Bulletin of commerce

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Bulletin of commerce
Uniform Title:
Bulletin of commerce (Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Commerce
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Field Service, Atlanta Regional Office
Place of Publication:
Atlanta, Ga
Creation Date:
1950
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 11, 1947)-v. 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1954).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 7, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1953) misnumbered as v. 7, no. 26 (Jan. 15, 1953).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 3, no. 13 (July 1, 1949) misnumbered as v. 1, no. 13 (July 1, 1949).
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004850614
oclc - 28680692
System ID:
AA00005235:00002

Full Text

_ _


MONOPOLY REPORT SUBMITTED


submitted to the Congressional Sub-
committee on the Study of Monopoly Powr-
er a report embodying resrulta of a study the
Department of Commerce has conducted in re-
ponse to a request from that gr ~up for eaar
bearing upon its inquiry into alleged competi-
tive and monopolistic practices conducted
in this country.

Copies of Secretary Sawyerte
report, a 26-page document, are
available upon request at all
Department of Commerce offices.
The report, as referred to in Secretary
Sawyerls letter of transmittal to Congressman
Emanuel Celler, Chairman of the Suboommittee,
shows the degree of concentration of output
in each of 452 industries as measured by the
Census of Manufactures of 1947.
At the same time, the Secretary announced
that President Truman had called upon him to
"take the lead in designing a program to pre-
serve and strengthen free enterprise" by
examining "possible threaten to free enter-
prise" and recommending a program to coordi-
nate and strengthen Government policies deal-
ing with unfair competition, monopoly and
other restraints of trade. Otner Federal GoP-
ernment departments will cooperate in the
etudy.


CENSUS OF BUSINESS


of 1950, the Bureau of
the Census wrill issue
the first reports from its 1948
Census of Business.
Hotels and other service ee-
tablishments, wholesale and retail firms and
other such businesses will be included in the
Census, the first to be taken since 1940.

Keep in touch with your near-
est Departm1ent of Commerce for
information on the Census of
Business of 1948.

It is expected that the information to be
distributed at the outset will be on a county-
wide basis.
Not shoce 1940 has business been supplied
with official Government figures on the volume
of wholesale and retail trade done, and the
dollar and cent business done by service es-
tablishments. Year-to-year estimates have been
made and widely used.
The Gensue of Business is one of four out-
standing censuses conducted and being taken
by the Bureau of the Censue. The Cenous of
Manufactures for 1947 is now being completed
for final distribution. Next year, the Bureau
wrill hold its decennial Census of Population,
and at the same time it will conduct its
decennial Gensue of Agriculture.


RELP POR SMALL BUSINESSMEN


Small Business Aid No. 60 Pree
Retail Gredit &e Collections Basic Informa-
tion Sources Free
Setting Up a Credit Sstem in a Men's Wear Store
SSmall Business Aid No. 21- Free
Should Your Store Sell for Gredit? Small Busi-
nees Aid No. 118 Free
Use of Collection Services A Sound Credit Policy Small Business Aid No. 472
Pree
Using a Controlled Gredit System Small Business Aid No. 111 Free
Bottlere Gain by Leasing Trucks Small Business Aid No, 319 Pree
Handling Charge &e Delivery Services in a Self-Se~rvie Store Smnall Business
Aid No. 414 Free.


C/d~ z~


AUTLAT 3, GA.
50 Mhitehall St., LL,
Tel. MAlnst 4)121 X-4)53


SAVAilYl, GA.
Anol 218, P.O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-)765


JACK30MVI;LE, FLA.
1)25 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 1)-7lli


SlYIl 32. FLA.
94)7 Seybold $1dg*,
Tel. 9-7633


MOBILE, ALL CHARLESTONI, S.C.
308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. -3641 Tel. 7771


JANUARY 1, 1950


VOL, 4 NO. 1


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









I --


SMALL BUSINESS RGMEDTOS
NET IRNIOS TXES A six-point program
SMAL BUSNESSdesigned to streng-
NET ARNIGS TKESthen the position
of small business in the

upon Seoretary of Commerce
Gharles Sawyer by the U. 8.
Department of Commeroe
Small Business Advisory
Committee after a three-day
meeting held in Washington.
The Departmentle mall Business Division was
asked to undertake immediately the following
studies:
1. The nature and extent of equity capital
problems
2. The impact of the minimum wage law on
small business
3. Implications of pension plan programs to
small business
4. Tax problems in connection with wrorkring
capital, adequacy of reserves and depreciation
5. The impact of industry-wide labor con-
tracts on small business
6. Competition between cooperatives and
small business.
The committee also recommended that changes
be made in existing laws to eliminate or reduce
the present duplication of taxation of corpor-
rate income by eliminating or reducing taxes on
corporate dividends: that legislation be adopted
granting business full flexibility in the
selection of depreciation rates; that the
Treasury review excise taxes with a view to re-
moving or reducing those taxes adopted as a
wartime measure; that the income tax lawr be
revised to permit small businesses to retain
a larger portion of income in order to permit
the accumulation of working capital out of
earnings, and thus promote the growth of small
business enterprisee; and that greater economy
and efficiency be achieved in the operation of
the Federal Government.
Included on the membership of the advisory
committee are Lorimer D. Milton, Atlanta, and
Charles S. Ragland, Nashville.
CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES


sentailso insttle F4. ib nal 8 ate
fo Repor a prepared
Manufacture are now in, and completion of
this proJect is expected momentarily.

Ask your nearest Department
of Commerce for the leaflet


on material and prices.

Reports just received in field offices are:
Illinois ]d0112 Price 200
SOhio MC154 Price 254
Missouri M0124 Price 20P
Early in 1950, the Bureau of the Censue ex-
pects to have Volumes I, II and III for die-
tribution, which will wind up the published
data. The first is a general summary, the
seond the reports for industries, and the
third the reports for States under one cover.


ADVERTISING) COMMITTEE APPOINTED

Sn Advertising
~jAdvisory Commit-
N \tee to advise
,the U. 8. Department of
Commerce on matters
pertaining to that pro-
feasion has been ap-
pointed by Seoretary
of Commerce Charlee Sawyer.
In appointing the committee, Secretary Saw-
yer emphasized the fundamental role played by
advertising in advancing the American economy.
"I feel that the advertising industry is
one of the keystones of national prosperity,'
he said.

A recent publication received
at Department of Commerce field
offices is the pamphlet "Adver-
tising Economice and Prinoipleau
which lists many sources of
information on the advertising
business. There is no charge.

The newly-appointed advisory committee is
composed of the following members:
Nelson Bond, Mtc~raw Hill Publishing Com-
pany; Elon G. Borton, Advertising Federation
of America; Fairfax M. Gone, Foote, Cone &
Belding; Russell 3. Eller, California Fruit
GIrowerse Exchange; Philip J. Everest, National
Association of Transportation Advertising;
K. H. Fulton, Outdoor Advertising, Ine; Fred-
eric R. Gamble, American Association of Adver-
tising Agenoice; Clarence Goshorn, Benton &e
Bowrles; Philip L. Graham, the Washington Post;
Ralph W. Hardy, National Association of Broad-
oasters,
David W. Howe, Burlington, Vermont, Free
Press; C. J. LaRoche, C. J. LaRche & Company,
Ino; Howard M~orgens, Prooter & Gamble; Stuart
Peabody, The Borden Company; Robert 8. Peare,
General Electric Company; Frank Stanton,
Golumbia Broadcasting System; Paul B. West,
Association of National Advertisere; A. E.
Winger, Growell-Gollier Publishing Company,
and Jamee Young, J. Walter Thompson.
STATE TAX COLLECTIONS UP


tate earno~lueheaanerin
States of Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Missiesippi, North
Garolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee were about 7 per cent
hihr in fiscal year 1949 than
in 1948~, aooording to a prelimpi-
nary report issued by the Bureau
of the Censue.

This report, 6-8F49-No. 4, is
i 9rentitled 'State Tax Collections
in14"and is available at all
Department of Commerce offices,
Collections at the end of fiscal 1949
totalled $964 million compared with $901 mil-
mion in fiscal 1948
Alabama with a 16 per cent rise led in
increases among the individual States. Miiss-
issippi was next with a 9 per cent gain,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2








1


MANUFACTURING FUJEL BILL UP

Further study of the Gensue of Manu-
Censue entitled "Puels and Electrio
Energy Consumed" prepared from the 1947 census
shows that manufacturing plants in the seven
Southeastern States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Missiesippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee spent 159 per cent more
for fuel and electric energy for their plants
in 1947 than in 1939.
This report, showing a State
breakdown of fuel and electric
energy consumption for 1947 is
Series MC100-9, and is available
at all Department'of Commerce
field offices without charge.
Cost of fuel and purchased electric energy
in 1947 wras placed at $28)3,426 000 compared
with an expenditure of $109,356,0000 for that
purpose in 1939.
By States, the amount pent in 1939 and
1947, included North Carolina, $22 million in
1939 and $45.8 million in 1947; South Carolina,
$13.9 million and $29.4 million; Georgia, $15
million and $32.6 million; Florida, $5.1 mil-
lion and 815.1 million; Tennessee, $19.1 mil-
lion and 847,} million; Alabama, $29.9 million
andan Ot m10)o.4 million; and Missiesippi, $~4 million

The cost of fuel in 1947 approximated $178,-
311,000 and $52,414,400 in 1939. It included
bituminous and anthracite coal, ooke, fuel oil,
natural, manufactured and mixed gas, and other
fuels.
Purchased electric energy bought by plants
in the seven States included an expenditure of
$14.3 million for that purpose in North Caro-
lina in 1939 and $23 million in 1947; south
Carolina, $8.1 million and $13.6 million;
Georgia, $9.S million and $15.1 million; Flor-
ida, $2.3 million and $5.7 million; Tennessee,
$11 million and $20.6 million; Alabama, $9.5
million and $23 million; and Mississippi, 81*9
million and $3.8 million*






















to the Treasurer of the U. S.)


RUSNES ] ( f{ ]

Personal income in GOtober declined to
6an annual rate of $208.4 billion, $2
Billion below the previous month. The
decrease wras due to factors of a temporary
nature, such as the wage loss resulting from
the work stoppages in the steel and bituminous
coal industries.
-o-
Publicly reported cash dividend payments by
United States corporations in October aggre-
gated $463.5 million, a decline of 2 per cent
from the $474.6 million distributed in Gotober
1948. In the three months ending in Gotober
1949, oash dividends amounted to $1,378 mil-
lion, or about 1 per cent more than the $1l 367
million disbursed in the same period of 19 8.
-o-
Total civilian employment in November had
recovered the losses arising from the disputes
in steel and coal. The latest Censue Bureau
figures showed total employment at 59,518,ooo
in the week ending November 12, as compared
with 59 million in the week ending October 8.
There were indications that the employment
upawfing expected with the holiday season had
started in early November.
-o-
Sales of service and limited-function
wholesalers in October were estimated at
$5,773 million. After adjustment for seasonal
variations, sale fell 6 per cent from Sept-
ember, writh all major groups contributing to
the decline. Sales of wholesalers in durable-
goods establishments were $1,842 million in
October, down 7 per cent from September on a
seasonally adjusted basis.
-o-
Production of building materials advanced
contra-seasonally in September. Output in that
month as measured by the Department of Commerce
composite index, was 1 per cent above August
levels, but was still about 6 per cent below
production in September 1948.
-o-
Meeting with G~overnment officials in Wash-
ington, members of the Burlap and Burlap Bag
Advisory Committee to the Commerce Department
Office of International Trade unanimously
agreed that there was no need to reimpose con-
trols over the export of burlap and burlap bagel
from the United States.
-0-
Production of knit cotton and wool under-
wear and nightwrear during September increased
3 per cent over the Auguat level and 8 per
cent over September 1948, the Bureau of the
Census reported. For the second consecutive
month, that months output was highern than
production during the same month of 1948. All
garments, except undershirt, registered in-
oreased output from August to September 1949.


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
The Monthly Report on the Labor Force -
November 199-re
eprt on Gotton Ginnning Growrth of 1949 -
Prior to DecembeSCELLAN9US.Free.


~rU,. 8.hould Hae In~ternational Tradead Fair -
Faire & Exhibitione Branch, Office of Inter-
national Trade, U. S. Department of Commeroe -
Reprint from Convention and Trade S8hows Free
Measurements of Radioactivity National
Bureus-~~au ~i-~of tndad ubia ionr solentitio
workrers who are beginning research on problems
of radioactivity and nuclear physics Giroular
476 64 large double-column pages, illustrated
Price 358
Preparation & Revision of Building Codes -
National Bureau of Standards publication for
individuals or organizations responsible for
preparing or revising building codes -
Building Materials and Structures Report BMS~
116 17 large double column pages 154
The Foreign Aid Program and United Statse
Commercial Policy An address by Thomas C.
Blaisdell, Assistant Secretary of Commeree.


__ 1
HELP FOR INCOME TAXPAYERS

YOUR FEDERAL INC0ME TAX, 1949 Discusses all phases of the
income tax law, such as exemptions, deductions, and so forth,
and incorporates provisions of the revised law., Priit_oe,
Javn BUL~LETIN F INCOME TAX DEPRECIATION AND OBSOLESCENCE Con-
1 taine detailed information on Depreciation of Real and Personal
Property. Taxpayers and their counsel may obtain the best avail-
able indication of Bureau of Internal Revenue practice from
>tthis publication, Price_?.5f
THE SMALL BUSINESSMAN AND HIS DECLARATION OF ESTIMATED TAX -
Points out certain problems of taxation not fully recognized by small businessmen,
especially those recently entering business. Fr~ea
HOW AN UNINCORPORATED BUSINESS MAY USE AN OPERATING LOSS TO OBTAIN A REFUND ON
PREVIOUS YEARS' TAXES, Free.
YOUR RIGHTS OF REVIEW"WE-EN THE GOVERNMENT QUESTIONS YOUR INCOME TAX RETURN _Fr~e~e

(Available at all Department of Commeroe Field Offices)
GPO W FSO 10-031


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF CONUMER
FIELD SERVICE i"
Atlanta Regional Ofific
50 Whitehall Street 4. .;
Atlanta 3, Georgi) *
OFFICIAL BUSINESS r,<
PERMIT NO. 1009 ;i O \ r-~

VOL. 4 NO. 1 JANUARY 1, li$ ~ 1 >


Goffee, Tea, Coooa & Spicese December 1949
loeued quarterly 46#~ a year,
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY

Fate &L 0118 Gonsumption By Uses October
194'9 free -
Construction Machinery (Excavating & Earth-
movi.ng Eulmfipment) Thir quarter 1949 Free
Heating & Cooking Equipment September
1949 Free
Paint. Varnish. Lacquer &s Filler October
194' Free
Shoes & Slippers September 1949 Free
Animal Glue July to September, 1949 Free


- BULLETIN OF COMMEe
SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YDUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08748 8572


BULLET


PAGE 4











INDUSTRY REPORTS








1.1 liEDI SiTgAlflif ICEPAR T'luEINT O CH=4:()AMtlllCi
1' FIELD' SERVICE









ATLANTA3,' GA, SAVAM31ll, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLL. NISM0 32, FLA. MOBILE6, AL CHA~RLESTON, S.C.
60 Ilhitehall.St., 3.., BAno 218, P.O. Bldg., 4)26 Federal Bldg., 947 Saybold 81dg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bidg.,
Tel. tlAlnst 1)121 E-458 Tl. 2-4765 Tel. 6-711l Tel. 9-7633 Tel. 2-8641 Tel. 7771



VOL. 4 NO. 2 JANUARY 15, 1950


COUNTY BUSINESSPTTRS

use. s*,.r mong the prime problems
facing; distribution in
the Southeast today is
how to achieve greater sales
c effecotiveness. What can the
sales executivev' do to meet this problem?
He can meet the challenge by stepping up
sales efficaency and improving salesman per-
formanoe. This required effective direction of
salesmen based on sound marketing facts as to
customer location and their potentials,
To help business achieve greater sales per-
formanpoe and to plan their 1950 ales campaign,
the U. 8. Department of Commerce has Just 18-
sued a series of reported k~nown as County Busi-
nees Patterne, which are, in fact, market in-
dicators reflecting demand for consumer and
industrial goods.
These County Bus~iness Pa~tterne
are. aaabe for ea Sae in '
thme. s ornaetFed nation, writh county break-
Oficeo for information. -

The reports, based upon the Old Age and
Survivors Insurance Program of the Federal
Security Agency, contain aggregate employment
payroll data for 2,674,931 businesses employ-
ing 35,627,497 workers in 1948 and having tax-
able payrolls totalling $23,o56,825,ooo.





fThemaimenhasicome againato remale
recehose whhe. Bunoetwish t~o continue

su~~AccordingBy 1aompan0 m ethialisa
oardddehichamust berexecute byothece
designated, if you woul4 like to, re-
main on the mailing list to receive
this publication


SOUTHEAST (IAINS IN BUgSpgSS

of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinae, ex-
perienced a greater percentage
gain in business firms from 1944
to 1949 than did the nation as a
whle, according to an article on
ewbusinessee and business discon-
inacscarried in the December is-
aue of Survey of Current Business, Department
of Commerce monthly publication.
Note: Survey of Current Business
is avaiab at all Field offices
on a subscription basis. (Price
$3( a year). A reprint of the ar-
ticle on businesses is available
without charge).
In the seven-State area, the number of ee-
tablishments went from 276,3~00 to 398,200, a
gain of 44 per cent, while nationally the rise
wras from ),022,200 to 3,9353o,jo or 30 per
cent.
The figures by Statee were: Alabama, 37 000
firms in operation in 1944 and 51,5oo in 1949;
Florida, 48,200 to 82,400; Georgia, 45,8oo to
611,700; Mississippi, 23,j100 to 32,500; North
Carolina, 50,900 to 71,7oo; south Carolina,
26,ooo to 35,500; and Tennessee, 45,100 to
59,900.


HELP FOR BRALL BUSINESS

AiRetail Grooer eDelivery Small Business
Smai~tel usnn ;~~aind rinin of Deliverymen
Soma 1BFaneseAbou NParce Delivery Service
Boosting Sales in a Baall Dprmn
St'ore -- ~m~all Buseiinieeess Ad N.ld P
Department Storee Basio Information
Sources September 1947 Free


c~z&~:


P,








__


FARM INCOME GENER N


~~__ ___U __CUI


ash farm income was generally
was in the nation, at the end
_of the first ten months of 1949 com-
pared with the corresponding period
in 1948, a report issued by the Bureau of
Agricultural Economice, U. S. Department of
Agrioulture, shows.
Only in Florida did total sales reflect an
upward trend, advancing from $272,6 million
from January to October 1948 to $232.4 million
in the same period last year.
Other total sales for the two comparable
period in the southeast included: North Caro-
lina, $606 million in 1949 and $64).9 million
in 19~48: South Carolina. 5240 million and
$285.7 million; aeorgia,4359.6 million and
3948 million; Tennessee, $326).) million and
3~78.3 million; Alabama, $214million and
6297.8 million; and Mississippi, $~3).6 million
and $359.3 million.
Nationally, sales of all products aggregated
822.1 billion in 1949 and $24.6 billion in
1948.
PARIKING PROBLEMS SOLUTIONS SUGGESTED

towns in the nation have a park-
ing problem in their downtown
areas. Realizing this, and in a further
effort to help the small busineeaman and mer-
chant, the Small Business Division of the U.
8. Department of Commerce has Just issued a
Small Business Aid on the subject entitled
What Dwrntown MYerchante Can Do About The Park-
ing and Traffic Problem. (small Business Aid
No. 492)

Note: Ask your nearest Field
Office for a copy of this Small
Business Aid. It is available
upon request.
The Aid, written by Goodreau Soper, of the
Small Business Division, Office of Domestic
Commerce, discusses such major phases of the
problem as how merchants can cooperate in
relieving the parking situation, and how they
may engage in joint effort to influence their
oity government in helping in the solution.
TRANSPORTATION REPORT ISSUED
-- earetary of Commerce Charles
Sawyer has sent to the President
a report on the transportation
situation in the nation at the request
of the latter, and copies of the report are
now available at all Department of Commerce
Field ortices. (Price 2o ).
The report, consisting of 49 pages, take
up such subJects as the nature of the Federal
transportation program; federal promotional
activities; federal regulatory activities;
confliote between federal regulation and pro-
motion; and the federal transportation policy
and national defense,
The report was prepared in response to a
|request from the President, who stressed the
need for a unified and coordinated Federal pro-
gram for transportation to ensuree maximum
benefits from the Governmentls activities in
this field."


AIRLINE TRAFFIC UP.RAILBOAD DOlN
~i~~~3 3~Airlines serving h
cy~~~ ~~ ESc0 2 'Southeast in the
I first nine months
of 1949 experienced a 16
per cent increase in the
number of revenue passeng-
ere carried over the corresponding period in
1948 and a 42 per cent rise in freight tonnage
flown, according to a report of the Civil Aero-
nauties Board, U. S. Department of Commerce.
At the same time, a 10 per cent decrease in
freight revenue handled by railroad operating
in and out of the region, and a 9 per cent drop
in passenger revenue from January to October
of last year was indicated in a compilation of
the Association of Anerican Railroads.
Revenue passengers floqn by the airlines
from January to September 1949 totalled
3,450,176, compared with 2,909,121 handled
during the same period in 14.Freight tonnage
aggrepated 13,41),032 in the nine-month period
of 1949 against 9,406,952 flown in the same
months in 1948.
The airlines, which include the Capital,
Chio go and Southern, Delta, Eastern, and Nat-
lonalagfell short in the nine-month period of
last year in express handled as compared with
the same period in 1948, Last years total was
4,851,761 tons, a 13 per cent drop from the
5,578,018 tons handled in the corresponding
period of 1948.
Twenty-four railroads in the Southern region
estimated their freight revenue during the
first ten months of 1949 as $812,886,242. com-
pared with $910,972,689 collected during the
eame period in 1948. Passenger revenue ag~gre-
gated $94,386,238 and $104,4j8,261, respective-
ly.
BTATE DEBT IN SOUTHEAST INCREASES

State and local governments of
sissippi, Tennessee and the
Carolinas increased their grose in-
debtedness by approximately 7 per cent
in fiscal year 1949 compared with fiscal 1948,
according to a report issued by the Bureau of
the Census entitled Governmental Debt in 1949.
This report is available at all
Field Offices of the Department of
Commerce without charge*
Total gross debt of the seven States at the
end of fiscal 1949 wpas $422,519,000 against
$391,861,000 in 1948. This included a general
indebtedness of $j86,642,000 and an enterprise
debt of $35,967,ooo.
Twenty-six States over the nation were able
to reflect a reduction in grose debt at the end
of fiscal 1949~ from fiscal 1948, but in some
instances where gains were shown the increases
were substantial*
Nationally, the indebtedness of all State
and local governments went from $3 592,240,000
at the end of fiscal 1 48 to $4,02 ,473,000
at the same time in 19 9, an increase of about
12 per cent*
In the Southeast, Gleorgia, Alabama and North
Carolina Joined the ranks of those States ef-
fecting a reduction*


BULLETIN .OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









1~11~1- -


1_1


SO UTHEASTIERN PAPROTPTH
~ pp mateyj5 er ent of
Sthe nation's output of eleven
I types of paper is being prod-
uced in the South Atlantic and
""y South Central sections of the
United States, according to
aFacle For Industry report
issued b~TheBueau of the
Census entitled wlood. Pulp,
Paper and Board 1948.
The report shows that in 1948 a total of
13.1 billion pounds of book, fine, coarse,
special industrial, absorbent and building
paper, and container, bending, nonbending
special paper and building board was manufact-
ured in the South, including 9.2 billion
.pounds in the South Atlantic area and }.8 bil-
lion in~the East and West South Central reg-
ione*

These Facts For Industry reports
are received currently and on many
subJects, and are available without
charge at all Department of Commerce
Field Offices*

In the United Statee, total production of
the eleven types of paper aggregated 37,4 bil-
lion pounds*
The 1948 production in the South was well
above that of 1947, the increase totalling 1.4
billion pounds*
The South Atlantic States include Georgia,
Florida, the Carolinae and Virginias, Dela-
ware, Maryland and the Distriot of Columbia*
The other southern areas are made up of Ala-
bama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkaness, Louis-
iana and Texas*

- tear here - -
ORDER BLAN K

(List the Material Desired, Tear this Form Out
and Mail it to Your Nearest Department of Com-
merce Field Office. Your Nane and Address are
on the Opposite Side)






















(On Sales Publications, Please Make
Remittances Payable to Treasurer
of the United States)


Asiness inventories at the end of Oct-
u(ber 1949 totalled $55.2 billion. After
YadJustment for seasonal factor, the
book value of business inventories in Gotober
was about $60 million below the previous month.
A decline of $200 million in stooke held by
manufacturers was partially offset by increased
at the wholesale and retail levels.
-o-
Manufacturers' new orders in recent months
have about equaled sales, which was in contrast
to orders behavior during the period from the
beginning of 1947 to the summer of 1949 when
shipments or sales consistently outran new
business and the huge backlogs built up after
the end of the wrar were gradually reduced to
more normal proportions.
-o-
Economic activity was maintained at a high
rate in November 19 9. Industrial output, ex-
cept for the rapid pickup in output of steel
and coal following settlement of major in-
dustrial disputes, held to the level of the
previous month, which was higher. in general
than in any period sines last spring. Con-
struction activity also continued firm, after
allowance for the usual seasonal reduction, at
about 6 per cent above the level of 1948.
-o-
Total sales of retail stores moved seasonal-
ly in November 1949. After allowance for season
al factors and trading-day difference, November
1949 sales were the same as in October 1949.
Nost of the major kinds of business reported
increases in November over October in season-
ally adjusted sales.
-o-
Publicly reported cash dividend payments by
United Statee corporations in November 1949
aggregated $190.8 million, a decline of 7 per
cent from the $205.1 million distributed in
November 1948.
-o-
Sales of independent retailers in November
1949 were 3 per cent short of the November 1948
record, but were almost unchanged from October
1949, the Bureau of the Gensue reported after
a survey. Motor-vehicle dealer recorded an
increase of 6 per cent in November over the
same month in 1948, furniture stores, 5 per
cent, and filling stations, 4 per cent.
-o-
Sales of chain stores and mail-order house
in November 1949 were estimated at $2,j40 mil-
lion, about 2 per cent below a year ago.
-o-
The nation invested a record total of more
than $19.3 billion in new construction during
1949. New private construction put in place
was valued at $14 billion, off half a billion
from 1948. Public expenditures reached nearly
$5.31 billion, up more than a billion dollars.


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


8 11 C








1 ___ _


BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE

Phosphre Elemental Synopsis of Inform-
ation Reprint from Chemicale and Drugs In-
dustry Report, November 1949 Free
Burlp Bak rund & Developments Reprint
From Winter 19 9 leaue of Contaiere & Packag-
ing Quarterly Industry Report Free
Training Commercial Saleamen Basio In-
formation Sources December 199
small Business Aid
Steps Involved in the Inoorporation of a


I


~-~ilr


Anit Underwrear & Nightwear -,:September 1949
Pree
Softwood Plywrood Gotober 1949 Free
diay Construction Products Gotober 1949 -
Free
Suprphsphte Otober 1949 Free
WoodPul, Paer Board 1948 -~ Free )i
Pup& aer Manufacture in the U, 8.
October 1949- Prees
Confectionery & Competitive Chooolate Prod-
uote Manufacturers' Ses. -.Ocobr 19-re
Flour ilngProducts October 1949 Free
Ioano~ dhemicas October 1949 Free
BURAUOFTHE CENSUS

Rert on Cotton Ginning Prior to Dedember
1, 1949 By Sltates an th United States and
Separate Re'ports for Mississippi, Louisiana,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Arkanese, Alabama,
North Carolina, Georgia, and Texas, ahd for
Specified States Free
governmental Debt in 1949 Pree
Provisional Estimates of the Population of
Continental United States Novermber 1, 1949 -
Free *
Census of Manufactures, 1947 Final state
Reports for Pennsylvania ndNewr Jersey 254
and 200 each, respectively
Issues I~nvolv na n ed &Q Coordinated
Federal Program for Traneortatio 200

HELP FOR INC0ME TAXPAYERS


Business Nu~mbe 4
INDUSTRY REPORTS


~our Federal Ipoome Tax,


_ ___~


Chemicals &r Druge December 1949 leaued
Monthly Subscription Price $2.50 Per Year
FatL & 011s November 1949 leaued Bi-
mon~thly Subeaription Price $1 Per Year
Rubber November 1949 leaued Bimonthly -
Subsciipt~ion Prioe 5011 Per Year
Leat her December 1949 leaued Monthly -
Bubscription Price 602 Per Year
PACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Cotton System Spinning: Activity November
1949 Preee
Cotton &r Linters November 1949 Con-
urmpition, Stocks, Imports & Exports, &r Active
Cotton Spindles Free
U. S. Wool Mtanufacturee September 1949 -
Free
Cotton Broad Woven G~oods July-September
194'5 Free ----
Rayon Broad Wroven Goods 3rd quarter 1949 -
Free
Men's Apparel September 1949 Free


~~: Price 259
""-----The small Businessman and His
IDecSa~laraion of Mathated tax
Free
How An Unincorporated Businees May Use An
Operating Loes To Obtain A Refund On Previous
Yearel Taxes Free
Your Rights of Review when the Government
Question Your income Tax Return Free.
(Orr From Your NeJ~a es Dartment; of
Commeroe FIel Office)


GPO w FSO 10-0)$


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
navancur nc.aqrAGE $300


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORID)A


UNIVERSITYOFFLORIDA

IIllillilIIIIlillIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllilllllllllllllllllllli
3 1262 08748 8515
BULLkissy urs 4.umme:KLE


PAGE 4


() () 1 4 Price 254
Bulletin F Income Tax
Depreciation and Obeolescence -


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office god
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

VOL. 4 NO. 2 January 15, 195C


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.









UNIITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLMTA1 3, GA. SAVAAAA, BG JACK30AVLLE, FLA. 1118l1 2, FL. IISBILE, ALL CHARLElSTO, 3.C.
gO ehitehall St., LL, Aeos 288, P.O. Bidge 52 Federal Bldg, 987 Serbld Ildg*, 38 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples l1d.,,
Tel. Mllnet 1)121 I-e68 Tel. 2*W65 Te. 7lt *. 9-7538 e.28) Tel. 7771


VOt. 4 No. 3 PEBRUARY 1, 1950

SECRETARY'S PACT-FIND)ING SURVEY SPECIAL DAYStWEEK;S.MONTHS

The Southeast appears to southeastern retail dealers can
ies with business raus- better coordination of adver-
ments of 1949 than did most other timing with national holidays and
areas visited by Seoretary of Co-seial observances, so the United
mere Charles Sawyer on his recently """ "State Department of Commeroe has
trip. over.the nation to. look into done something about it by publish-
the general economic situation, ing a booklet entitled "Special Days, Weeks and
the Searetary has just reported to Months in 1950" just teeued.
President: Truman.. It was the third ounseoutive report of the
"Efcept in a few lihes and cer kind, and wide oiroulation is being given it
tain local areas, business there throughout the country among busineeamen,
has been operating at a very eatisfactory lev- newspapers, radio stations and advertising
el, and businessmen are optimistic regarding agencies anxious to coordinate-their own so-
tne, outlook for 1950,* the report added, tivities with the special observanoee.
Note: Secretary Sawyer'a Re- Copies of pca as ek
port on his taot-finding sur and Months in 1950 are now avail-
vey is in two part. The Re- a abe at Dea ent of Commerce
port on the National Situation Field Ofiies. Price 19
*is available upon request at
all Field Offices. The Report The days, weeks and months listed are set
on thie situation in individual aside for special promotions and for oelebra-
areas is available at Business tions of interest to business. In addition to
Reference Libraries for inspect- legal and religious holidays, and such well-
iont known events as Mrother's Day, Qolumpbup Day
anid B~uddyi Poppy Week, the iiating includebp
nI was impressed everywhere with the remark- G)randmother's Day, National Sweater Week, Nat-
able gain wrhich have been made in further in- ional Table Tennis Week, National Bow Tie
dustrializing the South during recent years, Week and National Hot Tea Week.
and with the vigor of organized efforts direet-I The compilation list 154 daye, 124 weeks
ed toward that end,n the report stated. 'This and 36 other celebrations, most of them
hae, of course, reflected itself in rising in- scheduled to last a month. The purpose of each
come levels, and thue in a better base for event as stated by its sponsor is also given
continued business and industrial expansion.w in the publication.

HELP FUR 0 IALL BUSINEBSSMEN

ABmall Town Department Store and Its Customers Small Business Aid
e ?,Suggestions for Successful Millinery Retailing Small Business Aid
SNo. 230 Free
-Teed-A'ge~re' a Potfen~tiall4 Big ]Karket, Small Businese-Aid No. 356 Pree
Drug Stores -,1947 Operating Ratios Free
Drugstore 'Meaitehtahoe' & .ousekeeping Small Business Aid No. 418 Pree
Drug, Phar~miaceu'ticals, Soap & failetr~ies Basio Information Sources February
D97 rugs & Toltrd'-@ofld Trade in Commodities Part 3, Vol. 6 54
Effective Use of Wholesale Drug Warehousee 300
Increasing Copmetio Sales Small Business Aid No. 66 Pree
The Independent Druggist Small Business Aid No. 265 Pree.








PAGE 2


I


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
WOIgLESALE RETAIL BALES OFF

m wholesale and retail
,~B~ \~Isales were generally
,~ off in the Southeast
during the first eleven months
rrr~~ u~pa~sof~ 19 9 as compared with' the
corresponding period in 19l8, monthly reports
of the Bureau of the Geneue showed.
Wholesale sales were down 8 per cent in
the South Atlantio region and 11 per cent in
the East South Central section, while in only
nine of twenty-four cities and areas in which
the Geneus Bureau conducts monthly surveys of
retail sales among independent establishments
were gained reflected,
These monthly wholesale and
retail trade reported, issued
for all regions in the coun-
try are available gratin at
Department of Commerce field
ofiies.
Inoreases in retail sales in November 1949
over the same month in 1948 were reported for
fifteen of the twenty-four cities and areas,
but on the wrholesale side depresses were also
registered for those comparable periods, rang-
ing from 6 per cent in the South Atlantic area
to 15 per cent in the East South Central seo-
tion,
Deolines in sales of wiring supplies and
other construction materials, industrial sup-
plies, jewelry, dry goods, machinery equipment,
shoes and other footwear, and meat and ite
products were factors in the downward trend in
wrholesale sales in the South Atlantio in Nov-
ember 1949 from the same month in 1948, and in
the East south Central largely responsible were
decreases among full-line electrical wrhole-
ealare, hardware dealers, and wines and spirits
establishments.
URBAN CONSTRUCTION UP


INDUSTRY OUTLOOK GOOD


the year 1950 should be a good
one in the production of certain
~commodities in the Southeast important
tothe economy of the region, reports
received in Department of Commeroe ofiies in-
dioate,
A high level of activity is foreseen this
year in the production of such produate as
lumber, pulp and paper, industrial machinery
other than electrical, farm machinery and
tractors, and railway equipment. Here are some
of the indicators for individual lines:
Lumber Potential uses nationally this
year in new construction, maintenance and re-
pair may total 21.1 billion board feet, about
nine-tenths of a billion less than the revised
estimate for 1949. Indications are that new
residential construction, including both pri-
rate and public, will take about 9.1 billion
board feet, 7.3 billion going for framing, 1.1
billion for millwork, and seven-tenths billion
for hardwood flooring.
Pulp, paper and board lo'st industry lead-
ers look for maintenance of a good demand and
high-level output through the first half of
1950.
Industrial machinery, other than electrical
Production of construction, mining and pet.
roleum machinery in 1949 gradually declined in
the second and third quarters, but began an
upward trend in the last quarter which is ex-
r pected to continue as 1950 gets under way.
Parm machinery and tractor The physical
volume of production of farm machinery and
tractors in 1950 is expected to approximate
that of 1947, which would be three times the
average output for 1935-39.
Excavating and earthrmoving machinery Prod-
notion in 1950 should be about equal to 1949
if projected heavy construction activities are
carried out*

TAXABLE PAYROLLS UP IN REGIION
Taxable payrolls under the old-age
Sand survivorel insurance program
~L~~ .,, ,~~Ihave-advaneed-44- per+ ent-in the
Southeast in two years, an increase which was
3 per cent greater than the national average,
according to a further analysis of the Countz
Business Patterne publication just released
by the Department or commerce for sales devel-
opment purposes*

Copies of these County Businese
SPatterns eae now available at all
Department of Commerce field of-
fices

Total payrolls under the program in 1948
when last figures were compiled amounted to
$1.8 billion in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mie-
aissippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas compared
with $1.2 billion at the same time in 1946. The
increase nationally was from $16.3 billion to
$2) billion.
The number of employees in the seven-State
area went from 3 million in 1946 to 3.5 million
in 1948, a 15 per cent gain, and the number of
firms reporting under the program from 210,153
to 261,232, a 24 per cent increase.


ized in the Southeast in the
first nine months of 1949
was valued at more than half a bil-
lion-dollars,, and was $548.a1.illion
greater in dollar value than in the correspond-
ing period of 1948, aooording to the monthly
report Construction issued by the Bureau of
Labor st6atistics, U S. Department of Labor.
Total value of that type of construction
authorized for Alabama, Flor~ida, Georgia, Mis-
sissippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas aggre-
gated $572,459,000 compared with $517,574,ooo
in the same period in 1948.
The increase in the Southeast exceeded that
for the nation as a whole, which went from
$5 460.3 million in the first nine months of
19 8 to $5,491.7 million in the same period
last year, or a rise of a fraction of~a per
oent.
Value of new dwelling unite for housekeeping
purposes represented approximately half of the
outlay, or $288.2 million in the 9-month period
of 1949 against $265.4 million in the sane nine
months of 1948.
Oreatest rise in value of urban building
authorized in the seven States came in Alabama
where an increase of 106 per cent took place.
A total of $194.9 million was spent in Florida.










AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION ACTIVE


ersonalS inoei oebRer w sat

annual rate of $209.7 billion as com-
pared writh $209 billion in the previous
month. Totals for the three largest types of
income -- wages and salaries, proprietoral
and rental income, and dividends and interest
-- were virtually unchanged from the previous
month.
***+*
Sales of service and limited-function whole-
salers in November were estimated at 85,862
million. After adjustment for seasonal varia-
tions, sales were 6 per cent above Gotober.
r*****
Total business inventories at the end of
November were estimated at $55.2 billion. After
adjustment for seasonal variations, the book
value of inventories was about $300i million
below the GOtober level. The decrease was con-
centrated in retailers and manufacturers*
stocks. Wlholeeale inventories rose slightly.
*+****
Production of knit cotton and wool underwear
and nightwear during~ November was 51 per cent
ahead of November 1948, or at approximately the
November 1947 level. On an overall basis, Nov-
ember production equalled the October output.
**"**
Curtailment of farm operations with the on-
set of winter reduced total civilian employment
by about one million between November and Deo-
ember, Secretary of Commerce Sawyer announced.
The estimate for the week ending December 10
was 58,556,ooo, compared with 59,918,ooo for
the week ending November 12.
*****
Mica, a critical material in the manufacture
of electrical and electronics equipment, has
been suooeesfully synthesized by solentiate of
the National Bureau of Standards.

1 28S.awA "
BOTH YOUR ADDRESS AND:0OURS. ARE ON REVERSE SIDE
/ 7 Facts For Industry (Designate Beldw)....NC
..No
..NC
..NC
....NC
Containers & Packaging................,..600
Pulp. Paper & Board...................52.25
~7Lumber Industry Report.. .....( Yearly) $1.00
Construction & Con.Ma~ts.,.....(Yearly) $3.00
Business & G~overnment...................157
Tariff & Taxation.......................NC
Census Publications.....................35~
Economic Report of President............50~
State Estimates of Business Population. ,NC
Steel Firebox Boilers & Heating Boilere.NG
Special Days, Weeks & Months in 1950....15~
Dev. & Selling New Prods.In Ben.Field...NC
Plastic Products &e Processes............25~
*Price varies depending upon State
USE THIS SPAGE FOR ORDERING ITEMS NOT LISTED


TREASURER OF THE U.S.-ITEMS MARKED "NC" NO CHARGE


Total of $22,507,402 was
.~ ~~ chnnle by- .4s::::. theoFedeepan
sore into airport construction and
development in the seven Southeastern States
of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee
during the first three years of operation of
the Federal Airport Act, the Civil'Aeronautice
Administration has reported in its Fourth An-
nual Aert of the FederalAior a e


Note: Those wishing copies of
this report should communicate
ith the Civil Aeronauties Ad-
ministration, 84 Marietta St.,
N. W., Atlanta 3, Ga. They are
available without charge,

Of that amount, $10,319,391 was apportioned
by the Federal G~overnment and the remainder
oame from local sources. The funds have been
and are being used in the construction and de-
velopment of 88 airport projects in the seven
States, including 13 in Alabama; 11 in Florida;
15 in Georgia; 16 in Mississippi;. 12 in North
Carolina; 3 in South Carolina; and 18 in Tenn-
essee.
BELDIAN EXPORTS BOOSTED
B~elgian exports to the United States
nare being promoted by a group of mar-
Yketing analysts wrho will present ex-
hibits of consumer goods in several south-
eastern cities in February and March.
The itinerary included Knoxville, February
6 and 7; Ghattanooga, February 9 and 10; At-
lanta, February 13 to 17; Birmingham, Feb. 20
to 24; Savannah, Feb. 27 and 28; Jacksonville
Mar. 2 to 4; Pensaeola, Mar. 6; and Mobile,
Mar. 7 to 10. .
Goods to be shown will include linen and
laces, knitwear and blanketed; gloves and
shoes, fanoy leather goods and other items.

"b d~frder
T EAR KERE AND USE THIS RBANK FOR ORDERING :

Special Days, Weeks, Months..........15
Small Towsn Department Store.........NG
Successful Millinery Retailing ......NG
Teen-Agers a Potentially Big Market..NG
Drug Stores ,47 Operating Ratios...NG
Drugstore Maintenance &r Hikeeping....NC
Drugs,Pharms.,Soap & Toiletries......NG
Drugs & Toiletries..........NG
Effective Use of Wisale Drug Wi'house,30
Increasing Cosmetio Sales............NG
The Independent Druggist.............NC
/ *County Business Patterns ... ( Name State)
Monthly Retail Trade Report (B.A.)...NC
Monthly Retail Trade Report (E.S.C.).NC
Monthly Ret'ail~ Trade Report (U.S.)...NC
Monthly W'esale Trade Report........NC
Wlomen's,Children'e Outerwrbar:....,....NC
Estimates of Farm Poptlation.........NC
Monthly Report on Labor Force........NG
Public Employment in Got. 1949..'.....NC
Gensue of Manufacturee (Newp York)....25I
MAKE CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS PAYABLE TO THE Ti


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








___


rNAM~ggmm m mmmmmmmmmmmy
BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE
Woenle. M~issesl, & Children'a Outerwear -
Basio Info~rmation Bources Pee
BUREAU OF THE OENSUB

Estimates of the Para Population of the
United S~taes 1910 to 1949. Pee
TPhe Mtonthly Report on the Labor Force .
October-hovem~ber & D-~eembe 194 Free
onhyRetail Trade Report South Atlantio
and East South Central Regions and the U. S.
Summary November ~1949 FrCe ,
Yonthly Wlholesale Trade eort By Regions
and U. 8. SnnP~uommar -Novmbr19
P3ublio Employment in Gotober 1949 Free
densue of Manufactures, 194'{ Final State
Report for Newr York 20
PACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Pats and Oils Consumaption byr Uses, Nov.
194'P, and Raw Materiiaal at 011 Mills, Eto.,
November 1949 Gotober 1949 Pree
Supe poephate November 1949 Pree
dontinners & 01oeurea GOt. 1949 Free
Asphalt & Tar Rooiting & Siding Products -
October 14V9 Free
W omense Misses &Juniore Outerear d

gnit Underwear & ihwa Got. 1949-Pree
Menle Apparel 7is4- Go.149-ee
U. S. ool ]Knufaotures GOt. 1949 Pree
MecancalStkers GOt. 1949 Free
Aluinrm & M~agnesium WroughtPrdae-
GOt. 14 re
Steel Castings Oct. 1949 Pree
Nonferrous dastings GOt. 1949 Fr~e
Gray Iron Castinge Got. 1949 Free
Heating & dookng Equipment GOt. 1949 -
Free


MISCELLANEDUUS
Business &e Government 4th Annual Report
to the Presrident by the C~ouncil of Soonomio
Advisers December 1949 -158
Tariff &: Taxation List of Government
Printing Offie Putblications N~ov. 1949
Census Publications January-Sept. 1949
Catallog & B bJe~t Guidee 354
TPhe Economio Report of-the President -
Transminttled t te dogresJauay 9b Bo#
state Estisates of the Bsuiness population -
Reprnt romSurey of Durrent Business Pree
Steel Pirebox Boilers &C Steel. Heating Boil-
ers dommercial a keeidentiltps-snt
+l & Practice Recomnmendation R157--50 lof
SpeialDay, eeke &e Monthe in 19 15P
Devloin & eln ew Proucs the
Sanit~ary ahealoal Field Adldress by austav E.
Larsn, arkeingDivsion, U. 8. Department
of Commeroe, Washilngton, D. C.


NlEW PLASTICS PUBLICATION

ew Product .Oaportunities Available
oeesees is the title of a neWriul5Trea-
tion Just ieaued by the U. B. Department
of Commeroe and now available at all Pield
Offices. It is the third in a series of
material prepared by the Department as a
possible stimulus to manufacturere to seek~
increased sales through new outlets. The'
other are "Dereloping and selling New
Products" and AsoreofNwPrdc
Possibilities fo-r Manuacturere." All are~r


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office ~~
50 Whitehall Street S.W. :E ~~
Atlanta 3, Georgia *
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

V0L. 4 NO). 3 Febmrary'1, 1950


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE--

SERVICE TO BUSIINESS IS THE~ KEY.
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


Cotainers &* Packrn Winter 19k9 -
run. anrel u.Pie 60o early
ap Papr &Board Dec. 1949-~ Issued
nontal sus. Prio* 5.e5 reartr ,
pm r lgd &Alie Producti Ddo.
19rC9 Issue Qurel t r ( 1.00
YearlXy
Consructon &Codns~truction Yaterials -
Dec. 199-lae onhy-sb ric
$3.00 Ytearly.'l


GPOr rs FSO -034


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMEIII QL atSTAGE $300


BC-6-JF


UNIvESsITY or FLoaloA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMeICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


OF COMMERCE r
ORTS


/
i

~


PAGE 4


BULLETIN


LNZ)IBlPIlf)


NI DUSTY REP






II.UNI~XTE TAESDPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ArTLANTA 8, GA. SAVAMMAN, &A JACK30HTILLE, FLA SilZI 82 FLL IIBILE, ALA. CHARLSTON, 8.C.
50 Whitehall.8t., LL, Aeosl 218, P.O. B~ld., 4)26 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold ldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 810 Peoplers Bld.,
Tel. IIlunt 4)121 X-458 Tel. 2-I765 Tel. s*71II T*I* 9-763 e.284 Tel. 777



VOL. 4 ND. 4 FEBRUARY 15, 1950
K OOLTUO GOOD FOR TEXTILES 1 NATIONAL BUDGET IN BRIEF TOLD


,-s- otive demand, firm prices and
11C, high levels of production at
I leapt until middle 1950 are
forecast for the maJor textile fab-
ries industry by the Textile and
Leather Division of the U. S. De-
partment of Commerce.
In a special report, it was recalled that
influences at work in the fields of cotton,
rayon and wrool goode had been varied in kind
and degree, but that their net effects added
up to greater strength for the industry during
the first half of 1950.
Note: Among the material issued
by the Department of Commeroe on
the Textile Industry recently ,
were Basic Information sources
for the Cotton and Cotton Manu-
factures FueIT--ndutyand the Silk
and Synthetio Fibers, Yarne and
Fabrics Industry. They are a-
vailable at all Department of
Commerce field oficies without
charge.
A factor common to all branches of the in,
dustry w~as the improved retail atmosphere, the
report pointed out.
"Contrary to the expectations of many, re-
tail apparel sales did not plunge as deeply
in 1949 as numerous observers had forecast
early in that year,r it stated. rThus consumer
takings of apparel items wras at a rate higher
than unit production of garments?
The report pointed out that retailers ere e
quick to olear inventories during the first
quarter of 1949 but placed new commitments on
a sharply reduced scale. Store stocks in many
onees became unbalanced in sizes, colors and
styles and did not provide the consumer with
~the selection desired. As a calculated risk,
the retailer preferred to lose a certain amount
of business rather than to replenish inventory.
rBut by the end of summer, the lack of
adequate stocks had become so pronounced that
there was a rush to sonroes of supply both for
fill-ine and new merchandise,' it wras stated.
"Cutters and mills had geared output to demand
writh the result that immediate wants could not
.be satisfied. Paced with this valuation, re-
tailers were more inclined to plade fonrard or-
dere.'


operation of the Federal Government is
spent is outlined in a little booklet
lust issued by the Bureau of the Budget of the
United States The Federal Budget in Brief.
The booklet, replete with charts refleoorn
receipts and expenditures contains a breakdown
of just where the money goes, with comparisons
for past years. For example, there is a section
devoted to expenditures in the conducting of
international affaire and finance; the nation-
al defense program; veterans' services and
benefits; social welfare, health and security;
housing and community development; and so on.
Field ofiies of the Departm~ent
of Commerce will gladly order
these booklet for those inter-
ested. The price is 20f a copy.

"The amount of money received and spent by
the Federal G)overnment is large k- in recent
year about 40 billion dollars a~oh year com-
pared to less than 9 billion dollars in the
immediate prewar yeare,w sany the opening par-
agraph of the booklet. rThe coate of war and
the present uncertain international situation
are the two major reasons for this increase.
"Expenditures for national defense inter~-
national affairs, veterans' seetrices and bene-
fits, and interest on the public debt -- the
four largest items in the Budget -- are esti-
mated to be JO billion dollars in fisoal year
1951, as compared with 2.6 billion dollars in
1939."
The preface to the booklet says: 'It is
important that every oitizen understand the
principal tarote concerning his Governmaent~a
Budget. *, This booklet is intended
to meet the frequently expressed need of many
individuals and groups for a brief asummary in
nontechnical terms of the basio facts on~ where
the Governmentle money comes fromp and where it
is spent."
It is with aineere regret that we
announce the death in an Atlanta hos-
pital on January 25, 1950 oi Mr. C.
Parker Persons, Regional Director of
the U. 8. Department of Commeroe for
the Southeastern Region.





___
__~~__I_


TRADE GROUPS N~UEROUS IN SOUTH~AS4T

twenty six hundred of the national 16,-
S600 organizations of busineeamen are
Located in the Southeast, according to
a publication Just issued by -the Trade Asso-
ciation Division of the U. S. Department of
Cosseroe entitled National Associations of the
United States,
A total of 1,000 such organizations are
functioning in the New England area; 3,800 in
New York and Pennsylvania; j,400 in Wisoonsin,
Illinois, Indiana and Michigan; 2,500 in the
midwestern area; 1,800 in the far west; and
1,500 in the southwest.
The book is regarded as the most authorita-
tive and comprehensive handbook and directory
on 4,000 national trade, professional and other
types of nonprofit organizations in the United
States.

Order this publication through
the nearest U. s. Department of
commerce ortice. Price $3.50,
Buckram Bound.

The new publication comprises a handy ref-
evenoe to organization name, address, chief
executive, approximate membership, size of
staff, and other pertinent details. It is in
three parts. Part I deals with the organiza-
tions by types of industries; Part II lists
bureaus, exchanges, religious associations and
bodies, sports and recreation associations,
and so forth; and Part fII is concerned with
advertising olubs, oivio associations, conven-
tions, cooperative associations and the like.
More than 50 million people in the United
States are direct members of the association
included in the book. Affiliated writh the
4,000 national groups are most of the national
local organizations, such as 10,000 trade as-
sociations; 4,000 chambers of commerce; 15,ooo
oivio service groups; 100,000 local chapter
and olubs of weaen; 70,000 labor union locals;
10,000 farmer groups, and so on.
SOUTHEASTERN FARM INCOME DROPS

rarm income in the seven Southeastern
)IStatee of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
SMississippi, North Carolina, South Caro-
lina and Tennessee dropped 7 per cent during
the first 11 months of 1949 as compared with
the corresponding period in 1948.
A report issued by the Bureau of Agr~icultur-
al soonomies, U. S. Department of Agrioulture
showed that oneh farFm income in the region
from January to November inclusive of last
year totalled $2,876,620,000 against $3,116,-
~99,000 during the same period in 194C8.
However, the report also shoe that fazrmere
in the South in the firet 11 months of last
year experienced a dooline in cash returned for
their products substantially 1988 than that re-
ported for any other area in the country and
also the nation as a whole in comparison with
the sane period in 1948. In the United States,
a doorease of 9 per cent took place; 11 per
cent in the North Atlantio .and East North Cen-
tral region; 13 per cent in the West North
Central aeotion; and 9 per cent in the Wlestern
area. In the South Atlantio a 6 per cent drop
was recorded and 2 per cent in the South Central


STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 1949
Te Statistical Abstract


oued by the Bureau of the Gen-
sue, and copies are now avail-
Sable for distribution to busi-
neas firrks and individuals in
the Southeast.
As in previous years, the
1949 edition of this book
brings together the important
summary statistics on popula-
tion, trade, production, fin-
ance, and annerous other sub-
jects. It is a selection of
statistics most widely used by
business men, public officials, professional
workers, and many other persons in meeting day
to day needs for factual information.

The Statistical Abstract of the
United States for 194C9 oanbeo-
tained from the nearest field of-
fioe of the U. S. Department of
Commerce. Price $3, buckram
bound,
The source of each statistical table is
shown and a 36-page index helps in finding the
material needed. A bibliography of sources of
statistical data is included. Thus, in addition
to furnishing the most widely used statistical
information, the volume serves as an effective
index or guide to available statistical data.
Subjects covered inolute Area and Popula-
tion; Vital Statistics (including health and
medical care); Crime and Criminale; Immigration
Emigration and Naturalization; Education; Clim-
ate; Publio Lande and National Park System;
Labor Force, Emnployment and Pay Rolls; Military
Services and Veterans' Affaire; Social Security
and Related Programs; Income and Expenditures;
Prices; Elections; and a host of other enbject
matter.
GOO0D FOREST MANAGEMENT SPREADS


spreading in the Southeast, a report of
the Forest Products Division of the U.
8. Department of Commeroe indicates.
A compilation made by that agency shows that
960 tree farse have been established in Ala-
bama,.Florida, G~eorgia, Miselesippi, Tennessee,
North Carolina and South Carolina, or about 45
per cent of the nation's 2,11). Also, land
owners in the seven States have turned nearly
6 million acre into such farms, or some 30
per cent of the nations total of 19,430,~00.

subooribe for the Lme l-
wood & Allied ProductsInut
er and keep up wt rns
n e industries currently.
Price $1.00 a year.
Most of the tree farms in the seven-State
area are in the hands of small owners, bjut
large land owners hold the bulk of the aoreage
planted to such farms.
American Foreet.Products Industries, Ino.,
is sponsoring the tree farm management program.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2






BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
INVITATION TO SOUTHEAST BUSINESSMEN

Businessmen of the Southeast have been
Sawyer to express their ideas on the
subject of stronger Pederal policies to promote
competition and prevent monopoly.
As Chairman of the President's Committee on
Business and Government Relations, the Beore-
tary has sent a questionnaire to representa-
tives of national organizations, including
trade associations, anall business groups,
labor unions, farm organizations and consumer
group soliciting their suggestions in develop-
ing a positive program to increase the effoot-
iveness of Government policies dealing with
unfair competition, monopoly and other re-
straints of trade,

Note; Copies of the questionnaire
are available at Department of Com-
merce field offices.

In letters transmitting the questionnaire,
the secretary said the Committee wished to ob.
tain the benefit of the experience of those
addressed in helping to frame a sound and prao-
tical program. The request was made that re-
plies be forwrarded if possible before March 1.

BUlDiET RECMEIPSAND EXPENDITJRES SURPLUS OR DEnIcI

Billions dfDollors
FISCAL YEARS zo a,, 40 so


** (9)

eamaas
9.0 4
amamm
4,e ss
eo Aars



means ,


mna


hEat~cd '4


mscmum



E,camtd A
on. 3





Source: The Federal Budget in Brief
leaued by the Bureau of the
Budget. Price 200.


~pduction of building materials declined
~bper cent in GOtober 1949 from the
Sbeptember 1949 level due primarily to
the industry-wide steel strike, which sharply
curtailed output of nails, structural steel,~
concrete reinforcing bare, mechanical stokers
and onet iron soil pipe.
**e*****
Sales of large independent retail stores
dropped 4 per cent in Deceaber 1949 from Deo-
ember 1948, although a rise of 26 per cent
took place from November to December 1949. Only
furniture stores reported sales higher in
December than in December 1948.
"***"***
Sales of all retail stores in December 1949
were estimated at $12,805 million, about 2.5
per cent below a year ago. This brought sales
for the year to $128 billion, about 1.5 per
cent less than in 1948.
"*******
The ohemicale industry can look forward to
good business during 1950, the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce Chemicals and Drugs Industr
Rggort for January 1950 stated. While demand
for industrial obemioals and chealoal products
&FO ROt expected to approach the peaked of late
1948, output of the industry during the coming
year should compare favorably with 1949, it
was added.
*0******
The nation's Federal-aid highway program
picked up peed during the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1949. The dollar value of projects
completed during the year on Federal-aid
primary and secondary road systems broke all
previous record, amounting to approximately
1.1 billion dollars.
*******
Following three successive quarterly de-
clines, corporate profits turned upward in the
third quarter of 1949, amounting to $7.3 bil-
lion before taxes, 10 per cent above the $6.6
billion earned in the preceding quarter,
***+***
Manufacturers' sales in 1949 were $213 bil-
lion, about 6 per cent belowP the previous year.
The decline represented lower prices as well
as some drop in volume.
***~****
Total sales of chain stores and mail-order
houses in December 1949 reached $3~,066 million
slightly above December a year ago, Largest
advances in sales from November 19 9 after
adjustment for seasonal factors in trading day
differences appeared in the durable-goode
groups.
*******,
Net incomes of the 78,000 dentists in the
United States who were engaged in civilian
practice in 1948 averaged $6,912, the Office
of Business Economies, U. S. Department of Com-
merce announced after a survey. Dentiates dol-
lar earnings that year were 60 per cent above
1929, and 80 per cent more than the prewar
high attained in 1941. The findings have been
published in the January 1950 issue of Burvey
of Current Business.


PAGE 3





PAGE 4


YEAR'S RETAIL RM .

More than 50 per cent of the cities and
areas in the Southeast in which the
Bureau of the Censue conducts its month
to month surveys reported decreases in over-
all retail sales during 1q49 as compared with
the peak business year 19@.
Reports released by the Bureau for December
1949 showed decreases for the year ranging
from 1 to 7 per cent in Atlanta; Macon; Savan-
nah; Asheville; G~reenwood, S. G.; Birmingham;
Biloxi; Bristol, Tenn.; and Bleekley and
Twiggs counties, Georgia; Buncombe and Madison
counties, North car~olina; (Ireenwood and Mo-
Cormick counties, South Carolina; Jefferson
county, Alabama; and DeKalb, Pulton and Rook-
dale counties, Georgia.
On the other hand increases were re-
flected for eight of toe cities and areas,
ranging from 2 to 15 per cent. They included
2 per cent in Harrison and Stone counties, Mlis-
esesippil 3 per cent In Coahoma mad Quitman
counties, Missiasippi; 5 per cent in clarkedale
and Gulfport; 6 per cent in Chilton and Perry
counties, Alabama; 4 per cent in Golutmbus,
G~eorgia; 10 per cent in Augusta; and 15 per
cent in Manatee and Sarasota counties,
Florida.
Sales were mostly down in comparing Deces-
ber 1949 with the same month in 1948, only
Atlanta, Biloxi and Glulfport registering gains
among the cities surveyed.


TEAR OPP THISB PAGIE OF THE BUILLETIN OF COMMIERCE
AND USE IT TO ORDER BOOKS AND REPORTS -YOUR
NAME AND OURS ARE: BHOWN BELOW .


S/Cotton Ginned Pri~or to anar 16 (Separ-
ate Reports for All Cotton-Growing states
Canned Food Report January 1, 1950 Free
anall Sawanills & Forest Conservation -. Free
Ihe Geger Kuller Counter NBS Giroular
/7Some Factore in Establishing a TyPewriter
ketl& Repair Service- small Bus. Ad
No. 493 Free
l7 oe Gream Industry Basic Information
Sources 10P


RELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSMEN
7 nepedent DrgStore, Work Sheet for Estimain Initial aptal Requirements,
Heating a Drug: Store, Small Business Aid No. 204 Free
roit atn Techniques in Drug Store Selling Small Business Aid No. 441 Free
Rece~iving, Checking & Marking Drug Store Merchandise Small Bus. Aid No.419 Free
Retail Drug Storee Basic Information Sources Free
Trends in the DrgTrade lesued Monthly by the Bureau of the Censue Free
Open Display The Secret of Successful Retailing Small Bue. Aid No. 386 Pree
Good Houseeepin in a DyG~oode Store Small Bue. Aid No. 439 Pree
Retailers Preferences & Prctices in the Distribution of DyGoods Reall Bue.
/ 7 Wiaste in Dry Goode s; tores Sma~ll Business Aid No. 370 Free
GPO W FSO 10-040


_ _~__ _I__ __1_ ~_


Statistical Abstract of U. S. Price $3.00
National Assins of the U, S. Price $3.50
The Federal Budget in Brief. Price 200
Provisional Estimatee of Population of
dontinental U. S. Pree
7Marital Statue & Household Characteristice
free
Grose Changes in the Labor Force Nov.-
Dec. 1949 Free
Marital Fertility April 1949 Free


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

90L. 4 NO. 4 PEBRUARY 15, 195o


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
.A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
4~ P E $300
UNIV. OFFL -
so 000 8







BC-6-JF
U31VERSITY OF FLORIDA
I.ER)Y 1,. QUALLS
DEtPARTM~ENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVL~LE, FL;ORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
BULLET /IOUIHI(IIIIIUml III
3 1262 08748 8580







UN11111) il SATlfif IDEPAttRTIMiiTil (C)F C:(Ol/tMilRCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLANTA 3, GA. SAVAMAN, GA. JACK30AVILLE, FLA. NIANI1 32, FLA NIOBILE, ALA, CHARLESTON, S.C.
50 Whitehall St., 3.Y, Room 218, P.O. B~ldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 9)7 Seybold Aldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples BIdg.,
Tel. ISAlnut 4)121 X-453S Tel. 2-465 Tel. 4)-711 Tel. 9-7633 Te.2361 Tl. 7771



VOL, 4 No. 5 MARCH 1, 1950

FURNITURE PRODUCTION EXPANDS CARE AND REPAIR OF HOUSE


residents of the South-
Yeast who plan to take
Iladvantage of the coming
spring weather to make those
t~jrfhrflhl ~~ long-delayed repaired on their
II11IWU~llllnlI# I Ihomes might find as a worth-
'I y ~r UJ11 while aid the publication
Care and Repar of the House*
just issued by theDepar~tmen) i~of dromero
The book, prepared by the National Bureau of
Standards, presents up-to-date information on
the repair and maintenance of houses, based on
the results of almost fifty years of researab
and testing.

This publication, priced at 900,
_4.is available through all Department
of Commerce field offices,

It explains in nontechnical language the
common and recurring problems of the homeowner
in keeping his house and its equipment in good
condition. The need for repairs, how to inspect
a house, how to detect eigns of wear, what can
be done to prevent deterioration, the materials
and tool needed, and method to be need in
correcting defeated are described. While written
especially for the average American household,
some item in the book are also applicable to
other types of building,
The book is made up of 209 pages and 58
illustrations, and its chapters are on the sub-
jecte of Hinepeotion,n exterior walle," rinter-
ior walls,n paintings," nroofs," doorre" Hel-
coticiy, heating and ventilating," "plumb-
etiit~n~g ld water system," and other.


NIEW REGIONAL DIRECTOR

Merrill C. Lofton, who for the past
several years has been serving as Dep-
uty Regional Director of the U. S. De-
partment of Commeroe for the Southeast-
ern Region, has been appointed Director
suooeeding C. Parker Persons, deceased,
Mr. Lofton, a native of Savannah, Ga.,
has had a wide experience in the fields
of business and Governmental operations.


iture and bedding in the Southeast are
reflected in a Facts For Industry re-
port issued by the Bureau of the Census.
The report shows that while in 1939 the
seven States of Alabama, Florida, G~eorg~ia, Mie-
sissippi, Tennessee, North Carolina and South
Carolina produced only 14 per cent of the
nation's output of furniture and bedding, in
1948 wrhen the last survey was conducted, total
production in the area had advanced to 17 per
cent of the national production,

This report and many other
on industrial activities are
available at all Department
of Commerce offices gRatie,
Value of upholstered and nonupholetered
household furniture and bedding products in
1948 in the seven Southeastern States was ap-
proximately '$312,640,000 compared with $82,-
351,4oo in 1939q, an increase of nearly 280 per
cent. Nationally, the production totalled
$i1,814 870,000 and $570,468,000, respectively,
a rise of about 218 per cent.
Value by States in the region in 1948 in-
cluded North Carolina, $192,911,000; Tennessee,
8~54,519,ooo; Oeorgia, 830,072,000* South Caro-
lina, $11,816,000; Florida, $106 7 000; Ala-
bama, $8,984,000; and Mississippi, Sj,691,000*
Although North Carolina continued to lead
in total value of household furniture and bed-
ding produced, greatest percentage increase
since before the war has been in Mississippi
where the valuation went from a paltry $186,-
300 in 1939 to $3,691,000 in 1948, or a gain of
1,884 per cent, Other approximate percentage
rises included Alabama, 532; Florida, 3;35; Ten-
nessee, 31); North Carolina, 27j; Bouth Caro-
lina, 255; and G~eorgia, 195.
Included in the production in one or more
of the Southeastern States were living rooms
bedroom, dining room and junior dining room
furniture; breakfast and dinette sets; kitchen
furniture; infants' and children's furniture;
unpainted furniture; metal beds and oote;
suites and individual sofa, chaired, ottomanes
sofa-beds, studios, and other dual purpose
pieces; innerspring and other mattresses and
pade; box, coil and flat springs, and other.







T~VL I


INTERSTATE HIGHWAY PROGRAM


he proposed National
now under considera-
~BPi~ tion oalls for the expendit-
'ure of more than $900 million
in Alabama, Florida, G~eorgia,
Mlississippi, North Carolina, South
I- Carolina and Tennessee of a total of
? $11,266,j71,816 contemplated to be
.spent in the nation as a whole, the
Public Roade Administration, U. S. De-
partment of Commeroe, estimates in its
annual report for the fiscal year 1949 just ie-
sued.

Ask the nearest Department of
Commerce field office to have your
name placed on the mailing list to
ip receive the quarterly summary of
business conditions in the South-
east iceued by the Atlanta Regional
Office.

The report shows that a total of $901,189,-
401 wrould have to be expended in the seven
Southeastern States in carrying out the project
including $556,663,184 in the development of
highways to serve rural areas, and $344,526,217
in urban sections.
The program contemplates the construction of
6,288.2 miles of highways in the Southeast, of
which 5,644.1 miles would be rural and 644.1
miles urban. Every State in the nation would
be affected by the overall program.
Expenditures by States would include Alabama,
$7976,250; Fiorida, $115,262,500; Georgia,
17,727,585; Mississippi, $188,139,800; North
Garolina, $72,857,000; South Carolina, $119,-
568,750; and Tennessee, $241,657,516.
WORLD TRADE PUBLICATIONS

office of International Trade, U. 8. De-
partment of Commeroe, Office of Business
Economics, and Office of Domestic Com-
merce have Just issued three new booklets deal-
ig with international trade and affairs. They
reentitled United Statee Overseae Air Gargo
Services (rC5 )~; W~orld Trade Development in
( (fiT); and heBalanoe of International1
agents (55 1).
Th first-named book presents a comprehensive
urey of the development and characteristics
at air cargo services between continental U. S.
nd foreign countries, with much ot her informa-
tion. The one on world trade developments in
L948 is a collection of feature articles appear-
ngin Foreign Commerce Weekly in which all
orld traders are vitally interested. The pub-
Lioetion on international payments is a compre-
aesive discussion of the economics of inter-
ational transactions,
All three books are designed to answer some
pertinent questions of the day concerning mat-
ters in which many persons are deeply intereat-
ed, particularly those engaged in world trade
and those who have been making a study of con-
ditions abroad.
The three publications are available at all
field offices of the U. 8, Department of Com-
meroe.


TRADE ACTIVITY OFF SLIGHTLY

Retail sales, wholesale sales and depart-
ment store trade were off some in the
Southeast in 1949 as compared with the
Speak trading year of 1948, but on the whole
that segment of the business field in the
Southeast continued to hold its own well, the
1949 summary of business conditions in the
Area, prepared by the Atlanta Regional Ofioie
of the U. S. Department of Commeroe, will eay.
The report will show that actually nine of
24 cities and areas in which the Bureau of the
Consus conducts monthly ourveye of retail sales
activities reflected gained in such sales in
1949 over 1948, and in the other 15 cities and
areas the greatest decline registered ase 7
per cent. The increases included 15 per cent in
Manatee and Sarasota counties, Florida; 10 per
cent in Augusta; 6 per cent in Chilton and
Perry counties, Alabama; per cent in 01arke-
dale and Glulfport, Mise; per cent in Golum-
bus, Ga., 3 per cent in Coahoma and quitman
counties, Mississippi; and 2 per cent in Har-
rison and Stone counties, Miselesippi.
In department store trade, Charleeton and
Columbia, 8, C., Savannah, Ga., and Jackson,
Miss., reported increases, but in 21 other
cities declines were reported of from 1 to 12
per cent.
Wholesale sale were probably hardest hit,
decreased going from 1 per cent on tobacco
Sproduote and confeateionery to as high as 30
per cent on electrical wiring supplies and
construction materials. On seven commodities,
however, including refrigeration equipment and
Sports; beer; drugam~d sundries, except liquor;
fresh fruite and vegetables; electrical ap-
pliances and specialties;, and grocery special-
ty lines, gains were reflected of from one to
12 per cent.
NEW DRY CLEANING BOOKLETS


mere in the Southeast now have on hand
a supply of new booklet dealing with
the establishing and operating of a dry olean-
ing business. Price 45 .
The publication, entitled Establishing and
OPerating a Dry Cleaning Businese is a revision
of a previous one, which proved to be quite
popular among young persons planning to enter
the business field.
The new booklet states, among other things,
that oneh assets of about $8,500 are needed to
establish a new mall dry cleaning establish-
ment capable of handling enough business to
provide the proprietor with a reasonable per-
sonal income.
On the basis of the average for mall towns,
the medium-sized cities, and the great metro-
politan areas the new mall dry cleaner must
aim at a business volume of $500 a week to make
a reasonably comfortable living, pay for his
equipment, and eventually purchase the building
in which the business is conducted, it points
out*
SubJects covered include selection of the
location, building and layout, buying equipment
and supplies, financing and forms of organiza-
tion, production standards, and so forth*


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2







BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
FINANCIAL SITUATION STEADY
Both deposits and loans in
1949 exceeded those of
1948 in Federal Reserve
member banks in the Southeast, the
1949 summary of business condit-
ions in the Southeast will show when issued


Personal income in December was at an
)ana ae f$1. billion, abhrta i h rvout


1948 record of $212 billion.
Publicly reported oneh dividend ""paymets o
Unite ttscroain oald$,9.
million in 1949, or 7 per cent more than the
$6,093.7 million paid out in 1948.
Sales of service and limited-function
wholesalers totalled $5,685 million in Decem-
ber, bringing sales for the year to t65.8
billion, a decline of 11 per cent from 1948.

DeTotal bu inwereinventorice ant he ebdlofon
After adJustment for seasonal variation, the
booki value of inventories was $150 million
below November 1949.
"**"**
The economy of the United States reached
new peacetime levels of production and employ-
ment and all-time levels of income in the
fiscal year 1949, Secretary of Commerce Charles
Sawyer has reported in his annual report Just
off the press.
*****
Resumption of steel output following
settlement of the strike in the mills last
autumn and a contra-seasonal rise in lumber
production resulted in an overall increase in
building materials production in November 1949.
*****
Sales of large independent retail stores
rose 2 per cent in January compared with the
same month last year. Motor-vehicle dealers
reported the largest sales increase, 31 per
cent. Increases of 6 per cent each were regie-
tered by furniture stores and lumber and
building materials dealers.
*****
world production of natural and synthetic
rubber in 1949 totalled 1,922,500 long tone,
and world consumption was placed at 1,875,000
tons. The figure represented declines from
1948 when production and consumption set re-
cords of 2,052,000 tone and 1,900,000 tons,
respectively.




a o le un 1os e oyte aar essuc
ImmDedit emoe veal of 12 miscllaoneouns min-
reral, aores ad sme alefo the Dexpobrt conto

45Positive Lairst" ws annued by th er Oicen ofs

Inernational Tand eal U. ommtere Dpartmeont.o


shortly by the Atlanta Regional Office of the

U. S .eatmn jif- :!'ib nd

Bank of Atlanta at the end of 1949 totalled an
estimated $4,597 million compared with $4,574.4
million in 1948. Loans at the end of 1949
totalled $1,365.8 million against $1,303.1
million at the same time in 1948.
The figures, reported by the Federal Reserve
Bank of Atlanta, also reflected continued so-
tivity in 1949 in the matter of bank debits,
that is, checks drawn against demand deposited,
although the total draw in 1949 was slightly
lower than that of 1948. The figures were:
1949, $40, 177.2 million; 1948, $~40,40).2
millionsaThe debits were given for 32 cities

PULPWTOOD PRODUCTION DOWN

Production of pulpwood in the South con-
~tinued high in 1949g, but the total out-
Sput for the year was lightly off as
compared with 1948.
This is indicated in Facts For Industry re-
ports issued from month to month on that in-
dustry by the Bureau of the Gensue.
Last year, 47 per cent of the pulpwood re-
ceipts in the nation were recorded for the
South and 46 per cent of the national consumpt
ion was in the southern region.
The figures as reported by the Gensus Bureau
were as follows:
Receipts: 1948, U. 8. 22,332,680 cords and
South, 9,997,121. Consumption: U. S. 21,189,-
458 cords and South, 9,442,672.
Receipts: 1949, U. S. 19,238,360 cords and
South, 9,057,984. Gonausption, U. S. 19,916~,-
615 and south, 9,253,o33.
Inventories at the end of 1949 were, U. S.,
4 877,146 cords and 669,956 in the South, and
1948, U. 8. 5,622,057 cords and 828,074 in
the South.
TEXTILE BIBLIOGIRAPHIES ISSUED
~ ew bibliographies on creasing and
Nwrater-repellenoy of textiles are dis-
o ~ussed in a brief review Just released
by the Office of Technical Services.


h b oilorpis pe are byteA

Surervictes andp avilbl through all Deprment
ofie Commerce field ofiers ant 5 ense a year*
The Newslete bispblisgahied, mnthly.I also
t contain discusson of many Totheroa technal


items from month to month*


PAGE 3








- L~3_1 ~ k: HELP FOR THE SMALL auousNLJxAN


LL R EP ;


--age kd 10 B a


Sheet of the Bulletin of Commerce to Your
Nearest Department of Commerce Office. Your
Name and Address are on the Oosite Side.
Make Remittances Payable to Treasurer of the
United States. Item Not Priced Are Free.
Gare & Repair of House ..............50~
qurerly S. E. Business uar..,
Est. & Oprg. DrY Clea~ni~ns Buies.,....45
U. S. overseas rAir Cargo Srvics.......45
World Trade Developments in 1948.......70 1
Balande of International Payments......55
Technical Repor~ts N~ewle~eTter Pe Year)50
Facts About Retail outdoor Advertisig
Small Business Aid No. 9.....
r; Gost Cutting Ideas for Retail Stores
Small Business Aid No. 9......
Coal-Tar Dyes Synopsis of Information.10
Sources of Info, on American Firms......,.
Retailin Basic Information Sources....
RubrIndustr Bibliograph............
Tourist Courts 1948 O-Operating Ratioe...
Sirups. Molasses & Hone~-a~n T~


PAGE 4


r/ 7 pen Display The Secret of successful
Ietailing Small Business Aid No. 386
r/ 7 Goo Housekeeping in a Dry Goode store
Small Business Aid No. 43
/ 7 Retaileral Preferences &e Practices in the
Distribution of Dry Goode saA No. B
Wf aste in Dry Goode Storee SBA No. 370
Electric Ap lance Radio Stores, 1947
Operating Ra los
/ 7 Establishing & Operating an Electrical
Appliance & Radio shop 494
/ 7 Personalized service Profitable for Small
Appliaoe Dealer- SBA No. 366
/ 7 profit-Mtaking Service Department in Elect-
rioal Appliance &c Radio Storee SBA No.387.
LAST CALL!
/7 J hone who have not obtained their copy
Sof the booklet Your Federal Income
STax 1949 still have time in which to
get it before the deadline March 15 on payment
of their 1949 income taxes. The booklet sells
for 254.
Again this year, this booklet becomes the
Federal Government's nbeat sellern as thousands
of income taxpayers throughout the nation have
obtained them to assist them in the filing of
their return. The booklet covers the Federal
income tax situation from A to Z, and answere
many technical questions raised each year by
income taxpayers.
The booklet is on sale at all field offices
of the U. S. Department of Commeree.


Cheek the Material


Desired and Send This


/7
/ 7


Planning & Development Agencies....... CIVIL AIRCRAFT OFF
Revenue &: Expenditures of Selected States.. civilian airplane flying has experienced
Consumer Income Seriees No. 6.... a sharp downward trend, both in the
Monthly Report on Labor Force Jan.1950... South and in the country as a whole,
omedum of City Cort. Finances in the Civil Aeronauties Administration, U. 8.
1 4...............400Department of Commerce has reported in a special
Small Business in the American Eooy- compilation entitled Gegahc Aspets of The
Adress bysee. ofdmerce saryer ..... Civil Aircraft Market. This document is avail-
Business and the Consumer Address by able without charge from the CAA in Atlanta.
Secretary of Commerce Sawyjer.....******. In the South Atlantic area last year there
Pul Paper &e Board IndReprt (Per Yr.)52.25 were only 5.16 oivil aircraft per 10,000 per-
Canned Fruite &e Vege.Ind.Rpt.(Per Yr.141.00 sons8 and the U. 8. total was 6,26.
GPO WF50 10-047


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYNIENT OF POSTAGE $300


L1s DEPC MTORY
UN VERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMdICS
CA 8 *ILE FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3. Georgia <
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, No. 5, March 1, 1950

-- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY. T


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

BULLETIN 3 1262 08748 8598


aC-6-JP





























______I__ _____~__


ssg e irst reports from the 1948
gg w-census of Business are
~snr now beginning to come in
to Department of Commerce field
offices.
The Bureau of the Census, in charge of the
program, has just issued the first preliminary
release. It is for Washington county, Pennsyl-
vania. Other county-by-county releases are ex-
pected to become available from now on through
a good part of 1950.
(Those wishing information from
the 1948 Gensue of Business
should consult their nearest
Department of Commeroe field of-
fice.)
The Census Bureau will follow this general
procedure in announcing results of the census:
1, preliminary county release, largely
during the first quarter of 1950; 2, final area
Bulletin (States including counties), during
the second quarter; and 3, and 4, final Subject
and Trade Bulletins during the remainder of the
year,
The county data will show up to ten major
retail kind-of-businese groups, four major ser-
vice groups, for the five operating type in
wholesale trade, as well as six major kind-of-
business groups in the merchant wrholesaler
category. Less detail will be provided for
counties with a relatively small number of
business establishments so as to avoid disoloe-
ure of figures for individual businesses.
The area Bulletins will reflect final re-
aults by States, later to be consolidated into
final printed volumes. Copies of these publi-
cations may be ordered later in the year. The
Bulletin will be in three claseae, Area, Sub-
ject, and Trade,
Copies of preliminary releases )br single
counties will be available without charge.
Copies of released for other counties will be
furnished at a charge of 10 cents for lots of
ten or fewer counties. A charge of $30.00 will
be made for a set of all county releases for
the United States.
All orders will be filled as soon as the
data for individual counties become available.


4:~t/&


G /S~~ zd


business in the Southeast continued at a re-
the annual summary issued by the Atlanta
regional office of the U. S. Department of
Commerce.
Such segments of the economy as urban build-
ing, production of electric energy, operation
of telephones, and certain airline activities
actually gained over 1948, and in those divis-
ions of the business field where declines were
registered the overall situation wass considered
good.
(Note: This report will be ready
shortly, Those not on the mail-
4( ing list should request it from (
their nearest Department of Com-
merce field office).
Financially, the region appeared in sound
shape. Federal Reserve reports showed that de-
posits in member banks in five States were up,
as well as loans. A alight drop was recorded
for bank debited, but the decline eas less than
that for the nation.
Following national trends, trade activities
were off some in most cities and area, and
farm income was down as it was in most other
States throughout the country. The number of
new businesses incorporated in the region was
off in the Southeast, but here again the de-
orease was substantially less than that for
the United States.
Airline passenger and freight traffic was
up, but railway traffic dropped again, as it
has done in recent months. Airline express
handling were off.
A decline of from 4 to 14 per cent was
registered among the seven States of Alabama,
Florida, GZeorgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee in manufacturing
employment while a 10 per cent drop came for
the nation.
Urban building in the first 11 months of
1949 was $719.3 million in the seven-State
area against $646.5 million in 1948, or an
increase of 11 per cent. This was 7 per cent
greater than was recorded for the nation,
Several industries important to the region
registered slight declines in total business,


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLMITA 3, 6A. SAVAMAH, GL JACKLSOIIVILLE, FLA. HIANI1 32, FLA. MOBILE, ALA. CHARLESTON, S.C.
50 Whitehall St., S.Y, Rooml 218, P.O. Bldg., 4126 Federal Bidg., 947 Seybold Lldg*, 308 Federal Bidg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. IfAlnut 4)121 X-453 Tel. 2-41755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel.234 e. 7771


VOL. 4 NO. 6 MARCH 15, 1950
L E AINOIGE BUSINESS CONTINUES STEADY CENSUS OF BUSINESS 1948 -





SPECIAL DAYS,WEEKS,MONTHS 1950

ome forty-five or more special observances
month of April to acclaim or commemorate
some particular happening or project, accord-
ing to the publication Special Days, Weeks and
Months issued recently by th~e U. S. Department
of Commerce.
The booklet was issued as a guide to busi-
nessmen in tying in advertising programs with
the special observances. It has, however, been
popular also with the general public who are
desirous of keeping abreast of such matters.
This publication is available
jl at all commerce Department field
offices. Price 150.

Some of the special observances in the
Southeast and other sections during April
include National Laugh Week; National Leave
Us Alone Week; Perfect Shipping Month; Daught-
ers' Day; Honey for Breakfast Week; Large Size
Week; National Sunday School Week; National
Trimmed-Dress Week; National Goin Week; Nation-
al Donut Week; National Noise Abatement Week;
Sleep Show; 1950 silver Parade; National Base-
Ball Week; World Government Week; and many
other.
FLORIDA FACTS


1 is the title of bookete prepared
So facoso lrd~ cnm.or distribution by the Research and In-
dustrial Division of the Florida State Chamber
of Commerce and published by the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
Presented interestingly are facts and fig-
ures on the growth in population, in which
Florida is one of a select few reflecting
rapid advancement; on individual income and
tourismm; retail sales; bank debited; savings;
oaah farm income; industries; and other primary
developments in the State's economy.
The booklet is available without charge
either from the State Chamber of Commerce, at
Jackseonville, or the State Department of Agrio-
ulture at Tallahassee.
wDIXISTEEL ON DIXIE FARMS"

house to be observed by the Atlantic
Steel Company, in Atlanta, May 5 and 6,
the management of that company has announced.
The variety of products that company make for
Southern farms and the wide range of prime mat-
orials and fabricated part it supplies manu-
facturere of agricultural machinery and equip-
ment will be emphasized. The public is invited.
SECRETARY'S ANNUAL REPORT


just iceued the 37th Annual Report deal-
ing with nativities of the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commeroe for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1949. It iagrailable upon request at
all Commerce Department field offices at 2011.
|The report presents a comprehensive reviewr
of program and operations of-all divisions of
the Commeroe Department for that period.


DENTISTS' INCOME HIGHER

rhe average net income of all
"""" civilian dentists in the
~ IW1I~MP IUnited States in 1948 was 60
I~IIE~per cent higher than in 1929 and
80 per cent above 1941, aooording
to a survey conducted by the U. 8,
.Department of Commerce and carried
in the Department's Survey of Cur.
::2 --rent Business,
The 1948 mean net income wIas
---- $6,912, the median net income wras
$5,888; in 1929, almost two decades earlier
the mean net income wnas $4,275 and the median,
ty,676,
Watch the ~field offices of the
Department of Commerce for val-
uable reprints on worthwhile
subjects from the survey- ofGu
@( rent Business. The reprint on
dentists' income is 1011. The
publication itself is available
for t3 a year.
Scattered returns from dentists in the South
included in the survey indicated that the in-
comes under study exceeded the average for the
United States. For example, the average median
net income of dentists in the Southeast was
$711, while that for the country as a whole
wras $912. In the Southeest it was $8,439.
In discussing regional and State differen-
tials, the publication had this to say:
"Dentists in the far West had a higher aver.
age net income in 1948 than those in any other
section of the country; southwest wras second;
Southeast and Northwest, third and fourth (the
exact order depending on whether the mean or
median is used); Gentral States, fifth; Middle
East, sixth; and New England, seventh. This is
in sharp contrast to 1941 when the ranking
was: far West, first; New England, secoond; Mid-
dle East, third; Southeast, fourth; Southwest,
fifth; Central States, sixth; and Northwest
seventh."

FURNITURE INDUSTRY OUTLOOK GOOD
ui~rct'io~eer `a'n~ddistribjutors ora nit~ure may
w ell be facing a new era as family life
o enters around the home under influence of
television, the U. 8. Department of Commerce
holds in a survey results of which are set
forth in a publication just issued entitled
The Purniture Industry and Its Potential Mar-
ket.

This publication is available at


The survey, which follows a recent announce-
ment in the Bulletin of Commerce regarding the
great expansipn in t'he furniture indlustry in
the Southeast in the past.decade discusses such
important subjects as furniture production, re.
tail stores, trends in styles, and the poten-
tial market. Also, it is amply illustrated with
graphs and tables reflooting progress in the
industry. Available at Commeroe Department of-
fies, too, is .a Paots For Industry report on
household furniture and bedding products.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
PHIATEISTPUBLI CATIONi
Apublication for philatelists has just
been issued by the Federal Government.
Unte stis ent ted ota e Stmeopr tea
of the U. 8. Post Office Department.
The book, consisting of 185 pages, paper
cover, rune the gasut of A to Z in the phila-
tehio field. It is amply illustrated with
faceimilies of stamps issued by the United
States Government from the earlier days of
the Poet Office Departnent on through almost
to date.
As the foreword of the publication points
out: Today, more than ever, people in all
walks of life are realizing the importance of
a hobby and millions of Americans, young and
old alike, have turned to stamp collecting,
No other avocation has the appeal to the people
of all ages as does philately. Through it they
learn geography, history, art, and derive other
educational benefits. It also affords fascinat-
ing diversion to the sick and hospitalized.
The onltural benefits of stamp collecting have
been generally recognized and interest in this
hobby is being promoted by schools and stamp
oluba throughout the country."
The publication oeaeStamps of the United
States. 1847-a949 is pried at 9 cents and may
be ordered through the nearest U. S. Department
of Commerce field office,
RETAILERS' BUSINESS AIDS

Ever alert to the needs and problems of the
Ersmall businessmen, the Division of Small
L Business, Office of Domestio Commeroe,
U. 8. Department of Commerce has Just issued
a new series of small Business Aide designed
to advance the day-to-day operations of mall
business firms.
Among the newer Business Aide are three
directly applicable t> retailing. They are en-
titled Facts About Retail Outdoor Advertisig;
ost Cuttn Ideas for Retail Stores; and Hw
heRetailerCan Develop and Kep glrusE-


Note: see Page 4 for a list of
These and other Business Aide,

Also, in the series of Aide just issued by
the small Business Division is one entitled
Boe Factore in Establishing a Sm41 Nrsry
usnes.
Ths mall Business Aide are among some
Soo issues from time to time to assist mall
busineseen in either getting established in
new businesses, or, as previously stated, in
solving problame and furthering operations in
connection wi~th businesses already under way.
they are available at all Commeroe Depar~tment
field offices.


The new Statistical Abstract of the United
States for 1949 is now on sale at all field
offices of the U. S. Department of Commeroe.
As usual, it is bukrama bound and is prioed at
13.00. This publication is the official pur-
Veyor of all kinds of data dealing writh the
poonosio, social and onltural welfare of the
Isation.


Manufacturers' sales in January increased
over December, and new ordered showed
their first upturn since September. In-
ventory book values were practically unchanged
from December.
*
Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer has
announced the rejection of a proposal by a
group of private carriers forbaeaing trans-
portation facilities of the Inland Watezrways
Corporation. The rejection was based on the
failure of the group to make.adequate provie-
ion for rehabilitation necessary to provide
service to the public, especially shippers,
and because it did not make provision for get-
ting the Government out of business.
*
Sales of all retail stores in January
amounted to 89,525 million, nearly 2 per cent
above January 1949. After allowing for season-
al factors and trading day differences, ales
in January were up about 3 per cent from Deo-
ember 1949.
** **
A mid-winter building record was assured by
a lese-than-seasonal decline in construction
activity during February. Thelotal value of
new construction put in place during that
month amounted to more than $1.4 billion, off
5 per cent from January, but 21 per cent more
than the total for February 1949.
** **
The gross national product --- the market
value of the nations output of goods and ser-
vices --- amounted to $257 billion in 1949 as
compared with $262 billion in 1948. The nation-
al income, which measures output in terms of
earnings scoruing from current production,
showed a similar movement, from $226 billion
in 1948 to $C221) billion in 1949.
*
Publicly reported cash dividend payments by
United States coogorations in January 1950
amounted to $53o.2 million, lightly less than.
the $532.1 million paid out in January 1949.
In the three months ended in January 1950, oash
dividend disbursements totalled $2 218.4 mil-
lion, or about 8 per cent more than the $2,050
million distributed in the same 3 months of
1948-49.
0* *
Employment conditions showed little change
between January and February, according to
latest Censue Bureau figures. Total civilian
employment was estimated at 56,953,ooo in the
week ending Pebruary 11, about the same as in
the week ending January 14.

Continued large import deficit writh dollar
countries of the Western Hemisphere overshadow-
ed all other trade problems confronting Weetern
Europe during 1949~, despite the fact that most
countries in the region regained or even our-
passed their prewer overall volume of foreign
trade, the Office of International Trade, U.
8. Department of Commeroe, said. The situation
was discussed in a current issue of that a-
genoyle Foreign Commerce Weekly.









_ I


GUIDE FOR PROSPECTIVE EXPORTERS
G yde for the Prospctive Eprter
is the title of an attractively
Arranged publication Just issued
by the Economic Corperation Administra-
tion in Washington and now available
fordlstribution at U. S. Department of
Commerce field offices.
The publication, available upon re-
quest, was issued by EGA's Office of
Small Business. It takes up in one,
two,three order problems encountered
by the new exporter in selling goods
abroad.
This new publication might well be
regarded as complementary to the
Commerce Department's own booklet
,entitled Channels for Trading Abroad
(15 ) Just issued and its older pub-
lication titled guidess for New World
Traders, wPhich have proved so popu-
lar among embryonic world traders.

HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSMEN


NrEW BOOkS



Check the Material Desired and Bend This
Page of the Bulletin of gommeroe_1 Emto Y
Nearest Dpeartmept of Commerce Office,. Your


Name and Address are on the Opposite Btd@.


ga e Remittances favable to Treasurer of the


United Statee, ITeme Not Priced Are Free.


UNIV. OF; FL L1B.
DOC~U;



).9. DEPC

UNIVERSITY or FLonloA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Annual Summary of B.E.Busineas (1949).....
Dentist Inoome Reprint...,.....,,..,........
Furniture Ind. &t Potential Market ,.....54
special Days, Weeks,Mdonthe 19f0........154
Reprt of Secretar of Commerce. ......200
Postage Stamps of U. 9.,1147-1949 .... 500
Retail Outdoor Advertising, SBA 494......
goat putting Xdeas for Retail 9tores......
HowP Retailer Can Develop & Keep Regular


17


Customere..............,.... .. / 7 adio & Television Basic Information
aome Factors in Esbg~a Small Nursery...... Sources Free
Statistical Abetract of U,8, 1949.,...$.00 /7 7 Salesmen Learn Repairs & Servicee
Puly & Paper Manufacture in U,8, PRT...... Sell SBA No. 59- Free
Q~lay construction Products FFR............ Z 7 Successful Electrical Appliance Window
Fate 6 011s........ .................. ..... Displays SBA No. 87 Free
Household Purniture & Bedding Prods.FFI... I 0 Printed Cirouit Techniques NBS Circular
Softwood Plywrood FFI......,........,....... 6-28
Superphosphate FFI........................ Oeaiga mlyetAec B o
Confectionery BIS ....................... Free
Suga eceber 949Ind Rpt.(Y.) 504Farmn Equipment Retailere 1947 Operating
Chemical &~ Druge eb19 Ind. Rpt. $2. 50: Ration Free
Pulp,Paper & Board -~ Annual Review....$225 1 /7 Establishing & Operating a Retail Feed &
dFAA sa~tistical MandbookE...............5001 rarm supply store li# --------
Airport 'furfing....................254 / /Farm Machinery & Equipment Including Tract-
G~uide For Prospective Exporter (EGA)...... ore Basic Information Sources Free
Business Outlook 18 Wa e M It .. /[Fe rd Basic Information Sources -
Addres eBy~ Asi st .Secy.Blai sdell..... Free
Geog api Aspects of dIVIL Airoe / 7 Fate & Oils Industry Report Issued Bi-
aret.................... Monthly Subscription Price, $1 a Year
U. S.Coast Pilot, rd Edition. ............. 2 / Fate & 0118 World Trade in Commodities -
Tbles of Circuar~ &yeblic sines 6 Part 6, volume 6 Bubsoription, $1 a year -
Cosines for Radian A~rum~ients.....50. Single Gopies Vary in Price.
GPO WFS( 10-097


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


sc-6-JF


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 4 No. 6, March 15 1950


- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

MIII~I$BINII88 ll11
3 1262 08748 8606


PAGE 4


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





g1


SOUTHEAST CONSTRUCTION UP

last year represented a total expenditure
of $3.530.9 million, or 89.3 million more
than wass expended for the same purpose in 1948.
Figures included in a current issue of the
Department of Commercels Construction and Conr-
struction Materiale Industry Report show that
expenditures for that purpose in19 in Ala-
bama, Florida, Georgia, Miselesippi, the Caro-
Su~bscribe to the Construction
and Construction Materiale In-
gg)dustry Report through the near-
est Department of Commeroe
field office. Subscription
price, $3 a year.
linae, Virginias, Kentucky, Maryland, Dela-
ware and the Distriot of Columbia approximated
$1.3oo.5 million in residential building,
$503.4 million in non-residential construction
and $708.9 in new public utility construction.
Public construction in the region totalled
$946,3 million, including $286.) million spent
on non-residential building, $}42.5 million on
highwaye, and $78.7 million on sewer and water
facilities.


RALF CENTURY OF PROGRESS
Ahalf century of economic progress in the
Southeast is reflected in some facts and
figures developed by the Atlanta Region-
al Office of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
Since 1900, bank deposits have increased
6,452 per cent in the States of Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the
Carolinae, or from $138.6 million to $9.0 bil-
lion; value added by manufacture of goods pro-
Your nearest Department of Com-
merce field office is available
to serve you on this kind of in-
formation for your ownm area.
duced in manufacturing industries, $219.2 mil-
lion to $5.9 billion, or 2,609 per cent; and
salaries and wages paid in manufacturing in-
dustries, $106 million to $/2.8 billion, or an
advance of 2,583 per cent.
Federal tax collections increased from
$1).7 million to $3.0 billion, a gain of 21,-
905 per cent; state tax collections from $35.3
million to $96g.8 million, a rise of 26,230
Der cent; and generations of electric power
from 90.6 million kilowatt hours to 44.2
billion hour, an increase of 48,732 percent.


GOVERNMENT PRtOCUREMENT INFORMATION


(JhIllfil SilATlfif IIEF> oT-11/ErNT (18 (CII 4EliCIE
FIELD SERVICE


ATLANTA 3, 66
60 Whitehall St., S.4,
Tel. Ifllnut Y121 X-453


SAVANHAII, 6A JACKSDAVLLE, FLA. MIAMI6 32, FLA. HOBILE, ALL
Room6 218, P.O. Bldg., 4)25 Fderarl Bldg., 9417 Seybold 81dg., 308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-6765 Tel. 4(-711( Tel* 9-7533 Tel. 2-38641


CIIARLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bidg.,
Tel. 7771


VOL, 4 ND. 7


APRIL 1, 1950


I














...


Yur Department of Commerce Field Office has available the following Glovernment
Procurement Inform~ation:
(a) Government Procurement Manual, which lists the items purchased by the
Government, location of the purchasing offices and the manner in which prime sup-
pliers may be included on the bidding list.
(b) Synopees of bid invitations for the military establishments and the Fed-
eral Supply Service General Services Administration, showing type and quantity,
identification number and approximate closing date of bid of items required, are
available for review at this office.
(c) Current lists of prime contractors holding Air Force, Army and Navy con-
tracts in this region can be consulted at this Field Office for sub-contracting
possibilities.
For your convenience, this procurement information is also available at the
following locations:
Greater Tampa Chamber of Commeroe, P. 0, Box 420, Tampa, Florida.
Birmingham Chamber of Commeroe, Birmingham, Alabama.
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, Wilming~ton, North Carolina.
Agricultural and Industrial Development Board, New Capitol Building, Jackson,
Mississippi.
Chamber of Commeroe, Knoxville, Tennessee.
Chamber of Commerce, Jasper, Alabama.





SOUTHEAST FARM~ INCOME DECLINES

farmers in all but two Southeastern States
esxperienced declines in oneh farm income
i n January of this year compared with the
corresponding month last year, according to
the monthly report The Farm Inoome Situation
leaued by the Bureau aT Agricultural Economies,
U. 8. Department of Agriculture,
Cash receipts to producers in Alabama, Flor-
ida, G~eorgia, Missiesippi, Tennessee qnd the
Carolinas in January 1950 approximated $171.7
million agaiesmemnhins $23~2.8 million realized in the
eam moth n 149,a decrease of about 21
per cent.
Contributing factors to the decline in the
region were drops of 74 per cent in Mdississip-
pi, 35 per cent each in North and South Caro-
lina, 29 per cent in Alabama, and 11 per cent
in Georgia.
The two States reflecting increases were
Florida, with a gain of 44 per cent, and Tenn-
essee, where a 1 per cent rise was recorded.
Gash receipts in all of the seven Statee
included $56.4 million from livestock- and its
products in January of this year compared
with $61.7 million in January 1949, and $114.5
million and $171.1 million, respectively, from
orope.
Missiasippi's 74 per cent decline in oneh
receipts was due primarily to a drop of $51.1
million in returns from crop products.
SOUTHEAST 00NFECTIONERY INCOME OFF

~onfectionery manufacturers in the Southeast
last year experienced rather sharp de-
clines in sales compared with 1948, rang-
ing from 9 per cent in Georgia and Florida to
15 per cent in Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama,
and Mississippi, according to a monthly report
issued by the Bureau of the Gensus.

This report is available gratis
]g~yat all Commerce Department field
offices.

In Maryland, th~e Distriot of Columbia, Vir-
giniae and Carolinas the drop amounted to 12
per cent.
Thirty four firms participating in the sur-
vey placed total dollar sales during the year
at $27.5 million. *
Nationally, the candy bar continued to lead
all other classes of confectionery in popular-
ity among buyers.
THE RETAILER LOOKS AT PACKAGING

The retail businessman is becoming increas-
Singly aware of the importance of packaging
Sin selling merchandise, the current issue
of the Department of Commerce's Containers and
Packaging Industry Report points out.
In an article in the report entitled "The
Retailer Looks at Packaging" results of a sur-
vey of retailers opinions of the adequacies
and inadequacies of present day packaging are
given. The survey found that many retailers
were of the opinion that the sale of many ex-
cellent items had been retarded by the use of
inadequate or ill-advised containers and pack-
aging. On the other hand, they felt that even
the most desirable packages could not repeated-
ly sell a poor product.


RETAIL SALES' UP IN JANUARY
Most cities and areas in the Southeast in
which the Bureau of the Census conducts
monthly surveys reported increases in re-
tail sales in independent establishments in
January over the same month last year.
Ehe gains included 7 per cent in Atlanta;
9 per cent in Birmingham; 11 per cent in Bay.
annah and Asheville; and 17 per cent in Au;-
ueta.
In only five of the 24 cities and areas
brought into the survey were decreases record-
ed. They included 5 per cent in Macon, Ga., 12
per cent in 01arkedale, Mise., Chilton and
Perry counties, Alabama, and Bleckley and
Twiggs counties, Georgia, and 16 per cent in
Coahoma and Quitman counties, Mississippi.
The increases in the various cities and
areas in the region compared with a rise
nationally of 3 per cent.
Significantly, one city and one area point.
ed to the unusual situation of an increase in
sales in January of this year over the peak
shopping month of December 1949. Augusta re-
ported a 2 per cent rise, while in Manatee and
Sarasota counties, Florida, a 6 per cent gain
was recorded,

WHOLESALE SALES OFF IN JANUARY


crease in sales in January of this year
from the samue month last year including
5 per cent in the South Atlantic area and 9
per cent in the East South Central section,
according to the monthly report of the Bureau
of the Census on wrholesale sales trends.


Note: Both wrholesale and retail
trade reports issued monthly by
] o>the Bureau of the Censue are a-
vailable gratis through Commerce
Department field offices.
Factors in the declines were such sharp
drop as 25 per cent in sales of wiring sup-
plies and construction materials; 14 per cent
in hardware; 20 per cent in industrial sup-
plies; 22 per cent in jewelry; 24 per cent in
machinery equipment and supplies; and 19 per
cent in wines and spirits.
A total of 675 firms of the two regions par-
ticipating in the survey reported dollar sales
in January approximating $85 million.

TEXTILE PUBLICATION ISSUED

Developments in the Wear Resistance of Tex-
tiles, a collection of 19 key pa-pers on
that and related subjects published in
Germany during the war years is now available
to the American public through Department of
Commerce field offices. (Price $5.00).
The collection, issued by the Commerce De-
partment's Office of Technical Services, was
compiled at the request of the Chief euarter-
master, U. S. Army European Command, to summar-
ize significant German researches on fiber be-
havior, a subject of increasing importance with
the growing production of artificial textiles.
Five main topics are covered in the colleot-
ion, which is clothbound and 353 pages long.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
IMPORTS DECLINE IN SOUTHEAST
Adecline in the value of goods imported
through Southeastern ports last year as
compared with 1948 and 1947 is indicated
from figure just compiled.
The value of general imports brought from
other countries through the customs districts
of Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Mobile in 1949 was estimated at
$189.1 million compared with imports for con-
sumption valued at $219.2 shipped into this
country in 1948.
While last year's valuation was based on
the value of general imports, whereas, in 194g
the basis of valuation was "imports for con.
sumptionn the two figures are comparable, be-
cause there is little difference.
The estimated value of last years imports,
by districts, included Georgia, $46.1 million
compared with $C46.5 million in 1948; North
Carolina, $b10.2 million and $38.7 million;
South Carolina, $16.2 million and $16.7 mil.
lion; Floride, $86.6 million and $8d4.1 million
and Mobile, $30O million and $33.1 million.
General imports through the five South-
eastern districts in 1949 also were about 1
per cent below imports for consumption in 1947
when the total value of such commodities was
placed at $191,898,369.
"SHOjPMEN'S LIBRARY OFFERED

Miniature ashopmenls library" for the
A factory or metal-working plant is being
Offered to Southeastern businessmen by
the U. S. Department of Commeree.
The material, issued by the Commerce De-
partmentis Office of Technical Services, con-
siste of a collection of 54 technical bullet-
ins originally prepared for National Defense
Department Shops on such subjects as grinding,
milling, spinning, honing and tapping, solder-
ing, brazing and welding, working with plas-
ties and alloys, plating and finishing, care
and maintenance of equipment.
Papers currently available cover the mach-
ining of aluminum alloys, tapered workpieces,
corrosion, dust control, types and uses of
cemented carbide cutting tools, lubrication
of machine tools, increasing utilization of
shapers, and modern applications of the oxya.
cetylene torch.
ADVERTISING SURVEY PLANNED
Detailed plans for an extensive survey of
Sthe services, facilities and publications
L~of the U. S. Department of Commerce as
they relate to the needs of the advertising
industry have been formulated by a suboommit-
tee of the Advertising Advisory Committee ap-
pointed by the Secretary of Commerce.
The plans, announced by Suboommittee Chair-
man Fred Gamble, call for surveying not only
the services and facilities of the Commerce
Department as they relate to advertising but
also a survey of the 4000 publications of the
Department issued yearly. The survey will
start with a consideration of the problem by
the Research Committee of the American Asso-
ciation of Advertising Agenoles at its April
meeting, and will then be extended to more
than 35 organizations in that field.


(For further details on any of these items,.
ask your nearest Department of Commeroe
field office for copies of the release)

otal business inventories at the end of
billion. After allowance for seasonal
fluctuations, the book value of inventories
increased by $150 million, about the same
amount as the rise in stocks held by retailers.

Sales of service a~nd limited-function wnhole-
salers totalled $5,165 million in January.
After adjustment for seasonal variations, sales
declined about 2 per cent from December. Dur-
able goods were down 7 per cent on a seasonal-
ly adjusted basis.

Personal income in January -- exclusive of
payment of the special insurance dividends to
veterans -- was at an annual rate of $1 bil-
lion higher than in December. Inauguration of
the program for payment of the special div-
idend from the National Service Life Insurance
fund resulted in an extraordinary increase
of total personal income from an annual rate
of $211.9 billion in December to $218.4 bil-
lion in January.

Production of construction materials in
1949 was approximately 8.5 per cent lower than
in 1948 despite a 3 per cent increase in new
construction put in place in 1949. The year
1949 was characterized by the return of all
building materials industries to more normal
operational patterns compared with earlier
postwar years when materials shortages, rising
costs and empty pipelines impeded construction,


U. S. Government foreign aid in the form of
grants and credits declined sharply in the 4th
quarteraf 1949 for the second consecutive
quarter. The total of almost $6 billion for
the year as a whole was nevertheless higher
than the preceding year, and somewhat above
the average for the four full years since the
end of the war.


United States residents pent nearly $700
million for travel within foreign countries in.
1949, an increase of approximately $100 million
over 1948. The 1949 expenditures, an all-time
high, were about two-fifths above the prewar
record established in 1929.


A moderate advance in economic activity
during the first two months of 1950 was report-
ed by the Office of Business Economics, U. S.
Department of Commerce. The modest advance ex-
tended an upward movement in progress during
the second half of 1949.


PAGE 3




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08748 8499
BULLETIN uI* TOMMERCE

ABC OF POPULAR PUBLICATIONS

Developing & Selling New Products.......25
/nwto Judge a House...................25
/Atomic Energy & The Life 80iences......25~
/Buying Menls Suits .....................15~
Copyright Law of the U. 8. of .knerica..15~
Oortunities in Seln........2
Es-To-Build Kitchen Cabinets.....,..15l
Federl Labor Laws & _Agencie..........2 5
Gift of Preedom.............55
PRINTED PRINTCLOTH EXPORTS UP

interested in a report just issued by the
Office of International Trade, U. S. De-
partment of Commerce showing that exports of
printed printeloth in 1949 exceeded by 77,9
million square yards exports of the same com-
modity in 1948,
Exports of other" combed and carded cotton'
goods dropped 71.9 million square yards below
those of 1948.
In analyzing Bureau of the Gensue statistics
OIT found substantial declines in exports of
the following classes of finished cotton cloth
in 1949: Printed narrow sheeting, 16.7 million
yards below 1948; bleached and colored flannels
14.4 million yards; bleached narrow sheeting,
10.3 million yards; and bleached drills, twills
and eateen, 9.1 million yards.
Other classes of finished cotton cloth
showing smaller exports during 1949 were dyed
narrow sheetings, bleached wide sheetings,
voiles, organdies, lawns, batiates, and yarn
dyed fabrics.
LUMBER SHIPMENTS INCREASE

phiments of lumber in the fourth quarter
Sof 1949 exceeded all previous fourth
Quarter shipments on record, the Lumber
Survey Committee of the Seeretary of Commerce
has reported. Shipments totalled an estimated
9,087 million feet, 16.6 per cent more than in
the corresponding quarter of 1948.
The Gommittee estimated total lumber prod-
uction in 1949 at g1,ga7 million feet.

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMhlTAT if5,c 300
-- UNIV. OF FL1~B







BC-6-JF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


PAGE 4
N1EW

BUSINESS BOOKS

ANiDI RElPO LI'@>

i)# CRDR BLANK dear
Un~Ct ~T~he Yaera desired (m(Z Send This


Nearest Department of C~ommerce Ofice. Your


Name and Address are on the Opposite side.


Mate Remittances Payable to Treasurer of the


United States. Items Not Priced Are Tree.


onthly Retail Sales Rpt. S.A.FReR..
Monthly Retail Sales Rp~t.E.S.C.Re
Monthly Wholesale Trade Report.....


Developments in Wear Reeist.0f Textiles.S5
/onthl~y Confectionery Report..........
Retailer Looks at Pack~aging (Reprintin).....
Testing by the Nat. Bureau of Stde......25 1
Eort Control & Allocation Powers......15
Hiha Cacit Manual.................65
The Meaning, Purposes & Uses of Discounts
& Invoice TermB SBA#499....., ...
/ 7Mail-Order selling (Informa'tion sources)...
Wooworing& Furniture Renovation (BIS)...
Annual Report. Bureau of Gensus~..,.........
Ah~nual Re rt on Labor Force, 1949.........
Prvsional Estimates of opltion of U.S.
Ecnmc Characteristics of irats.......
Internal Mi rtion in U. S................
Canned Foodl Reor Feb. 1, 1950...........


Aesets in Addition to Stock & Good


Page of the aniletin of Commerce to Your


Construction &


Con Mats Report


$3 Year


EH LP POR SMALL BUSINASSEN


/ /Business


will Small Business Aid #2..........
usinese Life Insuranoe SBA #48......
Gorporation Life Insurance SBA #48)......:
Dscounts (Basic Info.Sjuources.,............
Factor~ing (Synopeis of Information)........
Finncial Assistance to small Busineeasr....
owto ApDly for a Bus~iness L~oan -SSA 79...
artnership Life Insurance 98A482........
The mallBusiness Mlan & ources of Loans..
...............15d
/7Th~ings to watch in Cashing Checke-SBA)29...
GPO DSO 1 r061


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 WChitehall Street S.W. sE
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 4 No. 7, April 1, 1950


~- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY.
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





SOUTH'S FACTORY JOBS UP '

The number of factory jobs in the South has
the Trade Association Division of the
Department of Commerce estimates.
In 1949, there were 2,112,000 persons employ
ed in factories in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mlississippi, Tennessee, Maryland, Kentucky, the
Virginias and Carolinae and the District of
Columbia, or 15.1 per cent of all such employ-
ment in the United States. Thirty years ago,
factory employment in the area totalled 1,236,-
000, or 11.8 per cent of the nations total.
Ten and three-tenthe per cent of the 15.1
per cent of the nation's factory workers em-
ployed in the South last year were working in
Alabama., Florida, Georgia, Hlississiippi, Tenn-
essee and the Carolinas.
Seven of the Southern States, North Carolina
You waill want the Trade Asso-
ciation Division's new book
National Associations of the
United States for your library
Ji if you do not already have it.
Order it from your nearest U.
S. Department of Commerce
Field Office. Price $l}50.
Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Virginia, South
Carolina and Kentucky since 1919 have regis-
tered increases, some substantial, in percent-
age of factory employment of the total such
employment in the country as a whole.
Sectionally, the northern States gained
only 18 per cent in factory employment in the
0-year period, although the bulk of that em-
loyment is still concentrated in the metro-
politan areas of New York, Pennsylvania., Illi-
nois, Ohio and Michigan.
In the past ten years, factory employment
has increased by 64 000 in Tennessee and Ala-
bamar 56,000 in Georgia and North Carolina;
lC8,000 in South Carolina; 19,000 in Mrissias-
ippi; and 17,000 in Florida. Last year, North
Carolina led in number employed with 382,000;
Georgia was second, with 254,000, and the
others were Tennessee, 231,000; Alabama, 203,-
000; South Caroline, 192,000; Mississippi,
78,000; and Florida, 88,000. In Tennessee, Ala-
bama, North Carolina, Georgia and South Caro-
lina, bulk of the factory employment was in
the textile industry.


WORLD TRADE GODWS SHARPLY

Half century of world trading in the
Southeast has brought a sharp increase
in imports through ports in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee and a rise in
exports is indicated.
Between 1915, when figures for ports of the
six States were first published, and 1947, the
value of exports went from $165.8 million to
8425.5 million, and imports from $27.9 million
to $19).6 million.
Greatest increase in exports came in South
Carolina where a rise of 730 per cent was re-
corded. Tennessee registered a 953 per cent
gain in imports and North Carolina an 810 per
cent increase.
Exports in Georgia in 1947 were 17 per cent
less than they were in 1915, and North Carolina

Seeyour nearest Department of
Commerce Field Office for help
on world trade problems, and
for many publications dealing
]g mp with international trade activ-
ities. Ask that your name be
placed on the mailing list for
the World Trade News. It's Free.

also showed a decrease in that type of
world trade.
The figures included exports, Georgia, $76,-
714,000 in 1915 and $)63r525,ooo in 1947; North
Carolina, $1,82,000 and $8,339,000; South
Carlolina, $4,d962 000 and $41,22),000; Florida,
$36,641,000 and ~206,36),0000; Mobile, $37,-
080,000 and $104, 722 000; and Tennessee,
nothing in 1915 and $14,000 in 1947.
Imports, Georgia, 4',0g8,000 and $463,636,-
000; North Carolina, $42800 n $856-
000; South Carolina, $245 000 and 97,871,000;
Florida, $b9,743 000 and $C76 130,000; Mobile,
$918,000 and $22,676,000; and Tennessee,
16,000 and $1,717,000.
Sharp increases came in the value of exports
from the United States of commodities which
the Southeast produces in comparing 1910 with
1948. In 1948, shipments of peanut to other
countries were 32,166 per cent greater than in
1910; cotton manufactures rose 1 308 per cent;
tobacco and its manufactures, 561 per cent,
.and pulp and paper, 548 per cent,


APRIL 15, 1950


VOL. 4 NO. 8


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLANTA 8, GA. SAVANMWll, 6A. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. nmtM 32, FLA. MOBILE, ALA CHARLESTON, s.C.
601 Whitehall St., S.Y, Room 218, P.O. Bldg., Y25 Federal 81dg., 947 Seybold )1dg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bidg.,
Tel. Mlinut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4765 Tel. 4-71ll Tel. 9-76533 Tel. 2-3601 Tel. 7771





LIVESTOCK INCREASES IN SOUTH

further evidence of the sharp strides the
SSoutheast is making in the production
Sof livestock is shown in figures issued
by the U. S. Department of Agriculture which
reflect an estimated 29 per cent gain since
before the war in the number of battle and
calves on farms in the region.
The increase, the report showed, exceeded
all other sections in the United States except
in the dominant cattle country of the west
North Central area where a 73 per cent rise
took place.

Have you ordered your copy of
the booklet Gare and Repair of
the House? Itte a must for the
]g .home owner, because itf tells
you from A to Z how to take
care of your home. Available at
all Field Offices for 50 cents.

The report placed the number of all battle
and calves in the South Atlantic region in
1950 at 5,866,000 compared with an average of
4,521,000 between 1937 and 1941. The 1950 fig-
ures, it was stated, necessarily were prelimi-
nary,
The percentage increase in the Southeast
compared with a 9 per cent expansion in the
North Atlantic?region; 11 per cent in the East
North Central; 22 per cent in the South Gent-
ral; and 19 per cent in the western Ar~ea.
In the United States, the rise was 18 per cent.
The figures were for both milk animals and
those for other purposes.
A 6 per cent increase was reported for hogs
on Southeastern farms in 1950 as compared with
the pre-war average, but a decrease was shown
for sheep, lambs, horses and mules in the
area.

WFHOLSALF: SATES DROP IN SOUTHEAST

Increases of 12 per cent in automotive sup-
Splies, 22 per cent in electrical ap-
Spliances and specialties, and 18 per
cent in lumber and building materials offset
heavy declines in sales of other commodities
and kept overall wholesale sales -in -the southi-
east down to a decrease of 3 per cent for the
first two months of 1950 as compared with the
corresponding period last year, the Gensus
Bureau reported.

These Wholesale Trade Reports
are available for all regions
Sand the United States at your
Department of Commerce Pield
Offices for the asking.

Increased sales in the three lines of prod-
uets and lesser gains in other transactions
were sufficient to withstand a 15 per cent drop
in electrical wiring supplies and construction
matse irile; 13 percn~t in furniture and other
houe frnshige;24per cent in industrial
supplies; 14 per cent in jewelry; 23 per cent
in machinery equipment; 17 per cent in grocer-
les; and 12 per cent in wines and spirits.
The 3 per cent decline for the two-month
period was 1 per cent greater than the 2 per
oent registered for the United States.


RETAIL SALES TREND FAVORABLE

E ighteen of 24 cities and areas in which
surveys reported increases in retail
sales in independent establishments in Febuay
over the corresponding month last year.
It was the second consecutive month in 1950
in which increases in sales were reflected in
a majority of the cities and areas surveyed
over the year 1949.

These Retail Trade Reports are
available gratis at all Field
Offices. They are obtainable by
_$># Regions and for the U. S. Ask
your Field Office to place your
name on the mailing list to re-
ceive them.

The February gains included, in percentage,
Augusta, 28; Columbus, Ga., 22; Biloxi, Mise.,
21; Chilton and Perry counties, Alabama, 19;
Gulfport, Miss,, and Harrison and Stone coun-
ties, Mi891asippi, 17; Savannah, 15; Muanatee
and Sarasota counties, Florida, and Greenwood
and McCormick counties, South Carolina, 14:
Greenwood, S. C., 12; Johnson City, Tenn., 11;
Birmingham and Jefferson county, Alabama, and
DeKalb, Fulton and Rochrdale counties, Georgia,
S; Asheville and Buncombe and Mladison counties,
North Carolina, 7; Atlanta, 6; and Sullivan,
Unicoi and washington counties, Tennessee, 3.
Decreases of 4 per cent were registered in
Macon, J per cent in Clarkrdale, Miss., and
Bleckley and Twiggs counties, Georgia; 1 per
cent in Kingsport, Tenn., and 10 per cent in
Coahoma and Quitman counties, Mississippi. In
Bristol, Tenn., the situation was unchanged.
Most of the cities and areas also reported
gained for the first two months of the year
over the same period last year. Among the
sharper increases were 23 per cent in Biloxi;
22 per cent in Augusta; 20 per cent in Manatee
and Sarasota counties, Florida; and 13 per cent
in Gulfport, Johnson City, Columbus and Savan-
nah.

SOUTH HAS 178 TRADE GROUPS

ional and regional trade associations,
the Trade Association Division of the
U. 9. Department of Commerce reported.
Georgia, with 33 such organizations, or ap-
proximately 33 per cent of the 178 in the area,
leads, and Tennessee, with 30, is next.
Others include Louisiana and North Carolina,
20 each; Texas, 19; Alabama, Florida, Kentucky
and Virginia, 8 each; Arkansas, 4; Delaware,
2; and Maryland and Mississippi, 3 each.
The organizations include those devoted to
such industries as plumbing and heating, pea-
nute, cotton, banking, coal, toilet goods,
insurance, bakery products, brick and tile,
construction, freight, ice, metals, plywood,
pulpwood, machinery, warehousing, confection-
ery, woodworking, textiles, photo-engraving,
stoves, granite and marble, and ahost of others.
It was recently announced in the Bulletin of
Commerce that in the Southeastern sec-tionof
the Un~ited States are 2,600 organizations of
businessmen, including Chambers of Commerce and
others, and 1,500 in the Southwest.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2







BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
HfIGHRAY FUNDS $P229.6 MILLION

Funds spent and being spent in the South-
Seast in construction and improvement of
SFederal-aid highways at the end of 1949
totalled $229,625,000, the Bureau of Publio
Roads, U. S. Department of Commerce, announced.
The funds, classified as in the activen
highway program, included $b115.1 million in
Federal funds in the construction of 5,246
miles of road in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Missiesippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee*
In the allotment were $8g5.3j million program-
med for the construction of 2 274.9 miles of
highway, $106.5 million for work already start-
ed on 2,199.3 miles, and $35.7 million for
771.8 miles on which work had not; started, but
for which plans had been approved.
In addition, $78.2 million in "unprog~rammed
balanoead was placed to the credit of the seven
States*
By States, the amount being spent, with
mileage included in the Hactive" program, in-
cluded Alabama, t30.5 million, with 684.7 miles
of highway; Florida, $25.9 million and 591.4;
Georgia, $60.8 million and 1,179.1; Mississippi
$13 million and 351.5; North Carolina, $36.8
million and 871.7; south Carolina, $19.8 mil~
lion and 839.5; and Tennessee, $42.5 million
and 728.1*
The unprogrammedd balancesH by States in-
cluded Alabama, $16.3 million; Florida, $9.3
million; Geor~ia, $11.1 million; Mississip *
$15.2 million; North Carolina, $12.7 million;
South Carolina, $6.6 million: and Tennessee,

Thmig229n6 million in funds beln spent in
the Southeast as of the close of 19 9 was ap-
bproximaxpel de pe ecenheof ahe $1.80billionn
operatawaiinaall Statesithe District of Colum-

MORE OLDER FOLKS IN SOUTHEAST

old and older in the Southeast now than
there were 10 years ago, the Bureau of
the Geneus reported in a special release on
population estimates.
The figures, based on 1948 estimates, showed
1,120,000 persons 65 years old end over in Ala-
bama, Floride, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee
and the Carolinas As compared with an actual
count of 951,190 in 1940.

Note: See your nearest Department
of Commerce Field Office for copies
mof this and all other Gensus Bureau
population figures.
The 1948 estimates for the seven States were
11 per cent of the total for the nation as a
whole, which approximated 10,950,000..
Greatest percentage increase in "older folken
in the Southeast since 1940 was registered in
Florida, which reflected a 35.7 per cent gain,
Florida Also stood eighth in percentage gains
for the nation as a whole, being exceeded only
by California, Oregon, washington, Nevada,
Arizona, wyoming and the Distriot of Columbia.
North Carolina was second in percentage gain
in the Southeast with 19.5.


(For further details on any of these items,
ask your nearest Department of Commeroe
tield office for copies cut the release)

manufacturers' sales in February remained
hAat Ja~nuary levels after allowance for
I seasonal factors. New orders exceeded
sales so that backlogs increased. Inventory
book values of both the durable and nondurable
goods industries remained closely in line with
January.

Foreign countries increased their gold and
dollar balances by about $440 million through
transactions with the United States in the last
three months of 1949 offsetting the losses of
$420 million they had sustained earlier that
year.
Publicly reported oneh dividend payments
by United States corporations in February 1950
amounted to $21).2 million, or about 5 per cent
more than the $W204 million paid out in February
1949.
Total sales of retail stores in February a-
mounted to $9,190 million, about '3 per cent a-
bove a year ago. Reflecting in part the stimu-
lating effect of the special National Service
Life Insurance dividend, the trend of sales
continued upward in February.

American business, exclusive of agriculture,
nwil spendand eq0pabout then en 1949.10apital
outlays are expected to total q16.1 billion in
1950 as compared with $18.1 billion in 1949
and 519.2 billion in the peak year of 1948.
Sales of chain store and mail order houses
in February totalled $1,882 million, about 1
per cent above a year ago. After allowance for
seasonal factore-and-trading day di~fferenoeaz=
the dollar volume of trade in February rose a-
boult 2 per cent from January.

Construction activity rose seasonally in
March from the unusually high levels maintained
throughout the winter months. Expenditures for
new construction put in place during the month
amounted to $1.5 billion, 8 per cent above the
revised February estimate, and 18f per cent
more than March 1949.

Sales of service and limited-function wrhole-
sales totalled $5,021 million in February, up
3 per cent from January after adjustment for
seasonal variations. February sales of durable
goods, at $1,5g3 million, were 9 per cent above
the previous month on a seasonally adjusted
basis.

Consumption of new rubber in the United
States in February totalled 88,329 long tone
com~pred with 93,958 tons in January and 81,015
tons in February 1949.


PAGE 3







1 _


CONSTRUC-TIONr MATERIALS SHIPMENTS UP

construction materials dealers in the
Southeast last year shipped thousands of
Dollars worth of building supplies for
use in the nation's new construction program,
according to the monthly Construction & Con-
struction Mdateriale Repor~t sued by the U. S.
Department of Commerce.
Order this report through your
$ >nearest Commeroe De artm earField


uran osme casesvipa~rticularly unglazed struct-
Portland cement, 1949 shipments exceeded those
in 1948 in certain areas of the region.
Shipments included, unglazed brick, 1.6 bil-
lion; unglazed structural tile, 315.9 thousand
tons; cast iron pressure pipe,4 69. thousand oe
tone; cast iron soil pipe, 348tosn oe
and Portland cement, 23.7 million barrels.
In addition, 282.1 thousand tons of vitri-
fied clay sewer pipe and large quantities of
asphalt roofing material were shipped from the
South during the year.
LIQUOR,WINE SALES 7.5 MdILLIO)N

Liquor and wine wholesalers of Georgia,
SFlorida, South Carolina and Tennessee
reported to the Census Bureau that sales
la~st year totalled 7,512,645 gallons, includ-
ing 6,420,464 gallons of spirits and the re-
mainder wine.

Your Department of Commerce Field
ggp Office has monthly reports dealing
with wine and liquor sales in all
states. They are gratia.

Approximately 75 dealers in distilled spir-
its and 38 distributors of wine in the four
States participated in the survey.
The year's sales included G~eorgia, 1 320,660
gallons of distilled spirits and 202 338 gallons
of wine; Florida, 2,526,089 and 681,128; South
Carolina, 1,388,200 and 53,709; and Tennessee,
1,185,515 Rad 155,oo6.

E 00VOID


Pae of he Bulletin o Comece o Yur
Nearest Dartment of Commerce Office. Your

Ma RemitAdn as Pa able the Opaeurer idethe


/ 7For the Home-Buying Veteran His Rights
and Wrongs..............10
/7are & Repair of the House.....,..........50
S/oodwforkring &G Furniture Pepair.......,....50
7-AHandbookr of Information on Provisions
of the Housing Act 1949.........15
/ JPublic Law 171 81st Congress (Declara-
tion of National Housing Policy....15
You Can Makre It Yolume I............15
You Can Make It for Camp & Cottage.......15
You Can Make It For Profit...............15 ~
o to Judge a House.......,...,..........25~
Furniture Its Selection & Use.......,..20d
A Step-Saving U Kitchen, ......, 10
Closets & Storage Space .........10
Small Business Management Publications...10 l
Organic Chemicals Production, 1938-48....
Patents & Covt. Patent Services SBA5oo....
Estimates of Population 65 Years & Older
for U. S. &'States, July 1, 1948......,
r /Provisional Estimates, U. S. Population,
February 1, 1950..............
/Canned Food Report, March 1, 1950...........
Gross Changes in Labor Force,Jan.-Peb 1950..
FPull-Time & Part-Time Workers,Nov. 1949~....
.Jonthly Retail Trade Report, South Atlantic
& East sou. Gent. Regions & U.S.........
M-~onthly Wholesale Trade Report,Feb. 1950....
/ Cotton Ginning Reports, All States & U.S.
Crops of 1949,1948 & 1947. ...............
/ JAmerican Business is Business of All of Us -
Address by Secretary saw~yer.........
nPo use 10-063


United States. Items Not Priced Are Free.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 4, No. g, April 15, 1950


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
CAINES ILLE* FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08748 8341


BUL LETII


PAGE 4





















ATLANTA 3, GA. SAVAMMAH, GA. JACK(SONVILLE, FLA. MIAMIl 32, FLA. MOBILE, ALA. CHA~RLESTON, S.C.
50 Whitehall St., S.tf., Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bidg., 947 Seybold Aldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. thinut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. Y-71II Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-36411 Tel. 7771


_ __ I


rNE BOOKLET ON LQBN SURmCES


importance of adequate capital to effective bus-
iness management, and where to get such capital
in a booklet just issued by the U. S. Department of
Commerce.
The publication, entitled "The Small Businessman and
Sources of Loana," actually is a revision of a previous
booklet by that name issued by the Department which has
been in great demand throughout the country~ by those in
business and planning to enter the business field.

This booklet is available at all field
offices of the :Department of Commerce
in the Southeast and other areas. It is
priced at 15 cents to defray the cost

The booklet discusses the various kinds of capital;
the uses of capital; how to determine the need for ad-
ditional capital; and what to expect to pay for loan
capital.
In addition, it lists numerous sources of private
and public loans and describes howr these sources
operate their lending programs. Among them are inus-
trial banking companies, small loan companies, factor-
ing companies, commercial credit companies, sales
finance companies, miscellaneous finance companies,
insurance companies, the Reconstruction Finance Cor-
poration, Federal Reserve Bankcs, Federal Housing Admin-
istration, Veterans Administration, and Community In-
dustrial Development Groups. A number of other sources
often overlooked are also listed.


URBAN BUILDING UP SBiARPJI

Value of new urban building authorized in the
Southeast in January increased 59 per cent over
that of January 1949, according to a compilation
issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Depart-
ment of Labor.
It shows that the total value of new urban building
authorized in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas in January of this year
approximated $76,744,000 compared with $48,131,000
in the corresponding month last year.

Attention is again called to the monthly
industry report Construction and Construzct-
ion Materials issued by the Department of
]g3 ) *Commerce and available now through all
field offices for $3 a year. It is one of
the most comprehensive reports of its
kiad ieeved.
The new building activities consisted of new dwell-
ing units and all other buildings, including those
for nonresidential and nonhousekeeping purposes,
hotels, dormitories, and the like. In the number of
new dwelling units authorised, the total in January
nearly doubled that of the same month a year ago,
going from 4,713 in January 1949 to 8,174 in January
1950.
Florida continued to lead the region in value of
all urban construction authorized in January 1950, but
the percentage gain in that State this January over
the last was somewhat below that of other States in
the area*


SOUTHEASTERN BUSINESSMEN INTERESTED IN PROCUREMENT PROGRAM


B business firms of many sections of the Southeast have expressed an interest in the new procurement
made by the United States Government is being made available to small business operators of the
area as well as large firne in the metropolitan regions.
Under the program, the Office of Defense and General Servrices Administration, largest single pur-
chasers of supplies in the world, turn over to the Department of Commerce daily reports on items to
be purchased, quantities and other data so that small businessmen may be kept currently abreast of
such activities, and the Department of Commerce, in turn, is making the information available to firmsB
in the Southeast and other regions through its regional and district off ices and cooperating Chambers of
Commerce.
In the Southeast, in addition to the Atlanta regional office and district offices located at Jackson-
ville, Miami, Robiles Savannah and Charleston, S. C., the information is available each day at Chambers
of CoImmerce in Winston-Salem, N. C., Birmingham and Jasper, Ala., Tampa, Jackson, Miss., Macon and Rome,
Ga., Meridian, iese., Charlotte, N. C., Albany, Ga., Chattanooga, Tenn*, St. Petersburg, Fla.,
High Point, N. C., and Pensacola and Orlando, F'la.


Glz0 / 9 2L :?



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE


MAY 1, 1950


VOLUME 4, N~O. 9





PUBLIC EMPLO[MENT IN SOUTHEAST


CASH EARMd INCCAE CFF IN SOUTHEAST


despite the fact that cash farm receipts in Florida
I continued to climb to high levels this year, re-
Lturns to Southeastern farmers from products sent
to market in January sad February were 22 per cent less
than for the same two montba last year, sooording to
the monthly report of the Bureau of Agricultural Econo-
mics, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
While Florida farmers were experiencing a 40 per cent
increase, in Mississippi a 73 per cent decline was r~eg-
istereds and in the other five States in the area,
Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee, proportionate decreases were reflected.

Notes Copies of the 1945 census of
Agriculture conlduoted by the Census
Bureau are available at all Commerce
Department field offices. They will
be valuable in comparing the data
with results of the 1950 Census of
Agriculture to be announced next
year. The prices vary according to
States.

The figures showed receipts in North Carolina for the
two-month period this year as $36.6 million and $51.3
million for the same twfo months last year; South Caro-
lina, $15.9 million and $22.3 million; Georgia, $40.3
million and $45.3 mill-ion; Florida, $91.6 million and
$b65.4 million; Tennoessee, $69.6 million and $73.9 mil-
lioni Alabama, $28,2 million and $b36.3 million; and
Mississippi, $29.1 million and $107.6 million.
The decline in the Southeast for the twro-month per-
iod wras somewrhat greater than the 3 per cent loes for
the United States when, nationally, oash receipts went
from $3,959 million in the first two months of last
year down to $3,834 million in the same period this
year.

SCUTH PROGRESSES IN MALNUEACTURING

at tatistical picture of howr the South has progressed
I in manufacturing industry is reflected in a cur-
Srent report issued by the Bureau of the Census
on its 1947 Conous of Manufacturea entitled SummarYE
Statistics (MDC-201, Price 35 ),
The report shows that in the South Atlantio and East
South Central regions of the nation a greater percentage
of increase has taken place in the number of manufacntur-
ing establishments from 1939 to 1947 than in any other
area of the country with the exception of the Pacific
region.

These reports are available at all
ggy p Commerce Department field offices
glone with the reports by Stateae

The report, which gives a statistical breakdown by
commoadity, metropolitan area, States, regions, and other
information, shows that in the South Atlantic region
the number of manufacturing establishments has gone front
16,657 to 24,001 in the eight-year period, or a gain of
44 per cent, while in the East South Central section the
rise has been from 7,024 tto 10,907, or 41 per cent.
Other increases, by regions, included New England, 33
per cent; Middle Atlantic, 41 per cent East Nlorth Gent-
ral, 33 per cent West North Central, 23 per cent West
South Central, 38 per cent; Mountain, 33 per cent and
Pacific, 47 per cent,
Incidentally, the report also shows that the value
added by manufacture of goode produced in the two South-
ern areas also anltiplied three and four-fold.


ed the 664,798 mark, but 311 per cent of those so
employed were working in eahools and higher in-
stitutions of learning, the Bureau of the Census shows
in a report just issued,
0f the total public employment in 1949 in Alabama,
Floridas Georgia, MLississippi, North Carolina, South
SCarolina and Tennessee, 186,259 were Federal sad the
remainder State and local. School employment in the
seven-State area accounted for 229,254,
Monthly payrolls of State and local governments in
the seven States totalled $83,504,600, of which $43,-
897,900 was being spent in educational work.
Of the 478,539 employees working for State and local
governments in the area, 415,518 were permanent and
full-time.
An average of 33.8 persons of every 1,000 of the
population of the seven States were publicly employed
of which 9.4 wrere Federal. and the remainder State And
local.

This Bureau of the Census report,
State Distributiog of Public Equ~oy-
] ).)> ment in 1969. G-GE49-No.7, is a~vail.
able for the ashlyg at aill Department
of Coqqerge field offiogg,

In total public employment among the individual
Southeastern States, Florida led in number employed
with 113,916. Georgia was second with 113,789. The
others twer Tennessee, 106,778; North Carolina, 106,-
760; Alabama, 97,621; Msissiesppi, 63,374; and South
Carolina, 62,560.
In monthly payrolls for State and local governments,
North Carolina led with $17,189,200 and Florida, with
$15,380,200 wras second. The others included Tennessee,
$1~3,441,600; Georgia, $12,062,800; Alabama, $811,387,-
900; South Carolina, $7,332,600; and Miississippi,
$6,710,300,
RAILROLD REVENUE OFF IN SOUTHEAST


per cent decline in passenger and freight revenue
for the first two months of 1950 as compared with
the corresponding period last year.
The figures, released by the Association of American
Railroads, showed that freight revenue for January and
February among 211 roads covering 37,920 miles in the
Southern region amounted to $157,889,493 and passenger
revenue $19,133,006, which compared, respectively, with
$168,565,130 and $22,294,998 for the sane months last
year.

If you have not already obtained a
copy of: the publication Issues Involved
14 4 Unified and Goordinated Federal
]gW~ Government Pronrgm for Transportation
issued by the Department of Commerce
you may wish to do so before the sup.
s17 is exhausted. Price 20d.

Total operating revennue declined 7 per cent,or from
$206,053,038 recorded for the first twvo months of 1949
Sto $191,493,722 for January and February of this year,
At the same time, however, total operating expenses
declined approximately 9 per cent, or from $165,289,625
to $6150,276,508.
Nationally, freight revenue wras 11 per cent greater
for the first two months of 1949 and 14 per cent more
in passenger revenue was realized.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
LATIN AMERIGAN IMYPOR~T OUTPLOOK GOOD


Southeastern world traders who ship goods to Latin
ble credit conditions among most of those nations
this year, sooording to the Office of International
~,, cn,~,, E rd u


Fim nthergo e h yar shp large quantities
of lumber andl tobacco and their manufactures, naval
stared, foodatu~ff, machinery, and many other products
to South and Central america, Mexico and Cuba, and the
exporting of such goods is dependent upon the credit
situation prevailing in these countries.

If you are not on the mailing list
to receive the biweekly World Typdq
;Yggg issued by the various Commerce
Department field offices in the South.
easteat you undoubtedly will wish to re.
quest it at once. It is free. bAsk
your nearest field office to place
yogy qqqn on the mailing list,

Last year, OTT said, the United Statses ent an es.
timated $)2.7 billion worth of American-made goods to
Latin America and took in return some $2.3 billion
worth of commodities from those countrica for consump.
tion in this country, a slight drop from 1948.
Principal decreases in this nation's Latin American
exports last year were in trade with Argentina and
Brasil, while the decline in i~mports was mainly in
trade with Argentina, but the value of 1949 U. S.-Latin
American trade, both export and import, remained well
above prewar levels.
As for the 1950 outlook for goods produced in the
Southeas_t, 01? said at present prospects are for doi-
ing dollar exchange earnings for countries like Bolivia,
Chile and Peru, which depend upon exports of copper and
tin for a large part of their dollar income, and a
world-nide decline in demand and price for those com.
modities has taken place.
n~n the other hand,u it wasr stated, "Latin American
countries supplying agricultural products of the type
in demand in the United States are finding favorable
marketing conditions, particularly respecting coffee
exporting countries such as Brazil and Colombia.n

SOUTHERN PINE FROD)UCTION,8HIPMENTS UP


Production and shipments of southern pine lumber
1950 as compared with the corresponding period
last year, the Southern Pine Association reported.
Reports to the organisation from 327 mills showed
that for January and February of this year production
totalled 214,021,000 feet, an increase of 7 per cent
over the same months last year, and shipments approzi-
mated 213,606,000 feet, a rise of 17.5 per cent*

For a comprehensive discussion of the
nation's Inmber situation, subscribe to
_(> the Commerce Department'e hamber. P17-
meads. and.Allied Prodnotp Industry Report
issued anarterly. Price $1 a year*

Malo, southern pine production and shipments for
the first two months of 1950 rose substantially over
those of the same period in 1948, the SEL report
revealed*
At the same time, the National Lumber Manufacturers
Association reported unfilled orders among 106 report-
ing mills as of April 1 of this year totalling 52,631,-
000 feet and stocks of 174,334,000 feet.


(For further details on any of these items,
ask your nearest Department of Commerce
field office for copies of the release)


of non-transport goode was up 15 per cent in
the first 2 months of 1950 compared writh the
same period a year ago. Consumption in transportation
goods -- tires, tubes, camelback, and tire repair mrat-
eriala -- was up 5 per cent.
-o-
Employment started moving upward between February
and March. The estimate of total civilian employment
for the week ending March 11 was 57,551,000 as com-
pared with 56,953,000 for the week ending February 11.
Unemployment, which had reached 4,684,000 in February
dropped appreciably in March to an estimated 4,123,000.
-o-
Satisfactory progress is being made in the 1950
census of population enurmeration, the Census Bureau
reported. By April 11 reports had been obtained for
more than 67 million persons and almost 2 million
farms, representing 44.4 per cent of the population
and 30.3 per cent of the national farms.
-o-
Retirement of Rear Adrriral Leo 0tis Colbert as
director of the Coast and Goodetic Survey, U. S. De-
partment of Commerce, on Apr~il 7 was announced. He
had been director of the bureau for 12 years and
writh the bureau for the 42 years of his professional
car'eer,
-o-
Yarn output on woolen and worsted spindles averaged
15 million pounds a week in February, 6 per cent above
the January level and 15 per cent above production the
previous February, the Census Burean reported.
-o-
February wheat flour production wras estimated by the
Census Bureau at 17.7 million sacks, 8 and 11 per cent,
respectively belowr the January 1950 and February 1949
levels. It was the lowest February production since
1942.
-o-
Eatablishment of a new type of license covering ex-
ports of products used for construction ]projects or
maintenance programs abroad was announced by the
Office of International Trade, U. S. Department of
Commerce. To obtain the new project license, which
will be known as a Dollar Limit or "DLn license,
applicants anst submit a statement of estimated annual
requirements for the project or program, together with
a license application and letter of explanation.
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of February
were estimated at $)54.2 billion. After allowance for
seasonal variations, the book value of inventories was
$100 million below the January level. The decline oc-
curred in stocks held by retailers, with manufacturers'
and wholesalers' stooke remaining at their previous
month's levels
-o-
Consumption of apparel and carpet class wool in
February averaged 12.6 million scoured pounds a week,
7 per cent above the January weekly level, and 16 per
cent above consumption in February 1949, the Census
Bureau reported.





cheon the Material aesirect and Send This
Page of the Bulletin of Commerce to Your
Nearest Department of Commerce Office. oiner
Name and Addressi are on the Opoosite Side.
Bleak Remittances Payable to Treenurer of the
United States. Items Not Pried Are Free.


7-70nnatrnmtion & Constrctn Mlna Rn art


$3 Year
o-rin 7


/ /IssuesInvolved in Unified & Coordinated Federal
Godt. PEorrrqm for Transportation. ...........200


/T~ ~ ~ ~~nmberj TnutyRnr............$ ear
Aoments, Misses', Children's & Infants Underwrear
& Accessories (BIS ...........................
J~ihtic Solvent Chemicals..............,..... ......
/Concentration of Indus ryeor.........0
Jer Stores 198Oertn Ratio~e..............
Mothy eprton Labor Forcet~r15 P-57. No.93..
Consumer Goode Im r Maketa US.,,.........
Sie- Address ScrearyBawer...,,......

for bann apon emotion of


Mehd 05 k02).......... .........~..304
/ /estng y te NtioalBureau of Standards
(NE Gircuar 0403).................254
TaeDiscout &rieDoimaion (SBA All)...


D /Bsineas Civic & Trade Connections Mlaintained a
Retail kiorist toStirmulate His Businese(Sm$l1).
(}owt Poftas a Reai Forst(BA27)......
Ueanga ioisSh EA149..............
Seletin & tranin ages or a Small Florist
Shop 8 122).....................


HELP FOR SMALLL BUSINESSBI E


nne of the most popular "bargains" in the Depart-
Oment of Commerce today is its "Packet of Pointeran
for the small businessman. It consists of eight
different publications, all designed to help the small
businessman in his day-to-day problems, and to assist
the prospective small businessman to plan his future
in the business field.
The eight publications are listed below, and all
ehtare available for $1,
Small Business & Government Regu3.44iosa .....100
Sm411 Business & Reguilation of yriging Practices.1
The Small Businessman & Hip Bank.............10#
Smal1 Business & Governm~ent kLcenses..........150
Sma11 Business and Trage f~abyke.........,,......10f
The Small Businessman & Sources of Loans.......150


Thuidesegoit n~p olatirqserpn, a course, be ord54_
ad individually, and the price of each is so designated.

wATCH YOUR MONEYJ

How" do you know but what that ten dollar bill in
Syour cash drawer or your purse isn't counterfeit.
SIt could be. How about that check you cashed the
other dayl Are you sure it's good?
As a service to Southeastern businessmen, and in-
dividuals, too, the Department of Commerce has two
pieces of literature to help them against receiving
counterfeit money and handling rubbern checks. They
are:
97 Know Your Money Price 15
Things to Ba4$oh for in ashing Checks -
SBA No. 329 Free
The publication Know Your Money was prepared for the
United States Secret Ser-vice by the U. S. Treasury De-
partment. It answers in simple language such questions
as how to know counterfeit money; what to do about it;
and how to safeguard against receiving forged Govrern-
ment obecks. It includes case histories from Seoret
Semrice files, and includes facsimiles of genuine and
counterfeit bills and coins,
The Small Business Aid Things to Watch for in Opsh-
ingp Checks informs merchants in one, two, three order
how to avoid losses through the -cashing of bad checks.
GPO 050


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office Sg
'50 Whhitehall Street S.W. S4 c
Atlanta 3, Georgia d'"9
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NC>. 1009
Volume 4, No. 9, May 1, 1950


0-068


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
JrllrvP'iE~U E7g $300


BC-6-Jir


UNIVERSITY or FLoaIDA
LEHOY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UVESTOF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8192
BULLETIN O .mo~


PAGE 4


r- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.




























VOL. 4, NO. 10 MAY 15, 1950
91 50 GOD BUSINESS YEAR @CTORS IN SUCCESSFUL RETAILING


field in the Southeast thus far this year, 1950
promises to be a very good business year.
The first quarter of the year brought a sharp up-
surge in retail trading over the same period last year
in nearly all cities and areas in the region in wlhich
the Bureau of the Census conducts monthly surveys among
independent establishments.
Increases of 11 per cent in Atlanta, Birmingham and
Savannah; 14 per cent in Columbus, Ga; 23 per cent in
Bilcai, Mdiss.; 12 per cent in Gulfpor-t; 19 per cent in
Johnson City, Tenn., and 9 per cent in Asheville were
among the gains recorded for retail merobants of those
cities*

If you are not already on the mailing
list to receive these reports month27,
ask your nearest Cammerce Department
office for that service. It in arat~iB.

Other advances included Greenwrood, S. C., 6 per
cent, Kingsport, Tenn., 4 per cent, and such other in-
creases as 15 per cent for M~anatee and Sarasota coun-
ties, Florida; 14 per cent in Harrison and Stone coun-
ties, Misosissippii 12 per cent in DeKalb, Fulton and
Rockdale counties, Georgia; and 10 per cent in Buncanbe
and Madison coauties, North Carolina, and Jefferson
county, Alabama.
The only decreases reported for the period were 11
per cent in Clarkedale, Mdise; 16 per cent in Coahana
and Quitman counties, Mississippig and 9 per cent in
Bleckley and Twiggs counties, Georgia.


Many small retail streak and service establishments
in the Southeast became casualties, or produce lowr
earnings because the operate of those places
fail to avail themselves of information whiob would
help them succeed.
So the U. S. Department of Commerce has done some-
thing about it by releasing one of its Small Business
Aids which lists ten factors that can lead to encoess
in retailing if followed. The Aid is entitled "Ten
Factors in Successful Retailing," which, like its some
500 predecessors in the Small Business Aid field, is
available for the asking,

If you have not availed yourself of
this Small Business Aid service, tell
your nearest Commerce Department of-
fioe which subjects you are interested
in, and they will send you the Aide
available on those subjects. They are
free.
Desirable location, skillful buying, adequate fin-
ancing, effective stock control, sound merchandising,
proper pricing, adequate records, good service to
customers, a friendly personality, and good housekeep-
ing are factors generally associated with successful
business operation, the Aid points o~ut.
Greatest service the retailer can give his customers
is to provide the merchandise they want when they want
it, the leaflet says. Failure to furnish such service
results in the loss of many profitable sales and some-
times the future patronage of the customer.


Thrt-to oitsi te ouhestar owonth lsttorcevedalyinoraio rgadig h
~multi-million dollar purchases made a~nnally by the United States to run its different depart-
ments of government.
Day-to-da~y information on the commodities being purebased, quantities bought and return dates of
bids is being received by Department of Comrmerce field offices in Atlanta, Savannah, Jacksonville,
Mobile, Charleston, S. C., and Miami, and in addition at cooperating Chambers of Commerce in Macon,
Rane and Albany, Ga; Chrlando, Tampa, PensacoLa, St. Petersburg, Tallahassee, Lakeland and Panama City,
Fla; Birmingham, Jasper and Decatur, Alai Charleston, Anderson and Greenville, S. C; Jackson, Meridian
and Vicksburg, Miss; Wilmington, high Point, Hicokory, Raleigh and Charlotte, N. C., and Knarville and
Chattanooga, Tenn. In Jackson, Miss., the information is available at the Mississippi Agricultural and
Industrial Development Department in the New Capitol, and at Raleigh, N. C., it is being received at
the office of the Department of Conservation and Development.
The information is being distributed for the use of businessmen in the Southeast desiring to par-
ticipate in the Government's purchase operations, and as a move to give firms in all sections of the
United States equal opportunity to sell to the Federal Government.
The purchases being made include large quantities of lumber and its products, textiles, machinery,
foodatuffe, and other products produced in the Southeast.


C, /6 F~4, 24 & !?



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE


ATLANITA 3, 6A. SAAINI(Ill, GA. JACKSDIIVILLE, FLA. nmIAM 32, FLA. HIOBILE, ALA,
60 Whitehall St., S.M., Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bidg., 947 Seybold Illdg.. 308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. Mllnut 4121 1-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. Y-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641


CHARLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 7771





QMANFACTURING UP IN ME~TROIPO[LES

V alue added by manufacture at goode produced rose
\Imore than 200 per cent in 1949 as compared writh
S1919 in 25 of 53 standard metropolitan areas in
the United States, including three in the South, the
Bureau of the Censue has announced in a final summary
of its 1947 census of manufactures.
The three southern areas are Houston, Taexas, which
paced all metropolitan areas in the nation wpith a 1106
per cent gain in the 28-year period; Louieville, Ky.,
and Atlanta, Ga.
The other 22 areas reflecting sharp increases in-
cluded Baltimore, Bridgeport, Chicago, Columbus, abio,
Dayton, Detroit, Erie, Fall River-New Bedford, Flint,
Grand Rapide, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles,
Mlilwaukee, M~inneapo~lis*Ct. Paul, New Britain-Bristol,
Peoria, Providence, south Bend, Springfield-Holyoke,
Toledo and York.

A few copies of this Summary are still
available at Cammerce Department field
of~fices. It is designated as EC-201, and
ip priced at 35 ,
The report, which also has a breakdown by States and
regions shows that in Houston the value added byr maunu-
facture of goods produced in that area in 1947 wras
$385,549,000 against $31,964,000 in 1919, in Louieville
it was $488,956,000 and $90,721,000, respectively, and
in Atlanta it went from $60,993,000 in 19119 to $b237,-
012,000 in 1947.
Los Angeles also skyrocketed in percentage increase
in the 28-year period, with a gain of from $183,855,000
to $2,052,671,000, or a rise of 1,016 per cent,
Two of the areas houston and Los Angeles re-
flected gains of 117 and 162 per cent, respectively, in
increase in number of manufacturing establishments
during the period, which surpassed all other areas in
the nation in rate of such eXPanlsion.

SOUJTHEAST AIRPORT NEEDS REPORTED


d~~~~~~~~~~~~~ dmn f a sri i aeut an i
I f the Southeast is to meet existing and anticipate-
dh nrtdhe e wears erice sin han e ro inv a o
of 619 nae and improved airports costing approximately
$97,658,000, the Civil Aeronauties Administration has
uphe estimate included 337 new airports and 282 fa-
proved ones in the States of Alabama, Florida, Geargias
biesisisippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn"
easee, the farmer to cost around $32,706,000 and the
others, $64,952,000.

This report is entitled "National

C regin ~ i tari ed nata
affices. The prie is 754


DAIRY PRODUCTS QFF SLIGHTLY


114,938,000 from the sale of dairy products,
lightly less than the $1,172,709,0003 realized by
producers in the dominant dairy region in the east
north central section of the country, according to a
Bureau of Agricultural Economilcs, U. S. Department of
Agriculture report.
The income to southern farmers fran such products
included $439,418,000 received by producers in the
South Atlantic area of Florida, Georg~ia, the Caratinasn
and Virginias, Maryland and Delaware, and $b675,520,000
which went to farmers in the South Central aeotion of
Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, K~entucky~, Louisiana,
Gkl~ahomna and Taeas.

Watch the 1950 Genslus of Agriculture
far~ more detailed information on how Son-
thern farmers are progressing, not anlg
in dairying, but in all other divisions
of the agricultural econoug. It will be
available soon in D1reliminary form,

Last year's income in the South from the sale of
dairy products was 8 per cent less than the $1,218,*
238,000 obtained in 1948 in the same area, but the
decrease in the South in the two comparable years was
considerably less than that far the United States,
which fell from $5,303,041,000 in 1948 to $4l,55,938,-
000 in 1949, or a decline of some 14 per cent.
Included in the gross sale in the South were
415,762,000 in farm butter sold; $54,203,000 in ream
sold to plants and dealers as bultterfat; $4~58,389,000
in wrholesale sale of milk to pleats and dealers; and
$135,144,000 in the retail sale of ailk and cream by
farmers, or combined receipts of $b663,498,000 from
sales of butter, cream and milk.

DEVELOPIWX,SELLNG; NBR PRODUCTS


First-hand, step-by-etep experiences of 100 business
Sfirm b ich hav been successful in developig n
of Satheassnbok hliees Dmo th & e U. S. D prtet of
A Guidebook for Mdan afacturers issued recently.

This is not newdp~ublicatian, but it
many thans obtaining it thus far. Some
a pies are still available at Geolmerce
Department field offices. Price 256.

The booklet is geared to the Southeastemr ma~nufact-
urer who wants to round out lines, find new lines
kee machinery in Full-tm M o ration, and provide con-

The booklet suggests hen he may locate ideas for new


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE









BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
wuAuntESB srALS or IN assEs

Slight increases in wholesale sales in Marah com-
lpared with the corresponding month last year are
ushounn for Southeastern whakesale firms in the
monthly report issued by the Bureau of the Gensus.
The report indicates a rise of 5 per cent in such
sales in the South Atlantic region and 2 per cent in
the East South Central section,

This is another monthly report available
far the asking at all Coomerce Department
field offices

Q the other hand, nominal dooreases were register-
ed in oumultative sales for the first quarter at 1950
-scmaed nihte tam 310io las yer nl

reio paper e ienoted aot 16 p nti reise and thper East


per cen gain camh ein Mrchoe ebur fthsya*
Fhac tarps in te inrasen in March i ofthi yrear over
th ame onh le erastyea i thi ear Two SoutheAtasen aras
ere gions cpreofd 68 per cent in saes od eletia EaP"
plia Cncesand speciaties; 28 per cent gin lmerad
buildngmerals;, 15 per cent inces resrfrieratim i

equim ten and eparbang perio cent in drug and sundris5
an 1per c ent gancmin sprciat goer eray lies thsJer

FAtotal of 645 smalla buines firmso tin Alaean, e
Fhe aridonh a, t Gerga, Missisipp t ennteassee and th
Caroginas requested the incslusio of ectheir ame o
il~n te Raparters' Direotary bein comp i ledmbr the
Ecoldno micGoatelions Admicnstraion rfardisrtribut
oEquropmen and iporber8pe et ndus and other uyers.
same 15,25 cnam of thecalt troughou thne cutr s


ED t~ot o 4 small business cocrn vrm th nie States ,
to hCavelareuse the namesio of their fimlcain annoit
inthey sell a d ot er data liteding tharled pblictio
acqumint fopretign buyerswth tion formto which may i
boErigbou an simultesaind of aesaog nler U. er

Ifm prese5ntlanes ca frryhogh the direotar wil e
printeduto in EngltaihFech Geman an Ihotaian, and fg
pC o ssblylater inGreks aonden Povruee the fnirte run
to happrzathe 50,000 op hie for overseasin coverage,

D eer partment of Ocere fioeldis offichavse, reeie
fcqar istriaibution coies inof hesatemen ti made
brecenotl lar Seiuaetiar of Commeroe Charles Sawyer

jec. frs
Th pestaeent lans beeny zhepdrodcdr nerl abuness
Ifrantedian ervp~ich Fenh cover and copes i b avalale
at a proicae o25 cents copie. Th oe statee consists

of31pages ant testimapy in whichd ethics Seretayives

Vio t rous endorseentigi crrs to e project. fo


(For further details on any of these items,
ask your nearest Department of Commerce
field office for copies of the release)


Sales gain of 4 per cent was recorded by inepen-
Sdent retail stares in March 1950 compared with
I March 1949, the Census Bureau reported. Compared



Satreles ofallr eai stares in0 ve March amount t


from thae high February ratem butwresilln maboe Jan-
dealry. friuesoe n asln evc ttos
-o-

capita f al netenti estimaed at $ c billion tof h
$80,90 million wa needed fopr new lnt andv tequpme mnth
$300t million for iventares $500 maillione Bfor addi-
iotmnal workn ce ponand $400rsa milliong-a forprhae o


-o-
*usies 16,0 as a whole expecs continuing high sales
1950, acctardn to resls at a su represented in tal

vancesl in sales volume in 1950 were anticipa ed by
annfacturion cner ns and elr ecri pan sd gasutiletie,
while elight frecions etries expect bylio trad andd
trnansporaiong fairas, oed than railrion ads. rhse
-o-
Thnee spin piku ino emplomets continuedg hg at e a

en0,acoding Apri 8 abult o 1,0,0 higher thasnte in th e
Crendin March 11. Between February an Mrchp, whden the
exanosio in saempvloymen tree in creasee amounipted b

-o-
hexpatnsio inc industrial arctivitduring Moar ch lifte
emanufacturers 'aes toathed highest leve in 15e month
continue toil8 accuulte Inventor0 iges h in ar he w ree
pracicallyrc uno baed rom February book valuh tes.t

-o-
Stp~Bate oroaion indsra Marchii 190 murnte tor $818400,
ian Mactrrch of asear In the first square of 1950,ot
cash dividend diabuseent t osta pa n fled 1610000 ordr
8 piner etmr th rcianthe. $1,41,00,00disibte in Mrhrr
pathe amey 3 nthsne ofro 1949. bokvlu
-o-
Salles ofeprvied cashdvnd liitd-untint wholesaler
Stotaed $5,720 iions in March. Afte adjustmento for840,
seas onal6 variaetin sales were alaet 876 per centabove
February.o atya. ntefrtqure f15


PAGE 3









PAGE 4
YOUPTH POIPUIATION ON DBOREASE


1a ORDER BLANK we

Check the Ilaterial Desired and Send This Page of the
Bulletin of .0_qigece to Your Nearest De~artment of Can-
rce Offie. Yoaur Name and addreas Are On The Ounosite
Side. MYake Remittanoees Parrable to Treasurer of The U.S.
te~ns Not Pie r re
Retail Trade Report (S outh Atlantie) .n........,..
Retail Trade Report (East South Central)......

Wholesale Trade Report (U.S. & Regions)...........,
St. Lawrence Seaway & Power Project. ....,.......25
Es im~ee of 5-to-1 P option (P-25,No.41).......

Amino Resine (BIS)" """"....,........,

Public Employment Jna 15. ,...,
Construction & Con. Materials Ind. Rp8 Yatl
Fate & 0118 (Facts for Industry)..,.......
Pulp & Paper Manupfacture in U. 8 (Faet for n.
Confectionery, Inoluding Chocolate Prode.(FFI).....
Cotton & Linters (Facts for Industry)...............
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Prods. (FFI)........
Clay Construction Products (FFI).............o....
Cotton System Spinn Activity" " ".
Superlphoophate (FFI).,,..o.,, o.,............,,,.,
ANDC Procedures far Control at air Traffic ... 400
Tables of the Binomial Probability Distri r io 2.50
sack e oing o lumbing Fizrtue l ,, .........4

National Airport Plan ,.,...... ...75
Some Factors in Estab1ihn a Se Aser
Business (SBa 4696).. ..,.,,,.
7 H~ow Food Mlanufacturere Can Benei Fon o
Broker Services (SBB 503)......,..
~7 Sta tmntof teetayo aeo hre are

Departmlents or U. a. senate..,...............

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE UISE TO AVOID
~ PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


The Scutheast's crop of youngsters is on the de-
o rease judging fromn population estimates just re-
Sleased by the Bureau of the Census.
The estimates, for the population 5 to 17 years for
the years 1940 to 1948, inclusive, showr that in 1948 in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mdississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tenneasee the number of persons of
that age had decreased to 4,988,000 from a total of
5,032,000 counted in 1940*
From 1940 to 1945, a gradual decrease took place,
but in 1946 the 5 to 17-year old population took an
upward spurt again and continued on the upgrade until
the last estimate was taken in 1948*

This report, Series P-25, No. 41, is


onpopitre coualyii
The decrease which took place in the Southeast in
1948 as compared with 1940 was in contrast with a 1.4
per cent increase for the United States*
In tho southeast, only Florida and Tennessee regis-
t9794 inCreases in 1948 over 1940, the farmer recording
a 17.3 per cent gain and Tennessee a 2 per cent rise*
heaviest loss in the region was experienced by Missies-
ippi, 5.2 per cent. Greatest loss in units was in
North Carolina where a 35,000 drop occurred*
HELP FOR SMABLL BUISINESSMIEN


a Diaanoaut sc &Price Discrimination Saall
Business Aid No. 411. Free
L7Wa~m & LCoat .af Einancing _Retail .Installment Bg-

S~1~ Small Business Aid No. 151. Free

SOoeratinga a Floist Shor, Small Business Aid No*
.Free
Selec~tina & Training~ E~mrJloees for a Small Florist
p Smsall Business Aid No. 422, Free

a Dis S~Iaaa i iaC ientl Case Stud Sa Bsns
cpo coso eas *


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volumae 4, Number 10 May 15, 1950


- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


L': 17EMRITY OF~ F'LORIDA
*E~Y L QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF LORIDA~~v


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE









UNITE STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE










ATLIITA 3, GA. 3AV6llH6l, GA. JACK301IVILLE, FULA Illdil 32, FLA NIOBILE, ALA CHARLESTON, 8.C.
60 Whitehall St., LL, Amon 218, P.O. Bldg., 4)26 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Aldg.. 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples SIdg.,
Tel. Ifl~nut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4765 Tel. 6-7111 Tel. 9-7553 Tel. 2-3841 Tel. 7771



v00. 4, NO* 1l JTUNE 1, 1950

OENTURP OF COff0N PRODUCTION PCB~TiARI F~URNI~TURE MARKET


A hundred and nine years at cotton growing in the
Southeast is reviewed in the 1950 edition at the Census
Bureaus annual publication entitled Cobton Production
and Distribution just issued.
It shows, among obber things, that since IAjayr~oosn
innings in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas have increased 389 per cent
whheraea cotton acreage in the region has decreased 12
per cent ainee 1879.
Notes This booklet is now available
at all Department of Comrmerce field
offices. It is known as Bulletin 186.
Price 2d
In only Florida did a reduction in cotton ginnings
take lace since 1839. In Tennessee, the increase wasr
1,006 per cent; South Carolina, 575 per cent; Narth
Carolina, 541 per cent; Missiesippi, 46 per cent; Ala-
bama, 376 per cent; and Georgia, 118 per cent. In Foar-
ida, the reduction was 69 per cent,
All of the seven Statse, except Mississippi and Ten-
nessee, reduced their cotton acreages in the 70O-year
period. In F~orida, the reduction totalled 81 per cent;
Georgia, 43 per cent; Alabama, 23 per cent; South Caro-
lina, 11 per centt and North Carolina, 8 per cent. The
increases in Missiesippi and Tennessee were 35 and U3
per cent, respectively.
Significantly, the hundred year review showed that
California did not begin the production of cobtan oan
an important scale until 1910 when that State's 8,000
acres produced 6,000 bales. Last year, however, Calif-
ornia's cotton eareage totalled 963,000 aores and in
1948 her innings aggregated 974,581 bales.


Producers and distributors of furniture in the
Southeast are given an insight into the postwar Furni-
ture market and the factors determining demand for that
commodity in the current issue of the Surror of Current
Buiesissued by the U. S. Department of Commerce's
Office of Buslness Economies.
In an article entitled nThe Poetwar Furniture Mlarket
and the Factors Determining Demand," the publication
points out that expenditures for furniture, both in
dollar and in quantity terase, are now at a rate surpass-
ing any previous year on record.
The Surrer of Gurrent Business is avail-
able at all Department of Commeroe field
offices at a subeaription rate of $3 a
year. or 25 cents each for ainaile conies,

The article is especially timely in the Southeast
because of the great strides the region has mpade in
recent years in the manufacture and distribution at all
types of Furniture. (See BulletiLn of Commrcsre of Mdarch
The major factor amounting far the strength of the
demand far furniture in the postwrar years, the article
explains, has been the high level of disposable personal
income, swelled even further in the first quarter of
1950 by payment of the National Service Life Insurance
dividend and the residential building activity.
"The most recent survey covering buying plans at con-
aumers for 1950 as of the early months of this year re-
ported that intentions to purchase furniture were lit-
t1e different from those expressed in the corresponlding
survey a year earlier and relating to 1949," the article
pointed out.


hELP FOLR SOUlTHEALSTERN BUISINELSS FIRIS

The Federal Government is in the market for 15 million square yards of uniform twrill oot-
ton aloth; large quantities of paper products) ateel, iron and ohher coamodities produced in the
Southeast, and is willing to give the contract to any Southeastern firm that can meet the re-
quirements, and if the bid is right.
This is the kind of information being received each work day at field offices of the U. S. De-
partment of Commerce and local Chambers of Commerce wrho ad cooperating in maklingr it available to
local firase.
The information is available for inspection now at Commerce Department field offices and
coope~rating Chambers of Commnerce in cities of all Southeastern Statse. (See bulletin of Commerce
of May 15 for up-to-date list of locations),
This is a new pi~ogram put into operation byl the Federal Government to give Southeastern
business firms equal opportunity writh those of other sections in bidding for Government contracts
under which some $20 million worth of goods are bought each year for Government use.





SOUITHFAST GETS 1/4 BILLIGN AID

Near37 a quarter of a biion dollars was spent
in the Southeast last fiscal year to help finance Fed-
eral aid programs, the Bureau of the Census has report.
ed
Federal aid to the seven States of Alabamna, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee in fiscal year 1949 totalled $236,346,000
including $29,326,000 to Alabama; $39,21.3,000 to Flor-
ida; $43,047,000 to Georgia; $29,102,000 to Miasissip-
pi; $35,618,000 to North Carolina; $21,951,000 to
South Carolina; and $37,057,000 to Tennessee.

This report may be obtained from
any Commerce Department field office,
Ask for BSummary of State Government
Finances in 1949n G4SFA9-No. 1. It's
grqatia ,
Treasuries of the seven Statse took in upwards of
a billion and a quarter dollars in revenues and bor-
rowings last year. Collections exceeded those of fiscal
year 1948 by more than 9 per cent, or some $100,000,000
but the cost of running the government machinery went
up, too, by about 16 per cent. Expenditures were great.
er last year in all States than revenue collections,
except in North Carolina where the income exceeded the
outgo by apprazimately $10,500,000.
Revenues and borrowings in the region last year
totalled $1,296,682,000 compared with $1,178,012,000
in fiscal 1948, and expenditures were $1,381,563 000
and $F1,181,013,000, respectively.
Tax revenue last year was 7 per cent greater than in
fiscal 1948. The total last year was $965,428,000, and
included $92,701,000 in corporation taxes; $b66,498,000
collected in income from individuals, and $67,210,000
realized from the operation of motor vehicles.

GLEO INDUSTRY GRERS IN SOUITHEAST

Great growth of the oleomargarine industry in the
Southeast in recent years was indicated in figures re-
leased by the Bureau of Agricultural Economies, U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
The figures show that the production of colored and
uncolored margarine in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina
and Tennessee advanced 1,653 per cent from 1939 to 1948
and the number of federally licensed manufacturing
plants expanded 266 per cent, or from three to 11.

For a comprehensive statistical review
of the growth of the 01eo industry in
the Southeast see also the 1947 Census
of Manufactures Report 10C20B available
at all Commnerce Department field offices*
Price 30d.
From 1940 to 1948, the number of retail stores
licensed to sell uncolored oleo had increased 120 per
cent, or from 18,683 to 41,202 in Alabama, Floridas
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee, and a 1,736 per cent gain took place
from 1943 to 1948 in the number of retail stores
licensed to sell either colored or uncolored margarine,
or from 378 to 6,941.
In the production field, the output in South Carolina
increased 2,670 per cent in 1948 over 1939, going from
480,000 pounds before the war to 13,297,000 in 1948. In
Georgia, a gain of from 2,937,000 to' 30,359,000 pounds,
or 933 per cent was registered, and in Alabama the
increase was 800 per cent*


SOUTBEAST WORLD TRADING ACTIVE


Ports in the Southeast last year handled nearly
33 billion pounds of goods valued at some $1,710.5 mil-
lion shipped to and from countries of the world.
Bot th tonag handled and value of last yer's~
shipments fell slightly short o h 61blinpud
of goodswith a valuation of approximately $1,789.6
million cleared through the ports in 1948.

Anyone wishing the free use of moving
picture films on world trade should get
in touch with the nearest Department of
Commerce field office. Those available
deal with the value of both imports and
exports; Canada's international trade
fair: and foreign service.

Shipments last year included 14,7461 million pounds of
products valued at $1,10l4.3 million shipped from the
United States to other countries, and 18,185.6 million
pounds with a valuation of $8606.2 million shipped from
foreign destinations for consumption in this country.
This compared with exports of 18 032.7 million pounds
valued at $1,172.6 million and 18~,158.8 million pounds
of imports with a value of $617 million handled in 1948.
A further etudy of Gensus Bureau figures on world
trading in the Southeast also revealed that a total of
2.7 billion pounds of commodities were shipped through
ports in the region last year to foreign countries par-
ticipating in the United States foreign-aid programs
administered by the Department of Defense. The abipments
represented about 13 per cent of the nations total of
20.7 billion pounds shipped under the program,
The goods shipped through Southeastern ports went to
ten foreign countries. Included were 728.3 pounds to
Germany; austria, 250.2 million; Italy, 5.4 million;
Trieste, 48.4 million; Greece, 117.6 million; Turkey,
2.5 million; Korea, 310.8 million; Taiwan in Formosa,
5 million; and Japan, 1,253.3 million.

UNEMPLGYEMET INSURANCE COLLECTIGIE HIGH


Collections with interest under the unemployment
insurance program neared the billion dollar mlark in the
Southeast at the end of 1949, the Bureau of Employment
Security, U. S. Department of Labor, announced.
A total of $b970,891,000 badboeen ~psaid-in-tbheState s
of Aliabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Nortb Caro-
lina, South Carolina and Tennessee. QC that amount,
$395,818 000 bad been disbursed in oumuilative benefits
leaving 1575,074,000 available for further benefits.

There is still time to get the Cgggfg
Business Patterns Supsinese Estab3,iah-
ments. Employment and Taxable Pay Rolla
data compiled by the Colmmerce Department
from Social Security reports. It's for
all Statse and the U. S. It's a must for
_those looking for markets. 15d to 554.
The figures also showed that the total sum with inrt-
erest collected for the nation as a whole at the end of
1949 was $14,025,738,000.
Benefits under the program first began in most of the
Southeast as early as 1938. In Florida, they did not
start until 1939.
North Carolina, with $b217,110,000 collected led the
other six Southeastern States, but Tennessee was ahead
in cumulative benefits paid, with $91,841,000.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









I


EGTAL CAN SHIPMENTS INCREASE


The South Atlantic and East South Central regions!
wrere the only ones in the country showing an increase inl
shipments of metal cans in the first quarter of 1950 as ~
compared with the fourth quarter of 1949*
Thle Information was contained in a current Facts For
indpjury report issued by the Bureau of the Census. It
showed that shipments of metal cans from the South At-
lantic area in the first three months of 1950 totalled
116,135 short tons of steel consumed in their mann.
facture against 111,133 tone consumed in the fourth
quarter of 1949, and shipments from the East South Cent.
ral section were 7,689 and 7,649 tone, respectively.

These Facts For Industry reports
are issued for a number of indust-
ries and are available at all Com.
mere Department field offices for
the making,
Ah the other hand, shipments for the United Statses
as a whole in the first quarter at 1950 totalled 643,-
879 tone compared with 732,122 tons in the fourth
quarter of 1949, with all other regions except those
in the Southeast registering decreases,
Shipments in the first quarter of 1950 were up, hw-
ever, in all regions of the country as compared with
the first quarter of 1949, exLcept in the New England
section where a slight decrease was registered.
The metal oans referred to in the Census Bureau's
report are defined as nan unused container which is
made wholly from tin plate, terne plate, black plate,
or waste plate, and is manufactured from steel sheet
of 29 gauge or lighter.

CONFECTIONERYS SALES DWN

MYanufacturersl confectionery sales were mostly
down in the Southeast in the first quarter of 1950 as
compared with the corresponding period in 1949, the
Bureau of the Census reported*
Sales were off 8 per cent in Georgia and F.~rLoa~aa 4
per cent in Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama and Missisa-
ippi, and 7 per cent in Mdaryland, Delaware, the Dist"
rict of Columbia, Virginias and Carolinas*

Each year, the Department of Commerce
: -- iaeues a comprehensive report on the
confectionery industry entitled Co Q4
ionery Sales & Distribution. Watch for
the 19A19 revert. which is due soon.

A total of 46 firms in the Southeast which partici-
pated in the Census Bureauts survey reported dollar
sales for the first three months of 1950 as $7,339,000.
Same encouragement was found by the manufacturers
in the Census Bureau report in the fact that sales in
March of this year were 6 per cent higher in Kentucy,
Tennessee, Alabama and M~ississippi than they were in
March 1949 and one per cent greater in Georgia and
Florida.
Nationally, sales were down 4 per cent in the first
quarter of 1950 from the same period last yrear,
Bar goods continued to be much more popular in sales
than any' other type of confectionery sold in the coun-
try. Sales of that kind of confectionery in the first
three shonths of 1950 apprazimated 204,422,000 pounds
compared with 194,048,000 pounds in the same period in
1949. Bulk goods -- the penny product were also
high in sales.


HIGHLIGBTI~S &F THE BUSINESS WORLD)


(For Furrther Details (h Any Qf These Items, Ask Your
Nearest department of Comrmerce Field Office For
Copies of the Releases)


Led by private homebuilding, construction activ-
ity in April exceeded all previous records for that
month. Total value of newn construction put in place was
estimated at $1.7 billion, a seasonal increase of 10
per cent over the MYarch estimate and 24 per cent more
than in April 1949. In the first four) months of 1950,
a total of $b6.1 billion was spent for new construction,
20 per cent more than in the same period in 1949.
-o-
Personal income in Mlarch, inclusive of the apeolal
insurance dividend payments to veterans, was at an an-
nual rate of $222.7 billion, $b3.6 billion higher than
in Febnrary. Three-fourths of the February-March rise
was due to special factors, including resumption of
coal iningln operations followed by increases in payments
to veterans from the National Servie Life Insuranoe
fund.
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of Mdarch wrere
estimated at $55 billion. After allowance for seasonal
variations, the book value of inventories increased
$500 million in March. The increase occurred in stocks
held by retailers and wholesalers. Manufacturers' in-
ventories were unchanged from the end of February.
-o-
A sales decrease of 2 per cent was recorded by large
independent retailers in April compared with the same
month last year, the Census Bureau reported after its
monthly survey. Lumber and building materials dealers
showed an average sales gain of 16 per cent, motor-
vehicle dealer 8 per cent, and furniture stores 3 per
cent. On the other hand, generally lower sales were
recorded by food stores, general stores, eating and
drinking places, jewelry stores, department and hardware
saorea.
-o-
Grose national product in the first quarter of 1950
was $264 billion in terms of seasonally adjusted rates.
This exceeded the corresponding figure for enoh quarter
last year, and represented an advance of about $7 bil-
lion from the fourth quarter,
-o-
Production of building materials during February con-
tinued the trend of mid-winter declines, showing a 3
per aent drop from January. Despite this drop, overall
materials output remained about 8 per cent above the
level of a year ago.
-o-
Production of cotton broad woven goods amounted to
2,444 million linear yards in the first quarter of 1950,
the Census Bureau announced. This wras the highest quar-
terly production since the second quarter 1948 when
2,535 million yards were reported. Cotton tire cord and
fabric production in the first quarter increased by 6
million pounds, reversing the general downward trend in
recent quarters,
-o-
Robert F. A. Studds has been sworn in as Director of
the Coast and Geodetic Surey of the U. S. Deparbaent
of Commerce Formerly a captain, the new director as-
anaea the rank of Rear Admiral. He has been serving as
Chief of the Division of Charts of CGS.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





AlEN BOGHS ALND REPGHTS3

(To obtain coodes of this maaterial. oheok it in the
amoe orovided, and send this meae of the Bulletin
.af Commerce to .vanr nearest Deoartment of Ocus~eroe


Cotton Production & Distribution Bull. 186...208
Survrey at Current Businese...$b3 yr..Single ....25#
Summary of State Gor. Finances (Gs9FA69-No.1)......
Construction & Can. Mata. Ind. Report....$3 yearly
Lumber, Plywrood & Allied Prods. Ind. R~pt..$1.25 yr~-
Welding Equipment (Selected Referencees)......11)#Q
Liquefied Petroleum Gases (Comnodity Reviewr)...10g)
Aliphtio Salvent Chemicals (Commodity Reviewr)....
Phosphorus El~eaental (Commnodity Review)...........
Carbon Diaxide (Commodity Reviewr)..........,......
Retail Furniture Stores Average Operating Ratios.
Organic Obaemicals Production 1938-48..*********.....
Premium Advertising (Basic Information Sourrces)....
Potato Chipe (Reference Souroes)...........,.......
Groorery, Meat & Produce Stores (Referencre Sources).
Manufactured Dairy Products (Reference Souroes)....
Hown Food Mbfra. Can Benefit From Food fioker Svas...
Hobby Shope Can Be Profitable(BAo.0)....
Catering Servrices (SBAL No. 505).......... 0).......
Estimates of Population of Con. U.S.(P-25, #39)....
July 1, 1947 to 1949.......,...........
Monthly Report on labor Fore, April 1950 (P-Fl #194)
Grose Changes in Labor Force, Feb.-Mar.1950

SSchool Eurollaent of Worker in U.S. .t1949 (P-50,
No 23).
L7 Proisional Estimates of Population of Gen. .S
March 1, 1950 (P1-25i, No. 40)..
Capi 50 ebprn arom au~e c Cu.B s....
L7American Business & WarlZ1 Trade Address by Sea.
of Coneo Charles Sawyrer, .......
L7 The Seventeenth Deennial Censue !i ddeso
Sea. of Cammerce Charles 8 nyr ....
Netal Cans March 1950 (FFI lfl5D e ..........


Geasus of Mdanufactures 1020H (Yalmou ooo
Prodtl/**************************..10

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

UNIV. OF FL LIa.

ADOCUEL



U.S. DEPObITORY


557~ SMALLL BUSIlG~SS IDS

Soultheasterners engaged in food brokerage and cater-
ing series, or in the operation at hobby shop will
find valuable suggestions and ideas" in three new Smaan
Business Aida just issued by the Department of Cammerce.
They areas
How Food Manufacturera Can Benefit From Food roker
Services Number 503
Hobby Shone Can Be Profitable Number 504
04terity Serv3,oop Number 505.
Described in the leaflet on food brokerage services
are the functions of that business, methods of payment
to the broker for his services, and the advantages to
be derived by a producer from broker connections. Also
covered are the selection of brokers by a food prooeas-
or, how to obtain the maximum benefits from the services
they offer, and how to maintain satisfactory business
relationships with brokers,
In t~,he hobly hop Aide a outline of the diversified
requirements for successful operation of such a shop is
provided, and other practical aspectsa of hobby shop
operation are taken up, including capital, equipment,
and so forth,
Experience in the selection, cooking and serving of
food as a valuable asset to a prospective owner of a
catering establishment situa a sufficient business back.
ground and administrative ability in the operation at
such a business are stressed.

WQ~BLLD TRADE YEARBOOK

Issuance of a "Foreign Commerce yearbook for 1948.
has been announced by the Office of International Trade*
U. S. Department of Commneree,
The publication, a resumption of a previous project
"a'I.Mndb b his wmial dboume of nmda uotan aM Wtab ,
showing the direction of trade, commodity composition of
total trade, and also of trade with the United States*
other subjects include area and population, agriculture>
mining and manufacturing, transportation and commumnica-
tion and finance*


war have been noted in the individual country sections*
Buckram bound, the book will sell for $2*
GPO DSO 10-


office. Your name and address are on the canosite


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
3 1262 08748 8333
BULLETIN ur summmw.c


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street 5.W.
Atlanta 3; Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS *
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, Number 11, June 1, 1950


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


LEROTI L. QUALdTS

GRINESVILSE, PhqightO~





SOUPTHEALSTERN BUSINESS GOCD


PROD~UREMENT PROGRAMl BRGADE16


There are now nearly 70 outlets in the Southeast
through which local businessmen may obtain information
as to purchases being made by the United States Govern-
ment to meet the day-to-day needs for supplies of ita
armed services and its ordinary governmental activities.
Chambers of Conmerce and other agencies function-
ing in the seven States comprising the Southeastern
Region of the U. S. Department of Commerce Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee -- have indicated a desire to
cooperate in getting the information to their local
business firms.

Those Chambers of Colmerce and other
qualified agencies which have not as yet
requested this service may do so through
their nearest Goam~erce Department offiqq.

Briefly, the program was instituted a short time
ago by the U. S. Department of Conmerce, OFfice of De-
fense and General Services Administration to afford e-
qual opportunity to all business firms -- large and
small to participate in the Government's purobases
by making available to them each day a description of
the cormodity being purchased, quantity of purobase,
and return date for the bid through Commerce Department
field offices and cooperating agencies. Accordingly, this
information is now available at the following offices
in the Southeast:

U. S. Department of Comrmerce, 308 Federal Building,
Mobile; Alabama State Planning Board, Montgomery; Annis-
ton Chamber of Commeroe; Birmingham Chamber of Conmmerce;
Fairfield Chamber of Goamerce; Decatur Chamber of Can-
mseroe; Jasper Chamber of Commeree; SyLacauga Chamber
of Commerce; Florence Chamber of Colmmerce; Gadsden
Chamber of Commerce; Sheffield Chamber of Commerce;
H~untsville Chamber of Com~ere; and Alexander City Cham-
ber of Conmmerce.
Florida
U. S. Department of Comrcre, 425 Foderal Wlild-
ing, Jackseonville, and 947 Seybold Building, miami;
Tampa Chamber of Comrce; Lakeland Chamber of Com-
merce; Miami Chamber of Commerce; Orlando Chamber of
Commerce; Panama City Chamber of Coemeroe; Pensacola
Chamber of Comere; St. Petersburg Chamber of Comeroe;
and Tallahassee Chamber of Commeroe.
Geori
U. 8. Department of Comrcae, 418 Atlanta Wational
(Continuea on Page 2)


The first quarter of 1950 brought eshrp, upward
trends in most lines of business in the Southeast ovrer
the corresponding period last year, according to a
Sumrmary of Business Conditions prepared by the Atlanta
Regional Office of the U. S. Department of Colmeroe.
Increases included substantial gains in bank depoe-
ite, loans and debited; retail trade; telephones; new
business incorporations; urban building; airline rev~en-
ne; production of electric energy; imports; and in a
number of lines of industry.
On~e black spot on an otherwise bright business pic-
ture for the region eas a 19 per cent decrease in cash
farm income, due largely to a 69 per cent decline in
Mississippi and smaller drops for North Carolina, South
Carolina, Alabama and Georgia. In railroad revenue, de-
partment store trade, and wholesale sales other declines
occurred, but they were somewfhat less severe than the
drop in oash farm revenue.

If you are not already on the mailing
list to receive these Business S~iimmar-
ies quarterly, ask your nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce office to have them
pent to you. They are gratise

The report was the first quarterly review for
1950 of business conditions in Alabam~a, Florida, Geor-
gia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee issued by the Commerce Department. It rep-
resented a composite of data compiled by the Depart-
ments of Comrmerce, Agriculture and Labor, Federal Be-
serve Banks of Atlanta and Richmond, Federal Power Cam.-
mission, Association of American Railroads, Dun and
Bradstreet, Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Con-
pany, and Southern Pine Association. 1
Bank deposited in Federal Reserve member banker of
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miselesippi and Tennessee
rose nearly $200 million to $15,720.6 million, and loans
vere up $124 million, totalling $1,595 million at the
end of March. Bank debited in those five Statse and in
North Carolina and South Carolina increased 7 per cent,
reaching a high mark of $15,004.8 million.
Retail trade advanced in 18 of 21 areas in which
the Cenous Bureau conducts monthly survey, the gains
ranging from 4 per cent in Kingsport, Tenn., to as high
as 25 per cent in Bilozi, Mise. New urban building ex-
pendituree were up sharply in all States with a resul-
tant 52 per cent gain for the region. Electric ener87
produced in the area vas 11 per cent greater, and import
activities were nearly 12 per cent more.


CHARLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


ATLMlTA 3, GA.
0W~hitehall St., 3.&,
Tel. tl~lut 4)121 X-463


SAVAMMANS, GA. JACKSDaVILLE, FLA. MIMIl 32, FLA MOBILE, ALA.
I~os~ 218, P.O. Bldge, 425 Federal Bldg., 9Y7 Seybold $1dg.. 308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-1)765 Tel. 4)-71)1 Tel. 9-7538 Tel. 2-3641


VOL. 4, NO. 12


JUNE 15, 1950


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE




1ILTOI 0F C'~ E







I


0018TRUCTION BRINGS LUMBER DEMALND

The building boca which struck the Southeast and
other regions of the country this year is having a
beneficial effect on the movement to market of one of
the South's most important products --- lumber,
This fact was set forth in a current report of
the Lumber Survey Committee, which advises the Secretary
of Commerce on conditions in the industry.
The report stated that the new constriction situa-
tion had created a 'nsaear-ecrd demand" nationally for
lumber in the first quarter of 1950 with the result that
shipments had amoeeded supplies by 11 per cent and un-
filled orders had increased 25 per cent.

Copies of these reports, issued quar-
terly ar e available through anly field
office of the Department of Conmerce
without charred.

In the South, it was added, most mills are report-
ed to be uunning on a 40-horur week. Manqy small mills
which closed down have resumed operations, attracted by
rising pr~ies.
"AlCthough costs of production have increased sub-
atantially, largely because of the 75-cent minirmum wage
lawr, production in the Southern States in the first
quarter was about 7 per cent greater than in the first
quarter of 1949," the report stated. "Although producrt-
ion is increasing and current levels are higher in all
the major regions than in the spring of 1949, they still
fail to meet the demand for lumber for construction and
industrial purposes and the mills are drawing heavily on
their inventories.n
Production in the United States in the first quar-
ter of 1950 was estimated at 7,942 million board feet,
12.6 per cent less than the preceding quarter, but 7.4
per cent more than in the first quarter of 1949, the
committee said. Production was hampered in January and
February byr heavy rains in the South and unusually sev-
ere winter weather in the Northwest

PROD~UREME~NT PROGRAM Continued From Page 1)

Building, Atlanta; U. S. Department of Gormerce, Roan
218, Post Office Building, Savannah; Southern Plywood
Manufacturers Association, 728 West Peachtree St., N. WI.,
Atlanta; Thomaston Chamber of Commeroe; East Point
Chamber of Commeree; Thormaaville Chamber of Comneroe;
Amerious Chamber of Colmeroet Dalton Chamiber of Cormmeroe;
Athens Chamber of Comneroe; Carrollton Chamber of Com-
meroe; Albany Chamber of Commerce; Georgia State Depart-
ment of Comieroe, Atlanta; Macocn Chamber of Comnerce;
and Rome Chamber of Commerce,
Ygississinni
Missiesippi agricultural and Industrial Board, Jack-
son; Laurel Chamber of Comnerce; Vicksburg Chamber of
Comnerole; and MYeridian Chamber of Conmerce.
North Carolina
Marganton Chamber of Colmerce; Thomausville Chamber
of Commeroe; Sanford Chamber of Comneroe; Salisbury
Chamber of ComneroeJ L~enoir- Chamber of Comneroe; States-
ville Chamber of Comesrcei Shelby Chamber of Commeroe;
Graham Chamber of Conmeroe; Ashboro Chamber of Commero~e;
Burlington Chamber of Golmesrei Greenville Chamber of
Comneroe; Charlotte Obamber of Comreroe; HIickory Chamber
of Commerce; high Point Obamber of Comnerce; Raleigh
Chamber of Comneroe3 North Carolina Conservation and
Development Conmission, Raleigh; and Wilmington Chamber
of ComerCe,
South Carolina
U. S. Department of Comepnroe, 310 Peoples Building,
(Continued on Next Page)


RETAIL,'WHQ[.ESALE SALES R]BE


Advances almost all salng the line in the Suhat
in retail and wholesale trade activities in Aprril at
this year over the same month last year were reflected
in monthly Bureau of the Census reports on trade activi-
ties in the region.
Gains in retail sales were reorded far 18 of 22
cities and areas included in monthly surveyed in the re-
gion, while whiolesale sales were rising 6 per cent in
the South Atlantic section and 2 per cent in the best
South Central,
Increases in retail sales included 25 per cent in
Augusta; 22 per cent in Marcon; 16 per cent in Columbus,
Ga., and Bilaod; 16 per cent in Savannah; 13 per cent
in Johnson City and K~ingaport, Tenn; 10 per cent in
Birmingham; and lesser gains in Atlanta, Asheville,
Greenwood, S. C., Gulfport, Jefferson County, Alabama;
Harrison and Stone Counties, Mise.i Mdanatee andSaao
Counties, Fla.i Degalb, Fulton and Rochdale Counties,
Ga; Buncombe and Madison Counties, N. C.; and Greenwood
and MdcCormick Counties, S. C.

These monthly trend reports in the
retail and wholesale trades are avail-
able gratis at any Depertment of Cam-
areroe..1a14..offices.._._ .._.

The only decreases reported were declines of 31
per cent in Clarksdale, Misa; 29 per cent in Coahcan
and Quitman Counties, Mise; and 20 per cent in Bleakley
and Twiggs Counties, Ga.
Contributing factors in the increase in wholesale
sales in the two regions were gains of 16 per cent in
automotive suppieel 52 per cent in lumber and building
materials; 10 per cent in hardware; 43 per cent in
*electrical appliances and specialtiesc; 18 per cent in
specialty grocery lines; and 16 per cent in wines and
spirits,
The increases in the Southeast in April compared
writh a 2 per cent decline for the nation. Corresponding
gains in oumulative sales in the first four months of
1950 over the same period last year were registered in
the same cities and areas experiencing increase in
April sales.
AUPTdYO~aIlE ANTIREEZES


Mltobaists in the Southeast who are still driving
around with last winter's antifreese in their tautmo-
biles may be headed for car trouble.
This, in substance, is the highlight of a pamphlet
issued by the .National Bureau of Standards, U. S. De-
partment of Cammerce entitled "Automotive Antifreezes."
The pamphlet points out, among other things, that
during use, the antifreese solution can become contami-
nated by leakage or azhaust gas, particularly the asides
of carbon and sulfur which reast writh alkalinre compounds
in the antifreeze inhibitor to form salts.

This pamphlet is priced at 15e and
is available at all Department of Com-
aerc offices.

"As in the cae of salt-base antifreezes, even the
addition of newr inhibitor cannot prevent corrosion by
these salts," the study states. "Gontaminated anti-
freeze solutions with depleted inhibitors can oane
more corrosion and rut formation than unilnhibited hard
water if their use is continued indefinitely**
The pamphlet consists of 3b pages of text matter
and bibliograpb7*


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE







I


ECON(WIC DEVELOPMENT ATIAS


HIGELIGHEPS & THE BUSIMISS WORLD

(Far Furtber Details (h any O These Itemse, ask YoUr
Nearest Department of Caemerce Field O~ffce Far Copies
Qf The Releases)


Total sales of retail stores in April amounted to
$11,095 million, about equal to the figure for the same
month a year ago. After adjusting for seasonal factors
and differences in the number of trading days, dollar
sales in April were fractionally below the value regis-
tered in March.
-o-

Producers of nitrogenous fertiliser materials,
bitupinous coal, and coal coke in the South and other
sootions of the country may now ship their products to
aq destination in the world without the necessity of
obtaining validated licenses for such shipments as a
result of action taken by the Office of International
Trade, U. S. Department of Camesroe, to remove those
commodities from the so-called positive Ilit.*
-o-
In the first quarter of 1950, United States anne
facturere used 16 per cent more new rubber in makngn
non-transportation goods and 4.2 per cent more in the
manufacture of tires, tues, camelback and tire repair
materials than in the first three months of 1949.
1-o
A decline in international trade in leather foot-
wear is anticipated during the immediate future, altho
world production and consurmption are expected to expand
ealay. Local supplies of leather footwear should keep
pace with the expected gradual increase in per capital
consumption, thus reducing the volume of international
trade and creating keener competition in world markets.
-o-
Sales of chain store and mail-arder houses in
April amounted to $b2,332 million. After adjusting for
seasonal factors, including the shifting date of Easter,
sales in April were fractionally above March.
-o-
Manufacturersl business in April was off somewhat
from the high March rate, although still above Janluary
and February and well above a year ago. Aggregate values
of both sales and new orders were well above year-ago
totals. Mduch of the decline from March was attributed
to seasonal factors and the short work month.
-o-
Cash dividend payments made br corporations issuing
public reports amounted to $483 200,000 in April 1950,
or 3} per cent more than the $67,100,000 paid out in
april of last year. Publicly reported oash dividend pay-
ments in the three months ended April aggregated $1,514.8
million, or 8 per cent more than in the same three months
of 1949.
-o*
Sales of knit underwear and nig~htwear totaled 437.5
million dollars in 1949, an increase of 16 per cent over
1947, the Census Bureau reported. The overall rise re-
flected a 55 per cent increase, to 201.9 million dollars,
in knit rsaon and nylon shipments. K~nit cotton arxl wool
underwear and nightwrear sales for 1949 equaled 295.6
million dollars, 5 per cent less than 1947.
-o-
Average weekly cuttings of men's apparel during
March continued to exceed last years production, accord-
ing to the Census Bureau. All iteae except summer-eight
suits and sport shirts registered decreased output from
FebrPuary to March of this year. Sunmer-weight suit out-
tings, averaging 155.7 thousand weekly in Mlarch, ran 21
per cent ahead of March a year ago.


The Southeast and other regions of the United
States are narrowing the economic differentials which
have existed for years between those areas and the
more industrialiseed Newr England sad Mi~ddle Eastern
regions, according to a new publication just issued by
the Office of Dam~estic Cammerce, U. S. Department of
Commerce*
The publication, entitled nEconomic Developnent
Atlas Recent Changes in Regions and States," is a
graphic presentation of howr the ecoonogr of the United
States, by States and regions, has changed in recent
years*

This publication is available at all
Department of Cam~erce field offices
for 'Z t

The publication, described by Secretary of Coaomere
Charles Sawyer as one which should prove useful to busi-
neas and industrial planning executives, contains fou~r-
teen schematic m~aps, each accompanied by brief narra-
tires and tables. The mape depict the shares of nation-
al econcaio gains as distributed among the nine regions
into which the country la divided and among the States.
It covers such factors as population, manufacturing,
agricultural operations, and total and per capital in-
com*
The maps, terbs and tables of the Atlas are so
arranged as to enable the user to determine the develop-
aent status and development trends of each State and
region to determine abealute gains and rates of in-
creases on twelve specific points.

PRODUREMIENT PROGRAM~ Continued From Page 2)

Charleston; Anderson Chamber of Cormeroe; Charleston
Chamber of Commero~e; Georg~etown Chamber of Commeroes
Greenville Chamber of Comrmerole; and Spartanburg Chamber
of Ca~mer~ee*
Tennessee
Chattanooga Chamber of Commeroe; Knarville Chamber
of Commerce; Mlaryville Chamber of Commerce; and Cleve-
land Chamber of ComPeroe.

SOUTHEASTERN UIMPORTS INDRFASE

Customer districts in the Southeast in the first
quarter of this year handled goods from other countries
valued at $18,700,000 more than in the first three
months of 1949*
Imports through customer district ports of Narth
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mobile and
New Orleans at the end of Mdarch this year were valued
at $179,400,000 compared writh $160,700,000 at the same
time last year. The figure were on goods handled by
land, sea and air*

Bare you a problem on world trade?
All CoImerce Department field offices
in the Southeast are equipped to give
ICE .aanistance...n such .matters._ ..

South Carolina registered an increaa6 of $15,100,-
000 in the value of goods handled through ite Charles-
ton port this year over last year, in MQobile the value
was $3,800,000 up, sad in North Carolina a rise of
$2,700,000 was reported*
Georgia and Florida both recorded dooreases, the
former $2,000,000 and the other $1,400,000.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3






PAGE 4

RQADBUILDING IN SOUITBEAST

Funds totalling $241;,786,000 for the construction
of 6,282 miles of highways in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenese
were available as of April 30 of this year, the Burean
of Public Roads, U. S. Department of Comrmere, none,
Qf that sum, $96,05L4,000 had been programmned; plans
bad been approved for the use of $b32 350,000, but con-
struction had not been started and 11U3,382,000 was
being used in construction already under way.
Of the overall total in the active program, $11l9,-
127,000 were Federal funds and the remainder were being
appropriated locally.

Public Roads, a magazline type publi-
cation is issued by the Bureau of Pub-
lic Roads bimonthly, and covers many
current subjects dealing with highway
construction and usage. Its subearip-
tion price is $b0.75 a year, and it is
obtainable through any Commerce Depart-
meqi field officee,

In the unprogranmmed balances to the credit of the
seven Southeastern States was a total of $56,406,000 on
the last day of April.
The total in the active program included Alabama,
$30,775,000; Florida, $27,969,000; Georgia, $60,946,000;
Mississippi, $b9,110,000; North Carolina, $b45 821,000;
South Carolina, $21,091,000; and Tennessee, ~46,074,000.

LUMBER PRODUCTION DOWN

Production of softwoods and hardwoods in the South-
east in 1947 was about 1.3 billion board feet less than
in 1946, according to a: final report from the Census of
Manufactures just released by the Bureau of the Census.

(This is a Facts For Industry Report ,
Series M13G-)7, entitled Forest Products:
1947, Lumber, Lath, and Shingle Product-
ion, available gratis at all Commerce De-
partment offices).
Dutput in 1947 totalled 8.4 billion feet compared
with 9.7 billion in 1946, and included 6.1 billion feet
of softwood in 1947 and 2.3 billion feet of hardwood,
and 5.0 and 3.2 billion, respectively in 1946.


NEW BOOKSj AND REPORTS

(To obtain copies of this materials check it in the
gpace provided. and send this pure of the Bulletin
of Commerce to your nearest Department of Commerce
offiee, Your name and address are on the opposite

United Statep, ItemPs not priced are fe.
Southeastern Business Surmmaries ....................
Monthly Retail Trade Reports ................... ....
Monthly Wholesale Trade Reporte........ ............
Automotive Antifreeses..............,..........15#
Lumber Survey Committee Report...........
Economic Development Atlas............5
Pub ic ods.............................750 early
oetProducts:1947 (FFI M13G-07I)............., ,
Copyrights & Copyright Office Services (SBQ 506)...
Direat-Mail Advertising (BIS); ..........,.....,.. .
Cheadeals & Druge (Ind. Rpt. May 1950)..$2.50 Yearly
Gross Changes in Labor Force,M~ar.4Bpl.1950 P-499#15..
American Expenditures for Foreign Travel in 1949....
Fire Resistance of Wells of Lightweight-bggegrtep
Concrete Masonry Unite (NIES BMS117)..20p
r ) Census Publications 1949 Catalog & Subject
Guide .............,..................45#
Cotton System Spinning Activity (FFI 815 3-9-50....
Fatal & Oils (FFI #17i-1-4).........................
Tractors, 1949 (FFI M637-09) ....................,,
Cotton & Rayon Woven Goods Finished, 1949 (FFI).,,,
The Geographic Bases of Urban Planning (BIS).......
nCompetition" Address by Comrmeroe Sec.Sawyer....
Act Nowr To Increase Your Frozen Food Sales..(SB8314)
Handling Frozen Foode in the Grocery Store..(SB8389)
Operating a Retail Food Business.......(SBAA23) )
Building Mlore Profitable Produce Sales.,,(SBA448)8 I
Repackaging of Prodnoe in the Retail Store..(SBA408)
Proper Care & H~andling of Fresh Produce.....(SBA40b7)
Results from Pre-packaging Fresh Fruita & Vepe("378)
Retailing Produce. ...............,. ........(SBQ294)
Developing Competitive Advantages in a Retail F~urn-
iture Store. .................. .....(SBA28)
SEffective Use of Floor Display in Furniture
Store .............................(SBA296)
Facts About the Used Purniture Store......(BA 162)
Furniture Stores & Interior Decoratore...(SBQ 182)
How to Merchandise Nursery Furniture.......(8BA 270)
Establishing & Operating a Gift & Art Shop.....154
Are These Your Grocery Problema?.. .........(SBA 437)
Lo-111


BC-6-JF


LOTV 2 ~ITYI 0 FLORIIDA
LER3Y L. QUALLS
DEPARTZED:IT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

BULLETI 3llllll Wlllllllll1II III iJ
2 13R 62~ 08748


I~A Y FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
ia TPA EAGE $300


.3 F


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, Number 12, June 15, 1950


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLANTA 8, GA. SAVIlAII5, GA. JACKS2ilviLLE, FLA. MIAMI1 32, FLL MOBILE, ALA CIIARLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., LL, Amonl 218, P.O. Ild.. 4)25 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Oldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tl~lut 4)121 X-468 Tel. 2-4765 e.471 Tel. 9-7683) Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



VQL I NO. 2 JULY 1, 1950


ADDITIONAL PROCURFIElff INFORMATION


TREND UPWARD IN SOUTHEAST POPULATION

A sharp increase in population in the Southeast in
1950 as compared with ten years ago was indicated in a
tabulation mnade by the Atlanta Regional Office of the
U. S. Department of Comrmerce on the basis of prelimnnary
reports from the 1950 census received from more than 50
per cent of the counties in the region.
The reports, received from 313 of a total of 616
counties in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missiesippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee, showed a 1950
population of 8,111,4?.2, or a 6 per cent gain over the
7,647,537 reported for those counties in 1940.
The reports did not include the larger cities in the
Region, such as Atlanta, Birmingham, M~emphis, Jackson-
ville, Mdiami, Tampa, Obattanooga and Knaxville, most if
not all of which undorubtedly wrill reflect substantial
increases in population.


Beginning July 15, Southeastern business firs and
others interested will be able to obtain from all De-
partment of Camnerce field offices and cooperating out-
lete in the region the names of contractors awarded
Armgr, Navy and Air Farce contracts at $b25,000 and over,
Under the program, wPhich is part of a further effort
to make military procurement information wide27 avail-
able to businessmen of the Southeast and elsewhere, each
of the military departments will p~repae~ a weekly synop-
ala at awrards on unclassified, negotiated and formally
advertised contracts amounting to $25,000 or more. In
addition to names and addresses, the synopses will con-
tain the items to be purobased and the apprazimate value
of each award.


At the close of each wreek, the synopses will be
mailed to the Chicago office of the Department of Com-
merce where they will be consolidated and distributed
to the more than 1,200 information outlets through the
United Statse and Hawaii. Among the outlets are Commrce
Department field offices and cooperating groups, such
as Chambers of Comnmerce, trade associations and State
development and industrial commissions. Here in the
Southeast, some 100 such agencies are cooperating in
distributing this information.


In addition to the 313 counties included in the tabu-
lation, a total of 636 cities and towns located in those
States was also represented. Of the 313 counties shown,
167 reflected decreases in population and 146 as~perienced
increases, and l498 of the cities and towns reported in-
creases, indicating to some degree a migration from rural
to urban areas in manmy sections of the region. The total
population of the cities and towrns in 1950 was placed at
2,751,976 compared with 2,180,787 in 1940.


SURVEY & BUYPINQ P0115 IN1 800PT)IEST IN ~1;99


If you are interested in obtaining in-
formation on Federal Government procure-
ment activities, get in touch with your
nearest Department of Commerce field of-
lf ee or your Chamber of Campqeroe


Your nearest Department of Commeroe field
office is receiving census of population
figures for its area. Get in touch with
them for latest information on the subject.


Alabama
Florida
Geargia
Misississppi
Nar~th Caro.
South Caro.
Tennessee


8 urce:t Sales .Manarrement .MA~ansin
Nfobe: The above data are avaiable far all cities, counties and States
in the United States. It interested, consult youtr nearest
Department f Comrmerce 1*24 office.


RETAL SAMES EFFECTIVE BUSIING PINDQAE EGR[
GE1gIERB agg. (muanor~~as Doctans Praan
151'AL F.01 MOP~e.. DREG ~IQME .iE FABMWJ
(THousamDs &P DQULAS) RBDIg ~ igi) (D6igg
1,769,247 34 156 199,551 48,6501,50 103,540O 2,54,6 864 3311 45,7
2,178,22,3 456,479 236,029 86,172 136,234 2,766,627 1090 3,587 389 950
2,050,064 44t1,928 332,992 62,063 116,345i 2,931,105 900 3,356 496,282
416,42287 2499951 333622 34,790 47623 1,792,442 831 3,066 617,206
2,230s425 413,555 275,185 60,437 133,533 3,3n~71,5: 877 3,636 787 082
1,104,746 239,837 138,596 31,935 6,366 1,711,148 852 3,383 306 531
1,895,116 407,050 302,419 55,645 102,412 2,800,789 874 3,298 451,023





FARMd MACHINERY SHIPMENTS HIGH


FARM INDOME CONTINDIJS DOW1WYARD;

Cash farm receipts in the Southeast in the first four
months of 1950 continued a downwrard trend begun last sun-
mer with the result that at the end of April this year

ang peiod ya cl8 pe, acodn t a ripwrtM asskdb
teA Buetof Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department
Cumulative receipts at the end of the first four
momth i of ths ar lin Aa~a Floori a, Georenia, iss-

werehestim~ated at 18605,032,000 compared with $740,201,000
In April of this year, a 16 per cent drop was record-
ed from the samae month last year, with all States, in-
oluding Florida, reflecting decreases. Up to April,
Floidida bad consistently recorded month-to-month in-
creases, due to good prices for citrus fruit.
A 24 per cent drop in cash receipts from crop prod-
ucts was a factor in the 18 per cent decline for the
fo r-month period The totalsa far cr pbpeoductawere
from livestock products were off per cent, or from
$r/282,768,000 last year to $258,171,000 this year.
All of the seven southeastern States except Florida
reflected decreases for the first four-month period of
this year as compared with 1949, Although that State
registered a 6 per cent decline in April 1950 from the
same month last year, substantial increases recorded
during the earlier months of the year enabled it to
finish the four-month period with a 19 per cent increase
over last year. Decreases included 44 per cent in MYiss-
issippi, 25 per cent each in North Carolina and South
Carolina, 18 per cent in Alabama, 12 per cent in Georgia
and 7 per cent in Te~nnessee.
00ff0N BAG aUTLOOKI GOOD

The market outlook for cotton bagel for the next few
months appears favorable in the Scoutheast, although there
has been a noticeable decline in demand from the milling,
feed and fertilizer industries in the first quarter of
1950, according to the current issues of the Coqtg5,nerp
pan Packaaine: Industry Revort issued by the U. S. Depart-
ment of Cocmmeroe.
The decline in demand from the several industries
was attributed partially to the open winter which permit-
ted nout of season" atook grazing, the report added.
Nevertheless, it was stated, production and shipments of
cotton bags during the first quarter were only lightly
below the same period of 1949.

For the latest and most comprehensive
discussions in the fields of containers
and packaging, subscribe for this report
ihog un Conmee Dep art t f ied er

While present demand is fairly strong, orders for
cotton bags are not being placed in advance and bulying

repor ::dd. Cij rary to t e lte a o 949e ar


low previous periods.
The report found a decline in the demand for meah
bags, due to the citrus fruit concentrate companies
taking a large part of the fresh citrus crop. The wooden
container business, long listed among the major indust-
ries of the South, presented a varied and spotty picture,
with increased volume of business in some sections and
reductions in others.


Manufacturers of farm machinery and equignent in the
.Southeast last year shipped products valued at a total
of $140 465 926, which was $23,510~0 get han te

CeValue f the shpments in 1949 included $21,520,645
in the South Atlantic States at ,Georgia, Florida, North
Caoia South Car ln, Delaae M aryd, 8h V

Tn ahesEasts aot Cntral sect on comprising Alabam~a'

Note: If you would like to have a copy of
this record. ask your Department of Com-
merce office for Facts For Id1ustPry. Farm
arachinery & Equipment, 1949, Series 185&8-09.
It, is qvqi,461e upon request"
.Value of the shipments from the Southeastern areasa
l Iudin kl0 929,7? in cmplete units, and $29,536,-
The value of the abipmnents from the Southeast in
1949repesened bout7 cent of the total value for
the nation as a whole of 1,7053Shpesfom
the East North Gentral region, valued at $1,12,316,566
predominated.
Value of the shipments from the Southeastern areas
were divided as followsr:
Plows and Listers: South Atlantic, $b3,609,815 and
East South Gentral, $13,180,453.
Barrows, Rollers, Pulverisers and Stalk Cutters:
South Atlantic, $3,103,120 and East South Central, $b5,-
335, 590.
Planting, Seeding, and Fertilizing Mdachinery: South
Atlantic, $j1,8L7,012 and East South Central, $j3,369,337.
Cultivators and Weeders: South Atlantic, $1,115,364
and East South Central, $3,938,762.
Haying Mlachinery: South Atlantic, $7T70,749*
Machines for preparing crope for market: South At"
lantic, $2,257,772*
Farm Wagons, Trucks, and other Farm Transportation
Equipment: South Atlantic, $1,151,675 and East South
Central, i$952,164*
Farm Dairy Mbachines and Equipment: South Atlantics
$62,165*
FATAL WEATHER ACCIDENTS IN SOUTHEAST

Twenty-seven fatal weathern accidents among non-
carrier planes occurred in the Southeast in 1948 and
1949, the Civil Aeronauties Administration, U. S. De-
partment of Commerce stated in a report just issues
entitled Fatal Accidents and WYeathier (Non-Ait* Carriers)
Cal nte n 1f 8h ad .t involved private p'lanes
and ten were operated by pilots with commercial type
certificates
Non-air carrier planes are those engaged in other




Nationally, -there were 850 fatal accidents in non-
air carrier flying in 1948, and the Civil Aeronantics
Board reported an estimate of 550 fatal accidents in
non-air carrier flying in 1949, a drop of 35 per cent
belonr 1948. Fatal accidents where weather was a factor
however, increased. In 1949 there were 142 such acci- *
dents in the nation, almost 30 more than in 1948.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE







I 1 _


TRANSPORTATION BUSfINUSS STEADY


HIGBILIGBT~S OF THE BUSINESS WORID)


(For Further Details On BAy Of These Items, Ask Your
Nearest Department of Comrmerce Field Office For Copies
Of The Releases)


Large independent retailers recorded a sales gain of
8 per cent in Mday 1950 over Mlay 1949, the Bureau of the
Census reported. In the same large stores, the average
gain from April to May this year amounted to It per cent,
Compared with Nray 1949, sales of lumber and building
materials dealers this year were up 39 per cent, and
their May sales this year were 23 per cent higher than
the preceding month of April.
+ + +
American business has revised upward its planned
expenditures on plant and equipment in 1950, according
to the latest survey of capital outlays made public
jointly by the U. S. Department of Comrmerce and the
Securities and Exchange Commission. The survey indicated
that expenditures for the first nine months of 1950 are
now expected to amount to $12.7 billion, only 6 per cent
less than for the corresponding period of 1949.
+ + +
Personal income in April, other than the special in-
surance dividend payments to veterans, was at an annual
rate of $212.8 billion as compared with $212.2 billion
for March. The $.6 billion increase from March to April
was reflected in an expansion in payrolls that was
largely offset by declines in proprietors income and
transfer payments.
*
Total business inventories at the end of April were
estimated at $54.9 billion. After allowance for seasonal
variations the book value of inventories increased $300
million during April, Wlholesalers' and manufacturers'
stocks increased $300 million and $100 million, respeat-
ively. Retailers' stocks were $100 million lower than
the end of the March level.
swa we
Sales of service and limited-Function wholesalers in
April were estimated at $/5,113 million. After adjustment
for seasonal variations, sales were 6 per cent under
]Karch, part of which decline was due to the unusually
large difference in working days between March and April
of this year, which was not fullyr reflected in the normal
seasonal adjustment,
+ +
Sales of consumers' durable goods, including automobiles
and the major household appliances, are somewhat higher
currently than the rate which would be expected on the
basis of current income and price levels alone. The cur-
rent heavy demand for new care reflects, in addition to
the high rate of personal income, deferred replacement
needs resulting from the stoppage in output during the


Total sales of all manufacturing concerns starting
productive operations in the 1946-48 period amounted to
almost $b15 billion during these years. By the end of
1948 those firms which survived accounted for 4 per cent
of the sales, and almost 30 per cent of the number, of
all manufacturing companies.
+++++
Pacing the current expansion in business activities
continues to be the more than seasonal rise in residen-
tial construction and motor vehicle output, which are
being reinforced by a renewed advance in business plant
and equipment expenditures, according to a review of the
business situation carried in the June issue of Sur122
of Current Business, monthly publication of the Office
of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Comrmerce.


Tefirst part, of 1950 found the transportation buls-
iness in the Southeast -- railroad and airlines -- re-
maningnc steady, according to reports received from the
Association of American Railroads and Civil Aeronau-
ties Administration, U. S. Department of Commerce.
The reports showed substantial increases in airline
activity :bt the first three months of 1950 over the
corresponding period last year, and only slight drop
in freight and passenger revenue for railroads opera-
ting in the South in the first four months of 1950
compared with the same period last year.
Airlines operating in the Southeast carried 150,129
more revenue passengers in the first three months of
1950 than they did from January to March of 1949, in-
oreasing the total mnumbr from 981,979 handled last
year to 1,132,108 this year. In express carried, they
saw the ~number of ton-miles rise from 1,625,223 to
1,986,967, or a gain of 361,744 miles, and in freight
carried the increase in the first quarter of 1950oer
the same period last year was 1,787,828 ton-miles
flown, or from 4,312,558 last year to 6,100,386 this
year.
In railroad operations, carriers in the Southern
region reported freight revenue in the first fourmohe
of this year aggregating $339,679,626, a slight reduct-
ion from the $345~,534,70 at the same time last year,
and passenger revenue of $36,612,955 and $42,733,723,
respectively,
In net railway operating income, however, the
Southern region roads experienced an increase in the
first four months of 1950 over the corresponding period
last year. The figures were 1950, $43,695,826; 1949,
$39,462,666,
SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF P0BTWAR BUSINESS


Employment afforded by firms with 1,000 or more em-
playees represented a smaller proportion of total em-
ployment in 1948 than during the war, but the proport-
tion has increased since the early part of the postwar
period, according to a study conducted by the OfEfice
of Business Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce.
The survey, results of which were produced in the
May issue of Syrvey of Current Business, showed that
from March 1945 to March 1948, the proportion of total
employed in firms with 1,000 or more workers declined
from 44 to 38 per cent, increased among firms with
fewer than 100 workers, and remained substantially un*
changed in the intermediate groups

The Survey of Current Business is a
monthly publication devoted to facts
and figures on current changes in the
economy of the nation. It is available
at any Department of Commnerce field
office on a subscription basis of $b3 a
yeare

Two factors were responsible for the reduction in
the relative importance of the top size group since the
end of the war, the article stated. JFirst, employment
among the largest firms, primarily in manufacturing,
dropped sharply at the end of the war, and their sub-
sequent recovery still fell short of the high wrartime
levels. Second, the boom conditions of the postwar
period fostered a pronounced growth in the business
population so that there were 750,000 more firms pro-
viding employment in 1948 than there were early in
1945*


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








I


CONFECTIONERY SALES CONTINUE DIN

manufacturers of confectionery, including chocolate
*products in the Southeast reported declines in sales
both in April of this year as compared with the ease
month last year, as well as in oumulative sales from
Jan-uary to April of this year against the corresponding
four-month period in 1949.
Firms located in Narth Carolina, South Carolina,
Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia and the Vir.
ginias estimated their sales as 16 per cent down in
April fr~om the same month last year, and 8 per cent
aff when comparing sales from January to April of 1950
with the corresponding period last year.
Firms in Georgia and Florida said their sales were
down 6 and 7 per cent, respective37.

This report was taken from a monthly
Facts For Industry Report received in
all Commerce Department offices on many
industries. They are all gratin, and
obtainable upon request.

The survey, conducted by the Bureau of the Gensus,
also showed that 15 firms in Georgia and Florida in
April of this year sold goode valued at $1,024,000
with cumulative sales of $4,025,000 from Jarnuary to
April, while 23 firms in the other States in the
South Atlantic region had sales of $b583,000 and $2,457,
000, respectively.
ATOMIC ENERGY AND LIFE SCIENCES

This is the age of atomic energy and the United
State Atomic Energy Comrmission, anticipating the in-
creased interest in that subject has issued a publi-
cation entitled Atomic Eqaergy qnd the Idfe Scieneep.


NIM BOaGS AND REPORTS

(To obtain copies of this material. check it in the
space provided. and send this page of the Bulletin
of Commerce to your nearest Department of Commeroe
office. Your name and address are on the opposite
side. Make remittances payable to Tregaurer of the
United States. Items not pDri~ed are free.)

Farm Machinery & Equipment, FFI 5358&4.............
Containers & Packaging Industry Report......600 Year
Survey of Current Business...............$f3.00 Year
confectionery Sales, FFI Report............,........ .
Superphosphate, April 190, FFI Report...............
Softwood F13wood...FFI Report. ............,..... ...
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding.Prods.,FFI. ..........
Cotton Broad Woaven Goods, FFI Report................
Cotton System Spinning Activity, FFI Repor~t.........
Work Experience of the Population in 1949,P50,#21..
Population of the Canal Zone,Apl.1,1950,PC-4,#1. ....
Population of Virgin Islands of U.S.Apl.1,1950 Pot-#22
Monthly Report on Labor For~e,May,1950,P57-#9j~; 5 ......
Density of Solids & Liquida, NBS~ircr.487........204
uiness & Godt. An Essential Partnership -
Addresap by Asesist.Secy of Com. KIaisadeL..........
Business & Politica Address by Secy. Sanyer......
Fats & iL~s, Industry Reporb................1 Year
011burner & Fuel 011 Dealers 19469 Oper.Ratioe,BIS.
L/ Worksheet for Estimating Initial Capital Requirements
for Establishing An Electrical Appliance Radio
Store............................
Baby Foods A Profitable Mdarket for Grocers, SB8303
Candyr Selling in the Grocery Store, SB8430.........
Changing Counter Check Mdethod to Speed Up Custaerr
Service in a Retail Grocery Store, SBBl........
Check List for Food Retailing, SBB 23.......
Do's & Donate in Food Betailing, SBB268..............
Errors in Figuring; Costs, SEA 50...................
Establishing & Operating a Grocery Store.........70P
Food Retailing, smB 259.............l..........
Atomic Energy &e ILfe Sciences.......... .........45
Hame Improvrement Kit.......'.................... .$1.00
Developing & Selling New Prodnots..............2509
Opotnties in SeUllng...................... .25#
statistical Abstract of the U. S.....,,.,..... 6.00
ZINational Associations of the U. S..,..........$3.50
SQuarterly Surmary of Business Conditions in the
Southeast, January to Marcmh, 1950............
10-130

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


______ ~ ~ ~ ___ _


* __ _


I i


Available through any Department of
Conpleroe office for AS#


The publication is a sumrmary ofP the major develop-
ments in the national atomic energy program and gives
a comprehensive review of one of its majar phases -
the biological and medical activities. It reports what
is known at the effoots of radiation an man and other
living things, and surveys benefits derived from the
use of radiation for treatment of disease. roP so 1~


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009


j U.S. D)EPO91TOftrY


Valume 4, Number 13, July 1, 1950


so-6-JP


UI VRI T OF FLORIDA1111 11 1 11111111111111 111 1


BUL LETI


PAGE 4


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNrvIERSITY or Fhones
LE3ROY L. QUALLS
I)EAREINTOF ECONOMICS
GLEVILLA, FLORIDA



























vac. 4, No. 16 JULY 15, 1950

0014TRPIUCTION UP $100 ML~IONI 1950 CEIGS QPF PQPUIATION


Nearly $100 million more was expended in new building
operations in the Southeast in the first quarter of 1950
than in the corresponding period of 1949, according to
the current issue of the Constrqction and Construction
Materiale Industry Report issued by the Department of
Commerce.

State breakdowns of new construction ao-
tivities are carried each quarter in this
publication and are one of many phases of
the building industry included in its con-
tents. Subscribe for this report through
the nearest field office of the Departm~ent
of Commerce. Price C19,00 4 Yeqr,

In a breakdown of new construction work in all States
in the nation, the report shows, among other things,
that in the first quarter of this year, expendlitures on
such operations in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, M~ississip-
pi, Tennessee, Kentucky, the Carolinas, the Virginias,
Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia, totaled
$802.1 million compared with $715.3 million in the same
period in 1949.
(See 0016TRUCTION Page 2)

LOCAL RURAL ROLDS IN SOU~THFAST

Fifty-one per cent of the local rural road mileage
of the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee was sur-
faced as of June 30 of last year, the Bureau of Public
Roads, UJ. S. Department of Commnerce has reported,
The report, made in a publication just issued en-
titled The Igool ERura3 Road Problem, placed the total
local rural road mileage in the seven-Sjtate area at
350,710 miles, of which 179,658 were surfaced.
Go~der this booklet through the nearest
Department of Commerce field office. 51
Pages. Prices 20.

By States, the total mileage and surfaced mileage in-
alude Alaban~a, 52,718 and 33,513; Florida, 29,897 and
9,297; Georgia, 76,704 and 39,513j Mississippi, 54,007
and 23,755; North Carolina, 50,44~8 and 25,300; south
Carolina, 29,881 and 6,921; Tennessee, 57,055 and 41,-
359.
In 1945, more than two out of every three farms in
the United States were served directly by all-weather
roads, the booklet points out.


Complete official but preliminary reports from
the 1950 census of population for three States in the
Southeast -- Georgia, South Carolina and Florida -- re-
flect a 19 per cent increase in population over the 1940
figures .

Residents of Georgia, South Carolina and
Florida interested in these census of popu-
lation figures may obtain mimeographed
copies upon request to their nearest field
office of the Depqr~tsent of Conmerce.
The figures show the following standing for the three
States:


Preliminary reports have also been received for other
southeastern states, but they are yet incomplete. All,
however, are expected to showr gains in total population
in 1950 over 19460.
(See POIPUIATIONJ Page 3)
EldLOYEE RETIREMENT SYSTFLjS

The seven Southeastern States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee last year had a total of $46c.9 million credited
to their respective State-administered public-employee
retirement systems, the Bureau of th~e Census has report-
ed in its Compeqdium of State Government F34ances 14
1969 just issued.

This report, which presents a comprehen-
shve review of revenue and expenditures of
State Governments is available at all De-
Dartment of Cormmerce field offices. Pri~ce 304.

By States, the total included ALlabama, $5.1 million;
Florida, $8.4 million; Georgia, $5.3 million; Missiasip-
pi, $2.1 million; North Carolina, $1~5.4 million; south
Carolina, $b6,8 million; and Tennessee, $3.5 million.
of this amount, $;26.1 million wfas received into the
retirement funds for teachers and $1.4 million for
police.
A total of $7,4 million was paid out of the funds in
Benefits and other withdrawals.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE


MOBILE, ALA,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641


CHARPLESTONl, S.C.
310 Peoples Bidg.,
Tel. 7771


ATLMITA 3, 6A. SAYAilAH, GA. JACKSOIIYILLE, FLA. MlIAMI 32, FLA.
50 Whitehall St., S.N., Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 9Y7 Seybold Bldg.,
Tel. Mlinut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-711) Tel. 9-7533


19AQ
3,123,723
1,899,804
1.897.1&
6,920,941


12'it
3,418,120
2,127,698
2.73A.116
8,279,934


Georgia
South Carolina
Florida
Totals








II___ _


SULFiURIC ACID PRODUCTION HIGH

Fifty-two per cent of the nation's 1949 output of
aulfurio acid was produced in the South, according to
a Facts For Indus~try report issued by the Bureau of the
Gens9ua.
The report showed that of a total of 10,726,976 short;
tons of the acid manufactured in gh~e United States last
year, 5,582,169 tons were produced in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Maryland, Delaware, Texas, Virginia, Ok~la-
homra and Arkansas.

This and other Facts For Industry reports
are available for the asking at all field
offices of the Department of Commerce. If
interested in this report, ask for 5194.1-09.

Total production in the South last year increased by
more than 400,000 tons over that of 1948.
The 1949 production in the South, in short tons, in-
cluded Alabama, 309,385; Florida, 459,369; Georgia,
232,005; Louisiana, 419,866; Maryland, 995,138; Miss-
issippi, 20,118; North Carolina, 163,446; South Carolina,
204,203; Texas, 880,330; Virginia, 486,720; Kentucky,
and Tennessee, 795,728; and all other southern States,
615,861.
More than half of the plants producing sulfuric acid
in the nation were operating in the South at the close
of the year. Factories in the region totalled 101 com-
pared with 187 in the United States, Georgia led in num-
her of such plants with 16. Virginia had 12 and Alaiaman
and South Carolina, 10 each. The others included, North
Carolina and Texas, 9 each; Florida, 8; Maryland and
Louisiana, 6; Tennessee and Mississippi, 3; West Virginia
Kentuckyr, Arkansas and Oklahoma, 2, and Delaware, 1.

BUSiINESSMALNIS TIPSHEET


A gold mine of information for busineasuanl
That's the label placed on the Technical Renorts Newa-
legthe published each month by the Qffice of Technical
Services, U. S. Department of Commerce.
The publication carries in concise and comprehensive
form s~ummaries of new products or new processes discovered
in government-uponsore~d research projects that OTS thinks
might help the busineassman to build his business.

Note: Ask the nearest Department of
Comrmerce field office to show you one
of these "tipsheets" and then subscribe
to this service through that office.
Subscriottom: 506 a sear.

It all started when the United States Government as-
aigned to CUS the job of passing along to business int-
erests results of new developments taking place in govern-
ment laboratories, university research centers, private
laboratories and other sources of such information. This
is done through the medium of the monthly stipsheet"
prepared by OTS and known officially as the Technical
Roveto ewltte.The June 1950 issue, for example, has
a listing of a number of reports on research projects
prepared by the rmiy Quartermaster's Research and Develop-
ment Branch, the Atomic Energy Comrmission, and the Bureau
of Agricultural and Industrial Chemistry, U. S. Department
of Agriculture.
Regarding the information published each month in this
Newsletter, Business Week Mlaeazine says:
nThese developments could be of real help to the
businessman -- if he knew about them. + The information
is free for the taking, no royalties, no license fees."


RETABIL,WPHOLSALE~ TRADE UP


The month of Mby was a profitable one for retail and
wholesale dealers in the Southeast judging from current
Bureau of the Census reports.
The monthly retail report for independent establish-
ments in the South Atlantic and Ea~st South Central re-
gions shows that in nearly all of the cities and areas
listed in the two reports gains, many of them substan-
tial, were reflected for Mday of this year over the same
month last year.
Also, in the monthly wholesale trade report for the
two areas, increases of 13 and 8 per cent, respective-
ly, were recorded for the two comparable months.
(o the retail trade aide, the increases included 19
per cent in Birming~ham; 40 per cent in Biladj; 21 per
cent in Gulfport; 37 per cent in Kingsport, Tenn; 22
per cent in Augusta; 24 per cent in Greenwrood, S. C;
16 per cent in Macon, Ga., and Asheville; 12 per cent
in Savannah; and 6 per cent in Atlanta.
In the different areas in which the Census Bureau
conducts its su~rvyes Jefferson county, Ala., reported
an 18 per cent rise; Chilton and Perry counties, Ala.,
16 per cent; Harrison and Stone counties, M~iss., 26
per cent; Sullivan, Unicoi and Washington counties,
Tenn., 19 per cent; Mdanatee and Sarasota counties, Fla.,
23 per cent; and Greenwood and MQcCormick counties, S.C.,
24 per cent.
Daly two dowrntrend spots were indicated. Stores in
Clarksdale, Miss., reported an 11 per cent decline, and
a 10 per cent drop was registered for Coahomna and Quit-
man counties, Miss,
Corresponding increases were shown in retail sales
for the first 5 months of 1950 over the corresponding
period last year, including 25 per cent in Bilary; 13
per cent in Birmnugham; 12 per cent in Gulfport; 14
per cent in Kingsporby 23 per cent in Augusta; and
9 per cent in Atlanta.
Nationally, gains of 8 per cent in bay 1950 over
May 1949 and 4 per cent for the January to May period
of 1950 over 1949 were recorded.
In the wholesale trade field, sharp, rises were re-
flected for such commodities as automotive supplies,
electrical goods, Furniture and house furnishings, lum-
ber and building materials, refrigeration equipment,
and some grocery lines,

CONSjTRUCTION (Continued From Page 1)

The increase in public building this year ovrer l-ast
was spread over nonresidential structures for public
purposes, highway- construction, and improvements to
sewer and water systems, with the bulk of it going into
nonresidential building. The latter.represented an out-
lay of $b79.2 million in the first three months of this
year compared with $b60.6 million expended at the same
time last year.
A somewhat less rise was reflected in highway im-
provem~ent work, $50.9 million this year against $50.4
million last year, and an even smaller gain came in
sewer and water activities, $18.2 million and $18.1
million,
In other new public building expenditures, including
residential building, military and naval installations,
miscellaneous public service enterprises, conservation
and development, and other public constrnotion, a slight
decrease in expenditures was shown this year from last,
or a drop fran $468.4 million spent for that purpose last
year to $45.4 million this year.
In a separate report, the Co~mmerce Department and
U. S. Department of Labor said outlays for new con-
struction this year were expected to total nearly $b26
billion nationally,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





BIGHLIGHTS OF THE BUSINESiS WAORID

(For further details of any of these items, ask
the nearest U. 3. Department of Commerce field office
for copies of the releases)



Continued expansion in industrial activity during
Mday raised ma~nufacturerst sales and new orders substan-
tially over April and somewhat above the high averages
attained earlier in the year. Inventory book values also
increased during the month, but the total was well below
year-ago levels. Sales totalled $19.4t billion, an in-
crease of $2.3 billion over last Maey.

Total obain tore and mail-order sales in Mlay amount-
ed to $2,352 million, an increase of about 5 per cent
over the same month a year ago. Part of the increase was
due to the difference in number of trading days. After
adjusting for seasonal changes, sales of most of the
chain tore groups were higher in b~y than in April,

Outlays for new construction this year are expected
to reach a total of nearly $~26 billion, or 14 per cent
above the revised estimate of $22.6 billion spent in
1949, according to a joint report of the U. S. Depart-
ments of Comnmerce and Labor. During the first half of
the year, expenditures for all types of new construction
ran 17 per cent above the corresponding period in 1949.

Total expenditures for alcoholic beverages, including
public revenues, amounted to $b8,550 million in 1949,
the lowrest expenditure figure since 1944. The estimate
represents the aggregate expenditures, other than pur-
chases for resale, by consumers and business for dis-
tilled spirits, wine and beer, whether bought in package
form or by the drink,

Employment soared to a near record high in June, as
large numbers of young persons joined the labor force
at the close of the school term. Total civilian employ-
ment was estimated at 61,482,000 in the week ending
June 10, about 1 3-4 million above Mray, and the highest
since the summer of 1918.

Sales of all retail stores in M~ay amounted to $b11,555
million, more than 7 per cent above a year ago. The gain
was due in part to a difference in the unamber of trading
days, but a substantial increase remains after allowance
for this factor. Dollar sales in bly after adjustment
for seasonal factors and trading day differences advanced
moderately from the high levels of recent months.

'The net international creditor position of the United
State increased by about $1l billion in 1949 as compared
with 191c8. American investments abroad increased by a-
bout $1.5 billion while foreign assets in the United
States increased by about $0.5 billion, thus accounting
for the net orange of $1 billion,

The E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Compalny, W~l~mington,
Del., has listed 462 additional patents owned by that
company on the Register of Patents for Licensing or
Sale maintained by the Patent Office, U. S. Department
of Commerce. The patents range from a semi-stiff shirt
collar to color photography.

Cuttings of men's apparel in April ran ahead of
the same month in 1949. Exccept for suite and work cloth-
ing, April output was also above Mbarch of this year.
Production of work pants increased 5 per cent from liarch
to April.


COTTON CLOTPH EXPCBTS DECLINE


SCUTHERST AIIRPORTS BEING IMPROVED


A sharp drop in exports of cotton cloth from the
United States in the first four months of 1950 com-
pared with the corresponding period last year was re-
ported by the Office of International Trade, U. S.
Department of Commerce.
Exports of that commodity from January to April of
this year amounted to 173,430,000 square yards, a sub-
stantial decrease from the 363,410,000 yards exported
in the like period in 1949.
Largest export decreases for the four-month period
of this year were in shipments to Iran which were
38,807,000 yards less than for the comparable four.
month period of 1949; Canada, 2?6,131,000 yards les~s;
Philippine Republic, 20,758,000 yards less; Union of
South Africa, 11,085,000 yards leas; and Belgian Congo,
9,209,000 yards lower.
Exports of cotton cloth to the United Kingdom, Cey-
lon, Pakistan, Norwray, French Wvest Africa, Ethiopia
and Sandi Arabia, which amounted to more than 47 mil-
lion yards in the first four month of 1949 decreased
to less than 1 million yards in the first 4 months of
1950.

POPULATIO3N Continued From Page 1

Qfficial reports from the 1950 census covering all
States in the nation are expected to be released by
the Censue Buresa in Washington during the last part
of September or first part of October. They will be
followed by reports for the larger metropolitan areas
and cities.
It is expected, judging from the preliminary re-
ports, that most urban areas will reflect an increase
in the 1950 population ovrer that of 1940. This has
especially been borne out as a result of the prelimin-
ary announcements regarding the population of urban
areas in the Southeast.
For example, in reports compiled to date for the
Southeast, the figures include the following:


100,899
95,996
302, 288
44;2,294
172,172
173,065
108,391
167 402
128,163
292,942
267, 583


Aggg
133,212
119,109
326,962
663,711
247, 262
198, 880
124,073
172,359
130,333
394,025
298,747


Charlotte
Sa~vaunda
Atlanta
(Maetropolitan)
Mniami
Jacksonrville
Tampa
Nashville
Chattanoo~a
Maemphis
Birmingham


Five southeastern airports are among 1(4 in the
nation included in a Civil Aeronauties -autinistration
project for the installation of civilian-type aircraft
direction finders" contract for which has been awfard-
ed the Bendiz Aviation Corporation*
The airports located in the region to share in this
work are those in Birmingham, Memphis, Nashville,
Jacksonville and Atlanta*
The "finders" are linked with the scope of the sur-
veillance radar and are actuated by the very high fre"
quency radio impulses from the aircraft contacted.
Through its use, the airport traffic controller can
ta~lk to the aircraft to be certain which of the "pipe"
on his screen represents the plane with which he is in
communication, permitting him to give the pilot dir"
nations for entering the leading; pattern with safety*


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





31111111 1262111111 087481111 803611111111


TRAINING COR~IBRCIAL SALESMfEN I


ppoae provided gad send this paege of the Bulletin qf
Commerce to thbe eaqrepg Department of Comrmerce field
office. Your name and address qre showq belov. M~ake

9( the United States. Items not priced are Free.)
Construction & Construction hhrts.Report...83 Yearly
The Local Ru~ral Road Problem. ..................200
Compendium of State Govt. Finances in 1949.....30e
Monthly Retail Trade Report, South Atlantic......,,
Monthly Retail Trade Rpt.,East South Cant.Region...
Monthly W~holesale Trade Rpt., U. S. & Regions.....,.
Sulfuric Acid, Sumrmary for 19469,FFI 21Y96.1-09......
Machine. Tools, 1949, FFI 04A~-09 ...................
Fatal & Dils, May 1950, FFI M17-1-50. ...............
Clay Construction Products, Apl. 1950, FFI M26B-40.
"Transportation Bloodatream of Business" Address
by Sec. of Cormmerce Sawyer. .................
Technical Reports Newaeletter...............50p lear --
Training Commercial Salesmen, BISn...........,..,..
Accounlting, B~S.............s.........,,,,....,,,.
Ice Cream Indlustry, BIs...............,........10g
Department Stores, BIS,........,..................
Sewage Treatment & Water Purification Machinery &
Equipment, BIS.,,.............o.
Inle odReot ue~dustry Report, Chemicals & Drugs.........$2.50 Yr.190 ......,,
/7 Provisional Estimates of Population of U.S.5/1/50.
Fo Grsos nuac are yaRti rcr~os Changes in the Labor Force, April-Lby 1950...
Store, SBB 205. ................ ....
dr? Good Display Increases Meat Department Profits,
SBA 351,......................
L7 Bandling Charge & Delivery Services in a Self-
Service Store,~ SBA W414...........
aff Handling & Merchandising Fish in the Grocery Store,
H3towr Retail Grocera Can Mee Competition, SBA325....
Howr The Mhat Retailer Can Judge Quality in Meat,
SBB 367............
Increasing Sales by baes Displays & Placard,SEA100
The Independent Grocer (A Survey of Operations ),
SBA 320.... ..................
gr? Make Your Grocery Store a Safer Shopping Place,
SB& 447..........a...... ,,


hars you interested in increasing your sales? Cr
course you are,
The Department of Com~merce from time to time issues
material dealing with the subject of salesmanship, and
one such publication came off the press recently en-
titled Tiraining Commerciail Salesmen. It is a Basic
information Source, that is, it does not itself tell
you how~ to train your salesmen, but it lists many
other authorities on the subject with titles of their
publications .
This Basic Information Source, which is available
at any Commerce D~epartment field office for the asking,
lists for instance the following publications on how
to train commercial saleamen:
The Eyes Have it, which deals with selling life in.
surance,
The Five Great Rules of Sellineg, which takes up the
qualities needed to sell successfully and how they are
developed.
How I Ragged N~aelf from Failure to Sucqess in Sell-


. _


I


And many others. And, of course, there is the ever.
popular Opportunities in Selling, issued by the Depart.
ment of Commnerce, which? has already received such a
broad distribution throughout the country.
Ask your nearest Department of Connrerce field office
for the pamphlet entitled "Business Information Ser.
Vice,n nBasic Information Sources," "Training Commercial
Salesmen," by L. W. Gain, Business Information Senrice,
U. S. Department of Comrmeree, take your pick, and then
order them direct from the authors, agencies, or pub-
lishers .

CEPEBUS CF BUISINESS

Department of Comrmeroe field offices now have reports
from the 1948 Gensus of Business for nearly all coun-
ties and Statse in the Southeast, and those interested
in obtaining these data are invited to get in touch with
their nearest Comrmerce Department field office.
The Census of Business reports cover sales in dol-
lars and cents for the retail, wholesale and service
trade industries for 1948, as well as figures for the
tourist services and amusements.


U.S. DEPC)8tTCIIY


NEW 8000 AND REPORTS

(To obtain codes of this material check it in the


AD&*
Now To #9 4 Top-FAight Salesman


How to Win q Sqles Azyment


GPO oso 10-135


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Cffice
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIlT NO. 1009
Volume 4, Nurmber 14, July 15, 1950


-- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE--

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT .YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-Jr


PAGE 4


PITELLUB


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTIEfff CM ECONJOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA



























VQL. l, NO. 15 AUGUST 1, 1950


SOUTTHERNJ FIRMS GEsT CONTRACTS
Contracts involving the expenditure of some $7,893,-
000 have been awarded by the Department of Defense to
firms in the South for supplying the Federal Govern-
ment's armed services with goods and services, accord-
ing to a list of the contract awards issued by that
agency.
.The successful bidders include concerns located in
Dallas, Texas; Norfolk, Virginia; Greenville, South
Carolina; Houston, Texas; Tulsa, kl~a; San Antonio,
Texas; and Waynesboro, Georgia.

All offices serving as outlets for
procurement information being furnish.
ed them by the U. S. Department of
Comrmerce, including many Chambers of
Comrmerce are getting these lists, as
well as the procurement data. Ask your
local Chamber of Cogrmerce for it,

At the same time, the Federal Government has invited
bide on additional supplies to be purobased, including
a number produced in the Southeast. They included many
notal commodities, lumber products, paper, and others.

See PRODUREMENTE Page 2

SOUTHEAST EKPANDS FUIRNITURE INDUSTRY

The Southeast last year stood second among all re-
gions in the nation in the value of manufacturers r
shipments of furniture and bedding products, according
to a Facts For Industry preliminary report on the
Household Furniture and Bedding Products Industry just
issued.

This statistical review of manufacturers a
shipments of household furniture and bed-
ding, Series M548-09, is available upon
recoaest.

Shipments of all types of furniture and bedding
valued at $4603,714,000 went forward from factories in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mi~ssissippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, K~entuckry, Virginia, West
Virginia, Maryland, D~elawfare and the District of Colum-
birr
The value of last year's shipments from the region
was slightly below that of 1968 which totalled $4~73,-
847,000. Only one other regions the East North Central,
comprising Chio, Indianas Illinois, Mi~chigsa and Wis-
oonain exceeded the value of shipments from the Soruth-
east. That area's valuation was $b502,869,000.


SOUTHEAST IEADS NATION

The past 20 years brought a greater percentage in-
crease in buying in the retail and wholesale trade fields
in the Southeast than in any other region in the coun-
try, according to an analysis of preliminary Census of
Business reports issued by the Bureau of the Census.
The analysis showed that between 1929 andl 1948 sales
in the retail trade market in the Southeast rose 235
per cent, or 17 per cent more than in the west, the
runnerup in percentage gain, and 240 per cent in whole-
sale trade, or 36 per cent more than the west, second
highest.

These Census of Business reports are
now available at all Department of Com-
merce field offices ,

Total retail sales in the southeast in 1948 approaz-
mated $21,066.9 million compared with $6,275.8 million
in 1929, and wholesale sales approximated $23,749.1
million and $6,982.3 million, respectively,
For analysis purposes, the States of Alabam~a, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Missiasippi, the Carolinas, and Virginias,
Tennessee, K~entucky~, Maryland, Delaware and the District
of Columbia were included in the Southeastern area.

See OENSTjlS OF BUSINESS Page 3

MU1'OR-VEICLE BEGISTRATIO016 HIGH

A motor vehicle for every four persons was in opera-
tion on the streets and highways of the Southeast last
year, and if all of them had to pay taxes in the operatic
of those vehicles, it would have cost each about $15.
Official motor-vehicle registration figure issued
by the Bureau of Public Roads, U. S. Department of Com-
merce, show that a total of 4,894,256 motor-vehicles of
all types were registered last year in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee. The Census Bureau's population estimates
for the seven*4tate area in 1949 placed the population
at 19,839,000.
-In operation of the vehicles, the operators paid in '
to the State treasuries a total of $240,943,000 in
furel taxes and $67,210,000 in taxes on motor vehicles
and operators.
Nearly' 11 per cent of the nation's 46,670s38 motor-
vehriles registered last year were in the seven South-
eastern Statee, and of $2,026,277,000 paid into the
treasuiri~es 'of the 48 Statse and the District of Colum-
bia in the form of taxes on motorvehicles, Fuel and
operators, about $1.50 more was paid in the Southeast
than the per capital collected nationally.


CHA~RLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


ATLANITA 3, 6A.
60 Whitehall St., S.L,
Tel. Ifllnut 4121 X-453


SAVANNArH, GA. JACK(SONVILLE, FLA. MIAMI1 32, FLA.
Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 4125 Federal Bldg., 9472 Seybold Aldg.,
Tel. 2-Y755 Tel. 41-7Ill Tel. 9-7533


MOBILE, ALA.
308 Federal 81dg.,
Tel. 2-3841


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMlnERCE

FIELD SERVICE





URBAN CONSTRUCTION STILL RISING


New urban construction was up 44 per cent in the
'Southeast in the first four months of 1950 as compared
with the corresponding period last year, and a 32 per
cent increase was registered for cities in the region
of 100,000 population and over, according to figures
compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. De-
partment of Labor.
The value of new urban construction authorized for
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee from January to April in-
clusive of this year was estimated at $k326,365,000, or
nearly $100,000,000 more than that for the same four -
months of 1949.

For a comprehensive discussion of
new building operations and supplies
of building materials subscribe to
the Capstruction and Constructioq
Materials Industry Report of the U. S.
Department of Commerce, #9,00 a Yeap,

In the cities of Atlanta, Birmingham, Charlotte,
Chattanooga, Jacksonville, Knouville, Memphis, Miami,
Nashrille and Tampa, a total of $93,903,000 was rep-
resented in new building authorized for those points,
which was some $23 million more than was expended for
that purpose in the same cities in the first four
months of last year.
Qf the total involved in new urban building author-
ized in the seven-rState area in the first four months
,of 1950, some $184,453,000 was for new dwelling units,
and $i108,802,000 for other new structures compared with
$~107,119,000 and 588,656,000, respectively, expended
for those purposes in the same period last year.

PROCUREMdENT (Continued from Page 1)

The supplies on the list to be purchased will be bought
mostly in August 1950.
Following is the list of contracts awarded by the
Department of Defense, with name of firm, goods or
services to be purchased, and amount involved:
Degolyer & MbacNaughton, D~allas, Texas -- Services
(General Consulting Service) -- $25,000.
Wood Towing Corporation, Roanoke Dock, Norfolk, Va.,
-- Service, tugs, Hampton Roads Areat, fiscal year 1951
-- $100,000.
Bray Towing Corporation, Norfolk Va.,-- Services,
tugs, etc., fiscal year 1951 -- $60,225.
Southern Materials Co., Norfolk Va., -- Concrete,
ready-mixed, Norfolk Area as required, 22,500 cubic
yards -- $~258,284.
J~ackson Transfer & Storage Co., Norfolk, Va., --
(Two contracts), packing, orating, storing, etc., --
$27,500 and $280,000, respectively.
Southern Weaving Co., Greenville, S. C.-- Cotton
tape and webbing -- $69,081.
Southline Metal Products Co., houston, Texas ..
Metal shipping containers -- $67,1;60.
Warner Lewis Co., Tulsa, Olkla.-- F-28 fuel filtering
kits, Class 15 -- $179,589.
Texas Engineering & Mdanufacturing Co., Dallas, Tex..
Rehabilitation and provision of F-51 type aircraft *-
.85,000,000.
Slick Airways, InD., San Antonio, Tease -- Ovrerhaul.
of 269 R-1340-an-1 type aircraft engines -- $403,500,
Slik Arwas, nc.San Antonio Rehabilitation of
C-46 type aircraft ,4,0.
Knax Metal Products, Inc., Waynesboro, Ga., Type
F-2 trailers, clase 19A $~24S,158.


AUTOMOBILE BUYING LEADING


'Southeastern residents in the post-w~ar period have
been spending the greatest part of their dollars for
automobiles and their operation than for any other com-
modity in the retail market outlets, a further analysis
of the 1948 Census of-Business reports issued by the
Bureau of the Census shows.
The analysis revealed that 24 cents of every dollar
spent by consumers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee
went for automobiles and their accessories and to gas
service stations compared with 23 cents of every dollar
spent; for food and 7 cents for clothing,
Volume II of the Gensus of Linufactures,
1947. nStatisties b Industry," is now
available and orders for it are being
taken by field offices of the Department
of Commerce. It is buckram bound, and sells
for $4.50. It is a 2g$ for all libraries,
research arports and others.

Qf the 24 cents of each dollar paid for automobiling,
18 cents went to automotive establishments and 6 cents
to gasoline service stations.
Fifteen cents of each dollar paid out by consumers
went for general merchandise, 8 cents for lumber, build-
ing materials and hardware, 6 cents each to eating and
drinking establishments and for home furnishings and
appliances, and 3 cents for drugs and proprietaries,
Another 8 cents went for goods bought in all other re-
tail places, such as jewelry, book, cigar, floral and
other miscellaneous stores,
Altogether, an estimated $12,L85,200,000 went from
the pockets of consumers to retail sellers of goods in
the seven States. This included $2,889.6 million for
food, 328 per cent more than the $674.7 million expended
in 1939; $b704.8 million for eating and drinking outside
the homes, a rise of 300 per cent over the $176 million
paid out for the same purpose nine years previously;
and $1,8W43. million for general merchandise, a gain of
181 per cent over the $h655.4 million expended before
the war.

CHINA EXPERT LICENSES REVOKED


Revocation of all outstanding validated export licenses
covering shipments to the mainland of China effective
Thursday, July 20 was announced by the Office of Industry
and Cormmerce, U. S. Department of Comm~erce,
The revocation was ordered in accordance with the
current policy of denying exports of strategic material
to the general area of military operations in the Far
East.
The revocation order did not affect shipments of com-
modities laden aboard exporting carriers prior to 4 P. MI.
of the effective date. Licenses for exports to H~ong Kong,
Macao, Taiwan and the Republic of South Korea likewise
were not included in the action.
Holders of licenses revoked by the Cormmerce Department
were required to return them inrmediately.
The revocation action applied only to comnmodities on
the U. S. export control, or so-called "positive list."


5 IMrPORTANT NOTICE! t
a Post offices no longer give directory ser- I
vice to mail incomrpletely or incorrectly ad- a
,dressed. You are urged when writing our of-
Ifices to give complete address as well as
?Bour own complete return address, a


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE '2





NATIONAL PRCD)UCT DECLINES


HIGBIJGBTS OF TBE BUSINESS WORLD


The gross national product -- the total value of
goods and services produced by the nation -- during
1949 was $255) billion, or $33 billion below the 1948
high, the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Depart-
ment of Comrmerce estimated.
At the same time, 058 estimated that national in-
come in 1949 -- the sum of incomes acerning in pro-
duction -- was $217 billion as compared with $~2231
billion in 1948*
The estimates, with a full discussion of the sit"
untion were being carried in the July National Income
Number of OBEta Survrey of Current Business*

Note: The Survey of Opprent Business
is available on a yearly subscription
basis at all Department of Comrmerce
field offices. Price $b3.00 a year*
Singe copies of the July 1950 issue
are available at 30 cents each, and
the National Income Supplement to the
July 1914 issue is 25 center

Presented for the first time are detailed data on
the composition of the 1949- income flow. Also broken
down are the national income and each of its compon-
ents, including wages and salaries and other forms of
labor income, income of unincorporated enterprises,
rental income, corporate profits, and interest, by
industry of origin, as well as by legal form of or"
ganization*
New information is given in CBEss report on the
composition of personal saving, broken down into fin-
anoing saving of various types, such as cash and bank
deposits, securities, life insurance, and so forth,
as well as saving that takes tangible forms, such as
investment in residences and business fired capital
and inventories.

CENSUS OIF BUSINESS Continued from Page 1

In the west, which embraces Statea in the WAest
South Central, Mountain and Facific regions, retail
sales in 1948 totalled $30,291.1 million compared with
$9,501.7 million in 1929, an increase of 218 per cent,
and wholesale sales, $34661.5 million and $11,391.7
million, respectively, a gain of 204 per cent,
The rate of increase in the other regions in retail
trade included 159 per cent for the East North Central
section, 155 per cent in the West North Central, 127
per cent in the New England area, and 126 per cent in
the Middle Atlantic zone.
The rate of increase in the Southeast from 1929
to 1948 in both retail and wholesale sales was well
above the increase for the nation as a whole, which
was 170 per cent in retail sales and 176 per cent in
wholesale trade.
The South Atlantic region, comprising Georgia,
Florida, the Carolinas, the Virginias, Maryland, Dela-
ware and the District of Columbia, with retail sales
in 1948 totalling some $14l,691.1 million against
$4,138.3 million in 1929, led all sections of the
nation in rate of increase in the two-decade period
with a rise of 255 per cent. Next in line was the
Pacific region, with an advance of 241 per cent,
En wholesale sales, the South Atlantic region was
second among all regions in the nation in point of
percentage increase with a rise also of 255 per cent,
which closely followed the Mountain region's 262 per
cent, highest for the nation. The East South Central
area, comprising Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky and
Tennessee was a close third with a gain of 212 percent.


(For further details of any of these items, ask the
nearest U. S. Department of Comrmerce field office for
copies of the releases)


Production of building materials in Mapil 1950 rose
5 per cent above that of March sad was 13 per cent
greater than in April a year ago. Significant increases
were recorded for brick, cement, gypsum board and lath
and asphalt roofing materials, Substantial production
gains were also recorded for lumber, hardwood flooring,
oast iron radiation, galvanized range boilers, cast iron
soil pipe, softwood plywood, gyrpeum board and lath, and
warm air furnaces.

Personal income in May other than the special insur-
ance dividend payments to veterans was at an an~ndal
rate of $212.2 billion compared with $209.7 billion for
April.

Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers
totalled $5,646 million in Nay. After adjustment for
seasonal variations, sales were up 11 per cent from
April. Part of the increase was due to the unusually
large difference in working days between April and May
of this year, which was not fully reflected in the
normal seasonal adjustment,

Total business inventories at the end of May were
estimated at $54.9 billion. After allowing for seasonal
variations, the book value of inventories increased
$500 million. Manufacturers' stocks were $300 million
above the end of April. Retailers' and wholesalers'
stocks each were about $100 million above the previous-
month's level,

Cash dividend payments of corporations issuing public
reports amounted to $210,600,000 in Maey 1950, or 12 per
cent more than the $188,200,000 paid out in May of last
year. In the three months ended May 1950, publicly re-
ported cash dividends aggregated $1,512,200,000, or 9
per cent more than the $1,386,300 000 distributed in the
same three months of 1949.

Total sales of the nations retail stores in June
amounted to $11,915 million, 10 per cent above a year
ago, Dollar sales, after adjustment for seasonal factor
and trading day differences, continued their strong
advances to reach new high ground. Adjusted sales were
up 3 per cent from May, the previous high, and were
nearly 6 per cent above the earlier peak reached in
August 1948.

The importation of 100,000 metric tons of wheat from
the United States has been a~uthorized by the Brazilian
Government. The action was reportedly taken to tide
Brazil over a temporary shortage caused by delays in
Argentine wheat shipments as a result of strikes at Ar-
gentine ports, Import licenses will be granted by the
Brazilian Government only to flour mille, according to
trade sources,

E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wil~mington,
Delawares has informed the Patent Office, U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce that it has released 32 patents to the
Federal Government and the American people on a royalty-
free, nonexclusive license.-basis. By this action, the
Du Pont company makes the patents available to the
government and to .Onerican firms and individuals for
unrestricted use. The patents, developed in the firm'a
laboratories are useful in many lines of industry.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3








I


CURRENT OFABUS BUREAU DATA


NEW BOOIGS AND REPORTS

(Tlo obtain copies of this material, check it in the

0 mmnerce to the nearest Deprwtment of Commeroe fPield


office, Your name and address are shown below, Make
remittances for sales materiq2, payable to Treasurer


I-~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~----------- ---~ l~~-
Household Furniture & Bedding Prods.,FFIM54AB-09**
Gessof Business: (List County or State D~esired)




Construction & Construction Materials Report..Q3 Yr.
Census of M~anufactures, 1947, Volume II.......84.50
Survey of Current Business...i..............$?3 Yr.
Survey of Current Business, July 1950..........30Q
Survey of Cur. Bus., National Income Supplement..25Q
Cotton Broad Woven Goods, FFIL1158-o9 ..............
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Prods..FFIMa26D-09...
Menls Apparel, Apri 1950, FFIMd67B-40.............
Knit Underwear & Nightwear, FFIM670-40.............
Pulp, Paper &( Board, FFI-M14-50.... ...............
Fate & 0118, FFIM1l7-a-2-50...................****
Aluminum & Mlagnesium WVrought Prods.,FFIM24-1-50...
Consumer Education (Reference Sources)...,........
Foreign Trade Practices (Reference Sources).....20e
Exports Control & Allocation Powers, 11th Report 15Q
Distribution Cost Analysis A Nanagement Tool For
Analysing Markets Address by Chas H, Sevin~...
Colaorimetry (National Bureau of Standarda)......30Q
Nickel & Its Alloys (NBS) cir.485. ..............500
Statement of Secretary Sawyer before U. S. Senate
Committee on Small Business Act of 1950.......
q Plast Resear~ch & Technology at Nat. Bureau of
I 'StanC~Ldard................... ...15Q
,Bg~et Competition, SR~ 26..........
iq ~p~tn in Grocery Profits, SBQ379...
Proper, Care er ln of Fresh Produce, SBQ407....
Quibker Che o~pr Self~ervice Stores, SBB654.~
Results from ingka~i Fresh Fruits & Vege....
SBA 378...........
Retail Grocers Customer Relations.... .SBQ358........
Retailing Produ~ce, SBQ294..........................
Salesmanship in Self-Service Stores, SBA134........
So You Want to Open ~a Super Marke _SBQ59.........

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAY V~3NT OF POSTAGE 300_/_c
no -sa


On~e of the busiest agencies in the Federal Govern-
ment right now is the Bureau of the Census, U. S. De-
partment of Comrmeroe. The bureau has just finished its
enumeration of the population of the United States;
its Census of Business for 1948 is now being recorded
for posterity; and' its Census of Mdanufactures for 1947
is now rolling from the presses in buokram form for
permanent archivists.
Few persons have any conception of the actual work
the Census Burean is carrying on from day to day and
month to month in the compilation and tabulation of
facts and figures on the national econougp. Adverbiaine
A.,g recently asked the bureau for a brief review of
its activities and functions, and the bureau gave 9
this brief su~mmary of some of the more outstanding:
Genana. of Poamlat~ion. Preliminary data from this
program for 1950 are now being released and final de-
tailed figures will be ready in mid-195L.
Estimates of Pomdlation. Issued monthly for the
U. S. Issued annually as of July 1 in more detail,
Issued annually for States giving total population,
and also for some age groups, etc.

Issued annuallV as to color, sex, age, residence, m-
gration and many other variations,
Labor Force. Issued monthly, giving estimates of
labor force, employed, unemployed, and so forth.
|gaome. Anlnal sample surveys iasued and include
data for U. S. on number of families and persons at
each income level writh other characteristics.
SFamilies. Has been issuing numerous reports on
families or households,
Hogsang, The 1950 Census of Population will also
- embrace a special section on housing.
C current Housine Renorts Based on Samnle Survers.
This information is available for U. S., urban and
rural areas, as well as metropolitan areas.
Gensus of Business. Issued every ten years. Now
being concluded for 1948,
Monthly Reports. Retail trade, wholesale trade,
and Canned Foods, writh special releases on specific
trades, such as electrical tobacco, and so forth.
Foreign Trade Stqtistiep. Issued monthly, and cover-
ing manyr phases of export-import activity.
;Industrr Statistics. Issues 58 periodic reports of
us eful information for industry, bus iness,governmaent.
GPO 83-

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, MNuber 15, August 1, 1950

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.1


of the United States )


BC-6-JP


UNIveRSITY or vLORIAr
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAN VILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

illilllilllnllllillllsi rll


BUL LETIF


PAGE 4












UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLAN(TA 3, GA 3AVAMMUl, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. MlIMI 32, FLA. MOBILE, ALA CNARLESTON, S.C.
50 Whitehall St., S.Y, Rooce 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 94)7 Seybold Lldg., 308 Federal 381d., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. Ifllnut 4121 X-458 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-8641 Tel. 7771



VOL. 4, NO. 16 AUGUST 15, 1950


COTTON CONTINUES "MlONEY" CROP

Cotton is still "king" among the money-making orope
of southeastern States, but tobacco and livestock are
fast narrowing the margin.
This is indicated in a report released by the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics, U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture, which showed that farmers in AlabamPa, Florida,
Georgia, M~ississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee last year received $894,554,000 in cash
receipts for their cotton lint and seed; $552,977,000
for their tobacco; and d41,156,000 for meat argmalso

If you have not already done so, order
your copy of the latest Census Bureau
publication Bulletin 186. Cotton Product-
ion and Distribution, for the year ending
July 31, 1949 through your nearest Camnerce
Department field office. Price 204.
Other southeastern farm products produced last year
in order of their importance were poultry, dairy prod-
ucts, vegetables, fruits and nuts, oil-bearing crops,
feed crops and food grains. The dollar and cent value
were: Poultry, $248,808,000; dairy products, $235,428,-
000; vegetables, $212,070,000; fruits and nuts, $202,-
439,000; oil-bearing crops, $b137,972,000; feed crops,
$97,007,000; and food grain orops, $18,889,000.
Miscellaneous crope, such as legume and grass seeds,
forest, rursery and greenhouse products, popcorn, and
other brought in a total of $103,828,000, and horses,
mules, honey, bees and beeswax, $11l,354,000
See FARMl PR(DUCTS Page 3
NEWY WORLD TRADE PUBLICATION

A guide to basic reference sources on the practical
aspects of foreign trade is offered to southeastern
world traders in a publication just issued by the QC-
fice of International Trade, U. S. Department of Com.
merce entitled Forelanr Trade Prcice (Referenoe Src)
which replaces Foreian Trade (B~~s~f;asic Inraio
S...99eMs.* The price is 20 cents and it is available at
all Comrmerce Department field offices.
The new publication provides an up-to-date listing of
both governmental and non-governmental material relat-
ing to foreign trade practice. It is in eleven topical
subdivisions ranging from handbooks on techniques to
importing, and includes bibliographies .and guides, basic
reference books, regulations affecting world trade, and
other subjects of interest to exporters and imorer.


ESSENTIAL INDULSTRIES"DESIGNATED

MLany businesses conducted in the Southeast are in-
cluded in the so-called tentative list of essential ac-
tivities which the U. S. Department of Conmerce prepared
for the Department of Defense as a guide for calling up
active duty members of the civilian components of the
armed forces.
Among the industries listed are those engaged in the
production of food and kindred products, tobacco manu-
factures, textile mill products, lumber and wood prod-
ucts, paper and allied products, and other.
Ask your nearest Department of Commerce of-
fioe for a list of these essential industries."
It is available rzratia.
The Department of Defense has characterized the list
as broad in coverage, and that it would be subject to
revision from time to time asr the national emergency re-
quires.
Seventy-two lines of industry are included in the
list. Although not rated as to relative importance,
three criteria were used in assembling the categories,
including activities directly contributing to the
production of war materials, those necessary for main-
tenance of the production of war materials, and those
essential for maintenance of national safety, health
and interest.

SOUTHWESTERN FIRISh GET CONTRACTS

Tobacco products and packing bases for rifles were
among commodities to be supplied the Federal Government
under contracts recently awarded to Southeastern firms.
Lists of contract awards received by Comerce Depart-
ment field offices and cooperating agencies included the
awarding of contracts for $319,396 to Wearer Lumber and
Plywood company, Jackson, Misa8., for packing bares for
75 millimeter rifles, and three contracts to R. J. Reyr-
nolds Tobacco company, Winston-dalem, N. C., totalling
nearly a million dollars for cigarettes and tobacco.

Ask your nearest Commnerce Department or
Chamber of Comlmerce office to show you these
11Pts.
06her contracts given southern firms were for 32,778
ponsof aluminum tubing, to the Reynlolds Mletal compaqy
Louisvlle, 33,318, and ~31920 for a glide scope re-
jceiveq~r to abe haRedl byeneral Development in Ulkton,


ZG F.


ii ~ I


Y//d





WHIQf..SALE, -RETA~IL TRADE RISE

Gains in both retail and wholesale trade fields in
sales in the Santheast in the first half of 1950 as com-
pared with the corresponlding period in 1949 are reflect-
ed in monthly reports issued by the alrean of the Cen-
sus*
All but three cities and areas in the Southeast in
which the Bureaui condnote its surveys reported gains in
retail sales, and both the Santh Atlantia and East South
Central regions exrperienced rises in wholesale salear
including 4 per cent in the former and 2 per cent in the
latter*
The increases in retail sales in some instances were
sharp, including such advances as 28 per cent in Bilazi,
Miss., 22 per cent. in iAugusta, 20 per cent in Columbus,
Ga., and 17 per cent in Harrison and Stone counties
Mtississippi, and Mlanatee and Sarasota counties, Florida<
Obber rises included Birmingham, Johnson City and
Kingsaorb, 15, Quklfport and Jefferson county, Alabamas
14t, Greenwood, S. C., and Greenwood and MaCormcick coaun-
ties, Santh Carolina, 33, Degalb, fulton and Rochpdale
counties, Georgia, and Buncombe and Madison counties,
NJorth Carolina, 12, Savannah, ALsheville, and Sullivan>
Unicoi and WAashington counties, Tennessee, 11, and
Atlanta, 10*
Sparked by sharp increases in sales of such comrmodi-
ties as electrical appliances and specialties, wiring
supplies, electrical conretzuokton materials, and lumber
and building materials, overall wholesale sales contian-
ed to go up also in June compared with the same month
last year. Gains of 13 per cent in the South Atlantio
and 12 per cent in the East South Central areas were
recorded. Obber substantial gains were shown in automo-
thve supplies, furniture and house flurnihings, hardwares
and refrigeration equipment and parts* -
Likewrise retail sales ent up in June as compared
with that month last year in all but two of the cities
and areas reporting to the Census Bureau in the South-
east. These gains included 40 per cent in Bilaoi, 29
per cent in Birmingham and Jefferson, Harrison, Stone,
Greenwood and MIcCormick counties, and 27 per cent in
Gulfport and Mdanatee and Sarasota counties*
ATOMIC ENERGE REPORS AVAIIABLE

Business firs and others in the Santheast who are
interested in atomic energy will have easier access to
non-secret technical reports on that subject as the re-
sult of an arrangement entered into between the Atomic
Energy Commission and U. S. Department of Com~erce.
Under the arrangement, the Commerce Departaent's
Office of Technical Services will become the sales a-
gency and reference source for such reporba, -and the
latter agency will ascpedite arders for them.

Ask your nearest Ccamerce Department
office for the leaflet "Advance Notice -
The Effects of Atomic Weapons." It la
amailablgL an .manests. _... .

Responsibility for preparation and release of the
AED reports will remain with that agency, which will
handle distribution and exchange of pahlioations with
academic, scientific and official institutions. They
will also handle directly non-technical reports.
Under the new plan, one office will handle non-secret
atomic energy documents along with those handled from
other federal research prog~rams, particularly the de-
fense agencies. The industrial researcher oan go to one
source for many types of technical data. CUS has long
been a clearing house on other types of technical data,


FOUR SOUITBFASTERN STATES ADVANCE


Four States in the Southeast --- Aalabama, Florida,
south Carolina and Ibississippi -- were among the top
ranking States of the nation in percentage increase in
receipts of service trade establishments in 1948 as
compared wAith the pre-war year 1939, Bureau of the
Census reports just released show,
The reports, issued in connection with the Bureau'a
1948 Census of Business reflected a tie between Alabama
and Florida for second place in this category, wfith a
297 per cent increase each. South Carolina was nort
with 270 per cent, an~ Mississippi was fifth with 263
per cent. The leader for the nation was New Madioo
with a rise of 339 per cent.

These latest Census Bureau releases on
the 1948 Census of Business are the "per
capital" group of releases and are avail-
able at all Cormerce Department field
offices.
The releases also showed that Alabama, Mississippi
and South Carolina were second, third and fourth, res-
pectively, in greatest growth in per capital aspendit-
ures in service establishments in the 9-ryear period,
with percentages of 286, 267, and 262, respectively.
Here again, they were led by New Marico, the toprank-
ing State, which experienced an increase of 320 per
cent,
A third release just issued by the Bufrean showed
that two southeastern States, Florida an dAlabamla, were
among the nations eight leading States in percentage
increases in retail sales in the 9-year period, and
that Alabama and Mi~ssisippi were among five States
which led in greatest growth in per oapita expenditures
in retail establishments.
In retail sales, percentage increases included, in
order of leadership, Arisona, 307, North Dakota, 289,
Florida, 282, New Mexico, 280, Alabana, 276, South
Dakota, 267, ALrkansas, 263, and Gregon 261,
In advance in per oapita expenditures in retail
stores, the leading percentages were North Dakota, 330,
South Dakota, 285, Alabama, 265, A~rkansas, 264, and
Mlississippi, 263.

TRAISPOR~TATIONI REVENUE UP

For the first time in months, railroad freight rev-
enue in ~the first part of 1950 reflected an upward trend
in the South when compared with the corresponding per-
iod.
A report issued by the Association of American Rail-
roada showed that freight revenue of railroads operating
in the Southeast and other sections of the South in the
first five months of 1950 totalled $430,280,676, a $1.3
million gain over the same period in 1949.
Passenger revenue among the same railroad declined,
however, the $43,293,930 collected on that tyrpe of
transportation representing a $7.9 milliondodorease from
the like period Last year.
The same railroads, however, continued to show a gain
in not operating income. At the end of the first five
months of 1950, the not "take" amounted to $55,421,831
against $467,879,462 at the same time last year.
In the first four1 months of 1950, gains were shown
in all departments of airlines operating in the Soulth-
east. Revenue passengers carried went from 1,393,480 to
1,58112798, ton-niles of express carried from 2,126,071
to 2,651,581, and ton-mlles of freight flown, from 6,-
115,373 t~o 8,333 892. All of the five airlines shared
in the increased trade.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





SOITIHESTERN WRfET PR(IUCED

Four southeastern States -- Tennessee, North Caro"
lina, Georgia and South Carolina --- asat year produced
6,148,000 sacks of wheat flour from 15,101,000 bushels
of wheat ground, sooording to a report inaued by the
Bureau of the Census*
The report, one of the Facts For Industry series
also showed that the 1949 production fell short of the
1948 output by about 733,000 eacks of flour*

These Facts for Industry reports are
available at all Conmerce Department
field offices on a large number of in"
dustries. Then are. aratie*

Mills in the four States also produced 140,61,1 tbne
of offal from their grinldings*
More mills wAere in operation in 1948 than in 1949*
The production of wheat flour by Sta~tes and in
thousands of sacks included Tennessee, 3,343 in 1949 and
3,784 in 1948; North Carolina, 2,023 and 2,2/46; Georgias
503 and 532; and south Carolina, 279 and 319. The grind-
ings, in thousands of bushels, for the year 1949 in"
cluded Tennessee, 8,122; North Carolina, 4,8851 Georgia,
1,208; an~d South Carolina, 686*
FARMa PRUUnCTS Continued From Page 1

Farmers in the seven~tate area reported a 9 per
cent drop in total cash farm receipts last year trea
1948. The totals were, 1949, $3,126,471,000 and 1948>
$3,462,327,000. This compared with a 7 per cent decline
for the nation as a whole*
Biggest decrease in the twso-year period oame in re-
oeipts from cotton lint and seed, which went from $1l,-
105,574,000 in 1948 to $894,554,000 in 1949. Otber de-
olines were tobacco, $573,008,000 to $552,977,0001 oil-
bearing orope, $177,579,0000 to $137,972,0003 meat ani"
mlails, $516,209,000 to $413,156,000; dairy producs,
$244,167,000 to $235,428,000; and feed grains, $29,-
393s000 to $18,889,000*
Increases in 1949 over 1948 were registered in re-
oeipts from vegetables, fruits and adas, poulity, and
miscellaneous livstook products. They innairded, vege*
tables, from $200,521,000 in 1948 to $212,070,000 in
1949) fruits and ants, 81834000 to $2022439,000;
poultry, $240,803,000 to ii28&8,000J and mriscellan"
eaus livestock products from ,11278,000 to $1,354,1000.
SOUTHIERN~ PINB PRBDUCTION UP

Production and shipments of southern pine lumber
took a sharp upturn during the first half of 1950 as
compared with the corresponding period last year
scoarding to reports issued by the Southern Pine Ass" -
ooiation'
Production from January fo June of this year in
the States of Alabama, Arkns~as, Florida, Georgias
Louisiana, Missiasippi, aklahoma, Tennessee, Texas
Virginia and the Carolines approazmated 746,598,000
feet compared with 671,985,000 feet during the same
period last year. Shipments totalled 772,069,000 and
666,200,000, respectively*
Orders were also up sharply. At the end of June of
this year they totalled 8(f/,557,000 feet against 648,-
918,000 feet at the same time last year*
i For a comprehensive discussion of the I
i lumber situation, subscribe to the De" '
apartmentt of Coamerce Lumber Industry Re- *
) port. Price $1.00 a year. I


BIGELIGRES QT& TBUSINLESS WELD

For further details at any of these items, ask the
nearest U. 8. Department at Cammeroe field office for
copies of the releases)

Total chain store and saal-order sales in June
amounted to $2,371 million, an increase at about 7 per
cent over June of inst year. After adjustment far
seasonal obanges, sales averaged about 1 per cent
higher than in Mayr. The largest June increased waee
shorpn for the durable-goods gramp at stores. Salea at
building material stores wren up about 10 per cent and
at hardware stores 6 per cent. Furniture and automobile
accessories stores registered moderate advances.

The nation's business urpowing continued in June with
total volume of activity the highest inr the postwru
rio, acoringto the current issue of Survrer of
rent usinss. onthly publication of the Office
of business Economics, U. S. Department of Comoerce.
Thus, it was stated, prior to the North Klorean attack,
aggregate demand had advanced to a peak rate and sensi-
thes prices were rietang. Earlier, during the latter part
of 1949 and first quarter of 1950, the rising demand
was set pr~inipally by an. expansion in production with
little change in the general price level.

Imranuaturrersr' sales in June rose to $20.7 billion,
sooording to 2atest data issued by the Grfie of Busi-
ness Economics, U. 8. Deparbaent of Comenroe. The value
of new orders placed with manufacturers was up to $22.6
billion, while inventories contioned to sooromlate at an
sooelerated pace, adding about a half billion dollars
in book value.

Tobal sales at the nation's retail stores in June
apprazimated $11,915 million, at 10 per cent above the
same month a year ago. After adjustment for seasonal
factors and trading day differences, dollar sales con-
tirnued their strong advances to resaeh new hground.
A~djusted sales were up 3 per cent from May, t prb-
vious high, and wrez nearly 6 per cent above the eard-
ier peak resohed in Augutst 1948.

Because of the importance of marintaining complete
supply and deapnd information on tin -- a strategio
rawr material ~-- the Office of Industry and Colmeroe
of the U. 8. Department of Camerce will continue to
colleot and compile statistics on this metal under a
voluntary industry reporting system, it was announced,
Sale of service and limited-tunation wholesalers
totaled $5,751 million in June, which, after adjustment
for seasonal variation, were 5 per cent above May, Sales
of wrholsesers of durable goods wre $~2,149 million in
June, an increase of 6 per cent over the previous month
after allowrance for seasonal fac~tors. Substantial gains
over May eren shown by wholesalers of lumber and build-
ing materials, hardware, machinery and metals and auto-
active equipment. Sales at dealers in electrioal goods,
jewrelry and house furnishin~gs wre little changed.

Isrge indpendennt retailers reoarded a sales gain
of 11 per cent in June 1950 over June 19419, the Gensus
Bureau announned. The average gain from May to June
this year amounted to 13 per cent. Compared with June
1949, sales of lumber and building materials dealers
this year w~ere up 43 per cent and their June sales this
year wrere 7 per cent higher than the preceding month.
A year~to-year increase of 27 per cent was registered
by actorwehcle dealers in June and a rise at 10 per
aent from May to June of this year was noted.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3











BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
30058S AND REPUT~S AVAILABLE


Amrae SEroviSA aDi aead AME JnSge A &9 11914.8 g
Q981Rsec Ap At nearesA Donartment S C 9.988rct fAthl

remittances fqE AAAA maeidal nav4hle 4 Treasure


Wulletin 186, cotton Prod. & Dist...............204~
Foreign Trade Practice (Reference Source)......,200
List of Essential In~dustries.... ..............
Retail Trade Report for June, 1950, South Athantio.
Retail Trade Repor6 for June, 1950, E.Sou.Cent....
Retail Trade Report for June, 1950, U. S..,.......
Wholesale Trade Report for June,1950,U.S.& Regions.
Faat~s For Industry, W~heat Production, MI604)9......
Poetwar Market for Furniture, Eto., Reprint.....10)
Eardware Stores 1949 Operating Ratioe.......,,.,
Cleaning & Dyeing Plants 1949 Operating Ratioe...
Primary Channels of Distribution for MaUf~~Lacturers.
Senna (Business Informaation Service)..............
.Gross Changes in the Labor Force, iay-June 1950....
Governmental Revenue in 1949.......... G-CFlc9-#f2....
Census Bureau Publications on Government to be
Issued in Fiscal 1951...............
Canned Food Report Distributors & Camners........
Grey Iron Castings, May 1950, FFIM21A-50...........
Clay Construction Products, May 1950 FFIMY26B-50....
Cotton System Spinning Activity, June 1950 FFIMI.5.*
Air Conditioning & Commercial Refrig.Equip.FFIMU52Q.
Business & Education Teamw~ork for Strength~ (Ad-
dress by Secretary of Commaerce..,....
rj Business Assete in Addition to Stock & Good Will,
SBA No. 2...................
Steps for Reducing Your Distribution Costs,SB8184..
Ways & Cost of Financing Retail Installment Accounts
SBlll85 ................... ....
Selecting & Training Mia~nufacturers Saleamen,SBil94..
Six Tools for Industrial Selling, SBB217..........,.
Making the Most of a Narr'ow Store, SBA218...........
Fire Prevention in Retail 4torea, SBA222............
Canaea of Custom~er Complaints, SBa227..........,.....
Wage Inoontives WAill Help Reduce Costs, SBA229.....
Suggestions for Successful Millinery Retailing,SB8?JO
Service Provides Information on Prospective Employea,
SBA231............ .
J7 Informative Labels Do a Job, SBAP32................
00110


PAGE 4

EGG PRODUCTION RISES

All States in the Souftheast last year were well
above the period 1935 to 1939 in the prodnotion at
eggs, a U. S. Department of agriculture report just
issued showed.
The report, dealing writh production of eggs on farms,
gave the total on farmse in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Ten-
essee in 1949 as 44,450,000,000 compared with 32,170,-
000,000 as an average during the period of 1935 to
1939.
The total on farms last year represented about 5.5
eggs per oapita of the total population for all of the
eeven States.
The percentage increase by States las8t year over the
1935-39 average included the followings Alabeam, 243
Florida, 301 Georgia, 38; Misesiesippi, 171 North Caro.
Ilna, 63; South Carolina, 45; and Tennessee, 40.
NERI FURNITURE PAMPHLET LISTED

Southeastern businessmen and others interested in
the progress of the region in the furniture production
field will be interested in a pamphlet issued by the
U. S. Department of Commeroe entitled The Postwrar dar-
ket for Furniture. Malor Anaoliances. and Automo~biles.
The pamphlet, a reprint from the Su~rver oi Gurrent
Business. monthly publication issued by the Qefice of
Business Economies, of the Department of Colmmeroe,
deals with such subjects as measuring the demand for
furniture, the influence of credit andl expenditure sur-
veys .
In the portion dealing writh automobiles and ap-
pliances are discussions of automobile production and
sales phases, as well as comprehensive data on electric
refrigerators, vacuum cleaners, electric wrashing mach-
ines, and electric ranges.

This pamphlet is available at all De-
partment of Commerce field offices for
,190d

Nearly $2.8 billion was spent in 1949 on furniture,
not including housefurnishings,- or housebald equipment
and appliances, the pamphlet points out, which was
only slightly below the exrpenditure of $2.9 billion in
1948, and in dollar value more than doubled prewfar.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID


BC-6-JF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUA4LLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, Number 16, Aug~ust 15, 1950


-- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


3 1262 08748 8176








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLANTA 8. GA. SIAVANHA, GA. JACK(SONVILE, FLL. nlIal 32, FLA HIOBILE, ALA. CHARLESTON, S.C.
60 tIhitehall St., LL, Room 218, P.O. Bldg.., 42 Federal Bldg., 91)7 Seybold Aldge 308g Federal Bldg., 310 Peopies Bldg.,
Tel. YlInsrt 4)121 E-468 Tel. 2-4)765 Tel. )-71II Tel. 9-76889 Tel. 2-3841 Tel. 7771



vQL. NJo. 17 SEPTEMBER 1, 1950


FARM PR(DU~CTS OFF IN VALUE

The value of all farm products produced in the Suh-
east last year was estimated by the U. S. Department of
Agriculture as $3,828,200,000, which is $444,883,000
short of the value placed on the 194,8 output.
The value last year, which includes both cash re-
ceipts in markets as well as products produced for home
consumption, included $1,366,863,000 on livestck and
$2,461,337 000 for crope compared with $1,541,941,000
and $2,731,142,000, respectivety, in 1948.
The figures reviewed here were for the states of
Alabamna, Flarida, Georgia, Mlississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee.
Government payments last year in connection with the
agricultural program totalled $33,682,000, which was
$2,753,000 less than those made in 1948.
Notes watch the Department of Com-
merce Facts For Industry reports for
current data on certain agricultural
industries. They are issued monthly
and are gratia,
All of the seven southeastern States, except Alabamna,
received less in Government payments last year than in
1948.
Following are the totals for each of the southeasten
States in cash receipts plus value of the products far
home consumption for the years 1948 and 1949:
North Carolina, 1948, $952,520,000 and 1949, $850,-
608,000,; South Carolina, $429,840,000 and $351,065,000;
Georgzia. $658,985,000 and $57,256,000; Florida, $b360,-
772,000 and $457,889,000; Tennessee, $636,232,000, and
8542,4710000; Alabama, 5571,358,000 and 9461,523,000;
and Mlississippi, ;3663,376,000 and $593,088,000.

TRAFFIC VGILUMBI INDREASES

There was more traffic over State highways of the South-
east during the first three months of 1950 than in the
same period last year, the Bureau of Publio Roada, U. 8.
Department of Commerce reported. Only in Tennessee was
traffic lighter on those highways.
The percentage increase in Mdarch 1950 over the ease
month last year included Alabama, 8.3; Florida, 14.1)
Georgia, 6.6; Mdississippi, 10.1; North Carolina, 14.45
and South Carolina, 4.1. In Tennessee a drop of" 1.4 was
recorded. Alabamna and Georgia also reported gains of
.17.3 and 7,6, respectively, in local highway traffic.


CIAY GCOSTRUCTION SHIPMENTS HIGH


plants in the Southeast last year shipped unglasqd
brick, unglaed structurnal tile, and glazed and unglazed
hollowr facing tile valued at apprcazmately $40.2 million,
according to a report of the Bureau of the Census.
The report, one of the Facts for Industry series
(M626B-09), showed also that the Southeast and Southwrest
shipped vitrified clay sewer pipe in 1949 valued at
$8.1 million,

These Facts For Igdustry reports are
gratis. This particular one has a
State and Regional brealrdowrn on the
production and shipment of clay prod-
14ctp,
In the unglased brick field, 179 plants in.the Soulth-
east reported to the Census Bureau that they shipped
during the year a total of 1,641,549,000 standard brick
and ~that their production for the year was estimated at
1,682,609,000 brick.
The States included in this reviewf are Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Mdississippi, North Carolina, South Caro-
lina, Tennessee, Kentuckyl, Idaryand, Virginia, West Vir-
ginia, Delawfare and the Distriot of Columbia,
Thirty plants in the same States reported a produat-
ion of 323,455 short tons of ungilazed structural tile,
and that shi~pents totalled 386,033 abort tons valued at
$2,955, 000.
Ten plants producing glazed and unglazed hollow facing
tile said their production last year aggregated 28,786,-
000 brick equivalent and shipments totalled 24,700,000
brick equivalent valued at $j1,141,000.
In the production and shipment of vitrified olay sewer
pipe, 14e plants in the southeast and souithwest produced
280,698 short tons of that product, and shipped 272,550
tons valued at $i8,187,000.



SThere were 64,~513 motorcycles registered in Alabampa,
Florida, Georgia, Misasissippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee Last year. Florida alone had 16,-
069, and North Carolina, 13,641. Ohher registrations, by
States, included Alabama, 7,915; Georgia, 8,881; Misa-
issippi, 2,550; south Carolina, 6,619; and Tennessee,
8,838.
In the nation as a whole, the reg~istrationsa totalled
469,872 a~rclusaive of the prhticl-owned.








I _


800TEIRN FIRE GET CONT~RACTS

Two southeastern firms have been awarded contracts
for supplying the Federal Government with needed sup-
plies, according to the week3 lists of contract awards
now being received by more than 2,000 U. S. Department
of Comrmeroe field offices, local Chambers of Comrmerce,
State agencies and trade organisations.
The awards were made to the Benham Undenrear Mills,
Soottsboro, Alabana, for 100,000 white shores at a
price of $52,000, and to the Atlanta Paper company,
Atlanta, Ga., for 3,150,000 folding baz oartone at a
cost at 867,567.
AroundIC 200 firm~s located over the nation were in-
aluded in the contract award list, some of them re-
ceiving contracts running into seven figuroea.
The list included a large number of products import-
ant to the Southeast, such as fruits, ants and other
foods, paper, tobacco, and other comnmodities.
The contract award list is available for inspection
by anyr interested businessman at any of the foregoing
outlets. Most local Chambers of Commnerce are receiving
the service. Those which do not may do so by expressing
a desire for it.
The service is part of a twfo-ay approach to the
~objective of giving all businessmen in the nations
large and small, an opportunity to share in the Federal
Government's procurement operations. Also available
at the same outlets is a daily list of supplies for
which the Government is in the market, with quantities
desired and dates of bid openings. Purpose of the con-
tract awant list is to afford interested businessmen an
opportunity to negotiate with the anocessful bidders
for subcontracts, and the lists of products to be bought
are being made available for prime contracting purposes,
TECHNICAL BUSINESS ADVICE

Southeastern businessmen who here not already done
so, may be overlooking an opportunity to improve their
operations by becoming more acquainted with the reports
on technical subjects which the Office of Technical Re-
ports, U. S. Department of Commnerce, has been issuing
for .the past several years.
The reports are the results of considerable research
on the part of firs, individuals, educational institu-
tions and others cooperating with the Federal Government
in providing the "knowhown to more successful activities
in the business field.
As an acample of what these reports consist of, here
are a few reports which have just become available, and
which may have a special interest in the Southeast:
Rice Curls An ideal "anack food" ready to take its
place beside products like potato chips and corn chips.
Can be inexpensively prepared.
Pre-Peeled Potatoes Bra in use by the resten-
rant trade, but yet an unexploited opportunity for
drc sase Fod 1eal o stores as a pacae d i em.
Yelv Fo; Fo Icuing turkey metsek,
tratv Fruit frozen deaserbs, citrus purees, sirup-
fruitsd aande gliocea, sad debydrafreezing process for

more ful inteu Off o a Tehia Srie s smhnical
Reports Newsletter, available through any Department of
aolmerce field office on a yearly subscription basis of

9 is also turning out for businessmen of the South-
easO and other regions many other reports daily. Some

ementi ofc me; dihwahdin ergts add n bie
night-work lighting systems~ for construction equipment,
and the serviceability of fabric.


SUGAR DELVERIES HBVI

PrimPary distribution of sugar over the nation in the
first three months of 1950 included 3,892,185 abort tons,
refined value, in the States of Alabama, Florida, Geor-
gia, Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee, according to a current issue of the Department
*of Commesrce Industry Renort for Suesar. Molasses and Con-
footioneru.V
The report showed the following distribution, in
short tonls, by States in the Southeast: Alabamna, 455,-
378; Florida, 666,049; Georgia, 857,970;. Missiasippi
282,716; North Carolina, 689,652; south barolina, 4b,-
326; and Tennessee, 644,094.

This report is available at anly De-
partment of Commnerce field office at
a subooription rate of 50ka year. It
is issued quarterly,

Incidentally, the report also listed 498,289 tone
as having been imported into the seven southeastern
States for direct consumption. These importations in-
cluded AlabeanP, 632; Florida,'287,831; Georgia, 64,982;
Mississippi, 75; North Carolina, 127,719; south Caro-
lin., 6,813) and Tennessee, 10,237.
Cane sugar refineries were responsible for the dia.
tribution of 3,218,307 tone, including Alabama, 438,112;
florida, 252,992; Georgia, 791,489; Mississippi, 276,-
048; North Carolina, 561,933; south Carolina, 289,505;
and Tennessee, 608,228.

BE~NEPHT PAIN~ENS $;8.8 MLL~IGN

Benefit payments made in the Southeast under the
unemployment lasurance program up to May 1950 totalled
88,858,671, the Burean of Employment Security, U. S.
Department of Labor has currently reported.
All types of unemployment for which the payments were
made including total, part-total, and partial, aggre-
gated 618,731, the Bureau stated.
Benefit payments in the Southeast, by States,inled
North Carolina, $2,039,219; Alabamna, $b1,579,503; Florida,
$588,906; Georgia~, $01,2214988; Missiasippi, $b647,15&:
'South Carolina, $871,829 and Tennessee, $1,907,072.
IMPRLOV~EMENTS IN AVIATIGR

Three southeastern cities --- Atlanta, Memphis and
Jacksonville -- are among 23 aviation centers scheduled
for a new improvement in aviation known as the "Mdechani"
cal Interlook," a device which will expedite movement
of aircraft into the control sones of heavy-traffic air-
ports during instrument weather conditions, the Civil
A ronauties Administration, U. S. Department of Comrmeroes

A present, in air traffic control at terminal areas
during instrument weather, coordination by interphone is
required between the air traffic control center and the
airport traffic control tower to coordinate flight as"
signments and exrpedite the movement of aircraft*
Through the mechanical interlock, most of the verbal
cooo intion wl eli iaed bynaenana of push buttons

signed to an altitude by the center, the tower is in-
formed by a light on its instrument panel, actuated by
a push button at the center, and if the tower assigns
an altitude to an aircraft, the center is similarly ad-
vis ed

ion wit th entr wil as re eve the new ssoojnt -


PAGE 2


LUB LETIN OF COMMERCE





HIGELIGIES &F TEE BUIluHSS WORID

(Far Further details at any of these items, ask the
nearest U. 8, Department of Comeeroe field office for
coapes of the releases)

Cuttings at boy apparel increased from 1948 to
1949, whereas the output at ments tailored clothing
declined, the Census Burean reported. Ments work cloth-
ing showed gains ovrer 1948. The rise in sport shirt
cuttings was the most striking development in the
furnishings field.
Tobal besinese inventories at the end of June wrere
estimated at $55.3 billion. After allowance for seeasn-
al variations, the book value of inventories rose 9~00
million during June, which brought the total to abant
the level of the same tiae a year ago,

Route chart 2204 covering the west coast of the
United States from Seattle. Wlashinton, to San Diego,
Californi, and extending eastwarld to Billings, Mdont.,
and Trooson, Arisona, has just been published by the
Coast and Geodetic Surrey, U. S. Department of Commeroe,
Price 25gh --
A recommended Commercial Standard for Ciroular Knit-
ted Gloves and Mittena has been airoulated to manurfact-
urers, distributors, and users for consideration and
written sooeptance, the Co~modity Standards Division,
Office of Industry and Conmeroe, U. S. Department of
GoamePrce, announced,

Appointment of Dr. Archie M. Falaer, of Tennessee,
by the President to serve as Chairman of the Government
Patents Board, a new and independent agency established
under recent reorganisation action by Congress wras an-
nounced. Functions of the newP agency will be to look
after a uniform patent policy for the Giovernment wpith
respect to inventions by Government employees,

Shipatents of knit cotton and wool underwear anid
nightwrear in May totalled $15 million, 3 per cent more
than April's sales of $146 million, the Consue BuLreau
sadd. Iarn consumption of 8.9 million pounds was also
3 per cent above April but purchased knit fabric con-
sumption dropped 7 per cent,
Setting a newf all-time record for the second straight
month, United States manufacturers in June conaused
11,012 tons of newr rubber. The short-lived May record
was 110,211 tone. In June a year ago consumption totalled
84,156 tone.

In the first quarter of 1950, shipments of women's
misses, and junioral ouaterwrear totalled $682 million,
or 16 per cent below the first quarter of 1949, the
Census Bureau announced. Cuttings of all garments, in-
oreased with the exception of coats and unit-price
dresses.

The average price of carpet wool in the principal
areas abroad which supply this commodity to the United
States increased more than 100 per cent durring the 12-
month period June 1949 through Maey 1950, the G9rie of
Industry and Cocm~erae, U. S. Department of Cameroe,
said,

a total of 6.3 million dosen dresses were made in
1949 far girls, children, sad infants, it was announced
by the Census Bureen. This represented a 21 per cent
gain over the 5,2 million doseas produced the year be-
fore and a 14 per cent increase over 1947.


SUPER MABRKET SALES R3ISE

Sales in general in all departments of super markets
in the nation were better in 1949 than they were in 1948
despite a 3.8 per cent decrease in food prices in 1949
from 1948.
This is pointed out in a Bu~esinss Information Service
release of the U. S. Department of Comearoe entitled
nSuper Markets 1949 Operating Ratioe.n
The release, one of a number issued from time to time
by the Conmerce Department dealing writh various trades,
stated that the 601 super markets reporting in a survey
conducted throughout the country had aggregate sales
last year of ib417,324,000. The average volume per mar-
ket was $b691,382.

Notes Obher operating ratios for 1949
now available include those for clean-
ing azz1 dyeing pants and hardwfare
ptorea. They are a~ll ratia,
Greater tonnage wass moved ly the super market -in
1949 than in 1948. By departments, grocery sales so-
counted for 60.5 per cent of total store sales, inolud-
ing 1.6 per cent in frozen foods and 8.3 per cent in
dairy products. Meats, poultry and delicatessen did
26.3 per cent of the volume, andl produce 11.8 per cent.
The remaininng 3.ii per cent was accounted for by other
departments such as drugs and cosmetics, wines and
liquor, and so forth,
The information was released lay the Commaerce Deparb-
annt through the condresy of Suner Market Merchandisina
a Newf York City publication.
FACTORP EM6PLOYMENT INGREQSES

Marnufac~turing employment in the Southeast in June
of this year -reached a total of 1,692,300, .an increase
of 11,000 over May but a decline of 18,300 as compared
wfith the like period last year, the Butreau of Labor
Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor, reported.
B~y States, the employment included Alabama, 208,800;
Florida, 86,500; Georgia, 265,300; Mlississippi, 83,700;
North Carolina, 392,000; South Carolina, 200s6001 and
Tennessee, 242,100.
All States in the region reported gains over 1949
while Florida and Georgia were the only States reporting
losses from May, it was stated.
Employment in the durable goods plants rose 8,300
between May and June with more than half the gain con..
centrated in the lumber industry. Textile ills employ.
ed 580,000 persons in mid-June, an increase of 3,000
over May. The food industry employed 148,600 workers
an increase of 1,300 over the previous month.

TRADEZ ASSOCIATION MIEETINB i

Members of trade associations and whher business ar-
ganizations in the Southeast will hold a number atl an-
nual meetings in Atlanta, the Atlanta Convention and
visitors Bureau announced,
The meetings, to be held during the lasit half at
1950 and in 1951 include those on toilet goods, electric
wholesaling, the bakery trade, hotel greeters, libra.
rianag~ soience and industry, drugs, shoes, building
tradeefaa Maadating, and many others.
Those interested in the sames of the organisations
which will meet, with dates and roontacts" may obtain
additional information from the Atlanta Convention and
Visitors Bureenr, 1216 Rhod -Haaverty Buildinge, in At-
lanta.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3







PAGE 4
GUARBllTIES FOIR BUSINE~SSMEN

Businessmen in the Southeast will be interested in
an announcement from the Economie Gooperation Adminis
tration of the enactment by Congrees of legislation
providing for two major guarantiees which assure them
greater scope and broadened government protection in
their transactions conducted under the Marshall Plan.
Under the new legislation, provided for in the
Economic Cooperation Act of 1950s those who invest in
or license to foreign producers in Miarshall Plan coun.
tries such intangibles as patents, processes and tech-
rciques wdill be~ ahle to obtain guaranties of converb-
ibility into dollars of the foreign ourrenoy proceeds
received from such investment or 'liense, and also
guaranty is provided against the risk of lose through
expropriation or confiscation by the participating
country.

If you have not obtained your copy
of the little booklet Information on
the Marshall Plan for Americans ggojigg
AbEog get it from the nearest Field
Office of the Department of Comrmerce,
heree is po oberge .
Heretofore, only capital equipment and actual oneh
investment contributing to European recovery, with
provision for additional earnings on intangibles in.
cident to capital investment, have been eligible to
receive the benefits of the program,
Under the guaranty respecting exrpropriation, busi.
nessmeq of the United States will have increased con.
fidence in investments in Marshall Plan countries and
their overseas dependencies. As in the past, the
Guaranty provisions do not give courage against busi.
neas risks or against exchange fluctuations.


i .-



U.S. DEP~OlbITORYC


BO0058 AND REPORTS AVAILABLE

(19.9UtRsi.B,9.ieasg 320, 19 nterial. .ghEdl i 4,, A ihtb
APhaB provided arA AME1a jkib. 2BP.Se St 4t~I Blletin pf
Commerce ji2 dih 89.e9arst D~evartment gt Cormmerce IE,1,q],gC
.Qffic.S*IE Xpyy ADAp .061rrdes.E AM 9,hPIEB Pa.%2. IBMr
remittances IQE &.8.1. material tBY.b.M. dig Treasurer


Clay Construction Products, 1949, FFIM26B-09.....
Sugar Industry Report........................50#Yr.
Super Mdarkets 1949 Operating Ratice.............
Information on Marshall Plan for Americans Going
Abroad.....,,.............,,
The .Identification of Rock Types....,.......... .10e
The Monthly Report on the labor Force, July 1950..
Trends in the Grocery Trade, June 1950...........)
Trends in the Dry Goods Trade, June 1950.........
Trends in the Tobacco Trade, June 1950...........
Consolidated Cotton Report, Aug. 1, 1950......,...
Fats & 011s, Consumption by Uses, June 1950,FFIM17
Children's & Infants (Ilterwear, FFIE67k-09........
Pulp, Paper & Board, June 1950, FFIM~14A-60......
Small Business Inder to Selected Publications at
the U. 8. Department of Commneroe........250~
Small Business Management Publications, BI3....109
Check List for Establishing a Retail Business.....
1949 Quide to Government Information on Retail-
ing......................159
Retain Policies Their Selection and Application..
On~e Hsundred Questions for a.hPropective Y'fr.......
Financial Considerations in the Establishment of a
Newo Small Business ................15e
Systemsa for Keeping Small Store Records, BE..,,
AddVertisi3g:Econo0mica & Principles, BI;........,...
Direct Mail Advertising.....................,,n..
Premium Advertising, BI.........................,.
Retail Store Advertising, BS.,............,....,
Bolr the Retailer Determinee Customer W~ants, SB249
The Reduction of Distribution costs, SBm256.......
Check List for Food Retailing, SM23.......
Dols and Don'ta in Food Retailirng, SM268.......,,.
Busiess Pitfalls to Avoid......8MQ281............,
Retail Salesmanship, SB8284 .n......,.,......... .,,
Ten Comrmandments for the Grocer Today, SBQ332.....
Hour to Meet Competition in Retfailrngr, SBA368,..,,.
Making Effective Use of H~andbill Advertising, SBAA74
83. 100157


USE TO AVOID
TAGE $300


i The Identification .af Rock Tuaes is the
I title of a booklet just issued byr the Bureau
I of Pulblie Roads, U. S. Department of Com.
Smeroe. The publication is designed to ser~e
as a guide for highway engineers and orthere
in selecting the best rook for use in differ.
ent tyrpes of highway constnrution. Available
Through all Comrmerce Department. Field Offices
Sfor 10d.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE '
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS *
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, NPumber 17, September 1, 1950

=- BULIAETIN OF COMMERCE--

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY


lil li II IlI llIII IUII 1111111111111111111 1111 1111111111111
3 1262 08748 8473


BULLETIN


BC~t~


UNIVIERSITy OF PLORIDA

DEPRT~~TOF ECONORtd~feg
GAINESVILLE, FLORDIDA











UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE










ATLANTA 8, 6A. 83AVAIM8l, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. MIMI 32, FLA. HOBILE, ALA CHARLESTON, S.C.
60 ihitehall.St., LL, 88om 218, P.O. Bldg.. 4)26 Federal Bldg., 91) 3761 Sebl 1dg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tl~laut 48121 E-4563 Tel* 2-4765 Tel. 1)-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-864)1 Tel. 7771



vQL. 4, No. 18 SEPTEMBER 15, 1950


BUILDINGS MAITERIALS OUT~LOOK GOCD


REDUCED FARMY RECEIPTS CUTS INC(IE I

A sharp drop in agricultural receipts last year was
a major factor in a 3 per cent decline in total income
payments to individuals in 1949 as compared wcith 1948
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina and Tennessee, the annual report
of the Office of Business Economics, U. S. Department
of Colmmerce, on income payments to individuals, shows.
Last year's total in wages and salaries, and income
from unincorporated businesses, social insurance bene-
fits, relief and veterans' pensions in the seven-8tate
area amounted to $17,297 million, a $593 million de-
orease from 1948.

(At thei present time, this report is avail-
able in twro forms, namely, a press release
showing payments by States, and the August
issue of the Survey of Current Business, re-
flecting a more detailed digest. Both are
distributed by field offices of the Depart-
ment of Commerce, the former wPithout charge
and the other at 250~ a copy. Reprints will
likely be issued l ater),

Onily in Florida wras an increase in 1949 over 1948
reflected, payments in that State rising from $2,817
million in 1948 to $2,9rC8 million in 1949, or a gain of
5 per cent. Obberwrise, decreases of from 2 per cent in
Georgia to as high as 14 per cent in Mlissiasippi wrere
indicated.

See INCOhIE PAYMIENTS Page 3

00ff0N,LINTER(S ON LICENSING LIST

WRorld traders in the Southeast wAho ship rawf cotton
and cotton linters to foreign countries mu~st now obtain
validated licenses before so doing, the Office of In"
dustry and Comrmerce, U. S. Department of Commerce, has
announced.

Get full information on this action from
your neareat Commeree Department qffioe,

Action has been taken to place such products on the
positive list" of commodities in short supply in this
country, and which, therefore, must be validated be-
fore shipment is made abroad. Raws cotton up to $250
valuation and linters to $100 valuation may be shipped
lawithout licensing to other than "Iron ourtainn coun-
tries and shipments to Canada are unrestricted*


Building contractors and materials dealers in the
Southeast will be interested in a report just issued by
the Construction Division of the U. S. Department of
Commerce reflecting prospects for building materials
supplies and use for the remainder of 1950.
Stepped-4p production of building materials is ex-
pected to bring supplies generally into balance with
requirements for ipamediate use late this year, the re-
port stated. Shortages of cement, brick, gypeum board
products and some other materials that have appeared
in 1950 have not been due generally to a lack at prod-
uotive capacity, but to several other factors, includ-
ing the fact that the record volume of homebuilding in
1950 wnas not fully anticipated.

The Department of Commerce Industry Re-
port 09astruction and Construtong M~aerfial
is an excellent medium for keeping abreast
of conditions in the building field. It is
issued monthly and is available at all field
offices at a subscription rate of 89 a venr.

A tight supply situation for several building mater-
ials may be expected to continue through September and
October, but the subsequent seasonal downturn in con-
atzuction activity should bring rebuilding of atocks by
early winter if builders' purchases conform to the nor-
mail schedule in advance of actual use, the report said.

See BUILDING MATERIAIS Paee 2

MIOfl0N PICTURE D3ETRIBUTION UP


Four cities in the South -- Atlanta, Memphis, Char-
lotte and New Orleansl bare seen their motion picture
distribution business increase by more than 100 per cent
between 1939 and 1948, according to 19468 Census of Busi-
-ness figure just announced by the Bureau of the Census,

Ask the nearest Commerde Department, field
office for a copy of this report (BC-2P-1),
It is eratis

Film rentals and other receipts derived from the
operation of this industry rose 129 per cent in Atlanta;
117 per cent in Charlotte; 110 per cent in MemphisIr and
106 per cent in New Qrleans in the 9-year period. Nation-
ally, the industry grew 123 per cent. Since 1929, the
growth in Atlanta was 232 per cent; Obarlotte, 255 per
oent; Mbemphis, 261 per cent; and New Qr~leans, 169 per cent,











I -


SOUTHERN FIRh8~ GE~T CONTRACTS

Seventy-six contracts calling for the expenditure of
near3,y $9,000,000 were awarded by the Federal Government
within the past month to businessmen operating in the
South, according to weekly contract award synopsis lists
now being received at U. S. Department of Comrmerce field
offices, local Chambers of Commerce, State agencies and
trade organizations.
The contracts ranged from one for $6,722 given the
Wood Preserving Division of the Koppers Company, Inc.,
Montgomery, Ala., for oross ties to an award of $1~,510,-
800 to the Magnolia Petroleum company, Dallas, for 10,-
920,000 gallons of aviation gasoline.
Lists of the contract awards are now being received
salng with daily lists of products needed by the Federal
Government at more than 200 outlets for such information
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee.

Note: If you are a businessman and are
interested in this information, ask your
nearest Department of Commerce field of-
fice or your local Chamber of Commerce
for it.
In the Southeast, the awards made in the past month
included the following: Central. O11 company, Inc., Tampa,
$44,161,000, Eastern Seaboard Petroleum company, Jackson-
ville, $94,482,000, Fuel 011 Supp3,y company, Fairhope,
Ala. $71,000;. Hewtitt 011 company, Inc., Charleston, S.
C., ~33,293; and Grange State QL.company, Miami, $2C8,-
010 for various fuel oils and gasolines; Mooreoville
Mills, Mooresville, N. C., $31,002 for 45,000 yards of
Turkish toweling; Atlanta Paper company, Atlanta, $90,-
027 for 2,100,000 folding bar cartons; R. J. Reynolde
Tobacco company, Winstor Salem, N. C., two contracts of
$49,629 each for cigarettes; the H~umko company, Mlemphis,
Tenn., 843,304 for 160,000 pounds of` canned shortening;
W. G. Avery Body company, Jackson, Miss., $31,486 for
4.200 rack assemblies; ~emnworth Hosiery Mills, IHickory,
NJ. C., 853,704 for 180,000 pairs of sooks; gells-Qhtes
Lumber company, New Bern, N. C., $18,708 for 151,100
witch ties; M. R. 8. company, Jackson, Miss., $375,000,
for 20 scrapers; Fontaine Truck Equipment, Birmingham,
$37,480 for five trailers; Pasco Packing company, Inc.,
$30,614 for 9,300 dozen cans of grapefruit juice; Rey-
nolds and MbanyI Lmber company, loo., Savannah, Ga., for
$28,965 for lumber Perry Lumber company, H~enderson, N.
C., $35 273 for lumber; Cannon Mills company, Kannapolis,
N. c., $35,972 for 57,200 cotton Turkish towela; c ad
Benham Underwear Mills, Scottaboro, Ala., $52,000 for
100,000 white shorts.
The daily lists of purchases to be made by the Govern-
ment received at the same outlets include invitations to
bid on many other commodities produced in the South. Pur-
pose of the program is to afford business firms through-
out the country an opportunity to participate in Federal
Government buying, both as prime and sub-contractors.

BUILDING MAIITERIAIS Continued from Page 1

The report showed that total lumber supply this year
is expected to reach nearly 40 billion board feet, break-
ing all records since 1916. Construction uses account for
about 65 to 70 per cent of total lumber consumed. In 1950
Actual consumption in construction is expected to amount
|to about 27.2 billion board feet.
Cement production probably will reach about 212 mil-
lion barrels in 1950, appro~miately equalling the amount
called for in estimates of quantities that actually will
be used in construction this year. Production of unlglased
clay brick may exceed that of any~ other year since 1929.


RETAIIL SALES UP SHIARPLY

A wrae of buying struck the Southeast in July follor-
ing development of the Korean situation with the result
that all cities and areas in the region in which the
Bureau of the Census condnets monthly surveys retorted
increases in retail sales, many of them substantial>
over the corresponding month last year.
The gains ranged from 4 per cent in Coahoma and Quit-
mlan counties, Mississippi, to as high as 44 per cent in
Augusta, Ga., and Chilton and Perry counties, Alabama.

These Monthly Retail Trade Reports
are available for the asking. Request
that your name be placed on the mailing
list to receive theme

-Dbber percentage increases included: Birmingham and
Maeon, 43; Jefferson county, Alabama, 41; Johnson City,
Tenn., 38; Atlanta, and Dei~alb, Fulton and Rookdale
counties, Georgia, 34; Greenwood and McCormick counties,
South Carolina, 29; Sullivan, Unicoi and Washington
counties, Tenn., 28; Savannah, Ga., and Greenwpood, S. 0*
27; K~ingaport, Tenn., 26; Columbus, Ga., and Buncombe
and Madison counties, North Carolina, 25; Asheville,
N. C., and Bleakley and Twiggs corinties, Ga., 24; and
Gulfport, Miss., 23*
In many instances, the increases were well above the
21 per cent rise registered for the nation*
Most cities and areas in the region also reported
abarp rises in sales for the first 7 months of 1950 over
the same period last year, including 26 per cent in
Augusta and Biloxi, Mdiss.; 21 per cent in Columbus; 19
per cent in Birmingham; 18 per cent in Johnson City,
Tenn; 16 per cent in K~ingaport; and 14 per cent in
Atlanta, Savannah and Greenwood*
Sales* in individual lines of goods reported for some
of the cities and areas in the Southeast indicated un"
usually brisk trading in such commodities as foods,
clothing, furniture and other household goods; lumber
and building materials; and automobiles*

SGXITHIIS WHOLESALE SALES HIGH

Nine Southern counties were among 50 leading counties
in the nation in which most of the wholesale sales con-
ducted in the United States were concentrated in 1948,
the Bureau of the Census has announced in a special re-
port it has issued on its 19A8 Census of Business.
The nine Southern counties are Dallas county, Texas;;
Fulton county, Georgia; Yhelby county, Tennesuee; r-
leans Parish, Louisiana; Mdeeklenburg county, North Caro-
lina; Jeff"erson county, Kentuchy~; Jefferson county, Ala-
bama; Tarrant, county, Texas; and Duvral county, Fla.
Order this report from your nearest
Commerce Department field office. It
is BC-1P-4-1. and is gratis,

The nine counties experienced gains in wholesale
sales between 1939 and 1948 ranging from 192 per cent
in Orleans Parish to as high as 370 per cent in Miecklen-
burg county.
According to the census Bureau, 69 per cent of the
nation's wholesale sales in 1948, or about $128 billion
of the national total of $i185 billion was accounted for
in the 50 leading counties. Shelby county moved from
22nd nationally to 16th in rank in sales increases in
the 9-year period; Mecklenburg county from 34th to 29th;
Jefferson county, A.la., from 38th to 32ndjand Tarrant
county from 45th to 39th. With a few exceptions all of
the 50 counties had more than 500 establishments.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2










BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
WA~Gl!,BARIAR1! UP IN 800TBEAUST

Residents at the seven Southeastern States of Ala-
bana, Florida, Georgia, Milssiasippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee last year received a totaL.
of $10,61,4 million in wages and salaries, about 211 per
cent more than the $3,466 million received in the pre-
war year 191,0, according to an analysis of the 1949
income payments to individuals made by the Office of
Business Economies, U. S. Department of Comrmerce.
The payments last year, by States, included Alabama,
$1,116 million; Florida, $1,761 million; Georgia, $1,-
902 million; Mi~ssissippi, $~638 million; North Carolina,
$2,086 million; South Carolina, $1,066 million; and
Tenabassee, $1,775 million.
Last year's total wage and salary payments in the
region represented approximately $536 per capital com-
pared with an estimated $185' in 1940.
The 21 per cent increase in such payments in the
seven-State area was somewhat above the rate of in-
orease for the nation in the 10-year period, which a-
mounted to around 172 per cent.
Florida with an1 advance of about 236 per cent in the
decade experienced a greater rise in wage and salary
payments for the period than any of the other South-
eastern States. The rate of increase in the others was
Alabamoa, 203 per cent; Georgia, 214 per cent; South
Carolina, 213 per cent;. Tennessee, 21.1 per cent; and
North Carolina azrl Mississippi, 198 per cent.
Information on National Income has also
been issued by the Office of Business E-
conomies. It is in the July issue of the
Survey of Current Business, available at
all Commerce Department offices on a sub-
scription basis of $3 a year, or 25P a
COth

Proportionate increases were also reflected in the
10 ear period in proprietors' and property income re-
ceived by residents in the area. Proprietors' lacome
rose from $1,298 million in 191.0 to $~3,669 million last
year, and property income went from $602 million to
$1,588 million, respectively.- Proprietorse income, by
States, last year included Alabama, $515 million; Flor-
ida, $559 million; Georgia, 8553 million; Mi~ssissippi,
$451 million; North Carolina, $736 million; South Caro-
lina, $269 million; and Tennessee, $3586 million.
Property income included, Alabama, $p167 million;
Florida, $1.15 million; Georgia, $256 million; Missise-
ippi, $88 million; North Carolina, $296 million; South
Carolina, $116 million; and Tennessee, $250 million.

INCOLdE PAYMIENTS Continued from Page 1

In fact, Florida was one of only seven States plus
the District of Colusibia in which increases in 1949 over
1948 were shown. For the nation as a whole, a 2 per cent
decline took place, the total dropping from $202,385
million in 1948 to $197,531 million last year.
In the seven Southeastern States, the total in 1949,
however, was 12 per cent greater than the first post-
war year 191,6. The total in 191.6 was placed at $15,421
million. Following were the total payments by States in
the Southeast in 191,$ and 194+9:
Alabama, 1948, $2,486 million and 1949, $2,313 mil-
lion; Florida, $2, 817 million and $2,9148 million; Gcrur-
gia, $2,990 million and $;2,928 million; Mdississippi,
P1531 million and a1,318 million North Carolina,
,439U, million and $3,349 million; South Carolina, $1,-
681- million and $1,581; million; and Tennessee, $2,946
million sad $2,858 million.


PAGE 3
HIGHLIGBIS F TBB BW6INESS W(RLD)


(For Further details of any of these items, ask the
nearest U. S. Department of Commerce field office for
copies of the releases)

Sales of large independent retailers were 21 per
cent higher in July 1950 than in July 1949, but July
sales this year were 4 per cent short of the June dol-
lar volume, the Burean of the Census reported in ita
monthly survey. Substantial gains were recorded in
July of this year over July 1949 by lumber and building
materials dealers (48 per cent); motor-vehle dealers
(38 per, cent); furniture stores (28 per cent); depart-
ment stores (22 per cent); gasoline servio e stations
(19 per cent); sad hardware stores (18 per cent).
Gross national product in the aeocad quarter- of
1950 wass at an anmnul rate of nearly $270 billion, $7
billion higher than the previous quarters and greater
than the previous high serk of $267 billion reached in
the last quarter of 19148. Personal consumption expend-
itures rose to $181;} billion at seasonally adjusted
annual rates as compared with $182) billion in the
first quarter and $180) billion at the end of 3ast
year.

Estimated production of salad dressing, mayonnaise
and related products during 1949 reached apprazimately
89.2 million gallons, or 3 per cent greater than the
revised 1948 production.

Expenditures on new construction reached the unpre-
cedented monthly total of more than $2.6 billion in
July, the U. S. Departments of Colmmerce and Labor an-
nounced in a joint report. The July figure topped the
June level by 6 per cent and that of July a year ago
by 25 per cent. Supported by the large volume of house
construction under way, total private consrulnction in
July advanced more than seasonally to $1~,960 million,
6 per cent above June and 32 per cent more than in July
1949.

Chain store and mail-order sales amounted to $2,476
million in July, about 18 per cent above July 1949,
This year the total dollar volume for July eas 4 per
cent above June, in contract to a usual seasonal de-
eline between those two months. After adjustment for
seasonal and working day variations, the gain over June
amounted to about 11 per cent.

United States exports of cotton cloth in June total-
ed 52,318,000 square yards, an increase of 3,629,000
yards, or 7,5 per cent over exports8 in Mayr. Isrge~r June
shipments to the Philippine Republio, Cuba, Iran. and
the Union of South Africa accounted for a large part of
the increase, an analysis of the Bureau of the Census
figures showed,

Sales of retail stores in July reached $1~2,195 mil-
lion, nearly 20 per cent above July 1949. In the first
month following beginningr of the K~orean conflict, total
sales, instead of following the usual decline from June
to July rose 2 per cent. On a seasonally adjusted basis,
July sales were up 7 per cent from June.

Cash dividend payments by American corporatiions fa-
suing public reports amounted to $892,100,000 in June
1950 and $509,400,000 in July 1,950, or nearly 8 per cent
more than was paid out in the same~ two months ALt year,
Most of the industrial groups registered moderate gains.










________~


1950 POPUI~aTIae FIGURES BEING 1SSUED

IFirt official preliminary figures on the 1950 cen-
sus of population are now being issuedd by the Bureean
of the Censusu, ase well as statistion on housing taken
from that ceenus.
Figure for Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississeippi,
North Caratina, South Carolina and Tennessee were
among the first reports received on population, and
housing figures for Alabam~a were included.

Get in touch with the nearest Department
of Commerce office for these reporbe. They
are available in singe copies without
charge,
The figures include the prelimi~nary count for April
1, 1950, that for April 1, 1940, and the per cent
change. between 1940D and 1950 for the counties and also
---- Aaealtpora~te places of 1,800 or more, They are not
considered final, the Census Bureau explained, because
they may differ from the final figure in allocation
to the place of usual residence of persons enurmerated
elsewhere andl other revisions.
The figures, in printed form, give the following
populations for April 1, 1950 and April 1, 1940, with
percentage change 1940 to 1950 for the seven Sou~th-
eastern States:


B80058 AND REPORZTS GURRENTLY AVAILABLE

To obtian copies of this materia~lr aheck it in the
onese provided sad send this arse of the Bulletin of
Commerce to the nearest Decartment of Comwerce field


Pofie. Yonur name sad address are shown below. Mdake
remittances for sales material arwable to Treasurer


of the United States, Itents _not prised ~are free.
L7 Survey Current Business:
MVonlth27...........................$3 Year
August Issue. ................... .....25#
July lesue..............,.............250
onsrucion& Construction Mlaterials Report.$3 Year
Motion Picture Film Distribution (BC-2P-1).........
hoeaeTrade in 1948 50 Largest counties(BC-1P-W1)
Q~icial Prelimnnary Population Figures:
Alabama, ........,....,............,....,.
Florida....l~ .................... ...
Georgia............,,..,.... ......,,,,,,,
Mississippi. ,..............,... ....,,,,,,
North Carolina. ...............,.. ....,,.
South CarPo-lna...........................
ITennes ssee,,................. ...,.,o....
Business Information Service Mien's & Boys'Clothing
fj Business Information Servrice Electrical Appliance
&( Radio*Celevision Dealers 19119 Operating Ratios
L7 Business Information Servrice Indaz to World Mlotion
Picture Data Jan. 1, 191+5 to June 30, 1950......
fjGross Changes in Labor Force, June-July 1950........
Illustrative Projections of Population of U.S.,
1950 to 1960.....................
Monthly Report on Labor Force, August 1950...........
Full-Time & Part-Time Workers, Mdey 1950...........
Information Bulletin, National Inventors council....
Grort~h & Trends of manufacturing in the Pacific
Nor~thwest, 1939-1947................o.,,
L7Chemicals & Drugs Industry Reporb, August 1950,32.50
a year
Increasing Sales by M~ass Displays & Placards (SBB100)
What Type of Lease Should You Sign? (SBB507),..
Public Accounting in Smaller Ca~Inmuities (SBB / 2.
MUodernising the Front of Your Store (SBA 103),,,,
Experience With Profit Sharing (8BB 110),,,,,,
What Is Important In Selling?(SBA 112),.,,,..
Should Your Store Sell for Credit? (SBQ1),,..
Significant Factors in Plant Location (SBQl20),,,
Elements of Purchasing (SBBl24) ............... .


PreUimiary
~P9,gg
Auril 1. 1950
3,052,754
2,735,13
3,433,190
2,173,373
4,038,814
2,107,32
3,282,271


Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Mississippi
NSorth Carolina
South Carolina
Tennssee


S7,8
2 ~
S9.9
- 0.5
r~.1
0.9
.26


2, 832,961
1,897,041
3,123,723
2,183 796
3,571,623
1, 899,804
2,915,841


CGITON,RdPYOR LO0tB DECLINE

A decline of 14,000 cotton and rayon looms in place
in the cotton growing States at the end of 1949 as
compared with February 28, 1942 is reported by the
Burreau of the Gensus. The number in operation at the
end of 1949 wras 349,009, includizig 298,678 cotton and
50,331 rayon*
ade ofen 2, aMenrally dow rar. Nationally, a


6 PO 83-100173


PE IPY. dO PRIVAr US TO ~VOID
r PAYMENT OF POSTAL $30



U.S. DEO STO RY


PERMIT NO 1009

Volume 4, Number 18, September 15, 1950


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNll IVR SITY OF FLORIDAll


PAGE 4


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS


UNIfVERSITY OF FI.0tWLt
LEROY 1.. QUALLS
DEUAR~TasnT'I or sCONnowls
GAINESVILLE, PLORIDA










UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE










ATLANTAB 3,SA SAIVAMMIl, GL JACKSDAVrILE, FLA. MlINI 32, FLA HIOBILE, ALA. CHARLESTON, S.C.
60 tihiteall1.St., LL, Iloom 218, P.O. Bldg.. 426 Federal Bldg.., 947 Seybold Ildg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peopies Bldg.,
Tel. tl~lnut 4)121 X-1)53 Tel. 2-475 TM1. 1-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



VQ. 4, NOe. 19 0DTO[BER 1, 195i0

1950 BUSINESS ADVANCES REcORDED MATRF~IALS CQGERVATION PROGRAM E~STAB~ISHIED


Users of strategic materials in the Southeast shortly
will be given additional information regarding the use
of such materials in the light of the defense program
following the establishment recently in Washington of
the National Production authority to Function within
the United States Department of Commerce.
The NEAB, created by Secretary of Colmerce Charles
Sawyer, is headed by W~iliam. Henry Barrison, now on
leave from his post as President of the International
Telephone and Telegraph Corporation.
Now available for distribution at De-
partment of Commeroe field offices is
a coyg of Regulation No. 1 of the
National Production Authority on the
su~b~ect of Investory~ Control.

The NEa will be responsible for (1) determining re-
quirements of materials needed to maintain national de-
fense, the civilian econolqg, and established foreign
policies of the United States, and (2) formlating and
caecuting policies and program by~ which the American
econoug can meet these requirements.
NPA has already announced formation of a primary
copper producers industry advisory committee composed
of representatives of the industry located in several
sootions of the country. Creation of the group tallowed
a meeting of representatives of the copper and steel
industries held in Washington at which both pledged
their full cooperation in carrying out the programs
EFFECTS CP AT(YIC WEAPQG

(be of the most currently popular books issued b
the Federal Government la ita "The Effoots at Atade
Weapane," which deals with the nature at dang caused
by an atonio Mlast, how the damage is esnsed, and the
immediate danger areas. Allready, thousam of copies
have been sold, and nand to the booklet on ifahnt eaze,
is considered top rank in popularity.

This book is no r avilable threugh 1eld
offies of the Department at Commarce at
a salon .nriae of $1.25.

The publication ia replete with dreadags amld phto-
graphe showing the damage canned ag atomic Boba drgged
in Japan, with estiates at probehl* ki ete a nAmelsea
cities, and rearcmdation for withatandin the abook.9


Sharp advances in a number of lines of business in
the Southeast in the first half of 1950 over the cor-
responding period last year are reflected in the quarter-
ly summary of buisiness conditions in the region released
by the Atlanta regional office of the U. S. Department
of Colmmeroe*
Bank deposited in Federal Reserv~e member banks were up
16.8 per cent bank debits, 10 per cent; new business
incorporations, 17 per cent; urban construction, 49 per
cent; and production of electric energy, 12 per cent.
These quarterly reports are available
upon request. Get them through the near**
eat Donar~tment of Comme~rce field office-

Leeser increases included telephones in operation, 5
per cent; average number of wage and salary workers in
manufacturing industries, 1.9 per cent; average weekly
insured unemployment, 9 per centi and wholesale sales
from 2 to 3 per cent*
Retail trade rose from 6 to 28 per cent in 23 cities
and areas, and department store trade was up in more
than half of 25 cities reported upon, Wholesale sales
advanced 4 per cent in the South Atlantic and 2 per
cent in the East South Central. Also, in most instances
airline and railroad carriers reported increases in
business. The value of imports increased 23 per cents
Qly black spots were declines of 10.3 per cent in
oach fare income and 15.5 per cent in passenger rev-
enlue among railroad serving the area*

001TON PR(I)UCTION, GINNING LOR


Cotton production and innings were lower in the
Southeast last year than they were in 1948, final fi~-
ures released ta the Bureau of the Census show.
The figures, incorporated in a booklet entitled
Cotton production in $be United States Gror, of 1949
show that production in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas last year
totalled 4,612s472 bales compared with 6,421,609 in 1948
and ginningrs, 4,615,041 and 6,423,614, respectively,

This publication is available at all
Commerce Derrartment field office for 156.
The drop in production and innings was reflected in
all of the major ootton-growing States in the region,
and silmilar deolines were registered for the U. S.











1 _


STATE TAUI COILLECTIONS INDREASE

State tax collections in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Missiasippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee in fiscal year 1950 approdimated $1,031 million,
a 6 per cent advance over the $965 million collooted in
fiscal 1949, the Bureau of the Census has reported.
Included was the collection of $67,469,000 on individ-
nal income tezes; $78,018,000 on corporations;
$29,046,000 on property; $9,333,000 on deaths and gifts
$271,592,000 on motor vehicle Fuels; $74,2L3,ooo on al-
coholio beverages $24,094,000 on insurance companies;
$19,264,000 from public utilitica; and $16,816,000 on
admissions and amulsements,

This report is available gratin at
any Department of Cormmeroe field of-
fice. Ask for G-SF50-Ho. 4, Dstate
Tax Colleoftions in 1950."

Operation of motor vehicles yielded $73,357,000;
corporations, $14,672,000; and alcoholic beverage es-
tablishments, $1,775,000. For the privilege of hunting
and fishing, sportsmen in the Southeast paid $5,006,000
into treasuries of the seven States. GOcupational
licenses brought $3,039,000; chain stores, $792,000;
and amusement places, $715,000.
North Carolina collected more State taxes than any
of the other southeastern states in 1950, $230 million,
and Florida was highest in per capital collections with
$68.85. Georgia was lowest with $41.16. Florida was
fifth in the nation in collections on sales of alcoholic
beverages, being exceeded by Illinois, New York, (bio
and Pennsylvania. North Carolina, Mississippi and South
Carolina were among only eight States in the nation
registering less total collections in 1950 than in 1949.
LOCCL INDUSTRIALL PROM~Il0K

Since the Korean outbreak U. S. Department of Com-



dustrial development organizations for consideration
in the establishment of any defense plants which may
be created in connection with the defense program.
The Area Development Division of the Department of
Commerce has issued a memorandum on the subject setting


othe ohaev itmanufa kiong toe nae rions te



and local industrial development programs.

1950 CENBUS (P AGRICULTURE

First pre~liminlar returns from the 1950 Census of
Agriculture, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, are
expected to be released some time this month. They will
be issued first in the form of a fou -ae press release
for each county and State, containing totals for acreage
and production of each important crop and livestock
produced in 1949, asmber of each kind of livestook on
farmos, number of various kinds of equipment, and so on,
After data are tabuae for all counties, State re-
ports wil be issued containing the statistics for each
acnmty. The State reports are expected to become avail-
able in 1951. Data will be presented separately for
commercial and nlon-commrcial farmsr.


This income information is in the
Department of CommPerce Sprev f Cyr.
rent Business for August 1949 and
previoqp years.


Greatest rate of progress, 312 per cent, was in South
Carolina. Tennessee was next with 280 per cent, and the
other were Alabama, 279 per cent; Georgia, 264 per
cent; Florida, 260 per cent; Mississippi, 254 per cent;
and North Carolina, 230 per cent.
By States, in dollars, manufacturing payrolls in 1939
and 1949 were Alabam~a, $122 million in 1939 and $462.6
million in 1949; Florida, $59 million and $212.2 million;
Georgia, $152 million and $553.3 million; Mbississippi,
$39 million and $138.2 aillion; NJorth Carolina, $253
million and $833.9 million; South Carolina, $195 million
and $432.4 million; and Tennessee, $151 million and
$57564 million,

PUBLICATION GR HRRICALNES ESSTED

Those interested in the origin and development of
h~urricanes will find a comprehensive discussion of the
subject in a pamphlet issued by the United States
Weather Burean entitled "The ~huricane."
The publication, the work of I. R. Tannehill, meteor-
ologist in the Weather Burean office in Washington tells



personal and property damage'

These pamphlets are available at
the nearest Department of Cormmerce
off ce for 10d a. copy



of rrcae oqb e rnff o eelo ads bakhe ael ofd


was stated. The publication is amply illustrated with
charts.

s FRCOURWIIENT INIF(RBTION
SKeep in touch with your local Chamber a
t of Commnerce regarding purchases made and a
t being made by the Federal Government. I
t There are now about 250 outlets for auoh a
t information in the Southeast. The infora- a
ation includes lists of commodities for I
which the Government is in the market a
for prime contracting purposes, and con- a
tract awards just made for suboonstract,-
ing negotiations. It is available for a
the gaakise. a


RBNUFACTURING PAIRQMS INCREASE

Payrolls in maanfacturing; industries in the Southeast
climbed from $881 million to $3,2(Y/ million in the past |
ten years, data issued by the Office. of Business Econoa-
iss, U. S. Department of Commeroes show,
TPhe data, in the form of statistics on income aens
to individuals in 1949, give the sources of such incom e
and reflected an advance of 264 per cent in manufactur-
ing payroll income from 1939 to 1949 in Alabema,Flrd,
Georgia, Mississippi, Nlorth Carolina, South Carolina and
Tenneasee.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





NET AGRICULTURAL ~INCOE INCREASES

Farmers of the southeastern area of Alabamna, Florida,
Georgia, Mbississippi, North Carolina, Sourth Carolina and
Tennessee have seen their net income rise approximately
$1.4~ billion since before the war, according to addition
al data supplied on income payments to individuals in
1949.
Greatest increase for the seven-State area was in
Florida where such income went from $75.6 million in
1940 to $294r8 million last~year*
North Carolina led in not farm income last year with
an estimated total of $549.2 million, a 177 per cent
gain over the $197.9 million recorded for that State 9
years ago*
Other totaled for 1940 and 1949, with percentage gain,
included ALabame, 1940, $112.1 million and 1949, $291.4
million, 160 per cent; Georgia, $155.7 million and
$339.6 million, 118 per cent; elississippi, $124.3 mil-
lion and $321.3 million, 158 per cent; South Carolina,
$100.2 million and $212.2 million, 112 per cent; and
Tennessee, $1344 million and $337.2 million, 151 per
cent.
The income included value of changes in inventories
of orope and livestock, farm wages, and net rents to
landlords living on farms.
The position of the Southeast as a whole in post-war
increases in net farm income was not too favorable when
compared with other regions and the nation. While the
rise registered in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, MissBfiss-
ippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Arkansas, Ken-
tucky Louisiana and Virginia was 163 per cent, or
from 1.3 billion in 1940 to $3.6 billion in 1949, four
other regions exceeded that rate of gain. They included
the Southwest with an advance of 268 per cent; the
Northweat, 218 per cent; the Far West, 213 per cent;
and the Central regions 179 per cent. In the New En~-
land region the rate of gain wass 160 per cent, and in
the middle East, 139 per cent. The national average was
a rise of 189 per cent*

MUN~ICITAL OUTGiO EICEEDS CINOE


Seven major cities in the South -- New Orleanls>
Houston, Louisville, Atlanta, Dallas, MYemphis and Bir-
mingham -- were among 30 others in the United States
whose expenditures exceeded their revenues in fiscal
year 1949, according to a current report issued by the
Bureau of the Consua*
altogether, the seven southern metropolises last
year had general revenues totalling $135.3 million
while general expenditures approximated $168.7 million*
This represented a decline in both departments compared
with 1948 when revenue totalled $124.8 million and ez"
penditures, $155.0 million*

Department of Colmmeree field offices
bare this report "Large-City Finances
in 1949" (G-CFA69-No.3) for distribution
aratips

Nhen figuring total expenditures less amounts set
aside for debt retirement, however, Louieville and
Birmingham last year experienced less expenditures than
revenues as did thirteen other large cities in the
nation, the report showed*
Largest revenue producer in the Southern cities in
fiscal year 1949 was Louieville with $26.2 million and
New Orleans recorded the greatest 66tal expenditures
$32.8 million. Nearly 50 per cent of the 1949 revenue
collected by the seven southern cities was from pro-
perty taxes, which yielded $865,9 million. '


HIGBLIGHTBS OF THE BUSINESS WORLD


(For further details of any of these items, ask the
nearest U. S. Department of Commerce field office for
copies of the releases)


Sales of large independent retailers were 20 per
cent higher in Augut than in the same month last year,
and 7 per cent above the July 1950 dollar volume,
the Bureau of the Census reported, Lumber and building
materials dealers reported sales up 63 per cent in
August 1950 over the same month last year, hardware
stores, 28 per cent, furniture stores, 27 per cent,
and motor-Pehicle dealers, 25 per cent.
*
Since the outbreak of hostilities in Korea, American
business has again revised upward its plans for capital
expenditures, the U. S. Department of Commerce and
Securities Exchange Commission stated in a joint report.
Plant and equipment expenditures for the second half
of 1950 are expected to amount to $9.8 billion compared
writh $9 billion in the corresponding period of 1949,
and are close to the peak level in the second half of
1948.
+ +
Total. business inventories at the end of July erel-
eatisated at $54.6 billion by the Office of Business
Economics, U. S. Department of Commerce. After allowance
for seasonal variations, the book value of inventories
was $800 million below June, with declines recorded at
all distributive levels. Retailers' stocks fall $400
million, while manufacturers' and wholesalers' stocks
declined $200 million each,
*
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers
totalled $6,335 million in July. AFter allowing for
the usual seasonal movement between June and July,
sales were up 10 per cent from June with both durable
and nondurable goods contributing to the sharp gain.

Personal income in July was at an annual rate of
$219 billion compared with $217.1 billion in June. The
July total was higher than in any previous month except
March 1950 when disbursements of the special National
Service Life Insurance dividend to veterans were at a
peak. Apart from the special dividend payments, the
July 1950 personal income total wras the highest on record.
ess
Motonr-ehicle travel in 1949 broke all records, ex-
ceeding the previous year's high by 7 per cent and the
prewar peak by 27 per cent, the Bureau of Public Roads
U. S. Department of Commerce, reported. A total of 2116.3
billion vehicle-miles was traveled on roads in rural
areas. Seventy-four per cent of all travel on rural
roads took. place on the 345,000 miles of main State
highways .

Inedible molasses has been placed on the export con-
trol 'Positive List" of commodities requiring validated
licenses for export to all destinations except Canada,
the OIffice of Industry and Commerce, U. S. Department
of Commerce, announced. The action, effective September
15, was taken to prevent undue foreign drain on domestic
supplies of that product, which is used as a cra material
in the production of industrial alcohol.
we
Manufacturers' sale in July aggregated $19.9 billion,
greater than those in June when allowance is made for
seasonal factors. Contioned expansion in the flow of
new orders raised July backlogs of unfilled ordered $3
billion over the end-of-June total. Inventor scumula-
fion alowed appreciably in July. r c


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





BOGELS AND REPORTS CURRENTLYJ AVAILABLE

(To obtai4 oopies of thi p apteria1, aback it in the
a~ane prvided and send this care of the Wil3letin of
Coqqrerce to the nearest Depqrtment of goqqeree field
office. Your namp and address are shorn below, Mbke
remi~tt~9skeancsfo alsmaeil aabetoTeaue


This publication is available through
the nearest Department of Comrmerce field
office for 90#,
A number of the reports were prepared with the co.
operation of the Bureau of public Roade itself. They
range in ecope from long-ters State-wide studies to
location surveys for specific routes and city traffic
counts.

SOUTHEAST'S CANDYP COESUNFTION OFF


Confectionery manufacturers in the seven States of
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee reported sharp decreases
in confectionery sales last year as compared with 19&8
in a report just compiled by the Department of Com-
meroe.

Note: This report, entitled freliminary
Re ort on Confectionery Sales and Distribn-


p_~1 __I_ ~ __ C__


tion 19A9 is available at all Department
qf Comrmerce field offices without obprae,
The report shows that dollar volume sales last year
in the seven-State area totalled $95.2 million com.
pared with $12.8 million in 1948. Poundage sales
last year approximated 283.2 million pounds against
304.5 million in 1948. Sales per capital last year were
13.9, a abarp reduction from the 15.3 pounds register-
ad in 1948.
Dollar sales, by Statse, last year included North
Carolina, $18.7 million; South Carolina, $9.1 million;
Georgia, $159 million; Florida, $16.4 million; Tenn.
easee, 817.9 million; Alabama, 811.0 million; and
Idississippi, $5.8 million,
GP0 83

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional ()ffic~e
50 Whitehall Street SV.W
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, Number 19, October 1, 1950


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BIBLIOGRAPHY QN HIGIHNAI PLANNING


The Bureau of Fublio Roads, U. S. Department of
Commerce has just issued a publication entitled
a Biblingrarhv of Eighlal PlanningRemands, rmakifng
available for the first time an extensive listing of
reports on highway planning issued since 1930.
Included are reports of traffic, origin-destination./
location, and highwayneeds studies prepared by city,
county and State aged les, as well as by private non-
sultanta.


Quarterly reports of business conditions in S.E....
Cotton Production in the U. S.................. .159
Regulation #1, NEa, Inventory Control..............
Effects of Atomic Weapone......................(1.25
The Ihuricane...............,..,,........ .......10C
State Tax Collections in 1950 (G-BF5044 )..........
Large-City Finances in 191c9 (G-CF49-No.3) ..........
A Bibliography of Bilghway Planning Reporta......300
Preliminary Report on Confectionery Sales,1949.....
Foreign Government Purchasing Agencies.............
Summary of Licensing and Ezohange Control Require-
ments of European Countries & Certain African
Areas & Status of Private Trading With U.S..50p
Building Produce Profits Thru lee Displays (SBA508)
Soap & Detergents (BIS).. ................... .......
Hardware Retailing (Reference Sources) (BIS).......
Starting a Rug & Upholatery Cleaning Busineas(SBA509S)
Food Processing machinery & Equipm~ent (Reference)..
Radio & Television (Information Sources)...........
Projects & Publications of Interest to Planning &
Development Agencies (No. 10).............
Drug Storea 1949 Qperating Ratios................
Electrical Applianoe & Radio-Television Dealers -
194b9 operating Ratios.. ...................
Indez to W~orld Motion Picture Data Jan.1,1945
to June 30, 1950.,.......................
Cotton System Spinning Activity, July 304Bug.26....
Inorganic Chemicals, U.S.Production,FFI (h198- 70)..
Malleable Iron Castings FFI (M21ZB-70). ......,,......
Cotton & Linters, Consumption,Stocks, Etc.,FFI....
Cotton Broad Woven Goods, 2nd Quar. 1950 FFIN1~5-2-0
Fatal & Oils FFI (ML7-1-70). ................... .....
Cheeking the Soundness of Your Company's Organisa-
tionL (SBA129)........,............
Operating an Employment Agency (SBA130)............
Advertising Suggestions for the Qffice Appliance
Dealer (BBA 132).......
Salesmanship In a Self-Service Store (SBkl34)......
Protecting Customers From Accidents (SBL136)......
Training Retail Employees Pays (SBBl39)............


Zrf







-148


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $3Q0


BC-6- 9


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEP0Y L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


~\IUNIV~ERS~~~ir~iiiiTYO FOiDA~

3 1262 08748 8317


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4





















ATLMTA 3. GA. SAVMHM, GA. JEKISDAVrl~E, FLA. nIMI 8. FLA. IIDBILE, ALA. CARLESTON, S.C.
0 YtIhithl.St., LL. Anae 218, P.O. Aldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 9471 Sebld Aldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples BIdg,,
Tel. tl~lnet el21 X-1)68 Tel. 2-465 Tel. )-7111 Tel. 9-7688 Tel. 2-364)1 Tel. 7771



VQIL. 4, NO. 20 OCTOBER 15, 1950

SOUTHFAST BUILDINGS $26.6 BLLION s a


Nai~onal Production Authority


New construction carried out in the Southeast in the
past 11 years has represented an expenditure at some
$26.6 billion, according to a current issue of the
Department of Commerce Industry Report Construction .and
COnstruction ifrteri4.8*
The outlay .included $b-14.5 billion in private con.
struction of which $7.3 billion was allowed to residen-
tial building,

This Industry Report, Constrqction and
Construction Material~s is issued monthly
and is available at all Department of
Comrmerce field offices for 83 4 year,

With exception of the war years, a gradual increase
has taken place in the region in amount of money placed
in new construction operations from year to year since
1939 with the expenditure in 1949 exceeding that of 1939
by some 177 per cent.
In Georgia alone, the 11-year period brought new con.
struction valued at approximately $2.2 billion; in Flor-
ida, an estimated $b3.7 billion; and in Tennessee, $3.2
billion,

See Construction Page 2

DWELLING PIACliS UP IN SOUTHEAST

There are a million and a quarter more dwelling
places in the Southeast nowr than ten years ago, accord-
ing to prelirmi~nary reports from the housing census taken
by the Bureau of the Census in connection with the 1950
census of population.

These reports are now available without
charge on a State and county basis at all
Department of Comrmerce field offices a

In April of this year there were 5,928,752 dwelling
units in Alabana, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee, which compared
with 4,674,272 on that date in 1940, an increase of ap-
prozinately 27 per cent,
Florida was credited with the highest percentage gain
in the region, 62 per cent, or from 590,451 in 1940 to
961,084 this year. North Carolina had the largest number
of anoh units on april 1 of this year with 1,059,335, an
increase of 29 per cent over the 820,888 recorded April
1, 1940.


Businessmen in the Southeast are asked by the Nation-
al Production Authority in two regulations just issued
to bring certain phases of their activities within the
purriew of the defense program.
One of the regulations, designed to prevent accumurla-
tion of excessive inventories of materials in short sup-
ply, calls for limitations on quantities of certain mat-
eriaLs that can be ordered, received, or delivered, in-
cluding building materials, and certain chemicals, forest .
products, iron and steel mill products, metals and min-
erals, rubber products and textiles.

Note: Up to the issuance of this W11lletin
of Commerce Regulations Numbers 1 and 2
had been issued by NPA. Both are available
a-rzatis at all Comsmerce Derartment offices.

The second regulation gives priority to defense or-
ders. It authorises the assignment of a rating to such
orders, which Imust be accepted and filled exoopt under
special circumstances, and is made applicable both to
prime as well as subcontractors. It sets up basio rules
of the new priorities system by defining the use of
ratings, method of application or attension of a rating,
establishes special provisions applicable to rating az-
tensions and so forth.
DEFE16E PR(I)UCTION AIDS
HPA has inaugurated a new service to busineeamen to
help them to conform to regulations issued by that
agency. It is knownn as "Defense Production Aids" and
the first of a series, entitled "K~eeping Records Needed
Under Possible Price Controlan is now available without
charge at all Department of Commerce field offices.
JOINT AGREEMENT
The Departments of Commerce and Interior have jointly
released a memoanudum of agreement covering allocation
and rioitie poersover minerals and metal. Copies
Commerce field offices.
DELEGATIO16 GP AUTHORITY
NEL has issued delegations of authority to the De-*
partment of Defense andl Atomic Energy Commission to as-
sign ratings under the newly-established NPA priorities
system. Copies of the press release (NPA-14) giving
details of this action are available at Department of
Commerce field offices.
The steel industry's plans for 1952 were announced
in another release (G-120) also available.


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE





SQRB~ERNJ FIREB GET 001GRACTS

Firms located in the South continue to receive con-
tracts from the Federal Government for the supplying of
military and civilian branches with goods and services
needed in the inlediate Future, according to copies of
contract award synopses being received each week at
232 Department of Commerce field offices, local Cham-
bers of Commerce, State agencies and trade associations.
Contract awards announced as this issue of the 18-
tin of Commlerce was being published included the followf-
ing:
Canton Cotton M~ils, Canton, Ga., 230,000 yards of
denial, 8b56,043; Tennessee Soap Company, Mdemphis, 750,000
po~unds of soap, $b79,875; Flough, Inc., Memphis, 600,000
bottles of water purification tablets, $27,720; atlanta
Paper company, Atlanta, 343,334 paper bazes, $~95,124;
H~unko company, MYemphis, 1 million pounds of shortening,
$249,300; R. J. Reynolds Tobacco company, Winaton-Salem,
N. C., 1,071,000 packages of plug chewing tobacco, $63,-
853; and 851,000 pounds of tobacco products and smoking
accessories, $83,437; Howell Flywood Corporation, Dothan,
Ala., 170,000 feet surface measure; and Southern Dry K~iln
Company, Atlanta, 126,000 feet board measure, both lum-
ber, and at contracts of $25,925 and $30,272, respective-
17.
The contract award lists are being made available
to southeastern businessmen along with daily lists of
goods to be bought lay the Government to give all bu~si-
ness an equal opportunity to share in such purchases.
This information is now available on a pickup basis at
the following outlets in the Southeast:
DEPAR1TMElt aF CGGEERCE FIELD QFFICES
Atlanta Savannah Jacksonville Miami
Mobile Charleston, S. C.


LUMBE8R INDUSTRY COMMTITTESS RMED


Thirty southeastern lumbermen have been appointed
members of a Forest Products National Industry Advisory
Committee established by the U. S. Department of Com-
merce to serve in a liaison capacity between the indust.
ry and the Federal Government, according to a current
issue of the Commerce Department Industry Report Iar e
Plywood and Allied Products,
GI the committee are seven residents of Georgia,
five each of North Carolina sad Alabama, four each of
South Carolina and Florida, three of Tennessee, and two
of Mississippi. They comprise production and distribrut-
ion groups of the whole committee.

The Lumber Flywrood and Allied Prodneps
Industry Report is issued on a quarterly
basis and is available at all Department
of Commrerce field offices for $1 4 year.

Those from the Southeast on the committee follon:
Georgia -- R. E. Sullivan, Preston, representing
those engaged in primary forest products activities;
Edwin L. Douglass, Augusta, manufacturing; F. L. Lan-
caster and William B. Byrd, Augusta, wood millwfork and
concentration yards; C. R. Mason, Mdadison, concentra-
tion yards; R. F. Crutcher, Savannah, nonaarehousing
w holesalers; and George W. W8est, Atlanta, retailers,
North Carolina -- Walter J. Damtoft, Canton, primary
forest products; G. Colucci, Wilmington, plywood and
veneer manufacturing; John K. Barrow, Jr., Ahookie,co
centration yards; J. Alex MIchillan, Charlotte, non-
warehousinlg wholesalers; and David B. Morgan, jr.,
Black Mountain, hardwood dimension production.
South Carolina -- A. R. Chappell, Prosperity; T. C.
Caze, Jr., D~arlington; E. E. Dargan, Conway; and J. S.
Dizon, Sr., Lake City, concentration yards.
Florida -- 0. J. Brown, Mount Dora, lumber manIu-
facturing; A. M. Foote, Jacksonville, non-warehousing
w::olesalers; W. F. Walker, Tampa, warehousinrg whole-
salers; and harry L. Lesson, Mi~ami, retailers,
Alabama -- Wlinthrop Md. Ballet, jr., Mobile, lumber
manufacturing, Norman M. Molnnis, jr., Stockton, ply-
wood and veneer manufacturing; J. R. Bennett, jr.,
Greenville; A. B. Carroll, Hurtsboro; and Ray E. Loper,
Fayette, concentration yards.
Mdississippi -- E. L. Packett, Amory, concentration
yards, and A. D. Burdette, Meridian, non-warehousing
wholesalers .
Tennessee -- 8. M. Nickey, jr., Memphis, lumber man-
ufacturing; Lawrence Fury and Joe Thompson, Mdemphis,
hardwood dimension production and non-warehousing
wholesalers .

Construction Contirnued From Page 1

In the region, public constriction since 1939 was
valued at approximately $12.0 billion, and private non-
residential building at $b3.1 billion. Others were:
Privately-owned public utilities, $2.8 billion; pub-
lic nonresidential, $~3.2 billion; public highways, $2.5
billion; sewer and water, $4~65.2 million; other public
conlstruction, 85.7 billion; public residential building
$6667,7 million; military and naval construction, $~3.5
billion; conservation and development, $.1 bilion;
'and miscellaneous public service enterprises and other
construction, 8342.5 million.

s The fifth anniversary of organization of a
athe United Nations will be observed Oct* s
a 24, 1950. Ask your Departmaen of Cosmemerl
afield office for literature. a


CHA~MBRFS &F CG4ERCE
bla;bl!!B
Andalusia Annisto
Brewton Cullaan
Florence Gadsden
Jasper Mlonteva
Roanoke Selman
Talladega Troy
EQrida
Carrabelle Clearwa


,n


illo


Bessemer
Deca~tur
Guntereville
Montgomery
Sheffield
Rtscaloosa


ty


Alexander Ci~
Birmingham
Fairfield
Hunteville
Opelika
Sylacsauga

Bradenton
Cross City
Gainesville
Mliami
Panama City
St. Petersb~u


Iter Crestviewr


Daytona Beach Ft. Lauderdale Ft. Wlalton
Hialeah Lakeland Leesburg;
New Sngrna Beach Orlando Palatka
Pensacola Pinellas Park St. Augustinze
rg Sanford Tallahassee Tampa
Winter Park


Geords
Albany Amerious Athens Atlanta Augusta
Bainbridge Bazley Brunswrick Carrollton Garteraville
Cedartown Clayton Columbus Cornelia Dalton
East Point Elberton Ft. Valley Gainesville Griffin
Bartwell La~range Mlacon Manchester M~arietta
Mlilledgeville Newnaan Roolanart Rome Savannah
Thomaston Thomaasville Toccoa Valdosta; Wnayoroes
Misasissippi
Abezrleen. Brookhaven Canton Columbia Columbus
Greenville Greenwrood Gulfport; Hattiesburg Indianola
Laurel MLcComb M~eridian Natches Pascagonla
Picayune Vickaburg
North Carolina
Asheboro Asheville Beaufort Blowing Rock Burlington
Charlotte Durham Elis~abeth City Fayetteville Goldaboro
Graham Greensboro Greenville Hickory High Point
Kinaton Lenoir Lazrinton Mbarehead City Mdorgantownm
Murphy North Wiilkesboro Raleigh Saliabury Sanford
Shelby Stateaville Thomaaville WIlaington Wilson
Winston-Salem
See OUTLETS Page 4


GPO 81100550


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE









I


HIGHLIGHTS (F THE BUSINESS W{RT.D


RETAQIL,WAHC[iBALE SALES INCREASE

Brisk increases in both retail and wholesale sales
in the Southeast in August of this year, and also in
the 8-month period of January to August compared with
comparable periods last year were reported in monthly
releases issued by the Burean of the Census.
All cities and areas in the region in which the
bureau conducts its monthly surveys with one or two
exceptions reported gains in retail sales in both per-
iods, including 31 per cent in Birmingham in Augnat
1950 over August 1949) 37 per ~cent in Bilcari 35 per
cent in Savannah; 28 per cent in Columbuls, Gai 27 per
cent in Augusta; and 25 per cent in Athanta.
For the eight-month period of JanuaryT to August this
year, Bilazi reported a 27 per cent rise over the cor-
responding period last year; August a 26 per cent gain;
Columbus a 22 per cent advance; Birmingham a 20 per
cent; and Atlanta, 15 per cent.
Gains of 12 per cent in the South Atlantic region
and 11 per cent in the East South Central section were
recorded in the wholaale field in the 8-month period
of this year over last, sparked by sharp upturns in
electrical goods, automotive supplies, hardwAare, lumber
and building materials, refrigeration equipment, and
some lines of groceries. The South Atlantic reflected
a 40 per cent increase in sales in August 1950 over
August 1949 and the East South Central a 35 per cent
rise.

FARM~ INCOMaE CONTINUES DCWWARD

Southeastern farmers in the first seven months of
1950 continued to take sharp outs in cash receipts from
their marketing, the Janulary to July drop for the
current year approximating 14t per cent as compared with
the corresponding period last year, the Bureau of
Agricultural Economies, U. S. Department of Agriculture;
reported*
The report showed that cash receipts to farmers in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolinas
South Carolina and Tennessee for the first seven months
of this year totalled around $1,064,165,000 against
$i1,244,399,000 for the same period last year*
Mbississippi farmers contioned to bear the brunt of
the regional decline with a decrease of 50 per cents
or from an estimated $200,643,000 from Janruary to July
1949 to $98,380,000 for the same period this yea*
Florida again reflected an increase after consistent-
ly registering an upturn in past months while the other
States experienced declines. The gain for that State
for the 7-month period was one half of one per cent*

RAIL FREIGHT REVENUE ONl UIGAE


A 4 per cent increase in freight revenue among rail-
roads searing the Southeast in the first 7 months of
1950 over the corresponding period last year was re-
ported by the Association of American Railroade. That
type of revenue rose from $576,890,215 in the Januay-
to-Julyr period of 1949 to $601,977,348 in the same 7
months of this year*
The same railroads, however, continued to report a
de'ln n hep as ger reneue which has pers sted for

year inessenger revenue among carriers operating in the
region totalled $359,1;71,931 compared with $69,667,170
for the same period last year, a drop of about 14 per
cent. A 29 per cent gain in net railway operating in-
hwa rs reported for the same carriers for the seven-
month~~ pei


(For Further details of any of these items, ask the
nearest U. S. Department of Colmmerce field office for
copies of the releases)

Total sales of retail stores continued at a high
rate in August amorunting to $b12.4 billion or 17 per
cent above a year ago. Dollar sales in August were
somewhat higher than July, but after adjustment for
seasonal factors and trading-day differences, sales
were down about 1 per cent from July. They were still
7 per cent above June sales.
An unwarranted amount of scarce buying has resulted
in artificial shortages in some types of containers.
The scarce buying has come about because it has become
extremely difficult for industry to es~timate its re-
quirements for the balance of the year in light of
uncertain international developments.

Sales of large independent retailers were 20 per
cent higher in August 1950 than in August 1949, and
August sales were 7 per cent above the July dollar
volume this year, the Census Bureau announced. Lumber
and building materials dealers reported' sales up 63
per cent in August 1950 compared with August 1949. A
sales increase of 28 per cent was recorded by hardware
stores, 27 per cent for furniture stores, and 25 per
cent among motor-vehicle dealers.

Employment hit an all-time high in August as non-
agricultural activity reached record levels. Estimated
at 62s367,000 in the weekend of August 12, total civil-
ian employment was 1 million higher than in July and
surpassed the 1948 peak by 750,000.

Building materials production reached an all-time
high in M~ay 1950. Chtput of lumber, hardwood flooring,
cement,.softwood plywrood, and gypsum board wras substan-
tially above earlier postwar peaks. Almost twrice as
much cement was produced in Maey this year as in the
average month before the war and eight times as nanch
gypsum board,

Rising demands of business, consumers and government
resulted in the expansion of economic activity to a
pos~twar high in August. As demand pressures mounted,
prices advanced further in August and early September,
although at a less rapid pace than during the first
few weeks in July when rawr material prices moved up
sharply in reaction to the Korean hostilities.

Manufacturers' sales n orders moved sharply upward
in August to a point well above the previous highs. In
a month of peak demand and rising prices, shipments ex-
ceeded $24 billion, while newr orders received by maunu-
facturers amounted to nearly $28 billion. Inventories
declined by $200 million,

Chain store and mail-order sales continued high in
August, with total dollar sales for the month amounting
to $2,472 million, or about 15 per cent above August of
last year. After adjustment for seasonal and working day.


cent above June.

Cash dividend payments made bl U. S. corporations
issuing public reports amounted to $212.9 allion in
August 1950, or 11 per cent more than the $91.6 million
paid out i August 1949.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3







PAGE 4

DUTLETS Continued From Page 2
South Carolina.
Anderson Charleston Columbia Conway Easley Gaffney
Georgetown Greenville Greenrood Hartaville Nytle Beach
Grangeburg Spartanburg Snaber Union Walterboro
Tennessee
A~thens Obattanooga Cleveland Etowah Johnson City London
gidgsport Kncatville Lenoir City Mdaryville Sweetwater
STATE AGENCIES
blaMbaB
State Planning Board, Montgomeryg Employment Security
Office, Evergrean


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08748 8168
BULLETIN v. rvrr.,was....
PUIB~ICATIONS AND REPORTS

CEg obtgig ggggs gg 4bi material, chgag it jg 48s!
agagE provided 284 228d4 hid pe~gg! Pg th Bulletin pg
Commerce 42 4th neaBes Denartment 2( Commerce figig
offi&2* ISSE na88 884 SHEreE S2 AhoaB qe2125* MeS
remittanoea f2E sal2& material 282ghle 40 Treasurer
Pf 4et United taBAsE* AheElk BP4 vricd BEB B122*)
Constnrution &e Construction Materiale Ind. Rpt. 9b3.00
National Production Anthority Reg. #1.............
National Production Authority Reg. #2............
Lumber Plywrood & Allied Prods. Ind. Report......r81.00
Retail Trade Report (Place on Mailing Idst)........,
Wholesale Trade Report (Place on Mailing~ List)......
Annual Report 1949, National Bur. of Stan~dards...75
The U. S. Merchant barine Its Development and
Problems.................,,.,,,,..
Mbbilising for Defense Address by Sec.Sawyer......
Selling Related Itemrs Adds to Store Profits (SB8510)
How Small Businesses Can Profit By Using State
Employment Services (SBk51).............
Store Location (Reference Sources).,............,..
HPA Defense Production Aid No. 1....................
Containers & Packaging Industry Report.......604 Ir.
Chemicals & Drugs Industry Report..........$2.50 Ir.
Canned Fruits & VTegetables Industry Report.01.00 Ir.
Softwood Plywood (FFI Bt3B-70) ................... ...
Construction Machinery (FFINB368-2-0) .........,......
Steel Mill Products (FFIMb22B-09).............'.......
Clay Construction Products (FFIM626B-70) ............
Fa~ta & Oils (FFIML7-1-80) ............,,...........
Cleomargarine (FFIba7J-80)..........................
Cotton Gie Prior to eptemberin
SGeorgia Alabama PMississippi
/S. caro. L/La. Texas
Report on Cotton Ginning,..........,................
Public Employment in July 1950... (G-GE50-No.3)......
Monthly Report on the Labor Force (P-57,No.99)...
B merican Households Continue to Decline in Size
(P-20, No. 31).........
/7 1A Qualification Chart for Prospective Retailers
(S~L 141)........... ~.
Operating a Photographic Supply Store (SBA1471)......
Operating a Floris t Shop (SBkl49) ................
How to Analyze Your Local Mlarket (SBQl56),......
Facts About The Used Furniture Store (SBQ162)..,....
Operating a Paint Store (SBBil64)......... ...........
BWhat the Salesman Should Know About His Product (175)
)-100205

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

UNIV. OF FL LIB.





U.S. DEPOblTORY


GerP~aSE
State Departnent of Commoerce Employment Security
Atlanta Agency, Atlanta
Whataes~im
Agricultural and Industrial Board, Jackson
North Carolina
Conservation & Development Commission, Raleigh
State Ports Authority, Wilmington
TRADE REPRESENTATIVES
A1blaba
Associated Industries of Alabamn, Birmingham
ELggigg
Florida Lumber & MIYllw~ork Association, Ino., Orlando
Greater NBiami Manu~pfacturers Aasociation, Mdiami
Allapattah Business Associatce, Miami
Sebring Air Terminal, Sebring

Georgia Power Company, Atlanta Southern Association
* Southern1 Plywood Man~lufacturers o(cSeience & IndustrJ
Association, Atlanta Iiic, Atlanta
,Tuf~ted Textile Mdanufacturers F5%drixurn Chvic Club,
association, Dalton Fairburn


Y,


bipssiasippi
United Gas Corporation, Mississip ~Retail Lumber
Jackson Dealers Aamtiiation, Jackson
North Carolinq
American Cotton Nbanufacturers Carolina Lumber & Builk
Institute, Inc., Charlotte ing Supply Ass'n,
Southern Furniture Mlanufacturers Charlotte
Association, High Point
North Carolina Co~ncrete & Mlasonry Aesan., Ral~eigh
South Cqroling
Rock Bill Board of Trade, Rock Bill
Tennessee
Hamilton National Bank, Chattanooga
Pioneer Bank, Chattanooga
GPO


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Wh iteh all Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERHUT NO. 1009

Volume 4, Number 20 October 15, 1950


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BCd-dp


UNIVERsITY or FLoales
IeEnor I.. Qum.I;s
DEdPARTYWNi OF ECONOMIfCS
GgggggqL~E '14110





C. / M 4 : 'ff.2/z


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ArTLATA 3r GA. SAVAMIAI, GL JACK(SDAVILLE, FLA. Mail11 32, FLA. MO0BILE, ALA CHARPLESTONl, S.C.
60 Ihitehall St., LL, Room 218, P.O. Bldg*, 4)25 Federal Bldg., 94)7 Seybold Aldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples 81dg.,
Tel. Yl~lnet 1121 X-4)53 Tel. 2-4765 Tel. *)7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



70[,. 4, NOe. 21 NJOVEM~BER 1, 1950
SOU~THEASTERN CITIES wmOE UP .I ..


A Further analysis of the 1950 Census of Population
taken recently by the Buireau of the Census shows that
thirty cities in the Southeast now occupy the more-ta--
100-thousand population category assigned to mletropoli-
tan areas and fifteen are among the more-than-100-
thousand class as cities,
The analysis, made by the Atlanta regional office of
the U. S. Department of Commerce from Census Bureau pre-
liaifnary reports, also reflects vast strides made in
the population of most of the cities and areas included
in the classification,

This analysis, in tabular and statistical
form, shows the population standing for
1950 of 147 metropolitan areas and 106 oit-
ies, and can be ordered gratis from the
nearest Donartment of Comm~erce field office.
In several instances, cities and areas in the South-
east have moved into the more-than-100-thousand popula-
tion class since the 1940 census as the followi~ng tabu-


National Production


AUtnOfIty
Here is a roundup of NPA activities up to the issuance
of this Bulletin of Commnerce as reflected in press re-
leases distributed by that agency. These releases are
available at all Department of Commerce field offices.
Order them by number,
NPA #1 Establishment of NPA announced.
NPA #2 Steel representatives meet azzi discuss problems.
NPA #3 Copper industry advisory committee formed.
NPAP # NPA General Counsel appointed.
NPA #5 NPA Regulation #1 Inventory Control lasued.
NPA #6 Staff appointments announced.
NPA #7 H. B. MIcCoy appointed Assistant Administrator,
NPA #8 Chemicals industry discusses supply and demand.
NPA #9 Sulphur and nickel indutries discuss situation.
NEa #10 Rlubber industry discusses rubber allocation,
NPA #11 Appointment of staff member announced,
NEa #r12 NEa Regulation #2 issued on basic priority.
NPA #13 Second meeting of steel representatives.
NP A #1 Authority delegated to assign "DO" ratings.
NEA #15 Pulp, Paper Board industry discusses "DF" rating.
NPA #16 Staff appointment announced.
NEL #17 Agreement between Commneree,Interior on priority.
NPA #18 Staff appointment made.
NEa #19 NEa Grder M-1l on steel priority rating issued.
NEa #20 Retail trades meet to discuss part in program.
NPA #21 Steel requirements for freight ears discussed.
NEA #~22 Retail thre dealers discuss supply, demand.
NMa #23 auto manufacturers discuss relationship to pro-
gram.
MEQUTIVE (RDERS
The following Reaeutive Orders important to NEa were
issued, copies of which may be ordered through Department
of Commnerce field offices:
#10161- Delegation of defellde production act duties to
various Federal Government departments for execution.
#110160 Dealing withl preservation of business records.
NFSCELIANEOUSF
Supmmary of Senate hearings on Defense Production Act -
54-page Maeybank Committee Report on 83938 (Report #2250,
81st Congress, 2nd Session),
Address of- Commerce Secretary Sawyer on "Mdobilising
for Defense" before Association of National Advertisers.
Amendment to NPA Geder of Sept. 11 Department of
Commerce Order #r12,3 expanding Priorities Committee,
Public Iaew 774, 81st Congress, Chapter 932, 2nd Ses-
sion, BR 9176, Defense Production Act of 1950 Price
i 10g.


lation shows:
MSI4RQPGE.ITAN AREA
Atlanta, Ga.
Loui-sville, y.
Birmingham, Ala.
Miami, Fla.
Memphis, Tenn,
Norf~olk-Portemoulth, Va.
Tampa* Knarcville, Ten.
Richmond, Va.
Nashville, Tenn.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Ibobile, Ala.
Charlotte, N. C.
Greenaboro,High Pt.,N.C.
Columbus, Ga.
Augusta, Ga.
Charleston, 8. C.
Savannah, Ga.
Winston~aSalem, N. C.
Columbia, S. C.
Jackson, Miss.
MLontgomery, Ala.
Raleigh, N. C.
Macon,1 Ga.
Roanoke, Va.
Asheville, N. C.
Dhurham, N. C.
See PaP0IATIONJ Page 2


664,033
574,474
554,186
488,090
480,161
409, 545
406,175
335,664
326,863
320,388
294,388
245,499
228,835
196,160
190,152
169,921
162,104
159,838
150,946
145,076
141,880
1G1,480
137, 512
135 942
134,464
232,779
122, 557
100,641


442, 294
434,408

250,537
332,477
330,396
209,693
151,829
245,674
241,769
195,619
193,215
114,906
112,986
73,055
92,478
87,809
98,711
117,970
109, 833
89,555
88,003
93,697
109,5144
74,830
110,593
76,324
69,683








I


SOUTH ATIA~NT LEADER IN DWELISGS

The South Atlantic region of the nation, comprising
Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginias, Maryland,
Delaware and the District of Columbia, led the nation
in percentage of increase in dwelling places during the
* past ten years, azooph on the astreme wst coast where
emigration has been heaviest in recent years, according
to a thrther analysis of the census of housing conduct.
ed recently by the Barean of the Census.
The rate of increase in dwelling places in the Santh
Atlantic area between 191,0 and 1950 was 32 per cent
compared with 18 per cent in the Nlew Enanl secotion;
17 per cent in the East South Central and Mliddle Atlan-
tic; 22 per cent in the East Nlorth Central; 13 per cent
in the West North Central; 24 per cent in the West
South Central; and 30 per cent in the Moruntain region.
The increase in the Pacific region was nearly 50 per
cent, sad followed a vast aigration of residents to
California, Gregon and Washington, comprising that area.
In the South Atlantio region, the unaber of dwe~llng
places rose from 4,5467,316 in 191,0 to 6,019,516 in 1950.
The rate of gain in the South Atlantic was well above
the United States average, which was 23 per cent,
The Census Burean has defined a "dwelling place' as
"the living quarters occupied byr, or intended for oo.
onpancy by, one household."
The increase by States in the South Atlantic was:
Florida, 961,084 in 1950 and 590,451 in 191.0, 63
per cent; Georgia, 966,896 and 796,715, ZL per cent;
South Carolina, 559,203 and 458,899, 22 per cent; Eorth
Carolina, 1,059,335 anid 820,888, 29 per cent; Virginia,
905,463 and 659,787, 37 per cent; West Virginia, 51,,-
477 and 459,725, 18 per cent; Maryland, 691,322 and
500,156, 38 per cent; Delaware, 97,002 andl 75,567, 28
per cent; and District of Columbia, 234,734 arnt 185sl28s
27 per cent.
POUaaTION Contimed From Page 1


SHARP INDREASE IN1 URBBA WIIDIWO


I SIFT PACKABGES
If you plan to send any ~gift packcages
to other countries this year, get in touch I
with your nearest Department of Cormere I
( field office for copies of import regulla-
S tions on the subject. Neerly every country I
has some kin of regulation covering the I
i Sportation of goods. Chris~tmas packages 1
Receive no special treatment, but are anb- a
ject to certain regulations. The regula- a
tions usually guide you as to preparation ,
a of the package for shipment, duty which a
aa be Samoosd, and so north. ,


Ten cities in the Santheast in the over 100,000 ppr-
lation oategory registered an expenditure of $149, 61,000
in newr arban buldzing authorized in the first half at
1950, a 27 per cent gain over the $117,069,000 spent in
the same period last year, according to figures released
by the Bureau of Labor Statistios, U. 8. Department at
Labor.
Atlanta led the region in vtlue of acmch new building
anthorised in the first half of the year with $30,020,000
and Knazville was ahead in rate of increase in 1950 over
the corresponding period in 1949 with a gain of 222 per
cent,
In the seven~tate area, comprising Alabma, Florida,
Georgia, Mitssissippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee, the value of new urrban building anthorised in
the first half of 1950 was $530,829,000, a 41 per cent
increase over the $373,844,000 rewarded for the same
period last year.
In the major cities, about 51 per cent of the -total
represented in this years expenditures went for homes
and 56 per cent in the seven Statee as a whole.
The value, ly cities, for the two comparable period
wasr Atlanta, $30,020,000 in the first half of 1950 and
$15,326,000 in the first half of 1949; Birminghams
$18 219 000 and $17,1,81,000; Charlotte, $15,486,000 and
$12,472,0001 Chattanooga, $5,056,000 and $5,024,000;
Jacksonvillle, 89 736,000 and $9,519,000; Knazvlle,
$7,499,000 and $2,322,000; Memphis, $26,61,000 and $1&,-
450,000; Miiami, $27,712,000 and $24,853,000; Nashrille,
)o,.100,000 and $10,320,000; sad Tampa, )5,016,000 and
$5,302,000.
By States: Allabama, $64 382,000 and $1.6,402,000;
Florida, $63,213 000 sad ~U5,701,000,* Georgia, $70,-
61500 MXand $15.5,6800M; Mississippi, $31,317,000 and
$19 568,000; North Carolina, $106,341,000 and. $63,346,-
000; south Carolina, $30,723 000 and $24,703,000; anid
Tennessee, $64,238,000 and $/48,496,000.

$259.9 HILLIGNJ IIJ HIGIWAY W AK
A total of $259,986,000 has been and is being spent
in highway construction work conducted in the Santheast
during the poes~twar period, the Barean of 166110i Roads,
U. 8. Department of Comraerce, announced.
The azpenditures included $127s356,000 in Federal
iunds and involved 5,569.1 miles at road in Allabama,
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Caro-
lian and -Tennessee.
The figures were far the post-warr period up to the end
of August of this year.
Georgia with an antley of $62s611,000 tope the seven-
State area followed by North Carolina with i4,807,000.
The others were, Alrabama $29,825,000; Florida, $33,5L1,000;
Mississippi, $i24,333 000; Sanrth Carolina, $19,781,000 sand
Tennesssee, $4.1,118,000.
The funds were and are being useed in what the Bnrean of
Pahlie Boade referred to as the "active" program, which
included work in the "pprogra~ming" stage; that on which
plans have been approved but construction had not been
started; and projects on which constrnation is under way.
EELP F(I WWID TRALDERS
The Ec~aonomc Cooperation ladmnistration has just issued
another booklet to help world traders. This time it is
pointed towrar getting importers established in the field.
It is entitled "Guide for the Prospective American Im~port-
ern and is a sort of companion publication to the one pub-
lished some time ago entitled "Qtuide for the Prospective
Exporter." Both are available through Departmpent of Come-
aerce field offiees without charge.


CIT.E
Yemaphis, Tenn.
Louisville, Ky.
Atlanta, Ga.
Birmingham, Ala.
Miami, Fla.
Riabaond, Va.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Nlorolk, Va.
M9ashrille, Ten.
Charlotte, N. C.
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Mobile, Ala.
Knarville, Tenn.
Tampa, Fla.
Savannah, Ga.
Montgomery, ACLa.


Eit
394,012
367,359
327,090
298,720
246,983
229,906
198,880
188,601
173,35i9
133,219
130,333
127,151
124,183
124,W73
119,689
103,098


;L/6g
292,91,2
319,077
302,288
267,583
172,172
193,042
173,065
144,6332
167,402
100,899
128,163
78,720
111,580
108,391
95,996
78,084


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE









_ ___ __ _


UIEMPLCEEW~ FROGRML RRBBIS BIICE

Contributions with interest to the unemployment
insurance program in the Southeast passed the billion
dollar mark at the end of the first half of 1950, ac-
oording to figures made available by the Buareau of
Employment Senari~ty, U. S. Department of Labor.
The total in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, MIissiasippis
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee to June
30 of this year was, $1,016,011,000, including the
following amounts by States s
North Carolina, $5228,460,000; Alabarma, $145,118,000;
Florida, $130,151,000; Georgia, $162,960,000; Msisase-
ippi, $67,757,000; South Carolina, $B85,047,000; and .
Tennessee, $196,518,000.
The figures also showed that $)447,693,000 bad been
paid out in the seven Statse in benefits and $)568,-
319,000 was available for further compensation activi-
ties. Bly States these items included
North Carolina, cumulative benefits paid, $73,739,-
000 and funds available for benefits, $154,721,0003
Alabean, $91 177,000 and $53,941,000; Florida, $57,-
157,000 and ~b2,994,000; Georgia, $59,025,000 and
$103,935,000; Mdississippi, $26,519,000 andf $41,238,000)
South Carolina, $35,951,000 and $49,097,000; and Tenn-
essee, $1b~04,125 000 and $92,393,000.
There were ;69,896 employers subject to the program
in the Southeast at the end of June. Included won
North Carolina, 14,516; Allabama, 8,965; Florida, 12,*
196; Georgia, 11,963; Misesissippi, 5,864; south Caro-
lina, 5,596; and Tennessee, lo,79.
The current rise in employment and corresponding
decrease in unempqloymenrt brFouht a 28 per cent decline
in the week~y average unaber of persons receiving: bene-
fits of the program in July of this year as compared
with the same month last year. The drop was 203,322 in
July 1949 to 145,503 in July 1950. This was somewhat
below the decline nationally, which amounted to 34 per
oent, or from 2,111,221 in July 1949 to 1,388,374 in
the same month this year,
CElBSUS &F AGRICULTURE, 1950

Grders are nowr being taken by Deparbaent of Com-
merce field offices in the Southeast for preliminary
releases from the 1950 Censuse of ALgriculture expected
to be made available shortly bgr the Burean of the
Census.
The releases will consiat of four pages for each
county and State in the United States, with one or
more summary reports for the continental United States'
sad will present data on anaber of farms, farm oharse-
Seristics, soreage in farms, value of lanrd and build-
ings, uses of land, fara facilities and equipment*
specified classes of livestookr, specified crop ha>
rested, value at farm products, as shown by the 1950
Census of Agriculture, anod available comparative data
from the 1945 Census of Agricrulture*
No abarge will be made for one copy of a ]prelimin-
ary release for a single area. Single copies of re-
leases for other States at counties will be ftrnished
at a charge of 20 cents for lots of 1D or tower re-
Pomt. A charge of $60 will be made for one set of
the releases for all counties, all States and the U.S.

RGBERITSON "RN~L & 800TP '
Renben B. Robertson, Chairman of the Boazds '
*Champion Paper and Fiber Compaqy, Canton, N. 0*s '
and Graduate Member of the Business Advisor7 '
Connoil of the U. S. Department of Commerce has '
been selected the year's "Mlan of the South" 67 '
*Hubert F. Lee. Editor of DIIIE UPSWINESS.


HIGEIDMC~S & THE; BUSINESS WALD)

(For Further Details of Any of These Items, Ask the
Nearest U. S. Department of Commerce Field Office for
Copies of the Releases)

The not working capital of U. S. corporations reached
a new record level of $73.8 billion at the end of June
1950, increasing by $2.3 billion over the quarter, accord-
ing to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Current
assets rose by $49 billion, being offset in part by a
$2.6 billion rise in current liabilities,

Personal income in August, at a new high annual rate
of $223.b billion, was $2.7 billion above the rate for
July. The July-August thse was accounted for largely by
increased wage and salary receipts. The payroll total
for August, at an annual rate of $144.3 billion, was
$2.6 hillion higher than in July and reflected one of the
largest mron~th-to-mronth increases in employment on record.
Total business inventories at the end of August were
estimated at $55.5 billion. After allowance for seasonal
variations, the book value of inventories increased $700
million during August. Mlanfacturers' inventories were
moderately lower than at the end of July, while the value
of stocks held by retailers and wholesalers rose $600
million and $300 million, respectively.

U. S. manufacturing corporations in the second quarter
of 1950 earned $13.2 billion, more than in any previous
quarter since 1947, the Securities and Ec~hange Colmdasion
and Federal Trade Comission annorunced in a joint report.
Net income after taxes was 34 per cent above the preced-
ing quarter and 59 per cent above th~e second quarter of
1949.

Unprecedented demand for all types of lumber during the
second and third quarters of 1950 was reported. Indications
pointed to a "runaway' situation, but there eren signs at
a "stop-watch" to the price tag, the tendency being to
accept such prices as a temporarily inevitable premise to
obtain what is wanted now, rather than weeks or months from
now. In July, unfilled orders totalled 2,631 million board
feet of softwoods and 285 million feet of hardwoods, and
grass stooke were 4,120 million and 2,050 million, respect-
ively.
Cotton ginnings for the United States from the 1950 orop
priar to Getober 1 wren reported by the Butreen of the Cen-
sus as 2,770,392 running bales compared with 5,306,453 far
1949 and 5,305,45~6 tor 1948. PRomotion was placed at 9,-
869,000 bales of 500 pounds gross weight, and condition at
66 per cent of normal on October 1. The indicated yield
was 257.0 pounds of lint per acre on the 18,429,000 sores
eatisated, as of September 1, to be harvested this year.

Paper and board production during August amounted to
2,174,480 tons, the Bureaur of the Cnanau reported, refloot- *
ing a seasonal increase from July and about 24 per cent
over production in August 1949. In terms of production
base capacity, the industry operated at 91.5 per cent in
August, with the paper and paper-board sections operating
at 88.4 and 94.1 per cent, respectively.

Sales of confectionery ana chocolate products in August
were estimated by the Census Boreau at $80 million, or
59 per cent above July and 35 per cent over August 1949.
Mlanufacturer wholesalers reported sales 53 per cent above
the July level and 32 per cent higher than last year. Sales
of man~ufacturer-retailore, 7 per cent higher than last
year, were up 10 per cent from July.


PAGE 3


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE







PAGE 4
BOOKELET 0 LIGHTNIJGZ 1SUED

An estimated 400 persons are killed and 1,000 injured
each year y lightning in the United States and property?
damage runs into mitinillions of dollars, so to help
in the protection of life and property the National Bur-
eau of Standants has issued a booklet entitled Code for
Protection Against Lightning, Parbs Is II and III.
Order this booklet from the nearest De-
partment of Commerce field offices Price 304
The publication has 99 pages of advice and suggest"
ions on the subject of lightning. For example, there
are chapters devoted to the protection of persons, in-
cluding personal conduct during storms; protection of
buildings and miscellaneous property; relative 1cseaea
from lightning, with factors to be considered; and a
comprehensive discussion as to the value of lightning
rods.
PUBLICATION ON GERMAN SCIENCE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

\\\ll~illlll llllI III llulIII l
3 1262 08748 8465
BULLETL._ r..vrrirwasmLc
FOBLICATIalB AND) REPEATS

('o btain C~odg of this Mlaterial, Check it in the
SA~G Provided &81d $.88 T~hai L1Ea &e 482 Blleth4 g
Commerce 40 4h8 ]|ares DeDartmnent gf Goomerce E3,g

Remittances fgg S.,gg Material Pgya],g 42 Treasurer

f3Special Censan Tabulation on Cities,A ....
NPA Beese (C ek T fse D ired)


#19 l20 # ~;###2
Executive Orders on NPA 1 110#.....
Amendment to NPA Grder of Sept. 11,,......,.......,.
PuEblic Law 774, 81st Congress, Defense Production
Act of 1950.....100
Guide for Prospective American Imtporter.............
1950 Gensus of Agriculture (Name A~rea Desired)

Code for Protection Against Lightninlg............30o
Research on Dental Materials at Nat.Bur~ofStda...15e
Bibliography of Recent Research in Field of H~igh
Polymers Nat.Bu~. off tds ,.,,,., 200
Bibliography of Technical Reports.......5 Year
Shopping Centers (Reference Sources) ..............5e
Sarsaparilla Root (Synopsis of Information)...,....5e
A Survey of Diaper Service Prac okes (SBL177 ...

Acro Accessory, T dl$r


SSources, 1950 Loet~ ni~~f
Small Department Store
ES AND MARKET ANALYSTS *********..., #183
*iSSteps for Reducing
will be found sources of prepared data Your Distribution Costs
sales quotas, selecting distribution chan- ..............#184
Ilyzing present and future prospects. LSl~ aOs iFn
ancing Retail Instalment

Price $2.25, c~lot Mlanufacturers' Saleamen
261 pages ..............194
De atmnt of Comrmerce O~perating a Drug
1 fie Store.............#204


0,
ng
na


The QOfice of Technical Services, U. S. Department
of Commerce has announced the issuance of an 88-volumes
22,000-page publication designed to lose a gap in
scientific knowledge resulting from the six-year war-
time brier between German scientiate and the rest of

entitle "bamerican JEIST RELEASEB!


Th .. ?"aio Market Researc
German achievements
in biology, cemie- A GUIDE FOR SALES EGXECUTI'
try, mahm c,
medicine, physics In this ninth edition, the first since 194
and the earth
sciences, started useful in measuring market potentials, settil
at the warag aend nels, planning advertising campaigns, and a
is available on a
free loan basis'
and applicationIs
for it are now
being taken. Also
available is aFomheeae
Fe
tree catales. F
GPO


83--100278
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF PO $300



US~ DEPrCy@(TO


It
,3


BC-6-Jr


UNIVERSITY OF FLonlDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3. Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume 4, Number 21, November 1, 1950


~- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE










ATLM'TA 8, 6A. SlAVMH, 64 JACK1SDAVILLE, FLA HIZI 32, L. Hr OBILE, ALA. CitARLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., LL, Iloo 218, P.o. Bldg.. 426 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold ldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tl~last 48121 X**453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel* 4-7111 Tel. 9-7588 Tel. 2-364)1 Tel. 7771



voL. k 6,O no. NOVEMBER 15s 195o


SOUTHEAST RETAIL SALES BRISK

SALES OF RETAIL STOREs


1947 ~~ ~oe 19814915 sy
Southeast with the result that increases in sales from
9 to as high as 169 per cent over the corresponding
month last year were reflected'

dAs ~the nearest Department ~of Commnerce
field office to place your name on the
mrfify 1Pet r receive these repo to.
also available for the United States.

Gains of 21r per cent in Birmingham and Jefferson
county, Alabama) 30 per cent in Augustat 35 per cent
in Columbus, Ga; 19 per cent in Atlanta, Macon and
Johnean City, Tennt and L9 per cent in ELeckley and
Twiggs counties wrere among the advances recorded.
Other were, in percentages, Savannah and Gr~eenwood,
S. C., 171 Asheville, 18; Blazi, 22) Clarksdales 20;
and (jlllfport, 21.

SEE RETAIL SALES Page 2

FALRM INCOME CONTAINS DECLINE

Farmers in the Southeast continued to experience a
decline in oash farm income, which has persisted for
the past several months, and during the first 8 months
of 1950 the drop was 10 per cent as compared with the
corresponding period last eear.
The decrease registered for the States of Alabramas
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolinas South
Carolina and Tennessee received acceleration as the
result of a b7.8 per cent loss in cash income two Mise.
issippi faraore.
The figures wrere reflected in a report isoned by the
Bureau of Agricultural Economices U. 8. Department of
Agriculture, which showed that total cash farm income
in the seven-State area from January t~o August of this
year was $1,386,667,000 compared with $1J,560,989,000
for the same time last year. The dealing was national
in scope, all regions repaprting dereases,


National Production

Authority
ALnnouncement has been made by the National Product-
ion Authoritys U. S. Department of Commerce, of plans
for taking care of small business firms in its program
to conserve strategic materials in short supply for the
national defense program.
In Order M-6, issued by NPA, steel producers are re-
quired to allot to their warehouse customers proportion-
She percOntages Of each steel product, based an average
monthly shipment during the first 9 months of this year.

The following recent sativities have been can-
ducted by NPA as reflected in press releases issued
by that agency. Copies of these releases may be re-
quested from the nearest Department of Commerce of-
o~ .1 e PDrcto r of IrnS~tee Division announced,
NPA-19 Or~der issued for handling steel priorities.
NPA-20 Retail trade representatives meet with NPA.
NPA-21 Steel requirements for freight care disonesed
IIPA-22 Retail thre dealers disonas NPA program.
NSPA-23 Aunto manufacturers meet with NPA.
NJPA-21, Director of NJPA Chemicals Division Named.
NPA-25 Conservation of rubber discussed at meeting.
NPAL-26 NPAL consultant appointed.
NlPA-27 Steel warehouse inventories approved,
SEB NPAL Page 2

61 SOUTHWEST FIRMS GET CONTRACTS

Contracts awmarded by the Federal Government to south*
eastern firms since the beginning of the present fiscal
yeartotal more than $168 million, according to contract
award lists now being received weekrly at Department of
Carmerce field offices Chambers of Commproe anrd trade
organizations.

These lists are available for p~ickup pur.i
posse without charge.
Sixrty-can firms located in Ala~bama, Florida, Georgia,
H ississippi, Nlorth Carolina, South Carolina and Tennes-
see were given tbe contracts. Included in the com12odities
purchased were petroleum products, textiles, Ilumbe and
its products, canned beans, canned citrus traite, packing
barea, cotton produate and others. Sharing in the awards
were 16r Georgia firms 7 in Ala~baag 11 In Floridai 6 in
Meisssippit 11 in N~orth Carolinai 3 in South Carolinai
and 9 in TePnnese**


A brisk
September





SOUTHEAST HOTEL RECEIPTS ADVANCE


hotel receipts in the Southeast have advanced 187
per cent ainee before the war, but payrolls also rose
236 per cent, according to a i196 Census of hauiness
report juxst released by the Btrean of the Cenrsus
The report showed that receipts in hotels in Ala
bama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee wrent from $71,3Y(,000 in
1939 to $20kshis8000 in 191r8 and payrolls from $16s-
007,000 to $53,9301000*
This release is available gramis from
any Department, of Commnerce field office*
See back page for ordering*

The report also showed that Florida is one of the
leading hotel States in the nations that State's 230
per cent gain in receipts in the 9-year period, or
from $30,272,000 to $99,811,000, exceeding that of all
States except New Bampshires Connecticut and Nevada*
Allso, Florida's total hotel receipts in 19l68 were ez-
seeded only by New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois and
California*
The 187 per cent gain in receipts in the seven
Southeastern States was well above the rise for the
nation as a whole, which aggregated 15;2 per cent. An
increase in the South Atlantic region as a whole con-
sisting of 171( per cent was topped only by advances of
187 and 181r per cent, respectively, in the New England
and Mountain regions*
In the seven-S~tate area, the figures also reflected
a 12 per cent rise in the number of hotels, or from
2,928 to 3.2893 a 21 per cent gain in number of guest
rooas, from 133,075 to 160,9911 and a 25 per cent a
pansion in number of employees, or from an average of
39 ?$8 in Mlarch 1939 to kr9,831, at t~he same time in
198. The number of proprietors went from 2,357 to
2,760.
Receipts by States in 1918 and 1939 included North
Carolina, $21,987s000 in 191r8 and $8,750s000 in 1939;
Sourth Carolina, $9,676,000 and $3,666,000; Georgia,
$25,1091000 and $9s696,000; Tennessee, $23 623,000 and
$10,029,000; Alaobasa, $13,285,ooo and sk,786,ooo; ana
Mlississippis $i11,377,000 and $6,159,000,

RETAIL SALES Continued from Page 1

06her area increases included Manatee and Sarasota
counties. Florida, 1Si Dellalb, Fulton anld Rochdale
counties, Georgia, 191 knncombe and Madison counties,
North Carolina, 18; GTreenwood and McCoraick counties,
South Carolina, 1S; Coahoma and Qeitman counties,
Mississippi, 91 Harrison and Stone counties, Missise-
ippi, ~21S and tSllivans Unicoi and Washington conmtiess
Most of the same cities and arreas reported increased
also in eunmlative sales in the first 9 months of 1950
over the corresponding period last year, the gains
ranging as high as 27 per cent in Augustai 26 per cent
in Bilazii and 25 per cent in Colmabus. Conversely,
however, most of the reporting localities registered
declines in sales in September of this year compared
with the previous month, only Macons Columbus, G~een-
wood, Clarkasdale, OnLfpart and Kingaport, falling in the
"pltan column among the cities. ELeckley ad Twiggs
counties, Georgia, were among the areas reporting gains,
that section observing a k1 per cent advance.


IPA Continued from Page 1

NTPA-28 Construction industry discusses materials.
NPA-29 Revised rubber order announced.
NJPA-30 Columbina1 bearing steel order issued.
NPA-1 Field offices priced for IPA administration
NPA-3~2 'DO" defense order ratings interpreted.
NPA-33 Rlubber industry suatite 1991 analysis.
NPAL-3L Office of Small Bpainesss created in NPA.
NSPA-35 Scheduled programs for steel announced.
NPA-36 Provision made for steel for freight cars.
NPA-37 Construction for amllsement purposes banned.
NPA-38 Steel industryls participation in NPA talked.
xPA-39 Aluminum fabricating indurstry mase with NPA.
NPA40~ M~achine tool industry discusses NiPA program.
NPL-61 Appointments made to general counsel office.
N0PA-62 Radio, television industry diseasses program.
NPA-63 Rules for handling aluminum "DOn ordegs gives,
NPA-hkl Instter to Associated Gen Contractors reproduced.
NPA-45 Order MK~l explained and clarified.
NPL-~66- Unissued
NrPA-h? Basic priorities system eaendment issued.
NPA.48 Industrial alcohol industry discusses program.

The allotmaents will come out of the steel prodaction avail-
able after the ills have filled defense requirements. Such
allotaents will be in addition to shipments made to steel
erarehouses to cover their defense rated orders.
After a disonusion of the matter with Economic Stabili-
sation Administrator Valentine, Williamp H. H~arrison, NPA
Adm~inisntrator said both had agreed that the provision of
adequate warehouse supplies should enable the warehouses
to assist surbstantially in the Government'se attempt to
"hold the line" against inflation by making every effort
to maintain normal price relationships on steel products
between ail1 anQ warehouse.


IIISTBIBI~TI~ OF NP~ HATERLBL ~LRRBNUM)


I ArrangemeIents have been made by which those inter-I
c*sted now may obtain direct fromt the U. S. Depart .
seens of commerce in washington copies or regpals *
Itions, orders, foras, press releases and related
Isaterial. Two public maiing liate will be main-
stained in the Department of Coamerce to provide
Associations, chambers of camserce, anufenracturrers, '
businessmen and others with not too Bexced five (5) I
Ioopies of such material as followsa
SList 1. Requests for copies of regulatory
a material and press releases.
I List 2. Requests for copies of regulatory
r material only.
I Requested for such material sabold be addressed
It~os U. S. Department of Coamerces Division of
IPrinting Services, Attention, E. E. Vivian, Room
162251 washington 25, D). C.
SSnch material will be supgplied free.
I QI requests for balk copies of NP~A material, a
Ioharge of $1 per 100 copies will be made, with a
Charge of 10 cent for each additional 10 copies. I
cSacdh orders should also be sent two the foregoaig
address accompanied by a check or manoey order for I
Inot less than $i10.00 made payable to the Treasurer (
cof the United States. A~ "Deposit A~ccont" anaber
Ivill then be assigned and accountings made to the I
'depositor. Unless otherwise advised, shipmenta
Will be made by regular mail. If special sailing
'is done, the cost will be charged against the de- '
Ipositor's account. A pickup service will also be
Iaaintained at Room 6225 in the Department of Ca,
'merce for those wishing to obtain balk copies in
spanmnn, a


SPopulation data for 1950 are now beins '
i received at Camerce Department field ot- *
I fices. Ak them for information.


I


GPO 81100550


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE







I


SOUTHI MOST -POPUMUIS AREA

Uness Axo BRunn POPULATI~O OF THE UNITED 5STATESSie herel
H90O TO 1940 riEEtin rr
MIu.ONS ward in ah pst
2. ... 100 years, the
"" """""" South ia still the
fa20t ppfOl e
,.,0 gion in the coun"
-- try, a Burean of
,C the Cenans release
save on the 19k0 census
**** of population in-
se~o dicates*
"ie The report, a o
no ed that on April
... 1 of this year
thbwe wone 166>
"" a ... a name 931,354 persons
une~ ~Z~Z~ RRII livig in he
Boaith compared with 19shl2.227 in the Westi W1,229,7163
in the North Central area, and 39,282,268 in the
Northeast*

Copies of this release are obtainable
at all Departmoent of Ceamerce offices
without charge. See Page 4 for order
blank*

Since 1940 when the last previous cenane was taen
the population gain in the Sourth has been 12.6 per cents
sompewhat above, the increases of 10.2 per cent in the
North Central region, and 9.2 per cent in the Northeast
but lightly below the 13.8 per cent rise for all
States in the nation because of the phanamenal 39.8
per cent gain taking place in the WJest in the 10-year
Period*
The Censue Burean defined the South as Alhabaas
Florida, Georga, MIississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Kentackyr, the Virginias, Mlarylanld>
Delawrare, the District of Columbia, Louisiana, Arkansas
Texas and Oklahama*
Those States bordering the Atlantic and Qulf, in"
cluding Georgia, Florida, the Carollaas and Vir ina
Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia made
the greatest gain, 18 per cent, in population of all
sourthern States between 1910 and 1990, with the Weat
Santh Central lenisiana, Alrkansas, Oklahamau and
Taras nrESt With a 108 per cent rise, and the re
mainer a 6 per cent advance. The 18 per cent inareasse
for the Atlantio and Gulf States, dueh in large measrre
to the great forward stride in population reflected in
Flarida, was the third largest percentage increase
among all sections in the counltt*7*
SOUITHEAUST HOSPITAL~ FACILITIS EE[PANDED

A total of $)198,732,000 was being expended in the
Southeast as of June 1 of this year in the constrnet~io
of new civilian hospital facilities under the ecn~tly*
established Federal aid pr~ogram, but the region still
needed 237,062 beds to bring its facilities up to ar.-
rent requirements, according to the Caestruction and
Construction Materials Industry ReporT of fl~e U. S.-
Departenst of Cam6erc.
ltn~ rtrri~ Zd t-~ R ti bak


HIIGBLIGHTS OFTEBSINESS WREE

(o PDhrter Details Of Of These Items As~k The
Cariesl- ,6 08 0* for


Sales of large independent retailers were ~1 per cent
higher in September 1950 than in September 1919, but
September sales were 2 per cent short of the ALngnet dol..
lea volume this years the Barean of the Caaums reported.
number and building materials dealers reported sales up 39
per cent motor-vehicle dealers, 23 per cent; furniture
stores, 21 per centi hardware stores, 17 per cent and
jewelry stores, 15 per cent.
ease
Total net debt of all boorroers in the nihrted States
amounted to thb2 billion a December 31, 191(9s the Office
of Business Ecanamics reported. The increase in total
debt during the year was $11) billion, placing the total
_23)e cent above the volume outstanding at the end of
194t0. This rise ra be compared with increased of 3) per
cent in 19L8 and at per cent in 191r7.
+ + w
Business activity nationally continued at a high rate
in September and early October with government purchasing
riigand private srpendi~tures still reflecting the
stm engendered by government programs. Industrial
output was higher in September than duin an Mod
scethe wartime month of June 1969, but the more rapid
Spnonof deandnr resulted in a further rise in unfilled
orders and contdmand price advances,
+++ +
oalsales of retail stores in Septms amoute t
$12,85 million, 14 per cent above a year ago. The spending
urewhich had been initiated after the KCorean hostile.
tiswas still strong, although it was receding to some
exet.Ater adjustdag for seasonal factors and d$fer.
eesin the number of trading days, sales in September
weedown about I per cent from Anugnet, but were still Ir
per cent above Junle, the pre-Korean ih
+ + *
National income in the second quarter of this yea r ws
at the annual rate of $229 billion, representing a marked
advance over the first quarter rate of $217 billion Pad the
$218 billion rate recorded for the second quarter of 1919
+ + *
Chala store and mail-order sales for September amounted
to $2,679 millianr, 12 per cent above a year ago. Chain
store activity was less strong in September than during
the preceding two monlth. After adjustment for seasonal and
working day differences, September sales were about 5 per
cent below Autguset, though they exceeded Jane, the pre-
Korean high, by k per cent.
+ *
New construction activity turned daownward in October
from the record rate it maintained through the summ~er.
Total value of all types of new construction put in place
in October as $c8 2. billion
w +
Manufacturers, sales and new orders in September aere
moderately below their Aulgust highs, but the volume of new
business was still larger then production. Sales totaled
0.15 bileo wia m Pw ere received y manaractuens
were $23.7 billion. Unfilled order backlogs thus rose by
$2.2 billian,


able at all Camaerce Department ofi~ces + + + *
fo~r 3 a asr ployment swng uparpd behem~ Septembe sad October,
M *shiflybecaulse of a pickup in farm sativityJ. Estimated
Inclded n te toJune30 ere 25,- st ,74,000 in the week ending October 14, total civilian
821,000 in Floridai 3i1~ 06,000 in Georgia) $31,698,000 apomn a afamlinaoeteSpebrlvl
in North Carolinal $)28, 68,000 in South Caro~lPIna $33,- codn too the latest Censue Barean figures. This estimate
12h,000 in Alabamal and Tennessee, $25,257,ooo. vas te hihs wter rpoted for an October.
GP0 81100550


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





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ORDER BLANK[ FOR PUBLICATIONS &r REPORTS

(g ObanC ofhi Materal, hc ti the
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L7 Monthly Retail Sales Report Place Names on Malng..n
List for (Name State)
for U. S. ............................
L7 National Production AhoiyReleases a
0.18; .1; o20' o21) o221 o231
o2 o251 .261 o271 .28; 0.291
.301 o1 .321 .33) o3; .9
.36, No371 .8 .9 .0 ~ l
Census of he a blReceipts ( 281)......
Population of U.S.by Regionaegtos(PC-3sNo.1) ......
Construction &r Canatruction Mth.Ind.Rlpt.....$3yr
Suggested Beaearch Problenes hieiness-Economica..5t
PotWrWatch Markests............ .....20g)
Cotton Ginned Prior to Octel (Name State/States)


Report on1 Cotton Ginning (for All States)..........
Provrisional Estimates of Pop'n of U.S.(P-25,#65)...
Dwelling Units in U.S.,April 1,1950 (II0-1,#90).....
Dwelling Units in Alaska (HC-2,No1).............
SIIAor iChareiterii~fos. o- f Draft-Age MensJulyl95r 0
~ -(P-90,No.27)..........
Gross ,Changes in the I~boi*i Force sAug-Sept.19S0( 59-#20)
:'ai~king Facilities at Trade Genters(Ref.Sourcres).10#
Buying for Retail StoreaI (Reference sources).....10#~
Addresses by Secretary of Commerce Chas. .Sawyer a
nWhere wSe StandafuRedisoovery of Asimirica"
Boal hiness Helps us ~Epandes
'Tae- Strength of the Free Worldu
aProduction Act of 1950 Public Law 771...100
Forms of Insurance Carried by Retail Grocery(8BA205).
Promotion & Advertising in Childrencs Wear Store(209)
Sporting Goods Rental Service (212)..................
fUse of Market Measurement in Planning Introduction
:of a New Product (2116)............
f Handling Floor Display of Furniture in a Store of
Idaited Space (216)...............
f Six Tools for Industrial Selling (217)..............


University faculty members, graduate students and
,university and private research bureaus in the Southeast
will be interested in a new bulletin (fut issued by the
U. S. Department of ComPerce entitled"Saggested Research
Problems a hasiness-Economics.n
The Dailletin lists as pressing practical subjects for
study more than 200 problems suggested by businessmen,
casmercial and professional associations and Government
officials.

This public~ation is on sale at all
Camenrce Department field offices for
S$c.
The problems cover such subject fields as Government
control, international economics public finances basi-
neas management, marketing, labor, business finance,
housing, transportation statistics, accounting econo..
aic analysis industry studies, regional studies, local..
ity studies, population and social welfare in addition
to the field of economic mobilization.
JEWELED WATCH INDUSTRY BOOKLET

A publication for
jewelers and wateh-
makers in the South-
P ~east has been issued
O St wa r by the U. S. Depart-
ment of Colmeroe.
It 1a called "Poss-
War Watch Mark~ets.,
WATa It consists of a
63-page report anam

to f 9 Ssaless imports,
Markeditribuction and
the present and
oenaljeweled
ehmarket in
this country for domestic producers and fipiiorters.
Among other things, the study points out the signifi-
cant contribution of this small industry to the nation-
al defense. Past and present factors relating this in-
dtustry to its important defense role anld certain conald-
erations affecting its potentials are also examined.


GPo 83-100261


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Volume b, Numrber 22, November 15, 1990


-- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORtIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08748 8010


PAGE 4


BULLETIN





WHOLESALE SALES CONTINUE GAINS


I


1 I I I I


__1____~1 1 I I 1


National Production

Authority

Wood pulp, highly important in the South because of
the great volume of pulpwood produced in the region,
has been excluded from NPB's basic priorities regula-
tion, and, as a result, no "DO" priority ratings may
be used to obtain that commodity.
The action was taken, NPA explained, because of the
fact that only 6 or 7 per cent of the U. S. consumption
of wood pulp is available for purchase on the domestic
marlo~te AS & rBsult, Only that small quantity has been
subject to "DO" ratings.

NPAls action an wood pu~lp is contained in
Amendment 2 to NPA Regulation 2, available
gratis at all Commerce Departmnent field offices.

Excclusion of wood pulp from the priorities regular
tion was designed to prevent disruption in the product-
ion and distribution of the several essential grades of
wood pulp, it was stated.
Wood pulp is the key raw material for paper, paper-
boards rayon cellophane, explosives and thousands of
end products necessary for both the defense program and
important non-military uses. U. S. consumption is cur-
rently at the rate of about 17 million tons annually.

SEE NPA Page 2

MARKET RESEARCH SOURCES, 1950

The publication Markejt Research Souce, 1950, con-
taining information on sui~ch sources among Stat and
local agencies, bureaus of business research of colleges,
universities, associations, foundations andl cooperatives,
commercial organizations, and publishing companies
located in many sections of the Southeast is now avail-
able for distribution.

This book, ba~ckram bound, may be ordered
from any Department of Commerce field office.
Price $2.25.

The book, the work of the Office of Industry and
Commerce of the Commerce Department in Washington is
designed to supply needed sources of information for
those engaged in marketing and marketing analyses. It
constitutes a national inventory, so to speaks of
available market research material, and is the ninth
in a series issued by the Com~merce Department.


first nine months of the year wholesale sales were 115
per cent greater in the South Atlantic area and 11 per
cent more in the East South Central section than they
were in the corresponding period last year.

These monibly reports on wholesale s~alses
are available gratis through any Department
of Commerce field office. In requesting
them ask that your name be placed on the
mailing list to receive them regularly.

Increased sales of such commodities as automotive
supplies electrical goods hardware, industrial sup-
plies, lumber and building materials, plumbing and
heating products refrigeration equipment, and certain
foods, have been responsible for the advance in whole-
eale transactions in the region.

See WHOLESALE SALES Page 2

SPECIAL DAYSIWEEKSIMONTHS

The new 1951 edition of the booklet Special *
Weeks &r Months is expected to be available for South-
eastern advertising agencies, radio broadcasting sta
tions and others in the business field same time in
December, it was announced*

Get this booklet wrhile the supply lasts
from Eany Cormmerce Department field office*
Price will be announced later*

Events for January and February 1991 have already
been announced. They range from nNational Crochet Weeka
to "Pancake Day."


ATLANTA 3, sA.
50 Whitehall St., LL,
Tel. tIllnut 4)121 X-4)53


SAVAMM3ll, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLL. MIAMI1 32, FLA. MDBILE, AiLA,
Amon 218, P.O. Bldg., 4125 Federal Bldg., 94)7 Seybold Aldg., 3083 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-(F755 Tel. 4)-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641


CNAlRLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


YOL. 15, NO. 23


DEC~IBER 1, 1950


Steady Gains
recorded
for
All Regions


Wholesale
dealers in th
Southeast ap-
parent ky are
finding 1990
to be a rather
profitable
year, judging
from & Current
report issued
by the Breau
of the Census.

showed that
during the


S.,t..br 1950 panl


Persmts ane..
sept.l sept.l 9 mos.
19X I 19) 1


No. of
s" e.


apgOrd
don"
(MT


on08 seeL~aax


am.a sus.. sout .


__I _I___


Y,4"
7,72
,i ~7
159
238,818
1 ,405


HN Englnd............... +21 -14 15

namde ,..ti..........:.; .x -13 +15
Pacine...di...........**** +0 1 +6


Source: Bureau of the GCnsus


UN[IRLTEDSATSDEATMN OF COMMERCE





FARM INCOME RISING GRADUALLY

After numerous setbacks in cash receipts from their
marketings dating back well into 1919, indications are
that southeastern farmers may be gradually recovering
from a period of such reductions*
The monthly report of the Bureau of Agricultural
Economies of the U. S. Department of Agriculture shows
that of six States in the nation reflecting increased
in cash receipts in the first nine months of 1950 over
the same period last year, three of them, North Caro-
linas Georgia and Floridas are in the southeastern re"
gion. The other three are Michigans Wyoming and Oregon*
Georgia, with a 6 per cent gain, enjoyed the dis-
tinction of having the largest rate of increase of anF
State. The gains in North Carolina and Florida were
two, and one-tenth of one per cent, respectively*
Watch for the announcement regarding avail"
ibility of the 1950 Census of Agr~iculture.
The Census Burean expects to release first
preliminary reports soon*
The report showed that regionally the States of
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolinas
South Carolina and Tennessee recorded a decrease of 6
per cent in the 9-month period, or from $1s972,399,000
from January to September of last year to $1,891sl37s000
for the same time this years due primarily to a 33 per
cent decrease suffered by Mississippi farmers*
This 6 per cent drop in the 7-State area was 3light-*
ly greater than that for the nation as a whole, which
amounted to 5 per cent, or from $19,r16s265,000 to
$18,lr16,216,0000*
'the receipts by States in the Southeast in the first
nine months of 1950 as compared with the correspondinS
period last year included North Carolina, JCL61,312s000
in 1950 and $60rF0,829,000 in 191r9; South Carolina, b183s-
3716,000 and $197,603,0000; Georgia, $292skr37>000 and
$273,523,000; Florida, $337,732s000 and $337,283,0003
Tennessee, $b2tS,097,000 and $270,6920000; Alabamas
$163,373,000 and $1761203,0003 sad Mlississippi, $167s"
852,000 and $266,166,000*

WJEOLESALE SALES Continued From Page 1

Business among the section's wholesale firms as
also rmch better in September of this year than in the
samtanonth~last.year, rises of 23 per cent in the South
Atlantic area and 15 per cent in the East South Central
being recor~ded. However, in September of this years a
rather sharp decline came when compared with August of
this year in both areas, indicating a slight recession
in wholesale operations as the present national ean"
agency progressed*
In dollar volume sales, 696 firms in the two southern
areas reported a $127,918,000 business in September of
this year, a substantial increase over the 8199,37,0000
reported by 661r firms in the same month last year. The
increase in sales in the South Atlantic section in the
first nine months of 19M was 1 per cent better than
that for the nation, which was 13 per cent, and the
.gain in September in the region was well above that for
the United States, which was 19 per cent*


NPA Continued from Pg

Obher primary aebions recently taken by NIPA follow:
Alkali-Chlorine Industry
Members of the Idstry recommended 6 tiaa plan be
adopted to distribute nDOn rated priority orders for
caustic soda, soda ash, and clorine equitably among domes-
tic producers of those chemicals.
Atomic Energy
Delegation of priorites au~thoit issued to the Atomic
Energy Commaission to permit the use of nDO" priorities
ratings for certain plants serving the AEC but not owned
or operated by that agency was broaadened. (NPA Delegation
2 As Amended).

Note: Where Delegations of Authority, Regn-
lations, Orders and other actions of NPA are
specified in these highlightss" copies of
them may be obtained gratis from the nearest
Department of Commnerce field office.
Joint Priorities
The joint prioritis;ses sysems btwee the United States
and Canada were implemented by NPA Regulation 3 providing
for specific methods of carrying out provisions of the
State of Principles for Economic Cooperation issued Oct.
26, 1990 by the two govelrnments.
Delegations of Authority
Delegations of authority to assign defense order (DO)
ratings under NPB's basic priorities system were issued
So the National Advisory Colmmittee for Aeronantics and
the U. S. Coast Guard. (NPA Delegations 3 and Ir).
Aluminum
Grder 5-7 was issued designed to provide the necessary
quantities of aluminar far the rearmament effort andC for
equitable distribution among all users of that commodity
available after defense requirements are met.
Inventory Controls
Three interpretations of its inventoryp control regula-
tion covering methods of adjusting orders extent of
imp~orted materials exempts and deliveries of goods through
intermediate distributors were issued. (NPA Reg. 1,
Interpretations 1s 2 and 3).
Tin
Rules for reporting on inentories, receipts, consnap.
tion, imports and distribution of tin weare announced.
(NPA -8).Construction
Construction Or~der M-4 ~is amde to clarity and extend
the scope of NPA'a ban on construction for am~usement, re-
creational or entertainment purposes.
Great Lakes CroVessels
Establishment ofa program topoieselprodnets in
sufficient quantities for construction of 12 new Great
Lakes cargo resseela necessary for defense was announced,
(Supplement 2 to NPA W1).
Zine
Erales for accepting and sheduling rated defense orders
for shec are announced to provide for equitable distriba-
tinof rated orders among all producers and fabricators.
(NPA Grder 8-9).
Cormnications Committee
Formation of a C~lm';omunGic;~ati;;;r'onsIdry Avsr Commit-
eeto bring about close cooperation between NPA and that
inutywill be madertakren, NPA announced.
Cobalt
Issualnce of a temporary lIchive for distribution of
obl a highly strategic metal principally used ase a
hrengagent in the manufacture of steel was announced.
Robber
Termse of a fortheaming lIation order for rubber in
heirtquarter of 1991 were discussed at a meeting of
PAofficials and that agency's Rabber Industry Advisory
Committee.


__U __I I___ __^


*


LOC LEGIATE EDUCATI S


r The Deparlment of Coamerce has jrs iessed
a pamnphlet entitled A Report on the rv
Sof Colleiate Edueation rar small Business
r for 415* spring of 1950. It is availlable at
all fied ofiies for 16#*


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





SAFETY ON THE HIGHWAYSISTREETS

IOTOR-VEHICLEPRODUCTION (CAR~eS, BoTUSEN TRUKS
THOUSANDS OF VEHICLES) States in
the South-
east were
above the
national
average in
number of
motor ve-
1947 1948 1949 1950 hi0fa-
alities


HIIGHLIGHiTS OF THIE BUSINESS WORLD


(Fo Further Details Of Ant Of These Items Ask The
N;3-eare S.Ri4 p t FmniiE G ere Od~c~For
01rie S Releases)

The value of all business inventories at the end of
September was estimated by the Office of Business Econo-
mics, U. S. Department of Commerce at $56 billion. After
allowance for seasonal variations, the book value of in-
ventories increased $'1.8 billion from the end of August.
Valuation at higher prices accounted for about one-half
of this increase with the rest coming from an increase
in physical volume.
9a 9+
Sales of service and limited-function wholesalers
Iin September totalled $6s835' million, which, after adjust-
nent for seasonal variations, were 10 per cent lower than
in August, with both durable and nondurable goods con-
tributing equally to the decline. The September total,
however,~ still remained considerably above the June level.
1(39) 9
Personal income in September, at a new high annual rate
of $228.3 billion, was $2.9 billion above the August rate,
The August-September rise in such income steamed mainly
fromt a substantial increase in corporate dividend dis-
bursements. W~age and salary receipts also increased. The
overall rise in personal income was limited by decline in
proprietors a income and transfer payments.
9
Sales of large independent retailers were 9 per cent
higher in Gotober 1950 than in October 1969, but October
sales were 3 per cent short of the September dollar
volume this years the Burean of-the Census reported.
October sales of lumber anld building materials dealers
wer1e 32 per cent higher in 1950 than in 191r9; jewelry
stores reported sales up 16 per cent; hardware stores, 11
per cent; motor-vehicle dealers, 10 per cent; anld Furni-
ture stores, 9 per cent.
weaa+9
Publicly reported cash dividend payments which in the
first eight months of 1950 had been running about 8 per
cent higher than in 19L92 spurted ahead in September to
register an increase of 60 per cent over September 1949,
the Office of Bushness Economics, U. S. Department of
Comrmerce reported. Dividend payments of American corpor-
ations issuing public reports aggregated $1sl$2 million
in September as compared with $;721 million in the salme
month last year,

Sales of all retail stores in October amounted to
$12,085 million, or 9 per cent above the same month a year
ago. The level of spending, which had risen sharply in
July under the impact of Korean hostilities, continued to
recede in October, reflecting, in part, the readjustment
following the initial high sales, as well as effects of
credit curbs in October.
*
Gross foreign aid extended by the United Statee Gov-
ernment in the form of cash or goods and services in the
fiscal year ended June 30s 1950s declined to $6 billion
from the high of $6.6r billion in the previous year. In
the five postwar years ended June 30s 1950, such aid as
broad aggregated $28.1 billion.
*+ +s
A total of 2s399 million linear yards of cotton broad
woven fabrics was produced during the third quarter of
1950, the Bureau of the Census announced. This was approm-
imately the same as in the second quarter, but 26 per
cent greater than in the third quarter of last year. Cot-
ton thre cord and fabric production continued to clImbs~
being 18 per cent greater than the second quarter aotput.


M


per 100 million vehicle miles in 1969, says a report
issued by the Presidentls Highway Safety Conference
entitled Priorities in the ActionPora.
While the national average was 7.4, the rate of
such deaths in Alabama was 9.1, Florida, 7.9s Georgia,
8.0, Mississippis 7*9s North Carolinas 8*2, South Car>
lina, 10.8, and Tennessee, 8.1*

Copies ot' this report are available
through all Department of Commerce
field offices for 356 a copy. 85 pages,

Some progress in high-school driver education work
for the school term 191r9-50 over 1918-69 was reported
by all of the seven southeastern States, except South
Carolina where a decrease of from lr,560 to 3,072 was
indicated. The others were, Alabama, 1s038 students
enrolled in 1968-69 and 1s261, in 19L9-90) Floridas
2,536 and 3,lr79; Georgia, 711 and lr,198; Mississippis
1,483 and 2 280; North Carolina, 1,903 and lrs217s and
Tennessee, 6~20 and 961.
In commenting on the seriousness" of the situations
the report said in part:
"Death has taken a runaway lead on our streets and
highways this year. Midwa through 190sO total traffic
fatalities averaged 11 per cent higher than for the
same 6.month period last year, with the gria prospect
of a 35,000 death toll if the trend continued.
The nAction Program" was formulated in 1946 by the
first Presidentls Highway Safety Conference, with some
2,000 public officials, safety authorities and private
citizens of all part of the U. S. participating.

32 CONTRACTS AWARDED SOUTHEASTERN FIRlMS

Nearly $3s000s000 in Federal Government contracts
rwer awarded to southeastern firs during the first
half of Novembers according to lists of contract as
wards being received at samre 400 outlets for such in-
formation in the Southeast.
Firms in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippis
North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee were the
recipients. Inmber, textiles, paper, hosierys coal and
petroleum products were among the commodities figuring
in the awards. In addition, the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill was given a contract to teach
Naval Reserve officers for $86.360.

Note: These contract award lists are l-
railable, along with lists of goods to be
bought by the Federal Government at all
Commerce Departmpent field offices and at
most local Chambers of Commerce.

To the Peerless Woolen Millas of Roseville, Ga.,
went a contract from the New York Quarterspaster Pro~-
ourement Agency for 660I000 linear yards of woolen
lining for $,1l20sf00, the top award made in the se~ven-
State area. Another large award was for 1,3654000 lin-
ear yards of cotton duck given to a Memphis firm.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





SMALL BUSINESS LOAN PROGRAM ANNOUNCED

Business firms in the Southeast needing Federal
Government loans for development of their operations so
that they may participate in the national defense pro-
gran are now given the clgreen light to proceed with
their applications for such loans.
Phe application forms are available at field offices
of the U. S. Department of Commerce in Atlanta, Savannah,
Jacksonvilles Miami, Mobile and Charleston, and the
applications will be received by those offices for fo~-
warding to Washington for processing.
Authority for proceeding with the loan program was
given by the National Security Resources Board following
its incorporation in the 1950 Defense Production Act
passed at the last session of Congress.
The money obtained through such channels mu~st be used
for expansion of capacity, development of technological
processes, or production of essential materials, and
the loans will be made only if it can be shown that
their use will speed production and deliveries or ser-
vices to aid in carrying out Government contracts for
national defense.
In addition to field offices of the Commerce Depart-
ment, the application forms are available at Washington
offices of the Departments of Comrmerce, Agriculture nd
Interior, and the Defense Transport Administration of
the Interstate Commerce Commission, which have been
designated as certifying agencies. Also, if businessmen
have contacts with such Government agencies as the Air
Force and other such procurement divisions they may
place their applications with those agencies.
The Reconstruction Finance Corporation will serve as
agent in making the loans.
Applications for the loans rmet show that funds for
such purposes as expansion of capacity, development of
technological processes, or production of essential
materials to speed up production and deliveries or ser-
vices under the program of national defense are not
Otherwise available on reasonable terms. The loans will
be granted only when the applicant is unable to obtain
them from private financial sources, with or without
government guarantee, or from other public sources on
reasonable terms*
In judging the merits of the applications, careful
attention will be given to the needs of the defense
program with primary consideration given feasibility of
the project, competence of management, and so forth.
GPO 83-


(To Obtain Copies of thdy Material, Check it in the
ace Provi~de and Send this AP e of teE Be112iE El
Commerce to the Neares31 Department of~ormmerce Fiell
0111ce. Your ELme ahd Address Are sKoma Below. ME~e5
REerdtEances for Sale 2 189171 Payalle to Treasurer
of the Uaited St22es. Items Not Priced Are Free.)

Special Days, Weeks, Months, 1951...............154
National Production Authority (List Regulation or
Order Desired)



Market Res;earch Sources...........----..........225
President's Highway Safety Conference Report......}$#
Full-Time & Part-Time Workers, August 1950(P-50#28)..
Monthly Report on Labor Force,0ct.1990 (P$7#100).....
Report on Cotton GinningsNov.8sl9S0(A/C-0-100).......
Cotton Ginned Prior to November 1 (gr Counties)
(Specify State or States Below)



S Surgical Instruments & Equipment Trade Inventories
*****1Sg
Journal of Research of National Bar.of Standards..754S
Fats & OilesConsumption by Uses,Aug.19S0(FFIM17-2-80)
Furniture Its Selection & Use....................104
Selling Home Furnishings .............. ............65#
Supply & Distribution of Domestic & Foreign Cotton
in U. S.............(Supp~to M19-1)...
~LFarm Pumps, July 1950 (FFI M31B-70).................
SCotton & Linters Consumption,Stocks., Eto.(FFIlF-1)
SAddresses:
SThanas C. Blaisdell, Assistant Secy. of Commerce
"American Businessman World Citizenn........
// aj. Gen. Philip B. Fleming, Under Secy~ofCommerce
"Safety on the Highways" .....................
4) Major General Fleming:
nTransportation Lifestream of Nation"......
1) Major General Fleming:
"1Transportation on the Home Frontnn,.....
Making the Most of a Narrow Store (SBA#218).........
Fire Prevention in Retail Stores (SBA#222)..........
Operating a Retail Frozen Food Business (SBA223)....
L00268

PIVAE USE TO AVOID
Bkrum~aoSTE $300









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LERor L. QUALLS
DEPARTBIENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINES~L' *E FLORI.DA


ORDER BLANK FOR PUBLICATIONS & REPORTS


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERNUT NO. 1009

Volume L, Number 23 December 1, 195o

--BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNllIVERSJ~ITOFLORIDA


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

FIELD SERVICE










ATLMITA 8B. GL SAVMM, 8A. JACK(SOIVtLE, FLA. NIMl 32. FLL MOBILE, ALL CIARLESTOII, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., LL, 3oom 218, P.O. Bldg., 42 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Aldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peopies Bldg.,
Tel. tlAlnst 1)121 I-458 Tel. 2-4766 Tel. 9-7111 Tel. 9-7638 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



voL. 6, wo. 26 DECEMBER 15, 1950


SOUTHEASTERN WS~IN

CONSUuPTION OF COTTON
BA~LES CONSUMED QUARTERLY BY TI
IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES


-National Production

Authority
Plans are under way to assure uniform compiliance in
the Southeast with regulations and orders issued by the
National Production Authority designed to conserve scarce
materials for the national program of defense,
Compliance specialists will be added to Commerce
Department staffs in those sections of the region where
regular offices are functioning including Atlanta,
Savannah, Jacksonville, Miami, Mobile and Charleston,
and also at certain other strategic points in the area
to be designated from time to time as other offices are
added for that purpose.
To dates NPA has issued twelve regulations and orders
with which Southeastern firms are directly and indirect-
1,y concerned and with which they should familiarize
themselves. All deal more or less with the conservPation
of materials vitally needed in the defense program.

loter Information on these orders, regulaw
tions, and so forth as well as the other
item contained in this NPAcolurmn can be
obtained from the nearest Department of
Commerce field office without charge.
Cobalt
Representatives of~nsawre and frit users meet
with NPA officials to discuss distribution methods for
cobalt not used in defense program. Recommendation were
taken under advisement.


1948 1949 1950
Source a Georgia Business


Ask your nearest Department
of Commerce office for a
copy of this report.
Corresponding increases were
also shown in certain lines of
industry, including the consump.
tion of cottons cotton spindle ope
nations, and consumption of pulproc
in the manufacture of paper in thr
South.
$ee W~SINESS Page 2


ESS CONTINUES UP
IJkhl ar no
EXTILE MILLs lease ig of the

rmss ameity which devel-
u..o oped in the
Southeast early
last auwoer with
the outbr~eak of
the Karean war
was reflected in
the third quaw i
550ter of 1950, so-
cording to the
quarterly sun-
'pOmary of business
conditions in
the region, julst
son prepared by the
Atlanta Regional
Office of the
1 oU. S. Department
19)a Of COImneree for
Alabamas Florida
Georgia,Miss-
ippis North Car-


I


ol12na, South Carolina and Tennessee.
Nearly all lines of business operations showed a con-
tinuing high level for the 9-month period of January to
September of this year compared with the corresponding
period last years including deposits, loans and debits
in Federal Reserve member banks, retails wholesale and
department store trade, new business incorporations,
operation of telephones, number of wage and sal-
ary workers empiloyed in manufacturing indnst-
ries, new urban building aluthorized, freight T
revenue of railroads operating in the re.. ATL
gion, as well as all forms of airline REGIO
revenue, and production of electric FICE AN
energy. TRICT OFF
U. S. DEPAR


Aluminum
NPA issues directie providing for adjustments
of aluminum supply for month of December.
Motion Pictures
Manufacturers and dealer concerned
with motion picture equipment meet
with NPA to discuss the situation
as result of NPA Order M-k and there
4* asked to present statement as
SEAI to what was necessary to kesep
6SsAGEN- present theaters operating.
'IDUAIS lN Cobalt
'UR CHRISTMAS NPA annouce action to
BRING FOR YOD limit cobalt inventories to
,CONTENTMENT. WE a 20-day supply and directs
sole imrporter of product how
to distribute supply in December
of this year. (Order 1910).
Compliance
John Peckham, New Yor City, is
See NJPA Page 2


'HE
IANTA
~NAL, OF"
D THE DIS-
'ICES OF THE
.TMEJT OF 001~


MERCE WI~SH TO EKTEND THE
SNI'S GREETINGS TO ALL FIRM
CIESs ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIV
THE SOUTHEASTERN REGION. MAY YO
BB A JOYOUS ONE AND THE YEAR 19a1
THE FULLEST SKARE OF PROSPERITY AND
HOPE THAT YOU
er- WILL KEEP US
od IN MIND WHEN"
e ESVE WE CAN BB
OF ANY SERVICE


I-:~T~(;C~i~.~T~i~i~?J~L~~c?~~ci :r- .its ~C:,~x: ; -;;






PAGE 4


GOVERNMENT PURCHASES IN SOUTHEAST

Goods and services valued at Jbks318,699 were sold by
Southeastern firms to the Federal Government during the
last half of November, according to weekly lists of
contract awards made available to all business firms by
the U. S. Department of Commerce in cooperation with
the Department of Defense, General Services Administra-
tion and some $s000 local Chambers of Commerce, State
agencies and trade organizations,
These lists, along with daily synopses of
goods and services for which the Government
is in the market, are available without
charge. Ask your local Chamber of Commerce.
Some of the larger purchases included 712,800 paired
of winter underwear given in six contracts awarded to
firms in Knorvilles Tenn.s Winston-Salem, N, C.s and
Chattanooga, Tenn., totalling $2,523,116; tractors,
trailers and scrapers, bought from a Flora, Miss., firm
for $313,563; lr00,000 khaki trousers, purchased from a
Nashville, Tenn., concern for $337s960) 290,000 kh~aki
trousers sold by a Greensboro, N. C.s firm for $b207s290;
and 150,000 khakis trousers, purchased from a Johnson
City, Tenn., firm for $3123,000*
Other purchases included southern pine lumber, woolen
caps, coal, cotton sheets, plywood, wash cloths towel-
ings and squaring shears all bought by the Government
from firms in North Carolina, Alabama, M~ississippi and
Tennessee .


(To Obtain Copies Of This Material, Check It In The
SaeProvided And Send This Page Of The Bulletin Of
Commerce To The Nearest Department Of Commerce Field
Office. Your Name And Address Are Shown Be~l~ow. Make
Remittances For Sales Material Payable To Treasurer
Of Te UitedStaes.Itpais Not Priced Are Free.)

ef National Production Anthority:
SOrder W10 GI rder Kll Gr~der M-12
SOrder M- 13 Order M-16 Order M-1S
SDefense Pr dcion Aid No. r 1 Defense
Production Aid No. 2 nDefense Production Aid
No. 3 / Defense Proauction Aid No. &
Confectionery Sales & Distribution.............60
Priorities in the Action Program.............364
Compendium of City Government Finances in 1969.hod
Canned Food Report for November 1, 1950...........
Report on Cotton Ginning prior to Nov. 16.........
Gross Changes in the Labor Force, Sept.-Oct.1950..
Population of Alaska,Hawaii & Puerto Rlco(PC-11#)
Causes of Customer Complaints (SBA#(227)...........
Wage Incentives Will Help Reduce Costs (SBA#229)..
Suggestions for Successful Millinery Retailing(#230)
Service Provides Information on Prospective
Employees (#231).....................
Informative Labels Do a Job (#232).r................
Retail Grocery Delivery......(#23lr)..............
Safety Rules for Painters & Decorators (#239)......


The Federal Government again this year is offering; five booklets and pampihlets
to help Southeasterners in their annual income tax problems. On top of the list,
of course, is the nations best seller, nYour Federal Income Tarc,n which again
has been revised to include some amending done by Congress at its last session.
Second in importance is the popular nBulletin F, Income Tax Depreciationl Also
available are several pamphlets designed to help the small businessman.
Following is the list. (Please indicate your choice with an upX and accompany
your order with the proper remittance, unless the document is free.)
LZ Your Federal Income Tax 1990......................................2
L Bulletin F, Inc~ome Tax Depre ciation******************** ..............,... 2Sd
Your Rights o~fR!iwtJevi~ew Whmen theGvrm Questions Your Income Tax
Return................,**.. .......,.......10#lo
The Small Businessman and His Declaration of Estimated Tax...........,.Free
~How An Unincorporated Business M~ay Use An Operatin Ls Oti


A Refund On Previous Yearsl Taxes....... .........,...Free


tro 8)-100281


I i

d



O


ge


BC-6 -JP~


il-r
:=li_,--tiih.U,... .: -;'
---- ---- I-- ----------- ----- ^1-


UNIVERSITY 0or eunive

BULLETIS1111IR~lllm~lllliI
ORDER~~~~ BL2fK FOR4 PULCAINS&REOT


PENALTY FOR~ PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
UNIV. O)F FL UBI.





U.S. DEPOsiTORY


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

VJolumne Irl Number 2LI December 1SJ 1950

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIICS
ChKIMP.SVILtEr FOI'ilDA





RETAIL SALES CONTINUE ADVANCE

Trends in U.S.Saleasct.1990 From Oct.19L9
All except one of


HIIGBIGHIifTS OF THIE BUSINESS WORL

(For Further Details Of A Of These Items Ask The
Neare ol M T DealEmn o m;ere: 01'HcaL~coro
Coie 6 Tre Releases) "" "


U. S. exports of cotton cloth in September totalled
50,959,000 square yards, an increase of 5 326,000 yards
Over those in August but a decline of 19, 25,000 yards
from the shipments in September 191r9. Larger figure
than in August were recorded mainly for Ouba, Indonesia,
Venezuela, Costa Rica and Colombia while somewhat smaller
figures were recorded sudzdly for the Philippine Republic
and Canada.
4 MMMM
More than 27,000 students studied small business man-
agement techniques in American universities and colleges
in 1949-90, according to a Department of Comrmerce survey.
A total of 220 separate on-campus courses was offered by
147 institutions, indicating a more than S0-per cent
increase in course offerings in 1950-51.
+ wee
Employment nationally dropped between October and
November as harvesting operations entered a final stage.
Estimated at 61,271,000 in the week ending November 11,
total civilian employment was half a million under the
October level. A rise of half a million in nonagricultural
employment was more than offset by a decline in farm
employment of approximately 1 million.
asa wa
Manufacturers sales, orders and inventories increased
from September to October. Sales were up 1 per cent over
the previous month after seasonal adjustment, and were
more than 25 per cent larger than last October. Small
gains were general among the durable-goods industries.
The largest increase, amounting to 7 per cent, was report- L
ed by the general machinery industry other than electrical.
aaa we
Nonresidential building expanded in November partially
offsetting a decline in homebuilding to hold total con-
struction activity at a record level for this season of
the year. The total value of all types of new construction
put in place during November amounted to more than $2 1-2
billion, off by 8 per cent from October 1950s but 23 per
cent above the total for November 1969.
sw
Centralization of administration of transportation ac-
tivities in the Department of Commerce was announced by
Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer. An~ order was issued
delegating additional responsibilities to the Under Secre-
tary for Transportation, Major General Philip B. Flsning,
sad establishing a Transportation Council within the De-
partment with the Under Secretary as chairman.

One hundred and forty-four additional U. S. government.
ownled patent applications have been made available for
foreign filing, the Office of Technical Services, U. S.
Department of Commerce, announced. The applications are
the eighth group to be released in accordance with executive
orders of the President.

Shipments of kn~it cotton and wool underwear and night.
rear amounted to 338 million dollars during September, 3
per cent under August's level of 36.9 million dollars, the
Buresa~ of the Census announced. Yarn consumption dropped
) per cent from August to September, with a 3 per cent in-
:rease in the quantity of purchased knit fabric consumed.

beCotton waste expre a nm India under contracts aod a
tax instead of the 50 per cent ad valorem tar recently asp-
nounced by the Indian Government.


"MF reas in
LUNER AND MUILDING MATERIALS DEALERS
zo -t--L-/ RAD MSHISEOUIPPUAACeE OME -
20- HARDI*RESTOR5 _.
20 f / YTDWEVICEM RA R T



emrawrrsoasra
Source: Bureau of the Census


increases in retail sales in independent stores in
hctober of this year over the same month last year,
and in all but two, corresponding gains were recorded
for the first 10 months of 1950 over the same period
last year, according to the current report of the
Bureau of the Census,
At the sam~e time, however, the survey revealed that
evidently the scare buyingn which developed over the
international situation early in the summer was taper.
ing off in October since sales in that month were low-
er in all but three of the sections contributing to
the report.

Ask the nearest Department o~f Commerce
office to place your name at the mailing
list to receive these reports, specifying
the State or Region ia which you are in.
terested. There is no charge for them,

Detober sales increases over the same month last
year included 18 per cent in Birminghan; 26 per cent
in Clarksdale, MLiss; 19 per cent in Augutsta; 16 per
oent in Biloxi; 12 per cent in Atlanta.; 11 per cent
in Columbus and 10 per cent in Gulfport and Johnson
City, Tenn,
En adueulative sales for the first 10 month period of
1950, Bjirminghan nurked up a 20 per cent rise; Bilari
25 per cent; Johnson City, 17 per cent; Augusta, 26
per cent; Columbuss 23 per cent; Atlanta and Gulfport,
19 per cent; Savannah, 16 per cent; and Kingaport and
Macon, 16 per cent.
The increases in the various cities and areas in
the Southeast compared with a 9 per cent climb for the
nation in October 1950 over October 191r9s and a 10
per cent gain in cumulative sales for the 10-month per-
iod,

COTTON WASTE EXPORTS OUTLINED

Reporters of hard and soft cotton wastes in the
Southeast have been given a new ruling by the Office
of International Trade, U. S. Department of Commerce
under which exports of those commodities may be made
in the immediate future,
Announcing that an allocation of 15 million pounds
of soft waste had been established for export for the
period of December 1, 1950 to March 31, 195'1, the
OIT announcement said applications for licenses to
export reasonable amounton of hard waste, consisting
of yarns and threads, including wipings, will be con-
aidered until March 31, 1951.
No single exporter will be a~uthorized to ship more
than 60 000 poundplofasofs nastefiledall destinations

not approved will be returned immediately. New appli-
orations to export soft wastes should not be submitted
until new procedures and policies are issued.


es~i and( a-
the South-

which the

the 098-
sus con-
ducts
monthly
surveys
reported


BULLETIN( OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





A total of $6S2.3 million has been apportioned by the
Federal Government to be spent beginning next July in
imp~roving the system of highways in the Southeasts the
Bureau of Public Roadas U. S. Department of Comnerce,
has announced*
The funds, part of a $$00 million apportionment of
$500 million authorized by Congress as Federal aid for
Sthe Statesl highways has been set aside for disburse-
ment in Alabamas Florida, Georgia, MiLssissippis North
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee beginning July ls
S1991 and continuing until June 30s 1954.

lIf you have not already done so, get your
copy of Priorities in the Action ora
based upon hereport of hePresidentes
highway Safety Conrference. Itls available
at all Conmmerce Department offices for 3{.

Of the total allowed, $24.6 million will be expended
on the Federal-aid highway system; $19.3 million on
secondary or feeder roads; ~and the balance of $8.3 meil-
lion on urban highway*
The apportionment, aulthorized in the Federal-aid
Klighway Act approved September 7, 1960s was based upon
Tentative population figures for rural and urban popa-
lation for each State just announced by the Bureau of
the Census. The remainder of some $b100 million between
that apportioned and the amount enthorised will be used
in making appropriate adjustments after final urban and
rural population figures are made known. The remainder
to be apportioned will increase by about one-fourth the
aamounts just alloted to the different States.
In the Southeast, the totals apportioned included
Alabama, $b7,928,501; Florida, $6,310,6L7; Georgias J09s-
12~2,633; MiSssissippi, $6s383,s89; Nor~th Carolina, $9,-
600s?09; South Carolina, $6,022s302; and Tennessees "
160,966*

BU~SINESS Continued fran Page 1

Where capparable figures were available, the gains
in many instances exceeded the increases shout for the
United States as a whole. Following, briefly, were the
trends for the region as a whole in the various major
segments of the areas economy:
Bank deposits in Federal Reserve member banks, uP
7.1 per cent and loans, 24.4 per cent. Debits in all
seven States, up 16.3 per cent*
Retail sales increased in 22 of the 23 cities and
areas in which the Census Bureau conducts survey*
Wholesale trade, up 16r per cent in the South Atlantic
region and 11 per ceh~t in the East South Central*
Department store trade advanced in 26 of 28 cities
surveyed*
New business incorporations, up 12.8 per cent*
Telephones in operations business phones up 9.6 per
cent and residential telephones, 9.7 per cent*
Wage and salary workers in manufacturing industries,
gain of L.6 per cent in average number employed monthly.
New urban building, up 90 per cent in the first eight
months of the year.
Railway freight revenue, up 8.3 per cent.
Airline passenger revenue, up 13 per cent, express
handled, 28.2 per cent, freight ton miles flown lrgg
Super cent.
Electric energy, up 11.7 per cent.
Cotton consumption, up 25 per cents production ~of
. southern pine, 13 per cent, shipments of southern pine,
14 per cent.
Cash receipts from farm marketing, down 16 per cent.
Railway passenger revenues down 11.3 per cent.
Production of gun turpentine, downward trend.


lam Cotinue frm Pge
appointed Director of NPBss Compliance Division.
Copp~er,Co~pper Base Alloys
Rules for accepting and scheuling rate defense
orders for copper and copper-base alloys are issuled.
(Order M 11). Second order is issued (M-12) designed to
provide necessary supplies of copper and its products
for the defense effort and to maintain equitable dis-
tribution after defense orders are met.

Copies of the following Defense Production
Aids, issued by NPA's Offic~e -of ~;SmallBu
ness, are available without charge from any
Department of Comrmerce field office:
No. 1 Keening Records Needed Under Poe-

No. 2 How to Sell to the Government
No. 3 Technical Aids for Factories, Metal-
worin Plnt -I2& MachineShs


Leather
leather Industry Adi~s~ory omittee meets with NPA
to discuss a proposed order providing equiitable distri-
bution of defense orders among producers of that product.
Electronics
it'A orders two elec'fric manufacturing firms to deliver
12,000 electronic tubes for use by civil air carriers.
Steel
NPA announces revisi2EE Inl its !'lead time' provisions
covering handling by steel producers and warehouses of
defense orders in ammadments to orders M-1- and E-6 pro-
viding for more efficient production schedules.
Aluminum
Order M-7 is issued in ananded fornn providing for less
abrupt changes in January and February 1951 in non-
defense consumption of aluminura.
Nickel
Plan is announced to assue supplies of pringr nickel
for the expanding rearmament programs and to provide for
equitable distribution of the remaining quantities for
non-defense uses in NPA Or~der M 16.
Zine
Order M-19 is issued providing for supplies of shec
for the nations defense program and ~outlining a method
of distribution to meet non-defense needs an an equitable
basis,
Rayon Yarn
Order M 1 providing for an equitable distribution of
defense orders among producers of high tenacity rsayon yarn
is issued. It provides that producers need not accept a
rated order received less than 30 days prior to the first
day of the month in which shipment is requested and that
no producer need accept rated orders for any mod21 in ex-
cess of 10 per cent of his scheduled production.

GANDY BAR MOST POPULAR

The candy bar amcelled in popularity among the conr-
fectionery-loving public of the Southeast last year, and
as a result more than 61 per cent of all types of candy
sold by manufacturers in the region was that type of
product, according to a report just issued by the De~part-
ment of Co~mmerce entitled Confectionery Sales & Distribu-
May1949.

This publication is available ab all De-
partment of Comrmerce offices for L04.
Value of all confectionery products sold last year by
mauacturers in the region was placed at $b11sA49s000.


1951 HIGHWAY FUNDS APPORTIONED


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE