5, Number 13 July 1, 1951


~AIESILE, FLORIDA


BULLETIN OF: COMMERCE


PAGE 4


..,m~s~



s~J~~































n~t r rn .


SOU'THEAST MATERIALS SHIPMENITS IP


Producers of building msater-
PRCOUCT1CWS OF GLA'f ials in the Southeast last
CONS.TFRCTTICN PIRCDU(ITT year kept pace with increased
construction operations by
ooo tcoo shipping to market some 26
UNGLAZED BRICK I per cent more unglazed brick
(YuLLuous orsTaNDIO nooICK than in 1949, 6 per cent more
Tso 750 unglazed structural tile, and
59 per cent more hollow facing
soo C-H-C---\L ----oo Itile, according to a Facts For
I Jandustru report issued by the
Bureau of the Census.
nso ------- ----- aeso In the production of un-
glazed brick, the Southeast,
o. a one of the nation's major pro-
duoing areas, was credited in
the report with an output of 2 billion brick as compared with
1.6 billion in 1949, a rise of 22 per cent, and shipments of
that product to market were valued at $47,481,000) compared with
$36,105,000 in 1949, a gain of 31 per cent.

These Facts For Industry reports are available
without charge at all Department of Commerce field
offices monthly, quarterly and annually. They deal
with a multipticity of industries.

The report also showed that abipments of unglazed structural
tile from southeastern plants last year totalled 317,372 short
tons compared with 298,033 and the value of such shipments at
$3,012,000 and $2,955,000, respectively. Production of that
commodity was 3 per cent off, however, or 312,140 tons last
year against 323,455 in 1949.

CASH FARM INCOME ADVAN~CES IN REGION

General advances all along the line in cash farm income
were registered in the Southeast in the first four months of
1951 as compared with the corresponding period last year, ac_
cording to information compiled by the Bureau of Agricultural
Economies1, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
A 23 per cent increase was reflected for the States of
Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Hississippi, South Carolina and Tenn
essee where the total cash received from farm marketing went
from $547,829,000 in the four-month period last year to $1675,-
636,000 this year. Included was a 78 per cent rise in Mississip-
pi; 36 per cent in Alabama; 25 per cent in South Carolina; 20
per cent in Tennessee; 30 per cent in Georgia; and 3 per cent
in Florida.
Similar gains were recorded for all geographical regions in
the country and for the nation as a whole.


The information is required of all
manufacturers of products listed in the
"Official CMP Class B Product List" as
revised July 1. The list is available in
Department of Commerce field offices.
Manufacturers whose fourth quarter materials requirements
are small will be permitted to file at Departmenlt of Commerce
field offices in Atlanta and Birmingham.
COlNSTRUCTION
NPA has revised its order dealing writh restrictions on the
use of materials in building construction in four respects.
hereafter, instead of the $35,000 limitation onl residential
housing, the limitation on such homes is now 2,500 square feet
of "calculated floor space.u Sharp limitations have also been
placed on the use of copper and aluminum in such construct-
ion. A provision dealing with the installation of up to $2,000
worth of personall property" wahs amplified. Finally, outdoor"
advertising signs may now be authorized, instead of an out-
and-out prohibition on such projects.

Two additional Department of Commerce
field offices have been designated to
approve or deny applications for permission '
to carry on construction activities. They
are Jackson, Miss., and Columbia, 8. C.
Offices already acting in that capacity are '
Atlanta, Ghattanooga, Memphis, Birmingham,
dlobile. Jacksonville and Miatmi.
MAIINTENArNCE; REPalR,0PER~aTION
In connection writh issuance July 6 of CMP hegulation 5
and simultaneous revocation of NPA Regulation 4, NPA has
pointed out that outstanding orders for maintenance, repair
and operating supplies calling for delivery during the
current calendar quarter bearing the rating D0-97 and
placed before July 6 will have equal preferential status
with authorized controlled materials orders, or DO-rated
orders identified by an allotment number or symbol.
(See NPA Page 2)


' UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah,Ga., Jacksonville,Fla., Miani,Fla., Mobile, Ala., Charleston, S.C..
50 Whitehall St.,S.W., 218 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., Arear 2,8gt.Jasper Apt~s.
Tel. WA-4121,1-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,X-206 Tel. 7771


Birmingham, Ala.,
246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355

Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Chattanooga,Tenn., Columbia,S.C.,
719 James Bldg., 1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185

Knoxville,Tenn., Augusta, Ga.,
253 Daylight Bldg., Maxwnell Hlouse,
Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 2-8394


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972

Aiken, S.C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Tampa, Fla.,
698 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Barnwell, S.g.,
201 County Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292


ryL ~. nu. Lb


~1~V ~r ~nr,


CONTROLLED MATrEhihLS PLIb
Manufacturers in the Southeast are
-being asked by NPA to submit their 4th
: quarter requirements of steel, copper
and aluminum under the Controlled Mater-
ials Plan.
The deadline" for such information
was designated as July 31, and NPA has
11 been busy mailing out forms and in-
structions to some 50,000 manufacturers
over the nation.
Anticipated requirements for the Ist,
2nd and 3rd quarters of 1952 are also
being requested.


CL )E% d


ENc( 114n 1(


Orli 3 io





SOUTHEAST FIlRMS GET 108 CONTRACTS

A total of 108 contracts were awarded to southeastern
firms by the Federal Government in June, including 21 in
Alabama; 17 in Florida; 31 in Georgia; 26 in Tennessee;
8 in South Carolina; and 5 in Mississippi, according to
a tabulation mPade in the Atlanta office of the U. S. Dev
partment of Colmmerce.
The awards included jungle cloth in Georgia, dredge
and mooring facilities in Florida, coal in Ala~bama,
aviation gas bought from the city of Jackson in Mississ-
ippi, and Arctic sleeping bags in Tennessee.

For day-to-day information on Federal
Government purchase operations consult
the nearest Department of Commerce field
office or local Chamber of Commerce.

The awards inlE1uded some $b400,000 worth of goods
bought by the General Services Administration, such as
calculators, adding moachines, typewriters and so forth
for the civilian departments of government. That agency
is now including a list of its contract awards with
dollar value in the weekly compilation of such informa-
tion announced by the government.
Pending completion of arrangements for restoring
dollar value award information in the near future, the
Department of Defense did not include such data in the
June reports.

38 NECESSITY CERTIFICATES 0.K.'D

Twenty-five firms in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, South Carolina and Tennessee obtained permis-
sion from the Defense Production Administration to ex-
pand their facilities at a cost of $120,431,439 and
certificates of necessity for tax amortization purposes
were granted them by DPA for that purpose.
The certificates, numbering 38 in all, are based on
plans of the firms to establish new or expand old facil-
ities so that their participation in the national pro-
gram of defense may be accelerated.
Amounts involved in the approvals included Alabama,
$33,987,563; Florida, $20,314,593; Georgia, $46,159,265;
Mdississippi, $12,157,007; South Carolina, $~832,300; and
Tennessee, $6,980,711.
The list of approvals recently announced was one of
a series issued by DPA for the past six months. Alto-
gether, DPA's approval of such applications since the
program started will run well above the half billion
mark in the Southeast.

CENTRED BIEATING RISES IN SOUTH

The number of dwelling places having central heating
equipment have more~ than doubled in the South in the
past 10 years, according to a Bureau of the Census re-
port just issued.
The report, released from the Census Bureau' s 1950
census of population, shows that 2,683,000 dwelling
units in the region reported central heating last year
compared with 1,121,741 in 1940. .
At the same time, however, 9,333,000 of a total of
12,795,000 dwelling places in the area are still using -
the noncentrarl type of heating, which also was a sharP
increase over the 8,707,387 in 1940*
Of considerable interest in the study were' the vast
strides gas and electricity have made in the 10j-year
period in type of fuel used in heating the homes. Ten
years ago, only 152,109 homes used gas for central heat-
ing purposes and last year the number had grown to
1,179,000.


HPA Continued from Page 1

SMALL MAwNUFaCTURE~RS
In Directions 1 and 2 to CMP Regulation 1, NPA took
action to take care of manufacturers whose operations
fall under the Controlled Materials Plan, but who use
only small quantities of steel, copper and aluminum in
their operations. The two directions provide a simple
method for such manufacturers to obtain needed-supplies
of copper, steel and aluminum without application to
the Government and assign a DO symbol to purchase or-
ders for production material placed by producers of
controlled materials.
IRiON AND STEEL
Percentages of iron and steel to be set aside for
the mobilization program so as to assure more tonnages
for defense and defense-supporting activities during
the third quarter of 1951 were increased in an amend-
ment of June 8 to NPA~ Order Number 1.
AIHCRAFT MATERIALS
Delegation of authority to the Secretary of Defense
was expanded in an amendment to Supplement 1, LPA
]Delegation 1 to permit rescheduling of delivery on
rated orders for all materials required in support of
the aircraft program according to urgency of the re-
quirement.
BUILDERS FINISHING HAiRDiiaRFE
NPA has written the country's 350 manufacturers
of builders finishing hardware asking for their comments
and suggestions on a proposed order which would simplify
and standardize the industry's production to conserve
scarce strategic metals for defense and defense-support-
ing activities. IO N TE

Directions have been issued to iron and steel prod-
ucers providing assistance in handling orders for
September delivery by postponing to July 7, 1951 the
date on which authorized controlled materials orders
will have preference over DO orders under the Control-
led Materials Plan. (Direction 1, NPA Order YI-1). Also,
in Directionl 1 to NPA Order M-6 the same producers were
instructed to continue providing carbon steel products
to warehouses on the basis of 85 per cent of average
monthly shipments during the base period, January 1 to
September 30, 195 .ATILS<RTE

Publication of a four-page pamphlet entitled List _of
Basic Mlaterials and Alternates classifying approximate-
ly 550 materials according to their present availability
wazs announced by NPA. The list was planned as a guide
for procurement and substitution of materials for the
Armed Forces, Government agencies and private business.
It -will be revised and brought up to date periodically.
PAPERBOARD
Manufacturers of special paperboard used in making
food containers were instructed by NPA in an amendment
to Order M-36 to set aside 5 per cent of their monthly
production for Government use. At the same time, prod-
ucers of cardboard were ordered to reserve 10 per cent
of their output each month for the same purpose.
MIlN~lE MRO SUPPLIES
A new priority rating for ship operators, marine
suppliers and ship repair yards was authorized for use
during the third quarter of 1951 to procure materials
for maintenance, repair and operation of vessels in
U. S. ports. (Order M-70).
CONSUME DURALuES
Announcement was made that one order known as M-47A
would be used to control the use of steel, copper and
aluminum in most consumer durable goods to bring Ameri-
can industrial consumption of controlled materials into
balance with estimated supply and defense requirements.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





Chain store and mail-order sales in May were estimated
at $2.6 billion, about 10 per cent above a year ago. Little
chn e ws seen in the total from April to May after season-
aland trading day adjustments. May marked the second con-
secutive mlonth of relative stability in chain store activ-
ity following declines from the January buyring wave.
+ + *
Export license applications covering 36,378 bales of raw
cotton were approved during the nine-day period June 11 to
June 20, 1951. The unlicensed balance for all countries as
ofJune 20 totalled 57,800 bales. It was expected that this
baac ouild be reduced to about 20,000 bales before the
ndof the week of June 17.
*
Large independent retail stores in the United States
regsteeda small overall sales increase of 3 per cent in
ay1951 over May 1950, the Bureau of the Census reported.
Again of 6 per cent from April to May 1951 was reflected.
Badaestores recorded the largest sales increase, 13 per
cent, in May 1951 over gay 1950, whila decreases of 6 per
cet ere registered by motor-vehicle dealers and furniture
stores .

Footwear production in April, 39 million pairs, was 16
percent down fromt the March production of 46 million
parbut was 2 per cent more than the April 1950 output
of38 million pairs, according to the Census Bureau.
+ *
Shipments of ferrous castings during February 1951
amutdto 1,487 thousand tons compared wAith 1,631 thous-
adtons in January and 1,016 thousand tons in February
1950.
+ +
The May dollar value of confectionery manufacturers'
sae ere about 12 per cent above May of last year. The
slgtdecrease in sales reported by general line houses
asmore than offset by increases of 9 per cent and 17
percent reported by package goods and bar goods houses.
+ *
Commercial stocks of wool on the sheep in the U. S.
amuted to 175 million pounds on April 1, 12 per cent

~ inal Regional Reports on 1948 Census of Business: Retail:
Merchandise Line Sales Apparel Group 2-R-19....35e
Merchandise Line Sales Furniture, Furnishings,
Appliance Group 2-R-20 ................... ..254
M merchandise Line Sales Lumber, Building, Hardware
Group 2-R-22. ................... ...........254
M7 merchandise Line Sales Eating & Drinking Places -
2-R-17 ................... ................... .15
a merchandise Line Sales Food Group -2-R-16........204
L/srvice Trades:
LL Legal Form of Organization 2-S-5............. .204
U Hotels 2-S-10................,.................354
/ Wholesale Trade:
Petroleum Bulk Stations & Terminals 2-WY-14....10e
Sales by Class of Customer 2-W-4............. .354
i7 Year Built, Household Equipment & Cooking & H~eating
Fuel for Dwelling Units in U. S., April 1, 1950......,
U_ School Enrollment of Workers in U.S., Oct.1950.........
-/ Canned Food Report June 1, 1951. ................... ..
Hqg~sing Characteristics, Apl. 1, 1950:
ffSt. Louis, Mo. 'Baltimore, Mld. 2 Houston, Tex.
SReport of Coordinating Committee for National Plumbing
--- Code.............................50t
U- Export Control 15th Quarterly Report,See. of Com..154
Small Business Aids: 20 Planned Work Increasee Operating:
Efficiency of Yeat Dept, #~355............-.............
~fImproving Employer-Employee Relations, #357.........
U Retail Grocers' Customer Relations, #358............
L7Those Most Likely to Succeed in Business,'#360......
JO Work Simplification, 1#361 ................... ..*****


Manufacturers shipments during May were at the early
spring peak rates while unfilled orders and inventory
book values continued to rise. Billings for May deli-
veries by the nation's manufacturers reached $24.5
billion on a seasonally adjusted basis, about 5 per
cent above April. Sales by the durable-goods induat-
ries of $11 billion were equal to the March peak and
were 4 per cent larger than in April.
*
Total expenditures for alcoholic beverages, includ-
ing public revenues, amounted to $8,760 million in
1950, which compared with outlays of $;8,550 in 1949.
The estimate represents the aggregate expenditures,
other than purchalses for resale, by consumers and
business for distilled spirits, wine and beer, whether
bought in package form or by the drink.
*
Sales of retail stores in May, estimated at $12.4
billion were about 6 per cent above a year ago. Sales
in the aggregate showed no appreciable change from
April after allowance for seasonal factors and trading
day differences. This brought to a halt the declines
which characterized retail activity in the months since
January of this year when a buying wave was under way.
*
Total business inventories at the end of April were
estimated at $68.7 billion. After allowance for season-
al variation, the book value of inventories at the
end of April was almost $1.9 billion above March. Mlanu-
facturers' inventories increased $1.3 billion, while
retailers' and wholesalers' inventories each rose
about $250 million.
*
During the first quarter of 1951 foreign countries
were able to increase their gold and dollar holdings
by about $790 million through transactions with the
United States.


Newv NPA Orders, Regulations, Etc:
CMP Reg. 1, Directions 1_& 2 /}Order 1 Amended
Delegation 1, Supp. 1 U0rder Ma-1, Dir. 1
Order Y-6, Dir. 1 L/ Order M-36 Amended
Order Y-70 /' Order M-47A
Facts For Industry:
Clay Construction Products, M268-00
Cotton System Spinning Activity, Y-15-3-10/51
Cotton & Linters, M-15-1-10/51
Air Conditioning &r Commercial Refrigeration
Equipment, 1950, Y52H-00
Paint Varnish Lacquer & Filler,M19cF-41
g'Fats & Oils, M17-2-41 & M17-1-41
L7 01eomargarine, M17J-W1
aG Pulp, Paper & Board, M14A-W1


390 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3










I


SOUTHEAST'S AIRPORT EXPANlSION NEEDS

If the Southeast expects to keep abreast of needs for the
development of its airport facilities, it is going to take the
expenditure of $51,342,000 in establishment of new airports and
improvements of old ones in the next 3 years, the Civil Aero-
nauties Administration, U. S. Department of Commerce, has esti-
mated.
The estimate was made in that agency's annual nNational Air-
port Plan for 1951" just issued.
The report showed that Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Hississip-
pi, South Carolina and Tennessee need 471 new and improved air-
ports between now and 1955, which would mean the expenditure of
$34,031,000 on improvements and $12,885,000 on new facilities.
The total proposed expenditures would mean an outlay of
$6,026,000 in Alabama; $10,771,000 in Florida; $8,834,000 in
Georgia; $6,965,000 in Mississippi; $7,787,000 in South Caro-
Ilna; and $6,538,000 in Tennessee in funds provided jointly by
the Federal Government and local sponsors.
The report, required annually by Congress with passage of
the Federal Airport Act in 1946, also bowed that Alabama would
need 84 new and improved airports to cope with increasing air
commerce needs; Florida, 63; Georgia, 96; Mississippi, 123;
South Carolina, 69; and Tennesse*, 36.
Since 1947, a total of $33,912,000 has been and is being
spent in development of air facilities in the six-State area,
the report revealed, including $2,789,000 in Alabama; $11,865,-
000 in Florida; $9,362,000 in Georgia; $1,345,000 in Mississippi
$1,174,000 in South Carolina; and $7,377,000 in Tennessee.


SOUTHEAST PAYS $7 MLILLIONJ IN ESTATE TAKES

Residents of the Southeast who fell heir to money and pro-
perty last fiscal year had to pay more than $7,000,000 in
taxes to receive such inheritances, according to the annual
Compepdium of State Government Finances issued by the Burean
of the Census.
The report, for the fiscal year 1950, showed that Alabama
collected $914,000 in inheritance and estate taxes; Florida,
$3,011,000; Georgia, $613,000; Mississippi, $231,000; South
Carolina, $397,000; and Tennessee, $1,873,000.

Copies of this report are available at all
Commerce Department field offices for TD#.

IncidentSlly, ndry" Mississippi was again listed as a
collector of license and privilege taxes on alcoholic bever-
ages and also taxes on sales of that commodity. Its license
and privilege taxation grossed $79,000 and taxes on sales,
$2,311,000. Altogether, the six States received more than
$)66 million from such taxation, including $64,057,000 on
sales and gross receipts, and $2,007,000 on license and
privilege taxation.
Chain stores paid the six States a total of $1,497,000
in taxes; tobacco dealers, $50,181,000; and insurance com-
panies, $19,046,000.
Only four of the six Statse, Alabama, Florida, South
Carolina and Tennessee, reported taxation on public utili-
ties, $9,385,000.
Operators of motor vehicles paid $218,756,000 into the
brate treasuries in the form of taxes on fuels they used in
their cars, trucks and so forth, and income taxes paid by
individuals totalled $43,022,000 in five of the States,
Florida not reporting any taxation of that kind.
The Federal GovernMent poured nearly a quarter of a
billion dollars into treasuries of the six States on various
Federal aid projects. Georgia wass the biggest beneficiary
from a standpoint of amount received, with $49,782,000.
Others were Alabama, $32,868,000; Florida, $42,579,000;
Mississippi, $29,844,000; south Carolina, $24,991,000; and
Tennessee, $46,893,000.

A total of 731 business firms in the Southeast
last fiscal year sold millions of dollars worth of
goods to the Federlc Government. See story in issue
of Bulletia~ qf Commerce of August 1, 1951, '


a ATIONAL MEDICAL SURVEY UPCOMING
SThe Office of Business Economics,
U. S. Department of Commerce recently
conducted with the aid of the American
Medical Association a survey of the .
' income of 55,000 physicians located
' over the country and results of that
survey are about ready for publication
' in the July 1951 issue of Survey of
' Current Business. Copies of the publi-
' cation will be available at all field
' offices of the Department of Commerce
at a price to be stipulated later.


Gre sy3-3s2


UNIVt~SiIY UP FLUMIUA


3 1262 08748 8903


PAGE 4


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


U. S. OEPARTMEnT OF COMMERCE
IELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St, S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000


Volume 5, Number 14 Juily 15, 1951


UNIVERSITY OF PL~ORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMlICS
GAINESVILLE,~: itLORtIDA









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE









Atlanta, Ga., Sarannah, Ga., JacksonvilleFla., Miari, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Charleston, S.C.,
50 wlhitaball st.,8.W., 218 P.O.Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper B1dg.,
Tel. WA-4121,I-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,1-206 Tel. 'T/7

BirmingamAla., Chattanooga,Tenn., Columbia. S.C., Jackson, Miss., Tampa, Fla., Iashrille, Tenn.,
246 Federal Bldg., 719 James Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 426 Iasoo St., 606 Tampa St., 315 Union St.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355 Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972 Tla. 2-3880 Tel. 42-2426

Memphis, Tenn., Knozville, Tenn., ALugus~ta, Ga., Aiken, S. C., Barnwell, S. C.,
Madison at Front, 253 Dayligh~t Bldg., Maxwell House, 1833 Curv St., 201 County Office Bldg.,
TPel. 8-3426 Tel. 5-1138-9 Tla. 2-8394 Tel. 1060 Tel. 292

VOL. 5, Nro. 15 AUGUST i. 1951


WHOLEtSALE SALES CONTINUE RISE
Wholesale Sales


Source: Burean of the
Ceqage
Central; hardware, 32 per cent up in the South Atlantic and 28
per cent in the East South Central; industrial supplies, 55 per
cent in the South Atlantic and other sections of the South;
plumbing and beating supplies, 60 per cent greater in the South
Atlantic .
The increase for the 5-month period in the Southeast, however,

didn "tqu "e ppo imat t e 2 r c n:adva ce fo he nation.

lantic and 2 per cent in the East South Central, and for the
nation the advance wais the same as that in the South Atlantic.
In the South Atlantic, 546 firms participating in the panel
repre dollar smls ainsMay a $90 88000 and in the East South


FORlEIGNl COTTON CONSUMPTION DECLINES

The cotton-growing States of the Southeast are consuming
less foreign cotton than formerly, judging from the new publi-
eation Cotton Production and Distribution just issued by the
Bureau of the Censue for the year ending July 31, 1950*
The publication, also known as Bulletin 187, placed the
consumption of foreign cotton in the Southeast last year at
91,728 bales compared with 106,640 Gales in 1947*
Only three southeastern States were included in the foreign
cotton use column last year, Georgia, North Carolina and
South Carolina, whereas, four years ago such consumption was
listed for Alabamoa, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and
Tennessee.


SPARE TIRE BAN LIFTED
Action of the National Production

~tres fo an ombie me owi~th gneral
satis action throughout the Southeast.tie

in the South Atlantic and East South Cen-
tral eg 5n in 1948, when t~he last Census

te5Census approximated wonl in excess of
Some evidence of what NPA' a action meant
tonwcar ownr man e tre ion ts f d

n ea fiohtire as original quipmentp oi
of as much as $15 million during the third
quarter of this year. During the ban, a
new car purchaser had to buy a fifth tire,


THE


Pe firts fv m tsO o 9j a c

af u e o reason period last year in
In the South A~tlantic area, a rise of 25

::' "reu : th C" su" ." in :" st"::: E
South Central region the increase was 19

Neal all commodities sold shared in the
edaot acumul tiveu eise. me examp as in-

29 pe cent e th eSot eBtlantic seoM on
full-line electrical wholesalers, who ex-
perienced a 41 per cent rise in the South
Atlantic and 24 per cent in the East South


INDEX
1o snes5 *O*TRm IVanlCe


Production


lesf oll 2.3e.'" 5L P


if he could get one at all, on the open market, paying consider-
ably more for it than when the pare was included as original
equipment .
The spare tire was banned in April and the rubber that would
have been used for that purpose was channeled into production
of heavy duty tires for trucks, tractors and fars equipment. A
serious shortage had developed in those lines, threatening to
.disrupt transportation and interfere with farm production.

ON N~hr SWE FOR SIKLG BU e Ma -

rsby raising the permitted use from 25,000 to 150,000 pounds
quarter regardless of a company' s base period consumption.
ore natural rubber than previously may not be used, however,
intheaprodu tion of dc rommoditiest esbowrling:balls r uto

obiles, bicycles and motor-cyclesCOs.KCT

Announcement was made that all applicants for permission to
commence construction must use the new application form, CMP-
Cwhich will serve both as construction application and ap-
plication for allotment of steel, copper and aluminum on types
construction for which allotments will be made. It complete-

ly replaces Form NPAF-24, which has been used since midFebruary.
In Order Y-45, Sobedule 7, NPA ordered allocation of sebacic
beginning July 1, because increases in old uses and
devlopentof new ones have created a shortage.
METHYL CHLORI~DE
Rapidly increasing uses of methyl chloride, particularly in
poution of synthetic rubber, has led to the allocation of
;that commodity. (Order Y-45, Schedule 8) .
SEE NPA PAGE 2










I


GOVERNMENT BUYING HEAVY YI SOU~ITHST

A total of 735 contracts were awarded in the States
of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mlississip~pi, South Caro-
lina and Tennessee in the Federal Government' s
multibillion dollar procurement operations conducted
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1951, according
to a compilation made by the Atlanta office of the U. 8.
DepartmentaofiCommerc fro ael geontract award in-

The dollar value of the contracts awarded ran
well in excess of $100,000,000, since up to early last
March, when the Defense Department abandoned pbiiig
the dollar award information for security reasons, con_
tracts awarded to that time had a dollar value of $86,-
369,942. Since that time, many contracts have been let
in the area and a large number are believed to have run
into seven and eieht figures.
Contracts awarded by States as compiled by the
Commerce Department from available information included
115 in Alabama, Florida, 158, Georgia, 189, Mississippi,
50, south Carolina, 46, and Tennessee, 177.
By States, the dollar value of the awards up to the
time of discontinuance of the information included Ala_
bama, $7,711,010; Florida, $11,433,620; Georgia, $37,_
900,396; Mlississippi, $4,591,468, South Carolina, $3,-
453,379; and Tennessee, 120,921,873.
The compilation, either as to number of firms parti_
cipating or dollar value, may be at variance with data
kept on such activities in the Department of Defense,
since the weekly contract award lists distributed by
Department of Commerce offices did not include negotia
ted contracts.

FOUR SOUTHEASTERNERS TO ADVISORY GROUPS

Appointment of four southeastern businessmen to
industry advisory committees to advise with the
National Production Authority, U. 8. Department of
Commerce in carrying out its programs has just been
announced by NPA. Those named and the committees in-
cluded the following:
01an Richardson, President, Southern States EquiP
ment Company, Hampton, Ga., Power Switching Equipment
Committee .
Joseph D. Robinson, Vice President, Profile Supply
Company, Orlando, Fla., Aluminum and Mlagnesium Warehouse
Committee*
F. Y. Dabney, Partner, "M" System Trailer Manufactur-
ing Company, Vicksburg, Miss., House Trailers Committee.
David Cronheim, Executive Vice President, Uisco Power
Equipment Corporation, Birmingham, Power Switching Equip
ment Committee*

COTTON EXPORT ALLOCATIONS B1EGIN

Licensing of the 2,500,000-bale cotton allocation for
export during the 1951-52 crop year was begun July 10
by the Office of International Trade, U]. S. Department
of Commerce.
The licenses first were issued against the United
Kingdom; then the allocations for Belgium and Switzer
land were to be taken up. OIT expected to receive from
the Belgian and Swiss governments recommendations con-
cerning the distribution of their respective alloca.
tions among importing cotton mills.
Licenses issued between July 10 and August 31 will
be valid through December 31, 1951, but no shipments
may be made on such licenses until August 1. Licenses
issued after August 31 through November 30 will be valid
for four months following the date.of issuance.


NPA Continued from Page 1

HIGKI TENACITY RAYONV
By amending its Order Y-2, NPA took action to pre-
vent increased use of high tenacity rayon in the product-
ion of rubber products for non-defense purposes. The
action restricted consumption' of such rayon in each
quarter, beginning July 1, to the average quarterly use
during the frt si mntEN TI 0191

In Order 81-71, NPA gave priorities assistance to
technical and scientific laboratories in the procurement
of materials needed to carry on important research pro-
jects.

In a move to minimize disruption of mill schedules
which might otherwise occur with inauguration of the
Controlled Materials Plan, NSPA issued Direction 1 to
CMP Regulation 3 postponing from July 1 to July 7 the
date on which authorized controlled materials orders
will have preference over DO-rated orders calling for
delivery of steel, copper or aluminum during September.

Because United States consumers face a possible lose
of some foreign sources of chemical wood pulp used in
production of many types of paper and paper prodnote,
NPA, in Order Y-72, acted to assure equitable distri-
bution of the domestic supply.

Small firms either manufacturing shoes or cutting
sole leather were exempted from restrictions on sole-
leather cutting in an amendment to Order Y-34.
PASSENGER CARS
Order M-68 dealing with passenger cars was amended
adding aluminum castings and forgings to the list of
materials the use of which is limited in automobile
production .


CMP ALLOTMENTS
Authority was delegated to the Secretary of Defense
and his designees to make allotmpents of controlled mat-
erials and to apply and assign the right to apply def-
fense ratings and allotment numbers and symbols to meet
authorized programs for which the Department of Defense.
is claimant agency. (Delegation 1 as amended) .
CIDSUEiES
-The basic order regulating the use of metal cans by
packers was revised by NPA establishing for the first
time quotas and preference ratings on the use of cans
made of black plate, which have hitherto not been sub-
ject to use restrictions. (Order Y-25, amendedd.
NICKED
Pending proposed overall revision -of 1-14, which is
expected at an early date, the nickel conservation order
has been continued for the third quarter of 1951 by
NPA in an amendment to Order Y-14.
PE~TBQLE~U & GAS
Authority to reschedule deliveries of controlled
materials for the petroleum and gas ~industriees ws
delegated by NPA to the Petrolens Administration for
Defense in Supplemental 1 to Delegation 13.
In a separate action, NPA issued regulations and
instructions for the use of allotment numbers to pro-
cure controlled materials and fabricated items for
operators in the petroleum and gas industries. M-4c6,Sup.1.


S' AND A'
Publication of a new booklet, "80
Questions and Answrere on the Controlled
Materials Plan" for distribution with-
out charge was announced by NPA. The
questions selected were those mrost fre-
quently asked at the CMP educational
meetings held for businessmen recently
in 20 key cities.


'


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





goods. Durable goods were $2,478 million in May. After
adjustment for seasonal factors, housefurnishings,, elee-
trical goods and automotive parts and accessories de-
clined 15, 5 and 3 per cent, respectively.
+ + *
Shipments of knt cotton and wool underwear and night-
wear were valued at $24.3 million in May, or 63 per cent
more than in May 1950 and 4 per cent over April 1951. Pro-
duction of underwear was higher than in May 1950 but
showed a mixed pattern compared with April of this year.
+ +
Average weekly cuttings of most men' s; apparel in May
registered decreases from the May 1950 levels, the Bureau
of the Census reported. In comparisons with April 1951,
there was no fixed pattern. Summer-weight suit cutting .
decreased sharply while regular-weight suit cuttings
showed a 12 per cent rise.
** **
May wheat flour production was estimated by the Census
Bureau at 18,556,000 sacks, or an average of 843,000 eacks
per working day compared with 822,000 sacks per working
day in april and 835,000 sacks in May 1950. Wheat flour
mills in May operated at 74.6 per cent of capacity, com-
pared with 72.5 per cenlt in April.
+ + *
Consumption of raw wool in April averaged 11.1 million
scoured pounds per week, 10 per cent more than in March,
thie Census Bureau announced. Consumption of apparel class
wool averaged 8.5.million pounds per week and carpet wool
2.6 million pounds per week, an increase of approximately
22 per cent over March for apparel wool, but a decrease
of about 19 per cent for carpet wool.
+ *
Retail prices of goods and services bought by moderate-
income urban families on May 15, 1951 averaged 0.4 per
cent higher than a month earlier, the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor, reported. Food
prices rose 0.8 per cent during the month and fractional
increases were reported for most other major groups.

L7 ABC' e of CMP.............................,..........
Census qf Busiqess. 1948

City Size, Series BC-3-R-5A..............................
Merchandise Line Sales, Drug & Proprietary Storea,3-R-23A
Merchandise Line Sales, Automotive Group, Gasoline Service
Stations, BC-3-R-21A...................
Sales Size, BC-3-R-2B..................................
Selected Servines
Employee Size of Establishments Personal, Business and
Repair Services, BC-3-S-3A.........
Wholesale
Sales Size Service Wholesalers, BC-3-W-2A1.............,
Number of Trucks, Truck-Tractors & Trailers Operated by
Petroleum Bulk Stations & Distributing' Terminals,3-WR-70
Service Trades
Laundries, Cleaning & Dyeing Plants & Related Services,
SBulletin 2-S-8. ................75(L
Census of Maggfactures, 1917
Shipments, for Classes of Products, by Geographic Division -
Tobacco Manufactures...........................
Shipments for Cla~sese of Products, by Geographic Division
& St~te Leather and Leather Products.........
Public Employrment in April 1951.........................
Provisional Estimates of Population of U. S., April 1,
1950 to May 1, 1951, P-25,lo. 51................,
8 1Business Aids:
Ways of Increasing Music Store Salse, #1363.'...........
Price Fixing, #364 ................... .................
How the W~holesaler Can Help the Retailer to Increase
H~is Sales, #365...........................
L7 Personalized Service Profitable for Small Appliance
Dealer, #366.......................
GP0 81100550


(TO OBTAIN COPIES OF THIS YATERIAL, CHECK( IT IN THE
SPACE PROVIDED AND SEND THIS SECTION OF THE BULLETIN
OF COMMERCE TO THE~ NEAREST DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE, YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THEB OPPOSITE
SIDE. MAKIE REMITTAlNCES FOIR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO
TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR
ITEMS NOT PRICED.)


/3 Monthly Wholesale Trade Report (Place on Mail List)
SCotton Production & Distribution, Bull.187......250
Sew National Production Authority Actions:
Order IY-2 Amended I Orider I-45, Sched. 7
Order 1l-45, Sched. 8 U~rder Y-2 Amended
Order MY-71 a CMP Reg. 3, Dir. 1
Order Y-72 U Order P-34 Amended
Order 1-68 Amended V 80 Questions and Answera
on the Controlled Materials Plan
Delegation' 1 Ainended Order Y-25 Amended
Order I-114 Amended Supp. 1 to Delegation 13
& r-46, Sup. 1
SCMIP Outline Talk..........................;......***
U Sarap For Steel For Defense...r.................... .


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAG`E 3


8 IISINESSS TREN 0S

Business and consumers were in a favorable finan-
cial position at the end of last year with incomes the
highest on record and supported by large overall hold-
ings of liquid assets, the Office of Business Economics
of the U. S. Department of Commerce reported. Holdings
of cash and U. S. Government securities by business
corporations ~expanded by over $86 billion, exceeding by
over $3 billion the record holdings accumulated by the
end of World War 11.
*
Total business inventories at the end of May were
estimated at $~69..7 billion. After allowance for season-
al variation, the book value at the end of May was
$1.5 billion above April. Price factors accounted for
only one-tenth of the increase. Manufacturing inventor-
ies increased by a billion dollars while wholesalers'
and retailers' stocks rose almsot $350 million and $150
million, respectively.
*
Expenditures for new construction in June 1951
totaled $2,700 million, an increase of 6 per cent over
May, the U. S. Departments of Commerce and Labor re-
ported jo~intly.. Wiith the exception of commercial build-
ing, which was beginning to reflect the effects of
construction controls,'almost all types of construction
expenditures increased over May. The relative gain in
private residential construction, however, was consid-
erably less than during the comparable period in pre-
vious post-rar years. .
*
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers in
May were estimated at $6,527 million, which, on a
seasonally adjusted basis, were almost 5 per cent
higher than in April, reflecting a 7 per cent increase
in nondurable goods sale and no change in durable










I


NPA APPEALS BOARD ANNOUNCES DECISIONS

First announcement of the Appeals Board of the National
Production Authority regarding actions taken in appeals for
authority to commence construction previously denied by the
Construction Controls Division of that agency found two denials
affecting proposed southeastern projects. They were:
Florida State Theaters, Inc., appeal to construct a theater
at Delray Beach denied. ,
J. C. Lewis Motor company, Inc., Savannah, denied appeal
for construction of one-story garage building.
In the case of the Delray Beach project, the board held that
there was no persuasive showing of unreasonable or undue hard-
ship, and regarding the proposed Savannah structure, it was
held that there had been no persuasive showing of improper
discrimination or hardship.

VALUE OF SOUTHIEASTERN 1KPORTS RISES

A 27 per cent increase in the value of imports passing into
southeastern customs districts in the first four months of 1951
over the corresponding period last year was shown in a tabula-
tion prepared by the Atlanta office of the U. S. Department of
Commerce .
The value placed on imports through enatoms districts of
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Mobile
at the end of April this year was estimated at $19.8 million
against $94.2 million at the same time lkst year.
North Carolina registered a 173 per cent gain, Florida, 44
per cent, and Georgia, 14 per cent. A 3 per cent advance was
shown for Mobile, but South Carolina experienced a 13 per cent
drop.
At the same time, the tabulation also showed that the value
of exports going out from the customs districts of the same
States at the end of April this year was $162.2 million. No
comparative figures were available. North Carolina registered
a valuation of $600,000, South Carolina, $27.5 million, Georgia,
$15.1 million, Florida, $100.2 million, and Mobile, $18.8 mil-
lion.

SINCOMdE PAYMENTS TO INDIVIDUALS '
During the month of August, the Office of '
Business Economics, U. S. Department of Com- '
'merce releases its annual estimates of income '
'payments to individuals by regions and by '
SStates. Watch for this'.!


KUNITSVLLE. ALA.. CRITICAL AREA

The Defense Production Administration has announced the
designation of Hluntaville, Ala., as a critical area for defense
housing.
The designation was made after DPA' s Interagency Critical
Areas Committee made a study of conditions in conjunction with
,other interested agencies.
The action provides a basis for relaxation of Federal
credit controls on housing by the Board of Governors of the
Federal Reserve System and the Housing and home Finance Agency
to assist in providing additional housing units.
A thousand in-nigrant workers will be needed to staff
essential activities in the Huntsville area in the next year,
it was explained, virtually all of the demand stemming from
expansion of the Redstone Arsenal.
Designation of the Huntsville area was the fourth such
designation for the Southeast. Previously DPA had placed
Aiken, 8. C., Valdosta, Ga., and Tullahoma, Tenn., in that
category .

MILKL COWS 05 SOUITHIERN FARMS INCREASE

There were more milk cows on southern farms January 1 of
this year than at the same time last year, according to a
report issued by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
At the beginning of this year, farms of the South Atlantic
region had 2,171,000 cows and heifers 2 years old and over
kept for milk and on the same date last~year the number was
2,125,000. In the South Central area, they totalled 5,011,000
and 4,953,000, respectively.

~DEFENSE PRODUCTION POOLING
S Southeastern businessmen interested in forming
Production pools for the purpose of participating
Sin the Federal Government's multibillion dollar
'procurement operations will find some valuable
inormation in a booklet just issued by the Le-
'fense Production Administration entitled p2211&&
SProduction for Defense to be available soon. The
Booklet explains in simple A-B-C fashion the
'steps a group of businessmen must take to band
Themselves together into a pooled production unit
'to handle defense contracts and sub-contracts.
GPO 83.15052


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 889
IBUILIET ,. ......rverrs


Pittil 4s


U. 5, OEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oftice
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009


Volume 5, Number 15 August 1, 1951


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGiE $300












UNIfVERSITYP OF F1;0RIDAU.TY
LERot L. QLUAL;S
DEPARTMENT ~OF SCfRONOIfCS
GA INESW11L.LE .0plat~D































._ I __ __


ARMED FORCES SMALL BUSINESS EEMlBIT SET FOR ATLANTA


1 COMPL1ANCE CHECKS
liTH compliance check will abortly be
instituted in the Southeast to determine
Nartonal if regulations dealing with the use of
(d ()1(g) steel, copper and altedanan issued under
the Controlled Materials Plan of the
National Production Authority are being
Produ tion complied with.
& 21) 11Citft The investigation will cover opera-
tions of a cross-section of industries
and trades affected by CMP and will be
the forerunner of similar cheeks to be
111 oI~ity made during each calendar quarter.
Investigators will audit records to
determine whether a company has adhered
to authorized production schedules, has
,placed orders within its CMlP allotment
'of materials, and did not maintain ex-
.cessive inventories,
In the initial audit, investigators
will check specifically whether companies have cancelled or
adjusted outstanding orders where necessary to stay within
their quarterly CMP allotments. Such orders include those ac-
cepted by suppliers prior to receipt of allotment for delivery
in the quarter for which it is valid.

CONSTRUCTIONN
SNPA is making a vital change in its
'construction order. Details of the revision '
'will be announced in the next issue of the
'Bulletin of Commerce. Watch for it*, t

CADMIUMR
Restrictions on the use of cadmium have been eased to per-
mit its increased use in a wide range of military and civilian
products. The cadmium conservation order Y-19 was amended be-
cause inventories of the metal have been backing up in the
hands ofeproducers, pending the placement of a larger volume
SELECTR~OPLATISNG
Existing electroplating facilities are believed, adequate



aD ihreton 5 toe coventrlen Materile Plan Regultion 1 ats
been ssued tor orrectta a moriappehnion tof purc whaser tofb


ciston5t controlled materials whr plesare unable ton delive

full amounts during the second quarter.
(SEE NPA PAGE 2)


Reaching out to intensify mobilization of mall business in
the National Rearmament Program, the Armed Forces Regional Coun-
egl of the Yunitions Board has announced the establishment of a
joint Arm, Navy and Air Force small business manufacturers
exhibit to be held in the newr exhibit hall of the Atlanta Bilt-
more Hotel, September 10, 11 and 12.
Prime contractors of the Southeast and South will display
products they are now making for the Arm, Navy and Air Force
for the inspection of manufacturers who are potential sub-
contractors for such wPork.
Major contractors will exhibit their products for the benefit
of smaller businesses willing to undertake subcontract manu-
facture.
The United States Department of Commerce is cooperating in
establishment of the project.
Lieut. Col. Robert R. Kay, of the United States Air Force has
been designated project officer for the exhibit and those inter-
eated have been asked to communicate with him. His address is
in care of the Inspector of Naval Material, 770 Spring Street,
North West, Atlanta.
The exhibit will be restricted to representatives of manu-
facturing firms, and will be open from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M.,
daily, except on Tuesday, September 11 at which time the exhibit
nill be open from 9 A. M. to 9 P. M. in order that small manu-
facturers in the Greater Atlanta area who cannot leave their
businesses during the day will have an opportunity to visit the
exhibit that evening and talk to the technical representatives
of the prime contractors.
The exhibit will permit engineering and contracting represen-
tatives of prime contractors to get together with small manu-
facturers, discuss actual products, machine tools and tolerances
with them and plan blue prints and specifications.

FARM MACffhIERY SH~IPMENTS OFF SLIGHTLY

Manufacturers of farm machinery and equipment in the South-
east last year shipped to market products valued at $119.3 mil-
liouresome 15 pe ceen lessrthan the 1949 value, according to


District of t Columbia Wesot Vrii n ot Crlnw37
000. The 190 shipments i h otes included a valuation of 82. ilo
9.5mlonin th ot tatcmpete uni, and $25.7 million in. h East tchme

and ssiparts 2,6,0 Tnese 2,310 a Dlir


LNITilEI StokTES IDElPAsiTMN fiilFil (8 :COlMliMitC:E

FIELD SERVICE


Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala.,
947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federall Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,1-206


Charleston, S.C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville,Fla.,
50 Whitehall St.,S.W., 218 P. 0. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,1-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-711


Chattanooga,Tenn., Columbia, S.C.,
719 James Bldg., 1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972

Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Birm~ingham,Ala .,
*266 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355

MemphiB, Tenn.,
gadison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426

VOL NO~ 16


Knozville, Tenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Augusta, Ga.,
Hazwpell House,
Tel. 2-8394


Barnwell, S. C.,
201 County Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292

UGUA ST 15i 1991l


L





SOUTHEASTERN FIRMS GET 183 CONTRACTS


BPA Continued Frqm Page 1

ALUMINJUM FOIL
The aluminna foil order, M-67, was broadened to include
all types except insulation foil. The order originally
covered only aluminum foil used in containers and packaging
materials. The amendment brings in other usea such as
aluminum foil for household purposes, for florists, gift
wrapping and seal and label usages.
STEEL. COPPER. ALUIIINUML
In Direction 2 to Order 1Y-47A, manufacturers of consumer
durable goods whose second quarter use of steel, copper and
aluminum items was based on adjusted base period figures
were, in general, permitted to use those adjustments in com-
puting permitted use of the three materials in the third
quarter .
AEC AUTHORITY BROADENED

The Atomic Energy Commission's authority to apply ~"D"
ratings to orders for materials needed to meet authorized
programs for which AEC is claimant agency was extended to
include the right to allot materials and to redelegate
this right to other Federal agencies engaged in AEC pro-
jects. (Delegation 2, amended) .
CONTAINERS & PACTkAGING
Despite a number of material shortages, the containers
and packaging industry has been operating at a record
production rate in an effort to meet heavy defense and
essential demands, according to a current issue of NPA' s

COMMUNICATIONS
The nations operating communications industry -----
telephone, radio, telegraph and cable --- overloaded with
demands for its services will receive priorities assistance
to obtain materials for maintenance and expansion as a
result of action taken by NPA in the issuance of a new
order, 1Y-77. The order affects 21 major and 6,000 indepen-
dent telephone companies serving about 43 million phone
customers as well as those companies which provide national
and international telegraph service by radio and cable.
CRdlIMkIN PROSECUTION
The first criminal prosecution involving a violation of
NPA orders was instituted in Federal Court in New York
City. The Ender Manufacturing Corporation, New York City,
manufacturers of fluorescent light equipment, and Jules
Levenstein, its president, were charged in a 12-count
criminal information with violating NPA orders.

COM~PLIANCE COURT
Announcement was made of the creation
of a "compliance court" to be.composed
of eminent jurists as commissioners to
hear and act on charges of violations of
NPA orders and regulations. Walter HI.
Foster, Boston attorney and chief corP-
pliance commissioner of the War Product-
ion Board during World War II, was named
Chief Hearingr Commissioner.

PRINTING PLATES
Companies that process copper aluminum and steel sheet
for use in making printing plates are required to file
MPForm 4-8 to get fourth-quarter material allotments,
PA held.
PIG LEAL
In a new order, Y-76, allocation of the available
supply of soft pig lead produced by primary refiners was
made by NPA which also established limitations on the re-
quired acceptance of rated orders for pig lead products
adalloys. The action was necessary, it was stated, to
asueequitable distribution of the availaDle primary
soft lead supply in the best interest of defense production
and civilian needs.


Firms in Alabama, Florida, Ggorgia, Mississippi,
South Carolina and Tennessee in July of this year were
awarded a total of 183 contracts by the Federal Govern-
ment in purchases being made under the national defense
program and for the civilian departments of government,
according to a compilation made by the Atlanta office
of the U. S. Department of Comrmerce from weekly cautract
award lists now being made available to business firms.
The awards included 29 in Alabqama; 34 in Florida; 28
in Georgia; 9 in Mississippi; 20 in South Carolina; and
43 in Tennessee.
Included in the purchases were shells, rifle barrels,
paper, textiles, wood manufactures, petroleum products,
office furniture, food products and other commodities.
The number of contracts awarded to southeastern firms
in July was believed to have been the largest number
for any one month since the defense purchase operations
became accelerated in June 1950*
At the same time, in a tabulation issued by the
Munitions Board in W~ashington, southeastern firms were
shown to have received nearly half a billion dollars
worth of contracts for goods and services for the Fed-
eral Government from July 1950 through April 1951.
The awards shown in the Yunitions Board tabulation
did not include those under $5,000 awarded by the Navy,
those under $10,000 awarded by the Air Force, and those
under $5,000 awarded by the ArmyJ for the period of
July through December and under $10,000 since that time.
Tennessee led the southeastern States-in value of
awards for that period with $113,104,000 and was closely
followed by Georgia with $107,514,000. Alabama's total
for the 10-month period was $91,123,000; Florida'as
$838,779,000; Mlississippi's, $26,509,000; and South Caro-
Ilna' s, 859,423,000.
Value of the contracts awarded in the six southeast-
ern States was about 2.6 per cent of the $16.9 billion
for the nation as a whole.

FOREIGN TRADE OFFICIALS MOVE 05 SOUTHEAST

Apparently recognizing the importance of the South-
east as a trading center, seven foreign countries have
established, or are setting up regional consulates in
Atlanta as a move better to serve the region.
The countries are Austria, Belgium, France, Federal
Republic of Germany, Great Britain, Mlexico and Panama,
which are doing a three and a quarter billion dollar
business with the United States, or sane 16 per cent
of the world's total trade with the United States.
One of the appointments was recently made. It was
0. J. Coogler, jr., who will serve as honorary consul
of Mlexico. Robert Hecht, honorary consul of Austria,
will serve Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas,
Louisiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Texas.
Dr. Georg Ahrens, consul for the Federal Republic
of Germany, will serve Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, and
John Ashley Jones, honorary consul of Panama, will look
after Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee.

YORE SOUTIEASTERNERS ON ADVISORY GROUPS
Appoin;tm;ent of ddi.n;Ir~Tioa ebr fidsr ad-
visory committees to assist the National Production Au-
thority in discharging its functions was announced by
NPA. They include W~illiam Lowndes, jr., Greenville, S.C.
Carl D. Brorein, Tampa; Frank S. Barnes, Rock Hill,
S. C., Benjamin S. Gilmer, Atlanta, C. J. Brown, Pt.
Dora, Fla., Winthrop M. Hallett, jr., Mlobile; S. M.
Nickey, Jr., Mlemphis, and T. J. Carpenter, Holt. Ala.


OPO 811005370


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE







I


SUS NE SN FBR EB I



Large independent retail stores in the United
States registered a decrease of 3 per cent in June
1951 over June 1950 and a 4 per cent decrease from May
to June, the Bureau of the Census reported. Both food
Stores and general stores recorded a moderate increase,
11 per cent, in June 1951 over June 1950, while a de-
crease of 15 per cent was recorded for motor-vehicle
dealers.
*
Cash dividend payments of United States corpora-
tions issuing public reports amounted to $2,500 mil-
lion for the first 5 months of 1951, about 11 per cent
higher than the $2,264 million paid out in the same
'period a year ago. April 1951 eash dividend payments
totalled $516 million, up 6 per cent from April of
last year. Ma~cy dividend disbursements of $210 million
were at about the same level as a year ago.
*
Economic activity during June continued at a high
rate with military procurement expanding on a broad
Scale, the Office of Businless Economics, U. S. Depart-
ment,of Commerce reported. Production remained at a
peak rate, with shifts in the character of output re-
flecting increases in defense goods and producers'
durables and cutbacks in orders for consumers' goods.
*
Profits of U. S. manufacturing corporations were
down in the first quarter of 1951 although sales
reached an all time peak in the first quarter, the
Securities and Exchange Commission reported.


(TO OBT~ld COPIES OF THLIS h6ATERIAL, CHECK IT IN THE


I


SPACE PROVIDED ANJD SEND THIS SECTION OF THE BULLE~T~N


OF' COMMERECE TO THE NEAREST DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


FIELD OFFICE. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THIE OPPOS-
ITE SIDE. MAKE RE'dlTfANCES FOR SALE MAlTERIAL, PAYABLE
TO TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES. THERE IS P10 CAHARE
F"OR ITEMS NOT PRICED.)


/ Farm Machines & Equipment, 1950, Y35A-00...........*
J'/ NPA Material:
LLorder Y-19 Amended Dir. 5 to CMP Reg. I
Orde M-6 Ameded Dir. 2 to Order M-47A
SDel. 2 Amended /7 Order M-77 /' Order M-76
' Facts For Industry ]Reports:
KLicnit Cloth for Sale, MY15K-00...........,....*
01eomargarine, M17J-51 *************************
Cotton System Spinning Activity, M115-3-11/51***
Men' s Apparel, M678-51.. ................ .....**
LLSuperphosphate, M119D-51. ..................******
SConfectionery, Y160~-51.........................
Iron & Steel Foundries & Steel Ingot Producers,
(Report on Products Shipped & Materials Used)>
M210-11 ................****************
Cotton & Linters, M15-1-11-51*******************
Fats & Oils, M17-2-51*************************** .
L/ Construction Machinery, Y36~-.1-1 ..............**


Personal income in May was at the annual rate of $249.5
billion, virtually unchanged from April. The May total of
personal income was about $5) billion higher, at an annual
rate, than the average for the first quarter of this year.
Changes from April to May in the components of personal
income were small and largely offsetting.
+ + +
Cotton exporters may now submit license applications
for contracts entered into prior to June 15, 1951 covering
sales against the 1951-52 crop year allocation even though
they have not received import license numbers, the Office
of International Trade, U. S. Department of Comrmerce, an-
nounced. All other required information, such as consignee
statements, date of sale, and shipping periods, still must
be supplied with each application, OIT said.
eaaa +
The net working capital of U. S. corporations reached a
new record level of $77.8 billion at the end of March 1951,
according to estimates of the Securities and Exchange Com-
mission. This was $2 billion higher than the total at the
end of 1950, largely reflecting expansion of inventories
and receivables in excess of increases in payables, taxes
and other current liabilities.
w +
A total of 9,329 million yards of cotton and synthetic
broad fabrics were bleached, dyed, printed and finished in
1950, the Bureau of the Census announced. This was 13 per
cent above the 1949 output of 8,291 million yards. Also,
it was the largest annual production figure reported since
1943. Synthetic fabrics, which accounted for 18 per cent
of the total in 1943 increased to 24 per cent in 1950.
*+ + +
The Recommended Commercial Standard on Model Forms for
Boys' Apparel, TS-4640O, has been endorsed by the model form
industry, the Commodity Standards Division, Office of In-
dustry and Commerce, U. S. Department of Commerce, announced.
It becomes effective January 26, 94q 88-4
/Insuring America' s Future (Address by Secretary of
Commerce Charles Sawryer) .........................
Listing of Approved Certificates of Necessity List 5
Area by Standard Commodity Classification Code.......
~7Index of Specifications & Related Publications (Used
By) U. S. Air Force, Military Index, Vol. IV....$2.75
T Shipments for Classes of Products by Geographic Division
and State 1947 Censue of Manufactures Rubber
Products, MC100-25 ......... ....
/1950 U. S. Census of Population Vermont Number of
Inhabitants, P-A45 .......... .....104
/719~ census of Business* ]Retail Trade*
L/Merchandise Line Sales of Automotive Group, Gasoline
Service Stations, 2-R-21 .................. 304

Merchandise Line Sales Miscellaneous Kinds of~nl nt utuis --........ 5
Business, 2-R-24. ................... .......454
/1 4 Census of Business: Wholesale Trade:
/! Comrmodity Line Sales of Merchant Wkholesalers, Manu-
facturers' Sales Branches, Offices, Assemblers..759
S194 Census of Business: Service Trades:
SEmpl yee Size. ......... ..... 254
r Small Bus ness Aids*
How Th'e Meat Retailer Can Judge Quality In Meat,#367
How To Meet Competition in Retailing, #368.,.......
Radio Advertising, #369 ................... .........
Waste in Dry Goods Stores, #370. ...................
Outside Sources of Buying Information.... .#371.....
Rural Market for Plumbing & Heating Equipment,#I372.
Facts About Book Rental Libraries, #373............
Gross Changes in the Labor Force, April May 1951,P-59ff28
Housing Characteristics of Miami, Fla., HC-3,#28.....
Estimates of the Farm Population, 1910-1950, BAE, #16A.
19 9 Annual Survey of Manufactures:
L/Expenditures for New Plant & New Equipment in the
U. S., 1949 & 1947, M(AS-49-2 ...................

GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3







I


SOUTHEA\STERNl FIRMlS PLAN HALF-BILLION EXPAN~SION

Southeastern firms up to June~ 11 of this year planned new
and expanded facilities to cost more than half a billion dol-
lare so that they may participate more effectively in the
national program of defense, according to a compilation prepared
by the Defense Production Administration and Bureau of the
Census .
As a result, DPAL has granted then certificates of necessity
for tax amortization purposes under provisions of the Defense
Production Act of 1950.
The proposed expenditures included $215,011,000 in Alabampa;
$112~,372,000 in Florida; $94,208,000 in Georgia; $59 020 000
in Miesiasippij $41,699,000 in Tennessee; and $18S,621,000 in
South Carolina.
The certificates issued included 35 in Alabama; 25 in Tenn-
easee; 24 in Georgia; 16 in Florida; 12 in South Carolina; and
9 in Yississippi.


Southeastern physicians in 1949 received an average not in-
come of $11,159, which exceeded the average for the mpetro~-
politan areas of the New England and Middle Eastern sections
as well as the national average, according to results of a
survey conducted by the Office of Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerce in cooperation with the American Medi-
cal Association and published in a current issue of the Suc
of Current Busipeas.

Copies of this publication are available
at all Department of Commerce offices for
25 gents,
Louisiana led the southeastern area States with an aver-
age of $12,236 followed closely by Alabama with $12,172.
Other states listed in the Southeast were Tennessee, $11,985;
Virginia, $11,713; Georgia, $11,259; Florida, $11,148; North
Carolina, $10,920; KCentucky, $10,744; South Carolina, $10,637;
Yississippi, $9,595; and Arkansas, $8,631.
The national average was $11,058, and the averages for the
New England and Mliddle Eastern section were $9,442 and $9,772,
respectively. The Middle Eastern area includes such States as
New York, Pennsylvania and BNe Jersey.
In the Southeast, the average net income of physicians
engaged in civilian independent practice was $12,157, which
also exceeded that of the New England and Middle Eastern re-
gions and the national average, and those engaged in salaried
civilian practice in the Southeast received an average net
income of $7,616, which was the lowest for all regions and
for the nation.
In the Southeast, Floridians apparently paid out more money
for physicians' services than did residents of any pther State
in the region. The per capital personal consumption expendit-
ursfor such services in that State was $15.45. The average
for the Southeast was $11.59, which was the lowest for all
regions and for the nation. In Alabamna, it was $11.11; Arken-
sas, $10.08; Georgia, $11.52; Kentuckry, $11.86; Louisiana,
$1.99; Missiasippi, $8.95; North Carolina, $10.33; South
Caoia 10.31; Tennessee, $12.06; and Virginia, $12.81.
Alabama led the Southeast in point of per cent of income
spent by individuals for physicians' services with 1.44. This
WSgreateT than for alg( region ndA the Dation. The &Terage
for the Southeast was 1.31.
The survey was one of the most comprehensive ever taken by
the Office of Bilpinepp yEconomics.


S The Department of Defense has announced the issuance '
' of a publication entitled Military Production News, de- *
i signed especially to provide for businessmen and in- '
' dustrial editors engaged in defense production activi- *
' ties brief summarize of all Department of Defense oper- *
' nations which ma~y have an impact on the business comanmn- *
a ity. Those interested can have their names placed on '
I the mailing list for the asking by addressing Chief, '
a Industrial Services Branch, Office of Public Informa- a
' tion, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Washington '
' 25, D. C., and requesting the material. '
S At the same time, the Chamber of Commeroe of the '
r United States has announced the issuance of a 25-page '
i booklet titled Sabqtage and Plant Prqtectign, which '
' combines addresses on that subject from a special '
i session of that organization at its recent annual '
' meeting. This particular publication is available '
' for 50 cents and should be ordered directly from '
i the Chamber of Colmmerce of the United States, W~ash- '
' ington, D. C., with remittance accompanying the re- '
quest. *
ca is~


__


TWO AGENCIES ANNOUNCE PUBLICATIONS


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF: POSTAGE $300


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

BULLETIN ((III\Wlls/IIIIII
PHYSICIANS'126 INCOME MINUTES' E.AIEHG


PAGE 4


U. S. OEPARTMENIT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oflice
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009

Volumle 5, gnuber 16 August 15, 1951


rm~c~
p~l~;~C~LS~
~dS
s~~4


ggygagSIIT OF FLORIMA

OEe~CISI~P IP E~CONOMICS
sa;lassal~ts PhoI~IDA






























VOLUME 5. NUMBER 17 __ SEPT1EMBER( i 1


I


SML BUSINESS TO GET "BREAK" INI ATLANITA EXHIBIT

BILLION DOLLARS Small business in the South-
40 east will get its first real
FEODERAANGOSVTPCHASESO "break" in the present multi-
billion dollar purchasing oper-
so~ nations being conducted by the
Federal Government when the
Armed Forces Regional Council
to~ establishes a display of some
certainL of the goods being bought at an
exhibit to be held in Atlanta,
in -September 10, 11 and 12.
/ The exhibit, to be held in
%rrrp2, the new exhibit hall of the At
o 'r' I' I I lanta Biltmore Hotel, will fea-
Source: Office of Business ture products produced by prime
Economics, U. S. Department contractors for the armed ser-
of Commerce vices and component parts for
inspection by potential subcon-
tractors, and major subcontractors will also display their
products for the benefit of small businesses wishing to assist
in carrying out such contracts. The U. S. Department of Commerce
is cooperating in the project.

Interested persons wishing to make inquiries
regarding the Armed Forces Regional Council Small
Business Exhibit may do so by communicating with
Lieut. Col. Robert R. Kay, of the U. S. Air Force,
who is serving as Project Officer. His address now
is 770 SpDring: Street. Northwest.

The exhibit, one of several being held at strategic points
over the country, will point up products the Federal Government
and prime contractors are now seeking, those for which they will
be in the market later, and those that would be needed in case
of an emergency.
The exhibit will permit engineering and contracting represen-
tatives of prime contractors to discuss first hand with small
manufacturers their actual products, machine tools and toler-
ances, blueprints and specifications.
nThe exhibit will be for informational and educational pur-
poses only," Colonel Robert R. Kay, U. S. Air Force, project
officer for the exhibit, pointed out. "It will not be held for
the purpose of awarding contracts to argone, or assuring anyone
of contracts, but it should prove invaluable in giving potential
subcontractors a first-hand insight into what the Federal Gov-
ernment is buying so that they will be in a better position to
determine whether their plant and productive capacity will per-
mit them to participate in the government' s buying program.n
The Arsed Forces Regional Council is composed of the Armgy
Navy and Air Force and was established by the Munitions Board.


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla., Yiami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Charleston, S.C.,
50 Whitehall St., S.WU., 218 P. 0. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.
Tel. WA-421,1-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3661,X-206 Tel. 7771


Birmingham, Ala.,
246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,X-355

Memphis, Tenn.,
}ladison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Chattanooga,Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673

Knoxville, Tenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Columbia, S.C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185

Augusta, Ga.,
Maxwell House,
Tel. 2-8394


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Tarmpa, Fla.,
608 Ta~mpa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Nashville', Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2626


Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Barnwell, S. C.,
201 County Office Bldg.
Tel. 292


CONSTRUCTION
Building contractors in the Southeast
are now operating under a new procedure
Established recently by the National
:Production Authiority, U. S. Department
of commerce.
Construction Order M-4 was revoked and
in its place is Order M-WA which tightens
controls over larger building projects,
n but removes the necessity of applying to
NPA~ for permission to begin construction
or to get allotments of materials for
buildings or projects using relatively
smanl amounts of steel, copper and alumi-
num.
The new order provides rules for regu-
lating construction and limits the use
of building materials to promote further
./ the conservation of critical materials and
services required for the defense program.


THE






Al. OductilO



Authority


Note: Those wishing copies of the new con-
struction order, M-4A should get in touch
with the nearest Department of Commerce field
office.

Under Order M~-4A generally no person may commence certain
prohibited types of construction whicch require the use of more
than two tons of carbon steel, 200 pounds of copper, or any
quantity of aluminum alloy steel or stainless steel without
authorizations and allotments of materials.
The new order, while allowing a system of self-authoriza-
tion for small amounts of critical materials, places all con-
struction under NPA' s "Controlled Materials Plann beginning
with the fourth quarter of 1951. Under previous regulations,
construction came under CMP only on a permissive basis. Owners
and builders could elect to obtain construction materials
under CMbP procedure but were not required to do so.
Hereafter, application must be made to the appropriate
government agency for permission to build and for an allot-
ment of controlled materials as provided for in CMP regula-
tions for all construction projects using more than the mini-
mum amounts of controlled materials for which self-authoriza-
tion is allowed in the new regulations.
Under the new order, all construction applications will be
processed for the present in washington.
In addition to restricting the use of copper in the manu-
facture of certain items of material for construction, the
new regulations add six items to the restricted list.
The new construction order has been anticipated since last
July when NPA Administrator Manly Fleischmann indicated that
suCh aCtiOn would be needed to cope with the present situation
regarding structural steel.
SEE NPA PC


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





NEWY CONSTRUCTION IN SOUTHEAST OFF SHARPLY'


NPA CONTiNUED FROMl PAGE 1

ATTENTION. SOUTHEASTERN MAUWFACTURERS!
Continued failure on the part of many manufacturers to
file their applications for fourth quarter allotments of
steel, copper and aluminum under NPA's "Controlled Yater-
ials Plan" can result in serious difficulties in obtain-
ing production materials for the fourth quarter of this
year.
All manufacturers were instructed on July 10 to file
fourth quarter application forms so that an efficient
system of distributing available supplies of the three
controlled materials to those industries could be develop-
ed if it becomes necessary to include them under NPA's
CMP. Also, the applications are needed as an aid in deter-
mining if the manufacturers should be given CKP allotments
to assure them the quantities of materials needed to main-:'
tain their authorized output of civilian goods.
Up to the middle of August, fourth quarter applications
had been coming in to NPA offices in Wiashington "very
slowly" and many still had not been received.
NPA Administrator Mlanly Fleiachmran recently stated that~
consumer durable goods production would be maintained at
the highest level consistent with the mobilization effort.
FOLLOW CMP REGULATIONJS.NPA ASKS

NPA is urgently requesting that manufacturers in the
Southeast follow the regulations on quarterly allotments
made under provisions of its "Controlled MYaterials Plan."
The regulations require that business firms in the
region cancel or adjust outstanding orders that exceed
the allotments, and prohibit them from placing orders that
exceed limits of production established by NPA even if
they expect to cancel or reduce some orders if others are
filled .
Some manufacturers are finding it unnecessarily diffi-
cult to place orders authorized by third quarter CMLP allot-
ments because other manufacturers, in violation of existing
regulations have failed to cancel or adjust outstanding
orders exceeding their limitations on use of materials set
by authorized production schedules; placed duplicate orders
with different suppliers; or placed orders for delivery in a
single month for more than the authorized 35 per cent of
the total quarterly allotment they can receive in one month.
It is these violations of CMYP regulations and not the
alleged over-issuance of CMP allotments that are causing
the difficulties, it was stated.
Because _of difficulties reported by some manufacturers,- -
NPA has undertaken a thorough reanalysis of the balance
of allotments with available supply, and the recheck con-
firmed that the allotments granted were within the necess-
ary limits.

NlEW CONSTRUCTION ORDER CLARIFIED
NPA' s new construction program recently announced
has resulted in the following actions:
1. Revocation of Order LL-4, the basic construction
order.
2. Issuance of Order 11-4A, the new basic constnrct-
ion order.
3. Amendment of CMP Regulation 6, the CKP con-
atruction regulation.
I. Issuance of Direction 1 to CMP Reg. 6 providing
for allotments of controlled materials for construct-
ion and for self-authorization of minimum amounts of
such materials for certain categories of construction.
5. Amendment to Delegation 14, NPA's delegation to
other Government agencies to process construction ap-
plications on categories of construction in their
jurisdiction to conform to the new regulations.

SEE NPA PAGE I


Copies of the report Canstrqqtion and
construction Mlaterial4 are available on a
subscription basis of $b3 a year through any
Department of Commerce field office.


Private residential, building registered a decline of
from $568.8 million to $445.3 million and private non-
residential building fell off from $200.8 million to
$189.7 million. The value of newr public utility con-
struction showed a corresponding decrease of from
$153.5 million to $b146 million.
At the same time, from the Bureau of Labor Stas-
tistics, U. S. Department of Labor came a report show-
Lng a rather general decline in urban building in the
Southeast for the same period. The reduction wRas felt
in ten metropolitan cities in the region, with Birming-
has and Mliami bearing the brunt of the drop. In the six
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South
Carolina and Tennessee the value of new urban building
fell. from $198,442,000 in the first three months of
1950 to $183,333,000 in the same period this year, due
primarily to declines in Alabama, Georgia, South Caro-
lina and Tennessee. Only in Florida and MLississippi were
increases shown.

FlARM MbACHINERY INVVENTORIES DOWN

Consumer demand for products of one of the South-
easts largest industries --- farm machinery and equip-
ment --- is exceeding the output and inventories of
finished goods in the~hand~s off.dealera and in. company
warehouses are low, a committee of the industry told
officials of the National Production Aulthority, U. S.
Department of Commerce.
Shortages have occurred in farm irrigation equipment,
combines, tractors, cotton pickers and harvesters, disc
harrowns, corn pickers, and barnlyard equipment, the com-
nittee stated, and inventories are down 10 per cent.
One company is using idle warehouse facilities for
production purposes.
The argument advanced by the committee, which in-
cluded several southeastern businessmen, wras that pro-
duction of farm machinery and equipment would be
seriously cut if the industry has as much difficulty
procuring materials in the fourth quarter as it has now.
Last year, producers of farm machinery and equipment
in the Southeast sent farm machinery and equipment to
market valued at $119.3~ million, including $7,500,000
from Georgia; $2?,300,000 from Florida; $4,724,000 from
Alabama; $2,041,000 from M~ississippi; $28,934,000 from
Tennessee; and $4,307,000 from South Carolina, West
Virginia, Delaw;are and the District of Columbia.
The NPA industry committee included John T. Phillips,
Albany, Ga., John Blue, HIuntsville, Ala., and H. T.
Armstrong, Chattanooga.


The value of new construction in the Southeast drop-
ped $183.1 million in the first quarter of 1951 from
the fourth quarter of 1950, according to a current
issue of the publication Construction and Constructiqn
Materials issued by the U. S. Department of Commerce.
The decrease was from a value of $1,362.2 million in
the fourth quarter of 1950 to $1,179.1 million in the
first quarter of this year.
Both private and public construction shared in the
reduction, the value of private building dropping from
$969.1 million in the fourth quarter of 1950 to $820.2
million in the first quarter of this year, and public
construction from $393.1 million to $300.5 million,
respectively .


GPO 81100550


PAGE 2


BULLETIN ~OF COMMERCE






PAGE 3


More Detailed Shipments of ferrous castings in March amounted to
Information On 1,732 thousand tons compared with 1,487 thousand tone in
The Biahliahtsl February and 1,174 thousand in March 1950, the Bureau of
Of The News Sn the Census reported. March shipments of gray iron castings
The Field Of totalled 1,440 thousand tone compared with 1,234 thousand
Business Ip A- and 996 thousand tone in February 1951 and March 1950,
available at Deonatmlent of Commerce Field Offices. respectively.
sosa w
....... ........Preliminary figures indicate the June dollar value of
confectionery manufacturers' sales was about 9 per cent
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers above June of last year, The Census Bureau announced.
were estimated at $6,313 million in June, which, after Package goods houses and bar goods houses reported in-
Sadjustment for seasonal variations was a decline of 2 oreasee of 13 and 14 per cent respectively in contrast to
per cent from May. Sales of wholesalers dealing pri- the decreases of 3 and 7 per cent respectively reported
marily in durable goods were $2,368 million in June, a by bulk goode house and general line houses.
decline of 4 per cent from the previous month after + + +
seasonal allowances. All durable-goods groups except World production of natural rubber was 152,500 long tone
auto parts and accessories showed lower sales. The de- in May, bringing the total for the first five months of
lines ranged from 9 per cent for house furnishings to 1951 to 802,500 tons, according to estimates of the Seo-
2 per cent for jewelry and optical goods. retariat of the Rubber Study Group.
e + e+ 1 + + *
New construction valued at nearly $2.8 billion was The Office of International Trade, U. S. Department of
p~ut in place in July, the Departments of Comrmerce and Commerce has reminded exporters that the present temporary
Labor reported jointly. The preliminary estimate re- priority assistance program for exports of replacement
presented an increase of 3 per cent over both the June parts and accessories for machinery and equipment expired
4951 and July 1950 figures. Increasing effects of re- July 31. For the past three months, under authority of
strictions on building became evident in July. Private Direction 2 to the National Production Authority'sa Regula-
homebuilding activity failed to show the usual seasonal tion 4 --- now CYP Regulation 5 --- exporters have been
increase and was about 30 per cent under last year' s permitted to use DO-97 and DO-MYRO priority ratings for
record. Commercial building began to drop and there was exports of maintenance, repair and operating supplies
a continued decline in construction of social and re- subject to application to OIT.
creational facilities. 1 + *
+ + United States stocks of burlap of all constructions,
Manufacturers continued to accumulate goods during spot and afloat, totalled 170,981,000 linear yards on
June, and the book value of their inventories increased April 1, 1951 as compared with 203,192,000 yards on Dec.
$900 million. The value of unfilled orders advanced, 31, 1950. The Fioers Branch of the National Produation
but sales declined somewhat from the May rates. New Authority reported importing bag manufacturers were the


1919 NE BO K )~ TRI MATERAL CHPEK OF BEST SELLERS" AVA14ABLE
~;i~fqi) AND]EP()}(' r T IN TRE SPACE PRO- ~andbook',Emergency Defense Activities,250
94 VIDED AN EN HI elected & Annotated Bibliography of Recent
SECTION OF THE BUL- Air Age Textbooks, 304
LETIN OF COMM~ERCE TO o ducin Allocation Manual, 454
THE NEAREST DEPARTbLENT OF COMMERCE FIELD OFFICE. YOUR Cd For Protection Against Lightning,30Q
NAMIE AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. K~AKE REMLIT- eeoig& Selling New Products, 254
TANCES FOR SALES MATERALL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE nniga New Small Business, 154
UNITED STATEcS. THERE IS N0 CHARGE FOR ITEMIS NOT PRiTCED* atio Products & Processes, 254
.. ... ..... TangOil, 254
arketResearch Sources, 1950, $2.25
/ 2 NPA Construction Order LI-4A ..................*** Furniture Industry & Its Potential Market,15 '
Construction and Construction Materials Report,$3Ir* os wa atch Markets, 204
SAmendment to NPA's CKLP Reg. 6 on Construction***** Sugete Research Projects, 1950, 55#
Direction 1 to CMYP Reg. 6..................... ...... 4 uln Source Material, Saall Business
Amendment to NPA'sa Delegation 14 ................*** .I Education, 1950, 30C
School Enrollment of Civilian Population, P-20#134** ./ LStandard Industrial Classification Manual,
195Q Densus of Population Number of Inhabitants ol. 1, Part 1, Mlanufacturing Industries, $1l '
LZ Nevada, P-A28 ................... ...............1 e Effoots of Atonic Weapons, $1.25
U Vermont, P-A45................................10# ireplaces & Chimneys, 204
1950 census of Housing Characteristics of Metropoli- k r Repair of the House, 504
tan Areas 4eyfr the Egyehold. 750 '

Boston, fiC3,#7 40kdf 10003-#3 UChicagoH31 Small Business Aids:
Cincinnati,IC3- UCleveland,HC 312 New Channels for the Distribution of Goods, #375.......
Dallas, 80C3#14 ao,E3#15 ~~7enver, H03#16 Fundamdentals for a Good Salesman, #376. ................
1950 Census of Populatiqg Characteristio$ of States Doea Your Fire Insurance Give You Adequate CovenrageY3T77
Daiornia,PC6#1l 11inois,PC6#2 Uass.PC6#I3 Results From Pre-Packaging Fresh Fruite & Vgeg.,#378....
icia,PC6#4 1lissouriP6 ,//NednerseyP6# Pr~icing is Important in Grocery Storea, #379.............
ew York,PC6#7I LOio,PC6#8; equ~a. PC6#r9 Modifying Misleading Promotions, #382 ...................
Texas, PC6#~10 Urkaneae, PC 63 LfDelaware,PC:Z Using Spot Radio Ada to Increase Sales, #383............
andFood, July 1, 1951. ................***********. Control of Cost inla Smant1 Manufacturing Bnainess, #384.
iderEconomic Report of President,July 1951...65# Newapaper Advertising, #Y385 ................... ....******


GPO 81100550


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





RETAIL.WHOLESALE SALES UP IN FIRST HALLF OF 195\

The first half of 1951 brought sharp advances in sales in
both the retail and wholesale fields in the Southeast as compar-
ed with the corresponding period last year, according to Bureau
of the Census reports.
In the retail trade field, increases included 32 per cent in
Augusta; 18 per cent in Clarkedale, Miss; 17 per cent in Bilozi,
Miss., 14b per cent in Savannah; 9 per cent in Macon, Ga., and
Gulfport, MYiss., and 8 per cent in Atlanta and Columbus, Ga.
In wholesale activity, an advance of 21 per cent was reported
for the South Atlantic area and 15 per cent in the East South
Central region.
The gain in retail sales came despite some sloughing off of
buying which took place during the latter months of the first
half. For example, in most sections of the southeast a downward
trend occurred in June 1951 as compared with the same month last
year, as well as in June of this year from May 1951*
Largely responsible for the increases in the wholesale field
in the first half were substantial gains registered by such
commodities as automotive supplies, electrical goods, hardware,
industrial supplies, jewelry, lumber and building materials,
plumbing and heating supplies, refrigeration equipment, surgi-
cal and medical equipment and supplies, and paper and its
products.
As in the case of retail sale, wholesale sales in the South
Atlantic region and the East South Central section were lower
--- 5 per cent --- in June 1951 than in May 1951, and were off
2 per cent in the East South Central area in June 1951 as com-
pared with the same month last year.
N CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2

6. Revocation of Delegation 7. This delegation
was to 57 Department of Commerce field offices to
process certain construction applications; under
the new regulations all construction applications
will bemprocmased or dh tme ig i a hi gto.

use of copper in the manufacture of certain items
of material for construction. This amendment adds

si8i arm NPthe2 asse tor dls e in applying
under terms of Y-4A for exception or adjustment
from provisions of the order on prohibited construct-
ion cases and in cases involving the prohibited use
of copper or aluminum.


NEWN NPA ADVISORY GROUPS INCLUDE SOTTHIEASTERNIERS


Appointment of 13 southeastern businessmen to industry ad-
visory committees of the National Production Authority, U. S.
Department of Commerce, was announced.
Those appointed with names of committees on which they will
serve included:
Robert W. Mc~arity, Atlanta, brass mill products distribut-
ors.
J. Craig Smith, Sylacauga, Ala., and R. C. Kane, Elizabeth-
ton, Tenn., carded cotton sales yarn.
Willilam Lowndes, Jr., Greenville, S. C., narrow fabric.
Carl D. Bsorein, Tampa, Frank S. Barnes, Rock Hill, 8. C.,
and Benjamin S. Gilmer, Atlanta, domestic communnications
operating.
Edwin L. Douglass, Augusta, C. J. Brown, Yt. Dora, Fla.,
Winthrop, I. Ballett, Jr., Mobile, and S. M. Mickey, Jr.,
Memphis, lumber manufacturers.
T. J. Carpenter, Holt, Ala., nitrogen.
The committees report to NPA on conditions in the various
industries and advise with officials of that agency on the
issuance of orders and regulations dealing with the conse~ra-
tion of raw materials for the defense effort.

PURCHAfSES UNDERI WB~lpH-HIEALEY ACT HlIGB a

The dollar value of unclassified contracts subject to the
Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act awarded in the Southeast
in the first three months of 1951 totalled $83,688,349 by
State of prime contractor and $109,268,919 by State of manu-
facture, the U. S. Department of Labor announced.
Those awarded by State of prime contractor included:
Alabama, $9,264,604; Florida, $5,374,763; Georgia, $20,-
733,895; Mississippi, $4,179,391; South Carolina, $1,257,073;
and Tennessee, $~42,878,623.
Those awarded by State of manufacture included:
Alabama, $20,023,335; F'lorida, $8,423,582; Georgia, $20,-
O8,70 2012d~ipp tlL, 98 South Carolina, $22,720,-

DFlEN1SE LOANiS FOR SMAL BUSINEES
S This is the title of Defense Production Aid Number
S10 jus issued by the Of ac si mallrBusines Nai tional
I assistance, loan facilities, and the general loan purposes I
( of RFC loans. The leaflet is priced at centst.
sea as seas


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
(GP0)








U.S. DEPO TTOrCY


Volume 5, Number 17 September 1, 1951


UNI~VERSITY OF FLO~RIA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DCEPARTMENT OF ECONOBlICS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDAt


ll 11 i I lli lill 11 111 IlliillilliIIIIII111111 1
BU LLE1 312207889


PAGE 4


U. 3, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Offiee
50 Whitehall St., W.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009


-.~o~~
~N~T~o~- '
~-~ ~
s~-































~^___ ____I^ __


, 1 199


SOUTHEASTERN INCOME KITS KIGHI LEVEL
Residents of
PERCENTAd3E INCREASES, 1940 TO 19150 IN thet Soteast r
TOTAL INCOME PAYMENTS laste ear ret-
o0 'o 00 soo ceived an est,-
UNITED STATES wwwmwwww"00ed00 On w gea



no****'and other forms
M ~ro EatOf iDcome TO-
N~~ewEglau d ivddaby duin


thed e rtoathe
Source: Office of Business Economics, annual report
U. S. Department of Commerce of the Office
of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce on Income
Payments to Individuals.
Such payments to individuals in the region in 1950 were 235
per cent greater than the $9,043,000,000 received by them in
1940 and 12 per cent more than that form of income received in

19The "Southeast" in this instance included Alabama, Arkansas,
Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

This complete report is available at all De-
partment of Commerce field offices in the August
1951 issue of the Survey of Current Business. 250

trTheeriby i esufhiincomeB in hessouthemsternoreg nr waponding
increase in factory pay rolls. A second important factor was a
sharheincrepee an gove nment insomwapaymenthidlres an
regionally in the nation and was exceeded only by increases
registered for the Southwestern and Far Western sections. It
was also sharply greater than the 186 per cent reflected for
the nation as a whole.
thThe 12pr eecega jiep inie950 over No49wabwexceeded only by
increase in the Southeast was also 1 per cent more than that

fora Tbeay jnnts in the Southeast in 1950, in billions of dol-



$3.1; and Virginia, $3.5.


fourth quarter 1951 construction must
appl95again by filing CMP-40 applications for the first quarter
CRITERIA FOR AUTHORIZING CONSTRUCTION
NPA has announced the criteria by which allotments of
controlled materials for construction purposes for the fourth
quarter of 1951 will be authorized. The "high spots are:
No non-essential construction that can be postponed will
receive allotments.
No commercial construction will get allotments unless by
dday nglitafheepublic health, safety or welfare would be
Four classes of priorities will be followed in "grading"
the essentiality of construction projects. In Class I will be
projects that further the defense effort by providing facili-
ties in areas adjacent to military establishments or defense
plants considered necessary to furnish or supplement facili-
ties in connection with activities of the Defense Production
Administration, Department of Defense or Atomic Energy Com-
miss j:L insludingoprogram Lo bensrersingopredassiteecapacity.

essential to maintenance of public health, safety or welfare
ang 11uindustriaerconstauetion nedepsant expansna uifollow-
which had been commenced prior to August 3, 1951.
In Class 3 priority will be construction required as a
result of fire, flood or disaster materially affecting the
public interest, or where it is essential to meet the needs
andirequiremen ss rubteicommuni yanAlexpansthis nategor ytill
~certificates of necessity issued after August 3, 1951, or
where issuance of certificate was prior~to August 3 but con-




or sponsoring agency or NPA industry division must be obtained
and screened to determine which construction can be deferred.
(SEE NPA PAGE 2)


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla., Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala., Charleston, S.C.,
50 Whitehall St., S.WA., 218 P. O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 917 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. WA-4121,X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,1-206 Tel. 7771


Birmingham, Ala.,
246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-31421,1-355

Mlemphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673

K~noxville, TPenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185

Augusta, Ga.,
Mlaxell Hogae,
Tel. 2-8394


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972

Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2266


Barnwell, S. C.,
201 County Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292


E MULOV 5 NUMBER 8


SEPTEMBER 5


IMPORTANT NOTICE'.
Construction contractors and others
for the construction of buildings must
get their applications in for copper,
steel and aluminum for the first quar-
ter of 1952 and for succeeding quarters
.by e tem ed 20n 1951.CThe appli nations
at all Department of Commerce field
offices .
ApplicaDES who were not given allot-
ments of the controlled materials for


Pyrodciticaicn



Auth it() 1"


FIELD SERVICE








I


RETAIL SALES UIP IN MOST OF SOUTHEAST


NPA CONTINUED FROMI PAGE 1


Despite sharp decreases in sales in July of this
year as compared with the same month last year, a
majority of the sections of the Southeast reporting to
the Bureau of the Census reflected gains in cumulative
retail sales at the end of the first 7-month period of
1951 over the corresponding period in 1950.
Independent establishments in Atlanta, Columbus,
Macon, and Savannah, Ga., and in Biloxi, Clarksdale
and Gulfport, Miss., experienced advances for the 7-
month period ranging from 2 to 16 per cent, and cor-
responding gains were recorded for Manatee and Sara-
sota counties, Florida; Degalb, Fulton and Rockdale
counties, Georgia; and Coahoma, Quitman, H~arrison and
Stone counties, Mississippi.

Note: These Monthly Retail Reports are
available for the asking at any Commerce
Department field office. Request that
your name be placed on the mailing list.

On the other hand, Birmingham, Johnson City and
Asheville reported a 4 per cent decline; Greenwood,
S. C., 5 per cent; and Kingaport, Tenn., 1 per cent.
Generally speaking, sales were off throughout the
Southeast in July compared with the same month last
year with the exception of at Biloxi where a 10 per
cent rise was reported. In some sections the decline
was sharp, as for example in Macon where a 28 per cent
drop was shown; Columbus and Birmingham, 23 per cent;
Atlanta and Johnson City, 20 per cent; Greenwood,
S. C., 26 per cent; Asheville, 18 per cent; and Savan_
nah, 15 per cent.
In comparing sales in July with June of this year,
reductions were found in all areas, which, however,
were not quite so sharp as in July 1951 compared with
July 1950.

75 U. S. CONTRACTS LET IN REGION

Seventy-five contracts valued in excess of $7.5
million were awarded by the Federal Government to
southeastern firms during August, according to the
weekly lists of contract awards received at Department
of Commerce, Chamber of Comrmerce and other offices.
The dollar value was well over the $7.5 million
mark because 18 contracts were awarded which exceeded
$250,000 each the exact amount of which was withheld
for security reasons.
The contracts awarded included 12 in Alabama ex-
ceeding $;888,200; Florida, 22 and $2,786,414; Tennessee
21 and $2,058,396; Georgia, 12 and $1,237,187; South
Carolina, 4 and $171,765; and Mississippi, I, and
$430,961*
The contracts included training services at the
University of Alabamaz construction work at various
installations, textile goods, naval store products,
and food products*

i~ I
MEETlING DEFENSE GOALS '
The second quarterly report of Charles E. '
W~ilson, Director of Defense Mobilization on '
the nation' s defense mobilization program has '
i been issued, and is now available through all '
Department of Commerce field offices. It is '
i entitled nYeeting Defense Goals A Must For '
Everyone."It is priced at 30 cents. The first '
i report was entitled "Building America's Might." '


STEEL. COPPER & ALUINUMRO
To relieve small users from difficulties encountered in
placing orders for steel, copper and aluminium, NPA amended
its Direction 3 to CKP IRegulation 1 providing, among other
things that no manufacturer whose quarterly cillotment or
advance allotmrent of carbon steel is equal to or more than
a carload lot shall be required to reduce his delivery order
for aueh material below a carload lot.
HORSERIIDE FRONTS
By amending Order M-62, restrictions on the tanning and
sale of horsehide fronts were released. An increase in
supply and a decline La military buying made it possible.
TUNGSTENMOLBDENMI
Control and allocation of pure tungsten and mlolybdenum
were separated from regulations controlling other forms
of the kwo scarce metals in Order Y-81. This was necessary,
it was stated, because of the radically different problems
involved in allocating the metals in those foras and in
allocating ferro-tungsten and ferro-mtolybdenum.
FERRO-ALLOYING MATERIALS
Fourteen important ferro-alloying materials and ferro-
alloy products were ordered brought under centralized con-
trol in Order Y-80. Six of the Iunber were placed under
complete allocation. The order, plus seven schedules
issued in conjunction with it supersede regulation of the
products under separate orders, including Y-1 on iron and
steel.PETROLEUM
Action wras taken by NPA in Order y-46A to establish a
priorities assistance system to help petroleum operators
get materials for foreign operations.
WATERFOWL FEATHIERS
Order Y-56 wras amended to make it clear that waterfowl
feathered and down still may not be obtained for maintenance,
repair and operating sup 1RIL WEEL

By amending Order M-61, NPA took action to make scrap
cast iron car whfeels available for production of new cast
iron wheels for freight ears.


._I_ ______ _1

ELECTRIC UTILITIES
Continuing its program to maintain and expand the
nation'sa vital electric utilities, NPA has amended Order
Y-50 to provide fourth-quarter 1951 allotments of con-
trolled materials and advance authorizations of allotments
for the first three quarters of 1952.
LABORATORY PRIORITIES
In amending Order Y-71, restrictions on production rune
of certain laboratory experimental models were liberalized
by NPA.
UNJRATED ORDERS
In seven directions to Order Y-1, NPA provided addition-
al times for conversion of unrated orders to authorized
controlled materials orders for fourth-quarter delivery
of steel, copper and aluminum. The action was taken to avoid
disruption of mill schedules and production of consumer
durable goods and passenger automobiles. As a result, those
in the nye arean under Orders M-47A and Y-68 will be able
to obtain supplies by placing authorized materials~ orders.


DEFENSE PRODUCTION AIDS
Four new Defense Production Aids dealing with
matters of interest to the business field have been
issued and copies are available at all Department
of Commerce field offices They are Number 11,
"Converting to Military Production," Nurmber 12,
nInereased Production Through Improved Brazing
Techniques," and nYotor Care and Maintenance Tech-
niques," which are priced at 5 cents each, and
nA Checklist For Small Plant Hiousekeeping," Number
14~ which is available without charge~


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








1


Mor~e Detailed
Information On
The Highlights
-- Of The Nlews In
r I u, IThe Field Of
Business Is A-
vailable at Department of Comrmerce Field Offices.



Chain store and mail-order sales in July were esti-
malted at $2.4 billion, representing a decrease of abbut
5 per cent from July 1950 and reflecting both trading
day differences and the buyring wave following the Korean
crisis. After adjustment for seasonal and trading day
changes, July 1951 sales were 2 per cent below a year
ago. .
*
July sales of retail stores were $11.3 billion, which
after seasonal adjustment was unchanged from the June
level. An 8 per cent decline from July 1950 reflected
the 1950 buying wave following the Korean crisis.
*
Business as a whole in July 1951 reflected continued
divergence in the trends of expanding business invest-
ment and government procurement on the one hand, and
of reduced personal consumption on the other. The de-
fense program was continuing its gradual buildup and
remained the dominant factor in the economy.
*
Sales of large independent retail stores in the U.S.
Ln July 1951 were 14 per cent lower than in July 1950
and dropped 11 per cent fran June to July of this year,
the Census Bureau reported. Drug stores and eating and
drinking places recorded sales up 6 per cent while
substantial decreases were registered by department
stores, furniture stores and motor-vehicle dealers.


TRINEW BOC>KS A pp TO OBTIl~N COPIES OF
THIS MATERIAL CHECK

:~F APD ILElP()IlS IT IN THIE SPACE PROR-
g it$ \ IDE AD SEND THIS
SECTION OF THE BUL-
LETIN OF COMMERCE TO
THE NEAREST DEPARTb6ENT OF COMMERCE FIELD OFFICE. YOUR


NAMdE AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAK(E REaMIT-
TANCES FOR SALES BATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE
UNITED STATES. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ITEMIS NOT PRICED.


Monthly Retail Trade Report (Place on Mail List),.....
Meeting Defense Goals (2nd Quarterly Report of
Director Charles E. Wilson).........'........304
nf National Production Authority Material:
L7Direction 3 to CMP Reg. 1 Amended _LOrder M-62
Amended L7Order YI-81 U0rder Y-80
Order M-64 Amne Order Y-56 Amended
ffOrder 8-46A AmendedOer Y-50 Amended
Order M-71 Amended k~OrderiM-1, Directions 3 to

Defense Production Aids:
SConverting to Military Production, #11...........5#
SIncreased Production Through Improving Brazing
Techniques, #12...........................5#
a otor Care & Maintenance Techniques, #13.........5#
SA checklist For Small Plant H~ouakeeping, #14......
/ ~1949 Census of Manufactures:
L Summary Statistics For Geographic Divisions and
States, YBS49-4.............,........ .........
L7General Statistica for Industry Groups and Selected
Industries, MAS-49-3..............,....... .........
SSummaruy Statistics for New England States)EAS-49-41


.


umayStatistics for Pacific States,MAS49-4.9.....
umayStatistics for West South CentralKAS-49-4.7
SmayStatistics for Mountain States,MAS49-4.8....
SmayStatistice for West North Central,MAS49-4.4.
umryStatistics for Middle Atlantic,MAS49-4.2 ....
umayStatistics for East North Central,MAS49-4.3,
SmayStatistice for South Atlantic States........
umayStatistics for East South Central...........
take Empl ymnt in 1951..... .G-GE51,#5.....
tate Tax Cymleetions in 1951.... .GSF51-No.4. .....
governmental Revenue in 1950..... .C-GF50-#2. .........

Additional "best sellers" available from
De tentof Commerce field offices
owTo Judge A House .................254
nant Care.............,.... .........154
our Child From 1 to 6..........,......204
Sour Child From 6 to 12............... .204
'- L1oodworking & Furniture Repair.........504
ling House Furnishings ..............654
stage Stamps of the U. S.,1847-1950..604
National Associations of the U. S.....$3.50
tate Economic Aes.....,,,,10

Small Business Aids:
OpnDisplay The Secret of Successful Retailing,#1386
roit Waking Service Department in Electrical Ap-
pliance and Radio Stores, #387 ................... ...
Shetail Stores Should Watch These Efficiency K~illers,
#388.....................................
HadigFroz~en Foode in the Grocery Store,#r389.....
Sugestonson Grocery Store Layout & Arrangement,#l392
planned & Controlled Retailing Creates a Profit,#393
Cotainers & Packaging Industry Report........604 Yr.
Tensile Recovery Behavior of Textile FiberaPB103038
59 Pages. ................... .....$1.50


Offerings of newa securities by U. S. corporations
in the second quarter of 1951 amounted to $2.4 billion,
the Securities and Exchange Commission reported. This
amount of new financing compared with $1.8 billion of
new issues in the first quarter of this year and $2.3
billion in the second quarter of 1950.
w *
The gross national product increased to an annual
rate of $326 billion in the second quarter of 1951, the
Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Com-
merce, announced. This compared with $319 billion in
the preceding quarter and $275 billion in the corree-
ponding quarter a year ago.
+ w
Total business inventories at the end of June of
this year were estimated at $69.3 billion. After allow-
ance for seasonal variation, the book value of inven-
tories in manufacturing and trade at the end of June
wass $550 million above May. Price changes had little
effect, and practically all of the rise represented
higher volume. Manufacturers' inventories increased
$900 million, while declines in retailers' and whole-
salers' stocks exceeded $200 million and $100 million,
respectively .
+ +
Personal income in June was at an annual rate of
$251 billion, about $1 billion higher than in May,
which was mostly the result of larger pay rolls. Changes
in other forms of personal income from May to June were
small and largely offsetting.
+ + *
Cash dividend payments by U. S. corporations issuing
public reports totalled $1,116 million in June, 25 per
cent higher than in June 1951. The large disbursements
in June, normally the second largest dividend month in
the year, brought total publicly reported payments for
the first six months of 1951 to $3,617 mill~ion.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





FORNITURE.BEDDINGC SHIPMENTPS $437,5 MILLION

The value of shipments of household furniture and bedding in
the South Atlantic area in 1950 wass estimated by the Bureau of
the Census at $437,567,000. At the same time, the East South
Central section shipped products of that kind value at $122.4
million, making a total of more than half a billion dollars
for the Southeast as a whole, or some 26 per cent of the value
of all such shipments for the nation as a whole.
The value of shipments from the Southeast as a whole was
exceeded only by that of the East North Central region, which
totalled $701,176,000.

Ask the nearest Department of Commerce office
for a copy of the Facts For Industry report
M54-A-00 entitled n8ousehold Furniture and Bed-
ding Products. 1950..It' s available gratis.


1949 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES

The Bureau of the Census is now releasing results of its
1949 Census of Manufactures. WAhile based largely on a sample
survey, the census is the only official report available on
activities in 1949 for~operating manufacturers.
Reports already received at Department of Commerce field
offices deal with regional breakdowns, as well as State data,
on the value added by manufacture of the goods produced by
industries, number of employees and other information.

See Order Blank on Page 3 of the Bulletin of
Commerce for list of material for convenience in
qrderin .
First reports received showed, for example, that the value
added by manufacture of goods produced in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee in 1949
was estimated at $4,125,642,000. Only two States, Florida and
Tennessee, experienced increases in 1949 over 1947. Salaries
and wages paid totalled $2,248,720,000, an 8 per cent increase
in 1949 over 1947.
The reports also revealed that the textile industry was
still the major industry in the region, the value added by
manufacture in the production of such goods topping that of all
other products. Next in order were food and kindred products,
chemicals and allied products, lumber and related products,
paper and allied products, primary metals, printing and publish-
ing, fabricated metal products, primary metal industries,
electrical machinery, leather and its products, and petroleum
and coal products.

TAI COLLECTIONS UP 1L PER CENT IN AREA

State tax collections in the southeastern area of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee in
fiscal year 1951 approximated $846,000,000, or more than 14 per
cent above those in fiscal 1950 and 171 per cent greater than
in 1942, according to a Bureau of the Census report just issued.

See Order filank on Page 3 for listing of
this report.

Collections in 1951 were the equivalent of $38.19 per capital
in Alabama; $74.13 in Florida; $44.30 in Georgia; $46.40 in
Mississippi; $49.03 in South Carolina; and f50.30 in Tennessee.
GPO 83-m82


For the first time, the annual report recorded the value
of shipments of radio, phonograph and television cabinets
from the Southeast, which in the two areas combined totalled
$39,676,000 in 1950.
Included in the southeastern shipments were upholstered
furniture valued at $)110,125,000 and nounpholatered products
with a value of $)405,647,000.
HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS FOR SOUTHWEST READY

There were 260,500 dwelling places in nine metropolitan
areas of the South that were in a "dilapidated" condition or
with no running water when last year' s census of housing was
taken; 213,000 were writh running water, but with no private
toilet or bath; and 93,300 had private toilet and bath but no
hot water, according to a study of housing characteristics
for individual areas of the country now being released by the
Bureau of the Census.

Note: A large number of these reports have
been received and are available in single copies
without charge. Name the metropolitan area and
ask your Commerce Department for it,

The figures were compiled for the metropolitan areas of
Atlanta, Birmingham, Dallas, H~ouston, Louisville, Memphis,
Nashville, New Orleans and Tampa-St. Petereburg. Nashville
led in percentage of homes with no running water or in a
dilapidated condition with 29 per cent in that cateno7ry.


.


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Volume 5, Number 18 September 15, 1951


lillIlllililllilllllill~llIIlililll~l ililll~l


PAGE 4


BU LLETI


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300







IU.S.I DEF oeITO.:y


sosT~S~
.~~f~D~3~PI~~

I~jC~S~Y


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTadEINT OF ECONOMICS
GAINJESVILLE. -FLORIDA































_____


I ,I ,, I I~-I ~


NEW CONSTRUCTION UP SHARPLY IN SOUTHEAST


This report is available on a subscription basis
of $i3 a year at all Department of Colmmerce field
offices.

H~ere were some of the other advances from 1940 to 1950: Total
private construction, $885,800,000 to $3,612, 100,000; private
nonresidential building, $176,500,000 to $635,600,000; privately
owned public utility, $11l3,100,000 to $585,200 000; public non-
residential building, $122,800,000 to $508,300,000; public high-
way, $275,700,000 to $558,400,000; public sewer and water, $29,-
400,000 to $86 700,000; and conservation and development pro_
jects, $104,5000,00 to $167,800,000.
GIF STATES LEAD IN LUMBER OUTPUT
The three States of Georgia, Florida and Alabama last year
produced more lumber than did any other area in the eastern half
of the United States, and stood second among all regions in
such production, according to a Bureau of the Census report.
Total production in the three-State area was placed at 4.7
billion board feet, lumber tally, including 3.7 billion feet of
softwood and 999.3 million feet of hardwood.
In only the North Pacific States, composed of Oregon and
Washington, was the 1950 production greater than in the three
Gulf States. The output in that area was 11.8 billion feet.
In the eastern half of the country, the Lower Mississippi
States --- Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and
Texas --- were second in total production with an output of 4.6
billion feet and the South Atlantic States, including North and
South Carolina and Virginia, were third with 4.5 billion.


THE :-i
INSECTICIDE FOR COTTON
GHOH~gThe south' s farmers will get enough
benzene hezachloride for their cotton
crope next year if plans made by the
Production NPA and its Industry Advisory Comittee relied
NPA and the committee meeting in
Washington agreed that about 125 mil-
Authority lionidunds uf chni 5l ben eneahxa-
and that the industry now has adequate
facil isc t r oduceant s t mci.Bc

used principally in spraying and dlust-
'ing cotton crope.
Last year' s production of that com-
modity was 72 million pounds, but now production facilities
brought into use enabled the industry to produce 80 million
pounds in the first six months of this year.
DAIRY EQUIPMENT THIREATENED
Dairy equipment manufacturers' working inventories will. be
depleted by the first quarter of 1952 because of their inabil-
ity to procure sufficient quantities of controlled materials,
the Industry Advisory Committee for those products reported
at a meeting with NPA officials. Of total current production,
the percentage of new equipment being turned out is small, the
committee members reported. Close to 35 per cent of present
production is for repairs and minor capital additions, it was
stated.
ADMLINISTRATIVE PRACTICE RULES
General rules to govern proceedings of its recent.]y-
established administrative "court" proceedings have been an-
nounced by NIPA. The court is made up of eminent jurists who
will be named hearing commissioners to act on charges of al-
leged violations of NPA orders and regulations. Heading the
neourt" is Walter H. Foster, a prominent Boston attorney and
chief compliance commlissioner of the War Production Board in
World War II who was named NPA' s Chief Hearing Commissioner
in July.
CONTROLLED MATERIALS PLAN
To prevent excessive accumulation of inventory and at the
same time avoid disrupting normal production procedures, NPA
amended its basic zules of the Controlled Materials Plan in
Amendment 3 to CMP Reg. 1 providing that a manufacturer who
has on hand controlled materials or Class A products which he
cannot use for purposes permitted by the regulation, he any
hold the materials for use in other authorized production
schedules or may ask permission to sell them. Simultaneously,
Direction 6 to CMP Reg. 1 was issued providing that a aman-
facturer of a Class A Product may ask his customer for an
SEE NPA Page 2


Miami, Fla., Mobile, Ala.,
947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,1-206


Charleston, S.C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771

Nashville, Tenn.,
315 Ulnion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Atlanta, Ga., Savannah, Ga., Jacksonville,Fla.,
50 Whitehall St.,8.WR., ;218 P. 0. Blde., 425 Federal81dg.,
Tel. WA-4121,1-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111


Tampa, Fla.,a
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Birmingham,Ala.,
246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355

Memphis, Tenn.,
Madison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Chattaziooga,Tenn. ,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 715673

K~noxville, Tenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-1138-9


Columbia, S.C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185 i

Augusta, Ga.,
Maxwell H~ouse,
Tel. 2-8394


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972

Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve St.,
Tel. 1060


Barnwell, S. C.,
201 County Office Bldg.,
Tel. 292


R EBOTCO 1 195)


OV LUME 5 NUMBER 9


NEW CONSTRUCTION


New construction in the Southeast last
year cost an estimated $5,038,100,000,
three times the $1,703,000,000 paid out
for such purposes 10 years ago, according
to a current issue of the Construction and
COnstruction Materials Industry Report of
the Department of Commerce.
The epot, hic givs fgurs o co-
.."uts::"" whkhton iv slf wtte nomo
1939 to 1950, shows that residential
buildings esrprizvate purposes exclusive

from an expenditure of $516,200,000 in
1940 to $2,166,000,000 last year, a rise
of nearly 320 per cent, and public con-
struction activities in 1950 cost $i1,426,-
300,000 compared with only $6819,900,000
ten years previously.


ma ss,.....
N~wronsrucdio W50minMjonso Dolors
P Ir..e.. hnorr...was


c /S f, q 9 -'//

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





N1PA COptinued From Pa~e 1


WOOL YKANUFACTURING GAINS IN SOUTH


and wine ease mf 30.81pee cent en obehnubb en lw ooland
1949, a gain not shared by anly other area in the coun_
try is reflected in a report just issued by the Bureau
of the Census,
The data, given in a Facts For Industry report on
wool manufacturing, showed that in the New England
States a decrease of 15.6 per cent was recorded; 15.3
per cent in the Middle Atlantic; 4.7 per cent in the
North Central; and 30.5 per cent in the West.
Most of the gain in the number of woolen and worsted
Geom in placeoi tht industry was concentrated in
All regions, including the South, however, reported
rather sharp decreases in the number of woolen spinning
spindles in place at the close of 1949 as compared with
1943. In the South there were 165,756 in place at the
end of 1949 against 192,654 in 1943.
Again, the South showed the greatest increase of all
regions in the number of worsted spinning spindles in
place at the close of 1949 as compared with six years
previously. The number in the region in 1949 was 95,838
compared with 58,312 in 1943, a gain of 64.4 per cent.
In wool carpet and rug looms in place in 1949, all
regions reported decreases.

SOUTHlEASTERN FIRMS GET LOANS

Emergency loans totalling $b885,000 were granted by
the Defense Production Administration to three south-
eastern firms.
The firms included two in Tennessee and one in Miami*
Their names, with amoults and purposes for which the
loans were granted were:
Appalachian Mining and Smelting company, Embreeville,
Tenn., engaged in the manufacture of zinc oxide and in
the mining of zine ore, $8400,000 to purchase and install
equipment .
Winter Garden Freezer company, Inc., Bells, Tenn*>
supplier of frozen food products to Army camps, $310,000
to expand plant facilities.
Frohman Manufacturing company, Inc., Miamni, manufact-
urers of high precision gears for army tank components
and fine pitch gears for electronic and military pur-
poses, 5175,000 to alter building and purchase maenine-
ry.
The loans made in the Southeast were part of a total
of $49,560,620 granted by DPA to firms over the country
for the expansion of facilities needed for the defense
effort.


allotment of controlled mterialsr needed to fill the cus-
tomer's order, but that the manufacturer cannot ask for
an allotment if the materials would overstock his permissible
inventory C

Order M-25, dealing with cans, was amended setting the
pattern of production and use of cans for the 12 months
beginning October 1. The amendment provides more flexibility
in meeting seasonal can requirements and permits long-range
planning.

LIST OF BASIC MAkTERIALS & ALTERNATES
Publication of the second issue of the pamphlet 11st '
f Basic Materials and Alternates" classifying approx- '
imately 400 materials according to present availability'
was announced by NPA. The list is designed to guide
industry, Government agencies and the Armed Services
in purchasing materials and for the use of alternates
Sin the place of critical materials. It is available
at all Department of Commerce offices without charge.'

MLETHYLENECHLORIDE
Methylene Chloride has been placed under allocation
through the issuance of Schedule 9 to MI-45 and revocation
of #L-21. The allocation was found necessary because the
product is in short supply and has not been getting to the
right places at the right time, thus threatening delays in
some defense programs.
APPEALS
Manufacturers who use steel, copper and aluminum or any
scarce material under blPA allocation may now appeal denial
of their applications for adjustment of CMP allotments and
materials allocations as a result of the amending of Regu-
lation 5 setting up a three-man board to hear appeals from
denilalfor adjustment or exception from provisions of orders
adrultions. The appeals board was authorized to act


RUBBER
NPA's rubber order Y-2 was amended to liberalize certain
prvisions affecting manufacturing companies which consume

rubberBRaSS MILL PRODUCTS
Action was taken to assure a flow of brass mill products
to the nations distributors sufficient to assist them in
maintaining inventories at workable levels in order 11-82
isudby NPA.
JACK[S
To conserve critical metals needed for defense mobiliza-
ioNPA in Order Y-83 ordered limitations on production
of jacks to certain specified models, sizes, capacities and
specifications .
COPPER CONTROLLED MLATERIALS
Producers of copper controlled materials may not fill
a orders after October 1, 1951 other than authorized con-
trled materials orders as the result of Direction 4 to
3re -11 adopted by NPA which provides the final step in
transition to a 100 per cent CYP operation in the fourth
quarter so far as copper is concerned.
ORDER OF ACCEPTANCE
Recently-issued directions to the steel, copper and
aluminum conservation orders were modified in a series of
directions excluding authorized controlled materials orders
bearing the "D" allotment symbol from the preference which
such orders were previously received.
FOREIGN PETROLEUM OPERATIONS
In an amendment to Order MI-46A, NPA reduced the number
of allotment symbols and DO ratings used for foreign petro-
lemoperations administered by the Petroleum Administra-
tion for Defense.


PRESERVATOION OF VALUED DOCUMLENTS


e q o p n gg
the Constitution of the Upited Statep.


ptt


'
'
e
'
'
'
'
'
e


'
e
'
r
'


Libraries in the Southeast, State Departments of
History and Archives and other agencies engaged in
the preservation of old documents will be interest-
ed in a publication just issued by the National
Bureau of Standards, NBS Circular 505, entitled
Preservation of the D clarati n f Inde e de e a d


The publication, available at all Department of
Commerce field offices for 15 cents, details the
steps taken to preserve the nation's historical
documents with ample 111ustrations. The work of
preserving the papers was referred to recently by
the President of the United States in an address
in Washington. The publication is in the nature of
a report to the Library of Congress by NB8.


GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2










1~11-'-- -- ---------~---


.. .I__ L~L- ~ -YV IU Y~Y~I II- I


7


~c NW BOKS C3 TO OBTAIN COPIES OF
NEW ()()S ,dllipTHIS MATERIAL CHECK

-tT3~t~ NI) IEP()IfS IT IN TtlE SPACE PRO-
itgggVA SECTION OF THE 85&_
LETIN OF COMMERCE TO
THE NEAREST DEPARTblENT OF COYMMRCE FIELD OFFICE. YOUR
NAMlE ANJD ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. KAK(E REIYIT-
TANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE
UNITED STATES. THERE IS N0 CHARGE FOR ITEMS NOT PRICED.

U- Construction & Construction Materials Ind. Rpt.$3.00
Luaber Production & Mill Stocks, FFIM13G-09........*NP Yaei

CMP Rg. 1 Amed. 3 CMP Reg. 1, Dir. 6
&Y Order 8-, Amend. 3 List of Basic Materiall 1
& Alternates
harder M-45, Sched. 9_ 1Revocation of Order Y-21
Reg. 5, Amended U/Order M-2, Amended
Order M-82 Order M-83 Order Y-11, Dir..
SOrder M-468, Amended
Lumber Production, 1950, FFI, Series M13G-00........ .
Cotton & Synthetic Woven Goods, Finished, 1950s
FFI 1115G-00........................
Plumbing Fixtures, FTI M51H-2-1. ...................*
Household Furniture & Bedding Products,1950,FFIM54A-C
Machine Tools, 1950, FFUI34A-00********************** .
Cotton Broad Woven Goods, let Quarter,1951,FFUIM15Al-1
Metalls Consumed By Metal Product Producers, For Selected
Industries, Census of Manufactures,1949%1947 ,MAS-49-5
L7 Construction Mlachinery, 2nd Quarter 1951, FISY368-2-3
4291 Manufacturing Equipment in the U.S. ,FFIM1I5H-096up,...
U X-ray Calibration of Radiation Survey Yeters, Pocket
Chambers & Dosimeters, NBS Cir-508..............15#


Chain store and mail-order sales in July were estimated
at $2.4 billion, representing a decrease of about 5 per
cent from July a year ago reflecting both trading day dif-
ferences and the buying wave following the Korean crisis.
fter adjustment for seasonal and trading day changes, July
sals were 2 per cent below a year ago.
aa+ + +
Personal income in July was at an annual rate of $251.6
billion, or little changed from the June rate of $251 bil-
lion. Higher farm income was responsible for the rise of
aggregate personal income, offsetting small declines in
wages and salaries, corporate dividends and transfer pay-
ments.
+ *
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers in
July were estimated at $6,053 million, which after adjustment
for seasonal variation sales declined 4 per cent from June.
Durable-goods sales were $2,178 million in July, a decline
of 5 per cent from the previous month on a seasonally ad-
justed basis.
& # MW
Expenditures for new construction in August totalled
$2.8 billion, about the same as in July, according to a
prelimninary report of the Departments of Commerce and Labor.
Tedollar value of new construction in August was slightly
uerthat of August 1950, but when adjusted for the in-
crease in construction costs represented a significantly
smaller physical volume of work put in place.
a +
Cash dividend payments of United States corporations
issuing public reports amounted to $525 million in July
1951, about the same as the 8520 million paid out in the
same month a year ago. Random dividend payment dates in
comparison with the 1950 patterns accounted in the main
for the increases and declines which occurred in various
inutries in July. This factor was especially evident in
the chemical) ail refining and electrical machinery Indusatries


More Detaileg
Information On
The Highlights
= Of The News In
The Field _QL
Business Is A-
.gailable f_ggDe~prtet of Commerce Field Offices.



Total sales of retail stores in July were $11.3 bil-
lion, which, after seasonal adjustment, were unchanged
from the June level. An 8 per cent decline from July a
year ago reflected the 1950 buying wave following the
Korean crisis. After seasonal adjustment, sales of non-
durable goods stores rose 1 and one-half per cent from
June to July. Gains of 7 and 3 per cent, respectively,
were registered by the apparel and general merchandise
groups. Food stores sales rose 1 per cent.
aMMWM
Sales of large independent retail stores in the
United States were 14 per cent lower in July 1951 than
in July 1950, and dropped 11 per cent from June to
July this year. Drug stores and eating and drinking
places recorded sales up 6 per cent this July from July
1950, wAhile substantial decreases were registered by
department stores, furniture stores and motor-vehicle
dealers.
*
TIota~l business inventories are currently showing def-
inite tendencies to level out, the Office of Business
Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce, reported. Re-
ports from business indicated a seasonally adjusted
increase in inventory book values of only $200 million
during July of this year as compared with a $600 mil-
lion rise us June*


SCotton Production in the U. S., Crop of 1950.......154
/ 948 Census of Business:
wholesale Trade, Credit ................... .........304
./ Retail Tra~de, Warehouses, Other Auxiliary Units......104
Retail Trade, Merchandise Inventories ..............304
SRetail Trade, Sales Size...........................504
1 0Census of Population:
Characteristics of the Population of Georgia...........
Characteristics.of the Population of South Carolina....
Characteristics of the Population of North Carolina....
Characteristics of the Population of Virginia..........
Provisional Estimates of the Population of the U. S.
April 1, 1950 to July, 1, 1951, P-25,1#53..........
L7Final 1950 Population Figures:
i2Population of Virginia..................... .........,
SPopulation of Florid~a................................
8 1Business Aids:
H~ow to Operate a Stamp Collector'sa Business, #395.....
Facts About the Photography Business, #398............
Merchandise Cards Help Sales, #399..................
Self-Analysis Check List for Retail Salesmen, #401....
Checking the Work of the New Retail Salessman, #403....
TDetermining How Yluch of a Product' s Sales Should be
Spent on Advertising, #404.......................
7 First Steps in Package Design, #405 ...................
1947 Census of Manufactures Shipments for Classes of
Products by Geographic Division & State:
Chemicals & Allied Products 17Textile Bill Products
ALpparpl & Related Products M Yiscellaneous Mlanufactures
Stone, Clay & Glass Products Fabricated Mletal Products
Petroleum & Coal Products fElectrical M~achinery
Food & kindred Products L/ Tranrs orta~tion Equipment
Instruments and Related Products UI~urniture & Fix:tures
Paper & Allied Products yffrinting & Publishing Industries
Geographic Reports, Bureau of the Census, GEO.#1..........


GPO 81100530


PAGE 3


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE










1


SOUTHEAST PRODUCES 42 PER CENT OF COTTON GOODS

Forty-two per cent of the nation's a1950 output of finished
cotton woven goods was produced in the five southeastern States
of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennes-
see, according to a report issued by the Bureau of the Census,
U. S. Department of Commerce.
Total production in the five southeastern States was 2.9 bil-
lion linear yards and that for the nation 7.0 billion.
Production in the five southeastern States in 1950 was 11
per cent greater than in 1949, which approximated 2.6 billion
linear yards. All showed a gain except South Carolina where a
slight reduction was reflected.

This report, a Facts for Industry release,
ML15-00, is available at all Department of
Commerce field offices gratis. Use the order
blank on Page 3 for ordering,

Following was the production for the Southeast by States for
1950 and 1949:
North Carolina, 959,168,000 yards in 1950 and 807,954,000
in 1949; South Carolina, 1,251,492,000 and 1,279,671,000; Geor-
gia, 425,022,000 and 373,910,000; Tennessee, 128,151,000 and
86,849,000; and Alabama, 212,236,000 and 125,497,000.
GOVERNMENT INCOME PAYMENTS ON RISE

Income payments from government sources --- Federal, State
and Local --- made to residents in the six States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee
last year totalled approximately $3,186,000,000O, about 321 per
cent more than the $756,0000,000 received from such sources in
1940, the annual report of the Office of Business Economics,
U. S. Department of Colmmerce on income payments to individuals
in 1950 shows.

This report is available from any Commnerce
Department office in the monthly Sunrve of
Current Buainess for August 1951 for 2$d.

In the 10-year period, Florida experienced the greatest rise
in such payments with a gain of from $143 million in 1940 to
$679 million in 1950, an increase of 371 per cent. Next was
Alabama where the payments went from $122 million to $b525 mil.
lion. an advance of 330 per cent.
GPo 83-18335


WHOLE;SALE lhVENTORIES RISE IN AREA

Southeastern wholesalers at the end of July of this year had
inventories totalling more than $188 million, a substantial in-
erease over the same time last year, the Bureau of the Census
reported in its Monthly Wholesale Trade Report.
In the South Atlantic region, 408 .firms reported inventories,
at cost, totalling $137,543,000, which were 52 per cent greater
than at the end of July 1950, and inventories of 156 firms in
the East South Central section totalled )50,572,000, a 19 per
cent gain.

These reports are on a monthly basis and are
gratis. Ask the nearest Commerce Department
field office to place your name on the mailing
list to receive them regularly.

Cumulative sales for the 7-month period.of January to July
of this year were 16 per cent more in the South Atlantic see-
tion than in the corresponding period last year and 10 per cent
greater in the East South Central area, but sales in July of
this year had fallen 11 and 15 per cent, respectively, from
those of July 1950 and July 1951 sales were 1 per cent lower
in both areas than in June of this year.

HAF MILLION REPRESENTED IN EXPANSION PLANS

Southeastern plants wishing to participate more extensively
in the national program of defense are planning expansion ac-
tivities totalling nearly half a billion dollars and certifi-
cates of necessity granting them income tax amortization privi-
leges for that purpose have been issued by the Defense Product-
ion Administration.
Up to July 16 of this year, certificates of necessity issued
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mlississippi, South Carolina and
ennessee totalled $458,016,000, which represented the proposed
epnitures by firms in the expansion program.
Alabama led in both number of certificates and amount approved
in the proposed investment, with 32 certificates for a total of
$162,148,000. Florida was next in amount with $104,201,000 and
with 14 certificates. The others were:
Georgia, 13 certificates and $52,155,000; Mississippi, 7 and
$61,000,000; South Carolina, 14, and $20,968,000; and Tennessee,
27 and $57,544,000.
Certificates issued by DPA between July 20 and August 17 of
this year in the six-State area totalled $35,009,435.


U. S, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Ofliee
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMITf No. 1000

Volume 5, Number 19 October 1, 1951


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMEENT OF POSTAGE $300


~?~i~"~"i'~~
KGE


UNIV'ERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROI L. QUALLS
DEPAtRTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVIL;LE, FLORIDA





,- ~ r---LI
BUSINESS CONIDITIBhS IN SOUTHWEST MOSTLY ONi UPGRADE IN FIRST HA~LF OF 1951;TRADE FIELD ACTIVE; FARM INCOME UP


ELECTRIC-POWER PRODUCTION BY UTILITIES Business condition
so (B~~ILLIONIS OF KILOTT-HOURS)Wre tl onhe
upgrade in the South_
tosp- e-- ------sl- 4 ast in the first
half of 1951 as can
so pared with the cor-
responding period in
so r~a~n~--sr~ 1950, according to
the semiannual report
of the Atlanta Re-
to '' "" ** gional Office of the
U. S. Department of Comerce just lanud.
Deposited in Federal Reaserve member banks in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi and Telnnesse were up 7.4 per cent and
loans advanced 16.4 per cent. Debits in the same States and the
Carolinas rose 23.2 per cent.

Copies of this report are available for the
asking at anpr Department of Comerce field of-
fice as listed above,

Retail trade increased in 15 of 21 cities and areas in the
region, and depart~ant store trade rose in 25 of 28 cities. In
the wrholesale trade field, a gain of 21 per cent was reported
for the South Atlantic region and 15 per cent in the East South
Central section.
825 BUSINESS IN SOUTRA~ST PAGIE 2

DRENSE PLaNT EEPASIONS REACHI BILLION

Current plant expansions in the Santheast to meet the present
program of national defense have neared the billion dollar mark
according to a report of the Defense Production Administration/
Expenditures approved by DPA for tax amortisation purposes up
to the middle of September totalled $530,6/48,000 in the South
Atlantic region and $616,992,000 in the East South Central sec-
'tion including the following amunts for the different States:
Alabama, $162,306,000; Florida, $116,288,008; Georgia, $52,-
266,0086; ississippi, $68,383,800; Yorth Carolina, $40,247,000;
South Carolina, $28,891,000; Tennessee, $57,891 066; Kentucky ~
$118,412,000; Delaware, $25,436,0~00; aryland, 695,862,000; Vir-
ginia, $62,479,000; West Virginia, $100,245,000; and District
of Columbia, $9,000,000.
Alabama had 1.7 per cent of the national total of $9,296,892,-
060O; Kentuckyr and Florida, 1.3 per cent each; West Virginia, 1.1
per cent; and Maryland, 1 per cent.


Aiken, S. C.,
1833 Curve~ St.,
Tel. 1966


Atlanta, Ga.,
58 Wlhitehall St.,S.W.,
Tel. WA-121,I-453


Augusta, Ga., Barrzarll, S.C.,
Maxwell House, 201 County office
Tel. 2-8394 Bldg., Te. 292


Birmingham, Ala.,
216 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 53-3421,1-355


Charleston, S. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 Jamal Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673


947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


Colabia, 8. C., J(
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185 TI

Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,1-206


ackson, Missa.,
26 Iazoo St.,
el. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal 814g.,
Tel. 4-7U11


Knozville, Tenn., Memphis, Teann.,
253 Dayllght Bldg.,Madison at Front,
Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 8-3426


Nashrille, Tenna.,
315 Union St.,
Terl. 42-226


Savannah, Ga.,
L18 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Tampa, Fla.,
o~08 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


R EBOTCG I'i 1951


MIAI6V E "i MUMBE 0


CONSTRUCTION APPROVAL RATE HIGH
Y**FIT 70 Per cent of the applications
.for permission to conduct construction
*ain r 'operations received from Southeastern
allORGIresidents during the first six months
of National Production Authority re-
strictions were approved, according to
PreAR Hon a ...rary or such action. just .ade.
Of a total of 1,149 applications re-
ceived, 777 were approved and 372 were

Wuh~t denied. Georgian a standing was 2303 ap-
46; Florida' s, 170 and 130; Mississippi' a,
72 and 35; South Carolina' s, 116 and 44;
and Tennessee' s, 107 and 55.
The applications included in the sumnary
were those handled only by the Atlanta
and Washington offices, and did not take
Into consideration those handled by other
field offices in the region such as Birmingham, Memphis, Mobile,
Chattanooga, Miani, Jackson, Jacksonville and Columbia, S. C.
The applications included many for the construction, altera-
tion and repair of motels.
MlPA' s restrictions to conserve strategic materials for the
defense program first went in effect January 13 when a month' s
"freeze" was placed on certain types of building operations.
Laer, the restrictions were broadened to include other build-
ing activities and finally the industry was placed under the
controlled materials plan effective October 1, except that
part exempted from the restrictions.
ORDER ISSUED AFFECTING 3RD QUARTER
In a sweeping order affecting manufacturers and suppliers in
the Southeast, the National Production Authority held that any
iled orders calling for third quarter 1951 delivery which
hdnot been shipped by Getober 7 must be charged by a customer
to his fourth quarter controlled materials plan allotment.
The move was taken to break the log-jan of undelivered order
for steel, copper and aluminum backed up on mill boards.
Previously, an authorized controlled material order accepted
bya mill for delivery during the third quarter could be filled
at any subsequent time and still be charged against a third
qaerallotment,.
The action taken was implemented by an amendment to CMP Regu-
ltion I and Direction 7 to that regulation and Direction 3 to
Regulation 6 dealing with construction. It was designed to
2eueacceptance and delivery of all orders placed against Lth
quarter allotments.
SEB NPA- COTU INUD Oh PAGE 2


C ;~UNI~TE STTES BEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE







_I


SOUJTH LEADS IN PAPER AND PAP~ERBOARD PRODUCTION

The South in 1949 led all other regions in the
nation in the production of paper and board with a
total of 6,585,479 short tons, according to a report
just issued by the Bureau of the Census. The Northeast
region was next with 6,171,904 tons.

Use the Order Blank on Page 3 for order-
ing this report. It's gratia.

A slight decline in the South's production in 1949
as compared with 1948 was reflected, due largely to a
sharp decrease in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee
there production dropped from 1,185,728 tons in 1948
to 946,583 in 1949. The South Atlantic showed a gain
of from 3,788,488 tone in 1948 to 3,805,048 in 1949.
The South was far in the lead in 1949 in receipts
and consumption of pulpwood. Forty-six per cent of the
pulpwood received at mills over the nation went to
southern plants and 50 per cent of that commodity
consumed was used in the South,

NPA HEARING COMMIlSSIONER NAMED

Additional groundwork for enforcement of National
nroduction Author Th order apndnr gulationhawaealaid
Hlilkey, dean emeritae of the Lamar School of Law,
Emory University, as a hearing commissioner to preside
at public hearings into charges of violation of NPA
actions.
Three other commissioners were also named. They are
Frederick J. Moreau, Lawrence, K~ansas; Stanley H. John-
son, Denr~er; and Harrison W. Ewing, Shakter heights,
Ohio. Mr. Moreau will be assigned eases from the
Kansae City regional office, Mr. Johnson will have
charge of the Dennerreases, and Mr. Ewing will look
afte th Clvelnd egin.
The hearing system has been established to remedy
disruptions in NPA'sa priorities and allocation programs
and to correct improper diversions of materials and
facilities caused by violations. The hearing commission-
ae rs ay issue suspension orders to violators, withdraw-
ing or withholding priority assistance, allocations,
controlled materials allotments or facilities, or pro-
hibiting the use of certain materials or facilities.

BUSINESS IN SOUTHWEST Continued from Page 1

The number of residential telephones in the region
was up 8.5 per cent and 7 per cent more business tele-
phones were in operation, and in the field of employment
there were 8.4 per cent more workers employed in m~anu-
facturing indnatries and 39 per cent less unemployed

drElgtrinsuenergy produced for utility and industrial
purposes increased 11.7 per cent and freight and pass-
enl'er evenne oforailroadsumed in ethe arporadvano d
there were more spindles in place and active on the
last working day of the period. Also, there was 50 per
cent less cotton on hand.
Southern sills experienced a 14.9 per cent increase
in the consumption of pulpwoodas amicm 06

per cent gain in the Southeast was found at the end of
May of this year over the same period last year, and a

handlper bcoirl nesiand e6ma per oen mre enueppeenes cr
ried by that method of transportation.
inee deand there the business registebudinpped some,


NPB Coptinued From Page 1

Other recent NPA actions included the following:
ALURINUM
Consumers of aluminum for destructive" uses are per-
mpitted to obtain that metal under Order Y-84 just issued.
PLASTIC TYPE NILON
Controls were eased in an amendment to Schedule 4,
Order Y-45 changing it from an Appendix A to Appendix B
allocation classification.
ARTIFICIAL GRAPHITE
Inventory limitations placed on this commodity July 1,
1951, as well as on carbon electrodes were eliminated in
an amendment to Order Y-66.
ALUMRINU SCRAP
Order Y-22 was amended to channel aluminum scrap more
effectively into the nation' s rearmament program.
DEFENSE DEPARTMENT AUTHORITY
Delegation of authority to the Department of Defense was
broadened in an amendment to Delegation 1, Supplement 1
permitting rescheduling of materials required to carry out
ship and tank-automotive programs.
TANNING MATERIALS
Order Y-57 was amended to redefine the end-uses of vege-
table tanningp materials.
AUTOMATIC TRANSILISSIONbS
In an amendment to Order M-68, NPA limited the production
f passenger automobiles equipped with automatic trnse-
"DX" SEKBOL
An emergency measure designed to break bottlenecks in
urgent defense production programs was provided in amendments
to Regulation 2 and CMP Regulation 3.
COTTON DUICK
In an action of particular importance to the Southeast,
NPA amended ita Order Y-53 relaxing restrictions on cotton
duck looms.
PRINTING FLATES
Order Y-65 was amended simplifying compliance writh and
administration of the conservation of critical materials in
printing plates.
NIICKEL, SILVER
Schedule A of the ferro-alloy order M-80 was amended
.authorizing the use of nickel silver in the manufacturer of
functional parts of certain musical instruments.
CONTROLLED MATERIALS
Direction 3 to CMP Reguliation 1 was amended authorizing
manufacturers to order up to 40 per cent of their quarterly
alnoth n th qu seetercopper and aluminumI for delivery in any

Direction 3 to Regulation 2 was issued providing that
only defense ratings issued to the Department of Defense
and the Atomlic Energy Commission could be used to acquire
chemicals.
TIbi
the0dero Y8 was a eded o eextendacu rent limitations on
CONSTRUCTION
tio collationedf n linto pretains enpr constructing regusa-
ly announced. blPA Press Release 1266.
UIMPRTED STEEL
Steel consumers were given permission in an amendment to
Decon4, CMP Regulation 1 to use imported steel to
manufacture more products than the quantity show'n x their
authorized production schedules.
COISUMEIR DURABLE GOODS
Order Y-47B was issued to replace M-47A designed to
assure peaximnaenutput ofeconsulmpe durabli 1 midnawith fourth

FERRO-ALLOYS
ly hen feder acontrollmngedistributioneankeuses of critical-

GPO 81100530


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE






I -


More Detailed
Infornation On
The Biablights
---e Of The News In
... .. ... .. ... .. .-- -- --- -- -- The Field Of
Business Is A-
vailable at DepartJeeq( qf Conmerce Field Offices.



Public and private net debt increased $38 billion
during 1950 amounting to $)484 billion at the end of the
year. This increase amounted to 9 per cent and followed
a rise of 2) per cent in 1949. Unlike most other years
in the past two decades, however, the expansion in 1950
wars almost wholly confined to the private debt category.
++ ***
American business is planning record capital outlays
of $13.4 billion in the second half of 1951, the Depart-
ment of Commerce and Securities and Exchange Commission
reported. Plant and equipment expenditures for the full
year 1951 are expected to amount to $24.8 billion as
compared with $18.6 billion last year and $19.2 billion
in 1948, the previous peak year.
*
Aid extended to foreign countries by the United
States Government in the form of grants and credits in
*fiscal year 1951 totalled $4.7 billion, bringing total
foreign aid for the post-war period to $32.7 billion.
*
Sales of large independent retail stores in the
United States were 10 per cent lower in August 1951
than in August 1950, but 10 per cent higher in August
than in July of this year, the Bureau of the Ceasus re-
ported. Food stores recorded a sales gain of 9 per cent
in August 1951 compared with August 1950


I


NAMYE ANJD ADDRESS ARE ON THIE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAKLE REMIlT-
TANCES FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TO TREASURKER OF TIE
UNITED STATES. THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR ITEMlS NOT P~RICED.


C7Summar yof BusinesslConditions in Southeast for
Firt Blf f 95 ...........................

direction 7 to CMP Regulation 1
direction 3 to CMP Regulation 6
Order Y-84 2 Schedule 4, Order M-45 Amended
Order Y-6i6 Amended 270rder Y-22 Amended
el. 1, Supp. 1, Amended 120rder M-57 Amended
Order Y-68 Amended I~~eg. 2 & CMP Reg.3 Amended
Order Y-53 Amended UOrder Y-65 Amended
Order Y-80 Amended 27Dir. 3 to CKP Reg.1 Amended
Dir. 3 to Reg. 2 270rder M-8 Amended
SNPA Press Release 1266 Interpreting Construction
Regulations
Dir. 4 to CMP Reg. 1 Amended j70rder M-47B
/ ood Pulp, Paper & Board, 1949, FFW14UD-09*********
Paper & Board Production, 1950, FFIM14F-00..........
Monthly Report on Labor Force, Aug 1951,P-57,#110...
Report on Cotton Ginning,Sept. 10,1951**************
Report on Cotton Ginning, Sept. 24, 1951...........
Full-Time &I Part Time Workers,Feb.1951 & Nov.1950...


a total of 2,653 million linear yards of cotton broad
woven fabric was produced during the second quarter of
1951, a 7 per cent decrease from the first quarter of
1951, but 5 per cent more than the second quarter of 1950,
the Bureau of the Consus reported.
+ + +
Employment turned downward as usual between August and
September as student workers left their sumer jobe to
return to the classroom. Estimated at 61,580,000 in the
week ending September 8, total civilian employment was
about 1 million under the August level.
+ t
A sharp rise in exports was outstanding in the newly-
compied balance of payments of the United States for the
second quarter of 1951, the Office of Businese Economics,
U. S. Department of Commerce announced. U. S. exports of
goods and services were $5.3 billion in the April-June
quarter against $4.4 billion in the first quarter. Second
quarter exports equalled those during the second quarter of
1947, the previous export peak during the postwar period,
+ *
A new soil selection method using methyl alcohol which
will enable contractors to save time in the construction
of highways, airfield pavements, earthen dams and other
earth utilizing structures is discussed in a special
feature article in the august 1951 issue of the Biblio-
graphy of Technical Repqrts released by the Office of
Technical Services, U. S. Department of Commerce.
t *
A total of 598 million linear yards of rayon broad
woven goods was produced during the second quarter of 1951,
a 6 per cent decrease from the first quarter output, but
7 per cent more than last year' s second quarter.
w w +
Manufacturers' shipments and new orders expanded more
than seasonally during August. The pickup was widespread
among manufacturing industries.


/7 Census of Manufactures, 1917:
27 Shipments for Classes of Products by Geographic Dir-
isions & State Machinery, Except Electrical, MC100-30
SShipments for Classes of Products, By Geographic Dir-
isions & State Primrary Metal Industries, 80100-28...
L7A Proposed System For Classifying Manufacturing
Concerns By Size..............................***
17 948 Census of Business: Retail Trade:
Llerchandise Line Sales:
gO Food Group 2-R-16, 204 Skating & Drinking Places,
2-8-17, 15# i2eneral Merchandise Group, General Storea,
2-R-18, 304 Upparel Group, 2-R-19, 354 OFurniture,
Furnishings & Appliance Group, 2-R-20, 254 O Automotive
Group, Gasoline Service Stations, 2-R-21, 304
rBuilding & Hardware Group, 2-R-22, 254
ru Proprietary Storea, 2-R-23, 204
iscelaneus inds of Business, 2-8-24, 459
S1948 Census of Business: Wholesale Trade:
U Sales by Class of Customer, 2-W-4, 354 Ub Commodity
Line Sales of Merchant Wholesalers, Inufacturere Salse
Branches, Offices, 2-8-10-13, 754 UPetroleum Bulk
Stations & Terminals, 2-W-14, 404
~7_1948 Census of Bostaess: Service Trade:
ff Employee Size, 2-8-3, 254 RLegal Form of Organization,
2-8-5, 204 L/Laundries, Cleaning & Dyeing Plants & Re-
lated Services, 2-8-8, 759 htotels, 2-8-10, 35q
Sa Business Aide:
Patents Available for License & Sale, #406.............
Proper Care & Handling of Fresh Produce, #407..........
Prepackaging of Produce in the Retail Store, #4L08......
How the candy WRholesaler can Increase Retail Sales,#409
Modernizing the Apparel Store Front, #~410..............
Trade Discounts & Price Diserimination, #All...........
SaAdvertising Can Help Small Grocers Meet Competition,#412f


GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


TO OBTAIN COPIES OF
NETW IB()()KS ll) THIS MATERIAL CHECK
APill RIMPIDIRTS IT IN THE SPACE PRO-
gg VIDED AND SEND THIS
SECTION OF THE BUL-
GETIN OF COMMERCE TO
THE NEAREST DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FIELD OFFICE YOUR





COTTON OFF EXPORT RESTRICTED LIST

Southeastern cotton producers are now abipping their product
to foreign countries other than those behind the "iron curtain
without the necessity of obtaining export licenses for that pur
pose.
The shipments are being made under what is called a "general'
license procedure recently established. Such shipments to the
U. S. S. R and its satellites, and to Hong Kong and Macao will
still require validated export licenses,
The action to take the restriction off raw cotton was taken
by the Office of International Trade, U. S. Department of Con-
merce, which also announced that effective November 1 a system
of allocation and export licensing of bituminous and anthracite
coal to all countries except Canada would be established. The
rove was taken to increase the flow of United Statee coal to
meet essential needs of other nations friendly to this country
so that defense production requirements overseas may be stepped
up.
Before taking the "lid" off cotton abipmlents to other than
"Iron Curtain" countries, OIT had licensed 1,847,454 bales of
raw cotton for export to 34 countries in the crop year begin-
ning August 1 of this year.

192 UJ. S. CONTRACTS LET UI SOUTHWEST

Forty-two contracts calling for the purchase of such prod-
ucts as paint, candy, barbed wire and other commodities were
let by the Federal Government in the Southeast during September
according to weekly lists of contract awards received in De-
partment of Commerce Field Offices, Chambers of Commerce and
other points of distribution for pickup by businessmen.
Nine contracts were let in Alabama and Florida, 2 in Mies-
issippi, one in South Carolina, 10 in Georgia, and 11 in Tenn-
essee. Seven of them were in excess of $250,000 each and the
other 32 totalled $3,032,457. The Department of Defense is not
giving amounts in excess of $250,000 for security reasons.

TRAINING BY TELEVISION '
'This is the title of a publication just issued by '
the Office of Technical Services, U. S. Department ,
of Conmerce. It wras prepared by the Navy Speelal ,
Devices Center in cooperation with Fordban UIniver- ,
sity. It presents some results of an experiment--
al study comparing training of Naval Reservists by ,
live television with reegrded TVI and glassrqqa. 7ZC ,


PROPERTYP OWNERS RECEIVE NEARLY 3,( BILLION

Income payments received by property owners in the Southeast
last year have been estimated at $1,445,000,000, a 13 per cent
rise over the $1,279,000,000 received in 1949, according to
the annual report of the Office of Business Economics, UI. S.
Department of Comnerce on Income Payments to Individuals in
1950.
Property income rose between 1949 and 1950 in all of the
six southeastern Statse of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, South Carolinra and Tennessee, with Florida register-
ing the biggest gain.
By States the income included $162,000,000 in Alabama in
1949 and $178,000,000 in 1950; Florida, $412,000,000 and
)473,000,000; Georgia, $265,000,000 and $300,000,000; Mississ-
ippi, $92,000,000 and $106,000,000i South Carolina, $118,000,-
000 and $134,000,000 and Tennessee, $230,000,000 and $254,000,-
000.

DEFINITION OF "SYAIL BUSlhUESS" SOUGHT

What is small business? This question has been plagaing
those interested in the nation' s business economy ever since
the tera "amall business" began to be used and the National
Production Authority recently undertook to settle the pro-
blem by conducting a six-month survey of 452 manufacturing
concerns in the United States.
Results of the survey are contained in a publication just
issued entitled A Propoped System For Class~fifyta M444acgr-
ing Coggerne By Size providing tentative standards for classi-
tying concerns by size.
At the conclusion of the survey, however, HPA. officials
rere generally agreed that there can be no single definition
of "small business."

Copies of this report are available through the
nearest Department of Comerce field office.


The analysis abowed that in as many as 105 industries,
small manufacturers are those with. less than 100 employees.
In 92 other industries, they have either less than 50 or
less than 75 employees. In most of the remaining industries,
small manufacturers are those having between 125 and 500
workers, depending on the industry.
A small manufacturer may have as many as 2,500 employees,
according to the study, pointing up that what any be small in
one industry may be big in another. re 83-19021


31111111 12621111 08748lllllll 8846IIII


PAGE 4


BULLET


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga. s
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009

Volume 5, Number 20 October 15, 1951






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE: USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
(GPO


BC-6-JF

































N URMRRR 1 194T


VOLUME 5. NURS~ER 21 -__


STEEL FIRMS HIELP IN SOUTHEASTERN SCRAP PRM R

Defcots requiremat sate~larglymt hy weasal Faced with a critical shortage
steelspply--alsobycLKut-backslravianss of supplies whicb threatens the

um "'(civilian production, the steel in-
.uranvar ... dustry has moved in to help the
:C'"F' Federal Government make the South-
an~l ~ II east more iron and steel scrap
~tul )"conscious" in the present emer-
'L agency.
upons The industry has designated 18
mu..ausersteel and iron experts to serve in
runna..ma Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
onmrmrrnce issippi, South Carolina and Tenn-
nomsa essee to assist in the scrap
a a a 4 smobiliration program. They are:
***** T. L. Douglas and Gordon Brooks,
: tlanta, central and northern Georgia; Paul Hellatrom, Savannah>
southern Georgia; J. J. Glover, Macon, middle western Georgia;
R. P. Mc~regor, Jacksonville, south Georgia and northern Florida;
E. N. Dietler, Charlotte, N. C., northern South Carolina; E. L.
W~illis, Columbia, 8. C., central and southern South Carolina;
Ralph Gibson, Jacksonville, southern Florida; George Wl. Smith,
D. J. Early and I. C. McI~inney, Birmingham, southeastern BAle~ah,
north Alabama and north Yissiasippi, respectively; L. W. Reeves
Memphis, western Tennessee; R. C. Rhodes, Mem~phis, Memphis and
north Mlississippi; Garrison Siskin, Chattanooga, east and cen-
tral Tennessee; Roy Hammersmith, K~noxville, Knoxville area
E. WI. Gescheider, Cincinnati, Nashville area; R. G. McGaheys
Mobile, Mobile area; and L. H. Krieger, Newr Orleans, southern
Mississippi*
SEE SCRAP PAGE 2

LARGE-CITY FINANCES IN 1950

Two southern cities --- Atlanta and Dallas --- were among six
cities in the nation of populations in excess of 250,000 which
spent less money on city government operations in fiscal year
1950 than in fiscal 1949, according to a report entitled LF-
City Finances in 1950 just released by the Bureau of the Census.
Atlanta' s general expenditures for operation of its municipal
government in fiscal 1950 totalled $25,288,000 compared with
$26,346,000 in 1949 and in Dallas the expenditures were $;25,165,-
000 and $25,512,000, respectively.
In the nation as a whole, 17 of the 39 cities listed as having
populations in excess of 250,000 exceeded their revenue in ex-
penditures. In the South these cities included Mremphis, Atlanta,
Birmingham and Fort Worth. In eight cities, Chicago, Los Angeles,
Boston, Cincinnati, Seattle, Columbus, Fort Worth and Akron,
total general revenue and borrowings in fiscal 1950 dropped
belowr 1949.


Aiken, S. C., Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala., Charleston, 8, C.,
1833 Curve St., 50 Whitehall St., S.W., Mlaxwell House, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg., Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 1060 Tel. #&-W121,X-453 Tel. i-8394 Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,1-355 Tel. 7771


Jacksonville, Fla., K~noxville, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn.,
425 Federal Bldg., 253 Daylight Bldg., Madison at Front,
Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 8-3426


Jackson, Miss.,
426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 3-4972


Chattanooga, Tenn., Columbia, S. C.,
719 James Bldg. 1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


Miami, Fll., Mobile, Ala., Nashville, Tenn.,
947 Seybold Bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 315 Union St.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,X-206 Tel. 42-226


Savannah, Ga.,
218 Post Office Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


O


e TEXTILE INDUSTRY
THE
Controlling of materials in short
supply is continuing to affect one
of the Soutb's major businesses --
N ati ncr l the textile ladustry.
Gli~nalNPA has announced that an order is
in the mill designed to channel

asbestos fibre to more essential nsees,
TO~lu liOR and almost simultaneously came a com-
plaint from the textile machinery in-
dustry advisory committee that CMP
first quarter 1952 allotments needed
Hill rity upward revisions for that industry.
The proposed asbestos fibre order
would prohibit issuance of export licenses involving that prod-
not without prior NPA approval. Inventories of that commodity
have declined sharply in the first six months of 1951 and the
industry, it developed, is operating on a "hand-to-mouth" basis.
Also under consideration, it was stated is an order re-
stricting the use of spinning grades of chrysotile asbestos
fibre to specified uses, which would ban the manufacture of
certain end-use items.
Textile machinery committee members said projected outs in
materials allocations would leave only 10 to 15 per cent of the
industry's productive facilities available for building new
machinery for the textile industry since about 40 per cent of
its production now is for maintenance and repair items.
NEW ADVISORtY COMMlITTEE MEMBERS NAMED
Appointment of 10 southeastern businessmen to committees
to confer with the National Production Authority in the ie-
suance of orders and regulations and in the conducting of other
NPA actions affecting their industries was announced. They
included:
R. Y. MacIntyre, Birmingham, conveyor equipment manufacturers,
industry committee; Elmer Kinkade, Tampa, electronic parts and
components distributors; D. J. Griffin, Birmingham, and Louis
Rosenberg, Atlanta, electroplating; Howard B. Johnson, Atlanta,
steel forms and reports; Wallace WR. Allen, Jacksonville, and
D. L. Hlerndon, Atlanta, fan blower; Clinton Rucker and R. B.
McLean, Shelbyrille, Tenn., lead pencil manufacturers; and
Hugh Allen, Memphis, automotive maintenance equipment.
COPPER
HPA revoked Direction 1 to the Copper and Copper-base
alloy order Y-3. which established a temporary procedure for
distributors to obtain brase mill and wire mill products
from manufacturers, and which was rendered unnecessary with
the issuance of Order M-82 and Order M-86.
CONVERSION STEEL
Procedures were announced by which steel consumers operating
under CMP may continue the established custom of utilizing
conversion steel. Direction 8 to CMP Reg. 1 was issued providing
SEE NPA PAGE 2


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIIELD SERVICE





SOUTHEASTERN WHOLESALE SALES RISE

Southeastern wholesalers who report to the Bureau
of the Census on sales, inventories and so forth during
the first 8 months of 1951 sold goods valued at nearly
a billion dollars, monthly reports of the Census Bureau
on wholesale trade in the Southeast show.
The sales included $i727,887,000 in the South Atlan-
tic area and $259,931,000 in the East South Central
section for a total in the Southeast of $987,818,000.
An average of 521 firms reported in the South At_
lantic region during the 8-m~onth period and .206 in the -
East South Central section.
The eight months sales in 1951 were 16 per cent
greater than were reported in the southeastern wholesale
trade field in the corresponding period last year when
an average of 479 firms in the South Atlantic recorded
sales of $612,073,000 and $234,637,000 was reported by
198 in the East South Central region.
The sales recorded in the Southeast in the first 8
months of 1951 represented about 15 per cent of the
$6,477,655,000 registered by more than 4,000 firms
in the nation as a whole. .:
In August of this year, South Atlantic firms ex-
perienced an 11 per cent increase in sales over July,
but an 11 per cent decrease in August 1951 from August
1950, while sales in the East South Central section
were 15 per cent greater in August 1951 over July 1951
but 11 per cent lower in August 1951 as compared with
August 1950.

SCRA Continued From Page 1

Those named will be known as supervisors" to have
charge of the scrap collection program for their own
and other companies and to supervise operations of
steel warehouse salesmen normally working in the area.
They will also assume responsibility for organization
and coordination of all steel and warehouse salesmen
with local scrap mobilization committees. Objectives
of the salesmen are to organize scrap mobilization
committees in all cities where committees have not been
organized, and to work with them as assistants or
workers .
A publication entitled Scrap Handbook for Steel
Saese has been issued by the steel industry and is
being distributed to all mobilization committees and
Department of Commerce field offices. The publication
spells out in detail just how the some 8,000 salesmen
functioning for the industry are to assist in obtain_
ing an adequate supply of iron and steel scrap.

SOUTHIEASTERNl FLOUR PRODUCTION OFF

Flour mills in Georgia, North Carolina, South Caro-
`~lialandd Tennessee last tea poduce 5 56000 sa ks
cording to a Facts For Industry report issued by the
Bureau of the Census.

Note: These Facts For Industry reports
are available gratis and are issued for
many industries. See the nearest Depart-
ment qf Commerce field office.

The flour averaging 146.5 pounds to the sack was
produced from wheat grindings in the four States total-
ling 13,627,000 bushels from which 137,295 tone of offal
also were produced,
The 1950 production included j,154,000 eacks of flour
in Tennessee; 1,869,000 in North Carolina; 395,000 in
Georgia; and 158,000 in South Carolina. The total was
about 9 per cent below the 1949 output.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


N& Continued From Page 1

that a consumer having an allotment or steel for a given
quarter-year may order finished conversion steel to be
used in carrying out authorized production schedule by
placing the ALCM order writh a finished conversion steel
producer.
ALUMINUM INVENTORIES
Because of heavy military demands for aluminum during
a period when supplies are tight, MPA reduced by 15
days, or from 60 to 15 days, the supply of that metal a
manufacturer may keep in inventory. The action was taken
in an amendment to CMP Regulation 2.
GOVERNMENT PAPER ORDERS
In an amendment to Order Y-36, rules were provided
for placing, accepting and scheduling Government or rated
orders for paper.
OIL-COUNTRY TUBULAR GOODS
Allocations of the Petroleum Administration for
Defense of oil-country tubular goods were exempted from
a recently-issued direction to CMP Regulation 1 in
Directions to Orders Y-46 and M-46A.
RUBBE~R RESIDUE
Action was taken by NlPA in an amendment; to Order M-2
to stimulate purchases of the residue rubber material
accumulating in the production of synthetic rubber.
THIOKOL ALLOCATION
Allocation of Thiokol, a synthetic rubber-like plastic
material used principally in production of self-sealing
gas tanks for airplanes and as a ship-caulking compound
waas announced by NPA in Schedule 10 to NPA Order Y-45.
ALUMINUM SHIPMENTS
NPa has acted to achieve a better balance between 4th
quarter 1951 shipments of aluminum products and orders -
for those products through issuance of Direction 3 to
Order M-5 in which aluminum producers were authorized to
ship after the October 7 cut-off date materials produced
against 3rd quarter 1951 orders which could not be divert-
ed to bth quarter authorized controlled materials orders.
iIlNVFTORY CONTROLS
NPA Regulation 1 issued shortly after institution of
the Federal Government' s materials control program in an
effort to control inventories has been revised to tighten
such control by:
1. Limiting inventories of a greater number of
products and materials than were covered heretofore.
2. Providing a more specific definition of items in
inventory to include many materials formerly classified
as "in process."
3. Listing in the regulation all existing inventory
controls of other NPA orders and regulations.
STEEL
Four obsolete supplements to the basic steel order Y-1
were revoked by NPA, the supplements having been superseded
by the Controlled Materials Plan.

In a new order, M-7 P made 9,000 coal and coke
producers in the nation eligible to receive special priori-
ties assistance to obtain materials for maintenance, repair
and operating supplies and for minor capital additions.
LIST OF BASIC MA~TERIALS &I ALTERNATES
Number 3 in the series of "List of Basic Materiails and
Alternates" has been issued, which, among other things,
emphasizes that with growing industrial expansion for the
defense "tool up" and production reaching all-time highs,
the supply of metals like steel and copper is becoming
progressively tighter. The list is published as a guide
to industry, Government agencies and the military setablish-
ment in purchasing materials and in the use of alternates
in place of items in critical supply. It indicates what
materials are required for the defense build-up and are
therefore critical and what materials .are relatively easy
to obtain for civilian manufacture.





BUSINESS BRIEFS



Sales of large retail stores in the United States in
September wresr 9 per cent lower than in the same month in
1950 and 2 per cent lower than in August of this year, the
Bureau of the Cenana announced. Both food stores and eating
and drinking places recorded a sales gain of 6 per cent in
September 1951 compared with September 1950. Gasoline ser-
vice stations reported sales up 5 per cent and drug tore
sales were up 3 per cent. Sale of department stores were
down 6 per cent, and sales of lumber and building mater-
ials dealers and motor-vehicle dealers were down 14 per
cent and 16 per cent, respectively.
M *
Total business inventories at the end of August were
)69.7 billion, the Office of Business Economics, Ui. S.
Department of Commerce announced. After allowance for
seasonal variation, the book value of inventories at the
end of August was $200 million below July, the first de-
cline in book values since July 1950. Manufacturers' in-
ventories increased about $650 million while retailers'
and wholesalers' inventories declined $550 million and
$300 million, respectively.
*
Personal income in August increased to an annual rate
of $254.4 billion, or $2 billion above the July total.
Higher inceas of farm operators together with increased
government wage and salary disbursements were largely
repggngible fgy the enpanded flow of incpae ip Augupt.


.


I


TO OBTAIN COPIES OF THIS MATERAL CHECKS IT IN THE SPACE
PROVIDED AN~D SEND THIS SECTION OF TH[E BU~LLETINl OF COMMERCE
!!.iR hI ABRES WEPRTTEN OF 0OE FIELD OFICE. YORC


FOR SALES MATERIAL PAYALBLE TO TREASURER OF THE UNITED
STATES. THE6RE IS W0 CHARGE FOR ITEMS NOT PRICED*


Cash dividend payments by United States corporations
issuing public reports amounted to $217 million, a slight


Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers were
estimated at $7 billion in August, which after adjustment
for seasonal variations was an increase of 8 per cent from
July, or almost back to first quarter rates. August sales
of durable-goods wholesalers, at $2.5 billion, showed an
increase of 9 per cent from the previous month after allow-
ance for seasonal factors. All groups in the durable-goods
category contributed to the increase in July. The major
changes were gains of more than 10 per cent in sales of
jewelry and optical goods, housefurnishings, the automotive
group, and electrical goods.
+ *
Consumption of raw wool in July on the woolen and
rorated systems averaged 6.6 million pounds per week,
shourred basis, the lowest weekly figure since June 1940,
the Census Bureau announced.
*
Shoe and supper production in August, 42 million paired,
was 32 per cent above the July output of 32 million pairs,
but was down 16 per cent from the August 1950 output of
approximately 49 million pairs, according to the Census
Bureau.
+ *
Second quarter 1951 shipments of the women' s misses',
and juniors' outerwear industries totalled $538 million,
which was approximately the same level as in the second
Quarter of last year, according to the Census Bureau.
lowrever, the dress industries, which accounted for more
than two-thirds of total sales, reported shipments $16
11lion below last year's laevel


~aPulp, Paper & Board Industry Report,Sept. 1951, 754
Hydraulic Research in UI. S., NBSMP201........... .$1.25
Stone Exposure Test Wall, NBSBMSR125 ................304
fSelf-Siphonage of Fixture Trava, NBSBMSR126.........204
D7 U. S. Cnsu... or ropuaraon a oswang, 195o, k., to
rublished & Tabulated Data for Small Areas..........304
D 1948 C...0. or Buain....
Retail Trade Cash & Credit Sales & Balances Due.....
S19 r9 Annual Survey of Manufactures:
L/Carbon Steel Consumption By Metal Product Producers,
SalBu nG graph c Divisions & States, 19495c947,MAS-49-6

no to Sol aSuccessfultlye onthe installment Plan,#4
Store, #41~4.............
~7How Small Maufa turersCnYiti it forDrc
Malil Advertising, #415...............................,~
A Basic Check List for Testing a New Product or Idea,#416
Patents for Free Use, #417...............
Drugstore Maintenance & Housee png, # F.......
Receiving, Cheeking & Marking Drug Store M 0 nis~d49
ii~etin Upa Credit System for a Men' s Wear Store, #r421..


B Ataciga th Logs.................. ....................2
Grwn Annual Feor Pf 1h ainlBra iSaar
Culture of Oesrcide "qimnaYna o egt
Rosesn for the Home................... ................. .15


O7 a scarpin oe Farmsteado .............,...0

SBrahngham a 0emphief 188svil~e f Miari


Solin the U. S. Market11n **...........,....,......$1.00
NatinalIncme &Prouct ofthe U].S.,1929-1950.. .Loo
SLreit Fii 18 a an 15,1 G F0-do. -..************
Synthetic Broad Wloven Goods, 2nd Quarter 15,F1C-




Direction 8 to CMP Re 1 D CMP Reg. 2 Am~ended
Order B-36 Amended Directions to Orders M-46-46A
Order 8-2 bAended obaedule 10 to Order Y-45
Direction 3 to Order B-5 5 Regulation 1 Amended
Order Y-87 fLtist of Basic Materials & Alternates
'ubHi Emlplyment in Jul b91 G-E1 3...,

Pr::'d"'"'zE tmate of Poula n o ..P 7 Spl
Containers & Packaging Industry Report,Autumn 1951,604


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3


NE W

BUS IN ESS BOOKS

AND REPORTS





H~ELP FOR SMAL BUSINESSMEN PLANNED

An all-out effort to help small business in the Southeast
to obtain Government contracts to overcome the current in-
creasingly tight material supply situation is to be made by
field offices of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
Acting under directives from Washington, the field offices
wills
Locate small plants with adequate facilities and ability to
perform and otherwise determine available open productive
capacity for subcontract work.
Contact manufacturing concerns which have obtained prime
contracts at the management level to determine their needs for
outside facilities and to encourage expansion of subcontracting
to small factories.
Advise manufacturers of the facilities available for sub-
contracting .
Maintain a current inventory of small plant facilities with
the aid of Governors' commissions, chambers of commerce, Fed-
eral procurement offices and other local groups.
Develop and disseminate information for small businesses
regarding Government procurement.
Provide for the assembly and effective use of existing
facilities records by government procurement offices.
Assist government procurement offices by locating specific
outside production capacity needed by them,
Provide for handling or forwarding to the appropriate
authority the request of small firms for a fair and impartial
hearing regarding a government procurement action in which the
firm believes it is being discriminated against.
Maintain contacts with government procurement personnel to
insure proper implementation and performance of government pro-
curement policies regarding treatment of small firms.
Maintain liaison with other sources of information on gov-
ernment procurement such as repositories of government pro-
curement manuals and distributors of Department of Commerce
synopses to assist them in providing effective information
service to small business.
Provide information and counsel to small firms interested
in forming production pools and represent the Government in
authorized organization meetings of such groups.
To help the field offices carry out the program of assist-
ance to small business, representatives of the Office of Small
Business of the National Production Authority in Washington
will be dispatched to regional and district offices to imple-
ment the directives and insure effectiveness of the program.


The publication tells where to obtain inform
ation about markets; what distribution facili-
ties are available; how to choose the distri-
bution methods best suited to the product; and
how to develop a good product, a package that
will sell, and an attractive name.
By using practical illustrations, the book
suggests how products should be priced, how
selling agents are located and selected, and
how advertising programs are planned and car-
ried out.


NATIONAL INCOME
To help southeastern businessmen, research
experts, statisticians and others to keep
abreast of the national economy, the Office
of Business Economics, U1. S. Department of
Commerce has just published its 1951 Edition
of National Incqae, a Supplemlent to the Sure
of Current Business.
This publication, also available throngn
Department of Commerce field offices for $1.00
contains data on national income and product
statistics from 1929 to 1950; a review of
economte trends in the past two decades; the
basic principles underlying national accounts;
an explanation of methods and sources; allow-
ance for inflation and other subjeops.


I GPo 83-20195


SELLING THlE U. 8. MARKET
A guidebook to help southeastern manufacturers
sell their products in the United States market
has just been published by the U. S. Department
of Commerce.
Entitled "Selling the United Statses market "
the book covers a broad area of information from
the earliest stages of designing and developing
a product to finding U. S. markets for it. It is
especially designed to assist the newer and
smaller manufacturer.


Note: Orders for this publication
are now being taken by Department of
Commnerce field offices. See Order
Blank on Pape 3. Price $1.00.


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Ofhce
50 Whitehall St, S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000

Volume 5, Number 21 November 1, 1951


3 1262 08748 8838

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


See


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVI.LLE, FLORIDA





























^__ ______ ^^


1


PROGRESS IN SOUTHlEAST TOLD INr NEW PUBLICATION


Note: Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer, in an
address in Atlanta reviews this publication and its
applicability to the Southeast more fully. Copies
of his address are available at Department of Com-
merce offices for the asking.

Between 1939 and 1917, the region substantially increased
its regional shares of the nation' s textile, apparel, food,
transportation equipment, lumber, printing and publishing,
stone, clay and glass, paper, leather, petroleum products and
tobacco industries as measured by production worker employment,
(Continued on Page 2)


Bararell, S.C., Birmingham, Ala.,
201 County office 216 federal Bldg.,
Bldg., Te. 292 Tel. 53-3421,1(-355


Charleston, S. C.,
8gt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 777


Arken, S. C., Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga.,
1833 CureSt., 50 Whiteha~llSt.,8.W., Maxwell House,
Tel. 1060 Tel. WA-4121,1-453 Tel. 2-8394


Coltabia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jacksron, Mies., Jackolnville~, Fla.,
426 Yazoo St., 425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 3-4972 Tl -11


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 James Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673

Miani, Fla.,
947 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533


IKnoxville, Tenn., Memhis, Tenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,Madison at Front,
Tel. 5-138-9 Tel. 8-3426


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641,1-206


Yashrille, Tenn.,
315 Union St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. 0. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-3880


OV LUME 5, NUMBER 22


NOVEMBER 15, 1951


g TEXTILE ORDER AMENDED
A move to help the South' s textile in-
dustry was taken by NIPA when Order Y-23
GEtOnGI was amended removing restrictions on the
use of carded cotton yarn spindles to
relieve hardships of manufacturers by
P~odu tion permitting greater operating leeway.
TOBBHORPreviously, it wras required that all
spindles producing yarn in one classi-
fication could not be used to produce
Wuh rt carded yarns in another. The three
auth rity classes were yarns coarser than sizes;
sizes to twenty twos; and those finer
than twenty-twos.
The action wras taken because some
manufacturers have accumulated excessive
A~ginventories of particular types of yarne
for which there was currently little
demand.
Carded cotton yarn is used primarily to produce cotton
duck and webbing, knit and wroven goods.
Purpose of blPA' s previous action affecting the industry
was to assure equitarble distribution of defense-rated orders
among producers. The order presently provides that yarn
manufacturers need not accept rated orders in excess of 20
per cent of production of coarse yarns; 30 per cent of sixes
to tweenty-twos; and 20 per cent of finer yarns.
COM~PLIANCE PROCEEDING
Four hundred and thirty cases of alleged violation of NPA
orders, regulations and other actions have been investigated
in Georgia, Florida, Alanama, Miassssippi, South Carolina
and Tennessee in the past six months ol whlchl Lj involved
construction restrictions. Satisfactory compliance was obtain-
ed in 4d02 cases and 28 were referred to the regional attorney
for possible legal action.
Through compliance action in connection with the controlled.
materials plan audits, the return of 1,573 tons of steel;
9,037 pounds of stainless steel; 263,653 pounds of copper; and
138,197 pounds of aluminum in excess of allotments was ef-
fected.
NOY-FERROUS SCRAP
Formation of a non-ferrous industry scrap mobilization
committee to speed the flow of that vital material to the
nation' s industrial econolay wras announced. Created to find
a solution to the growing crisis in non-ferrous scrap, the
committee includes the nation' s top non-ferrous scrap experts.
The non-ferrous scrar, Drogram will cover copper, brass and
bronze as well as aluminum ana lead. T. E. Yeltf'ort, manager
of the Copper and Brass Research Association, Newr York City,
is serving as chairman. The committee will formulate a con-
certed non-ferrous scrap recovery program, funds for which
will be supplied by the metals industry.
(Continued on Page 2)


"In the generation fol-
lowing 1929, the econose
of the Southeast region
has been one of the most
dynamic in the Ulnited
States ."
j~~i This was the opening
statement of a discussion
of the southeastern econ-
om5Y in a publication just
issued by the Office of
Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerceiel ofcs
now available at all

Citing a few examples
ss of development of the
OCOBOlig of Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mississippi
the Carolinas, Tennessee,
K~entucky, Arkansas and
Louisiana, the publica-
tion recalls the follow-
ing:
The Southeast has the
highest rate of natural
increase of any major
region, nearly one-half
again as high as that of
the nation.
Agriculture is no
longer the leading in-
dustry, having become
second to manufacturing,
S. which accounted for
about one-sixth of all


UNITED STATEs



FAR WEST


MIDDLE EAST


CENTRAL


NEW ENGLAND


NORTHWEST


SOUTHWEST


SOUTHEAST

Source: Reg~ional Trends in the U.
Econon
income in the region in 1949.


C /;ZUNITES SATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE




~~i~~MUEFIEDI~ SERVICERC


PER CAPITAL INCOME
By Regions,1929 and 1949





AUTHORIZED URBAN BUILDING DECREASES

Thirteen southeastern cities authorized urban con-
struction in the first 7 months of 1951 valued at $8179,-
580,000, which was a decrease of 1;C.8 per cent from the
$205,852,000 authorized in the corresponding period of
last year, according to figures compiled by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor.
All but twoe of the cities -- Mashville and Tampa __
experienced decreases, including 27.7 per cent in
Atlanta; 37 per cent in Birmingham; 23.4 per cent in
Charlotte; 31.6 per cent in Chattanooga; 20 per cent
in Jacksonville; 42.7 per cent in Knoxville; 28.3 per
cent in Memphis; 28.4 per cent in Miami; 58 per cent
in Mobile; 21.6 per cent in Montgomery; and 13.6 per
cent in Savannah.
In Nashville a rise of 339 per cent took place, and
Tampa reported a gain of 45.7 per cent.
A 14.3 per cent decrease was recorded in the 13
cities in new dwelling units authorized for urban areas,
or from $106,504,000 in the first 7 months of 1950 to
$91,249,000 in the same period this year.
In new urban building authorized in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee,
a decline of 2.5 per cent was reflected, with three of
the States -- Alabama, Florida and Mississippi --
sharing in the drop.

32 AIRPORT PROJECTS PLaNNED

Thirty-two airport construction or development pro-
jects to be undertaken in 6 soutneastern States under
the Federal aid airport program during the present
fiscal year at a cost of $3,706,492 were announced by
the Civil Aeronautics Administration, UI. S. Department
of Commerce.
The number of projects by States and estimated total
cost in each included five in Alabama at a cost of
$672,747; Florida, six and $1,319,928; Georgia, seven
and $460,038; Mlississippi, four and $285,764; South
Carolina, four anld $568,811; and Tennessee, six and
$399,204.
Tne funds to be expended include $1,890,779 in Fed_
eral monies and the remainder in sponsor funds. Federal
funds will include $343,040 in Alabama; Florida, $682,-
964; Georgia, $L30,019; Mississippi, $142,882; South
Carolina, $292,272; and Tennessee, $199,602.

TRO SOUTHEASTERNI SECTIONS "CRITICALn

Designation by the Defense Production Administra-
tion of Camp Stewalrt, Ga., and Cocoa-Melbourne, Fla ,
as critical defense housing areas was announced. "
Camp Stewart was made eligible for restoration of
rent control and Cocoa-Yelbourne was made eligible for
relaxation of housing credit restrictions, mortgage
insurance benefits and community facilities development
aid from the government, but not rent control.
It was erroneously announced that Pensacola, Fla.,
had been included in the latest list of critical areas,
but consideration is still being given to that city. *
Altogether, nine areas were designated in the cur-
renlt list. The others were Aberden, Md., Rapid City -
Sturgis, S. D., Bainbridge Elkton, Md., Barstow, Calif.
Lorain county, Ohio, Babbitt, Minn., and Benton, Ark. *
The Camp Stewalrt atrea embraces Liberty, Long and
Taminall counties, inclu~ding thle cities of Hinlesville
Ludowici and Glea~ville, andi the c~ocoh-Mlelbournle ar~ea
includes all of B~revard county.
nearctivationl of military ins~tallations with increased
activity in defense aork and large additions to t~e
labor force are reasons for the designations.


NATIONAL PRODUCTION AUTHORITY Continued From Page 1

WALSH-HEALEY ACT
"Hiow the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act Affects
Government Supply Contractors" is the subject of a new
Defense Production Aid.just issued. The pamphlet, prepared
as a service to small businessmen who may be unfamiliar
with the law by the Office of Small Business of NPA,
explains howr the act generally applies to all prime and
secondary contracts in excess of $10,000 let by the
Government for materials, supplies, articles or equipment.
STEEL DISTIRIBUTION
Aircraft-quality alloy steels in warehouses were ear-
marked for sales only in connection with aircraft, guided
missiles and atomic energy programs in Schedule 1 to NPA
Order M-6A just issued.
IMPORTED PIG LEAD
Steps were taken to assure a wider distribution of
imported pig lead in an amendment to Order Y-76 which
enables all consumers to share in the available supply
of that product. As it was previously, only a relatively
few consumers use that source of supply.
aLUMINUM WROUGHT PRiODUCTS
Acting to assure a flow of aluminum wrought products
to distributors in quantities to replace authorized con-
trolled material orders from warehouse inventories, Order
M-88 was issued establishing procedures to protect the
distribution system.
CKP STEEL ORDERED
RPA has taken three steps to improve acceptance of
controlled materials orders by steel suppliers in an
amendment to Direction 3 to Y-1. They provide for cancella-
tion of the former 10 per cent reserve of output so that
producers may accept up to 100 per cent of their monthly
capacity in authorized CMP orders; prompt notification by
steel suppliers of rejection or acceptance of orders; and
opening of steel producers' order books for a quarter not
later than 45 days prior to the lead times for various
steel products.
OMP COPPER ORDERS
Like action was also taken by NPA with respect to
copper controlled materials in an amendment to Direction 2
to the basic copper Order r-11.
REGULATION 6
NPA Regulation Number 6 was issued spelling out the
conditions under which a company's priority ratings,
materials quotas and other authorizations granted it by
NPA may be transferred, along with its other assets and
obligations, when it is sold as a going concern to a new
owner .
wLUYLINUM SCRAP
In a directive issued by NPA's Aluminum and Mlagnesium
Division, N~PA acted to divert tne flow of aluminum scrap
from primary producers to secondary smelters by limiting
amounts of tolled and purchased scrap and secondary ingot
which primary producers may receive during the fourth
quarter of 1951.

ECONOMIC TRENDS IN THE SOUTHEAST Continued From Page 1

Between 1939 and 1947, the Southeast had 48 per cent of
the entire textile industry employment of the nation, 45
per cent of lumber industry employment and 60 per cent of
the tobacco products industry, the publication points out.
As a result of changes during the war period, the pro-
ductivity of the region's factories as measured by average
value added by manufacture per production worker rose the
most of any region between 1939 aind 1947.
Manufacturing output per worker in the region rose from
31 per cent below the national average in 1939 to only 20
per cent below it in 1947.
From sixth place among the seven regions as a mineral
producerr in 1929, the Southeast moved up to third in 1948.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





More Detailti
Information On
The Highlights
Of The News In
The Field Of
business Is A_
vailable at D~eparosent of Commerce Field Offies8.



Sales of retail stores in September amounted to $12.4
billion, or 2 per cent below a year ago. After adjusting
for seasonal factors and trading day differences, retail
trade in Sep~tember wass donn about 1 per cent from August.
Total sales in rhe last 6 months were generally stable;
adjusted sales for the third quarter were about equal to
those for the second.
** *
Chain store and mall-order sales in September were
estimated at $2.8 billion, about 1 per cent above Sept-
ember a year ago. Most trades reported declines in sales
from Arugust to September after adjustment for seasonal
changes anld working day differences. T'he largest decline
in September, after seasonal adjustment, was in men' s
wear.
*
Income earned by Americans on investments abroad rose
to an unprecedented $2.2 billion in 1950. Income received
in this country amounted to $1.7 billion, excluding $443
million of undistributed profits of foreign-incorporated
subsidiaries. The 1950 increase was a continuation of the
strong upward trend begun in 1946.












TO 08TAINJ COPIES OF THIS IMaTEKALk CHECK IT IN THE SPACE
PROVIDED AND SEND THIS SECTION OF THE BULLETIN OF COMMbERCE


TO THE NEAREST DE;PARTRENT OF COMMdERCE FIELD OFFICE. YOUR


NAM~E AND ADDRESS ARcE ON THLE OPPOSITE SIDE. MAKE REMITTANCES
F'OR SALES MATERIAL PAYABLE TIO TRExSURER OF THE; UNITED
STATES. THERE IS N0 CHARGE FO)R ITEMS NOT PRICED.



U eional Trends in toe U.SEconong ............$1.00
Order M-23 Amended Lf Howf the Walsh-Healey Public
Co ntact rAdc AffeeAs dov amment Supply Contractors -6


e/ Drecin t 6R l oA ededer/ D 2 to Order-M11


/ Training: Restaurant Sales Personnel A Teacher' s
Manual for Ulse in the Vocational Training of Restaurant
Sales Personnel ................... ................. 659
/ :ork Exper encenof henPopulation in 1950, P-50,#35 ..
/ 19418 Ce sus of uau 1 esso. Ret Tra Em ly $100

U Estimates of the Farm Population of Ul.S. BAE#Y17........


Manufacturers' shipments in September declined from
their August rate, but were 3 per cent higher than the
year-ago total. For the first time in two years backlogs
of orders did not increase, as new business received
during the month fell short of shipments. Inventory book
values continued to rise, due primarily to the accumulation
of defense goods.
+ u
The net working capital of U. S. corporations at the
end of June 1951 reached a new record level of $79.0 bil-
lion, according to the Securities anld Exchange Commission.
This was approximately $1.2 billion more than the total at
the end of March 1951, largely reflecting expansion of
inventories and cash in excess of increases in payables
and income taxes,
+ +
Individuals saved $3.2 billion in liquid form during
the second quarter of 1951, more than in any period since
the third quarter of 1946, the Securities and Exchange
Commission announced. During the first quarter of this
year and the second quarter of last year there was prarcti-
cally no liquid savings by individuals.
+* *
Rising defense requirements together with the related
plant and equipment expansion programs are the chief dyna-
mic influences in the current business situation, the
Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce
announced. Defense expenditures are rising steadily and in
the September quarter amounted to $38 billion at annual
rates as compared with $12 billion in the pre-Korean period.
+ +
National income reached a seasonally adjusted annual
rate of $27$ billion in the second quarter of 1951, $5 bil-
lion above the preceding quarter.


LZSummary of City Government Finances in 1950,G-CF50-#1..
SFats & Oils, Sept. 1951, FFIM17-2-91 .................
/ Cotton & Linters Consumption, Stocks, Imports &r
SExports & Active Cotton Spindles,Sept. 1951,MI5-1-2-52
SCotton System Spinning Activity,Sept. 1951,M15-3-1-52
/ Iron & Steel Foundries &r Steel Ingot Producers,June 1951,
FFI ,M210-61... .... ... .... ... ....

Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 2nd Quarter 1951,M1k21..rn&SelCsig tSelIgtAg195A-21-1...
01Oeomargari'ne, Sept. 1951, F'F1M17J-91..................
/ Testing of Yeasuring: Equipment, A Manual for Weights &
__ measures Officials, NBS handbook 45.............. .$1.25
Subcontractor Opportunities With Navy Contractors......
Small Business Aids:
L/Selecting &k Training Employees for a Small Florist
Shop, #1422................... ..~~....................

Handling~ & Merhandising Fih o ~ H:in ~ ~nb:trthe Grocery Store,
#426""""""""""
SWhat AnE p oye Ys o Ud t Scal Se iy

SCandy Selling in the Grocery Store, 1#430 .........
'/ Some Observations on Establishing an Antique Shop,




5on, 0133951 ...... ... ..0 .......%25

SFlorida U Yississippi USouth Carolina
_UTennessee
/1950 census of Population: Characteristics of Metropoli-

/ Aclanta / Dhllas /' Louisville / Mliami
ONashville O'New Orleans 27San Antonio


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE







I


MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS RISE INJ REDIOE
A total of 4,489,455 motor vehicles were in operation on the
streets and highways of the Southeast last year, an average of
one for every 3.7 persons, according to the Bureau of Public
Roads, U. S. Department of Commerce.
They included 3,472,858 passenger cars, 988,133 trucks, and
28,460 buses.
By States, the registrations included Alabama, 685,8123
Florida, 984,838; Georgia, 897,518; Missiasippi, 484,374; South ~
Carolina, 578,802; and Tennessee, 858,111*
Motor fuel consumed in the region approximated 3,421,663,000
gallons, including 526,142,000 in Alabama; 719,683,000 in
Florida; 405,952,000 in Mississippi; 706,796,000 in Georgia;
425,392,000 in South Carolina; and 637,698,000 in Tenlnessee.
The six southeastern States collected a total of $309,6/.0,000
in highway-use income, received $)244,685,000 for construction
and maintenance of State highways, and expended $220,572,9000
for that purpose.
Highway-use income collected included $45,820 000 in Alabama;
$79,500,000 in Florida; $57,155,000 in Georgia; ~33,062,000 in
Mississippi; $b34,821,000 in South Carolina; and $59,282,000 in
Tennessee .

SOUTHIEASTERN FARM INCOME ON RISE

A 17 per cent rise in cash farm income to farmers of Alabaan,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee in
the first 8 months of 1951 was reported by the Bureau of ALgri-
cultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agrienlture*
The income was placed by BAE at $)1,428,191,000, which com-
pared with $1,217,700,000 realized in the corresponding period
of last year*
South Carolina experienced a 16 per cent gain; Georgia, 30
per cent; Tennessee, 19 per cent; Alabama, 28 per cent; and
Mississippi, 43 per cent. Only in Florida was a reduction re-
flected, 6 per cent.
Included in the income in the first 8 months of this year
was $i775,620,000 from crops and $652,571,000 from livestock
and its products. Last year, income from those products totalled
$685,413,000 and $)532,287,000, respectively*
By States, total income for the first 8 months of this year
and the same period last year included, in millions, South Caro-
lina, $153.4 this year and $131.7 in 1950; Georgia, $322.5 and
$247.9; Florida, $33L.3 and $355.3; Tennessee, $254.0 and
$214.1; Alabama, $)173.1 and $15.5; and Mississippi, $190.6
and $132.9.


BOUSIESS STATISTICS 1951 EDITION
SAs a further oebrvice to business men in the Southeast,
'the Department of Comserce has just issued its 1951
SEdition of its publication Business Statistics, which
as first published 20 years ago. It reflects a com-
Sprehensive record of the past movements of all the
Business /inicators, and is a well-used tool in business
Research.
O sed in conjunction with the latest issue of the
SSurvey of Current Business, monthly publication of the
SOffice of Business Economics, this volume brings to
Sand a measure of the behavior of important business
Indexes from 1935 to the present.
SThe business statistics published are those having
'the most value in the current operations of the busi-
'ness community, a selection determined by long exIper-
i ence. More than 2,600 different business series are
'supplied.
SThis publication is available through anyr field of-
Sfice of the Department of Commerce at a price of
1.50. It is listed in the order blank on Page 3 of
'this Bulletin of Commerce.

80 SOUTHEASTERN URBAQN AREAS "UPu POPLATION

Eighty urban areas in the southeastern States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee
experienced an increase in population between 1940 and 1950
of 100 per cent and over, according to 1950 Census of Popula-
tion reports of the Bureau of the Census now being received
in Department of Colmmerce field offices.

Note: Many facts and figures are included in
these reports. See your nearest Department of
Cpommrce field office for data desired.

Included are 10 incorporated places and unincorporated
places of 1,000 or more in Alabama; 36 in Florida; 18 in
Georgia; 5 in Yississippi; 6 in South Carolina; and 5 in Tenn-
essee.
Some of the more spectacular gains were a 28,200 per cent
increase for Pine Lake and 966 per cent for White Sulphur
Springs in Georgia; 960 per cent in Opalocka, Florida; 903
per cent in Forest Aeres, South Carolina; and 681 per cent in
Childersburg, Alabama. 6on arms27s


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE: $300

UNIV. OF FL LIB.
DOCL% EDP .

n,,


U.S. DEPOIFITORY
BC-6-JF


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Oflice
so Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, a.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000 ,

Volume 5, Number 22 Yovember 15, 1951


3 1262 08748 8820


PAGE 4


BULLET


Tt~J~
os',


~j~7~-~cb


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF FCONYOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
































ULOV ME ), NUMBER 27 1


SOUTHERN GARMENT PLANTS "UP" SKIIPMENTS

WOMEN'S,MISSESS'*& JUNIORS' Southern garment manufact-
DUTERWEAR during plants last year sold
TOTAL SHIPMENTS underwear, nightwear and
unuLoNS OF DOLLARs outerwear valued at $125,-
*4.500 TOA NUTIS280,000, an increase of more
than 15 per cent over the
value of such goode sold in
1949, according to current
3,ooo Facts For Industry reports
issued by the Bureau of the
Census .
:: ~The figures showed ship-
Igoo ments of knit underwear and
nightwear valuedat $84,020,-
000 in 1950, and knit outer-
wear, including woven swim-
o 9915 ear, valued at $15,126,000.
source: bureau oz census Sales of women's and chil-
dren' s woven underwear and nightwear were valued at $23,680,000
in the South Atlantic area and $2,454,000 in the other sections
of the South,

These Facts For Industry reports and others
devoted to other businesses are available gratis
at Commerce Department field offices. See Page
3 for Order Blank.

Compared with the value of those shipments and sales were
shipments in 1949 of knit underwear and nightwear valued at
$73,080,000, knit outerwear, including woven swimwear, writh a
value of $12,795,000, and sales of women's and children's woven
underwear and nightwear in the South Atlantic area which brought
$19,831,000 and $2,427,000 in the other sections of the South.
In the United States, shipments of knit underwear and night-
wear last year were valued at $454,215,000 compared with $400,-
684,000 in 1949, and shipments of knit outerwear last year were
valued at $451,464,000 against $409,439,000 in 1949. Sales of
women'sa and children' s woven underwear and nig~htwear in the
nation last year were valued at $376,864,000 compared with a
value of $372,316,000 placed on such sales in 1949*


""""""'
satinum 'rAlhM N "


Department of Commerce field offices again this year me making available to Southeastern
4 businessmen and other intereeted persons material to assist them in paying their 1951 Federal
income taxes. The publications Lnclude the nation's best seller "Your Federal Income Tax,"
which will be available in December, and which will again sell.for 25 cents. It will incorpor-
ate oranges in the law made by the last Congress. The others are "Bulletin F Depreciation and Obsolescence,"
30 cents; nYour Rights of Review When the Government Questiona Your Income Taxn 10 cents; nThe Small Business-
man and His Declaration of Estimated Taxn 10 oents, and the leafleta "How An Unincorporated Business Mar Con-
vert a Net Operating Loss Into a Refund on Last lear's Income Taxes,".and "Basic Tax Information for Small
Business Enterprises which are available gratia. Request these from the nearest Commerce Department office.


____ __ ____ ___ __ ___1 ___ ____ __ ___


Barnwell, S. C., Birmingham, Ala.,
201 County Office 246 Federal Blldg.,
Bldg., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,1-355


Charleston, 8. C.,
Sgt. Jasper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771

Memphis, Tenn.,
Mardison at Front,
Tel. 8-3426


Aiken, S. C., 'A~tlanta, Ga., Augusta, Gat.,
1833 Curve St., 50 Whitehall St., S.WA., Maxwrell House,
Tel. 1060 Tel. Ix-4121,X-453 Tel. ;c-8394

Chattanooga, Tenn., Columbia,- S. C., Jackson, Miss.,
719 James Bldg., 1310 Lady St., 426 Yazoo St.,
Tel. 7-5673 Tel. 3-1185 Tel. 3-4972


Jacksonville, Fla.,
425 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 4-7111


Knoxville, Tenn.,
253 Daylight Bldg.,
Tel. 5-113-9


Miast, Fla., IMobile, Ala.,
947 Seybold Bldg~., 308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641,X-206


Nashville, Tenn.,
315 UInion St.,
Tel. 42-2426


Savannah, Ga.,
218 Post Office Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Tarmpa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tel. 2-388~0


nnrn r Inrmu ~1


R EBMECED


PAPER & PAPER BARD
THE mgd Shortages of chemicals used in the manu-
facture of all types of paper and paper
board products, an important industry in
NcrtioP1gg the Southeast, will continue for at least
the next six months, HPA told a joint
meeting of the Book Paper Manufacturers
Sand Writing Paper Manufacturere Industry
P)( 110(1000 Advisory Comrmittees held recently in
Washington.
Sulfur and chlorine, the two most La-
Auhoiy rete ot riial t asestdportant chemicals used in making paper
Consideration is being given several
proposals to restrict the use of anlfur
and sulfuric acid.
SULFUrR
Proposals aimed at saving critically
scarce enlfur, another important South-
eastern industry, by cutting the amount
used in rayon production in the form of sulfurio acid and
carbon bisulfide during the 4th quarter of 1951 and let quar-
ter of 1952 were discussed at a meeting of NPA officials and
the agency's Rayon Yarn Producing Industry Advisory Committee.
Regulatory action is desired by November 30, NPA pointed out,
to carry out the Defense Production Administration's decision
further to conserve sulfur to bring supply more nearly into
balance with requirements in the interest of defense.
NPA's tentative proposals involve a 10 per cent reduction
from 1950 consumption in sulfur used to make sulfuric acid
and carbon bisulfide, and a 90 per cent liait against 1950
consumption on the use of sulfuric acid and carbon bisulfide
by rayon yarn producers.
The committee countered with a proposal that defense in-
dustries' needs for sulfur be satisfied by positive NPA ac-
tion, and that any out required in the use of sulfuric acid
and carbon bislulfide be spread over all other industries.
AN~T1-HOARDING
In an amendment to its Notice 1, NPA added scores of items
.to the list of materials and products which are designated as
scarce and which are subject to anti-hoarding provisions of
~thu Defense Production Act.
SEE NPA PAGE 2


N O PAlihG OF


IllilllL IYn-~ YIYIII


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE





PAGE 2


RETALL SaLES TREND DOINNARD IN SOUTHEwST


NPH CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

MIACHINE TOOLS
Production of machine tools will be reserved almost
entirely for direct military and defense-supporting product-
ion i~nder new and tighter regulations issued by NPA. Three
actions were taken. In amending Order Y-41, a lid was
placed on machine tool shipments for unrated orders after
February 1, 1952. In a new order, L-41A, priority ratings
to buy machine tools were limited. In revoking Order M-40,
which provided for priorities for machine tool builders,
NPA held it had-become obsolete under the Controlled
Materials Plan.
COLUMBIUM & TANTALUM
Formal action was taken in an amendment to Schedule 5
of Order M-80 to permit the use of columbium and~ tantalum,
scarce alloys in the manufacture of "B" products, includ-
ing components that go into complete "A"products.


"Dips" in retail sales in September of this year
wrere reported by large independent stores in 10 of 15
cities and areas in the Southeast in which the Bureau
of the Census conducts monthly surveys.
Comparing September sales with those of the saime
month last year, the Bureau found an 8 per cent de_
cline in Birmingham, 1 per cent in Manatee and Sara'-
sota counties, Florida; 15 per cent in Atlanta; 12
per cent in Clarksdale; 19 per cent in Greenlsood,
S. C., 20 per cent in Bristol, Tenn., 4 per cent in
Savannah and Johnson City, Tenn., and 11 per cent in
Gulfport, Miss.
Five cities and areas, on the other hand, found
sales on the upgrade. Included were advances of 6 per
cent in Chilton and Perry counties, Alal., 13 per cent
in Augusta, 5 per cent in Columbus, Ga., 7 per cent
in Macon, Ga., and 12? per cent in Biloxi, Miss.
In most places, sales in September declined also *
in comparison with August of this year.
In the wholesale trade field, decreases also took
place in sales in the Southeast in September as com-
pared wida the same month last year. They included
4 per cent in the South Atlantic area and 6 per cent
in the East South Centrail region.

ILLSK OUTPUT ON RISE IN REGi0N '

Milk production in the Southeast has increased an
average of 6 pounds per person in the last 15 years
despite al per cent drop in the number of cows on
farms, according to an analysis of reports of the
Bureau of Agricultural Economies, U. S. Department of
Agriculture .
Production in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississip-
pi, South Carolina and Tennessee from the 1935-1939
period to 1950 rose an average of 423 pounds per per-
son to 449 pounds, and the number of cows on farms
had dropped from a total of 2,140,000 in 1935 to
2,104,000 in 1950.
Gains in per person production in the 15-year span
were recorded for all of the six southeastern States
except South Carolina where a decrease of from 302 to
297 pounds took plarce, due to some degree to a drop
of from 173,000 milk cows in the 1935-39 period to
157,000 last year. In Georgia, an increase of from 356
to 384 pounds was shown and a decrease of from 373,000
to 365,000 in cows.
Florida registered increases both in milk product-
ion and number of cows, with a gain of from 185 to
205 pounds per person in output and from 98,000 to
136,000 in number of cows. The other States were:
Tennessee, milk production, 634 to 709 pounds ahd
cows, 556,000 to 597,000; Alabama, 434 to 460 pounds
aind 410,000 to 388,000 cows; and Mississippi, 624.to
639 pounds and 530,000 to 461,000 cows.

30 NECESSITY CERTIFICATES GRANTED

Thirty certificates of necessity for tjax amortiza-
tion purposes were issued by the Defense Production
Administration to southeastern firms wishing to expand
theirofacilities to meet the needs of the national pro-

Eleven of the certificates called for an expenditure
o neal e s0p0c,0 ein the prop se dexpannioneg odig



and one in South Carolina.


NEWS PRINT
The plight of the weekly newspaper and small daily,
which are finding it increasingly difficult to obtain
sheeted newsprint because fewer mills are making it, is
receiving the attention of NJPA.
Meeting! with its newspaper industry advisory committee
in Washington, NPAk officials said some way must be found
to help those papers, and the recommendation was made that
a common pool made available by publishers for distress
cases be used for that purpose.
At the same time, NPAL cautioned newspaper publishers in
the Southeast and other sections that newsprint supplies
will continue scarce in 1952, despite increases in product-
lon and an outlook for continued rises.
SULFUR INVENTORIES
Sulfur inventories have been limited to a 25-day supply
at currently scheduled rates of operation or to a practic-
able working inventory, whichever is less, in an amendment
to Order 11-69, the basic sulfur order. The action was taken
when it became apparent that producers were unable to meet
the rapidly growing demand for that important inorganic
chemical on an unrestricted basis.

a -FI1H'UT QUA'~RTE 95 ALLUTRE~NTS --


CONSTRUCTION
Sixty-three per cent of the construction
applications filed with the Construction Con-
trols Division of the National Production
Authority for the 4th quarter of 1951 were
denied, NPA announced. A total of 3,834 ap-
plications was filed, of which 2,419 repres-
enting 9579,000,000, were denied; 907 were
found to be exempt; 298 were given an alibt-
ment of controlled materials; and 210 received
an approved construction schedule where no
allotment was required.


First quarter 1954 allotments of steel, copper
and aluminum to producers of consumer goods have
been announced by NPAt. The allotments provide
materials used in production of goods not directly
related to the defense production program, but
which are considered necessary to maintain the
nation's civilian economy. Allotments of controlled
materials for production of a selected group of
consumer-type goods required for defense supporting
industries will be announced shortly.
TIhe allotments aire i~n line with the previously
forecavaireduetion in amuntprof neotnolledsmatear-

ter 952 llotentsn :r :'bgou aet manufacturers


GPO 81100550


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








__


More Detailgg
Information On
The Highl~ights
Of The News In
The Field Of
B~usinerss Is A-
vailable at Department of Commerce Field Offte~es.




Personal income in September of' this year was at
an annual rate of $253.3 billion, virtually unchanged
from August 1951. Although total income was stable
from August to September, there were increases in
corporate dividend disoursements and wage and salary
receipts and offsetting declines in proprietors
income and transfer payments. For the first 9 months
of 1951, personal income was at an annual rate of
$b248.8 billion, 13 per cent above the total for the
corresponding 1950 period.
** ** .
Total business inventories at the end of September
were valued at $b69.3 billion. After allowance for sea-
sonal variation, the book value of inventories at the
end of September was about $250 million lower than
August. An increase of $350 million in manufacturers'
inventories was more than offset by a decline of $600
million in retailers' inventories, while wholesalers'
inventories ,remained unchanged.
*
Consumption of raw wool in September averaged 7.9
million pounds per week, scoured basis, 4 per cent
below the August level, the Census Bureau announced.


TO OBTAIN COPIES OF
biWi 13()KS d i) TalS IIATERIAL CHECK
~3~% e AND REPORTS r t SA PO
LAv/ --49 SDED ANDFSEND THLS
LETIN OF COMM~ERCE TO
THE NEAREST DEPARTb[ENT OF COMMERCE FIELD OFFICE. YOUR
NAME AND ADDRESS ARE ON THE OPPOSITE SU),IDE. AEREI-
TANCES FOR SALES MATERAL PAYABLE TO TREASURER OF THE
UNITED STATEcS. THERE IS NO CHARGE FORH ITEMS 1JOT PRICED.


W omen's, Misses' & Juniors' Outerwear, 1950,
Facts For IndustryM67H-00 ..........,....... .......
S Knit Underwear & Nightwear, 1950, FFI1M670-00.........
women' s & Children's a oven Fabric Underwear &
Nightwear, FFl 67J -00 ............................
SKnit Outerwear (Including Hloven Swaimwrear),1950,
FFI MY67G-00...................... ..................
ITnorganic Chemicals, U. S. Production, August 1951,
FFIM19A-81 ................... ............'.........
Z rap, Paper & Board, Sept. 1951, FFIM1A-91..........
Clay Construction Products, Aug. 1951, FFIM1268-81....
Soft-wood Plywood, Summary for 1950, FlM13B-00*******
Fats & Oils, Consumption~by Uses, Sept. 1951,)117-2-91

L7. alu qof Shp t ,of Selected Classes of Products,
1950, 1949 & 1947, MAS-50-2..........****************
/General Statistics for Industry Groups & Selected
Industries, 1950, 1949 & 1947, IYAS-50-1............,.
Monthly Report on Labor Force, Nov. 1951, P-57,#1112..
Nov. 1, 1951 Consolidated Cotton Report..............
.1948 Census of Business:
USelf-Service in Grocery Stores-Retail, BC-3-R-150..*.
SReport on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 8, 1951,C-0-10g-51-52..


Shortages of materials retarded almost all types of
construction during October resulting in a more than
seasonal decline in activity, the U. S. Departments of
Commerce and Labor reported jointly. Delays in construct-
ion projects extended even to the basic steel and electric
power expansion programs. Total value of new construction
fit in place in October amounted to about $b2.7.billion,
off 5 per cent from the September total and 3 per cent
less than the total for October 1950.
& MMMM
Third quarter 1951 shipments of the dozen price dress
industry totalled $75 million, a decrease of 5 per cent
compared with $79 million in the corresponding period of
1950, the Census Bureau reported.
+ + +
Employment conditions showed little change between
September and October, according to the latest Census
Bureau figures. Total civilian employment was estimated at
the end of October at 61,836,000, or about the same as in
the week ending September 8. Total nonagricultural emnploy-
ment, estimated at 54,168,000 in October, was also vir-
tually unchanged from the preceding month, but there were
a number of ninor changes in various nonfarm industry
groups .
+ + 9
Production of knit cotton and wool underwear and night-
wear during September registered decreased from both the
Auut1951 and September 1950 levels, the Census Bureau
announced .
+ +
Cuttings of most types of men's apparel in September
were less than production in either September 1950 or August
1951, the Census Bureau said. Rayon and other synthetic
fabric suits and rayon trousers continued to be exceptions
to the general trend.

Your Federal Income Tax, 1951 Edition. ..............254
Bulletin F ]Depreciation &k Obsolescence. ...........304
Your Rights of Review When the Government Questions
Your Income Tax. ................... ................104
The Small Businessman and His Declaration of Estimated
Tax. ................... ................... ..........109
How An Unincorporated Business May Convert a Net
Operating Loss Into a Refund on Last Year's Income Tax..
Basic Tax Information for Small Business Enterpr~ises....
national Production Authoriy Material:
Notice #1 Amended L/Order M-41 Amended
Order Y-41& f Revocation of Order M-40
Schedule 5, Order M-80 Amended Order Y-69 Amended
First Quarter 1952 Allotments
Hotline & Source Material Small Business Education,
1950, Domestic commerce Series No. 27...............304
Z 7ynthetie Org3anic Chemicale, U. 8. Production & Sales,
Report of U. S. Tariff Commission No. 173,2nd Series.45Q
2 uins Information Service:
Defense Production Aid V-Loans for Defense Production...
Defense Production Aida Reclamation of Tools & Workpieces
SllBusiness Aids:
Planning Grocery Store Newspaper Advertisements,#1432
The Credit Bureau As An Aid to Profitable Credit
Selling, #434.....................i.................
JS~ome Factors in Establishing & Operating a Public

Ar Tense Y ur Groicer #4361ems? #437 .............. ..
Films QAs n Aid For Training Employees, #438...........
Good Houisekeeping: in a Dry Goods Store, #439...........
Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards,
Volume 46, No. 3, Miar. 1951 (RP2188-RP2194)...........154
Teclhnicarl' News Bulletin, Vol. 35, #3, Har.1951,NBS....10t
_/Basic Radio Propagation Predictions for June 1951, Three
*months in advance, Issued Mar. 1951, 588..............104
Bibliography of Technical Reports.............$5.00 Year


GP0 81100550


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





SCRAP SUPPLY SHORT IN SOUTHEASTERN MILLS

Stocks of scrap iron and steel in southeastern mills at
the end of the first half of 1951 were 136,735 tons below
those on hand at the beginning of 1950, six months before
the Korean war started, according to reports of the Bureau
of Mines, U. S. Department of Interior.
Consumption of ferrous scrap in the Southeast in the' first
half of this year totalled 3,984,146 tons, which was averag-
ing a million more tons than the consumption in.1949. Includ-
ed were 1,276,063 tons used in Alabama; 97,273 in Florida
and Georgia; 667,177 in Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky;
14,122 in South Carolina; and 27,479 tons in North Carolina.

Ask the nearest Department of Commerce office
for information on the national iron and steel
acrap, prqgram.

In five of the seven southeastern States shown in the
Interior Department' s compilation of stocks among the indiv-
idual States, scrap on hand in June of this year was mater-
ially below that of last January. For example, in Alabama
scrap stocks .at the end of January totalled 171,752 tons
and at the end of June they had decreased to 124,673 tons;
in Mississippi, Tennessee and K~entucky, stocks had declined
from 84,678 to 47,179 tons; and in North Carolina the de-
crease was from 1,896 to 3,821 tons. In Florida and Georgia
an increase of from 9,175 tons in January to 11,1;76 in June
took place. Corresponding decreases nationally were reflected
in the report. For instance, in January of this year stocks
of ferrous scrap totalled 4,876,896 tons and in June they
had fallen to 3,671,223 tons.
In a recapitulation of the number of acr~Lp mobilization
committees now functioning in the six-State area, the Atlanta
regional office of the Commerce Department placed the total
at 155. Included were 11 in Alabama; 21 in Florida; 36 in
Georgia; 23 in Mississippi; 46 in South Carolina; and 18 in
Tennessee. In addition, agricultural officials, including
Extension Service personnel, were concentrating on ferreting
out old plows, harrows, tractors and other farm implements
in the deanetude category, and representatives of the steel
industry were cooperating with scrap mobilization committee
chairmen in recovering industrial scrap.
Committees functioning in the Southeast were appointed by
local chambers of commerce; and where no chambers of commerce
were in existence, the appointment was made by mayors.


CONFECTIONERY SALES IN REGION INCREASE

Increases of from 1 to 13 per cent in sales of confectionery
goods, including chocolate products, in the first 9 months of
1951 as compared with the corresponding period in 1950 for the
several regions comprising the Southeast were reported in the
monthly survey conducted by the Bureau of the Census.
In Georgia and Florida, the rise was 9 per cent; in Ken-
tuckyr, Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi it was 1 per cent;
and in the Carolinas, Virginias, Macryland and the District
of Columbia an advance of 13 per cenlt was experienced.
Dollar sales in the South Atlantic region in the 9-month
period totalled $19,14,000i and in the East South Central
section they approximacted $8,827,000.
Nationally, the candy bar _continued more popular than any
other kind of- confectionery isold in the United Statse. Sales
of that type in the 9-month period totalled $218,096,000,
which was some 60 per cent of all sales, which were valued
at $354,757,000.


SPECIAL DAYS. WEEKS AND MaONTHS, 1952


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I ee as.


January 6 to 12 will be nOdorless Decoration Week."
January 18 to 26 will be "National Turn to Tea Week.w
January 19 to 26 will be "National Crochet Week."
January 26 to February 2 will be nNational Fur Care
Week."
February 2 will be "Paneake Day."
February 7 to 16 will be "Nlational K~rant and Frankfur-
ter Week.u
February 23 to March 1 will be "National Sew and Save
W~eek."
March 9 to 15 will be nationall Smile WReek."
This is a brief preview of the 1952 Edition of the
publication "Special Days, Weeks and Months" to be issued
shortly by the U. S. Department of Comrmerce. It is an
annual feature designed to assist business men in
promotional activities.
The publication is expected to be issued in early
January.
When issued, it will cover about 400 business-
promotion events, legal holidays and religious days.
The booklet will be available at all Department of
Commerce field offices in the Souibeast. The price has
not been announced but it will be a nominal one.


BULETI3 1262 08748 8812


PAGE 4


U. 3. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Ofice
SO Whitehall St, S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1000

Volume 5, Number 23 December 1, 1951


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USIE TO AVOID
PAIIYMENT OF POSTAGE SSOO


UNIVER~SZTY OF ~FLORIDA
LERPOY L, Q UALLS
agJE~iSaass or conostos
assassanYL~s, whIostos



































L 5, 4 5, 9%


SQITHIEAST SMGLL BUSINESS HELPED
THE Several hundred small southeastern m~anu-
facturers who consume relatively small

Gli~nGin their business operations were affected
by a new ruling just issued by the National
Production Authorit~y making it unnecessary
Produ tion for them to file CMP-48 applications for
T~dutionanotmpents of the three metals effective
with the second quarter of 1952.
The manufacturers are those who make "B"

Auh rt prdut """ rho" reuiem" t """ t
uthoritysecond quarter of next year do not exceed
30 tons of carbon steel, 8 tone of alloy
steel, 1,500 pounds of stainless steel,
3,000 pounds of copper and copper-base
alloy, or 2,000 pounds of aluminum~, and
,A~ who are now given authority to self-
certify as a small user their needs up
to those amounts.
Previously, permission was given themt to self-certify their
orders for the controlled materials only up to 5 tone of carbon
steel, balf a ton of alloy steel, 500 pounds of copper and
copper-base alloy, and 500 pounds of aluminum, with no self-
authorization on stainless steel permitted.
The approximate number of business firms in the Southeast
could not be determined immediately, because the work of cer-
tifying the applications of smaller firms is divided between
Washington and the Atlanta office of the U. 8. Department of
Commerce.
Meanwhile, NiPA has sent out its "final call" for applica-
tions for the second quarter of 1952 for those firms consuming
more than the foregoing quantities and whose allotments,
therefore, anst be approved. The deadline for such applications
has been set for December 22. Companies applying later than
that date will run the risk of difficulty in placing authorized
controlled material orders against their second quarter allot-
ments.
FABM MAbCINERY & EQJlYMENT
a government order similar to the Wiar Production Board
Order P-153, which authorized priority ratings for distributor
of repair parts for farm machinery and equipment during World
War II is badly needed at the present time, HPA was told in a
Wlashington meeting by its Fara Prodnetion Tool and Small Equip-
uent Distributors Industry Advisory Committee. At the present
time, the comittee pointed out, manufacturers are able to
buy replacement parts for their equipment, utilizing government
priority ratings to get delivery of such replacement parts.
These parts can then be passed along to the manufacturers'
dealers who are thus assured of replacing their shelf stocks
even though they do not ask the ultimate farmer-consumer for a
ratng hentherepirpart is sold at retail, it wa stated.
~tig rha tb ~(SEE~ NPA PAGE 2)


SOUTHEAST'S GOODS VALUJED AT NEARLY $'f BLLION

Manufacturing Employment Manufacturing plants in the
And Payrolls Southeast in 1950 produced goods
u (UNADJusTED,1939- 100) with an estimated value of )6.8
...w. billion, the Bureau of the Cen-
0 -- m o are us reported in a preliminary
Release on its Census of Manu-
o -- -factures for 1950.
____I_ _The estimated valure, which was
noise, ona "value added by mnfcue
**"' ba was 290 per cent greater
n 94 194 s Oo than the 1939 output when th.
value added by manufacture was placed at $1.7 billion in the
seven Statse of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.

These 1950 Census of Manufactures reports are now
being received in Commerce Department field offices
and are available upon request. See Order Blank on
Page 9 for orderiqp this particular report.

This rate of increase in the Southeast was greater than that
for the nation as a whole. In the United States, the value added
by manufacture of goods produced in 1950 was 263 per cent more
than the 1939 production, or from $24.6 billion in 1939 to $89.6
billion last year.
Salaries and wages paid in manufacturing plants in the South-
east last year were eatisated at $3.4 billion, which compared
with $855.2 million in 1939, and the number of employees in-
oreased from 1,010,993 11 years ago to 1,469,909 in 1950.




+ kNMD a 1Ltrt CM~iSTMb TO YOUI x! 9

+ ~The Atlanta Regional Office and tne a
a 'iDistrict Offices of the National Pro- a
a ~duction Authority-United States De- a
a apartmentt of Commerce extend to the a
9 ~, businessmen and other readers of the a
+ ~Bulletin of Co~mmerce in the Southeast 9
their very best wishes for a Mlerry
a -- Y~Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous 3
As. New Year. It has been a pleasure for 9
them to serve you in the past year, a
9 -"'~'~and they sinlcerely hope that you will a
a ~' ~ call on them whenever they can be of a
a service to you in tae year to come. 9
e ** ** *


o0
40

so


20


Atlanta, Ga., Augusta, Ga., Barnwell, S. C., Bi~rmgam, Ala.,
50 Whitehall St.,S.W., Maxwell Bouse, 201 County Office 246 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. WAI-4121,1-453 Tel. 2-8394 Blag., Tel. 292 Tel. 53-3421,1-355


Charleston, S.C.,
Sgt. Jarsper Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


Chattanooga, Tenn.,
719 Jamres Bldg.,
Tel. 7-5673


Columbia, S. C.,
1310 Lady St.,
Tel. 3-1185


Jackson, Mise., Jacksonville, Fla., Knozville, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn., Miami, Fla.,
426 Yazoo St., 425 Federal Bldg., 313 U. S. Post Office Madison at Front, 917 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. 3-492 Tel. 4-7111 Bldg., Tel. 5-1138-9 Tel. 8-342 Tfel. 9-7533


Mobile, Ala.,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-364191-206
Vonr UM NUMBER 2


Mashrille, TIen.,
315 Union St.,
Tel, 62-2426


Savannah, Ga.,
218 P. O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755


Tampa, Fla.,
608 Tampa St.,
Tpl. 2-3880
DECEMBER 1r 1o


c rB ( 2 4 7'5




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE





PRIME CONTRACTS IN SOUTHEAST YEARLY $1 BILLION

Business firms in the Southeast last fiscal year
received nearly a billion dollars worth of prime miili-
tary contracts awarded by the Department of Defense,
approximately 3 per cent of the total value of all
such contracts awarded in the United States, according
to a report issued by the Defense Department.
Value of the awards in the Southeast for the year
ending June 30, 1951, including those made by the Army,
Navy and Air Force, totalled $147,933,000 in Alabama;
875,101,000 in Florida; $182,192,000 in Georgia; $42,-
278,000 in Mississippi; $209,813,000 in North Carolina;
$118,070,000 in South Carolina; and $206,645,000 in
Tennessee.

Note: Excellent opportunities for south-
eastern businessmen to participate in these
government contracts are offered in the
daily and weekly information on3 bids and
contracts available at all Department of
Commerce field offices. There is no eharge*

Contracts awarded in the region included those valued
at $789,458,000 given by the Army; $147,074,000 by the
Navy; and $42,979,000 by the Air Force. Also, contracts
let in Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and South Carolina
totalling $2,521,000 were awarded by the Armed Services
Petroleum Purchasing; Agency.
The Southeast received 5 per cent of the value of
the awards made by the rm~y in the United Statse; 1*9
per cent of those let by the Navy; and one-half of one
per cent of the Air Force awards*
The figures also showed that contracts totalling
$76,644,000 for construction operations were given in
the Southeast by the three branches of the armed ser-
vices, the bulk of which, however, came from the Araf*
The bulk of the purchases made in the Southeast in-
cluded textile goods, food and tobacco products, and
lumber and its manufactures.

FEKALES OUTNUMIBER MALES IN SOUTHEAST

In keeping with national trends, females outnumbered
males in the Southeast, generally speaking, between
1940 and 1950.
This is revealed in a report issued by the Bureau
of the Census on population characteristics for stand-
'rd- metropolitan areas over the United States.
The report, covering 57 areas, showed that only in
the Nlorfolk-Portsmouth, Virginia, metropolitan area do
males outnumber females. This situation also prevailed
in six other areas, including Duluth, Minn.-Superior,
Wis., Hlarrisburg, Pa., Johnstown, Pa., Seattle, W~ash-
Lngton, Syracuse, N. Y., and Youngstown, Ohio.

Note: This report is available gratin
through any Commerce Department field
office. See Order Blank gn Page 3.

Atlanta and the Tampa-St. Petersburg area were among
those in which the ratio of males to females was lowest
in 1950. In Atlanta there were 88.8 males for every 100
females and in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area the ratio
was 86 males for every 100 females.
Other highlights of the report affecting the South
were: Forty per cent of the families in the Tamnpa-St.-
Petersburg area had an income of less thag $2,000 in
1949; 36 per cent in San Antonio; 33 per cent in Mea-
phis and New Orleans; and 32 per cent in Atlanta.
Richmond and Atlanta had a relatively high percentage
of married couples not having their own households.


GPO 81100530


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


NPB Continued frqa Page 1

PHOSPHATEC FERTILIZER
Six southeastern businessmen joined writh other members
of IPA'sa Phosphatic Fertilizer Industry Committee in urging
NPA at a meeting in Washington not to issue an order govenz-
ing distribution of phosphatic fertilizer. The southeastern-
ere included C. T. Cunningham and J. E. Nunnally, Atlanta;
R. L. K~ing, Valdosta; George WR. Gage, Anderson, S. C.,
M. G. Field, Hatticaburg, and J. C. Dean, Knoxville. They
joined with other members of the committee in emphasizing
that an order was not necessary.
TEXTILES
The Textile Finishing Industry advisory Committee has
advised IPA~ that it would offer no objection to a proposed
order imposing a 90 per cent limitation on the use of
sulfuric acid for textile finishing. The committee does
not include the wool industry. In their first meeting
with NPA officials, representatives of the industry agreed
that some restrictions on the use of the acid might be
required as a result of the world sulfur shortage, but
pointed out that if textile production and demand improve,
a 90 per cent rate of use would be iLnsufficient.
CARDED COTTON SALES IARE
Despite the rising volume of def'ense-ra~ted orders for
carded cotton sales yarn, production of that commodity
continues to drop abarply, NPA reported. Releasing a pre-
lilainary third quarter 1951 report, NiPA placed third
quarter output at an estimated 127,553,000 pounds, whiich
contrasts with revised figures of 162,304,000 pounds for
the second quarter and 181,999,000 for the first quarter.
COPPER RAW MATERIALS
Direction 1 to Order Y-16 was issued by NPA which is
designed to permit brass and bronze foundries, wire mille
and brass ills to obtain supplies of copper raw materials
in advance of their receipt of monthly allocations. The
direction permits persons with authority to purchase the
materials to place advance orders for and accept delivery
on the first of each month of up to 50 per cent of the
quantity of similar materials they were authorized to use
during the previous month.
MRO FOR EXPORT
Order M-79 was amended providing priority assistance
in procurement of certain maintenance, repair and operating
supplies for export. The amendment removes five items from
coverage of the order and limits the dollar value of another
to which the DO-MRO priority rating may be applied.
08? RETAIL SALES
Retailers who customarily sell insulated copper wire,
nails and other steel, copper and aluminium controlled
materials to the general public have been authorized in
a new order, Y-89, to self-certify authorizedd controlled
material orders to obtain limited quantities of such
materials. Previously issued CKP regulations did not per-
mit retailers generally to replace the controlled materials
they sold with the result that retail inventories in some
,instances were diminishing and in other wholly depleted.
COLQR TELEVIS1N
Manufacture of color television sete for general sale
wras prohibited by NPA in Order Y-90 just issued. It
prohibits manufacture of color television sets and other
items, such as color attachments for black-and-white tele-
vision sets, designed solely to permit or facilitate
reception of color television. Manufacture of color tele-
vision equipment for experimental, defense, industrial
and certain hospital and educational uses is permitted.
ZZNC
An amendment to Order Y-9 restricted further the quan-
tity of alab zine which may be purchased monthly on eomaller-*
size orders without specific authorization. The amlendment
reduces from 20 to 10 tone the amount of that product that
can be purchased in any month without allocation certificates.









1


_ II


L7 1950 census of Population Characteristice of the
Metr politan Areas (3 to 10 copies, 504; set of

AL tlanta 30 Dallas af Louievillie II Miami
N Lashville D lew Orleans U San Antonio
/ 7 1948 census of Business:
Retail Trade:
Single Units & MYultiunits, 2R3................... 45t
Merchandise Line Sales of Food Group, 2R16.......20t
Eating & Drinking Places, 2R17..............,.... .154
Apparel Group, 2R19. ................... ..........354
Furniture, Furnishings & Appliance Group,2R20....25#
Automotive Group, Gaeoline Service Statione,2R21.304
Lumber, Buildling, Hardware Group, 2R22.....,.....254
Miscellaneous kinds of Business, 2RC4.........,...454
Wholesale Trade:
Sales by Class of Customer, 2W4. ................ .354
SCommodities Line Salse of Merchant Wholesalers,
Manufacturers Branches, Office Assemblers, 2K10tol3.754
i7 Petroleum Bulk Statbns & Terminals, 2W14...~......401
Service Trade:
Employee size, 2-8-3..............****************25#
Legal Form of Organization, 2-S-5 ................ .20(
Laundries, Cleaning & Dyeing Plants & Related
Services, 2-S-83................... ..................-75#
77 Hotels, 2-8-10. ................... ................35#
rf ~1 Busns Aids
SSml al~uiTown Dep rtment Store & Its Customers, #460
Profit-Making Techniques in Drug Store Selling, #441.
Proper Care &k Handling of Heats, #(442..........
The Charge Account List A Source of Extra
Business, #443..............................
Ways to Improve Business Letter Writing, #444........
Robinson-Patman Aid for Buyers, #1445.................
Making the Most of Window Display in a Wallpaper
Store, #1446............... .......................


More Detailed
Information On
The Highlights
Of The News In
The Field Of
Business la A-
vailable at U. 8. Department of Commerce Field Offices.


Total sales of retail stores in October 1951 were
estimated at $13.1 billion, or 6 per cent above a year
ago, the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department
of Commerce announced. Sales in the aggregate improved
somewhat in October. After allowance for the effect of
seasonal factors and trading day differences sales were
up 1 1-2 per cent from September.
*
A total of 10.7 million bales of cotton were consumed
in the UInited Statee during the 12 months ended Augu~t
4, 1951, according to final figures released by the
Bureau of the Census. This was an average of 40,979
bales per working day. The average daily consumption of
cotton ranged from 32,008 bales in July 1951 to 45,704
bales in February 1951. There were approximately 27,000
running bales of cotton destroyed during the 1950-51
cotton year*
*
Cash dividend payments by UI. S. corporations issuing
public reports amounted to $1,133 million in September
1951, a 2 per cent decline from the $1,153 million paid
out in the sane month in 1950.
*
Footwear production in September 1951 was 35 million
paired, down 17 per cent from August 1950 and 21 per cent
under the September 1950 total of 44 million pairs.


I


}{ VE }}()()KS d iOobbaCis
-~4~ ANDI REPORTS Ce\I pTe

Of Ie Buletn Of
Coquperce To The Nearesp D~epartment~ of Copmserce F~eld Of-


figg, logy Name And Addreps Are On The Oppeatte Si .


MaeRmttanges For Sales Material Payable T Tauer
Of The United States. There ia No Charge foF Ztans Ng


~7Characteristics of Population For Standard Metro-
politman reas in U, 8,,....... ,.,,,
L7 New NPA Orders & Regulations: "
SDirection 1 to Order Y-16 Order Y-79 Am~end.
U 0rder M-89 220rder Y-90 border M-9 Am~ended
General Statistica For Geographic Divisions & States
1950, 1949 & 1947, Gensue of Manufactures 1950. .
Report on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 8, 1951, A/C 0-100 7.'
Report on Cotton Ginning, Nov. 21, 1951............
Cotton Syrstem Spinning Activity, Oct. 1951, FFIM15-3
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Productafl26D-91 .,.
Nonferrous Castings, Sept. 1951, FFIR24E-91..... .'"
Women'sa, Misses' & Juniors' Daterwear,2nd Quarter
1951, FFUM67Hi-2-1 .................,..........

Seperphosphete, Sept. 19511,FFIK67BD911 ,,,.,..
1),50 Census of Housing: "
U Hoauston / Louisville JORichnaond
71950 Census of Population:
Af7 North Carolina
50 qs Census of Population Fifa County Returns:
SFlorida Mississippi U North Carolina
SSouth Carolina 30 Tennessee


Total business inventories at the end of September were
valued at $69.3 billion. After allowance for seasonal var-
iation, the book value of inventories at the end of Septem-
ber was about $250 million lower than in August. An increase
of $350 million in manufacturers' inventories was more than
offset by a decline of $600 million in retailers' inven-
tories, while wholesalers' inventories remained unchanged.
*
Sales of large retail stores in the United States were
2 per cent higher in October 1951 than in October 1950, and
7 per cent higher in October than in September of this year,
the Bureau of the Census announced. Food stores and eating
and drinking places recorded respective sales gains of 12
per cent and 5 per cent in October 1951 compared with Oct-
ober 1950. Sales of department stores were up 8 per cent.
Lumber and building materials dealers' sales were down 3
per cent, and motor vehicle dealers reported a decrease of
8 per cent.
++++e
Grose national product in the third quarter of 1951 was
at an annual rate of $328 billion, unchanged from the pre-
ceding quarter, the Office of Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerce announced. The recent levelling-off
contrasted sharply writh the large increases in the market
value of the nation's output of goods and services in each
previous quarter of the mobilization period.
+ *
Offerings of new securities by U. S. corporations during
the third quarter of 1951 amounted to $1.4 billion, bring-
ing to $5.6 billion the amount of offerings during the first
nine months of 1951, according to the Seourities and Exchange
Commission. This compared waith $4.8 billion of securities
offered during the corresponding 9 months in 1950. During
the first 9 months of 1951 more than 85 per cent of the not
proceeds from newr financing wass for new money purposes.


GPO 81100530


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





SOUTHEASTERN FOREST HIIGBWAY~S GET HALE MILLION

Apportionment of more than half a million dollars for in-
provement of highways in national forests in the Southeast for
the fiscal year beginning next July was announced.
The apportionment, totalling $591,287, will be spent in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee under direction of the Bureau of Public
Roads of the U. S. Department of Commerce. The bulk of it will
be utilized in modernizing obsolete and dangerous sections of
old forest highways, many of which are links in Federal-aid and
State systems.
The funds were apportioned among the States in proportion to
the area and value of land as certified by the U. S. Department
of Agriculture and of the 7 southeastern States North Carolina
drew the largest share with an apportionment of $121,489.
Florida was next with $116,095. Amounts given the other States
included $94,236 to Mississippi; $69,952 to Georgia; $66,778 to
Tennessee; $65,472 to South Carolina; and $57,265 to Alabama.
The amount apportioned for the United States totalled $20,000,-
000.

AIKEN. SOUTH CAROL14L OFFICE CLOSE

Closing of the Aiken, South Carolina office of the U. S*
Department of Commerce was announced. Businessmen and others
needing the services of the Commerce Department in that area
were asked to communicate with the offices in Charleston or
Barnwell, S. C., or Augusta, Ga. Discontinuance of the office
was caused by a curtailment of funds appropriated at the last
session of Congress for field service activities, and also
because of the fact that the Aiken office was only a special
one set up in conjunction with the Atomic Energy Commission
project in South Carolina*

ADDITIONAL NECESSITY CERTIFICATES ISSUED

Permission was given by the Defense Production Administration
to the Aluminum Company of Amerlea to expand its aluminum pro-
duction facilities at Aleoa, Tenn., through the issuance of a
certificate of necessity for that purpose.
The certificate, which extends tax amortization benefits
in the expansion of old and new facilities to meet the needs of
the national program of defense was on a proposed expansion at
Alcoa to cost an estimated $335,000.
At the same time, DPA authorized similar development of plant


NEWSPRLhT DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHEAST GETS 0, K.

Plans in the Southeast to expand the production of newsprint
to meet the present nationwide abortage among newspapers and
other publications through certificates of necessity permitting
rapid tax amortization have been given the "green light" by the
Defense Production Administration writn certain limitations.
The limitations were on expansion of the nation' s newsprint
production capacity and an announcement from DPA that priorities
in construction, or expansion in the construction of new facili-
ties must wait until the more urgent defense projects are out
of the way.
Th- production capacity expansion was fixed at 491,000 tons
annually. DPA said it recognized the importance of providing
sufficient newsprint so that newspapers will be able nto con-
tinue to carry o,?t their important function of keeping the
people fully informed."
Applications are now pending from five newsprint firms for
issuance of the certificates of necessity and DPA' s Office of
Resources E~xpansion, which issues the certificates will now
have to determine whether they abould be granted.

STOCKS OF SPKIRIS IN RBI~iOL APPEAR AMPLE
Ample stocks of spirits and wrines for the Christmas trade
were reported by wholesalers in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee
and South Carolina. Inventories at the end of the third quarter
of 1951 were placed at 1,282,354 gallons of wines and spirits,
and sales in the first 9 months of the year totalled 6,231,719
gallons.
Included in the inventories at the beginning of the fourth
quarter were 1,003,275 gallons of distilled spirits and 279,079
gallons of wines. Sales in the four States in the first 9
months of 1951 were 7 per cent greater than in the corresponding
period in 1950 anTY wine sales were 2 per cent up.

facilities in Atlanta, Birmingham and Woodward, Alabama. Certi-
ficates were issued to the London Iron and Mletal company in
Atlanta for development of scrap processing facilities to cost
an estimated $100,000, to the Continental Gin company, Birming-
ham, for expansion of its machine tool activities at a cost of
$114,766, and the Woodward Iron company, Woodward, to expand
its iron ore operations at a east of $161,682.
The certificate granted the aluminum company wass one of sev-
eral issued by DPA in recent weeks providing for expansion of
aluminum facilities in the region. Included among the others
was one for $12,000,000 to the Aluminum Ore company, Mobile.


rPO R' 21050


lilll 111 111IUIUNIVR IT OF LR IDA

3 1262 08748 8804

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


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PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


PAGE 4


U. 3, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall St., S. W.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT No. 1009

Volume 5, Num~ber 24 December 15, 1951


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDAI U.S. DErO MTOY
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMEENT OF ECONOMdICS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA