Bulletin of commerce

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Material Information

Title:
Bulletin of commerce
Uniform Title:
Bulletin of commerce (Atlanta, Ga.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Commerce
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Field Service, Atlanta Regional Office
Place of Publication:
Atlanta, Ga
Creation Date:
1949
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Mar. 11, 1947)-v. 8, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1954).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 7, no. 2 (Jan. 15, 1953) misnumbered as v. 7, no. 26 (Jan. 15, 1953).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 3, no. 13 (July 1, 1949) misnumbered as v. 1, no. 13 (July 1, 1949).
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004850614
oclc - 28680692
System ID:
AA00005235:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



UJNillEDI SilAnTlEl DElpwARilTMiErill CF C.'CIA/UVElitl
FIELD SERVICE









AiTLATA 3, 6A. SAVAAHAM, GL JACK(SDIVILLE, FLA. MlIZI 82. FLA HOBILE, ALA CHARLESTON, S.C.
601 Whitehall St., S.L, Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 4)25 Federal Bldg., 94)7 Seybold Aldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tl~lut 1)121 X-4563 Tel. >4765 Tel. 4)-71II Tel. 9-7633 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



Vol. 3 No. 6 MARCH 15 1949


SOUTI4'S BRICK OtJTPUT UP

The South last
~PRfODUCTIOR year produced j9
4 ~ ~ ~ ~ UNLZDBIK per cent of the
(malllsons of standard balck) nation' s output
ye son of unglazed brick
,r I iand 47 per cent
of the unglazed
**---ro ---- **tructural tile
for construction
usol Iam purposes, accord-
ing to Bureau of
I I':. 1the Census fig-
Wassgistsumalamxt. ures contained in
rw Jinsa synon u J-I osess~ a Facts For In-
': my a 21 ustry Repor on
iJerrR.FI ;-- ':o ?s.UmmWCTElremou the production ~
an bpment of Glay Construction Products.
Also, 54 Per cent of the South's output of
brick was manufactured in the South Atlantic
area, the survey shows.

The Facts For Industry Reports
are issued for a large number of
r _, industries. See your nearest De-
partment of Commerce office for
the report applicable to the in-
dustry in which you are interested,
In the South Atlantic, East South Central
and West South Central regions a total of 2.3
billion unglazed brick were manufactured in
1948, including 1.2 billion in the South At-
lantic. Shipments in the three regions aggre-
gated 2.2 billion, of which 1.2 billion were
sent to market from the South Atlantic, and
value of all shipments from the South approxi-
mated $45,480,000, including $27,190,000 in
the South Atlantic.
In the United States as a whole, production
of unglazed brick last year totalled 5.8 bil-
lion; shipments ~5.7 billion; and value of
shipments, $13~4,608,000.
In the production and shipment of unglazed
structural tile last year totels fore the -
South were: Production,0269on;hi-
ments, 60),256 tone; and value of shipments,
$5,458,ooo. In the output of vitrified olay
sewer pipe, production in the South last year
was about 19 per cent of that for the nation,
totalling 280,651 short tone.


NALTIC)NALL HOBBY 14EEK

National Hobby Week
will be observed Mar.
O 20 to 26, according to
the Department of Com-
merce publication
"Special Days, Weeks
and Months in 1242,;
and the Federal Govern-
ment is offering for
nhobbyiste< of the
South no end of in-
-_ teresting literature.
6E As most everyone
knows, many "hobbies"
o today become the businesses of tomorrow,
Important developments in aviation, electronics
and other industries have come from the brain
of persons who have devoted their time and
energies to some kind of activities followed
for the diversion and recreational benefits
involved.


Ask your nearest Departm~ent of
Commerce for the folder entitled
__ "What la Your Hobby?" which lists
Selected U. S. Government publi-
cations on favorite recreational
pursuit. It is available Rratie.
Here are some of the publications for the
hobby fan published by the Federal Government,
with price of each.
lutainPhotorp ,f Volume 1, 478 pages, with il-
lustatios, .00, And Volume 2, 423 pages,
with illustrations, 754.
A _Description of U. 9. Postage Stam28, 1847-
194f, 163 pages, S .
Fish and Shellfish of South Atlantic and
Gulf Coaste~j, 45 pages, loF.~
Hand, Measuin and Powr~ Toole, 121 pages,
Camp Stoves and Fireplaces, 89 p ges, Bo#.
Make It Of Leather, 31 pages, 15 .
Useful and~ Ornamental Gourds, 13 pages, 5 .
Handbook ok for Reoreation Leaders, 121 pages,
25 .
Mechanical Practice, 82 pages, 15f .aes
CompaLRative Ruesofe Road,24pes
454. ---
(Continued on Page 2)







__


ISEAS LLYAOJUSTED,13 9*100 1 in re ai
so ales in Jan-
nary from
no ---- -- the same
200--- --month last
year were
.so ------l registered
.m94 ..* for nearly
half of the
twenty-three cities and areas in which Bureau
of the Censue surveyed are conducted.
Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Ga., Macon,
Savannah, Asheville, Biloxi, Gulfport, Manatee
and Sarasota counties, Florida; DeKalb, Fulton
and Rookdale counties, Georgia; Buncombe and
Madison counties, North Carolina; and Harrison
and Stone counties, Mississippi, reported de-
clines ranging from 2 per cent in Augusta to
22 per cent in Biloxi.

Monthly Retail Trade Reports for
the South Atlantic, East South Cen-
e-- tral and all other areas in the
nation, and also for the United
States for January 1949 are now a-
vailable at Department of Commerce
field offices gratis.

On the other hand, Birmingham, Greenwood,
S. C., Clarkedale, Miss., Bristol, Johnson
City and Kingaport, Tenn., Bleckley and Twiggs
counties, Georgia; Coahoma and quitman counties
Mississippi; Jefferson county, Alabama; and
Sullivan, Unicoi and Washington counties, Tenn-
essee, experienced increases in sales ranging
from 1 per cent in Bleckley and Twiggs counties
Georgia to 24 per cent in Coahoma and Quitman
counties Missiastrol.
The report, based on a survey of sales among
independent retail establishments, listed the
following percentage decreases for those cities
and areas in which declines were recorded:
Atlanta, Asheville, Kingaport and Buncom ,e
and Madison counties, 4; Augusta, 2; Columbus
and Macon, 7; Savannah, 14; Manatee and Sara-
sota counties, 8; Gulfport and Degalb, Fulton
and Rockdale counties, 3; Biloxi, 22; and Har-
rison and Stone counties, 9.
Increases in sales, in percentages, were re-
ported for the following:
Greenwood and Bristol, 15; Clarkedale, 20;
Johnson City, 8; Kingsport, 4; Bleckley and
Twiggs counties, 1; greenwood and MoCormick
counties, 16; Jefferson county, 2; Coahoma and
Quitman counties, 24; and Sullivan, Unical and
Washington counties, 8.
Seasonal decreases in January compared with
December were recorded for all points. These
went from 15 per cent in Bleckley and Twiggs
counties to as high as 51 per cent in Macon.

United States Trade With European Re-
coIEEZ Program Countries is the title of
an eight-page summary of export and im-
port trade between the U. 8. and ERP-
participating countries Just issued by
the Department of Commerce. Price 200.


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreointed.

What Is Your Hobby? (From Page 1)

Establishing and 0 rating a Small WRoodwork.
ing Shop, 44 pages, 1 #. ~"""
American Battle Art, 1755-1918, 319 p. $5.
Realm of Flight, E~ p. 6O#.
Path of Flight, 3p O.
Facts of Flight, P1 P. 504.
Terrain Flying, 82 p. 25 .
You Can Make It Series, Vole. 1, 2 and 3,
45e per set.
Elements of Map ProJections, 226 p. $1.25.
Cartography, 85p. Al.
Forestry for 4-H Clubs 50 p. 10#.
Projectionist Manual, 60 p. 25 .
Techniques of Fish Pond Management, 22 p.10
Aunt Sammyls Radio Recipes, 142p. jO#.
Babeary Ware, Personnel and Ships, 86p.
$1.50.
U. S. Government Printing Office Style Man-
ual, 2 3 p. BO.
Rural Handicrafts in the U. 8, 40 o. 200.
Frist Watches, Pooke-t Wathes, Stop Watches
and Clocks, 222 p.50gy -
toodwrorking and Furniture Re air, 139 p.500.
Unarmed Defense for the American Soldier,
315 p. bop.
Savory Herbs, Culture and Use, 33 p. 100.

SOLTTHERN CANCPY SALES C)FF
Southeasternere lost a lot of their sweet
tooth in 1948 Judging from Bureau of the Cenous
figures on wholesale candy product sales,
The figures showed that In the Carolinae,
Virginias, Maryland and Dietriot of Columbia
wrholesale sale of candy products dropped 6
per cent last year from 1947; 12 per cent in
Georgia and Florida; and 18 per cent in Ken-
tucky, Tennessee, Alabama and Missiasippi.

Note: This report is entitled
Confectionery and Competitive
g--p Chocolate Products Manufactureral
Sales, December 1948, and is avail-
able gratin at all Department of
Commerce offices.

Sharp drop in sales in the three areas in
December 1948 compared with December 1947 con.
tribute materially to the years overall de.
cline. In the upper Atlantio seaboard area the
decrease was 9 per cent; in Georgia and Florida
21 per cent; and in Alabama, Missiesippi, Tenn-
easee and Kentucky. 22 per cent.
Dollar sales during 1948 in Georgia and
Florida outstripped those recorded by the other
States, the report shows. Twrelve firms partici-
pating in the Georgia-Florida panel sold ap.
proximately $13,001,000 worth of products.


SOFOreas8


DEPARTMENT STORE SALES AND STOCKS


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2


RETAIL SALES FALL






BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


SOUTH BIG PULPWOOD USER

Forty-five per cent of the pulpwood used in
the nation last year in the manufacture of
paper and paper products was consumed in the
South, according to Bureau of the Gensue fig-
ures included in the Facts For Industry Report
on Pulp and Pa er ManGY E~urein the United
States for December 1949.Fg~
The south's consumption totalled 9,566,000
cords compared with a total of 21,208,000
cords consumed in the country as a whole*
Also, 44 per cent of the 22,g16,000 cords
of pulpwood received at mills through the
nation was represented in receipts of 9,718,000
cords received at southern mille*
In the South, total consumption of pulpwood ~
last year was 13 per cent greater than the 8,-
419,000 cords used in 1947, and the national
consumption was 7 per cent above that for the
previous year*
In receipts of pulpwood at mills in the
South, the 1948 total was 17 per cent more
than the 8,264,000 cords received in 194 and
for the nation as a whole receipts in 19 8 were
8 per cent lar er than the 20,645,000 cords
received in 19 7*
In the past ten years, consumption of pulp-


United States in 1939, consumption in the
Both totalled 4.2 million cords compared with
last years 9.5 million cords. The 1939 con"
Uu pedo Swas 85 per cent of that used in the
United ~ Stts


(List the Material in the Space Below and
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Field
Office of the Department of Commerce*
Your Name and Address Are On The Opposite
























(On Salse Publications, Make Remittances
Payable to Treasurer of the U. S.)


PAGE 3


Sep


B U


The gross national product in 1948 was $255
billion, 10 per cent above 1947. In 1948 con-
sumers and foreign customers bought a smaller
share of the total than in 1947. Private dom-
estic investment plue government purchases,
whose shar e increased, became the thief dynamic
factors in business expansion.
-o-
January sales at retail stores amounted to
89.5 billion. On a daily average basis they
were 1 per cent above January 1 48, but wi~thun
one less trading day than in 19 8 the total
was 2 per cent less than a year ago.
-o-
Manufacturers' sales declined slightly more
than seasonally during January. Inventory book
values increased about $400 million, of which


bheltotalova uebofloalebel\ Januarec mbe 17 1
gregate.
-o-
Prices of containers and packages are ex-
pected to remain fairly stable in the first
half of 1949, but some price reductions are
foreseen during the remaining half, according
to the quarterly Containers and Packaging In-
dustry Report just issued. The consensus among
users and manufacturetheiandhat a buyer's mar-

-o-
Approval by the Steel Products Advisory
Committee of a proposed voluntary plan to pro-
vide approximately 32,347 tons of steel prod-
uots monthly, May through September 1949, for
requirements of the Economic Gooperation Ad-
ministration was announced.Announcement was
also made that 50,400 tons of steel products.
will be provided for the manufacture of farm-
type grain storage bine.
-0-
Wholesale distributors' end-of-year (1948)
stocks of 33 canned food items (15 vegetables,
12 fruits, and 6 fruit juices), including those
in warehouses of retail food chains, were lower
generally in December than those reported on
hand a year ago.
-o-
Establishment of a Wholesale Trade Advisory
Committee to confer with the Department of
Commerce on needs of the wholesale trade for
government services, statistics and research
programs was announced by Secretary of Commerce
Charles Sawyer. An initial panel of 12 repree-
entatives of different wholesale trades was
appointed to the advisory body.
-o-
Chain store and mail-order sales in January
, ereu bsmte dat 8gr9ubillionmaAll of tthenn
durables recorded more-than-seasonal declines.


0 R
Use This Coupon
In This Issue


D ER BLAN K
For Ordering Material Listed
Of The Bulletin of Commerce

































































BULLETIN OF COMMERCE-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY.
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOUl WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PAGE 4


INeUIRY REFERENCE SERVICE
Wool and Wool Manufactures Basio Informa-
tion ~S6urc~ies
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY

Superphosphate December 1948.
Paint, Yarnish Lacquer &r Filler Dec.1948.
ftnit Underwer &Nihter -l Novemlber 1948.
Heafein Co~hn Balnn AEeo 19 8.
Lumber Pro utilon in the Western States and
Alaska
Veneer Mills
Tires anl ~i~fner Tubes
Paper Bage
Cacy Refraiictories
Scal[es and Balances
Morticiansi Goode
Hard-Surface,"F'I or'o Coverings
Rubber Footwear Industry
Sorewr-Machine Products
Piano, Orgggns, and Piano and Orggg Parts
and Materiale
Wallpaper
Cooperate Stock Mills
PottergProducts, Not Elsewrhere Classified
Wet-Process Corn Milling
Rubber Indusfflia, Not Elsewrhere Classified
Papean Bar
Ranand Broad Woven Goods
U-mbrells Parasole, and Canes
Hydraulic Cement
Chocolate anRbaocoa Products


MISCELLANEOUS

Postwar Patterne of Chain and Independent
Store Sales Reprin?"-from Survrey of Current
Business,
Temperatures in a Test Bungalow With Some
Radiant and JaktdSaeHeaters Issued
by Natio 1l Bureau of Standards. 254.
Standard Samples Issued or in Preparation
By the National Bureau of Standards.
Standards for Checking the Calibration of
otrophotomelre An NBS publTcation.
blications of the National Bureau of
Standards.
Third Annual Report of the Federal Airport
Aot Prepared by the Civil Aeronautics Ad-
ministration.
Microbiological Deterioration of Organic
Materials: Its Preventin n dMeethods of Test -
Issued by the Bureau of Standards. 25 .
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS PUBLICATIONS

Trends in the Electrical Goods, Drug, Dry
GCoods, Jewfelry and Tobacco Trades, for Decem-
ber 1948 (eparate Reports).
Marital Status. Number of Times Married
and Du~raon of Present Marital Status: April
19 8. -
Revenue and Expenditure of Selected States
in F1 48.
Cotton and Linters Consumption, Stocks, Im-
ports and Exports, and Active cotton Spindles,
January 1949 and 19 E. .
INDUSTRY REPORTS

Chemicals and Drugs Sub. price $2.50 year.
Canned Fruits and Vegetables $1 yearly.



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office r 0
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS (b
PERMIT NO. 1009


The Emerging Peacetime Economy is
the title of a comprehensive article
on the economy of the nation carried
in the February 1949 issue of the
Survey of Current Business now avail-
able at Department of Commerce field
offices. The article has been in de-
mand all over the nation, and several
thousand extra copies of the publica-
tion have been issued. Price for the
issue, 30 ; subscription price $3.



s- ortr-~ AVOfD
PAY AGE r300



)gPO f


EC-6-Jr


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEFAnfZfENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


I ii ll1111llilliill 1 111 1111lilill III 1111111


BULLET





















AUTLAT 3, 6A. 3AVAIMM, GA, JACK(SOAVILE, FLA. nIMI 32. FLA. MoBILE, L. ruCHRLESTON, s.C.
60 tIhitehall St., tr.5 SAm 218, P.O. Bldg.. 426 Federal Bldg., 947I Seyold Adg., 308 Federal Bidg., 310 Peopies Bldg.,
Tel. MYlmet 4821 X-r)53 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. p-71II Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



VOL.3 No. 7 APRIL I, 1949


(1939MYONTRYAI VERGE=1W)
XI ,,a "



too' '""


SOUTHEASTERN ECONOMY UP

-7Southeastern business rang
the oneh registers in 1948 as
general business activity in
the region reached a new high,
but in many divisions of the
economy the gains in 1948 over
1947 did not equal those of previous post-war
periods.
This is shown in the annual summary of bus-
iness conditions in the Southeast issued by
the Regional Office of the U, 8. Department of
Commerce in Atlanta,

Copies of this report will
shortly be available at field of- .
fices of the Department of Commerce
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and
South Carolina,

The summary reflects the following compari-
sons of business activity in 1948 in the
States of Alabama, Florida, G~eorg~ia, Mississ-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinae with that of
1947:
Bank debits increased by $5 billion, going
from approximately $50 billion to $55 billion.
Retail trade advanced from 1 to 12 per cent
in thirteen cities and nine areas.
Department store sales were up from 2 to 22
per cent in twenty-four major cities.
Wholesale sales increased 6 per cent paced
by sharp advances in furniture and house furn-
ishings, up 31 per cent; electrical goods,
from 12 to 19 per cent greater; and hardware,
which gained from 8 to 12 per cent.
Farmers received some $150 million more in
cash receipts from marketing, and employment
in manufacturing industries among wage and
salary workers added a monthly average of 54,-
000 more to the payroll.
New construction activity represented an
expenditure of 11 per cent more in urban areas,
and 13 per cent more electric power was gener-
ated for consumers.
Residential telephones increased 18 per cent
and business telephones 7 per cent. Freight
revenue advanced 13 per cent. Passenger rev-
enue declined slightly.
Most lines of industry included in the re-
port showed nominal progress.


FIELD SERVICE


r : I-1 ii;,


non 1


.I


IXD


IV


Sharp de -
ClineSs in whole-

such commodit-
ieB Rs Sutomo-
tive supplies,
apparel, dry
goods and some
foods brought
overall sales
among south-
eaesern dealer
down from 8 to
10 per cent in


DRUG WHOLESAllRS
SALES AND INVENTORIES
(Excludes Liquor)


_,wm __,,_ __mn ___r11( JL 11 Jr5OI January compared
with the same
month last year, sooording to a Bureau of the
Gensue survey. The decreases included 8 per
cent in the South Atlantic area and 10 per
oent in the East South Central region.
Greatest drops were in the dry goode indust-
ry where sales of South Atlantio wholesalers
were off 26 per cent, and those in the East
South Central section 23 per cent. Sale in
automotive supplies were reduced 14l and 19
per cent, respectively.
The January decrease in sales wse general,
proportionate declines being registered in all
areas of the country, ranging from 5 per cent
in the New England and West South Central see-
tions to 11 per cent in the West North Centrol,
The average for the nation as a whole wras 8
per cent.
In the South Atlantic region, 385 firms re-
ported dollar sales approximating $44C1,425,ooo
in January of this year and 399 firms in the
same section had dollar sales of $I50,411,000
in the same month last year. In the East South
Central, sales of 156 firms in January 1949
totalled approximately $19,404,000 compared
with $24,335,000 worth of goods sold by 169
firms in the same area in January 1948.
Only furniture and house furnishings, Jew9-
elry, drug store supplies, and some lines of
groceries were on the "plus sideH in the South
Atlantic in January 1949 compared with the
corresponding month a year ago. Otherwise,
decreases were reflected in all lines. In the
East South Central, increases were registered
Only for beer, confectionery and tobacco.


WHOLESALE SALES DOWN







__


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreciated.

IA4PROVED SAWVMILL MC)TORS
Economical power for small sawmills through
the use of two standard automobile engines is
discussed in a report now available from the
United States Department of Commerce,
Development of a dual power plant for port-
able sawmnills was investigated by the Univer-
eity of Kentucky in a research project eponsor-
ed by the Ofiice of Technical Services of the
Department of Commerce as part of its 1947
program to increase Americale technological
productivity through research of broad benefit.
This report, j2 pages, Inolud-
ing drawings and illustratiops,
oan be ordered through the near-
est Department of Corlmerce field
office. Price $.

According to the reports the typical port-
able sawmill, working in forest areas of limpit-
ed growth, requires power slightly greater
than that obtained from the stock automobile
engine. Inadeqaute power results in reduced
capacity, waste of manpower, and much waste of
good lumber. However, stock automobile engines
are used by small sawmilla because they cost
considerably less per horsepower than special-
ly-built industrial engines of higher output.
The report indicates that a satisfactory?
power-plant of higher capacity can be obtained
by mounting two automobile engines one in front
of the other on a suitable frame, both supply-
ing the same layshaft through flexible V-belts
and both controlled and governed simultaneous-
17*
The report is entitled Development of a Dual
Power Plant for Portable Sawimills.- -

E)(PCRT RESTRICTIC)N5 ()FF
Hundreds of southern lumbermen yho export
lumber to foreign countries are affected by an
order laeued by the Office of International
Trade, U. 8, Department of Commhe're, removing
all forest products, except port offord cedar,
from export control to all destihations outside
Europe-and adjacent areas.
The order frees from the positive list of
commodities in short supply enoh products as
millwor~k, hardwood flooring, and logs, bolts
and hown timber of soft wood, other th~an port
orford oedar*
. ormally, exports of lumber products from
the South run into millions of dollars in value
each year, much of which goes to countries
other than Europe and adjacent areas*
Recently, eteps were taken by OIT to remove
from validated license restrictions on similar
destin'ations a number of other softwood products


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


FARM RECElPTS GAIN

Cash receipts from
farm marketinse in the
V Southeast rose 271 per
;oent from 1938 to 1948,
sooording to a report.
iceued by the Bureau of
Agiultural Economies,
U. 8, Department of Ag-
;riculture.
In 1948, farmers of
AlbmFlorida, Miss-
issippi, Georgia, Tenn-
essee and the Carolinae
received an estimated i3.4 billion in oneh for
their products, and in 1938 their revenue from
the same sources approximated $930.5 million.
The gains in the ten-year period ranged
from 222 per cent in Florida to as high as 318
per cent in Alabama. Following were the dollar
and percentage increases by Statse:
Alabama, $104 million to $434.7 million,
318 per cen~t; Tennessee, $126.6 million to
8502.9 million, 297 per cent; Georgia, $137.7
million to $537.6 million, 290 per cent; south
Carolina, 287.4 million to $334.9 million 28)
per cent; Mlissiesippi, $149.8 million to f547.9-
million, 266 per cent; North Carolina, $219.3
million to $759.6 million, 246 per cent; and
Florida, $105.7 million to $340.4 million, 222
per cent,
In 19rc7, oneh receipts to farmers in- the
ease States totalled $3.J billion, or about
$158 million less than 1948.
In five of the Statse, Alabama, Georgia,
Missiesippi, South Carolina and Tennessee, in-
creases were registered in 1948 over 1947. In
Fiorida and North Carolina, alight drop oo-
ourred. The increases included 12 per cenit in
Miselesippi; Alabama, 11 per cent; Tennessee,
6 per cent; Georgia, 5 per cent; and South
Carolina, 3 per cent.
HCIME BUILDERS SiH)W'
The first annual Home Builders
Home Show to be arranged by the
Atlanta Home Builders Association
will be held in the Atlanta City
SAuditorium, April 5 to 14, and
the U. S. Department of Commeroe
has arranged to have an exhibit
at the Show.
The Department of Commeroe ex-
hibit will emphasize the material
available to home owners and home
builders through the Department.
According to the Home Builders
Assoointion of Atlanta, the Show
will afford the home building in-
dustry an opportunity to display
the many products of the entire
home building industry under the
one roof, and the Show itself is
expected to attract thousands of
visitors from Atlanta and surround-
ing area.
The exhibitors and visitors are
invited to visit the Department of
Commerce booth.







BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


SOFT DRINK CENSUS

Southeast engaged in manufacturing soft
drinks and doing a business estimated at
) $128 million, scoooring to a Gensue of
CS anufactures of 1941 report received in
Department of Commerce field offices from
the Bureau of the Census.
The report was one of the early ones
knoluding a State breakdown on data col-
leoted in the 1947 Census of Manufacturee
conducted last year.
The report, compiled for the soft Drink
Industry, shows that the establiEiinte,""
Located i Alabama, Florida, Georgia, His.
sissippi and the Carolinae, employed an
average of 13,436 employees and 6,82)
production workers drawing approximately
$49~ million in salaries and wages. Cost of
the materials, fuel, electricity and con-
tract work involved in operation of the
plants was estimated at $59 million.
In addition to the report on Soft
Drinks, the following other releases on
`iEhE 5 anaus have been received:
MC42A-1 Aircraft
Mdk Y25F-1 Wirework (Not Elsewhere
MC26D-4 Brick & Hollow Tile
MC F- Sporthf fAtlebStoc Goods
MC64-1 .Cgarttes
MC601- Knt Outerwear

MFB- oe &Des ng ons
MC6(D- Fabrio B combination work
Ij Gloves
M B-1 Measuring: & DispnigPms
I ast & Re ed Products
- - Tear Here - -
0 RDER BLAN K
Use This Cou o~n For Ordering Material Listed
InUi Issue Of The Bulletin of omre

(List the Material in the Space Below and
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Field
Office of the Department of Commeroe.
Your Name and Address Are On The Opposite
Side) ~


(On Bales Pub~lications, Make Rtemittances
Payable to Treasurer of the U. 9.)


B uJS I BE\ S If II EN [)S
Total value of world trade in 1948- probably
exceeded 851 billion. While the 1948 estimate
is about 6 per cent greater than the 1947
total of $48 billion, prices in 1948 were ap-
proximately 10 per cent higher than in 1947.
-o-
Elimination of special quota restrictions
on the amount of tin which may be used in the
manufacture of beer and animal food cane was
announced by the Department of Commeroe.
-o-
New construction put in place in February ~
was valued at $1.1 billion, representing a
normal seasonal drop of 9 per cent from Jan-
nary, but 14 per cent above the February 1948
total.
-o-
Sales of independent retailers in February
1949 were 3 per cent below the level of Feb-
ruary 1948, the Geneus Bureau announced. No
change was reported by department or drug
stores, general stores (with food), and dry
goods and general merchandise stores. Dealinee
were reported by eating and drinking places,
Jewelry stores, furniture stores and hardware
stores.
-o-
More building materials were produced in
1948 than during any previous year on record.
On the basis of preliminary totals for the
year, the Department of Commerce Index of
Production for Selected 'Construction? Materials
showed an increase of some 5 per .eent over
1947, the previous record year.
-o-
Total output of goods and services and the
flow of income from their production were run-
ning at a high rate in the first two months of
1949, though there was some easing in the pace
of activity from the postwar peak of the 4th
quart er.
-0-
Inner-tube manufacturers may now use more
natural rubber in the production of popular-
size tubes. Errective immediately, the De-
partment of Commerce has authorized manufact-
urers to make 40 per cent of their 9.00 orose-
aeotion and smaller tube of natural rubber'.
-o-
The Secretary of Commerce and Attorney Gen-
eval of the United States have approved the
continuation through next September of volun-
tary allocation plans making available about
3,130 tone of steel products for maintenance
and repair of anthracite mining and preparation
facilities, and 100,000 tons of pig iron month-
ly oD foundries for the manufacture of cast
irnresidential housing items.
-o-
The Gensue Bureau estimated that 22.4 mil-
lion eaoks of wheat flour were produced in
January, slightly less than the 22.5 million
eacks produced in December, but 7 per cent
lower than for January 1948.






























EASY TO READ INEXPENSIVE

THESE BOOKLETS HAVE HELPED MANY
EMa~ishins and Operatins A Weekly Newspaper~...~.~.............. .15
YourOwn &usiness__..~~~~~~~~ __ 0.15 A Stationerv and Office-Supply Store.. .15
A Metal-Working Shop...~...~.....~... .45 A Retail Feed and Farm-Supply Store- .15
A Shoe-Repair Business...~........~.._ .35 A Mail-Order Business....~.............. .25
A Flower Shop..~........~..~............ .15 A Small Woodworking Shop.~......~..... .15
A Grocery Storp------------------------ .70 A Confectionery and Tobacco Store... J20
A Service Station~:..-------------------- .40 Manufacturins Brick and Tile............. .20
An Automobile-Repair Shop---- ---- .35 A Year-Round Motor Court.............. .30
A Beauty Shop.----------- --- .3o A Paint, Glas, ~and Walipoper Store.~. .15
AB eal Estate and Insurance Brokerase A Trucking Business...................~...~ .20
A Painting and Decorating ContractingA iad rtop--------.. .0
Buinrr..***----- ....~~.~.. .ps A Sportins GoodsStore.......~............ .15
An Electrical Appliance and Radio Shop.35 A JeweIry Store.......------------......... .15
A Retail Bakery ..--------.....~~~............ .35 A Small Print Shop.~...... .....~...... .15
A Hardware Store ...~......~~........... .... .45 A Music Store........._.....~.~......... .. .25
A Retail Shoe Stro re~~................. ... ..a An Automatic Merchandising Business -.15.l
A Variety and General Merchandise Store.50Opotiis rEtalhisNwB
A n Apparel Store---------------.........~ ~ .55 in Aviation.-.. ........ ......_____~ ~~~~~ n 4
A Dry-Cleaning Business----~...... .45 Selecting a Store Location.......~.......... pgo
A Layndry Business.....~~....~. .40 Opportunitie in Selling..............~.~~....9
A Restaurant.......~.~~.~....~~........... .I Retail Policies-----..._.~~.~~~~ --- 2
A Bookkeeping Serice ...~.....~ .15
A Book Store...~~~...~~~~~~.. .1s Use this listing and
check items wanted


3 1262 08748 8218
BULLETIN 01- 4ummLman

INQUIRY REFERENCE SERVICE
Coal Basic Infomatio Sources February
1949i-
Sources of Information on American Firme -
March 1g~949---------
Elements of Selling by Mail MCarch 1949
Sellingz Machinery to the Government 2nd
Edition February 1949


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Monthly WhET ale Trade Report for January
1949
Trends in the Tobacco, Dry Goods, Drug,
Electrical, Glrocery, Jewelry and Wines and
Spirits Trades for January 1949 (Separate
Reports)
Provisional Estimatee of the Population
of the United gtylP~ice, By Monthe: November
Movement of Prisoners in State and Federal
Prisons and Refomnatories: 1947
MIsdkLLANEOUts
Eprt Control & Allocation Powrers 6th
uaery Report by the Secretary of Commerce
35
Metatl-Guttin Band Saws (Hard Edge, Flex-
ible Back) Issued by National Bureau Of
Standards A Recorded Voluntary Recommendatior
of the Trade 100
Aircraft Powerplant Handbook Revision of
Civil Aeronautics Administration Bulletin No.
28 called "Pilot I Powerplant Manual," ita
text book for piloted.
Route Chart 2201, Chicago, Ill., to Gander
Newfounian~d ~- Desind to meet requirements
of high-speed, long-range aircraft operating
at high altitude over North Atlantic Pub-
lished by U. 8. Coast & Geodetic Survey 25
Danger Area Charte Six New Ones Showing
United States by regions over which air navi-
gation is hazardous 54 each.
INDUSTRY REPORTS
Industry Reprt for Leather February
194 Pulished Monthly 600 a year
Industry Report for Pulp, Paper & Board -
Annual Reviewr leaue February 1949 Publish-
ed Monthly $2.25 a year
Construction & Construction Materials -
February 1949 Special Feature State Con-
struction Estimates Monthly Gratis.


UNF7~ 9~~~~B~~ E. ( PRIVATf USE TO AVOID
i~~~~~ FOB':~l ___e'! PO TAGE $300

/ "

U\ I. DE \


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOUl WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.





SOUTHEAST BUILDING RISES
YLIO' Ffo TOTAL expenditures
N,00 CNrosTRucnIon for new pub-
lic building
1.6oo 1 in the Southeast
last year rose
Ipoo 3 J per cent over
1947, according
to the February
soo 1949 issue of
the Construction
0oo 'and. Consetruction
MIaterials Report
o 11 11 llI sil i l lliof the Department
1948 1949 of Commerce.
The report
abowrs that the 1948 monetary outlay for new
public construction in Alabama, Florida, Geor-
gia, Mississi 1i Tennessee and the Carolinas
approximated 848.5 million compared with
$373.5 million in 1947.

Copies of this report are
p__ now available gratis at all
Department of Commerce field
offices.

All of the seven States, except Alabama, re-
flooted increases in the estimated expendit-
ures for new public construction. The gains
included 57 per cent in Mississippi, the high-
est percentage rise in the seven-state area,
50 per cent in Tennessee, and 39 per cent in
Gteorgia. In South Carolina, the increase was
33 per cent; 22 per cent in Florida; and 15
per cent in North Carolina. In Alabama, an
estimated 1.6 per cent decline was indicated.
The new public construction activities in
the seven States last year included an expend-
iture of $116.9 million in nonresidential
building; $197 million on highwrays; $39.9 mil-
lion in aewer and water projects; and $132.7
million in all other new public work.
The report showed that total new construct-
ion in the Southeast as a whole last year, in-
aluding both public and private activities,
totalled an estimated $b3.1 billion, including
82.3 billion in the Atlantic seaboard area,
and $8d32.3 million in the East South Central
section,


MANY CONVENTIONS BILLED
pwards of 600,000 Southeastern busine99
men and their families are expected to
attend more than fiftY conventions and
expositions to be held in April and May in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tenn-
easee and the Carolinas, according to a compil-
ation prepared by the Trade Association Divis-
lon of the Department of Commerce in Washing-
ton,
The gatherings will include eighteen to be
held in Florida, sixteen in Georgia, nine in
Mississippi, five in North Carolina, and nine
in Tennessee. Among the latter will be the
Memphis Cotton Carnival, scheduled to be held
May 8 to 15, and expected to draw an attend-
anoe of half a million persons.
The conventions and expositions will em-
brace many divisions of the business field. In
addition to cotton, they will cover such
products as metals, Jeweiry, textiles, drug,
groceries, banks, and other.

Department of Commerce field
offices now have, or shortly
will have the following reports:
U S. Associations in Wlorld
Taeand Afire 0
STrade Association Opportuni-~
*- ties i~n_ Marketing Researchh 25&
Tae Association Industrial

1949 Handbook and Directory of
4,000 Trade Associations in U. S.
81.50
Last year, an estimated $853 million was
spent by 9,105,000 delegates attending conven-
tions over the nation, the compilation showed.
The report lists 640 conventions, trade shows
and fairs to be held in 148 cities in the
United States from March 1 to June 1 of this
year, with a total expected attendance of more
than 4,744,000 persons.
In the Southeast, Tennessee, because of its
expected attendance at the Memphis Cotton Car-
nival, leads among the States in point of ex-
pected number to meet, and Georgia, with two
big home shows was second. Others were, Flor-
ida, 8,500; Mississippi, 3,985; and North Car-
olina, 1,300.


C /6~2 d"l


!1


ATLMTA 3, BA.
60 Whitehall St., S.L,
Tel. Iflinut 4121 X-463


SAYMMAII, GL JACKSDAVILLE, FLA. MIMI 32, FLA MOBILE, ALA. CHARLESTON, S.C.
Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold $1dg., 308 Federal 81dg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4)-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-364)1 Tel. 7771


3/8


FIELD SERVICE


VOL. 3 NO. 8


APRIL 15, 1949








C~l~


SALES OF RETAIL STORES
muouu M...-n. PO
---


---- **** *********** ***** ***** **


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreointed'

U.S. STATISTICAL MISTODRY
Southern business men, librarians, econo.
aists, teachers, and students will soon
be provided with a statistical summary of
American social and economic development since
1789 when the Bureau of the Ceneue publication
Historical Statistice of the United States,
1/89-1945 comes from the press.
The book will supplement the annual Statia-
tical Abstract of the United Statee, wblE775
76 years has been the orricial set~atistical
yearbook of the United States.
The new book, prepared with the cooperation
of the Social Science Research Council, will
bring together nearly 3,000 statistical time
series of annual data, carried back to 1789
where possible. Fourteen broad subJects will
be covered, including population characterie-
tice; ianigration and naturalization; vital
statistics, health and nutrition; the labor
force, wages, hour and working conditions;
agriculture; land, forestry and fisheries;
mineral and power; construction and housing;
and many others.
This new book reflecting the
economic development of the U.S.
g -o rom 1789 to 1945 will be avail.
able at Department of Commerce
field ofiices. Price $2,50.
The book not only will provide data for in-
mediate use, but will serve as a starting point
and guide to original sources of data for those
wishing greater detail, discussion, or explana-
tion. The text provides definitions of terms
and brief annotation, together with specific
statements of sources. A special appendix con-
tributed by the National Bureau of Economio
Research provides monthly and quarterly figure
similarly carried back in time, for 30 statie-
tical series recognized as useful indicators of
business conditions.
While the volume was planned, assembled, and
edited by the Statistical Abetract staff in the
Gensue Bureau, many other inidividfuals and
agenotee contributed to its preparation. Statia-
ties were provided by virtually all statistical
agencies of government, and private organiza-
tions contributed their own statistics and
advice. private publishers, author, and re.
search organizations gave permission to use
their materials,
Of the time series of annual data, about
one-tenth start before 1820 and give the fig.
ures for enoh year to 1945; more than a fifth
begin before 1860; a third start before 1880;
and half of the 3,000 series start before 1890.
The newr book is expected to prove as popular
as the Statistioal Abstraot, a best seller.


Retail
in in-
deenent ee-
tabilishmenta
in February
rp a Stedean
in most cities
of t~he South-


( I


-,d sa n,


"O '"'


I"" '"'


east in which monthly surveys are conducted by
the Bureau of the Censue.
The gained compared with February a year ago
in percentages included Birmingham, Greenwrood,
S. C., and Kingaport, Tenn., ; Ctlankeale, Au
hiss., 12; Brietol, Tenn., 6 tat,2 u
gueta, 8; and Golumbus .and Maoon, Ga., b.
Four cities reported declines, including 7
per cent in Bilozi; 9 per cent in Johnson
City, Tenn: 5 per cent in savannah; and a per
cent in Asheville.
The average for the nation in February com-
pared with the corresponding month a year ago
was a J per cent decrease.
Sharp fluctuations oame in February sales
compared with January, eight of the fourteen
cities reporting decreasee ranging from one
per cent in Savannah to 17 per cent in Johnson
City. Increases were indicated for five of the
other cities, Birmingham reporting no change,
The gains included Biloxi 5 per cent; gings-
port, 3 per cent; Atlanta, 2 per cent; Colum-
bus, 7 per cent; and Macon, one per cent. The
national average was a 6 per cent drop.
In area surveys, the Census Bureau found a
27 per cent increase in sales in Chilton and
Perry counties, Alabama; 18 per cent in Mlana-
tee and Sarasota counties, florida, and 11 per
cent in Coahoma and Quitman counties, Missies-
ippi in February compared with the same month
last year. On the other hand, Bleakley and
Twiggs counties, G~eorgia, experienced a 10 per
cent decrease, and Harrison and Stone counties
Miselesippi, 5 per cent. Other area recordings
included increases of one per cent in Jefferson
county, Alabase, and 2 per cent in DeKalb,
Fulton and Rockdale counties, Gleorgia, and
Greenwood and Hoc~ormick counties, South Caro-
lina, and a one per cent decrease in Sullivan,
Unicoi and Washington counties, Tennessee.


The U. S. Department of Com-
merce will have an exhibit
at the Southern Machinery
and Metale Exposition, to be
held in the Atlanta City Aud-
itorina, April 26 to 28.
The theme of the Exposition
will be rMeet The Puture."
Exhibitors of many sootions
of the country have reserved
pace, and the exhibits will
embrace the latest develop-
ments for industry, many to
be shown for the first time.
Michael P. Wied1, 267 East
Paces Perry, Atlanta, is in
immediate charge,


1


a


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2


RETAIL SALES INCREASE
















USI


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

DAIRY ANIMALS DECLINE
airy animals on Southeastern farms have
)risen nearly 75 per cent in the past 48
years, but have been steadily deolining
sine 1985.
This is shown in a current report of the
Bureau of Agrioultural Economio, U. 8. Depart-
ment of Agriculture. Among other things, is
revealed that there wras one milk cow and heifer
2 years old and over for every seven persons
in Alabana, Florida, G)eorgia, Mlississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas in 1900, andin
1945 the ratio has increased to one animal to
every six persons. But in 1949, it is estimaat-
ed there willl be only one to every seven per-
80118

Aek the nearest Departeent of
Commence field ofiie for latest
Reports on the agricultural eit.
nation.

The report shows that in 1900 there were
1,515,000 dairy animal on farms of the seven
Southeastern States against a population of
11,379 582. In 1945, the numnber had increased
to 2,87j5,000, but the population likewise had
increased proportionately to 17,745,000 p~er-
sons. This year, it is estimated that 2,634,-
000 cows and heifers for milking are on the
same farms, but the population has picked p
another million and a half, aooording to 194
estimates, now aggregating a total of 19,150,-
000.


Use This Coupon Fo rl)deripg Material Listed


(List the Material in the Space Below and
Retlrn This Coupon to Your Nearest Field
Ofiie of the Department of Commeroe.Your
Name and Address Are On The Other Side)


(On Sales Publications, Make Remittances
Payable To Treasurer of the U. S.)


exports of American goode and services ex-
toeeded imlports by $6.3 billion in 1948, a
sharp decline from the $11.2 billion ex-
cess of exports over iaports in 1947. The de-
oline reflected chiefly increased production
abroad and tighter import control imposed in
foreign countries.
-o-
Februaryr sales of retail stores were $8,-
945,000,000, unchanged from the year-ago level.
After seasonal adjustment, saleh also register-
ed no change from January. Beasonally adjusted
sales of nondurable-goode stores fel'l 2 per-
cent below January, due chiefly to declines in
the apparel and general merchandise groups.
-o-
Bounder conditions in the paper and board
trade appear to be emerging after several
months of adjustment in the supply-demand re-
lationship and a return to prewar business
competition, according to the Pulp, Paper and
Board Industry Report of the Department of Com-
merce for Mbarc~h 1949.
-o-
Amerioan business, exclusive of agriculture
plans to spend )18.3 billion on newr plant and
equipment in 1949g, nearly as auob as it did in
the record-breaking year of 1948, according to
a joint Department of Commeroe and Beourities
and Exchange Commission report. Actual expend-
itures last year for producers capital amount-
ed to $19q.2 billion.
-o-
Chain store and mail-order sales for Feb-
muary are estimated at $1.87 billion, virtually
unchanged from a year ago. After adjusting for
seasonal factore, sales showed a slight decline
from the preceding month. Among the durable
trades, hardware store sale s owed a j per
cent decline in February after seasonal adjust-
ment.
-o-
The upward trend in unemployment noted since
the fall months was halted, at least temporar-
ily in Mlarch. The March estimates, based on the
Gensue Bureauls Current Population, placed
unemployment at j.2 million or practically the
ease level as in February.
-o-
Allocations of steel products under the
voluntary Agreements Progream ill be reduced
by more than 15o,ooo tone monthly effootive in
June for voluntary plans which were in opera-
tion during February, the Office of Industry
Cooperation, U. B. Department of Commeroe, an-
nounced.
-0-
Nurmerous small obanges in Department of Com-
merce tin conservation ordered M-~4) and Ma-81 to
alleviate minor hardehipe among some groups of
tin users and to provide additional market for
"mill sooumulatione" of tinplate are announced.


In This Issue Of The Bulletin Of dommeroe


PAGE 3





I


Pulp Mills Series MC14A-2
Metal Barrels, Drume &e Paile Series
.."od Products Series MC76E-2
Wood Preserving Series MCl30-1
Woolen & Worate Pabries M015B-1
Malt Liquore a-~- Seie M630-1
Bolts, Nute, Washers &c Rivets -Series
MC2.5A~-1"-----~
Biscuit, Crackers & Pretzels -Series
MC-blP-1
Photoengraving Series MC73A-3
Electrotyping & Stereotyping Series
MG-73A-1
Typesetting Series MG73iA-2
Engine Electrical Equipment Series MCJ2L-1
Pressed & Blown Glaesrware Series M0770-2
Luggage Series MC7lA-1
Cleaning & Polishing Preparations Series
MC6bA-2
Earthenwrare Food Utensile Series MC26J-3
Vitreous-China Pood Utensils Series
Mc2bJ-4
Refrigeration Machinery Series Mc53A-1
Leather Dress Gloves Series MlC67D-2
Insulated Wire &r Cable Series Mc32K-1
Sporting &I Athletic Goode Series M079?-1
Supplement 1
Medicinal Chemicals Series MC65A-1
inorganic dolor Pig ents series MclyP-1
onuer Durable God Series MG52A-2
MISICELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS
Trends & Pr5os-p-c-ts In Radio & Television -
Trends & Prospects in the Farm Equipment
Industry- 10
Retail Hardwrare Store Work Sheet for Ee-
timat~-'ing Initial Capit Requirements For Ea-
tablishing A Retail Hardware Store 54
Body Measurements For The sizing of Hpae
For Bs For The Knit U~ndenrear Industry)
dmeial Standard 08155-49 Ts-4613
A Preventive Maintenance Plan for Government
Motor Vehicles $1.00
Investigation of Reinforced Joistile-Con-
crgig Beagg $12


GPO WF50 9-11-49-4000-10-148


UNIV. OF F B~I.=P




u.S. nhroMT Yn


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


SMALL BUSINESS AIDS
How To Apply Por A Business Lpann No. 479
ParnerhipLife Insurance No. 482
TriigRetail Sales People to Meet Com-
notition No. 44
IQIYREFERENCE SERVICE
Retail Drug Stores Baisic Inormation
Sources
Leather and Its Rawr Materials Basic In-
Sources of Information on American Firms
INDUSTRY REPORTS
Domestic Transportation (Petroleum Trans-
portation) -anuary-March 1949 CGratie
Pulp, Paper & Board March 1949 $2.25
a year
Containers & Packaging Feb. 1949 600
a year
Chemicals & Drugs Mar. 1949 $2.50 yr.
Leather March 1949 -600 a year
SuErE March 1949 504 a year
Coffee. Tea, Cocoa & Spices March 1949 -
0 a year
Rubber March 1949 So# a year
CENSUS BUREAU MATERIAL
Cotton Ginnedi In Georgia, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina, Missies-
ippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Tex-
as, and in Specified States Orope of 1948
and 1947 Separate Reports
Monthly Retail Trade Report Epet South
Central Region February 19
Monthly Retail Trade Report South Atlan-
tic Region Febuary 149
Cotton Production & Dietribution Bullet-
in 185 Season of 1947-44- 20 -
Trends in the Wines & Spirits Trade Jan.
U. S. Gold & Silver Movements Feb_ 1949


.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID


POSIAGE $300


BC-6-JF


aluavewar~,~ Fl


PAGE 4


N ITELLUB OF COMMERCE


RE F If 5


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009



-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.




















AUTLAT 3, GA. 3AVAMII, GA. JACKSONVLLE, FLA. MIAMI 32, FLA MOBILE, ALA CHARLEsTON, s.C.
60 Whitehall St., S.., Amone 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 9417 Seybold Aldg., 308 Federal 81dg,, 310 Peopies Bldg.,
Tel. tIAut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. C-711( Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-36411 Tel. 7771



Vol.3 No.9 MAY I, 1949


SOUTH'S INDUSTRIES EXPAND

Vast expansion since pre-war days of manu-
tend into the South is shorn in prelimi-
nary returns from the 1947 Census of Manufact-
ures of the Bureau of the Censue now being re-
ceived in Decartment of Commerce field offices.
The census was the first taken since 1939,
and in almost every instance a doubling and
trebling of the value of shipments, number of
employees, salaries and wages paid, And other
data collected in the census are shown,

Preliminary reports from the
1947 Census of Manufactures are
available gratis at all Department
of Commerce field offices. Industry

I) be ready on a nominal sales basisan Stt aplt r xetd
between now and September. Keep in
touch with the nearest Commerce De-
partment office.
Here are some recent examples of develop-
ments in industries operating in the South in
comparing the 1947 census with that taken of
the 1939 situation:
Receipts in the Commercial Printing Induat-
ry increased 150 per cent, and saaries and
wages paid in 1947 aggregated half a billion
dollars.
The Lithograching Industry has expanded 212
per cent in receipts, the number of production
and related workers h~as nearly doubled, and
the wages paid them more than trebled*
The output of makers of Bread and Other Bak-
eryProducts has increased 127 per cent*
The production of Paper Rlaggincreased 274
per cent and the number of employees nearly
doubled* *
Pulp Mille shipped 310 per cent more prod-
uct9 in 1947 than in 1939, exclusive of wood
pulp*
Similar advances are indicated in the furn-
iture industries, the value of shipments in the
upholstered household furniture field increas-
ing 180 per cent, and the metal office furni-
ture has gained 234 per cent in such activities
Manufacturers in the Wood Office Furniture' have
experienced a 267 per cent r~a~ ise in the value
of products shipped between 1939 and 1947*
(See Page 4 for latest list of reports)


The publications are all sales booklets,
ranging from 5 cents to a dollar, depending
upon the subject covered. They cover a wide
range of home planning and building activities
as well as the improvement of home properties,
both urban and rural. Here are Just a fewr:
Selection, Installation. Finish, and Main-
tenance of Wtood Floors For Dwellings. 10#.
Your Farmhouse, Howf To Plan Remodeling. 150.
Building With Logs. 15
Technique of House Naili g. 150.
Firelaces & Chmes. 1
Selection of Lumber for Per-m and Home Build-
ing. 154.-- -- -- --
Your Farmhouse ynigthe Bathroom.
Planning the Expanse~ibe ouse 200
A Step-Saving U Kitchen. 100.
One of the most valuable publications 18-
sued by the Department of Commerce from a
standpoint of its contribution to the general
household is its booklet entitled Safety for
the Household. Selling for 758, this bookle
contains 190 pages and illustrations setting
forth simple methods of oare and caution a-
gainst the many hazards which arise in every
day home life. It covers all kinds of possible
accidents in the home, and tells you how to
take precautions against their occurring. If
they do occur, it gives simple first-aid in-
structions. Many millions of persons are in-
Jured annually in American homes.


: I


Aek the nearest field office
of the Department of Commerce for
the folder 5 Star U. S. Govern-
ment Publications. It is avail-
able upon request, and it lists
a hundred or more booklet and
other material on many subjects.


FIELD SERVICE


HOME OWNERS' lBOOKiLTS

She season for home building and home
those planning such projects may be in-
terested in a wide variety of publications on
those subjects issued by various departments
of the Federal Government.
From the Department of Commerce alone have
come such booklets, for example, as How To
Judge A House (price 254); care aRnd Repair of
the House (200); and Furniture. Its Selection
and Use T100). There are a number of others.








__


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN C)F COCWMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreciated.

TI4REE IlNIDJSTIRIES REVIEWED

T hree outstanding industries are made the
pared by the Department of Commeroe and
now available for distribution to the respect.
ive trades from field offices.
The publications are entitled Pr ses and
Prospects in the Farm Equipment Indust 1R;
-TrndsandPr~ospect in Radio and _Television
Aeceivers e (90) andt Prospec~ts in the Jewpery
Trade (10#).
Ufie first-named release diseueses recent-
and current conditions and anticipated develop-
ments in the farm equipment industry, and cov-
ere such eeaential factors as production, de-
mand, foreign trade, prices and shipments. Sep-
arate sections are devoted to the major items
of farm machinery still in short supply,
The publication on radio and television re-
ceivere reviews changes that have taken place
in that field since the introduction of tele-
vision and commercial production of FM receiv-
ers, and developments occurring since the end
of the war.
The one on the Jewelry trade tells us, a-
mong ot her things, that the future of the jeR-
elry business may not be altogether discourage-
ing, despite recent steady declines in sales
volume, because of two major reasons, an in-
dicated further decline in the cost of living
with the resultant availability of more dol-
lars for luxury purchased, and the fact that
the backlog demand for consumer durables has
been satisfied,


rr o ..~Southeastern residents have ben
r rrawarded a total of 686 patents on
inventions for the year 1948, ae.
cording to data released by the U.
S. Patent Office*
The awards included 80 in 4Al-
boma; Florida, 184; Georgia, 107;
Mississippi, 27; North Carolina,
116; South Carolina, 49; and Tenn-
easee, 12j.
The Raards made in the seven
Southeastern Statee represented a-
bout 2 per cent of the 25,991 pat-
ents issued to residents of the U.
s. as a whole. Newf Yorkere led the
nation in number of patents received
for all states, with 4,664. Next wras
Illinois, with 2,448. Others were
Newr Jersey~adOi, 2,3599; California, 2s231;


WHOLESALE SALES OFF

sales were down in February compared
writh the same month a year ago, and
value of inventories was up, according to a
Bureau of the Censue survey.
Dollar sales of 547 firms in the South
Atlantio and East South Central regions were
estimated at $6j,309,000, a deorease of $4,-
223,000 fr~om a year ago, and inventories,
fi ured at cost, of 3 3 firms approximated
("rikok,00Porlr 5 194s000 more than for 355

.This report is available for
distribution gratis at all field
offices of the Department of Com-

separate reports on trends in the.
drug, Jewelry, grooery, tobacco,
electrical, dry goods, and winee
and spirited trade based on this
and other reports.

Despite substantial declines in salee
trends in the South Atlantic area in a number
of commodities in February of this year,
wholesalere of the region finished the month
with a 1 per cent increase, but in the East
South Central region, comprising Alabama,
Missiesippi, Tennessee and Kentucky, a 5 per
cent drop wras registered,
Increases of fran J to 13 per cent were
indicated among South Atlantio wrholeealers of
lumber and building materials, beer, drug
and sundries, excluding liquor, fresh fruits
and vegetables, tobacco, and some line .of
groceries,
On the other hand, decreases were reported
in sales of automotive supplies, electrical
wiring and construction materials, furniture
and house furnishings, hardware, machinery
equipment and supplies, confectionery, dry
goods, and paper and paper products.
In the East South Gentral, nominal gained
occurred in sales of beer, drugs and sundries,
fresh fruits and vegetables, groceries and
tobacco products, while Yminue" eigne appeared
in some electrical goods, hardware, confect-
tonery, dry goods, aid among certain lines of
grocery wrholesalere.
The national average was a 3 per cent drop
in sales.
CCONFECTIC)NERY SALES DC)WI
ronfectionery producer in the southeast
Experienced sharp decreases in sales in
~the first two months of 1949 as compared
with the corresponding period in 1948, accord-
ing to a Bureau of the Geneus survey.
The deolin~g ranged from an 8 per cent drop
in the Carolinae, Virginiae, Maryland and
District of Golumbia to. 16 per cent in Georgia
and Plorida.
Sixteen firms reporting from the former
area also registered a 14 per cent decrease in
sales in February compared with the same month
a year ago, and 11 establishments in Georgia
and Florida found salee 22 per cent off.
Dollar sales of $951,ooo and $2,125,ooo
respectively wrere reported for the two areas
in the two-month period.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE ~2







BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


MARKET RESEARCH SOURCES

apartment of Commerce field offices re-
garding a 1949 edition of Market Re-
search Sources, publication of whi ~ch se-
jieiied ii the near future.
The Department of Commerce decided to 18-
sue a 1949 edition of the book in response to
a current demand from business men for inform-
ation useful in setting up marketing programs.
The last one was published in 1940.
The book is designed to provide an up-to-
date statement of the marketing research so-
tivities of public and private agencies, and
questionnaires have already been mailed out
to contributors to former editions for incor-
poration in the new book.
An effort will be made to expand the list-
inge to include research group which have
developed new sources of marketing information
since the last edition was published. Business
firms, advertising agencies, universitiees,
State and local government agenoice, and
others who were not represented in the last
book are being urged to communicate wilth the
nearest field office, or the Department of
Commerce in Washington, if they do not receive
one of the questionnaires being distributed.
The forthcoming publication will have wide
distribution among business and market re-
search groups, and those who provide market.
ing services and information wrill find it
desirable to be listed. A form showing the
type of descriptive material desired for the
listing will be sent on request to group
engaged in compiling appropriate information.
Plans for the new edition also envision
a more useful, wider coverage than heretofore.
- tear here ----

0 RDER BLAN K
Use This Coupon For Ordering Material Listed
ITh s leae Of The Bulletin of Commaeroe
(L~ei~ist te atrGh;'iai h pceBlwad
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Field
Office of the Departnent of Commerce. Your
Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side)


(On Bales Publications, Make Remittances
Payable to Treasurer of the U. 8,)


Manufacturerel sales in February totalled
$16.2 billion, somewhat under those of
January, while inventories remained near
the January levels. Sales were lower primarily
because of the shorter wrork-month, although
the decline of $450 million was larger than
could be sooounted for on the basis of sceaon-
al factors alone.
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of
February were $54.6 billion.,. y,,eseasonally
about $450 million from the January level. The
bulk of the increase came in retail inventor-
ies in preparation for the Easter trade. Small
offsetting changes were noted in manufacturers'
and wholesalers e inventories.
-o-
New construction put in place in March is
valued at $11.2 billion, about $100 million more
than the revised February figEure and 2 per cent
above the total for March 1948. Total value of
new construction put in place during the first
quarter of 1949 totalled $3.5 billion, an in-
crease of about 5 per cent over the first
quarter of 1948.
-o-
Sales of service and limited-funotion whole-
salere in February, estimated at $5,186 million
showed a decline of $190 million from January.
The decline was about in line seasonally with
that usually experienced in February, sales of
durable-goode wrholesalers were $1,75'3 million
in February, while those of nondurablelgoods
dealers were $3,433 million.
-o-
production of building materials in January
fell somewhat more than seasonally below the
December output. The Department of Commerce
monthly index of production for selected con-
atruction materials showed a 12 per opnt drop
from the December figure and a deoline of II.5
per cent from the January 1948 level.
-o-
Personal income declined in February to an
annual rate of $217 billion from $219.5 billion
in January. About twro-thirds of the decline of
$2.5 billion from the revised January total was
in agricultural income. Prices received by
farmers were lower in February, and the physical
volume of orope marketed or placed under Govern-
ment loan declined more than seasonally.
-o-
More abundant orops in Europe and reduced
demand for food commodities in world mrarkete
oaused*United Statee 1948 exports of food-
stuffs to drop 17 per cent in value from the
1947 level. Imports of foodatuffe in 1948,
however, increased 20 per cent in value.
-0-
February shipments of all types of heating
and cooking equipment, except warm air furnaces
and domestic cooking stoves, dropped below Jan-
nary levels, the Bureau of the Censue reported.


PAGE 3


/
-----




a gg I |
0 U J 1 1


SI R 7 D [M





CENSUS BUREAU PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Report on the Labor Force March
1949
Gross Cha~ng~es in the Labr Force January-
Sohool Enrollment of the CivilianPola
tion Gotober 14
Public Employment in January 194
aned Foods Stooks and Shipments as of
FebruTarFy 2-28, 19
CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES. 194
Paint and Varnishee Series MO19P-2
Knit-Fabric Mills series MC670-3
Knit Underwrear Series MC670-2
Book Printing Series M0C73A-7
sookbinding series MC73A-5
Magazine? Publishing Series MOT3A-4
Watches and 01ooks Series MC75B-1
Photographio Equipment Series MC79L-1
Distilled Liquors Series MC63E-1
Brooms and Brushee Series MC79J-1
Window and Door Soreene Series ldc54D-1
Commercial Printing Series MC7jA-10
Lithographing Series MODjA-9
Metal Household Purniture. Except Upholater-
ed -SeriesM5B-
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholater-
ed -Series 5B-
Mattresses and Bedsprings Series MC54B-5.
SMALL BUSINESS AIDS
rT2mber 479 How To Apply For~ A Business
Loan
Number 480 Business Life Insurance
Number 441 Sole Proarietorship Life
Insurance
Number Ic82 Partnership, Life Insurance
Number 48f corporation Life Insurance
Ru Ker 484F~ TraRiinin Retail Salespeople To
Meet Competition

Appointment of John W. Arrington,
Greenville, 9. C., textile official
as a member of the Small Business Ad-
visory Committee of the Secretary of
Commerce is announced. He is vice-
president and treasurer of the Union
Bleachery of Greenville.
,o se IFO-2)-99-11oo-1o-1ec


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300
UNIV.~ OF FL Lia





U.S. DEPO~0TOrPY


I REP 1 5


FACTS POR INDUSTRY
Pulp and Paper Manufacturei~ii in the U. 8. -
January 1949 and rebruary199
Fats and Oile January 199
construction Products January 1949
Ahat& Tar Roofing & Siding Products -
February 99
Containers & Closuree January 1949
Sofwoo Pywod -Feruary 1949
Maleabe Ion astnge- February 1949
omercial'Steel Frig February 1949
Superphosphate January 1949
Cotton and Lintere Consumption, Stocks,
Imports and Exports, and Active Cotton Spind-
les February 1949 and 1948
Cotton and Linters Cotton Consumption and
Stocks, by States and Linters Consumption and
Stocks, by Type of Consumer and in Storage -
February 1949 and 1948.
INDUSTRY REPORT
Fatal and 011e Annual Review, 1948 -
Subscription Price $1 yearly.
IUIYREFERENCE SERVICE
Veneer & Plywrood Bas~,ionformtion
-Sources February 1949
Installment Sales Credit Basic Informa-
Stion Sources March 1949
Iron and Steel Industry Basic Information
sources Marc 99
MISCELLANEOUS
Soft Solders National Bureau of Standards
CirBiilar Lette Number LC-937
Soft and Brazing Solders for Aluminum -
National Bu~reau of Standards Circular Letter
Number 938
Silver and Brazing Solders National Bur-
eau of Standar-ds Ci~r~cular Letter Number 939
National Airprt Plan for 1949 Civil
Aeronautioe Adfm~ins~istton


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3, No. 9, May 1, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE-

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITy OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. Q)UALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
CACNESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8390


BUL LETI


PAGE 4











FIELD SERVICE










ATLMTA 3. GA. 3AVMMM6, 64i JACKSDVLrLUE, FLA NIMI 32, FLA. nOBILE, ALL CHARLEsTON, S.C.
50 Whitehall St., LL, Anom 218, P. O0., Blde26 Federa1 l dg., 957 Seybold Aldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tIlinet 1)l21 2-453 Tel* 2*465 Tel. (-71I1) Tel. 9-7533 e.284 Tel. 7771



Vol. 3 No. 10 MAY 15, 1949


NEW PUBLICATION ISSUED

Southern manufacturers interested in de-
find a new booklet now being issued by
the Department of Commerce to be helpful.
The booklet, as the contents imply, is en-
titled Developing and Selling New Products. It
is beaed on firstndi-hmandionformaTionuple by
100 business firms which have successfully de-
veloped and sold many new products, and it de-
scribes methods of locating new product idea;
selection of a product and its preparation for
the market, including designing, naming and
packaging; and the planning of marketing pro-
grams.
Orders for future delivery of
I)this booklet are now being taken
by Department of Commerce field
offices. Price 250.

The publication provides a obecklist of
major sources of new product ideas, sug~gest-
ions for undertaking surveyed; plans for or-
ganizing a company for the new product task,
a list of design` essentials, examples of how
to test a product, a guide for naming a new
product, and an outline of steps in a market.
ing program.
An interesting tabulation shows how 25 man-
ufacturere located ideas for profitable new
products. Among the products and sources of
ideas are canned onion soup, suggested by the
wife of.an executive of a meat packing com-
pany; a garage hoist, proposed by an automobile
mechanic; a steam producing unit listed in an
advertised sale of manufacturing rights; a new
type of bread box, suggested by a market re-
search agency; a kitchen gadget, from the U. 8.
Patent Office Register of patents available
for license or sale; and machines for use in
textile mills, developed by a machine tool man-
ufacturer after thorough study of the needs of
the textile industry.
The booklet also stresses the value of mar-
4et research as a useful tool at all stages of
new product development. It also gives many
step-by-atep sooounts of how individual manu-
facturers, market research organizations, ad-
vertising agencies and other business firms
have discovered, developed and launched new
products,


WORLD TRADE WEEK
World Trade Week is
146411 bysfedS to be observed over
-Md600Dthe nation this
year from Mday 22 to 28,
inclusive.
The week, sponsored by
-the U. 8. Chamber of Com-
-merce and U. 8. Department
of Commerce cooperatively,
.is proclaimed by the Pres-
ident of the United States
and this year Mr. Truman
in his proclamation in-
vitee business, education-
I'l 't *al~, and civie groups, as
pronrmCumammemanamaxwell as the people of the
United States generally to
take part in the observance.

The Atlanta Regional office of
the Department of Commeroe has
the following motion picture
sound films for loan in conneat-
lon with observance of World
Trade Week:
Round Trip Approximately 17
minute~s-
Ganadian International Trade
Fai -~ Approximately 16 minutes
The Foreign Service Operation
of a Mission Approx. 30 m~ine.

WInternational trade provides the medium by
which the nations of the world exchange the
products of their resources and skills," the
President's proclamation points out.''The ex-
pansion of import and export trade improves
standards of living, encourages full employ-
ment of labor and productive facilities, and
speeds the development of human and natural
resources throughout the world, thus laying
the foundation for lasting world prosperity
and peace."
The proclamation concluded by stating that
the United States advocates the removal of un-
necessary restrictions and discrimination in
international trade and accordingly has ini-
tiated a reciprocal-trade-agreements program,
and has taken steps in concert with other
nations toward the establishment of an Inter-
national Trade Organization.









I -


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN C)F COMMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re.
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreointed.

FARM RECEIPTS INCREASE

cash from their marketing during the
first two months of 1949 than they did in
the corresponding period last year, a current
report of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics,
U. S DepartmentB-of -Agriculture, shows.
Cash farm receipts in January and February
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, M~ississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas totalled $467,885,-
000, a 2j per cent rise over the $378,533,0000
obtained in the same period last year.
This was contrary to national trends, since
the total for the two-month period in the
nation as a whole was $4,134,793,000 compared
with $4,377,390,000 registered in the same per-
iod last year, or a 5 per cent decline.
In the Southeast, a 5 per cent decrease in
cash income from livestock products marketed in
the seven States in January and February was
offset by a 37 per cent increase in receipts
from crop products marketed. The figures for
January and February this year compared with
1948 were, livestock and livestook products
$136,619,000 and $138,529,000, and crop, $329-
906,000 and $240,004,000, respectively.
All of the seven States except Tennessee
reflected increases this year over last. The
totals included, North Carolina, 1948, $56,-
940,000 and 1949 $58 568,000; South Carolina,
$25,747,ooo and Q#33,407,tooo; Florida, $63,429,-
000 and $68,812,000; Georgia, $52,265,ooo and
$b56,411,000; Alabama, $42,486i,000 and 855,403,-
000; and Mississippi, $58,222,000 and $119,-
284,000. In Tennessee, the total for January
and February of last year was $79 444,000, and
for the same peri~od..this year,- 76,-000,000.


ProJects and Publications of
Interest to Planning and De-
velopment Agenoles is the
title of a pamphlet issued by
the Department of Commerce, or-
ders for which will be taken by
field offices for future deliv-
ery. It is available gratis.
The pamphlet, Number 2 in a ser-
les, includes 22 pages of data
and information important to the
development of a community. For
example, it discusses the grow-
ing school enrollment, how to
forecast the school population
of a State, the labor force,
electric power, and other topics.


Available for distribution
from field offices upon request
are the following:
Monthly Retail Trade Report -
East South Central Cities and
Areas Mdarch 1949g
Monthly Retail Trde Rpr
South Atlantic Region Cities
and Areas Mdarch 1949
Monthly Retail Trade Report -
United States Summary Mar.1949


Other percentage increases in March over
February were Birmingham and Jefferson county,
Alabama, 19; Atlanta, 17; Biloxi, Miss., 1);
Gulfport, Miss., and Greenwood, S. G.,20
Bristol, Tenn., 31; Kingaport, Tenn., Columbus,
Ga., and Creenwood and McCormick counties,
S. G., 21; Augusta, 24; Mdacon, 9; Savannah,
13; Asheville and Buncombe and Madison coun-
ties, N. C., 10; Goahoma and Quitman counties,
ises., 24; Sullivan, Unicol and washington
counties, Tenn., 18; Manatee and Sarasota
counties, F1a., 16; Bleckley and Twiggs coun-
ties, Georgia, 2j; and DeKalb, Pulton and Rook-
dele counties, Ga., 18.
Last year, Easter, with its attendant heavy
buying, came in March, which accounted subatan-
tially for the drop in sales in the Southeast
in March of this year compared with March 1948.
Consequently, declines were registered for
seventeen of the twenty-four cities and areas
snowfn in the survey, six other reflected
gains, and in one area, Harrison and Stone
counties, Miss., the situation was unchanged.
Seven of the cities and areas reported
gains in sales during the first three months
of the year over the corresponding period in
1948, 15 experienced declines, and two other
were unchanged.
In the nation as a whole, sales in March
were 6 per cent lower than for the same month
last year, and 16 per cent over those of Feb-
ruary of this year.
In the Southeast, the decreases in March
1949 from March 1948 ranged from one per cent
in Johnson City, Tenn., to 22 per cent in
Chilton and Perry counties, Alabama. Decreases
in the three-month period went as high as 18
per cent in 01arkedale.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2


MARCH SALES DECREASE

March over February were reported for
all cities and areas in the Southeast
in which the Bureau of the Census conducts
surveys in ite Ilonthly Retail Trade Report
for the South Atlantio and Eas~ot Souh Getr
Areas for March.
At the same time, however, sharp declines
were registered for most of the cities and
areas when comparing March sales with those
of the same month last year, and for the first
three months of 1949 with the corresponding
three-month period in 1948.
Gains in March sales over February ranged
from 7 per cent in Johnson City, Tenn., to as
high as 30 per cent in Clarkedale, Miss., in
the city survey, and from 17 per cent in Har-
rison and Stone counties, Missiesippi, to 33
per cent in Chilton and Perry counties, Ala-
bama, in the area survey.





NEWSPAPER INDUSTRY EXPANDS

ry has more than doubled since before
the war, according to a preliminary re-
port from the 1947 Census; of Manufactures con-
ducted by the Bureau of the Gensue.
The report shows, among other things, that
receipts from the operation of newspapers over
the country have increased from $904.9 million
in 1939 to $1,917.3 million in 1947, an expan-
sion of 112 per cent.

See Page 4 for latest list of
Preliminary Reports on the 1947
G) ensus of Manufactures. Order
them from the nearest field of-
fice of the Department of Com-
merce. They are gratis.

In 1939, the industry had 96 7;31 production
and related workers drawing $164 million in
rages, and in 1947 the number of such workers
had incheesed to 117,949 with a payroll aggre-
gating $372,800,000.
Expenditures for materials, fuel, electric-
ity and contract work totalled $2j1.1 million
in 1939, and in 1947 the output for such oper.
nations had increased to $518.6 million.
Expenditures for new plant and equipment in
1947 totalled $81,600,000.
In 1947, there were 8,339 establishments
engaged in the newspaper publishing business,
of which 534 were in California, 499 in New
York, and 489 in Illinois. PennsylvaniA had
392, Ohio 357, Michigan, 327, and Massachusetts
177. A total of 5,564 was scattered throughout
the other States.

-- -- -- tear here ------
ORDER BLAN K
Use This Coupon OFo Order1Eg Material Listed
In This Issue Of The Bulletin of dommeroe
(List The Material In The Space Below and
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Field
Office of the Department of Commerce. Your
Name and Address Are On The Other Side)


(On Sales Publications, Make Remittances
Payable to Treasurer of the U. 8.)


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3










d bas (, ahl te boo vau or iv n (i

inMrhanufcturer se soale incr March otaled
$17. bill heQC. bion, hinch waslse to thle
ovrteFebruary lee nasesnlyadjust-dageae


-o-
After adjustment for seasonal factors, in-
cluding the late occurrence of Easter this
year, total sales at retail stores in March
were virtually unchanged from February and
January. Except for the automotive group, all
durable-goods store sales tended downward in
March,
-o-
Current inventories of paper and paperboard
in many consumer fields, including stocks In
the hands of wholesale distributors, appear to
be substantially lower by comparison with sales
than was common in the prewar period. At the
mill level, the accumulation of paper And board
stocks during the part few months apparently
was considerably smaller than the decrease in
stocks of consumers and distributors.
-o-
The Sorap Drive Committee, appointed to
wrork for increased supplies of iron and steel
heavy crap from industry, farms and auto
wrecking yards, has been requested by Secretary
of Commerce Charles Sawnyer to terminate ite
campaign as of May 15, because of an improve-
ment in the scrap supply situation.
-o-
Business men of the nation, responding to a
recent survey, indicated that they anticipate
little change in sales during 1949 from the
record level of 1948. This expectation was re-
ported along with anticipation of a 5 per cent
decline in outlays for plant and equipment
from the peak in the previous year.
-o-
Buying by both businesses and consumers in
March continued at the cautious rate of recent
months, the Department of Commerce's SurveZ
of Current Business reports. Stepped-up selling
activity, combined with price reductions, were
effective in holding the seasonally-adjusted
dollar value of retail sales in March at the
same rate as in January and February, or about
J per cent below the fourth quarter of 1948.
-o-
Aggregate sales of retailers and w~holesalers
entering the business population in the three
years of 1945 to 1947 amounted to approximately
$15 and $20 billion, respectively. By the end
of 1947, these new entrants accounted for about
15 and 25 per caen, respectively, of the sales
of all retail and wholesale enterprises. The
new enterprises then comprised 29 and 45 per
cent of the number of all operating retail and
wholesale firms.









lr


UNIVERSITYOFFLORIDA

MitWHI~IlMEIAIII
3 1262 08748 8382

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
Morar on chracortion or ariou.
Brick 53pae, nlungablesadia
grame 2 Office of Technical Services
PB gail J,1.0> Subject Index:CLO0.S.
Volume I Iexand btract coll ion of
more than 1,000 unclassified scientific and
technical reports dealing with European tech-
nology Office of Technical Service $3
PB 96780, Determination of Factors Affect-
igLamination in tructua Cla Pr cs
Oice of Techia Se vces -$

$baFruit and*Vegetable Baskete MC76A-2
63 S~ease & Tallow MC19T-1
Plastic Produ~cts MC19J-1
Ca abon Paper &$ Inked Ribbone MG7)~B-1
Miea Wool C6-
co Public building furniture MG54B-8
Internal combustion Engines MC31D-1
Pa~rtitione & Fixtures M05rB-7
wooden Boxes (Except Cigar Boxes) MG76A-1
BokPbihn acD7A-11
Full-Fas~hioned Seamless Hoseer Mills -
MC670-
NewpaerPublishn MG73A-8
Aales & horn M019F-1
SDietilled Liquore MC63E-1
Commercial Printing MG7A-10
Metal Household Furniture, Excet phlater-
_Lithographing_ 87jA-9
Wnood Household Furniture, Excep Uhleter-
I hod M o bt- b-4L-
Bread _and Other Bakey Products MC61F-2
Adu-son a tonePrdut -xcF- 1


Wido Door 80reens Yc54D-1
Brooms & Brushee 1d?9J-1
WIood Offi-ce Furniture C548-3~
e$i)oio Peue 0 -1
enetian o inds c5A-1
Frouct o Puchsed Glase MC77B-1


PAGE 4


IIISINE M I BIS)B lll



INDUSTRY REPORTS
Lumber, Plywood &e Allied Products March
1949 Quearliterlyy~ 08 Per Year
Pulp, Paper&Bor April 1949 $2.25
Per Year leaued Monthy
Chemicals and Druge April 1949 $22.50
Per Year Monthly
Leather April 1949 600 Per Year -
Monf'f~~~
BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE
PlastciicsMaiTe~rials ~-=^~t BsoIoraion
Sour;ces- April 1949 ~
Internal Combustion Engines Basic Inform-
ation Souroes arh19
Gonorete Products B~asic Information
sour'iceis .- April 1949
Electric Motors & Generatore Basic In-
formatioTn sources pril 1949
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Cotton system sp~iiini;n~ing Activi March
1949
Cotton and Linters March 1949 .
Fate & Oile February 1949
Clay Construction Products February 1949
raIron Gastinge February 1949
Heating & Cooking Equipment February 1945
Nonferrous Gastings Febur 1949
U. B W~ool Manufactures January 1949
Tractor 1944
MISCELLANEOUS
Aircraft Use In 1947 Second in a series
of annual reports iceued by the Civil Aero-
nauties Administration on amount and type of
private flying in the U. S.
Calibration and Standardization of Weights
& Measures April 1 1949 National Bureau
oi Standards LC 94
Steel Reinforcing Bare Simplified Re-
commendation R26-49 A Recorded Voluntary
Recommendation of the Trade National Bureau
of Standards 10# GPO WFso 1-9-49-2700-10-151



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3, No. 9, May 15, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE--

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LERoY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


PENAL VATE USE TOAVOID
UNIV OF L tBYMET POSTAGE $300

I d -
ADD --

-8~. DErotORY





SOUTHEAST SHIPMENTS HEAVY

manufacturing establishments in the
Southeast has increased approximately
240 per cent over pre-war shipments, accord-
ing to the first State-by-State compilation
of returns from the 1947 Gensus of Manufact-
uree released by the Bureau of the Censue*
Ehe returns show that in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas the value of manufactured goods shipped
in 1947 was $51937 million compared writh
$1,746 million in 1939. The figures given were
for the value of shipments in excess of the
cost of materials and supplies.
This report is entitled Waummary
Statistics Por States and For Mad-
able gratis at Department of Com-
merce field offices. See Page 4
for list of other preliminary re-
ports
A rise of from 14,930 manufacturing estab-
lishments in operation in the seven Southeast-
ern states in 1939 to 23,677 in 1947, or an
increase of 58 per cent, and from an average
of 896,000 to 1,266,000 production workers, a
gain of 41 per cent, is also indicated in the
summary.
The increase in valuation placed on goods
produced in the Southeast and the number of
establishments exceeded the rate of increase
for the nation. The figures showed that the
value for the United States in 1947 was $74
billion compared with $24 billion in 1939. or
a gain of 204 per cent, and an increase
from 174,000 to 241,000, or 38 per cent, in
the number of factories. The Southeast lagged
behind the nation in point of production work-
era, however, the increase for the U. 8, reaoh-
ing 52 per cent.
Among the seven southeastern States, great-
est percentage increase in the number of manu-
facturing establishments in the 8-year period
was in North Carolina, 68 per cent. Alabama,
with 60 per cent, led in the increased number
of production workers. South Carolina, with
370 per cent, reflected the largest gain in
value of manufactured products shipped.Calif-
ornia led all States in rate of growth,


il,~ II
;.li


WORLD TRADE $5 BILLION

2.m6.Wo n ten years of world trade,
marked by the recent obser-
vance of World Trade Week,
southeastern ports have cleared
goode to other countries valued
at $3.9 billion and $I1.3 bil-
94,a Ilion worth of commodities from
ot her nations for consumption
in the United States,
The value of exports through
FIRst Ithe customer districts of Flor-
19391 "^": ida, G~eorgia, Mobile and the
TOTAL 10) DEEDN arolinae in the ten-year per-
ONA tXo oo iod have expanded from a valua-
tion of $86 8 million in the
pre-war year 1939 to $352.j million in 1948,
or an increase of more than j00 per cent,
For the latest information on
World Trade activities, ask your
I)nearest Department of Commeroe
on their mailing list to receive
the wRor~ld Trade News. It is avail-
able without charge,
In the same period, imports have gained in
value from $69.5 million in 1939 to $)217.4
million in 1948, or upwards of 200 per cent,
A sharp drop was registered in the value of
exports in 1948 from the $1424.1 million worth
of goode shipped abroad in 1947, but this de-
crease was offeet by a substantial increase
in imports for the two-year period. An 1947,
imports were valued at $192.1 million.;
Value of exports last year compared with
1947, by oustome districts, included' North
Carolina, $17.9 million in 1948 and $8.3 mil-
lion in 1947; South Carolina 8150.6 million
and $41.2 million; G~eorgia, 529.6 million and
63.5 million; Florida, $171.3 million and
I206.5 million; and Mobile, $82.6 million and
4104.7 million.
Total value of exports for the ten-year
peM~riod, by districts, included North Garolina,
$24, million; South Carolina, $162.8 mil-
lion; Georgia, $945,1 million; Florida,
$1,9.0~4.4 million; and Mobile, $673.5 million,
In most eases, exports in 1945 were only
half as much as in the previous year, and from
then on a gradual decline took place.


G /8, 26'i:3//(


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









aTLANTA. 31, A.SAVAMIAI, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. MIAMI1 32, FLA. MO0BILE, ALA, CHARLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., S.M., Room 218, P.o. Bidg., y25 Federal Bldg., 967 Seybold B1dg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. Mlinut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7633 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771


Vol. 3 No.11


JUNE 1, 1949








___


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreointed,

CONFECTIONERY SALES OFF

firme of the southeastern seaboard
states reported to the Census Bureau
that their Mtarch sales this year were 6 per
oent belowr those of the same month last year
and also for the period of January to Ka~rch of
this year compared with the corresponding per-
iod last year.
At the ease time, eleven firms of beorgia.
and Florida reported an increase of 3 per cent
in March sales, but a decline of 10 per cent
for the first quarter of the year compared with
the same period last year*
Seasonal gained of 13 and 40 per cent ree-
pectively, were experienced in the two regions
in March compared with February,
Dollar sales of the 28 participating firms
were placed at $1,615 000 in March 1949 con-
pared writh sales of $1.585,ooo of 30 iirms in
the same month last year, and from January to
March of this year the sales were $4,712,000
compared with $4,964,000 for the ease quarter
Last year*
Nationally, sales of 517 firm~s in March rere
14 per cent below the same month last year and
12 per cent lower from January to March than in
the corresponding period of 1948. March sales
were 7 per cent over those of Pebruar?*
MAutKET RESEARCH S)UIRCES
Ma7 51 was designated as the closing
Date for listings in the 1949 edition
of the new edition of @ma~et Research
Sources now being issued by the Department of
dommerce
Letters announcing the closing date were
sent to an extensive list of known market re-
search sources to which the Department had
sent questionnaires inviting listings in the
director y
Any nots inadvertentlyI left off the
list ar igurged by the Department to send
in their eings to the Marketing Division,
Ofiie meetio Commerce, Washington 25,
D. C., e have available publications and
reports current value in the general field
of market, research and analysis.
Market Research Sources is designed to pro-
vide helful ii~~-noraoni analysing market,
setting sales quotas, determining market pot-
entials, laying out advertising campaign, and
solving other marketing problems. It is being
prepared in response to widsepread requested
for such inifomation from sales, advertising
and other marketing executives, as well as
publishers and~ teachers. Its preparation is
bding sooelerated because of the intensive
selling and marketing prograne planned by bus.
iness for next year. It is soheduled for pub.
lioation this fall.


WHOLESALE SALES DROP

Wholesale Prices are off about harp de-elerr
7 percent from the peak. olines in
e"ODOEX. 1926.100 INDEX, 198 *1000~lt~(d b
"wayEI wa southeastern
wholesalers in
ameorie tOID~ he first quar-
ter of 194C
Compared with
... --soothe oor rnd
year in a Geneus
Bureau survey.
The survey
reflected a 4
too ,,,,,,1,,,,,,,,,1,,.nom oo cper cent drop
1946 1947 r48) )49 JARF MR in ales in the
Smwvey of Current Business South Atlantio
area and an 8 per cent deoline in the East
South Central section. Sales were also off 6
per cent in the South Atlantie in M~arch from
the same month last year, and 7 per cent in
the East South Central.
One bright spot in the survey was in a
comparison of sales in March 1949 with Feb-
ruary 1949, wrhich showed gains of 12 and 17
per cent, respectively, in the South Atlantic
and East South Central.

This report is now ready for
distribution gratin from field
ofiies of the Department of
Comrmeroe. Also available are
separate monthly reports on
trends in the electrical, jewrel-
ry, drug, grocery, dry goods,
tobacco, and wine and spirited
trades, all without charge.
Sales in the two areas followed national
trends rather exosely. The average for the
nation in the first three-month comparison was
a 6 per cent decrease, a 7 per cent drop for
March of this year compared writh the same
month last year, and an increase of 13 per cent
for March 1949 compared with Pebruary 1949.
Nearly a $10 million drop in dollar sales
was reported for the two southeastern areas in
March of thief year from the ease month last
year. A total of 535 tiime in the two regions
participating in the survey in M~arch 1949 had
sales aggregating $69,712 000 compared with
)7 ,8 3s000 recorded by 581 iirms in March
19 s.
Largely responsible for the declines in
sales in the Southeast was less interest shown
in such commodities as automotive supplies,
certain lines of electrical goods, industrial
supplies, jewelry, lumber and building mater-
iasl and dry goods.

If you have products for sale to
the U. 8. Government, field offices
of the Department of Commerce in
the Southeast can give you the
names and addresses of the purbaea-
ing ofiices normally buying items
you may be able to supply,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


COTTON INNINGS INCREASE
Cotton innings from the 1948 orop in
the Southeast were 57 per cent greater
~than from the 1947 orop and 59 per cent
more than from the 19rl6 orop, sooording to
Bureau of the Census estimates.
Sinning from the 19418 orop in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Missiesi 1p, Tenneseee and
the Carolinas aggregated 6,s~614 running
bales compared with 4,68),44 bales from the
1947 orop and 4,059,016 from the 1946 orop*
Soon to be released is the den-
sus Bureauls Cotton Production in
the United Staltes Drop of 19418*
Order now +rom the nearest De~par~-
ment of Commeroe field office*
Price 15 *
innings in the Southeast in the three-
Year period have kept pace with increased
national trends. A total of 14,580,279 bales
was ginned from the 1948 orop in the United
States compared with 11,551.738 trom the 1947
and 8,517,291 from the 1946 orop*
innings from the 1948 orop in the South-
east included, in running bales, Alabama, 1,-
167 1 7; Georgia, 746,618* Mdississippi, 2,-
292, jC; North Carolina, 9~7,042; South Caro-
lina, 71,587; Tennessee, 641,oyo; and Floridan
7,761*
Mississippi and North Carolina each regis-
tered a 51 per cent increase in innings from
the 1948 orop over 1947; South Carolina, 35
per cent; Alabama, 28 per cent; Tennessee, 26
per cent; and G~eorgia, 15 per cent*
- tear here - "

0 RDER BLtAN K

(Lse Thesouo Matria In The Space Belo Antd
Return This Coupon To Your Nearest Field
Oficie Of The Departmnent Of Commeroe. Your
Name And Address Are On The Opposite Side)




















(On Sales Publications, please Realt
To The Treasurer Of The U. 8.)


~hain store and mail-order sale for
SMarch were estimated at $2,190 million.
~After allowanoe for. the shifting Easter
date, March sales were only fractionally below
a year ago. Among the durable-goode groups,
furniture store sales declined about 2 per
cent during March, after seasonal adJustment.
This decrease was largely offeet by rises in
the automotive and building materials group.
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of
March wrere $54.5 billion, an increase of
about 850 million from February, but a decline
in booke values when measured on a seasonally
adJusted basis. An increase of $500 million in
retailers' stocks, primarily reflecting pre-
Easter influences, was almost completely off-
set by declines in holdings of manufacturers
and wrholeealers.
-o-
Value of newr construction put in place in
April was almost $1.4 billion, a seasonal rise
from March of $120 million, and just slightly-
under the level of a year ago. The April rig-
ure was 10 per cent above the revised estimate
for Marol\ and about 1 per cent below the final
figure for April 1948.
-o-
The grose national product declined to an
annual rate of $256 billion in the first quar-
ter of 1949. Although this rate was $9 billion

the highest of record.
-o-
Sales of service and limited-function
wholesalers in March were estimated at $5,674
million, uP $531 million from the February
level. The increase was larger than the usual
sales gain in this period. Durable goode
wrholesalersl ales were $1,982 million and
sales of non-durable goode wholesalers were
$},692 million.
-o-
Personal income declined to an annual rate
of $214.3 billion in March, $2 billion below
the February level. March was the third oon-
seoutive month in whtich personal income de-
olined. The reduction from the high of $221
billion resohed last December amounted to 3
per cent, but despite the decline, the rate of
personal income in March was 4 per cent above
March a year ago.
-o-
Publioly reported oneh dividend payments by
United States corporations during the first
quarter of 1949g totalled $1,441,700,000, or 7
per cent above the $1,346 900,000 paid out in
the first quarter of 1948. Railroads showed by
far the largest relative increase among the
major industrial groups, with a 29 per cent
rise over the first quarter of 19C8.


PAGE 3


--- --





)E BI EElbltli




BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Gensue Publications, 1948 catalog and
Subject Guide Paper Bound 700 --
omeium of City Government Finances in
1 47 Summarise o diy Government Finances
n947 in 37 cities of over 250 000 popula-
tion and over 25,000 population 45 -
State Distribution of Publio Employment In

Selected Characteristics of Occupied Dwell-
in nts and Lodger quarters in the U. S.
TeMonthly Reprt On The Labor Force,

doton and Linters Consumption, March 1949
and 19g
otton Ginned From The Cro~ of 198

Cotton and Lin~trer April 1949
Steel Castinge '- Mrch 1949
Aluminulm Wrought Products March 1949
Malleable Iron Castinge March 1949
Commercial Steel Forginse March 1949
anesium Wroug~ht Products March 1949
Mechanical Stokere Febur 1949
Knit Undenrear and Nhtwrear December 148
tour Mili Poucts February 1949
I DSTY EPRTS
Canned Fruit eand Yegetables April 1949 -
dosruction construction Materials -
Apr'Tsii 949 ~ --- Sela eaue- Ueo o
struction Materiale 1948-1949
SMALL BUSINESS AIDS
Number 48' Howr Wholesalers Assist Manu-
facturere
Number 486 Howr Wholesalers Assist Re-
tailere
BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE
Store Lo,~c~ation Basic Information sources
Peppermint 011 Synopsis of Information
Review of Nitrogen Fertilizer Situation-100



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PERMIT NO. 1009

vol. j, Ho. 11, June 1, 1949


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.
Gro WFso 1.25.49-2700-0-10150


Businessmencs Seleoted List of Department
of Commerce Publications
Cle~anngad Dyeng. 1947 Operating Ratios

Economic cIndicato;tore Janary 194 Pre-
paredf-tJor -ntheJ~mm Jon ottee on the Economio
Report by the Council of Economic Advisers
Medical X-Ray Protection Up To Two Million
Yolts Handbook 41 National Bureau of stan-
dards 158
Basing Point Changes And Industrial Loca-
tions Technical Release Number
Trends and Prospects in the American Dinner-
ware Industry li~
U. S. Genius of Agriculture Farms and Farm
Characteristice By Color and Tenure of Operator
- $1.25
Home Heating Problems List of Publications
and Articles National Bureau of Standards
Instruments for Measurin Humidit Letter
Circular L96- National Bureau of Standards
Golorimetry, SPectrophotometry. Photometry,


Corsets &Allie Grnts
Houeseurnishinge (Except Curtaine

Men~s & Boyet Suite & Coate
WIork Shirts
Fertilizers (Manufacturing &
Fur lioode
Toilet Preparations
Cotton Broad Woven Fabrics
Men's Drese Shirts & Nightwear
Ments,Youthe', & Boysi Separate
Roofingr Felta & Coatings
Plsic ateriale
Footwear Gut Stook
Nonolay Refractories
House S9ggagg
Grease & Tallow
Mineral Wool
Internal Combustion Engines
Industrial Organib Chemicals
Al als & Chlorine
Cork Products


Lighting and Visibility LO942
CENSUS OF MACTURES: 1947


& Draperie)
MC6 --

MIC1 8-1 -
MO EB-1 -
Macb B-1 -

Trousers
MC26E-1 -
MBlff-2 -
M0C12A~- -
Md26D-4 -
MCb8A-1 -


MC-

M~9F- -


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
[ PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300

:~~~~~ ------L .'

.iBf~ ,


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALMS
DEPARTMENT or EcoNoules
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8408

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4






t/B~UNIZED STATES DEP~ARTAIEN FC~TTSD MWENT OF C$dMj d ibE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLANTA 3, GA. SAVAIMAII, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. MIAMI 32, FLA M1O3ILE, ALA CHARLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., S.5, Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bidg., 947 Seybold bldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tfAlnut 1)121 X-453 Tel. 2-4)755 Tel. 11-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771



Vol. 3 No. 12 June 15, 1949


Copies of this report will be
available shortly in all field
offices of the Department of
Commerce in the Southeast. They
are gratis.


TEXTILE INDUSTRY EXPANDS

he textile industry in
a two billion dollar
business, and the value of
-goods produced has grown 27)
per cent over a period of eight years time, so-
cording to a Bureau of the Census report 18-
sued in connection with ite 1947 Censue of
Manufacturers. The report was the first of a
series dealing with major industries by re-
glone prepared from the census,
The textile industry's goods produced in
1947 in States along the Atlantio Seaboard,
including Georgia, Florida, the Carolinas,
Virginias, Delaware, Maryland and the Dietrict
of Columbia, were valued at $2,021.5 million
compared with a valuation of $541,7 million
in 1939. In Alabama, Missiesippi, Tennessee
and Kentucky, the value of such goode in 19117
was estimated at $368 million against $99 mil-
lion worth produced in 1939.

Copies of these reports are
Available gratin at all field
offices of the Department of
Commerce in the Southeast.

In the two regions, the number of establish-
ments engaged in the production of textile
goode expanded from 1,591 in 1939 to 1,978 in
1947, and the number of production workers in
that industry went from 477,000 before the war
to a post-war employed of 553,300, the re-
ports reveal. In 1947, raes paid production
workers approximated ~1,066.4C million and wages
and~ salaries paid all workers, r1,183.8 mil-
lion,
In Alabama, M salesippi, Tennessee and
Kentucky, the manu acture of textiles gave way
to the production of food and kindred products
as the leading industry in that region from a
standpoint of the value of goode produced,
Food and kindred products produced in that area
i n 1947 were valued at $509.6 million, $392.5
million greater than the output of 1939. In
that industry, 50,500 production workers were
employed in 1947 drawing wages estimated at
$96.1 million.
Altogether, $9.8 billion worth of goods
was produced in 1947 in the two areas.


BUSINESS GAINS, DECLINES
Less than an even break was registered
1949, according to a summary of busi-
ness conditions for that period prepared by
the regional office of the U. S. Department of
Commerce in Atlanta.
Compared with the first quarter of 1948,
bank debited wrere generally higher, oash face
income more than held its gains of the post-
war period, production of electric energy rose
by nearly a billion kilowatt hours, and great-
ner activity wras reflected in certain lines of
major southeastern industries.
Offsetting these gains to some extent, how-
ever, wrere declines in such primary activities
as bank deposited, wholesale, retail and de-
partment tore trade in some sections, new ur-
ban construction, manufacturing employment,
new business incorporations, railway~ freight
and passenger revenue, and operation of busi-
nese and residential telephones.


~


The report was based on data supplied by
the Departments of Commeroe, Agriculture and
Labor, Federal Powrer Commission, U. 8. Comp-
trodler of the Currenoy, Federal Reserve Banke
and such private organizations as Dun and
Bradetreet, Southern Pine Assooiation, Sou-
thern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company,
and Association of American Railwrays.
The report indicates that, despite some de-
olines, business activities in the region are
still at an extremely high level when matched
with previous comparable period*
The report is for the States of Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, MIssiesippi, Tennessee,
North Carolina and South Carolina. Among other
things, it shows that bank debited in 46 oities
in the region were up nearly 6 per cent; wihole-
sale trade increased in five line of business
but wse off from 2 to 20 per cent in' others;
retail trade increased in seven cities and
areas and Geolined in fifteen others; and de-
partment store trade gained in twro oities, but
lost ground in eighteen other. Cash farm in-
come increased 18 per cent.





United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreolated,

STATE REVENUES GAIN

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Tennessee and the Carolinas nearly cs h en otatr Sate o
billion dollars to operate their governments
in the fiscal year 1948, but they wound up the
year in the black by more than a quarter of a
billion dollars*
A Bureau of the Census report summarizing
State government finances last fiscal year
shows that revenue of the seven State govern-
ments during the year was $1.1 billion and ex-
pendituree $912.7 million*
Revenue in fiscal 1948 was $174.6 million
more than in fiscal 1947, a rise of 17 per
cent. At the same time, the States out down
their expenditures from $)938.4 million in 1947
to $912.7 million in 1948, a reduction of near-
ly 3 per cent*

Ask your nearest Department
of Commerce field office for
the Geneus Bureau report on-
titled Summar of State Gov-
ernment Finances in 9.It

The figures reflected an increase in revenue
for all of the seven Statee in 1948 over 1947,
ranging from 7 per cent in Florida to 46 per
cent in Tennessee. Total revenue in the South-
east in fiscal 1948 constituted about 11 per
cent of the nation's $10.0 billion*
The report also reveals that the seven
States in fiscal 1948 received a total of $187.5
million in aid from the Federal Government, 22
per cent more than was paid in fiscal 1947
with all of the States sharing in the increase*
The increases ranged from 7 per cent in South
Carolina up to 53 per cent in Alabama*
SPIRITS SALES HIGH

eastern States, Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina and Tennessee, sold nearly two
million gallons of their product in the first
quarter of 1949, according to a Bureau of the
Census survey*
Included in the sales were 1,684,993 gal-
'lone of distilled spirited and 294,025 gallons
of wine. The figures, leaued for the month of
March listed the following sales: Distilled
Spirited, Florida, 775,303; Georgia, 397,136;
South Carolina, 240,150; and Tennessee, 272 -
344, and wine, florida, 204,770; Georgias ,
942; South Carolina, 8,537; and Tennessee*
2677 *
The data covered wholesale operations
and an avera e of 51 wholesalers of distilled
spirited and 4 dealers in wine participated.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2


RETAIL SALES INCREASE

Wholesale dales Wholesale sales in the
APRIL 19V9 COMPARED WITH SuhAlni n
APRIL 194)8 1Easwesouth Centralri

1949g compared with the
20 asEcTRacheo eame month in
to HMHE 1948, but
a 0 most cities
rouse :__te gis-10and areas re-
JEtiLRY 9o in rea
on sons sales for the
two comparable months, according to Bureau of
the Census reports for the two lines of trade.
In wholesale sales, most of the lines of
business experienced downward trends, and
in the South Atlantic area the decline was
as much as 12 per cent, with the East South
Central region reflecting a 14 per cent de-
crease.
In retail sales, increases of 6 per cent
oame in Atlanta, 12 per cent in Augusta, 2
per cent in Columbus, Ga., 15 per cent in
Mdaoon, 10 per cent in Birmingham, 4 per cent
in Biloxi, 17 per cent in Clarkedale, 11
per cent in Gulfport, 14 per cent in Bristol,
Tenn., 8 per cent in Johnson City, 1 per cent
in Kingaport, and 7 per cent in Asheville.
In Savannah, a j per cent decrease wass re-
ported, and Greenwood, S. C., also showed a
j per cent drop.
The retail sales were for independent ea-
tablishments,
The increases registered for the Southeast
in retail sales in April 1949 compared wit~h
the corresponding month last year wass in keep-
ing with an average -gain of 5 per cent for
the nation as a whole. Likewise, the decreases
in wholesale sales in the two region refleot-
ed declines generally for the nation as a
whole with an average drop of 12 per cent re-
oorded for the United States.
In reporting on wholesale sales for the
four-month period of January to April, in-
olusive, the Gensus Bureau found a decrease
of 12 per cent in the South Atlantic and 9
per cent in the East South Gentral writh
most lines of business participating in the
decline. For the nation, a 9 per cent drop
was found.
In retail sales for the January-to-April
period, the trend was downwrard in most cities
and areas, including, in percentages, Atlanta,
2; Columbus, 1; Macon, ); Savannah and Biloxi,
9; and from 1 to 4 per cent among certain of
the area. On the other hand, Augusta exper-
ienced a 7 per cent rise for the four-month
period; Birming~ham and Greenwrood, 1; Clarke-
dale, 17; Gulfport and Brietol, 3; and Johnson
City, 1.
For the United Statee, the first four
months of the year brought an average decline
of 2 per cent.
Most of the southeastern arene reported
increases in sales for April 1949 compared
with March 1949, ranging from 1 per cent in
Golumbus and Kingaport to as high as 19 per
oent in Maeon. Only Augusta and Clarkedale
reported deolinee, 8 and 3 per cent respect-
ively. The average for the United States wras
a 5 per cent increase.







I


LUMB.ER BUSINESS OFF

Exports of southern pine in 1948 totaled
first quarter of 1949 an estimated 29.8
million feet of that commodity were sent to
other nations, according to the 72nd Quarterly
Report of the Lumber Survey Committee made
to Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer.
Imports of softwoods during 1946 included
319.8 million feet of pine and an estimated
2) million in the first quarter of 1949,
The Committee reported that the supply of
lumber had overtaken demand, prices had drop-
ped an average of 1 per cent a month for the
seven-month period prior to May 1949 when the
report was filed, and hundreds of small mills
had discontinued operations, writh many larger
mills shortening their hours.
The report pointed out that exports of
American lumber had fallen sharply during
the nine-month period preceding its issuance
and that exports in the first quarter of 1949
were less than half the imports.
In the manufacture of boxes and orates in
the Southeast, the Committee stated that the
output of 14 mills in the region in the first
quarter of 1949 was 19.9 per cent below that
of the comparable period in 1948.
With further reference to the general sit-
uation on lumber, the Committee said product-
ion in the first three months of 1949 wras
curtailed by unusually bad weather, decreased
demand, the closing of small and marginal
mills, and a general lack of confidence. Many
producers and dealers have adopted a nfwait
and see" policy. Most retail yards have been
making their purchases only as needed to fill
current orders. Total production in the first
quarter was estimated as 6,937 million feet,
17.5 per cent below the first quarter output
of 1948.
o RD ER -BLA N1

Use This Coupon For Ordering Material Listed
in T isssue of The Bulletin of commerce
(List The Material In T~he Space Below And
Return This Coupon To Your Nearest Field
Office Of The Department Of Commerce. Your
Name And Address Are On The Opposite Side)





















(On Sales Publications, Please
Remit To Treasurer of the U. S.)


April sales of retail stores were ea-
timated at $11.0 billion, about 3 per
cent above a year ago. However, after
allowance for the late occurrence of Easter
this year, and for differences in the number
of trading daye, retail store sales were 2 per
cent below April 1948.
-o-
Production and prices continued their grad-
ual adJustment to the reduced level of total
demand as the second quarter of 1949 opened,
but consumer buying in the aggregate remained
relatively steady at the level to which it had
dropped at the beginning of the year, the Of-
fice of Domestio Commerce, U. S. Department of
Commerce, reported in the Survey of Current
Business.
-o-
New construction put in place in May was
valued at $1.6 billion, a seasonal increase of
$200 million over April. With this 15 per cent
advance, total new construction activity
equalled that of May a year ago. The $6.6 bil-
lion total of new construction work done in
the first five months of 1949 was 3 per cent
above the total of $6.4 billion for the corres-
ponding period of 1948, largely because of in-
creased public construction,
-o-
Sales of chain stores and mail-order house
in April were estimated at $2,403 million, a-
bout 6 per cent above a year ago. After ad-
Justment for the effects of a later Easter
this year and for difference in the number of
trading days, sales at those stores were 2
per cent below April 1948.
-o-
Manufacturers sales declined. more than-
seasonally in April. The rediuction erased the
gain of the previous month, and dollar sales
were slightly below the levels of January and
February on a seasonally adJusted basis. In-
ventory book values were also lower than in
March.
-o-
Containers and packaging materials of all
types are currently in easier supply than at
any time in the past 10 years, according to
the current ineue of the Department of Com-
meroe Containers and Packaging Industry Re-
port. While it is expected that present demand
will continue through the summer and early
fall and that need for some containers, notably
food packages will increase, a downward adJust-
ment is to be expected in the latter part of
1949.
-o-
Suspension of pig iron allocations under
the voluntary plan covering the manufacture of
oast iron residential housing items wass an-
nounced by the Office of Industry Cooperation,
U. B. Department of Commerce.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3






I


w warning to motorists to be careful about driving around with last years
antyli-free in their automobiles is contained in a report issued by the
r National Bureau of Standards, U. 8. Department of Commeroe. The report,
entitled Automotive Antifreezes, is available at Department of Commerce field
offices at 1 cents a copy,
The point is stressed in the report as to whether antifreeze solutions can
be need safely for more than one season. During use, it stated, the anti-
freeze solution can become contaminated by leakage- or exhaust gas, wpartio-
ularly the oxide of carbon and sulfur, wrhich will reaot writh alkaline com-
pounds present in the antifreeze inhibitor to form salts.
'In view of the comparative cost of antifreeze and of even so minor a re-
placement part as a water pump or radiator, it is certainly cheaper in the
long run to use newr solutions each year," the report adds.


1 _


e


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta' 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3, so. 12, June 15, 1969

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FINo
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


sC-6-Jr


UNIVERSITY or FLORIDA
IGEROY L. QUAllaS
DEPARTHdENT OF ECON;OMICS
GalNESVILLAR FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY Ur LR'Y"w

BULLEY 3 1262 08748 837
sources
Book Publishing & Selling Basic Informa-
tion Bources ICE1JDU

Nautical Charts Coo~ver~iiing Section of the Gulf
Intraooastal Waterwray in Missiasippi and Louis-
iana, published by Coast .and, Gapdetio Survey -
Charts 878 and 879 250 each
Nautical Charts 876 and 877 covering water-
way through Mississippi Sound from Biloxi to
Glulfport and continuing coverage to hrand le-
land Pass
sales and Inventory Trends of New Trade
Firms -- Repi-int from S~urv!~~ey uret uins
Work Shet Forl Estimating Initial Capital
Requirements for EsitabIfS~l~n-ishing a Bok store
Recommended Commercial Standard for ood
Fiber B~lake Insurlatioan for Buildi Ang Const~ruch
ion TS4814 National Bureau of Standards
Electric Power Output and Investment Re-
print from Sur~vey of C~urrent Business'
Rotat ing Wing AcFetiviie nerayuin
the pio19914- pages avalbe
from British Iniormation Service, 30 Rookefel-
lor Plaza, New York 20 Price 600~
INDUSTRY REPORTS
Leather May 1949- Issue Monthly Sub-
script-~ion rie 60# a year
Chemicals and Druge May' 1949 Issued
Monthly Subscription price $2.50 a year
FACTS FOR INDUS ~RI
Cotton and Litr pi 949
dottonS sta SPinningz Activity April 1949
sofwod Pywod- Summary for 1948
at and Oils March 1949


PAGE 4


]%[gyp' RPOT



BUREAU. OF THE CENSUS

Provisional Estimates of the population of
Continenalnie Staes By Mtonths b-
ruary 1 to April 1, 1949 ~
Estimates of the Ppltion of Continental
Unite Saes, By Age, Tolor sdid Sex 1946 to
1948
School Enrollment and Educational Attain-
ment o~;eF Workers in the United tts-Orb
rgu
governmental Debt in 198
densus O-f ha~nufacturea:1ee:947
ICI-D5 South Atlantio States -'Slummary Stat-
istice by najor industryGbroups
MY[C-D2 Midd!l~e tlantio States Summary
Sta~Get~-~istc yMjliJor IndustyGrua
MC-D7 West South Central States Sum~mary
Statistics b~y MajTor I~ndutr Gou
M1C-D9 Pacific States Summary Statistice
by MtaJor Industry Glroups.
BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE
Farm Mac~hinery & Equipment, Including; Tract
ore Basic Iinormation Sources
SOperating Ae A Mdanufacturerle Agent
Grocery Wholesa~ling Basic Infomaltion





SOUTHEAST BUILDING UP

(..,,rlur.(c..ma..bnl l L ew public construct.
)I:1d.mas..wk... ion in the Southeast
.="""""" -advanced nearly 50
.na...... ; per cent in the first
a I quarter of 1949 over
E the corresponding period
last year.
This is shown in the
Construction and Con-
s truction Mat eriale Re or o te epartm ent
of commerce for May r~9. Expenditures repres.
ented in that type of construction in Alabama,
Florida, G~eorgia, Missiesippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinae in the first quarter of this year
approximated $120 million compared with an es-
timated $80.2 million spent in the same period
in 1948, with all States registering increases.
The report showed the following total new
public construction for the seven States for
the two period:
Tennessee, $28.2 million in the first quar-
ter of 1949 and $15.1 million in the first
quarter of 1948; Florida $19.7 million and
19.1l million; G~eorgia,182ilonad10
million; North Carolina, $17.9 million and $11 7
million; South Carolina,: $1. million and .4
million; Alabama, $11.4 million and $7.4 mil.
lion; and Mississippi, $9,8 million and $8.5
million.

This report is available gratin
--** at all Department of Commerce field
officer

Public construction in the first quarter of
1949 included $39.3 million in nonresidential
building; $37.2 million for highwpaye; b11*7
million on sewage and water facilities; and
$31.8 million in all other types of public
works*
Expenditures on all types of new construct-
lon operations in the Southeast in the first
quarter of 1949 amounted to an estimated $257.1
million compared with $227 million in the same
period last year. Included was $103.9 million
in new private construction spent in the first
quarter of this year compared with $112.8 mil-
lion expended in the same period last year*
Nationally, new public construction in the
first quarter of this year was $8,880.0 million.


COUNTY MANUFACTURING RISES


ped by manufacturing plants in nine
counties of the Southeast rose nearly
154 per cent from 1939 to 1947, according to a
preliminary report issued by the Bureau of the
Census on its 1947 Census of Manufactures.
The counties --- G)aston and Guilford in
North Carolina; Dfreenville and Spartanburg in
South Carolina; Fulton in G~eorgia; Davidson,
Hamilton and Shelby in Tennessee; and Jeffer-
son in Alabama --- were among 127 listed in the
United States as the principal industrial coun-
ties of the nation,
Value added by manufacture represents the
value of shipments less the cost of materials
and supplies. It has been found to be a useful
"measuring rod" in guaging the relative import-
ance of an industry. Such shipments from the
nine southeastern counties in 1947 was estima-
ted as $1,436.7 million compared with $567.5
million in 1939.
The number of manufacturing plants in the
nine counties went from 2,534 to 3,332 in the
eight-year period, and the average number of
production and related workers increased from
189 900 to 262,200. In 1947, there were 302,400
manufacturing employees employed in the nine
counties drawing salaries and wages totalling
$691.4 million.

Ask the nearest Department of
Commerce field office for the re-
--** port "Summary Statistice for
Principals Industrial Counties of
the U. Sn

The 262 200 production and related workers
received $544.2 million in 1947.
Glreenville county, writh a gain of 414 per
cent, led the others in percentage increase in
value added by manufacture of goods shipped in
1947 over 1939. The other, in order of per-
centage increase, were Spartanburg county, 390;
G~aston county, 371; Shelby county, 24); Guil-
ford county, 218; Fulton county 178; Hamilton
county, 116; Jefferson county, 65; and Davideon
county, 19.
The 127 counties accounted for 60 per cent
of all manufacturing establishments in the U. S.
adare located in 32 Statee of the nation.


CHARLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


ATLANTA 3, GA.
60 Whitehall St., S.tf.,
Tel. MAinut 4121 X-453


SAVAMMAII, GA.
Room 218, P.O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4765


JACKSONVILLE, FLA. MlIMI 32, FLA.
4253 Federal 81dg., 947 Seybold $1dg*,
Tel. -7111 Tel. 9-7533


MO)BILE, ALA.
308 Federal Bidg.,
Tel. 2-3641


FIELD SERVICE


Vol. 1 No. 13


JULY 1, 1949






__


FARM INCOME INCREASES

COTTN coarO~on armored of
louvm- WEUE "~IIS".an OF~Othe South
werre the
only ones in
the U. 8. to
experience a
f rise in total
oash farm in-
........ .... ......... ****** oome for the
194 197 1946 1949
survey or current business rh girr trn
four months of 1949 as compared with the cor-
responding period in 1948, and in the seven
southeastern States of Alabama, Florida, HYis-
aissippi, Georgia, Tennessee and the Carolinas
alone the rise was by more than $100 million,
nooording to a report of the Bureau of Agri-
oultural Economioe, U. S. Department of Agri-
oulture.

This report is entitled The
Farm Income Situation, and if
-->your Department of commerce
-field oficie does not have it,
it can be obtained by that of-
fioe. There is no charge.
The report showed that in all but the South
Atlantio and South Central regions perceptible
drops in cash fars income were registered.
In the seven States of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and the Carol-
inae, eash rarm income for the first four
months of this year was estimated at $874,-
950,000 compared with $753,436,000 in the same
period last year. Increases were refleted for
all of the seven States except Tennessee.
By States, the figures, in millions of dol-
lar8, included: North Carolina, 1948, $110,272
and 1949, $ 114,822;SohCalia 573
and $67,531; oeorgia, $100,969 and $105,448;
Florida, $151 763 and $178 283; Tennessee,
0132,719 and 122,871; Alabama, $89,961 and
0101,895; and xiesiesippi, $111,029 and $C181C,-
100.
In the North Atlantio region, the drop
weea-about -4-sper o~ns; in the Biast-North-Cent-
ral, 6 per cent; in the West North Central,
13 per cent; and in the Western region, "one
per cent.
In the seven southeastern Statse, a $120,000
drop in income from livestook and its products
in the four-month period of this year was sub-
stantially offeet by a 26 per cent rise in
receipts from the sale of orop produate, the
increase going from $454 123,ooo to $575,757r-
000, a net gain of $121,034 000.


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN OF COMqMERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreciated,

CITY EAAPL<0YMENT GAINS
City employment in the Southeast in-
o reased in 1948 over 1947 in keeping
writh upward national trends, according
to a Bureau of the Census report,
The number of employees employed by oity
governments in Alabama, Plorida, Georgia, Mia-
siasippi, Tennesene and the Carolinas in Got-
ober of last year wras appro~xaImatel 98,000 .. .
compared with some 94,000 employed at the same
time in 1947, the report showed.

(This Census Bureau report is ~
entitled City Employment in 194.
It is available gratin at Depart.
ment of Commerce field offices),

The non-school payroll in October 1948 ap-
proximated $16,399,200, an increase of $2,182,-
000 over that of the previous year.
The number of permanent full-time non-school
employees employed by oity governments of the
seven States last year was around 85,000 a.
against some 77,000 in 1947.
According to the Gensue Bureau, nationally
the volume of oity employment continued the
steady upward movement in evidence since 1944.
Although seasonal fluctuations brought about
temporary reversals in trend last year, city
em loyees numbered 4 per cent more in Gotober
19 8 than in the same month in 1947 in the
United States as a wholee' and monthly pay roll
of oity governments rose $30Q million between
October 1947 and October 1948, an increase ap
proaching that occurring between 1946 and 1947,
the bureau stated.
.,,,,;- **** ~* CMI.ttLS-- kCTIVtP"'R ",, ,,,
Cottonseed oil mills in seven States of
the South in 1947 shipped products val.
~ued at $319.1 million, sooording to a
Bureau of the Census Censue of Mbanufactures re.
port for 1947.
The report shows that 237 establishments
operating in Alabama, Georgia, Missiesippi,
North Carolina, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas
employed a total of 9,764 employees drawing
$20.2 million in salaries and wages, including
8,151 production and related workers receiving
$14.4 million in wages.
Goet of materials, fuel, electricity and non-
tract work in the seven States was estimated as
$255.1 million. Value of shipments included, in
millions of dollars, North Carolina, )24.5;
G~eorgia, $34.9; Alabama, )30; Mississippi, $63.5
Louisiana, $11,9; Oklahoma, $23.2; and Texas,
Nationally, the industry shipped products
valued at $518 million in 1947, an increase of
more than 200 per cent over 1939.


Business Aids distributed by
-Department of Commeroe field
orties is the one entitled New
-hannels Fo9r The Distribution oi
48ods An? extract; from the publI-
SE tin Mtodern Industry, the Aid
discuses edistrlibuItion problems in
the post-war period. Thousands of
oopies have been distributed, but
a few are still available.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





PAGE. 3


BULLETIN OF; COMMERCE

SUGAR DELIVER IES LISTED
A total of 189,961.3 short tons of re-
fi ined sugar was delivered by primary
I \distributors in the seven southeast-
ern States of Alabama, ELoridizs Georgia, Mise-
issippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas during
the first three months of 1949, according to
the quarterly Industry Report for sua ol
asses and Cneto nary~PBL3 issuedb h eat
ment of Commeroe.
The report, for June 1949, also shows
that in 1948 sugar deliveries by primary dis-
tributors in the same seven States totalled
797,745.8 short tons.
.Deliveries from January to March of this
year, by States, and in short tone, refined
value included: Alphama, 24,153.5; riorida,
26,93 .9; Gesorgia, 42,769.2* Missiesippi*
15,159.9* North Carolina, 34,227.7; south: Car-
olina, 14,929.8; and Tennessee, 31,714,.3*
Other Industry reports now avail-
able inolute those for Construc~tion
"I>and Construction Mtaterisis (la
Ty~ afffIPls_ TS~ff S 1 *9)and
Pulp. Paper anld Board (]ay 9
Deliveries during 1948 included the follow-
ing, in short tone: Alabama, 10),150.9; Flor-
.14a, 104 2167.0; Georgia, 185,392.8; MIseles-
Appi, 66 246.1; Norteh Carolina, 140),984.6;
South Carolina, 65,329.6; and Tennesse*, 132,-
37 ***
IlNCC)ME TAXES UP SHARtPLYf

M~isalasippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas in fiscal year 1948 collected
$4,280,000 more in individual income taxes
from their residents than they did in fiscal
1947 the Census Bureau announced in a report
entitled Summary of State Government Finanoes
Who report, available at all Department of
Commerce ofiies gratin, lieta 191C8 collections
in individual income taxes in the six Statses
as )56,469,ooo and $52,189,ooo in fiscal 1947*
1-. c -n.,vr-.tr -! **7r hre-- "a- -e1, me
OdLRDE p L_ E A
Use This Coupon Por Ordering MUateral Listed
In This ieaue Of The Bulletin _of Commeroe















S(On Sales Publications, Please Realt
To The Treasurer of the U. 8.)


Personal income declined to an annual
billion below the March level, although
2# per cent higher than in April 1948~. This
was the fourth conseoutive month in which per-
sonal income declined.
-o-
Sales of service and limited-funation wrhole-
salers in April were estimated at $5r227 mil-
lion, down about $450 million from the MYarch
rate. Approximately a third of the drop was
due to seasonal factors. Durable-goode whole-
saleres sales were $1,r933 million and sales
of nondurable-goode dealer were $3,294 mil-
lion.
-o-
Publioly reported oneh dividend payments
by United States corporations totaled $474.4
million in April, or 3 per cent more than the
$460 million disbursed during April 1948. For
the four months ended April 30 1949, oneh
dividend payments amounted to ~1.3 billion,
which was 8 per cent more than the $1.2 paid
out in the same period in 1948.
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of
April were estimated at $53,566 million, a de-
oline of $1,200 million from the end of MUarch.
Compared with the inventories of February 28 -
which avoided the difficulty df evaluating the
effects of the Easter season this represented
a net decrease of $900 million in the two
months.

Unemployment rose by 270,000 between April
and May, following a slight dooline in the pre-
vious month, according to Census Bureau eati-
mates. Unemployment was placed at 3,289,000
in the wseekending MdagsUkand the estimate for -
the week ending April 9 was j,016,000.
-o-
Production of passenger and motoroyole tire
in April 1949 was 7 per cent greater. than in
both March 1949 and April 1948~. For the first
four months of this year, however, production
was 9 per cent less than for the same period in
1948.
-o-
Production of building materials in March
exceeded the February total by 18 per cent.
March output of 15 of the 20 materials listed
in the Department of Commerce monthly index of
production showed gains over the previous
month.

The American Telephone and Telegraph Company
and its subsidiaries have submitted to the U.
8. Department of Commeroe a liat' of about 7,000
patents owned by than which they have requested
be included in the Register of'Patents Available
for Licensing or S~ale. The Register now con-
tains about 50,000 patents available for use.





PAGE 4



1510 SINil $S BIDOlia l

LN $$28 JE


8. 19~40 to 1948e
The Monhl Reprt on the Labor Force May
Estimates of the Nonwhite Population of
Continental U. S. By Race 191C0 to 1947
Git Epoyment in 194
Summaq of State Government Finanoes in 1948
Cjensue of Mtanufacturee:1947
Summary St atis~tre;j;ice fr Pinola Indus trial

Arkaonsa Summary Statistice For Selected
Local Areas
Aizaon Summary St~atlstics for SelectedlLo
Loal Areas
Idnaho Summary Statistice For Selected Lo
Loal EF ea
ontvana Summary Statistics For Selected
Local Areas

North Dakota Summary Statistics For Sel-
ected Local Areas
"Ov~
.~9~FPNALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
;!;' ~"~XPA MENT OF POSTA~GE $300




gg.(z.JF


LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTt6ENT OF ECONOMICS
MATNEsvLLE* FtoRIDA


BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE
Chlorine (synopsis of Iformatiion) June
1949 Price 10
Benzene (Bentol) -(Synopele of Informnation).
June 1949 10
Motor Vehicles 2nd Edition Basic Inform.
ation Sources June 1949
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Ments and Boye' Clothing and Gotton and Al-
lied G~arments December 1948 -
Gotton Broad Woven Goods Jan.-Mar. 1949
Superphosphte Summary for 1948
Red Cedar Shingles Mar, and April 1949
Confectionery & Competitive Chocolate Prod-
ucts Manufacturersl Sales March 149
Nonferrous Castinge March 1949
Gray Irorl Castings March19
Plumbing Fixtures rirst quarter 1949
Fana, Blowers & Unit Heaters -Frtqatr
1949
Aluminum Wrought Products April 1949
Mnesium Wrought Produc s April 1949
Maleable Iron Castings April 1949
dtton and Linters Consumed and on Hand -
By States April 1949
Cotton and Linters Consumption, Stocks,
I mports & -Exports;t~a &Ati ve Spindl e May 1949
Pulp & Paper Manufacture in the U. 8. Mar.
1949 and April 1949
Clay Construction Products March 1949
Paint, Varnish, Lacquer & Filler Mar. 1949
and April 1949 and ummary for19
Fate & 0118 Consumption let Quarter 1949
Rayon Broad Woven Goods let quarter 1949
Flour Milling Products April 1949
Asphalt & Tar Roofing & Siding Products -
March199
INDUSTRY REPORTS
Rubber May 1949g Issued Bimonthly -
Price 50P a year
Pulp, paper gS Board leaued Monthly May
1949 Price $2.25 a year j

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office U- J
50 Whitehall Street S.W. "
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009



-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY


GPO WF50 6-21-49 3000 10-160


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIUA
BULL
3 1262 08748 8366
Fate &e 0118 May _, uru mmonmY -
Price 81.00 a year
obstruction a construction Materials nay
1949 State Construction Es inmates, et uar-
ter 1948 and 1st Quarter 1949 Upon ]Request
Suar Molasses & Confectionery June 1949
Issued~ Quater~l~y -Prie 04a ya
MIS CELLANED U9
Current Inventory bevelbpments Reprint
from Survey of Current Business
Copr ater Tube & copper & Brass Pip
Simplified Practice RecommenatoR274
National Bureau of Standards 10B
The General Business Situation in 1949
An Address by Md. Joseph keehan, Director, Of-
flee of Business Economies, U. S. Department
of Commerce
Airport Design Authoritative Information
on Airport Pla~innin & Design lesued by Civil
Aeronautics Administration 300
Canadian-American Gooperation An Address
by Secretary of Commerce dha~rles sawyer
Eort Control & Allocation Powrers 7th
Quarterly Report by the Secretary of Commerce -
200
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Estimates of the Farm Ponulation of the U.,













ULllNITE SATS EPRTEN O CMMRC


d


INDUSTRY REPORTS RECEIVED

ceived from the Bureau of the Gensue
on the 1947 Census of Manufactures and
business men of the Southeast interested in
developm~ents in their own and
related industries would do
well to enter their requests
promptly for these reports.
To date, the following such
reports have been received
and are available through all
Department of Commerce field
offices:
MC32B Cement; tucua
jjj~~e~.r~~Clay Products Srcua
,, MG20F suga;Conecio-
eyand Related Products
MO24B Millork, Pyo
and Prefabricate~d~ Structural
Wood Products
MC22B Woolen and Worated
Manufactures
MG22D Garpets. Ruge and
Other Floor Coyverings
MHC28D soap Glycerin;
Clenig Polisin & Related
routs
Y0320 Pottery & Related
Productsa
MORVE Metal Barrele, Drmss

&ts Paiele;Wrahe Produot; n
Other Metal Products

ad39B Musical Instruments
and Parts; Toys; an~d Sporting
and Athletic Goods
MC30 Rubber Products
M037 B Aircraft & Parts
Each of the foregoing publi-
oations is priced at 100. Ad-
ditional reports will be ie-
aued from day to day covering
other industries. Most of than
are priced at 100, but a few
will cost 15d and one or two
i,' will be 200
see Page 4 of this Bulletin
of Commerce for a further 11stt
of Genius Bureau material.


NEWP PUBLICATION ISSUED

enter the business field will find in
a new Department of Commeroe booklet
just issued much up-to-date information on the
financing phases of their project,
The booklet, entitled Financial Considera.
tions in the Establi shmen~t ofa New Small Bush ei
nese discusses the different types of capital
ttHra are needed; how much of each type is re-
quired for various kinds of business; and where
such capital may be obtained,
The booklet discussed in this
article is now obtainable at all
Department of Commerce field of- 1
fices. The price is 15 .
The new publication takes up the importance
of having the proper amount of equity or risk
capital in the business to assure stability
and to provide a basis for borrowing from one
or more of the sources of loan capital.
It also emphasizes the importance of manag-
ing the capital accounts in order to maintain
a good balance between fixed and working capi-
tal. Several of the sources of capital most
frequently available to small business are
also discussed.
In addition to its usefulness to individuals
planning new small businesses, the booklet will
be of use to individuals who have recently
undertaken new businesses, as well as to prof-
feasional counselors.
The booklet is a sort of companion publica-
tion to several others of similar design pub-
lished by the Department in the past year or
two. For example, there is one entitled The
Small Businessnan and His Financial StatWemnts,
The Small Busi~nessman n i anadTe
malBusinessman an~d~ ources fLas The
first-named booklet is priced at l, the
second at 100, and the one on sources of loans
is 158.
Also available to the small business man
is the booklet Small Bu~sineese and Government
Licenses (158). Other include Small Business
and GLovernment Reguation (100); Small Businese
and Regulation of Pricing Practices (194); and
Small Busnessan Tad-Mrk (104). Finally,
there are the several Department of Commeroe
aide to business in solving income tax problems


AUTLAT 3, GA.
60 tihitehall St., LL,
Tel. Ilinet 4)121 X-453


3AiVAMMIl, GA.
Amon 218, P.O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-17855


JACK(SONVILLE, FLA.
4125 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 41-7III


NIIYNI 32, FLA.
947 Seybold 9ldg*,
Tel. 9-7533


MOBILE, AILA.
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641


CHIltLESTON, S.C.
310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. 7771


VOL. 3 NO. 14


July 15, 1949


r

c ,6~: zc4i~//C~


,k~J~"ri bl~ ~,,,pp,





SOUTHEAST SAMIfLLS ACTIVE

east have been shipping lumber productsr
in recent year valued at upwards of
half a billion dollars, the recent Gensue of
Manufactures for 1947 c~onducted by the Bureau
of the Gensue shows.
The bureau, in a preliminary report Just 18-
aued, found that in 1947 a total of 7,037 ee-
tablishments operating -16,623 mills in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee and
the Carolinae shipped products valued at $698.9
million, or about 27 per cent of the national
$2,501 million worth which went forward from
all States. The total production in the seven
States aggregated 8,489,206,000 board feet
of lumber and lumber products,

report ask your Department
fiCmec ll ileor Series MC13A-1, titled
Sawmills and Planing Mille,
General. 1947. It is gratie.
Production and value of products shipped
included Alabama, 1,794,961,000 board feet
valued at $159.7 million; oeorgia, 1,687,414,
-000 and $157 million; North Carolina, 1,539,-
656,ooo and $115 million; Mississippi, 1,397,-
145,000 and $122.5 million; SoTh arolin,
811,000 and $ 62.8 million; SoTennesseen,
665,7,ooo and millioni; and Florida,
533,579,ooo and 84.9 million. The industry em-
ployed an average of 13),123 employees in 1947.


United States Department of Commerce
BULLETIN C)F COAAAAERCE
Atlanta Regional Office
C. Parker Persons, Regional Director
This publication is available upon re-
quest. Its contents are not copyrighted
and may be reprinted freely. Mention of
source will be appreciated,
MOTOR TAXES HIGH
Motor vehicle operations contributed a-
bout 31 per cent of the total tax rev-
enue collected by seven southeastern
State last fiscal year. The States are Ala-
bama, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Tennessee
and the Carolinas. They collected $281.5 mil-
lion in taxes on motor vehiles, motor vehicle
fuels and operating licenses. Total tax rey.
enue wras $901l.1 million,
Some $)20 million more in taxes on motor
vehicle operations wees taken by the seven
State last fiscal year than in fiscal 1947.
The figures were compiled by the Bureau of
the Geneus from State reports and incorporated
among data for the United States in its publi-
cation entitled Summary of State Glovernment
Finances in 19 48~. Coip';~ies r~e availablewitou
charge at all1 Department of Commerce field of-
flees.
The taxes collected on motor vehicle opera-
tions included $220.2 million on fuels and
$61.2 on motor vehicles and operators.


1


Dollars Food Gen. Mldee. Druge Furn.- Net
(TotalI) House- (556
(Dollare) Radio Dole. )
(Add 000)


14

20.2
27.3


Sales


Is203,69 40,%~951
175.220 316,674
190,246 42,239
252,98o 56,786
277r735 54,s43
105 739 18.372
12o,2o6; 17,177
170,791 30,417
187,150 30 319
Yamaement Mag~azine


BUYING POWER FOR SELECTED AREAS OF


SOUTHEAST 1948 &s 1947
EFFECTIVE BUYING POWER


SURVEY OF


POP 'N.
(Families)


RETAIL BALES


~Per Per


Atlanta
1947 -
1948
Birming~ham
1947 -
1948
Me a
19 T~j
19 8
Knoxville
19T4{
1948
Chattnoa
194} ~~1
1948
Nashrille
19~47
1948
Jacrkson
1997
1948
Charlotte
19s7
1948
Source:
Note:


Bok,299 88,138
574,177 g2,459

421,121 66,310 7


169,59
188,o3 C


19,346
16,330 40,966


488,636 -
5o5,289 1,426
410,121- ---
453,185 1,439
569,195 ----
541,164 1,559
216,090--
216,488g 1,463
211,857 ----
196,gas 1,373
292,221 ----
2y7,875 1,379
115,074---
160,7871 1,703
192,546 -
251,048 1,793


4,896
4,817
4,854-
5,o24
5,8eo
5,159
5,747
5,319


84.5
90.2


51624 -10,019 --- -
8,02) 10,839 39,723


433,615 82,862 130,114
485-,ool 81,o32 138,692


14 086 --
16,080 --
6,122 --
6,256 --


24,280
33,829


25,9g64 5,28 24,837


37,989
41,970


8,977 --
9r547 21,248


17,970 4,os9 ---
20,991 3,993 9,352

32,369%g 6,367--


5,697
5,s90

6:,50


Th bove data are available for all
in the United States. If interested,
Department of Commeroe field ofiie.


oities, counties and states
consult your nearest


BU LLETIN ` OF; C COMMERCE


PAGEf. 2









I ..


SOUTHEASTs.BUILDING) UP
Total of. approxima ely 19.3 billion
was expended o~n new construction in
the Southeast in the past ten years,
sooording to estimated made by the Office of
Domestic Colmmeroe, U. S. DTepartnent of Com-
merce in a special number of its Industry
Rort for Construction and Construction.Mat-

eriT .expenditures included $10 billion in
new private building end 89.3 billion in new
public construction operations.

in ordering this report frm
your Department of Commerce
field ofiie, ask for the Con-
struction and Construction

plemen fo Jne~l~~ 199*
The estimate embraces the period of 1939 to
1948, inclusive. It showrs that $3.6 billion
was expended in private residential building.
$C2.6 billion on private non-residential build-
ing, and $2.2 billion on public utility work*
In new public construction, $651.6 million
was spent in residential building; $2 billion
on non-residential building: $3.5 billion on
military and naval installations: $1.7 billion
on highwsaye; $87 .7 million in conservation
and development; $323.8 million in sewer and
water development, and $208 million on other
enterprises for the public good.
The southeastern Statse covered in the
foregoing estimate included Alabama, Floridas
G~eorgia, Missiesippi, Tennessee, the Carolinass
the Virginias, Maryland, D~elawrare and the
District of Columbia. Florida was credited
with an expenditure of $2.7 billion in total
new construction and Georgia, 81.6 billion*
Tennessee had $1.8 billion*

tear here
O RDE R B L AN 1

Use This Goupon For Ordering Material Listed
I~n TPhis Issue ofi thet Bulletin of omre
(LT T~~hheMa;t~erf. I~niaI TeSac eowAd
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Field
Office of the Department of Con~netoe. Your'
Name and Address Are On The Opposite Side)


otal sales of retail stores in May
after adjustment for seasonal factor
and differences in the number of trading days.
The seasonally adjusted index of retail sales
for May was 332 compared with j3) in April
and 330 in May a year ago. Durable-goods sale
w~ere higher despite closing dowfn operations
of one of the larger automobile producers 'in
early May which interrupted expansion of auto-
motive sales characterizing previous months.
-o-
Value of new construction to be put in
place this year may reach a record total of
$19 billion, 1 per cent above the revised
figure of $18,77 billion for 1948. In addition
if construction costs continue to decline
the physical volume of construction in 1q9
might show a somewhat larger percentage in-
crease over 1948 than the dollar value.
-o-
The remaining backlog of demand for equip-
ment plue the continuing need for replace-
ment and growth is a major element of
strength in the present business situation,
according to an article in the June issue of
the Department of Commeree's Survey of Current
Business. The article cautions, however, that
some decline from the very high 1948 outlays
for such equipment seems probable as the more
urgent requirements become satisfied,
-o-
Total expenditures for alohholic beverages,
including public revenues, amounted to $8.8
billion in 1948. This estimate represents the
aggregate expenditure by consumers and busi-
nees for distilled spirits, wine and beer,
w hether.bought in package form or by the drink.
-o-
Sales of 15,000 large independent retailers
were one per cent lower in May 1949 than in
the same month last year, the Bureau of the
Census reported. A decrease of 4 per cent was
registered for May compared with April of this
year. Only motor-vehicle dealers recorded a
substantial sales increase -- 36 per cent --
in May 1949 over May 1948.
-o-
Sales of ferrous scrap owned overeeae by U.
S. government agencies are no longer restriot-
ed exclusively to buyers who will ship the
scrap to this country, 8eoretary of Commerce
Charles Sawyer announced. Existing contracts
covering scrap already purchased under the
former destination-control provisions may now
also be modified at the discretion of the own-
ing agencies to permit shipment to other coun-
tries.
-0-
The pace of business activity continued to
ease in May, the Office of Business Economioe,
U. S. Department of Commerce, announced.


(Please Remit to the Treasurer of the
United States on Salse Publications)


LBUELET~IN OF :COMMERCE


PAGE 3




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8358
BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Trends in the Grocery Trade April 1949.
Trends in the Drug Trade April 1949.
Trends in the Electrical Goode Trade April
949. --~--~-
Trends in the Jewrelry Trade April 19 9.
Trnsin the Tobacco Trade April 1q9
densue Publications January-M-~arch 19 9 -


Catalog & subJect (lide. Price Bo#.
Gensue of Manufacturee:194
MG13A-1 Sawmills & Planingr Mills. General
Md9id Summa~r Stati'stice for Selecte


Local Are~ae Texas;---~----
MCS46 Summary Statistice for Selected
Local Areas Louisiana
MG-830 summary statistics for Selected
Local Areas Florida
MC-828 Summary Statistion for Selected
LclAreae South Carolina
Ma2C-827 Summaryelc Stticsor Selected.
Local Areas North Carlina
MC-844 Summary Statistics for Selected
Local Areas Miseissipp
MC-82 Sumr Statistice for Selected
Loca Areas Vigii
MG-837 Summary Statistice for Selected
Local Areda Oklahomar
MC-822 Summary Statistice for Selected
Local Areas Delmiawr
MG-S41 Summary Statietioe for Selected
Local Areas Wyomin
MOC-s1 Summary statistics for Selected
oclAreas SUtah Dk
M0-819 Summary Statistice for Selected
LalAreas SerouthDoa
M0-83~ Summary Statistice for Selected
Local Areas Vermon
MO-816 Summary Statieties for Selected
LclAreas Iowras
MC-820 Summary Statietiics or Selected
Lc Arbcas Maine
MC-842 Summary Statistice for Selected
Local Areas Colord
MC-17A-1 Cottonseed Oil Mille
M1C-18A- oke Ovens Industries


MdCl6-: Prepared Animal Feede~


1


INDUSTRY REPORTS
Containers and Pa~ckaging une 1949q Is-
aued Quarterly Subecription price, 600 a
year.
Pulp, Paper & Board Issued Monthly -
June 19 9 82.25 a year.
Construction & Construction Materials -
JuneP 1949n Statistical Supplement Satse
Distribution of Construction Activity, 1939 -
1948.
FACTS POR INDUSTRY
Fats and Oils April 1949.
Superp~hosphate April 1949
Sotftwood Plywood April 1949,
Cotton and Linters Consumption, Stocks,
Imports & Exports & Active Cotton Spindles -
May 1949.
otton & Lintere Consumption and On Hand -
Ray 14.
Co~tto~n system Spinning Activity May 1949.
Ahat & Tar Roofin & Siin Products -
April 194.
construction Machinery Excavating & Earth-
moving Equipment First Quarter 1949.
Commercial Steel Forgings April 1949.
Steel Castings April 19 9.
Gray Iron Castings April 1949.
Mechanical tokes April 1949.
k180tCIILLNEDUS
Rapid Electrodeposition of Iron From Ferrous
chloride Baths Research Paper RP991 Nation-
al Bureau of Standards.
Publications of the National Bureau of Stan-
dalard pil 1949. ~
Radio Interference suppression of High Fre-
quency Are WPelder PB97469 Office of Tech-
nical Services. Price 500.
Plastic Inspection OTS PB91836 $2.75.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300








BC-6-JF
UNIVERSITY CUP PLCRIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .





-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE..

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PAGE 4










UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLIllTA 3, GA. SAV~llrl, GA. JACKSDAVILLE, FLA. NIANI 32, FLA MDBILE, ALL CHARLESTOn, s.C.
50 Yhitehall St., LLY, Amon 218, P.O. Bldg., )25 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold aldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. Illnet 4)120 X-153 Tel. 2-47551 Tel. 41-7111 Tel. 9-7538 Tel* 2-36411 Tel. 7771


voL. 3 No. 15 August 1, 1949


HISTORICAL STATISTICS OF Ut St

T he fishing industry has doubled in the
1918, sooording to figures published
in the book Historical Statistics of the United
o hCensus.
The publication, a supplement to the Statie-
tical Abstract of the United States, takesits
eaers back in some cases to the post-revolu-
tionary days of 1790s particularly in the ma~t-
ter of population. It was issued, the Gensus
Bureau points out, with the advice and assist-
ance of the Social Solence Research Council.
This publiention is buckram bound,
and is being offered the public at a
Price of $2.50. It is available at
all Department of Commerce field of-
fices,
While much of this new book is devoted to
statistics national in scope, a regional break-
down is made in the figures here and there, as
in the case of fisheries, which shows that in
1918 the total fishery catch in the Gulf and
South Atlantio States was 1C49,78S4 000 pounds.
In 1945, the catch had grown to 7 6,027,000
pounds,
Included in the taken in 1918 were IC8,003,-
000 pounds of shrimp in the southern area com-
pared wi~th 189,024,000 pounds in 1945.
According to the Ceneus Bureau, the new
publication presents in compact form for ready
reference approximately 3,000 statistical time
series covering various periods from 1789 to
1945. The figures, it was added, reflect econo-
mio, social and political aspects of the de-
velopment of the nation since the Federal Clov-
ernment was formally established.
"The present edition is not intended as a
final product,H the Bureau cautions in its in-
troduction, ''In terms of the obJectives of the
compilers, it is preliminary in character and
comprises, in effect, a working manuscript. As
such, it establishes a pattern and provides a
preliminary selection of materials. Gape and
weaknesses are thereby disclosed and problems
orystallizedu
The publication includes 36j pages of
statistics, appendix data, and indexes, with
much explanatory matter,


FARM SALES IN SOUTHEAST

ixteen orop products
eastern farmers a total
of $364,688,000, according to
Sa report of the Crop Reporting
Board, Bureau of Agricultural
-.' Economics, U. B. Department of
Agriculture.
This wpas $C18,681,000 less than
was received for the same products
;' sold in the Southeastern area in
.)1947, the report show~ed.
The States included in this sun-
mary are Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee and the Caro-
linas, and the commodities were wheat,
;*jl corn, oats, barley, rye, buckwnheat,
sorgha grain, soybeans for beans, cowpeas for
peas, peanut, hay, lespedeza seed, sorghum
eyrup, sugar cane, Irish and sweet potatoes.
If interested in this report,
ask your Department of Commerce
field office to order for you the
report of the Grop Reporting Board,
) ureau of Agricultural Economics,
U. 8. Department of Agriculture
entitled Farm Production, Farm Die-
position; ~, ,t""and ale o Pincp

Sales of each of the sixteen products in
1948 and 1947 for the seven-State area were:
Wheat, $25,061 000 in 1948 and $b33,638,000
in 1947; Corn, $66,112. 000 and $8~8,46),000;
oats, $16 714,000 and 922,337 000; barley, $1l,-
089,000 and $1t,486,000; 9e 937 000 and $1,-
149,00; uckheat $6,000 and $~66,000; sor-
gham grain, $}44,000 and $354 000; soybeans for
pa 2,beana, $17,314,000 and $18 195,r000; cowpeas for
peas, $ ,869,00 and $4,214,000; peanut
5155 g9,ooo and 8i35,315,ooo; hay $'14 839,ooo
and 51,738,000; leepedeza seed $ ,116 000 and
$6,603,000; sorghum syrup, $2,7 7,000 and $t4,-
915,ooo; sugar cane, ,to66 ooo and $ 0,562,-
000; Irish potatoes, 9,0 O~,000 and 23,950,-
000; eaeet potatoes, 7,j1C46,000 and $7,386,-
000.
Estimates for other crops produced in the
seven States, such as cotton and cottonseed,
tobacco, and so forth appear in separate re-
ports,


cn,,,d


~d~ep2oy





FARM MACHINE INDUSTRY ACTIVE


SOUTH'S PRODUCTION HIGH
Millwork plants of the South Atlantio
area in 1947 shipped products valued at
$19,614,000 less the cost of materials,
supplies and so forth, figures included in the
Census of Manufactures for that year conducted
by the Bureau of the Census show.
The figures are reflected in the industry-
wide Gensus of Manufactures reports now being
released for many industries by the Gensus
Bureau,

Request these reports by~industry
frm the nearest Department of Com-
merce field office. They are priced
at 10{ and 150 each.
Value of the millwork plant shipments in-
cluded Georgia, $2,939,000, and Florida, $3~,-
966,000.
Plywood plants in the same area shipped
products valued at $22,657,000, including
North Carolina, $4,468,000. South Carolina,
$10,554,ooo; and Georgia, 52,842,000,
Prefabricated wood produate shipped from
the South Atlantic were valued at $3,848,000,
including Georgia, $1,526,000, and Florida,
$844,000.
Other regional data developed in the re-
ports regarding value of shipments included:
Hydraulic cement, $12,223,000; brick and
hollow tile, $19,749,000; clay refractories,
$7,32),0000; preserved wood, $17 539,000; water-
proof outer garments, 8520,ooo; and confection-
ery products in the South and West, $81,563,-
000.
(See Page 4 of this Bulletin of Commerce
for a further list of Census Bureau reports).


this information wras taken from
a Facts For Industry report. Simi-
@)lar data are issued each month for
other industries. See Page 4 for
current list,

The Southeastern production last year was
6 per cent of the value placed on the national
output, which was estimated at $b1,684.,589,689.
Leading producing State in the South Atlan-
tic group was Georglia with a production value
of,$18,469,460. Others wpere Virginia, $3,026,-
848; North Carolina, $6,008,472; and Delaware,
Maryland, west Virginia, South Carolina and
Florida combined, $6,469,342.
In the East South Central area, the Tennee-
see production was $18,642,926, and Alabama and
Missiasippi, $10,914.524.


I
RADIO BROADCASTS ON THE BUSINESS SITUATION

his broadcast on the economic state of the Nation, The United
States Depa~rtment of Commerce will present -a series of five special
programs on the current business situation in cooperation writh the National
Broadcasting Company on the University of Chicago Round Table Program under
the general title "How's Businese?"
The first broadcast, presented Sunday, July 24, was participated in by
Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer, U. 8, Senator Paul Douglas, Democrat,
Illinois, and Theodore Yntema, Vice President, Ford Motor Company, and
formerly Executive Director of the Committee for Economic Development. The
subject wass "Will Business Get Better or Worse?w The second broadcast was
made July 31 on the subject of 'What Should We Do To Expand Business Ae-
tivity?u and the participants w~ere M. Joseph Meehan, Director, Office of
Business Economics, U. S. Department of Commeroe, Roy Blau, Professor of
Economies, University of Chicago. The other programs, with dates and par-
ticipants follow:
August 7 s"What Puture for the Small Businessman?n H. B. McCoy, Director,
Office of Domestic Commerce, U. 8. Department of Commerce, and Lynn A.
Williams, with a third speaker to be announced.
August 14 ntorld Trade and the British Criasi,n Thomas C. Blaisdell,
Assistant Secretary of Commeroe, and Theodore W. Sohultz, head of the
Economics Department, University of Chicago.
August 21 "How Can American Business Speed Economio Progress Abroad?"
Earl W. Clark, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce and Earl
Hamilton, Professor of Economics, University of Chicago.
All five broadcasts will originate in W~ashingiton and will be presented
each Sunday designated from 1:j0 P. M. to 1:45 P. M., Eastern Standard Time.


produced farm machines
and equipment valued
at $116.9 million, 116 per
cent more than the valuation
of $54,o61,195 placed on the
Production of those commod-
ities in 1947, according to
a Bureau of the Geneus sur-
Vey.
Value of the products
produced in Alabama Florida,
G)eorgia, Mississippi, Tenn-
easee, the Carolinas and
Virginias, Delaware, Mbary-
land and Kentucky in 1948
and attachments and parts at


wras $93,394,415,
823,551,105.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





NAVAL STORES MARKET ACTIVE


important to the Southeast -- was ob-
served as a result of the recent an-
nouncement of the U. S. Department of Agrioul-
ture increasing parity from 70 to 80 per cent
in the 1949 price support program, according
to the current issue of the U. S. Department
ufComme~rce Industry Report for Chemicale and

Ask the nearest Department of
Commerce for the June 1949 ie-
sue of the Chemicals and Drugs
Industry RepoT. (Pice 2.50
a year), Also now available
Share the Industry Reports for
Construction & Construction
Materials with outlook for com-
mercial construction (Free);
L;eate 600 a year); and Gof-
fee, ea, oooa & Spices (1if
a year),

Domestic demands for turpentine and rosin
were improved, the Report noted, and the ex-
port market picked up with sizable quantities
of turpentine and roein booked for early ship-
ment. Minor fluctuations in prices of turpen-
tine and roein occurred.
Production of gum turpentine during April,
as reported by the Agriculture Department,
totalled 22,120 barrels, which was slightly
below April 1948. Stooke at the end of April
amounted to 99,180 barrels. Output for the
1948-49 naval stores crop year reached 324,-
330 barreled, an increase of 10 per cent over
the previous season, the Industry Report said.
Production of wood turpentine in April was
27,890 barrels, 2 per cent above the same
month last year, it added,
- - tear here - -
ORDER BLAN K
Use This Cou22E orE Ordering Material Listed
In This leaue of the Bulletin of Commerce
(Lst Tie Material in the Space Below and
Return this Coupon to your Nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name and
Address are on the Opposite Side)


















(Please Remit to the Treasurer of the
United Statse on Sales Publications)


May sale of chain stores and mail-order
houses were up slightly from April af-
ter adjustment for seasonal factors and
for differences in the number of trading daye.
Total dollar sales for the month were estimat-
ed at $2,248 billion. Greater than seasonal
increases were registered among durable-goode
stores, including automotive accessories,
hardware and building materials stores.
-o-
Manufacturere' sales in May totalled $16.1
billion, or 8700 million below April, while
inventory book values declined $UO0 million
to about $30.7 billion. In view of the down-
ward movement of wholesale prices, the de-
creases in physical volume was not so large
as the change in dollar figures.
-o-
Sales of service and limited-function
wrholesalere in May -- estimated at $5,201 mil-
lion -- showed little change from the April
level. Since the seasonal factors were the
same for both months, the seasonally corrected
sales were also unchanged.
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of
May, estimated at $52,538 million, showed a
decline of $1,200 million from April. Nearly
a fourth of the decline was due to seasonal
fluctuations. Although in part due to price
factor, the change represented a sizable de-
cline in physical volume of stocks.
-o-
A record total of nearly $8.5 billion was
spent for new construction during the first
half of 1949. The figure was about $}00 mil-
lion, or 4 per cent, higher than the previous
record dollar value of new construction put in
place during the first six months of 1948,
-o-
About 1 1-4 million young person Joined
the labor force between May and June as a
result of the closing of sohoole for the sum-
mer, constituting a major onuse of the in-
orease in the estimated employment and unemploy-
ment for June, Secretary of Commeroe Charles
Sawyer announced.
-o-
American business, exclusive of agriculture,
plans to spend $4.6 million on new plant and
equipment in the third quarter of this year.
The anticipated expenditure represents a de-
oline of about 4 per cent from the preceding
quarter, and is about the same amount below
the corresponding quarter of 1948.
-o-
World production of natural rubber in 1949
is now estimated by the Department of Commerce
at 1,53j5,000 long tone, 40,000 tons less than
the total indicated last April by the Inter-
national Rubber Study Group in London. Expect-
ed U. 8. consumption is placed at 570,ooo tone.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3




















BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Monthly ~Retail Trade Report East south
Central Cities and Areas May 1949
Monthly Retail Trade Report South Atlan-
tic Region Cities and Areas May 1949
Canned Food Report -June 1, 1949
Estimated Farm Population of the U. 8* -
January 1949
Work Experience of the Population in 198
TeLbr Force July ,14
Public Employment in Aril 19
Census of Manufactures: 1
MC gZ Bummary Statistics for Selected
Local Areas New York
MC-85 Summary Statistice for Selected
Local ~Area Rhode Island
MC-32 Bummary Statistics for Selected
Local Areas New Hampshire
~d-57 Summary Statistics for Belected
Local Areas WashihKERE
SMC-9'C5 Summary Statistics for Selected
Local Areas OregonE
SMC100-4 -- Summary Statistics for Major
Cities
, MC100-3 Summary Statistics for Standard
Metropolitan Areas
MOC2 E-1 Sheet-Metal Work
M ?-2-~ Stamped & Pressed Metal Products
MC 1E-1 FlavorEMER
MCASA-1 Motor Vehicles & Parts & Truck
& Bus Bodies
bgC}4B-1 Heating & Cooking Equipment_. NEC
MC- 191 umpe~L& C~omprestti
M 60- Dressetu Roen~ Price
MC 7F-1 Pur-Felt Hate & Hat Bodies
MO 3A-1 Manufactured Ice
(01 1~- Prepared Animal Feeds
MC220-1 M~alleableo-FIron; Fonre s


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08748 8416

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE
PACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Cotton System Spinning Activity May 1949
otton and Linters Consumption, Stooks,
Imports & Exports & Active Cotton Spindles -
June 1949
Cotton and Linters Consumption and on
hand June 19.'gF 49---
Containers & Closures February & March

Cotton & Rayon woven Goode Finished 1948
Knit Outerwear 1948
women's, Misses' & Juniore' Outerwear -
4th' Quarter, 198
Knit Underwear & Nightwear March 1949
Shoes & S~lippers April 19~49
U. S. wool Manufactures April 1949
Softwoo0d Plywood May 1949-
Pulp & Paper Manufacture in U. S. May *49
onfectioner & Competitive Chocolate
Products Manufacturers' Sales May 199
Steel Castis May 1949
commercial steel Forgings May 1949
Magnesium W~rought Products May 1949
Aluminum wrought Products May 1 49
Heating &e Cooking Equipment April 1949
Air Conditioning & Commercial Refrigeration
19
Paint. Varnish, Lacquer & Filler May 1949
Anrgni Chhemiaals U. 8. Production -
BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE
Premium Advertisin Basic Information
Sources -June 199
House-To-House Sellin Basic Information
Sources June 1949
Office Management Basic Information
source June 19494~~
Electrical Appliances Basic Information
Sources June 199
American Lumber Industry Basic Informa-
tion Sources June 1949l
MISCELLANEOUS
The Demand for Producers' Durable Equipment
Reprint from Survey of Current Business
Electric Power Output & Investment Reprint
from Sur121 of Current Business
Standard Samples Issued or in Preparation
by the -Niait i~ionl Bueau of Standa~rds 19 large-
sized pages containing schedule of fees, unit-
weights, directions for ordering, eto.
F-r9-3000-10-004


USE TO AVOID
FAGE $300


U. S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.9V.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3 No. 15, August 1, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOUl WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION .
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





PULPWOOD USE 00NTINUES HIIH


She South has long
l~lI the use of pulpwrood
in the manufacture of paper
ns:..i d its products. According
a current issue of the
Department of Commerce In-
dustyRpr for the Pulp and Paper Indusry
te consumption of pulpwood in southern areas
in the first five months of 1949 wras 3,728,000
standard oords, or nearly 45 per cent of the
nation's total of 8,289,000 cords.
From the Bureau of the Gensue comes first
official government post-war figures on the
operation of pulp mills and the manufacture of
paper and board in the Southeast. They were
taken from the 1947 Gensus of Manufactures,
and they show that pulp mills in the South At-
lantio and East South Gentral sections shipped
goode valued at $140,048,000 in excess of cost
of materials and supplies, and plants manu-
facturing paper and board in the same areas
shipped goode valued at $168,467,000 on the
same basis.
Principal producing States in the twro seo-
tions were Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, North
Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.
The South's consumption of pulpwrood from
January to June this year was lightly off.


Small businessmen of the Southeast, and those planning to enter the field
problems in the great reservoir of publications in the files of U. S. De-
partment of Commerce field offices. with this issue, the Bulletin of Commerce
will review some of this material and will continue the review in subsequent 18-
sues so that those concerned may be informed and reminded of this assistance.
Accounting: Distribution Goet Analysis A management tool for reducing costs
and increasing efiiiciency. Price 10
Accounting & Auditing Service: Bookkeeper on Wlheels -Small Business Aid No.
47. Free.
Conducting: A Consumer Contest Small Business Aid No. 25. Free.
Direct Mail Advertising Baseic Information Bources. Free.
Mail Order Lists Small Business Aid No. 16. Free.
Stepped-Up Advertising & MerchandisinR _Program Pays Off Small Business Aid


CHARLESTONl, S. C.
310 Peoples 81dg.,
Tel. 7771


JACK30AIVILLE, FLI. NIANI 32, FLA.
1126 Federal Bldg., 9417 Seybold Lldg*,
Tel. 4)-7III Tel. 9-7533


NOBILE, ALA,
308 Federal Bldg.,
Tel. 2-3641


iTLANTA 3, GA.
50 hitehall St., S.L,
Tel. tlinelt Y121 X-1)63


SAVAMMII, GA.
Room 218, P.O. Bldg.,
Tel. 2-4765


August 15, 1949


VOL. 31 NO. 16


CASH FARM INCOME STILL UP


hbile fanners of other sections of the
nation were counting their cash losses
from the marketing of their products
during the first five months of this year com-
pared with the corresponding period last year,
those in the south Atlantic and south Central
regions remained in the black.
According to a current report of the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics, U. B. Department of
Agriculture, each receipts from farm market-
ings in the south Atlantic area from January
to May inclusive this year were g per cent
greater than for the same period in 1948, and
1 per cent up in the South Central sections.
On the other hand, in other regions of the
country decreases were reported, including
4 per cent in the North Atlantio; 7 per cent
in the East North Central; 12 per cent in the
West North Central; and 1 per cent in the Wes-
tern.
Total cash receipts in the south Atlantio
region approximated $876,o56,ooo against $802,-
172,000 in the same period last year, includ-
ing substantial rises in both crops and live-
atook and its products. In the south Central
area, receipts for the five-month period this
year totalled $1,712,782,000 compared with
$1,684,645,000 in the same period last year.
Crop receipts were up but livestock was down.


HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSMEN


No. 56. Free.
The Use of Premiums Small Business Aid No. 22. Free


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF CO d RCE^
FIELD SERVICE







I _


RETAIL BALES UP, WHOLESALE DOWIN

DRUG WHOLES/.ERS* thirteenn
SALES AND INVENTORY TRENDS O ities
(Excludes Liquorl and rTeas
rxo" fHpgOt the Southeast
(19SO MTRL YAVRAGE==IM) repOrted 18070880$
m in retail sale
XXIL0 i indpen gt
establishmnents
so8 during the first
half of 1949 as
,,I '.u"""' I ,, compared writh
the correspond-
ing period last
"J J1SO D Dj r p k J D nDyabti h
---1* -- --s --- --me- -- wholesale trade
field all regions of the country recorded down-
ward trends, according to current Bureau of
the Censue reported.
Six cities and areas of the Southeast re-
ported decreasee-~in -retail e~salewy white-in-f
five other there was no change.
Inoreases in retail sales, in percentages,
included B3irmingham and Johnson City, Tenn.,
2; Clarkedale, Miss., 16; Glulfpor~t, Miss., and
Jefferson county, Ala., ); Brietol, Tenn.,
Asheville, N. G., Sullivan, Uniool and Wlash-
ington counties, Tenn., and Buncombe and Madi-
son counties, North Carolina, 1: Augusta, Ga.,
1;Coahoma and Quitman counties, Miss.,
IB anatee and` Sarasota counties, Florida,
1;and Chilton and Perry counties, Alabama,10.
The South Atlantic area reported a 6 per
oent drop in wh~olesale sales ~n the first half
of the year, and the East South Central sootion
a 10 per cent decline. In the West South Cent-
ral region a 3 per cent fall occurred. For the
United States as a whole, an average decrease
of 7 per cent was reported.
Gained in most instances were also reflected
in retail ales in June compared with the sane
month last year, but wholesale sales were also
off in the monthly comparison, including 7
per cent in the South Atlantio, 13 per cent in
the East South Central, and 5 per cent in the
West south Central sootion.
COMBINED HARVESTER-THRESHER

~he Department of Commeroe has issued a
s business Inomtion service pamphlet
entite The Combine Harve st er-Thresh-
Se -. Developmnt an~d Industry Outlook.
The pamphlet, prepared by Roer ery
Chief of the Farm Machinery Section, Ofiie of
Domestic Commeroe, is available at all field
ofiies upon request. Subjects discuesed are:
Early history of the machine; various models;
size and capacity of the industry; demand;
exports and imports; the number on farms: and
statistical data on availability, distribu-
tion and anipmense.
The machine, as everyone familiar with the
subJect knows, is a combination butter an~d
thresher, which does both in the one operation.
It replaces and performed the functions of both
the grain binder and stationary grain thresher.
According to the publication, eleven tirms
over the nation now produce integral combinee,
with numerous small concerned producing parts
and special attachments.


COTTON PRODUCTION ON INCREASE

Cotton-producing States of the South have
~been increasing their output of that
commodity in recent years*
This is shown in the 1949 edition of the
Census Bureauls publication entitled Co~tton
Production in the United States, CropTIT48*
just issued. (Price 154).
It shows for example that, whereae, in Ala-
bama in 194~ a total of 803,}}8 running bales
of cotton was produced, in 19%8 the production
totalled 1 162,815 bales. In Georgia, produat-
ion in 1948 was 551,679 running bales, and last
year it had climbed to 745 012 bales,
The publication, available at all field of-
fices of the Department of Commerce, shows
production for all notton-growing States in
the nation, both by crop and by gin, with a
county-by-county breakdown for the principal
producing States.
YAJOR 00TTON DUCI MIARKIETS


portant phase of the large field of in-
Austrial uses for cotton fabric, the
U. S. Department of Commerce has just issued
the booklet Mdajor Cotton Duck Maethet. (158).
The publication deals with the broad aspects
of industrial usage of cotton, and covers in
detail certain major market for the four con-
Sstructions of duok produced in the greatest
volume, and these, in turn, have been trans.
lated into bales of cotton as a measure of
fiber consumption in fabric production and die-
tribution,
The booklet includes an appendix showing
duck production from 1919 to 1948 and the per-
Gentages represented by certain types.
The publication is the wolrk of the Commerce
Departmentle Office of Domestic Commeroe, with
the National Cotton Council of America, Inc.,
and individual mills cooperating in its i-
suance.
MdADE IN GIEORG~IA EXPOSITION

T~he Associated Industries of Georgia
w ill present this years Made In GeorF-
Sgia Exposition at the 35th Brent south-
eastern Fair, to be held in Atlanta, September
30 through October 9.
'Industrial G~eorgia will be the overall
theme of the Exposition," sooording to W. Kirk
Sutlive, AIG President. wAside from reflecting
the growth and importance of Georgia industry,
the MIade-In-Georgia Exposition offers a most
profitable medium for expanding sales and mpar-
Skets for products displayed."
Products manufactured, processed, assembled
or fabricated in Georgia wrill be featured, and
all Georgia manufacturers are eligible to dis-
play their products.
Objectives of the exposition this year will
be three-fold: To sell Georgia products and to
assist in marketing Georgia goods; to foster
an interest in Georgia-made goods; and to give
impetus to the growth of industry and manu.
featuring in the State. Miobael P. Weidel,
3075 Early St., N. W., Atlanta, is Director,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2






PAGE 3


FAR~M WlORK( POWER

More than 907,181 farme in the South had
no tractor, horses or mules in 1945
when the last Census of Agrioulture was
taken by the Bureau of the Geneus.
This is revealed in a publication prepared
from that census by the Bureau entitled Farm
Wlork Power now on sale at all Department of
commerce field offices for 30 cents a copy.
The publication also shows that 528,542
farms reported no tractor and only one horse
or mule in the South; 1 030 519 with no tractor
and two or more horses and/or mules; 295 511
with tractor and horses and/or mules; ani
119,076 with tractor and no horses or mules.
The publication is one of a series issued
by the Census Bureau since completion of ite
1945 Consue of Agriculture. Other include
the following:
RaningAniultural Counties, giving the
rakof the leading counties in the Unites
States in agriculture and agricultural prod-
nets, Census of 1945, with comparisons for
Census of 1940. 67 pages. 30#.
Multiple-Unit Operations (Plantatione),
soigacreage, value, crops, livestock,
value of farm products, and other character-
istics of units and subunits. 660 pages. $3.
1995 Sample Gensue of Agrioulture, statie-
ties by sta~t-es for item for which ata were
collected on a sample basis and data for farms
classified by economic class. 159 pages. to.50,
Farms and Farm Characteristies:
BY Size of Farm, 2318 pages, 80.75
By Value of Products, 226 pages, 80.75
By Type of Farm, 212 pages, O.75
ByColor and Tenure of Operators,
296 page~s, 1.25.
- - Tear Here - -
ORDER BLAN K
Use This Coupon For Ordering Material Listed
In Theis leue of the Bulletin of Commerce
(L'I~t TE Mia~teial in the Space Below and
Return this Coupon to Your Nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name and
Address are on the Opposite Side)





















(In Ordering Sales Publications, Please
Make Remittance to Treasurer of U. S.)


Cales were down 4 per cent, on the
average for 14,000 large independent
Retail stores in June 1949 compared
with June 1948, the 04'nsue Bureau reported.
June sales dropped back 2 per cent from the
level of May this year. High ales of motor
vehicles -- 26 per cent over June 1948 --
were in direct contrast with the experience
reported by most other independent retailers.
-o-
Personal income in May was at an annual
rate of $212.2 billion, virtually unchanged
from the $212.5 billion rate of April. The
mall decline in wages and salaries was al-
most entirely offset by a rise in farm income
stemming from larger crop marketing.
-o-
After adjustment for seasonal factors and
trading day differences, sales of all retail
stores in June declined about one per cent
from May. Total trade at retail stores has
been relatively stable since the beginning
of the year,
-o-
Publicly reported cash dividend payments by
United states Corporations amounted to $193.3
million in May, 14 per cent more than the
8170.4 million paid out in May 1948. For the
3 months ended May 31, 1949, oneh dividend
payments totalled $l1,373.3 million, up 10 per
cent from the $1,251.9 million disbursed in
the same period in 1948.
-o-
The capital requirements of nonfinancial
business corporations were lowered sharply in
the first half of 1949 as a result of reduced
working capital needs, according to the July
issue of the Survey of Current Business. In-
vent ori es an receivables ere reduced follow-
ing a decline in activity and prices.
-o-
Sales of chain stores and mail-order houses
during June were estimated at $2,225 million.
June sales at those stores were about 2 per
cent below May after adjustment for seasonal
factors and trading day changes.
-0-
Construction activity climbed more than
seasonally in July to retain a slight lead
over the high levels of last year. New con-
structions with an estimated value of more
than $1.9 billion was put in place during the
month, about 10 per cent above the revised
estimate for June, and 2 per cent more than in
July 1948
-o-
A less than seasonal increase of only five-
tenths of a per cent in the production of
building materials was noted in April over
March. The unexpectedly low showing was due in
large measure to a drop in lumber production,
accounting for almost 50 per cent overall.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE






I _


es


INDUSTRY REPORTS
~PE~fulpaer & Board July 1949 -
monthly -Price $2.2 year.
puber, Plywood & Allied Producte
1949 Quarterly 5O# a year.
Chemicals & Druge July 1949 M(
82.50 a year.
Leather July 1949g Monthly 6(
Rubber July 1949 Bimonthly ~
BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVI(
Alkyd Resins ynopeis o fInfonrm
July 1949 10#.
Store Modernization Cheek List i
Free.
Liquor Stores &e Drinking Places -
Infonmation Sources June 1949 Fr
Cooperative Organization Basio :
Sources June19 -re.
Marketing Research P~roce~dures BI
formation Sources June 1949 Pree
Store Arrangement & Display Bas
ation Sources June 1949 Free.
Hotels Basic Information Source
194' Pf~ee.
Industrial Marketing Basio Info
Sources October 1948 Free.
MISCELLANEOUS
Cans for Fru~its and Vegetables i
Dimensions, dapacities and Designatel
Simplified Practice Recommendation R:
Price 100.
Delivery Gases for Square Glase M:
ties Simplified Practice Recommend
R2f6-49 P~rie 10B.
United States CGovernment Publicat
Monthly a~talog July1949 29
Journal of Research of the Nationi


PAGE 4


3 1262 087480 84r
of Standards Volume -- -wr
Supleent to Sorewr-Thread S~tandards fo
Federal Services Supemento anaook

5 Report of the Uniform Plumbin Code Commit-
tes 4
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY
RT 5 Fa... n .., es
cotton System SpnnngAtivit June 1949.
Butings ofi Selected MIen's Garments Jan.-
Mar. 194
Clay C~onstruotion Products May 1949.
Superphosphate May 1949.
league containers & diosures -Aril 1949.

June Monthly Whol-es-~'ale Trade Report Sales &
Inventories U. 8. Summary-Geographio Divis-
onthly ions June 1949.
Monthly Retail Trade Report -~ Independent
0# a year. Retail Stores East South Centr~al Cities and
50P a year. Areas June 1949.
CE Honthly Retail Tad Rort Independent
aton Retail Stores Sout Atani Region Cities
and Areas June 1949.
May 1948 Gross Changes in the Labor Force Mtay-Jun~e
1949.
Basio g ensus of Manufactures:194
ee. MG5- he etal ~ork
Information 2E2 Same Presesed_ etal Products
MC2 D-1 Boiler shop Products
asio In- MC 8- Childrenls Coata
#7 E2 -Silverwrare &e Plated Ware
ic Inform- MG2b- -utSone & Stone Products
xdi 9R-1 Explosives
s July M -1 -Gaske'ts & Asbeetos Insul'ations
M1 -6 otton Broad woven rabrion
rmation MS EIA-4 Rayon & Related Broad Woven.Pabrie
-- Dresses, Unit Price
A2 A Aebestoe Products
Names, M C6A-~ Womenls Suits & doate
d Use M C61P-1 Poultry Dressing, Wholesale
155-49 Em 8B-1_ Abraiv Podct
YC1L-~ Pickles &dcauces
ilk Bot- MIC61A-1- dreamers sutter
ation Ihd61L-1 danning a Preserving, Except Fish
ions adb6-1 -dbeialPot ct N. E. C,

al Bureau adblee ro en Fooden
%- ~FO Blf$0 -114-000-10-007


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Geor~gia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3 No. 16, August 15, 1949

BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-J


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMEIff OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY O LRD

BUuLLEmHH~~~uswn~wi~


U (qLYW.VATE U E TO AVOlo
ucUIP sTA E $300




U.s. DEP~ l~~>V



















AUTLAT 8. GA. SAVMHA, GA. JACK0ISLLE, FLA nlMI 82, FL. NDBILE, ALA, CHAlRLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehll St., LL, Apo 218, P.O. Bldg., 42 Federal Bldg., 947 Saybld L1dg.., 30 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. tl~last 1)121 X-468 Tel* 2465 Tel. 4-711( Tel. 9-7633 Tel. 2-864)1 Tel. 7771


YOL,' 3 50. 17 September 1, 1949

SOUTHEAST BUSINESS REVIEII BOUTHEASTERN INGOYIE HIGBH
D espte sarp ownard rend in omeeeidents of the seven
trade activities, several lines of bue- Suhatr ttso
iness in the Southeast continued to ad- IAlabama, Florida, Gieor-
vance or hold their own during the first half gia, Miselesippi, Tennessee and
of 1949 ase compared with the abnormally high the lo $~7 ilo nh Carolinas last year received
January-to-June period of 1948, aooording to 9 atolof1807mlinn
the sealr-annual summary of business conditions income payments, lor som sve
in the area for 1949 issued by the regional per cent more than the $17,07mlinp
ofiie of the U. 8. Department of Commeroe. Ithan in 1947, soolording to the annual report of
income payments to individuals released by the
ou may wish to be placed on the IOfiie of Businees Economies, U. B. Department
mailing list for these reports, is- of Commeroe.
eed quarterly, semi-annually and
annually. If so, consult your near- This review ofi income paymienit is
set field oficie of the Department carried comprehensively in the Aug-
of Canaeroe. uet issue of Survey of Current Busi-
ness. Get a copy fo your nearest
Continrued increases were registered by such ~iield ofiie.
important sege~nts of the economy as farm in-
come, urban construction, telephone operations, Also, the 1948 payments approximated $5,408
production of electrio energy, and bank deb- million more than were made in 1946.
ite. Also, in thirteen cities and areas, gained The payments last year, in millions of dol-
were shown in retail trade, in six oities de- large, with pserentage increases for each of the
apartment store trade remained on the upgrade, seven States were:
and in five lines of wholesale trade increases Alabama, $2,585, a per cent; Florida, $2,762
were reflected. 4 per cent; Gleorgia, $3,076, 6 per cent; Miss-
On the "lainue side," however, were bank de- iceippi, $1,60), 12 per omnt; North Carolina,
posits among Federal Reserve banks, which fell $3.531, 7 per cent; south Carolina, $1,714, 11
3.7 per cent, employment in manufacturing in- per cent; and Tennessee, $3,036, 8 pefr cent.
dustries, down in all of the States, a slight Per oapita yesinue:Flia,1-
deoline in freight and passenger revenue, a 157; Alabam na, @91; Georgia,: $971; d is ipp,-
drop in department store trade in twenty oit- 75;North Carolina, $930O; South Carolina,
les in the area, and dooreases in sales in @6;and Tennessee, 8i955. The national average
some sixteen lines of wrholesaling. w as $1,410.


HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSMEN

Establishing and Operating an Air Conditioning and
Series No. 59. 2o#.
Pluorescent Lighting for Apparel Plants S~mall Business
Aid No. 12. Free.
EsalBsnes eis o 2Etablish ing and Operating ans" Apae tore Industrial
Electrical A~pplianes Several Publications.
Establishing and Operating an Automatio ]Relohandising Business Industrial
(Small Businese) Series No. 58. 158.
Establishing and Operating a Cift and Art Shop Industrial (Barall Business)
Series No. 53. 15 *


UJIbllEI) SilATlfif IIEPARiT~viEliT CM= C.(1AtiblRICl
FIELD SERVICE


~~(I nCI1~








I~__ _


INCOME PAYMENTS HIGIHLIGIHTS

following are some highlights from the
annual report of the Office of Business
SEconomics, U. 8. Department of Commerce
on income prayents to individuals in the South-
east in 1948:

The per eapita income of residents of the
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missise-
ippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas increased an
average of 219 per cent in the past ten years.

Wages and salaries received by residents of
the seven Statse in 1948 were estimated at
$11,31l7 million, an increase of $5,098 million
or 82 per cent over 1942.

Income to proprietors approximated $4,738
million, an increase of $2 352 million over
1942; property income was 1,556 million, a
rise of $725 million; and income from all
other sources was $1,283 million, a gain of
some $921 million.
'Strides in industrialization have contrib-
used significantly to the Southeastle relative-
ly large income growth eince 1929," said the
report. *, *, Deepite the gains in manu-
facturing aoorning from a long uptrend, the
Southeast is still not industrializedd' In
most States manufacturing accounts for
a markedly smaller proportion of total income
than in the country as a wholee'
EXPORTP RESTRICTIONS REMOVED

wride range of commodities, including
a number produced in the Southeast,
have been removed from validated
license requirements by the Office of Inter-
national Trade, U. 8. Department of Compmeroe,
and may now be shipped abroad under general
license.

Ask the nearest Department of Com-
m eroe field office for Current Ex-ulti N


They include foods, textiles, machinery and
other products numbering several hnn4red in
all. At the same time, onT also announced that
the fourth quarter export quota on galvanized
iron and steel sheet is placed at 22,500 tone,
including 12,500 tons for 18l-gauge and lighter
sheets. August 15 to 31 was set for the sub-
mission of applications for shipment of these
products. All other iron and steel mill prod-
note remain under Mopen-end" quote for the
fourth quarter.

Going into the world trade busi-
neest Ask the nearest field office
of the Department of Commerce for
a copy of Gkuidea for New World
Traders. Price ~.lIso#. Alo, o
are already in the business, you
will wish a copy of Channels Por
Trading Abroad (158) and Eaport
and laport Practice (60#).


POPULATION IN SOUTHE~AST UP

praised the ante" on
last years estimated
total population, exclusive
of armed forces overseas, in
five States of the Southeast -- Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee --
whhile in two other, South Carolina and Miss-
issippi, reductions wrere recorded, sooording to
a report just issued by the Bureau.
Ask your nearest fildl offsicfor
a copy of Series P-25, No. 26, gg.
y timatee of the Popula~tion of the U.


8 ates: July 144

The Bureau placed the total population, ex.
olusive of armed forces overseas, for Alabama,
Florida, Georgia Tennessee and the Carolinas
as of July 1, 19 8 at 17 457,000 compared with
a provisional estimate of 17,187,000 made in
October of last year, or an overall increase
for the six Statee of more than one per cent
over the previous estimate.
In Missiasippi, however, the Bureau estimate.
d that the population of that State had elnd
by 70,000, or 3.2 per cent, from the 1940 pop.
ulation, instead of 63,000, or 2.9 per cent as
made in last years provisional estimate, and
in South Carolina the estimated increase in 19g
over 1940 wras established at 82,000, instead of
last Octoberls eatisate of 92,000, or an in-
orease over 1940 of 4.3 per cent, instead of te
provisional 4,8 per cent.
The current estimates, by States, included
Alabama, 2,901,000; Florida, 2,430,000; G)eorgia,
3,167,000; North Carolina, 3,798,000; Tennessee,
3,179,000; South Carolina, 1,982,000; and Miss.
issippi, 2,114,000,
TELEVISION EXPANDS IN SOUTH
An estimated 68,700 television sete had
been installed in the South in July of
this year, 27,300 more than the install.
nations as of April, aooording to a publication
Just ieaued by the Department of- Commerce en*
titled Televisi~on as an Advertirsing Medium.
This publioa~tion is available through
Small field offices of the Departmnent of
Comrmeroe. price 60 .
Installations up to July included Atlanta,
9 500; Birmingham, 800; Fort Worth-Dallas, 11,-
000; Houston, 5,00 Lerouivlean, 8 500; Memphis,
6,000; Mdiami, 600NeOlen,,000; Okla.
homa, 3,000; and Richmond, 12,500.
Television installations in July of this eear
in the United States totalled 1 856,600 compared
wit~h only 60,100 in January 1947 and 165 7oo in
January 1948. The publication reveals that last
year advertisers spent approximatelrlyt,8311 mil-
lion in all forms of advertising. Newspaper ad.
vertising still led with $1,750 million and
radio was second with $597 million. If 1948
trends are maintained this year, it is expected
that advertising expenditures will rise to $6
billion, the publication prediate. Seventy-five
television stations were operating commercially
in July of this year.


8 By RegionsL Divisions, ang


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









____


BUSINEiSS ECONOM[IC RESEARCH


ented in the 1947-48d edition of the
Department of Commerce Burvey of Uni-
ersrity Business and Economic Research Pro-
eog j ust issued
research projects, which the new pub-
lioation liste, are carried on by faculty and
other staff members, as well as Dootort.s and
Hastercs thesis projects.

This book is available upon re-
*quest at all field offices of the
Department of Commeroe.
Southeastern colleges and universities list-
ed in the publication include the Universities
of Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, Tennessee,
Peorgia, Mississippi and South Carolina, Ala-
bama Polytechnio Institute, North Carolina
State College of Agriculture and Engineer-
ing, Yississippi State College, Woman's
College of the University of North Carolina,
University of Miami and University of the
South.
Hundreds of persons located at colleges
and universities throughout the United States
are authors of the workse listed, Subjects
covered include management, marketing, account
ing, statistics, personnel administration,
labor and labor relations, government and bus-
iness and other. The publication gives the
subjects covered, with a brief review of each,
and names and locations of the authors. Its
purpose is to promote fuller use of research
findingse of university schools.
- - tear here - -

0 RDER & LA E (
Use This Coupon For Ordering Material Listed
n Tis lsue of thne Bulletin of Commerce

Return This Coupon to your Nearest Depart-
sent of Commerce Pield Ofiie. Your Name and
Address Are on the Opposite Side)






















(Kake Remittances Por Salee Publio~a-
tions Payable to Treasurer of U. S.)


a les of service and limited-function
million, or about $75 million more than
in May. After seasonal adjustment, sales were
up about 4 per cent, and compared with June
1948 they were off 8 per cent, a large part
due to lower wholesale prices.
-o-
Manufactureral sales in June totalled $16.5
billion, or $200 million more than in May,
while inventory book values declined $500 mil-
lion to $30.4 billion. The June increase in
sale appeared larger after seasonal adjustment
since there is normally a drop in sales from
M~ay to June.
-o-
Total civilian employment at 59,72o,ooo in
July showed no significant change from the
June level, Seoretary of Commerce Charles Saw-
per announoed. Both agricultural employment
at 9,647,000 and non-agricultural employment
at 50,073,000 were substantially the ease as in
June,
-o-
The 1949 pack Tof oanned fruit probably wrill
be larger than that in 1948, the July issue of
the Department of Commerases Ganning Industry
Report states. A total fruit pack of from599
to 6) million standard cases is looked for as
compared writh 58 million cases in the 1948
season.
-o-
Construction activity climbed more than
seasonally in July to retain a slight lead over
the high levels of last year. New construction
with an estimated value of more than $1.9 bil-
lion was put in place, about 10 per cent a orp
the reriserd' estimate for June,land by&~f o St.
more than in July 1948.
-0-
The groes national product declined to an
annual rate of $256 billion in the second
quarter of 1949 as compared with $262.5 billion
in the first quarter. The decrease of $6.5
billion was attributable to a shift from so-
oumulation to liquidation of business inventor-
ies, as other elements of demand for grose nat-
ional product showed little change.
-o-
Business inventories declined by about $1
billion during June to reach an estimated book
value of $51,579 million at the end of the
month. Nearly half of the dooline was due to
seasonal influene.
-0-
Bales were down 8 per cent on the average
for 15,ooo large independent retail stores In
Julg. July ales dropped back 11 per cent from
the level of June this year. Only motor-vehicle
dealers sh 8ed sales in July 1949 higher than


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ulslulllnn~illH i ll r

BULLEThyr vir .umMl:RTE


BUSINESS INFORKATION BERVICE
Hardwiare i~E.-or~ee- 1944 Operating Ratios
Cbain Storee Basio Information Sources
Pestroleurm Basio Information Bources
Prolectse and Publications of Interest to
P~nlanningan b8eveoT18F meRA enies N~umber 3*
..-. C~_.anned PruitGe and Vegetables July 1949 -
Price $1.0U a year.
FACTS F~OR INDUSTRY
Cotton & Linters Consumaption Stookse, la-
ports and Exports, an;-~ l d Active Cotton Spindles
July 1949
otton & Lintere Consumption and on Rand
July 1949 ~e
Doeto and oeinCotton Supply and
Dis-tribution in the U. S. season or 1948-49
Supr~hs hte June 1949
Paa & 1a- June 1949
dutingsor selected Yense Germense April
omns &e Children~e Woven Pabrio Underwear
& ightear- Summary for19
K~nit Underwrear & ihwa April 1949
owodPlywood June19
RedCedr Singes June 1949
dontines &Closures May 1949
IBUSUTTHliW ENSBUB
Estimates of the Population o Continental
Uni e~d lia~ee~s O-T99;~-19uWo149-P25"o.2
ihange in Nmber of Households and in
Maia Sttus: 194 to14 -0 o. 25
Governmental Revenue 1?9i8 I- -GP4-N.

Whe onty Reorton thne Labor Force -


Ghs


1)




oo
e I


MC20B airy Products: Creamery butter,
Natural Gheese, donoontrated Milk~,
loe Greamr & Ioes, I8pecial Dairy
Products. Price 1011.
HC200 nnn Peein rei
CandSea Fod ae iahnn
ning & Preserv-ing, Except Fish,
Dehydrated Pruita &r Vegetables,
Pickles &t Sanoes, Prozen Foode.
Price 100.
MC20F Sugar: C~onfectionery & Related
Prdcs: Raw dane Bugar, ne
SarRefining, Beet Sugar, Con-
footionery Products, Chooolate &r
Coooa Products, Chewing Gam. Prioe
105.
H0200 Beverages: Bottled Soft Drinkse,
tisti do equ ast, Eonps Brandy.
Price 101.
MC21 Tobeooo Manufacturee: .Cigarettees
cigars, Chewing & Baoking Tobacco,
Tobaoo Stemaing &r Drying. Price
100.
MC22B Noolen &C Worsted Manufacturee:
Scouring & omin Plants, Yarn
Mills, Wool, Except Carpet, Woolen
&r Worsted Fabrice, Finishing Wool
Textiles. Price lo#.
MC22E Rata (rezoopt Cloth &r Millinery):
Fur-felt f~ratef &R Bies, Woo-
relt sate a nat bodies, straw Hate,
Hatteres Pur. Price 10#.
MC23A Men's & Boyset uita & Coats, Suit
and Cost Findings. Prc 1s
MC26A Pulp, Paper &: Board: Pulp Miille
Paper and Board Mills. Price 15#.


MISCELLANEDUS PUBLICATIONS
Unified Borew Thread Standaad "- Ntional
Bureau of Stnad 0
Establishment &t Main~tenance of the Electri-
oal Units Bureau of~ standiarde 01roular 4/5
Price 25-)
Active Chlorine Bleaching Compounds 1011
BonePerinet qestone &r Answere on the
st. Larec sewaaroer Project
Re orto the Uniform Plumbing Code Commit-
toe 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE e
FIELD SERVICE *3
Atlanta Regional Office pp 4
50 Whitehall Street S.W. fPo 4 'fe
Atlanta 3. Georgia g*
OFFICIAL BUSINESS *
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3 NJo. 17, Septemnber 1, 1949

- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --=


,ATY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
j AGE $300

/ 3r) '




BC
UNIVERSITY OF. FLORIDA
L~ERO~Y L. QUALMS
DE~ARTMENT OF ECONYOIICS
GAIN3ESVILLE, FLORIDA


SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.








UIfil (11[ flbk'ES DIEPARTlitTIliil C)F C(3)ttliEle(E
FIELD SERVICE









ATLAIITA 8, GA. SAVAIIIIMS, 6I. JACKSONVILLE, FLA nlMI 32, FLA. MOBILE, ALA. CHARLESTON, S.C.
go thitehall St., LL, Amon 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Fdera~l Bldg., 94)7 Seyold 6ldg., 308 Federal Btdg., 310 Peopies BIdg.,
Tel. tl~lut 41)21 X-48 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 6-71lf Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-384)1 Tel. 7771



VOL. 3 NO0. 18 SEPTEMIBERI 15, 1949


INCOME IN BOUTHEAST EXPA~NDS
f further analysis of the annual report
Sof the Ofiie of Businese Economioe,
vU. S. Department of Commerce on income
payments to individuals in the Southeast re-
veale the following facts and figuree:
Farm operators last year received a net in-
come of $)3 065,3oo,ooo, or $185,900,000 more
than in 1948.
Income from manufacturing payrolls increased
from $984,384,000 in 1940 to $3,424,184,000 in
1948, or 250 per cent,
Income payments to individuals
for 1948 and previous years are
3iscussed and analyzed in current
Leaues of the Survey of Current
Business availale hEugh all
dommserce Department field ofiies,
Federal, State and local governments con-
tributed $3,027,600,000 to the total income
of southeastern residents in 1948, $51,ooo,ooo
more than in 1947.
North Carolina led in not farm inoose and
South Carolina reflected the greatest inorease
in income from manufacturing payrolls.


ASSISTANCE TPO SKALL BUSINESS

S mall busipeas in the Southeast is prom-
the U. S. Department of Conneroe when
such help is needed, and when it can be given.
From Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawyer
comes a directive for expansion of the procure-
ment assistance services to include anall busi-
nees wherever possible, and the Ofiie of Tech-
nioal Services has announced that a mandate of
Congress that its notivities emphasize services
useful to smaller firms' will be carried out to
the letter.-

Note: Department of Commeroe field
ofiies can be, and are, of assist-
ance to smallbuiness. One example
is the material liated-below, which
the Bulletin oi Commeroe is cafrring
in each issue.iii~

Saye Secretary Sawyer: rThe current Congress
appropriated a sum of money for the small bual-
nees activities in the Department of Commeroe,
and I: have directed the use of part of that
fund for expanding our procurement assistance
services." I


HELP FOR SMAULL BUSINESSMtEN


Businsel~ss)Srie no. 29r Price j~
gatalisingand Operatinq a Beauty Shop Industrial (Smaall Business) Series No. 25 -
Price O
t PioeSerice- Small Business Aid No. 8 Pree
PayPla Ade enin Dull Season Anall Business Aid No. 1C2 Pree
Recrd eepng or,Lagall-storea Price 358.

.(Order From Your Nearest Department of. Commerce Ofiie)


Guardin Agins NoE bezzlements and Merchandise Thefts Small
Buiesaid No.T -uoobl Preeee

Karktet Anlyi and Sales Planning by the Automotive Dealer -
BllBusiness Aid N~o. 53 Pre
Oortunitiees fo Establishing New Businesese in Aviation Induat-
il eres No. 63 Pric 40
Bareyg Sanitation Small Business Aid No. 14 Priee
;establishig and Operating a Retail. Bakery Industrial smalll





PULPWOOD USE OFF SLIGHTLY

She South has long been a leader in the
paper and its products.
According to the August 1949 issue of the
Pulp, Paper and Board Industry Report of the
Department of Commerce, while the South was
still consuming almost 50 per cent of the
national consumption of pulpwood, its use in
the first half of 1949 in the South was 3.1
per cent belowr that of the first six months
of 1948. Consumption in the South at the end
of June was 4,407,000 standard cords compared
with 4,546,ooo at the same time last year,

Those interested in developments
in the pulp and paper industry of
the nation will wrish to be placed
on the mailing list to receive thia
Industry Report for Pu 9p, Paper and
Board. It is available through all
Commerce Department field offices
on a subscription basis of $2.25 a
year,
In receipts of pulpwrood, southern plants at
the end of June of this year had reported re-
oeiving j,996,000 standard cords, an 18.5 per
oent drop from the 4,902,000 cords reported at
the same time last year.
Nationally, at the end of the first half of
1949 the total consumption was 9,790,ooo cords
compared writh 10,480,000 in the corresponding
period last year, and receipts of domestic
pulpwood were 8,182,000 and 9,475,000 cords,
respectively.
Incidentally, the Bureau of the Gensus in
ite Gensus of Manufactures for 1947 reported
that pulp mills in the South Atlantic and East
South Central sections shipped goods valued at
$140,048,000 in excess of cost of materials
and supplies, and plants manufacturing paper
and board in the same areas shipped goods
valued at $168,467,000 on the same basis.
CIVIL AERONAUTICS ALLOCATIONS


the U. S. Department of Commerce, has
announced the allocation of a total of
$6,069,670 in federal and local sponsor funds
for the construction or development of airport
projects in six southeastern States during the
present fiscal year,
The allocation includes $3,146,710 in apon-
sor funds an a 2,922,960 in federal monies,
The Cities and States included in the allo-
cation include Birmingham, Ala; De~uniak
Springs, Jacksonville, Miami, Pensacola and
Plant City, Fla; Atlanta, Augusta, Jasper,
Savannah and Vidalia, Ga; Asheboro, Beaufort,
Dunn, Goldeboro and Southern Pines, N. C;
Greenville, S. C; and Athene, Bristol, Knox-
ville, Nashville and Union City, Tenn,

EGA BOOKLETS AVAILABLE

Department of Commerce field offices now
have available two booklet on the Marshall
Plan. One is for businessmen and the other for
persons planning trips abroad. Both are for
distribution upon request.


RETAIL SALES GIAIN.WHOLESALE DOWN
Trends in wholesale
sales & Inventories
acu etail sales
eleven cities
SILS of the Southeast in
J ,0 July compared with
the same month last
-*-year, but wrholesale
f firms continued to
II1 --- 200 experience the down-
ward trend felt in
the past few months,
the Bureau of the
i. i'o Censue reported in
its monthly reports
on trends in the two
a divisions of the
*r .~so onr~~so~ nations trade field.
--PU LPTwelve cities and
Source: Bureau of the areas reported de.
Census clines in retail
sales. The increases ranged from 1 to 13 per
cent, and the decreases from j to 14 per cent.
All but eight of the cities and areas found
sales on the upgrade during the first seven
months of the year compared with the corres-
ponding period in 1948, but sales were mostly
off in July from June of this year,
In the wrholesale field, sharp decreases in
such items as wiring supplies and construction
materials, furniture and house furnishings,
Shardware, industrial supplies, lumber and
building materials, machinery equipment and
supplies, clothing and furnishings, except
shoes, dry goods, and paper and its products
were factors in the general drop.
Declines of 3 per cent in wholesale sales
in the South Atlantio and 4 per cent in the
East South Central took place in July compared
with June of this year, and a 6 and g per cent
drop, respectively, in the first seven months
of 1949 from the same period in 1948.
The average for the nation in July was a
13 per cent drop compared with the same month
last year, 8 per cent in July from June of
this year, and another 8 per cent in the first
seven month period.

LEGAL PROFESSION SURVEYED
Members of the l egal profession in
the Southeast in 1947 had an aver-
age mean net income of $6,566, ae.
cording to the Office of Business Ec-
onomics, U. S. Department of Commerce.
Results of a survey conducted by
that agency, published in the Commerce
Department's Survey of Current Business
of August 1949 showed that the average
for all lawyers ranged from $5,190 in
Sentucky to $8,619 in Georgia. Among
the major independent attorneys in the
Southeast the mean net income average
was from $4,705 in Kentucky to $9,102
in Georgia.
The mean net income of attorneys in
the Southeast averaged more than that
in the Southwest and Northwest.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE





BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE

Businessmen of
.....4and other in-
terested in the econ-
omy of the region
O7A would do well to
watch the new Busi-

r ment of Commeroe for
worthwhile material
which may help them
in their day-to-day activities*
For example, this Business Information 9er-
vice has just contribu~ted a pnampheiet on tour-
ieEt-travel, which provides a listing of many
sources of valuable information on that sub-
Ject*

The Bsiness Information Ser"
vice pamphlets are available
at aa11 Department of Commerce
field offices, most of them
on a gratis basie*

This Business Information Service consisted
of two pr;i~m~ary approaches business problema
(1), information on the subject itself, and
(2), sources of such information.
Here is a list of the publications just re-
ceived at field offices:
Tourist Travel Trade Basic Informa-
tion Sources Free
Check List For Establishing a Retail
Business A discussion of the EEsTbet
Using P-remiume as a Means of Develo-
ing Markets ADiscussion
European Travel Filme Basic Inform-
atfion SourFices Pie 8
Men's Clothing and Furnishing Stores -
194 Operating Ratios
Oilburner and Fuel Oil Dealers 1948
Operating Ratios
Farm Eauipment Dealers' 1948 OperatinR
Ratios*

tear here

ORDER BLAN K

Ulse This Coupon For Ordering Material Listed
(L Thi 121u ofte Bullpain of10ommeroe
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name and
Address Are on the Opposite Side)


(Make Remittances For Sales Publica-
tions Payable to Treasurer of U. 8.)


coSnomic aciiyw vrtull nchage

in July with the usual summer slowness
in trade and industry broken primarily
by a substantial advance in the volume of con-
struction. The principal change in aggregate
demand continued to be centered in business
inventories, which were reduced in accord with
the cautious purchasing policy followed by
business in general since the end of last year.
-o-
Publicly reported cash dividend payments in
July amounted to $49),600,000, a fraction less
than the $496,100,000 paid out in the same
month last year. For the three months ended
July 31, eash dividends aggregated $1,512 700,-
000, an increase of 8 per cent over the $1,-
394 900,000 disbursed in the same period of
1948.
-o-
Total sales of all retail stores in July
declined about 1 per cent from June after ad-
justment for seasonal factor and differences
in the number of trading days. The decline wras
registered primarily in the nondurable-goods
groups, the durables showing relatively little
change from June to July.
-o-
Chain store and mail-order sales in July
were estimated at $2,111 million. After ad-
justment for seasonal factors and trading day
differences, July sales ere down about one
per cent from June.
-o-
Manufacturers' sales declined in July, part-
ly as a result of vacation shutdowns. The book
value of manufacturers inventories was also
reduced during the month, with liquidation at
the same rate as in the three preceding months.
July ales wrere estimated at $15 billion com-
pared with $16.5 billion in June.
-o-
vaNewr con truobilniput in placeninaAugusthwras
revised July total, but 2 per cent under the
total for August 1948. All types of construct-
ion advanced seasonally in August except pri-
vate nonresidential building and some types of
utility construction.
-0-
Although the changed economic ploture has
made possible a considerable relaxation of ex-
port control, some control are still eeeen-
tial because of their importance in the fur-
therance of United States foreign policy and
national security, Secretary of Commerce
Charles Sawyer said in his eighth quarterly
report on export control and allocation powrere.
-o-
A total of 2,00j million linear yard of
cotton broad wroven goode wse produced in the
U. 8, in the second quarter of 1949.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





A List of Periodicals and Butlletine:C6on-
taning Abstracts published inlbreat Britain -
OT 2Pages 0
Attempts to Defoam Existing: 0118 by Prooeas-
ing T -2 aes-Pe



THE TREND OF~












Economic Analyaea for Estimating Market
Trend?
It Discusses:
Inventory Turnover in Retail Trade
Current Inventory Developments
Retail Sales and Consumer Income
Postwar Patterns of Chain and Indepen-
dent store sales
State Income Payments
Regional Trends in Income Payments
Ca ital Requirements of New Trade Firms
8 les and Inventory Trends of Newr Trade
The Energing Peacetime Economy
Plant and Equipment Programs and Salse
Expectations in 1949
International Tranesotions During 1948
Order _From Pour Nearest De r~tment


RE Bii



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Estimates of the Population of Hawaii
Puerto Ricoo h Panama CnlZone, n h
Vi i elns fth nie Sae 1940 to
19 rose Changes in the Labor Forc June-
July 194
State Government Finan~es i~n 14 250
Chemical an NDrUS Y REO gust 1949- $12r50
a year
Leather August 1949 60P a year
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Cotton an Lit~ejre ~- C~-ponsupin Stoolks,
Iprs and Exports, and Active Cotton Spindles
Cot~ton System Spinning Activity July 149
dupplyand Distibuio of Domestio and
Foreign Gotton in the U. 8. Seasone 194-9
Men's ana Boyse App~arel Summary 19
Children's and Infante* Outerwrear Sun.
mary for 1948
Knit Underwear & Nigtwesar May 1949
dontainer & dosures June 1949
Fate & Oils Consumption 2nd Quarter
1949 --
Shoes & 811ppr s~ummary for 194g
Heatoing & HSE LE ment June 1949
What Puture ofor he mal Butsinessmanl -
Radio~ Discussion on University of cao
Round Table
Will Business Get Better or Worse? Radio
Discussion on University of Chicago Roundtable
G~ating Systems for Mdetal Casin 16-Page
Report iiof Oh~;~ffceof ehncleries $2. 50
The Royal Society Scientific Information
Conferenoe OTS 123 Pages (6
GPO WFSO 9.12-Y9-)600-10-012


__


of Qammeroe Fie & 0 ~+oei
Price 45 Cents


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
j 7u7FbL POSTAGE $300


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE o*
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional OfficeZ 3
50 Whitehall Street S.9V.
Atlanta 3, Georgia 59~c4
OFFICIAL BUSINESS ee'9


PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3 No. 18, SeptemPber 15, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
DOTEOF OUCRE.EPTAHRETMENT OF CMM RC
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF'


UNIVERSITY or FLoaIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONJOMICS
GAINESVILLE, .FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IMYI~lslM IMMII\IIIIIP
3 1262 08748 8440
BULLE1... ~~. ,..wmsnwe


PAGE 4








UN111111[) STfgAlflif IDEPAntiTMNTl ilF C)I 4:()AAERICE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLUlTA 3, GA. SAVAMMII, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. n~all32, FLA. MOBILE, L. ~UCHARLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., LLY, Amon 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold Aldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bidg.,
Tel. Mllnut 4121 3-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-364)1 Tel. 7771


VOL. 3 NO. 19 October 1, 1949
~ Almu.~ m nrrm~rmrr~r unu T~urAV rnm rs~m-rrrW


SOUTHEAST CONSYTRUCITIION HIGH
All forms of new construction in the
Southeast during the first half of 1949~
represented an expenditure of 1 1-2 bil-
lion dollars, according to a current issue of
the Industry Report for Construction and Con-
atruction Materials.Th expenditures included
some $1.1 billion in private construction and
around $422 million in new public building.
Ask the nearest Department of
Commerce field office to place
Your name on the mailing list
for this report. It's available
for the asking.

Approximately 13 per cent more in expendit-
ures on new construction was spent in the
State of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississ-
ippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee during the first half of this year than
was disbursed for that purpose during the cor-
reeponding period last year, the report shows.
Included in the increase were g per cent ex-
pended in new private construction and around
30 per cent more in new public construction.
New residential building dropped 8 per ceht
or from about $1590 milliobexpended from Jan-
uary to June, inclusive, of last year, to
$L541 million pent for such proJects in the
first half of this year. Nonresidential priv
ate building, however, took a 4 per cent jum ,
or from $243 million in the first half of 19 8
to $254 million for the same period this year.


She Federal Government is ap-
278,811 among the seven south-
eastern States of Alabama, Florida,
__Georgia, Mississippi, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina and Tennesseee
or improvements on Federal-aid
primary, secondary and urban
highwrays for the fiscal year
S1951, secretary of commerce
Charlee Sawyer announced in
Washrington,
For information regarding ap-
portionments to other States,
()ask your Department of Commerce
field office for a copy of the
press release on this subJect.
The amounts apportioned, to become available
October 1 of this year, and to continue until
June 30, 1953, will include$7,727918 tor the
Federal-aid primary system; $2,75,041 ior
secondary or feeder road; and $7,875,852 tor
urban highwaye.
The apportionment will come from a $C450,000,-
000 fund authorized by the Federal-aid Highway
Act of 1948 for the fiscal year 1951 and wrill
be administered by the Bureau of Puiblio Roads,
U. 8. Department of Commerce, in cooperation
with State highway departments. The not author-
izes an appropriation of $450 million for each
of the fiscal year 1950 and 1951.


HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSHEN
Bookkeepers on Wheele, Small Business Aid No. 47. Free.
KEstablishing and Operating a Bookkeeping Selrvice, Industrial (Bmall Business
Series No. 41. Price 158.
Book Stores, Basic Information Sources. Free.
Bookstores, 1939 Operating Ratioe, July 1946. Free.
Establishing and Operating a Book Store, Industrial (Bmall Businese) Series No, 42.
Price 100.
Manufacturing Brick & Tile to Serve Your Community, Industrjall (Small Businese)
Series No. 49, Price 15#.
Brooms, Brushes & Mops, Basio Information Sources. Free.
SControlling Volume for Profit, Case Study, Small Businese Aid No. 54. Free.


ZQ~'3~4


C /81









I____ _


FARM INCOME CONTINUES UP

Despite downward trend nationally, far-
I mere of Alabama, Florida, G~eorgia, Mie-
eLeeisippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee wound up the first half of 1949
with an increase of 7 per cent in total oneh
receipts from fare marketings over the corree-
ponding period last year, according to a report
of the Bureau of Agrioult~ural Economics, U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
The report showed that from January to July
of this year total cash receipts from farm
marketing in the seven-State area was $1,360,-
643,000 compared with $1,260,900,000 for the
same period last year.
All of the seven States did not experience
upward trends, however, declines being regis-
tered in North Carolina, GSeorgia and Tennessee.
A 44 per cent rise in Mississippi plus gained
of 18 per cent in Florida, 8 per cent in South
Garolina and 6 per cent in Alabama offset the
decreases in the three States.
Receipts at the end of the first half of
1949 and at the same time last year, by States,
included, North Carolina, $193 944,000 and
)194,714,000; South Carolina, 111,574,ooo and
~102,769,000; GSeorgia, $196,881,000 and $207,-
676,000; Florida, $255,838,000 and $216,077,000;
Tennessee, $209,508,000 and 8229,180,000; Ala-
bama, $1153 834,ooo and $144, 98 000; and Miss-
issippi, $239,064,000 and $1 5,786,ooo.
A further analysis of the recent report of
the U. S. Department of Commerce on income.pay-
ments to individuals during 1948 showed that
farm operators of the Southeast last year re-
ceived a net income of $3,065,3oo,ooo, or $185,-
900,000 more than in 1948. The estimate knoluded
net income of farm proprietors, including value
of change in inventories of orope and livestock,
farm wages and net rents to. landlords living on
farms.
Only three of the seven States, Alabama,
Georgia and Mississippi, showed increases in
1948 over 1947, but these were substantial
enough to bring; the overall figure for last
year above that for the previous year.
TRADE SERVICE INCOME HIGH

noome from the operation of retail and
barber shops, and other trade and ser-
vice activities in the Southeast last year
totalled approximately $4,712,300,000, an in-
orease of nearly 7 per cent over 1947.
This is shown in an analysis of the Depart-
ment of Commerce report on income payments to
individuals in 1948 released recently. The
income among trade and service operators last
year, in percentage increase over 1947, was
the equivalent of the national average of 7
per cent. Also, it represented about 24 per
cent of the total of $18,307,000,000 received
by all individuals in the Southeast in 1948.
Greatest gain in trade and service income
was-in-Mfei-ewisppi, which registered a 10 per:
cent increase, or from 8328 ,WO,000 to $36,
800,000. Next in order was NCorth~.Carolina, with
a rise of from $739,000,000 to $812,100d,000, or
9 per cent,
The income included both wrages .and salaries
paid and that received by proprietors.


NEWSPAPER INDUSTRY EXPANDg


lishing industry
of the Southeast
has expanded into a $140,-
500,000 business, accord-
OR ingto final reported on
kg / the Geneue of Manufactures
e-of 194)7 now being: released eue
by the B~-ureau of the Gen-

1-` Papere published in
Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Tennessee have estimated to the Bureau that
their product has increased in value from a
total of $53,727,500 in 1939 to $140,520,000 in
1947, and that their payrolls have advanced
from $22,364,900 in wrages and salaries to $51,-
666,000. The figures did not include a relative-
ly fewwreekly papers operated entirely by the
owner or owners.

Name the industry in which
you are interested, and ask
your nearest Department of
Commerce field office if the
final report for that indust-
ry has been received.
The report for the newspaper industry is en-
titled Newrspapers, Periodicals Book~e, and Mbis-
cellaneous Pubisig MC27A. Price 15 ,
Other final reports received from the Gensue
and available for distribution include the fol-
lowing:
Miscellaneous Electrical Products MG36D -
Price 10f
Electrical Appliances and Lamps; Insulated
Wire and Cale: and Enie Electrical Eupent
- MOb Price 100
Ball and Roller Bearings; Valves; and Machine
Shop Products MO35() Price log
Service-Industry and Household Machines -
MCAP Price10
Office and Store Machines MC35E- Price 100

ucts; and other Measl Producs-M0F 10
Metal Barrels~, Druas & P~ail~e; Wire Producte;
and other Metal Produotsu M0C34E 10#
Commercial Printing; Lithographing; oreetig
Cards; Bookbinding; and Related Industries -
Y027B Price15
Concrete Gyspaum, Mineral Wool, and Stone
Products; Lime MC)2D 154
W-T7;~;t~7;~omen's and Children's Undergarments; _Mill~i_-
nery; Childrenrs Outerwear; Fur Goode MC23D -

Due& Medicinee MC280 100
Photographio Euipment;: Clocks. Watches &
Watchoases CB-10.


Department of Commeroe field offices
still have a mall supply of the semi.
annual report summarizing business con-
ditions in the Southeast for the first
half of 1949.1I you would like to be
placed on the mailing liet to receive
these reports regularly, notify your
nearest field office.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2








BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


CAN MANUFACTWRNG LESS

Atlantio area in the manufacture of
metal cane during the second quarter of
1949 as compared with the first and second
quarters of 1948, but slight increases were
registered in the East South Gentral section,
sooording to a current Facts For Industry Re-
port for that industry.

Pacts For Industry Reports are
issued for a large number of in-
dustries. Name the industry in
which you are interested, and
I lt your nearest Department of
Commerce make the selection. The
reports are available upon re.
quest. See Page 4 for listing.
In the South Atlantio region, 91,925 short
tone of steel were consumed in the manufacture
of cans for shipment for food and nonfood pur-
posee from April to June of this year compared
with 100,184 tone from January to Mtarch and
105,111 tone from April to June of last year.
In the East South Gentral section, the figure
were, second quarter of 1949, 12,946 tone,
first quarter, 1949 6,999 tons, and second
quarter, 1948, 12,5b3 tone.

POST-WAR FABRIC SHIIEKENTS HIGH

Southeastern States since the war have
rioe, rayon and related broad woven
fabric, cotton system yarn mill products,
thread mill goods, narrow fabric mill products,
and finishing textiles, except wool, valued at
nearly ) 3-4 billion dollars, according to a
Bureau of the Cenous Censue of Manufactures
Report.
Principal southeastern shipping States as
shown in the report were North and South Caro-
lina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Virginia.
-- -- -- Tear Here -----

0 RDER BLAN K

Use This Cou~pon For Ordering Material Listed
In This leaue of the Bullet--~ino omre
(List The Material in the Space Below and.
Return This Coupon to Your Nearest Depart.
ment of Commeroe Field Office. Your Name and
Address Are On The Opposite Side)















(On Sales Publications Mlake Remittances
Payable to U. S. Treasurer)


personal income in July declined to an
with )212.6 billion in the previous
month. For the first 7 months of 1949, personal
income was at an annual rate of $212,7 billion,
$4 billion above the level in the same months
of last year.
-o-
The employment picture showed a marked im-
provement between July and August, Secretary
of Commerce Charles Sawyer announced. A sharp
rise of 1,368,000 in nonagricultural employ-
ment took place, which reached a level of 51,-
44'1,000 in the week ending August 13. Agricul-
tural employment, on the other hand, declined
by a corresponding number,
-o-
Total business inventories at the end of
July were $50.4 billion, down about $1.1 bil-
lion from June. After allowance for seasonal
influences, however, the decline was about
$700 million and was centered in manufacturers'
inventories,
-o-
Sales of service and limited function wrhole-
salers were $4,904 million in July, down about
$350 million from the June figure. In part the
decline was due to the increasing concentration
of vacation shutdowne in July among both whole-
salers and their customers.
-o-
Sales were down 4 per cent on the average
for 13,000 large independent stores in August
1949 compared with August 1948, the Bureau of
the Gensus reported. August sales rose 6 per
cent, however, from the level of July this
year. Only motor-vehicle dealers showed sale
in August 1949 higher than in August 1948.
-0-
The rate of personal having, which rose
steadily in the period from mid-1947 to mid-
1948 has tended to level off einee the third
quarter of 1948.
-o-
The overall stability of the national econ-
omy was maintained in August with the neual
seasonal Improvement in most segments from the
low levels of midsummer. Construction continued
as a principal area of strength in the business
ploture. A total of 98,000 nonfarm dwelling
units were started during the month, a rise of
11,000 from August of last year.
-o-
Aid extended to foreign countries by the U.
S. Government .on a loan or other credit basie,
excluding gifts and other grants, amounted to
$1,138 million in the fiscal year 1949 compared
with $2,694 million in fiscal 1948.
-o-
High level business operations are expected
to continue in the containers and packaging
industry for the remainder of the year.


PAGE 3









r


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ARIUMBERMI$UUIIM
3 1262 08748 8457
BULLETL_ .. vmms..w~nC
Consolidated Cotton Report Sept. 1., 1949 -
Free
Cotton & inters E ~ Cosmtostooke, eto.-
June 1949 Free
Trends in the Tobacco, Drug &e Jewelry Trade
- July 19~r~'49 Spart eort Free
Provisional Estimatee of the Populaio o
Continental United States August 1,194
Pree
Trends in the Wines and Spirite Trade July
1949 Free
MISCELLANELUS PUBLICATIONS
The ECA and Small Business Free
Rubber First Annual Reportb the Secre-
tary of Commerce Price 15
Building Materials & Structures Reprt BMs
115 National Bureau of Standards li
U. S. Navy Airplane Crash Fire Fighting -
PB 97925 Office of Technical Services $2.75
Air Force Individual Crash Firefighter Train-
ing Set PB 47093 $1in photootat or micro-
film Office of Technical Services
Final Rort on Aircraft Grash Reacue &
FirefightinR Equipment Photostat, 83, micro-
film, 1.50 oTs
Strength of Metal Aircraft Elements $1.25
An Improved Multipurpose Abrasion Tester &
Its Application for the Evaluation of Year
Resistance of Textiles OTS 81.25.


INDUSTRY REPORTS
SConstruction and Construction Materials -
August 1949 Special Feature State Con-
struction Estimates, First and Second Quartere
1949 Free
Construction and Construction Materials -
July-1949 special Feature Midyear Review
Construction and Materials Outlook Free
PACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Fate & Oils July 1949 Rawr Materials at
Oil Mills; Receipts; Crushings, etc.- Free
Fate & Oile Consumption by Usee July
1949 Free
Knit Cloth for Sale 1948 Free
Knit Rayon & Nyon Underwrear & Nightwear -
1948 Free
Rayon Broad Woven Goode 2nd Quarter 1949
- Free
Wu omen's, isss' & Juniorsl Outerwear -le
V -- --------U. S. Wool Manufactures June 1949 Pree
superphosphate July 1949 Pree
cotton & Linters Consumption, Stocks, Im-
ports & Exports & Active Cotton Spindles -
August 1949 Free
Construction Machiner Exoavating &
Eartmving; Equipment 2n quarter 1949 Pree
Malleable Iron Castings July 1949 Free
Paint. Varnish, Lacquer & Filler July
194~9 -Free
Sofwod BUREAd OF THE CENSUS ee
Cotton Ginned Prior to September 1 Crops
of 1949 and 1948 In Mississippi; Texas;
South Carolina; Alabama; Georgia; and Louis-
iana (Separate Reports) Free
Report on Gotton Ginning Prior to Sept.1


Are you a small businessman anx-
ious to participate in the Marshall
Plan? If so, the Edonomic Coopera-
tion Administration has issued a
booklet for you. It's available at
all field offices of the U. S. De-
partment of Commerce for the asking.
It is entitled WThe ECA and
Small Business and it is designed
to help the small independent man-
ufacturer or producer to avoid lost
mossonleunnecesasrylexpense, and
The booklet is educational, too,
in that it explains the ABC's of
the ECA program.


GPo wFsP 9-26-'(9-3800-10-ols


| I


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE










BC-6-~JF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUAILS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


ye
~~e


PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3 No. 19, October 1, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PAGE 4


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .



















ATLIITA 8, GA. SAV6llA6, GA. JACKSI6lElL, FLA NIZII SL Fl.A NOBILE, ALA CHRLESTOII, S.C.
60 Whitehall 8t., $.4, hoo 218, P.O. ldg., 4)25 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybld Aldge 30 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. IIlasrt 6l21 X-463 Tel. 2-4765 e. Tel. 9-7633 Tel. 2-3841 Tel. 7771


VOL. 3 ND. 20 OCTOBER 15, 1949

40000601REPOT DTA V LUABe ITUNG INDUSTRY GIRADUALLY EXPANDS


)rsinessmen of the South-
neast with an analytical
ueye can obtain a wealth
of valuable information from n-
dustry Reports of the Department
Sof Commeroe, which are issued on
a monthly, bimonthly, quarterly
and annual basis.
Por example, those Just is-
sued contain the following facts
and figures appilicable to the
Southeastern Region:
Construction materials plants
of the area in the first half of
1949 abipped nearly three quarters of a billion
unglazed brick; 2,628,000 square of asphalt
roofing; }}6,000 square of siding; 849,000
squares of felta; 154,000 tone of unglazed
structural olay tile; 386,600 tone of east iron
pressure pipe; 158,500 tone of east iron soil
pipe; and 11,121 000 barrels of Portland oement
for use in new building activities over the
nation,
The fiollowring Industry Reports are
currently available at Department of
ommeroe field ofiies:
Fate and Oils $1 a year
Pulp. Paper &: Boardl $2.25 a year
themicals & Druge t2.50 a year
Nearly 50 per cent of the pulpwood consumed
in the U. 8. in the first seven months of 1949
was used in the South,
Alabana, Florida, Georgia, Missiasippi, Ten-
neseee and the Carolinae last year.shipped 20,-
218 tone of insecticide by rail*


The Southeast is still a long way from
Supplying the nation with all the tung
Soil it needs, but it has made vast
strides to that end in the past few years, the
August 1949 issue of the Department of Commerce
Indu~trIy Repor tfor Pata and 0118 indicates.
Latyear, the production of tung oil in
Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia and
Louisiana --- primary producing area of the
U. 8. --- totalled 17 million pounds, which
compared with but 62,000 pounds produced in
1940.
Also, the output of tung nute from which
the oil is made has also increased sharply in
the five Southern States einee 1944 the Re-
port showed. Five years ago, only 2 ,690 short
tone of nute were produced, and last year this
production reached the 67,200-ton mark, with
sharp gained registered for all five States.
Ask your nearest Department of
Commeroe to place your name on
the sailing list for the Con-
struction and Constructionllat-
erials Industry Report. It is
available without charge.
Twelve mines are now manufacturing tung oil '
in the five Southern States, four enob in
Louisiana and Florida; two in Missiesippi; and
one each in Georgia and Alabama.
While the production of tung nute and oil
has been progressing rapidly in the Southeast,
the exigencies of war have handicapped import-
ation of the oil froma China, principal souroe
of supply for the U. _, Last year, imports from
China totalled 39,j24 metric tobe.


HELP FOR SM~dlg plNE88MEN

'S streamlined Wholesale Grooerr Warehousee Industrial
A Suaamested Desian for a Wholesale bronary Warehouse.
Pree.
Business Failures. Ba kructoies and Mtortalities Basio In-
formation Sourcee. Pree.
Business Service Check List Issued Weekly. Price $1 a year. Lists all De-
partment of Commeroe publications currently.
Cnngand Preserving of Fruits &e Vegetables Basic Information Sources. Free.
Woringdaptal- d Se :d Small Business Aid No. 67.
Meetng uperMaret Competition Small Business Aid No. 24.
domng omptiton Demands Setter Retail Manaaement Small Btlsiness Aid No. 41.
dkig te oso Cmlit Small Business Aid No. 49.


CJIg;lflC Zz S lliflifi IDllPacliTAAEibil OF (C:(:AtillRCli



~I~RRLLLFIELD SERVICE





1947 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES

.....rx .. r u PDI Iinal reports of the
..,,,. MAUATRRSNNSBurPRu Of the CODsuB
from ite 1947 Consus
.oo- -~of Manufactures show mog
other things, that 3 per
soo- ,/ cent more people are read.
ing county weekly newspap-
.ers now than before the war
--oo anad that reader interest in
daily newspapers has in-
.co creased by 57 per cent.
as Circulation of county
i~fl~I'wreelies in 1947 was 1,254,
s...e...mme.. 68 compared with 921,98j2
in 1939, and that of daily
papers increased about 2 million from 1939 to
7,251,309 in 1947.
To date, some three score final re-
ports from the 1947 Gensue of Manu. ,
i acturee have been received in field
offices of the Department of Commerce.
They are priced at 10, 15 and 2o# a
copy.
Other final reports from the 1947 oensue now
available include the following:
8040 ooden Containers. Price 10#.
Pbriatd PasicePrducsand
Other MiscelnosanfcuePouc. 10#.
MC22AL Cotton Manufactures; Rayon & Related
Manufacturers. 19#. --
MG24B Millwork, Plywood. & Prefabricated
Structural Wrood Products. 0.
YC2 0 Womense & Misseet Outerwrear. 10Z.
MC20E Bakery Produc~ts, 194
MGJSE Bin & Advertis ingiply & Other
Miscellaneous Mlanufactured rodute. 10.
MC2$G Vegetable & Animal oils 10 .
Lume~r & fimber BaTs~,ic Produc xC24A. 20P.
ua~ & Wood chemicals; Pertilizere SY28F.
154, --,,L,,,
Men's & Boys' Purnishings, Workr Clothing &
Allied Garments.- M2B 0.
OCTOBER 24 UNITED NATIONS DAY


ober 24, and communities throughout the
United States are laying plans to pare
ticipate in the observance.
In Washington, D. C., celebration plans in-
olude detailed participation by many racial
groups, showing of special movie shorts, ex-
hibits in museums, programs for touriate,
special displays and activities by civio groups
and participation by governmental agencies.
Special United Nations Day sermons wrill be
delivered Sunday, October 2j, in many Washing-
ton churches, as well as in
other throughout the coun- SEDING GIFT i
try. Reports received by U-
nited Nations Day Citizens If you plan to sc
Committee workers indicate toother countries
community-wide interest in i touch with your
observing the fourth birth- patent of Commere
day of the organization. arigregulationl
President Truman has dee- ortation of goode
oribed the United Nations ase ries. Nearly ever:
'the only bulwark we have old has such regr
for the peace of the world.' pastmentdostriommer


AUGUST RETAIL SALES UP

swenty-two of twenty-four cities and a-
reas in the Southetat registered gains
Sin retail sale in August over July,
according to the Monthl Retail Sales Reports
of the Bureau of thae Cnsue for the SouhAt
lantio and East South Central areas.
The increased ranged from 1. per cent in
Greenwood, South Carolina and its surrounding
counties of Greenwood and Mc~ormaick to as high
as 31 per cent in Atlanta, Only sections re-
flecting dooreases were Biloxi, and Harrison
and Stone counties, Missiesippi.
Other sharp upward trend in sales, in per-
oentages, included Golumbue, Georgia, 20,
Bristol, Tenn., 16, and Augusta, Asheritle,
and Johnson City, Tenn., 13.

Askr your nearest Department of
Commerce field office to place
your name on the mailing list to
receive these reports. They are
issued for all regions in the
country and the U. s. as a whole.
They are available without charge.
A somewrhat different situation prevailed,
however, in comparing sales in August 1949
with those of the same month in the peak year
1948, and also cumulative sales for the 8-
month period of January to Auguet with the
corresponding period last year. In the August-
to-August sales, twelve cities and area re-
ported increases and the other twelve decreases
while for the 8-month period, gains were record-
ed for eleven, decreases in nine, and the eit-
uation wras unchanged in the other three.
SUGAR DISTRIBUTION IS RIIGH

he "eweet tooth' of Southeasterners is
I fPparently still somaewhat rampant. Dur-
Sing the first hair of 1949, a total of
414,624 abort tons of refined sugar wras deliv-
ered by primary distributor in Alabama, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Miesineippi, North Carolina,
South Garolina and Tennessee, according to a
current issue of the Industry Report for Bugar
published by the U. S. Department of Commeroe.
S(Price 500 a year).
Deliveries by States included Alabama, 52,-
974 tone; Florida. 52,482 tone; Coeorgia, 9s,-
046 tone; Miaelesippi, 35,887 tone; North Car-
olina, 72,866 tone; South Carolina, 33,320
tone; and Tennessee, 71,046 tone.
00TTON LOANS ANNOUNCED


rush Commodity Gredit
SCorporation on Aug.
S25 of this year had
issued loans on 2, 51,715
:bales of cotton of the 1948
orop in Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Yieelseippi, North
Carolina, south Carolina
and Tennessee, the U. S.
Department of Agriculture
announced. Redemptions had
been recorded on 462,189
bales. Missiasip 1 led in
loans with 949,5 6 bales,
Land also in redesptions.


PACKAGES ABROAD?
end any gift packager
this Christmas, get
nearest U. S. De-
ce field oficie re-
s covering the im-
into those coun-
y country in the
ulations, and De-
ce offices have oop-


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





here N mayO not bas many eoso h

market this year as last, because the
U. S. Department of Agrioulture has
predicted an output in Southern-producing
States of some 76,800 tone less this fall than
last. The report forecast a production of
278,476 tons in 1949 compared with 355,334 in
198.
Peoan lovers will find some comfort, how-
ever, in the prediction that this year's ex-
pected tonnage may be around 57,ooo tone great-
er than the 1938-47 average. Principal produe-
ing pecan States are Alabama, Georgia, Florida,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Arkansee, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas*

GIVIL AIRCRAFT REGDISTRATIONS OFF



was registered in the seven Southeastern
.States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
Missiesippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee on July 1 of this year than on
the same date last year, the Atlanta Regional
Office of the Civil Aeronauties Administration
reported*
Total registrations of such oraft July 1 of
this year were 9,044 against 10 214 registered
on the corresponding date in 1948. Registra-
tions by States this year included Alabamas
938; Plorida, 2,553; Georgia 1,295; Missiesip-
i,686; North Carolina, 1,7 6; South Carolina,
69;and Tennessee, 1,135*

Note: For those interested,
the Civil Aeronauties Adminis-
tration has a compilation of
civil aircraft registrations
for all States. It is free*

-- -- tear here ----
ORDER BLAN K

Use This Coupon For Ordering Material Listed
In This leaue Of The Bulletin of Commerce
(List The Material In The Space Below And
Return This Coupon To Your Nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name and
Address Are On The Opposite Side)


(On Salse Publications, Mdake Remit-
tances Payable to Treasurer of U.S.)


BUSINESS TRENDS.

American business, exclusive of agricul-
ture, wrill spend an estimated $17.9 bil-
lion on new plant and equipment in the
year 1949, the U. 8. Department of Commeroe and
Securities and Exchange Commission predict. In-
cluded wrill be $9.1 billion actually expended
in the first half of the year, and $8.8 billion
anticipated by business for the second half.
-o-
August sales of retail stores totalled an
estimated $10,575 million, about ) per cent
below last years figure after allowance for
trading-day differences. There was little
change from July sales. Nondurable-goods sales
fell fractionally below July on a seasonally
adjusted basis.
-o-
Chain store and mail-order sales in August
totalled $2,139 million, 3 per cent below those
of a year ago. After seasonal adjustment and
trading day difference calculations, August
sales were lightly above those in July.
-o-
New construction put in place in September
was valued at $1.g billion reaching a seasonal
peak at about the same level as last year. The
September figure- was only fractionally larger
than the total for August, and an outstanding
development in the situationn was the contra-
seasonal advance in private homebuilding,
-o-
Manufacturers' sales advanced sharply in
August, registering a rise appreciably larger
than the usual seasonal recovery from July.
Inventory liquidation continued at about the
same rate as in recent months. The sales total
in August was $17.2 billion, the highest dollar
volume since March.
-o-
Total civilian employment in the week ending
September 10 was estimated at 59,411,000, about
half a million lower than in August. Unemploy-
ment dropped appreciably for the second suo-
cessive month, declining from 3,689,000 in
August to 3,351,000 in September.
-0-
United States consumption of new rubber in
August rose 78,615 tone from the 70,611 tone
reported in July. The August total was 14.8 per
cent below the 92,265 tone recorded in August
1948.
-o-
Despite the record volume of construction
activity which marked the summer months, output
of construction materials in July took an un-
seasonal dip of 9 per cent from June production
figures. The drop was attributed to sales from
manufacturers inventories, built up as a re-
sult of the high production rates of 1948.
Lumber, brick, clay sewer pipe, nails, concrete
bare and asphalt roofing materials were among
the materials recording a lower output,


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3






PAGE 4


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

BULLET3 1262 08748 8564
BUjSIN~ES INF~ORMAIIVn manrus

Whbat New Em~ployees Should K~now About Yourl


(g gggggggy


Bus~ineess nd ite holicies ---~ Sal Bsnes
Number 4dd. Free.
Drug Stores 1948 Operating Ratios Pree
Cleaning &r Dyeing Plants 1948 Operating
Ratios Free.


Cotton S~ystan 8pinningf Activity August
1949 Pree
Cotton & Linters Consurmption, StookEe, Im-
pot poorts, &~iie~~~ Active Cotton Spindles -
Auguet 1949 Pree
Cotton Broad Woven Goods April-June 1949 -
Free
Seleted Yen's Garments May 1949 Free
Knit Underwear &t Nightwear June 1949 -
Free
Pate & Oils Consumption by Uses July
1949 Pre
Flour Milling Products July 1949 Free.


BUREILU OF THE CENSUS

Bureau of the Consue Manual of Tabular Pre-
sentation A pecal epot -BucramBoud
Price $1.50
bag-ity Finances In 1 48 Free
anay- June 1949 Cata og &t Subject Guide
- Price E#
Report on Cotton Grinning Prior to Sept. 16


;o Septanber 1 in South


I I


Free
Cotton Oinned Prior t
Free
YISCE~LLANEDU

Chemical Statistice
Directory No. 2 20
~The ECA and small
Business Pree
Pundamental Techni-
ques in the Frequenoy
Adjustment of auarts
rystale National
Bureau of Standards -
10#
'Testing of Hydro-
r aeters National Bur-
eau of Standards 108

Boo bli of~Re-
ports on Gae Turbines,
Jet Propulsion &r Rooket
owrPats Naioa
Bureau of Standards -
20o
Annual Report of
.National Bur. of Stan-
dards for 1948 25P;*


*QN Y T A R s TAss o 's o UN. W B U S D I E S S

IN ouar m~~ 88RBanaLsantu
a kIELUWER MDI~lBUME ANDREUWERD













OF COMMERCE OFFICE. PRICE $1.25


ORDER PROM. THE NEAREST DlEEARTMENT
\ GPO WFSO-10/11 149-.300--100171


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W. 4
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

VOL. 3 NO. 20, October 15, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE --

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY.
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE $300












BC-6-Jr
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


T EP R 5









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FILD SERVICE









ATLMTA 3. GA. 3ATMAM, GA. ~JACKSAMLLE, FLA MlIMI 32, FLA. NIOILE, ALA CHARLESTON, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., LL, boom 218, P.O. ldg.. 4)25 Federal Bldg., 947 Sebold ldg*, 308 Federal Bidg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. Hllant 1)412 1-4 Tel. 2-476 Tel. 1)-711) Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771


VOL. j NO. 21 NOVEMBER 1, 1949
POTENTIAL NEW LUBER~ MARETI'ItL STATE CENSUSRPORT


Anew market opportunity for Southeastern
plywood and lumber is disclosed in the
current lasue of the Lunber Plywooo and
Allied Products Industry Re~por~t oth~e U. 8.
Department of Commerce. The report is for Sept-
ember 1949.
.To cope with the steel shortage, wood is now
being used in the construction of grain bin
storage facilities, and there is a strong poe-
sibility that plywood and lumber may be used in
future operations of that kind, the report says,


on a subsription bsis through
all Department of Commerce field
offices. Price 41.00 a year.


SState
=== ==m Re-ia
7 1 porter from
the Cenous
of Manufactures of 1947 are now being received
from the Bureau of the Census and are available
for distribution to those interested.
For the Southeast, already off the press are
the reports for Mississippi and South Carolina,
and other are expected momentarily.


r
z~ 8.


ii '1 '
i /


;? nt
:
; l~li(S


List the states in which you are
interested and ask your nearest
Department of Commerce field of-
flee for the final reports. Prices
ranne from 10k to 25:.;


The Feder~al Government has taken cognizance
of the value of lumber and plywood in the con- The rep
atruction of grain storage facilities as a re- ments, emp:
ault of strong representations made by lumber value adde
manufacturing industries and retail dealers, within the
hocontend that with steel in such short sup-Noav
ply as to necessitate allocations, the addition- ports:
al demand load is not Justlifed as long as Arizona
foreat.products are available to meet the needs, Arkanes
the report points out. Colored
Oficiial purchases were authorized of 35.g Delawrar
million bushels of grain storage capacity manu- Dist. o
factured from lumber and 7.4 million bushela Nebrask
from plywood of a total authorization of 280.J e e
million bushel. South C


1, HELP FOR SMALL BUS

rli he Small Businee
/ hottlere Gain by
Business Aid No.
Book Storea, Work She
Requirements Pree
Book Storee Gan Profit houhDirect Mail Advertisi
Facts botBook Rental Libraries salBusinese Aid
ISome Factore in Starting: Small chemical Enterprises -
Drydlenig -Oprating Ration for19 -re
j EtabIshing; & operating a Dry ceanin Bsiee 455
I Lanein & Dr ~aig- sasio Information sources
Wasin, lenin, ndPoisin Materiale National
Wil Mkig onree Bloo~k Pay In your Comnt?- 15
anySeligi h rcr Store SalBusines Ai
Laalsin & Oeain a Cofetionery-Tobacco Store


,orts give the number of establish-
,loyees, wages and salaries, and
id by manufacture for the industries
State specified.
lilable are the following final re-


10
15
15
lo
- 10
15
10 t
15


INESSMIEN

aman and His Bank 101
SLeasing Trucks Pree Small
319-.
et for Estimating Initial Capital
- Small Business Aid No. 456-Pree i
No. 373 PreeI
Small Businees Aid No. 225 Pree 1

- Pree
Bureau of Standards 20P
d No. 430 Free
S- 20P.


G/P.


5/ t/


-
'e
fi Columbia
:a
:ico -
larolina -


Idaho -10~
Yaine l
lontana lo
Nevada 10
Utah -10
N. Dakota 10P
Oklahoma 15/
diesisieippi '158





BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
umayof City Government Finances in 194
Puli Empl1oyment in July 194
Qross Changes in the Labor Fore July -
Auguet1s
The Monthly Report on the Labor Force -
Sepeme 14
Report on Cotton G~innina October 10,1949
donsolidatedd Cotto Report Oct. 10, 1949
Census of M~anuflacturee:1947
Exedtures for Plant & Equipment MC100-8
kisellneus rimryMetal Industries -
MC53 -lo
Nonferro~us Metal Mill & Foundry products -

Enies Turbinee; Farm Maohinery; Con-
struction, Mining, & Oil Field Eaup


World Study of Hard Fibers & Hard Fiber
Products Part I 254~
Technical Rel~easee No. 6 Procedure For
Area Deve-~lopment Copper CountryYi (Mca)
Example
The Electron Microsop~e & Its Application to
Ma~eterials. Problems 48 Pages $1.25- PB97957
An Introduction to the Dynamine of Compraese-
ible Fluide ;jO- 160 --Pags Pooeat #0
Microfilm, $6 PB 9;1906
Ipetion of Paint &e Varnish Activity in
AnEectrical Engine-Pressure-Indication
Device 29 Pages Mdicrofilm, 62; Photoetat,
t$.f5-- PR96928.


SECRETARY SAWYER 00MING SOUTH


INDUSTRY REPORTS

Lumber, Plyw~ood & Allied Products Bub-
crpion Price $1a year Setmbe 1949
Leather Subooription Price, 608 a year -
SepfEEEEF r1949
Su ar Molasses & Confectionr Sub-
scription Price 500 a year September 1949
Rubber Subsoription Price 5oy a year -
Sepfi~eER 1949
Coffee. Tea. Cocoa. & Spces Subscription
Price 0 a year September 199
FACTS FOR INDUSTRY
Cotton System Spinning Activity Aug. 1949
dotn& Linters Consumption, Stooke, Im-
ports & Exrports, & Active Cotton Spindles .
August 1949
Cotton Bro~ad Wloven Goode April-June 1949
Paper & Board Production 1948 (Prelimin-
ary Report)
U_ S. ool Manufactures uy 99
W~omenls, Misses', & Juniorsl Outerwear .
1915
Selete~d Mdenles Garments June 1949
Knit Underwrear &e Nightwear June 1949
19Fate & Oils Consumption By Uses July
Commercial Steel Forginge July 1949
Julnor anio dhemioale U. 8. Production -
Steel Castings July 1949
Juls hlt& Tar Roofing & Siding Products -
G Iron Catne- July 1949
eaig& Cooking Equipment July 1949
iour Milling Products; Sumary for 1948


__ I_


1


I


M%35A 15#
MlISCELLANEDUS PUBLICATIONS


Secretary of Commerce Charles Sawryer
will visit Miami, Jacksonville and Mob-
ile during the second week in November
oith leadinlo representative oni busenese,
oivie and labor organizations. His itin-
erary includes Miami, November 8; Jackson-
ville, Novenber 10, and Mobile, November
4 9-801 0-02


I


TO AVOID
E $300









BC-6-JF


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W.
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO 1009

VOL. 3J NO. 21, November 1, 1949


7- BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE'. THERE YOU WILL FINo
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNIVEMONT

l\llMillSillltillEl
3 1262 08748 8556

LUB LETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 4


Ul~rFT AGF9_R PRIATE US
[0U~v9$('ijgity 1 SAc




U.S. DEPOSITORY


UNIVERSlTY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALA3
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINE~SVILLE, FLORIDA










I


WHOLESALE SALES INCREASE

Southeastern wholesalers in August reg-
sales, the first of its kind exper-
lenced since East May, and the third such rise
for the year, according to a Bureau of the
Census report.
In August, sales in the South Atlantic area
were 9 per cent higher than in July, and 13
per cent greater in the East South Central
section.

(Available now at all Depart~ment
of Commerce field offices is the
Wholesale Sales Report for August,
and the separate reports reflecting
trends in the wholesale electrical,
drug, tobacco, jewelry and dry
goods fields). All are free.

Primarily responsible for the increase in
the South Atlantic region in August over July
were a 51 per cent gain in the sale of auto-
motive supplies; 55 per cent in furniture and
house furnishings; 61 per cent in jewelry;
21 per cent in lumber and building materials;
j1 per cent in machinery equipment and sup-
plies; 159 per cent in clothing and furnish.
ings; 79 per cent in dry goods; and 72 per
cent in shoes and footwear.
A 31 per cent increase in sales of lumber
and building materials in the East South Cent-
ral area; 75 per cent in ary goods; 18 per cent
in wines and spirits; 16 per cent in tobacco;
and 20 per cent among certain grocery whole-
salers helped the situation materially in that
area.
The national average was an increase of 12
per cent in August over July of this year.
In comparing sales in August 1949 with the
same month last year, however, an 8 per cent
decline in the South Atlantic, and 11 per cent
in the East South Central region were shown.

- - tear here - .
ORDER BLAN K
Use This Coupon bor Urder~iii ng katerial Listed
In This lasue of the Bulletin of Commerce
(List The Materia;l In The Space Below and
Return This Coupon To Your Nearest Depart-
ment of Commerce Field Office. Your Name
and Address Are On The Opposite Side)


(On Sales Publications Make Remittances
Payable to Treasurer of the U.S.)


Publicly reotdcs dvdn amentS
in August amounted to $189,600,000,
decline of 12 per cent from the $215,-
300,000 paid out in the same month last year,
For the j months ended August 31, 1949, oash
dividends aggregated $1,509 million, an in-
crease of 5 per cent over the $1,4 98 million
disbursed in the same period of198
-0-
Total business inventories at the end of
August were $150,4 billion, or less than $100
million below July before seasonal adjustment.
After allowance for seasonal fluctuations,
however, the decline was about $450 million.
A drop of over $500 million in manufacturers'
holdings more than offset the small July-
August increase in wrholesalers' inventories.
-o-
Sales of service and limited-function
wholesalers in August were $5,524 million, 7
per cent above the previous month after ad-
justment for seasonal variations. Sales of
wholesalers dealing primarily in durable com-
modities, at $1,981 million in August, were
10 per cent above July after adjustment.
-o-
Personal income in August was at an annual
rate of $211.5 billion, reflecting a rise of
$1.8 billion above the rate of the previous
month. About one-half of the July-August in-
orease in personal income occurred in the
nonagricultural sector, where gains were re-
corded in wages and salaries, proprietoral
income, and transfer payments.
-o-
A total of 7.8 million bales of cotton was
consumed in the United States during the 12
months ended July 31, 1949, the Bureau of the
Census announced. The monthly consumption of
cotton ranged from 454 thousand bales in July
1949 to 739 thousand bales in September 1948.
-o-
World new rubber consumption totalled 1,-
25750 long tone in the first eight months
of 19 as against 1,225 000 tone in the
corresponding period of 1948.
-o-
Appointment of Dr. Herbert Ashton as chief
of the Transportation and Communicatione Branoh
of the Office of International Trade has been
announced by Secretary of Commeroe Sawyer.
-o-
Cuttings of nearly all mense garments in
July were considerably less than in the previous
month, according to the Census Bureau. The de-
cline was largely due to July vacation period.
-o-
There were only 1,977,000 stock sheep on
Southern farms this year compared with 6,033,-
000 in 1867, the U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture reported. A gradual decline has taken
place in the eighty-two years.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3





NEWR URBAN CONSTRUCTION UP

tions in the Southeast have increased
* ~$17.1 million during the first seven
months of 1949 as compared with the correspond-
ing period last year, according to a report of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Depart-
ment of Labor.
Up to the end of August of this year, a
total of $~435,630,000 had been expended in Ala-
bama, Florida, Gteorg~ia, Mdississippi, Tennessee
and the Carolinae against $418,459,000 spent
to the same time last year,


SIXTY-ONE CONVENTIONS SCHEDULED


Note: For a comprehensive disous-
sion of all types of construction
activity, with periodic summaries
of expenditures by States and re-
gions, ask your Department of Com-
merce to place your name on the
mailing list for the Construction
and Construction Materials Indust-


Gains were reflected this year in the con-
struction of both new dwelling units and other
new building proJects. The figures for this
year included $21),909,000 paid for new dwell-
ing units and $163,719,000 for other new build-
ing proJects compared with expenditures of
$ 210,971,000 and $145,751,ooo, respectively,
in the same period last year.
In total new urban construction, Florida,
although showing a decrease from last year, was
way out in front of the other six States in
expenditures with a total of $151,426,000 ex.
pended to the end of August this year, or about
34 per cent of the total spent in the seven.
State area.
POST-WRAR MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMdENT UP
An increase of 30 per cent in the number
of employees employed in manufacturing
industries in the Southeast since before
the war was reported Jointly by the U. S. De-
partments of Commerce and Labor.
In June of this year there were an estimated
1,404,000 workers employed by manufacturing
concerns of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missies-
ippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tenn-
essee, or 324,000 more than in 1939.
All of the seven States showed substantial
gains in such employment in the ten-year period
ranging from 19,000 in Mississippi to 64,000
each in Alabama and Tennessee. Two of the
States --- Alabama and Tennessee --- advanced
in rank in number of manufacturing employees
in all States in the nation, Alabama going from
twentieth in 1939 to eighteenth this year, and
Tennessee from eighteenth to sixteenth. Also,
Alabama stood fifteenth among all States in
percentage increase in manufacturing employment
in 1949 over 1939 writh a 46 per cent advance
Four of the seven Southeastern States, Tenn-
essee, Alabama, South Carolina and Mississippi,
werre above the national average of 32 per cent
in percentage increase in manufacturing employ-
ment from 1939 to 1949.
In number employed in 1949, North Carolina
led writh 366,000, and Georgia was next writh
249,000. Tennessee had 227,000, Alabama, 204,-
000, South Carolina, 192,000 and Florida,89,000.


Iventione,faire
A I and other
'gatherings bringing
a possible total at-
tendance of more than
~~V--.125,000 persons are
scheduled for the
) southeast this fall,
---e -- according to a com-
(RpgeP-it~~\d(I pilation made by the
Tradrae Association
~~Division of the U. 8.
Department of Com-
merce.
Fifty-six such gatherings billed for Ala-
bama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North and
South Carolina and Tennessee were expected to
bring together an estimated 128,145 visitors
with an anticipated expenditure in convention
cities of thousands of dollars in trade and
for other purposes.
Highlighting the gatherings were Florida's
twenty-six meetings running all the way from
the Pensacola Interstate Fair at which some

Ask your nearest Department of
Commerce office for information
on conventions in your territory.

75,000 were expected to conventions of the Tin
Can Tourists of the world, scheduled for Tampa
December 5 to 19, and the Society for the Pre-
servation and Encouragement of Barber Shop
Quartet Singing in America, set for the same
city December 5 to 19.
North Carolina is looking for 30,000 at its
Exposition and Food Show in Charlotte, Novem-
ber 9 to 19, and the Tennessee Farm Bureau
Federation will be disappointed if at least
2,500 delegates are not on hand for its meet-
ings in November in Nashville.
Alabama was expecting 2,000 at conventions
to be held in that State; Georgia, 1 5eo; Mis-
aissippi, 3,300; North Carolina, j0,985; nlor-
ida, 84,185; and Tennessee, 6,075.
POST-wAR IMPROVEMENTS UP SHARPLY

eastern manufacturing industries have
cost nearly five times as much as before
the war, according to a Gensus of Manufacturee
for 1947 release Just issued by the Bureau of
the Census.
The report shows that manufacturing estab-
lishments in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Miss-
issippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas invested
a total of $512.6 million in new plants and
equipment, or about 375 per cent more than the
$107.8 million spent for such purposes in 1939.
The 1947 expenditures included $161 million
in new construction, or 457 per cent more than
the $28.9 million expended in 1939, and $C351.6
million spent on new machinery and equipment
in 1947, 346 per cent greater than the $78.8
million spent in 1939.
Florida, with an increase in total expend-
itures of 518 per cent in the 8-year period,
topped the seven-State area in percentage gain.
About $6,003.9 million was spent nationally.


A


y Repor~-T. Ita fee


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2









FIELD SERVIICE









ArTLMT 3, GLe SAVAMM, GA. JACK3DAVILE, FLL MIMI 812, FLA. IDIL, ALA, CHAeRLESTON, s.C.
60 titehall St., LL, boa 218, PO. Bldg., 12 Federal Bldg., 947 Seybold ildg., 30 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Blldg.,
Tel. thinet 482l1 X4)68 Tel. 24766 T*I. **Ill Tel. 9-7633 Tl 234 Tel. 7771



VOL. 3 NO. 22 NOVEMBER 15, 1949
EXPORT PLAN FOR BRALL BUSINESS N EEW BOOKS F~OR SOUTHEASTERN BUSINESS
Small businesswonwboeohepouhaerbui
~men in the neeemen in their day-to-day operations
Southeast aehave been ieeued by the U. S. Depart-
given an opportun- ment of Commeroe. They are "1949 Gluide to Gov-
ity to engage in, o rnment Information on Retailing" and "Dry
or increase their Goode Wholesalere' Operations.
export business n h uie to Government information on re-
der a cooperative tailing -- also of interest to research ex-
program formulated perts, statisticians and others -- is a biblio-
Dy the U. S. De- graphy of Government publications related to
apartment of Com- the retail trades. The one on dry goode wrhole-
merce, the Eoonomic saleres operations shoe, among other things,
Cooperation Admini- how the more effiolent dry goode wholesale
station and local f irms operate and enggests improvements in
Chambers of Commeroe. operations to reduce ooste.
The ECA will shortly publish an exporters The booklet on retailing was prepared at
directory for distribution overseas to Erpa the recommendation of the Department of Com-
Laporters and other buyers to serve as a ready aeroe Retail Trade Advisory Committee, composed
reference of American sources of supply, and of retail trade representatives of 41 national
mall businessmen are invited to list their retail trade associations. The other publion-
names and products in this directory. tion was laeued at the request of the whole-
eale dry goode trade.
+ Gt full information regarding
this program i~ao the nearest De- Note: Both of these books are
apartment of Commeroe field office. available at the nearest Depart-
ment of Conseroe field ofice.
The program will continue froma November 10 Prices 15d and 457 a copy.
to November 30, and forms for listing the for
going information may be obtained from Depart- The retailing publication indexes the sat-
ment of Commeroe field offices and local Cham- erial by type of business and operational sub-
bers of Commeroe. After execution, they are to Jeot. The other book abould also be of help to
be returned to the Department of Commeree. w holesalers in other lines of business.

HELP FOR BRALL BUSINESSMEN

How the Candy Wholesaler Can Inorease Retail
R R~nl ureyofUite Stat5ee Market for

Suga, hlases Confeotionery Industry Report -
leeued Quarterly Subsoription Price 508 a Tear
Vounar & oprtive Chains Basio Informlation Bources October 194f Pree
oieton Rates & capital Required to Pinanoe Installaent sales Sept. 1948 Free
EheCreitBurauas an Aid to Proff able reit- Seling Gaall Business Aid No.
434 ebur 14 -Pe
Handling C ae& Delivery bervices n a dSelf-B~rvice Store Baall Business Aid No.
414 -Jnar 9 -Pe
Razards of Com~petition in Retail Credit Tea- 85811 Business Aid No. 468 Pree
gow o sll noossfllyon the gnatallmenft plan Small Business Aid No. 41) Pree,





AUTOMOBILE REGISTRATIONS INCREASE-

half million motor
vehicles are plying
the street and road in
the Southeast this year.
According to information released by the
Bureau of Publio Roads, U. B. Department of
Commerce, motor vehicle registrations for 1949
in Alabama, Florida, Geuorgia, Hiselesippi,
'North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee
have totalled an estimated 4,698,000, a 7 per
cent increase over the 4,j71,j388 ~registered
last year,
Increases in 1949 over 1948 are reflected
for both automobiles as well as trucks and
buses in the seven-State area, automobile reg-
istratione jumping from ),371,840 last year to
an estimated ),630,000 this year, and trucks
and buses from-999,548 to 1,068,000 respective-
ly,
(Ireatest increase in total registrations
has come in Missiasippi where an 8.7 per cent
rise was reported. Other gains wrere Florida,
8.3 per cent; Alabama, 8.1 per cent; G~eorgia,
7.4C per cent; South Carolina, 7.2 per cent;
Tennessee, 6 9 per cent; and North Carolina,
6.4 per cent.
North Carolina still led in total registra-
tions this year, writh 885,ooo. Florida was a
lose second with 835,ooo.
Publioly-owned vehicles were not included
in the figures.

00NFECTIONERY BALES OFF FROM 1948

olate produate in the Southeast reported
sharp gains in sales in August of this
year compared with July, but a continued down-
ward trend from corresponding period in 1948
was shown*
According to figures compiled by the Bureau
of the Gensus, sales were up 39 per cent in
the upper Atlantic seaboard area in August over
July and .51 per cent in Georgia and Florida#
but were down 8 and J per cent, respectively*
in August compared writh the ease month last
year*
'This cono~otionery report is a-
vailable monthly at all Department
of Commerce field ofiies without
charge*
For the eight-month period of January to
August of this year, sales in the Carolinae
and Virginiae, Maryland and the Distriot of
Columbia wrere down 12 per cent from the same
period last year and 5 per cent in G~eorgia and
Florida*
Twenty-seven firms participating in the
Census Bureause survey in the twro areas report"
Sed dollar sales in August as )11,2317,000 and
$)10,839,000 during the period of January to
Auguet of this yrear*

The rapid-drying and water-proofing quali-
ties of tung oil make it one of the most val-
uable drying oils, and sooount for its many
industrial nsee, says the U. S. Department of
Commerce*


M[ONTH-TO-MONTH SALES UP

w~elve of twenty-four cities and areas
Sin the Southeast reported increases in
Retail sales in independent establish-
ments during the first nine months of this
year compared with the correeponding period
last year in a Bureau of the Censue survey.
The gained, in percentages, included Augusta,
12, Golumbus, Georgia, 3; Aeheville, Brietol,
Tenn., and Buncombe and Mladison counties,
North Carolina, and Harrison and Stone Coun-
ties, Mise., 1; Clark~edale, Mliss., and Coahoma
and qplitman counties, Mliss., 11; Gulfport, )C;
Johnson City, Tenn., 2; Chilton and Perry
Counties, Alabama, j; and Manatee and Sarasota
Counties, Florida, 13.

Reports on trends in retail
sales in all regions of the coun-

all Department of Commeroe field
offices,
Ten of the cities and areas in which the
survey was conducted experienced deoreases for
the nine-month period, ranging from 1 per cent
in Birminabam and Jefferson County, Alabama, to
5 per cent in savannah and sleakley and Twiggs
Counties, G~eorgia. Two other reported no
change.
In comparing ales in September of this year
with the same month in 1948, the peak year in
business activities, increases were found in
eleven of the cities and areas, and twelve of
the cities and area reported increases in
sales in September over August of this year.
CENSUS OF MANUFACTURERS REPORTS

p inal reports from the
Census of Manufactures
.r of 191r7 conducted by
the Bureau of the Consue
covering all States in the
,... Nation are still being
ummnagge~l ~ received by Department
of Commeroe field of-
flees. Those lust laeued include the following:
Plorida -15/ North Carolina ao
beorgia -15/ oregon 2o#
Minnesota 151 Tennesse* 154
Texas -154

*These reports are available
at the nearest Department of
Goameroe office Bsee Page 4.
The final reports include data on population,
establishments, employees, production womebrs,
value added by manufacture, and certain compar*
able information for the last oensue, conducted
in 1939, for each county in the State and for
the State as a whole, writh additional informa-
tion for the urban areas.
The reports are revealing in their content.
They show that in virtually all instanoes,
oities and areas have multiplied several fold
in their industrial activity einee before the
war, not only from a standpoint of the value
of goode shipped, but in wages and salaries
and other data. To date, final reports have
been received for 22 States and the Distriot
of Columbia.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 2





BANK DEPOSITS UP SHARPLY
B~ank deposits in the States of
n~abama, Florida, Georgia,
~iselieeippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina and Tennessee this
year totalled $9,083.] million, a 237 per cent
increase over the $2,690.7 million carried in
1940, sooording to a Federal Reserve Byetem

The 9 billion dollars on deposit this year
included $6,396.5 million in checking aooounte
and $1,997.8 million in savings. This compared
with $1,;443.6 million and $725.1 million, ree.
pectively, carried in 1940.
The number of banks also has increased pro-
portionately writh deposited. In 1940 there were
1,559 in the seven Statee, and this year the
number had increased to 1,684.
Banking activities in each of the seven
States showed a greater than 200 per cent in.
crease in total deposited in the nine-year per-
iod. South Carolina, with a 299 per cent ad-
rance, led the other six States with Floridate
27) per cent rise next. Incidentally, in five
of the States deposits were well above the
billion dollar mark this year,

MANAGEMENT-LABOR PROGRAM URGIED
Secretary of Commerce Charles Saw-
\yer in a Chicago address recently
Delivered urged that management
and labor undertake jointly a coopera-
tive program for strengthening and main-
taining the American free enterprise
system.
"There is in may judgment an opportun-
ity for enlarged public service by msan-
agement,r he declared,
Copies of the address are available
without charge at all Department of Com-
merce ofiies.
-------------------tear here------ ----------
ORDER B JA NI
pee This Cou228 ER r~der;iina Mateia Listeg
In This lesse of the Bulletin of Commerce
(tittel IeKYatria1 in the Space"Weowa~nd -
.Return this Coupon to your Nearest Department
of Commerce Pield Office. Your Name and Addrese
are on the Opposite Side)
















(On Salee Publicatione Make Remittances
Pay able to Treasurer of the U. S.)


ublioly S reotdcs d dn amentS

by United States corprations in Sept-
ember 1949 totalled $725,70o,ooo, an
increase of 7 per cent over the $678,000,000
distributed a year ago. In the third quarter
of this year, oash dividends amounted to
$1,408,900,000, or 1 per cent more than the
1,389,400,000 disbursed in the same quarter
of last year.
-o-
Sales of chain stores and mail-order house
in September were estimated at (2,30) million,
about 2 per cent belowr September of last year.
Sales for the first 9 months of the year were
about 3 per cent below the corresponding per-
iod a year ago.
-o-
Manufaclturers' sales in September reached
a monthly high for the year of $19.7 billion.
September sales exceeded those of August by
4 per cent,
-o-
The general stability of total sales at
retail stores which has been evidenced since
the beginning of the year continued in Sept-
ember. September sales totaled $10,890 mil-
lion, about 2 per cent below last yearle
figure. After adJustment for seasonal factons
and trading day differences, sales for the
month showed virtually no change from August.
-o-
Corporate profit declined further in the
second quarter of this year, the third eno-
cessive quarterly decline from the third-
quarter 1948 high. On a before-tax basis,
second quarter profits amounted to $6.6 bil-
lions, 12 per cent below the $7.5 billion
earned in the first quarter of the year and
about one-fourth below the second quarter of
1948.
-o-
Building materials production in August in-
oreased sharply over the lower-than-seasonal
output in July. Aooording to the Department' of
Commerce composite index of production, over-
all August output of these item was up 18
per cent over July, a gain approximately three
times the normally-expected seasonal rise.
-o-
Independent retailers sales were 4 per
cent lower in September 1949 than in the same
month last year, based on reports from 13,000
large independent stores to the Bureau of the
Census, September sales were 7 per cent ahead
of the Auguet level.
-o-
Total not debt of all borrowere in the U.
8, on December j1, 1948 amaounted to $429 bil-
lion, )14 billion more than at the ease time
in 1947. The aggregate at the end of 1948 was
3 per cent greater than the volume outstanding
at the end of the previous year.


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3







PAGE 4


BUSINESS INFORMIATIONERI
Comercal tatonery & Ofiie Equip~ment
Busnes 1948 Operating Ratios
Liquefield Petroleum Gases synopsis of
Information -1#
Laundering & Dry Cleaning Basio Informa-
tion sources
Deatet & Specialty stores 1948 Oper-
ating Ra'tios
Restaurants &r Other Eating Places Basio
Information sources.
IIDUSTRY REPORTS
Pulp. Paper & Boare- ctbe 1949 leaued
Monthly subscriptionti Price, $2.25 a year.

Suprphsphte- August 19
SoftoodPlyood- August 1949
Bed dedar Shingles Aupast 1949
Paa Oil August 1949
containers &r Closures July 1949
Pulp &r Paper Manufacture in the U. 9. Aug-
Sust 149
Aplt & Tar Roofing & Siding Products .
GryIron Castig August 1949
'aercial Steel Forgings August 1949
laCostruction Products August 1949
Refacores-19
dCuttings of Belecrted len's Garments July


UNIVERSITY OFFLORIDA

@81581111111115
BULLI 3 1262 08748 8549
SPB96928 An Eleotrical Engine-Preeaure-
Indication Devie -- M~icrofilm $2, Photootat,.
Publications of the National Bureau of
standa~i~rd~~s -Juy ndAuus 1
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Cotton GinnedrPrior to October 1 in Louis-
iana ennessee, Georgia, South Caro*~;lina Uie-
alasippi, Oklahoma and Texas and in Specrified
States (Separate Reports)
Gross Obanges in the Labor Force August-
September 194
Gensue of Mtanufactures
Final Industry Reports:
[[ -gecelanousFabricated Textile
C0H- M~iscellaneous Food Preparatione -
Yg} 2 Metal Stamping. Coatig&Egaig
Lighti g Pixtures -10
MC D~ general Industrial Machinery & Equip-
men f- 100
--- Y27C Serview Industries for the Prinin
Trade 10
S B- Mletalw~orn Yachiner 10
No ~ o arcae tructra Yetal Products

I011@ Ship &e Boat Building; Railroad and
Y~soellaneous Transportation Equipment 10P


terest to the southeast are avail-
able at Department of Commeroe
field offices. They are:
Ciroular 0477, Testing of Kydrometers,
issued by the National Bureau of Standards
and designed to improve the usefulness
of hydrometers and facilitate their test-
ing on a uniform basis Price 10f
PB 9801C, An Imrved Multipurpose
Abrasion Tester a~nd sKi~~ Its Appliation fo
heEauation of the pear Resistance


1949 ~~~~''iL-
Knit Underwrear &e ihtwear July 1949
MISCH OUS UBICATIONg
Irrgulr Ar drrer dertification &r Oper-
ation Ruies Civil Aeronauties Administ~ration
publication,- Manual 42 Price $1.oo
PB98487 Sohematio Manual for Sunlue E1-
ectronio Equipment l. 1 ~- Prce$1
GPOW


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE c
FIELD SERVICE ~
Atlanta Regional Office edf6~
50 Whitehall Street S.W. ,e
Atlanta 3, Georgia 4? 4a"
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009


of Textiles, lesued by the Office of
Technical Services Price $1.25. This
publication discusses an improved wear-
testing machine designed to provide
more accurate predictions concerning
the durability of textiles.
F50 l-021


/e dEI S/ l~bPYPOS T GE $300


----4


Vol. 3 No. 22 November 15, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY.
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFF.ICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA



























_ ~_____~___


SOUTHEAST ECONOMY REMAINS STEADY

despite the fact that 1948 was a peak
some divisions of the economy of the
Southeast continued to spiral upward during
the first nine months of 1949 as compared with
the corresponding period in 1948, according to
the third quarterly report for 1949 eunmarising
business conditions in the region issued by the
Regional Office of the U. S. Department of Com-
merce in Atlanta.
The report shows that in the region as a
whole farm income was up 1.2 per cent from Jan-
uary through September of this year over the
same nine months of last year; the value of new
urban building rose 4 per cent; operation of
residential and business telephones gained 1)
and 6 per cent, respectively; production of
electric energy increased 7 per cent; and more
revenue passengers and freight were carried by
airlines operating in and out of the seven-
State area.

Note: This report will soon be
available at all field offices
in the Southeastern area.

In addition, increases in retail sales in
independent establishments were reported in
half of the cities and areas in which the
Bureau of the Census conducts monthly surveys
of trends in the retail trade.
The report reflects estimates of a number of
Government and private agencies in the region.


FUEL COSTS $28),4 MILLION
Soat of fuels and purchased electric
Energy consumed for power and heat
Lby manufacturing establishments in
the Southeast in 1947 was $283,426,000,
according to a final report from the 1947
Census of Manufactures 18-
sued by the Bureau of the
Census.
The cost of coal amount-
ed to $69,858,ooo; coke,
$58,697,ooo; fuel oil,
$25,548,ooo; natural gas,
$10,0 3000; manufactured
gas, $1, 856,ooo; mixed gas,
$4,601,000; electric energy, $105,115,ooo; and
other fuel dosts., $15,825,ooo. The value of
electric energy sold was estimated at $5,893,-
000.

Final State Reports from the 1947
Census of Manufactures Just received
include those for Alabama, Indiana,
Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, New
Hampshire, Vermont, Washington, West
() Virginia and Wisconsin. There is a
small charge for each. Order from the
nearest Commerce Department office.
Consumption included: Coal, 9,144,000 tone
of coal; coke, 5,634,ooo tone; ruel oil, 8,-
981,000 barrels; natural gas, 62 736 million
oubic feet; manufactured gasj. 8,9 million et
oubic feet; and mixed gas, 4. ilo et


HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESSMEN

c & notallment Sales Credit Basic Information
.. -Sources Free
'Keeping Furniture Repossessions at a Minimum -
/ 'li Small Business Aid No. 60 Free
/rW~~- s. 1 4 : a~P Retail Credit and Collections Basic Information
-* sources Free
Setting Up a Gredit Sgetem in a Menls Wear Store -
Small Business Aid No. 21- Free
Should Your Store Sell For Gredit? Small Business Aid No. 118 Free
Use o Colectin Srie on Credit PollJ;uicysAd o 1 Sremall Business Aid No. 472 Free
Bottlers Gain by Leasin Trucks Small susinese Aid No. 319 Pree
Handlighae and Deliver Service in a Self Servvice Store Small Business Aid


VOL. 3 NO. 23


NOVEMBER 30, 1949


No. 414 Free.


c /A673 2.


UN EDSATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE









ATLANTA 3, GA. SAYAMMIl, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. MIAMIl 32, FLA MOB3ILE, ALA. CHARLESTON, S.C.
50 Whitehall St., 3.Y, Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 4)25 Federal Bldg., 907 Seybold bldg., 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg.,
Tel. Ifllnut 4121 X-453 Tel. 2-4755 Tel. Y-71lf Tel. 9-7533 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771





MARSHALL PLAN SHIPMENTS HiGH

ping~~~~~ miloso ol
Southeastern fires are ship
worth of commodities to
countries participating in the
Marshall Plan, according to a
"sample" survey conducted by the
Regional Office of the U. 8. De-
partment of Commeroe.
The survey showed that in July of this year
alone, products valued at $4,079,081.71 went
out from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississip-
pi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennes-
see to seventeen countries participating in the.
program.
SBy States, the valuation was Alabama, $1,-
720, 295.81; Ijorth Carolina, $876 611.45; Misa-
issippi, 00,80.49; Georgia, $443,662.78
Florida, 23519.75* Tennessee, $105,375.84;
and South Carolina, 58,810.79.

IMPORTANT NOTICE
Registration period for the
small business exporters' direct-
ory being compiled by the Economic
Cooperation Administration has
been extended to December 10. The
registration period, originally
scheduled to end Nov. 30, was ex-
tended to give small businessmen
ample thme to complete and forward
their applications for listing.
Destinations from the Southeast under the
SEGA shipments abroad included France, England,
Germany, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Ireland,
Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Guadeloupe, Martini-
que, French West Africa, Austria, Trieste,
Greece and Turkey,
The commodities shipped included bread
grains, fruits and nuts, except peanut, tob.
acco and its products, unmanufactured raw cot.
ton, cotton linters, miscellaneous inedible
animal and vegetable products, naval stores,
phosphates and other fertilizer materials, med-
icinal and pharmaceutical preparations, chanmi-
cals and obemical preparations, textile prod-
uote, including semi-manufactures, fabric cord-
age and twine, lumber and sawmill products and
lumber manufactures, and many others.
CONFECTIONERY CONSUMPTION HIGH
Residents of the Southeast last year con-
sumtinrypodued an average of ly.) pounds of~cnut con-rsnl
pounds more than in 1946, according to a pub-
lication just issued by the O~ffice of Domestie
Commerce, U. S. Department of Commerce entitled
' Confectionery Sales and Distribution 194.
(Price 250.
Total co~ansuption, as reflected in manufact-
urers, sale in Alabama, Florida, Georgia., Mia.
sissippi, Tennessee and the Carolinas was 304,-
537,000 pounds in 1948 and 268,647,000 pounds
in 1946. Sales last year approximated $b112,-
865,ooo against $74,943,ooo two years previous.
ly.
By far the most popular type of confection
sold was bar goods, which yielded $66,22),000
for manufacturers in the seven States. Next in
line of popularity were packaged products,
.which brought $22,159,000.


SMALL BUSIN:ESS BROADCASTS


broadcasts on the subject
of small business and re-
n/ lated activities will be made
f3:"\over Columbia Broadcasting System
\ etaionsbeginning December 5.
Some 47 of the organizational
182 stations will carry the
program, and many of those not
included in the live broadcasts
fWwill make recordings for later
scheduling,
The broadcast will be made from 6:15 to
6:30 P. M., Eastern Standard Time, and the
subjects and speakers are as follows:
Monday, December 5, from New York City -
A Report on Small Businese Secretary of Com-
merce Charles Sawyer
Tuesday. December 6, from Washington Prob-
leme of a Small Manufacturer Harry Miller,
Chairman of the Secretaryls Small Business Ad-
visory Committee
Wednesday, December 7, from Washington -
Government Procurement Problems C. g. Hughitt,
Chief, Small Business Division
Thursday, December 8, from Washington -
Management Problems Wlilford White, Chief,
Management Assistance, Small Business Division
Friday, December 9, from New York City Small
and Big Bus~iness Work Together L. T. White,~-
Member, Small Business Advisory Committee.

COTTON GINNINGS 9.5 MILLION BALES

States of the nation from the 1949 orop
totalled 9,543,686 running bales, a
sharp reduction from the 10 436,740 bales
reported to that time in 1948, but a substantial
increase over the 8,374,043 bales ginned to that
date in 1947, the Bureau of the Censue reported,

Note: Department of Commerce field
offices are oonetantly receiving a
wealth of data from the Census Bur-
eau on cotton production, innings
and consumption. If you have a pro-
blem in cotton, get in touch with
Your nearest office.
Innings to November 1, 1949, by States, in-
oluded, in running bales, Alabama, 729,306;
Arizona,' 188,184; Arkansas 1,000,607; Califor-
nia, 525,211; Florida, 9,249; Georgia, 494,474;
Illinois, 1,09g4; Kentucky 4 580; Louisiana,
494,529; Missiesippi, 1 086, 16; Missouri, 254,-
~556~8; New Mexico, los'76 North Carolina, 322,
55;oklahoma, 235,018; South Carolina 463 -
696; Tennessee, 410,509; Texas, 3,204,0)48; and
Virginia, lo,677.
The Censue Bureau also reported that cotton
consumed during September 1949 amounted to '
709,958~ bales. Cotton on hand in consuming es-
tablishments on September 30 totalled 744,602
bales, and in public storage and at compresses,
6,136,997 bales. The number of active consuming
cotton spindles in September was 19,975,ooo.
Total imports for the month of August 1949 was
5,324 bales, and exports of domestic cotton,
excluding.11sters totalled 167,616 bales.
The figures, the Census Bureau explained,
were preliminary and subject to later revision.


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE








I _


SOUTHEAST POPULATION RISES

'North Carolina, South Carolina,
!G~eorgia, Florida, Tennessee,
and Alabama have picked up an eatinl-
ated 1 469,000 in population since
the 1940 censue, the Bureau of the
Census reported in a compilation Just iceued
entitled Provisional Estimates of thePoua
tion of the United[ Statest By Pe~gios ivis-
ions. and States. July 1, 1949.

Copies of this leaflet are a-
vailable for the asking at all
Department of Commerce field
offices


The compilation shoe that as of July 1 of
this year the six Southeastern States, along
with Miessesippi, had an estimated population
of 19,839,000 compa ed with 18,425,162 in
1940. Only Mississippi reflected a decrease,
2.5 per cent-.*
The estimated population on July 1 of this
year, by States, included:
North Carolina, 3,864 000; South Garolina,
2 001,000; CGeorgia, 3,19 ,000; Florida, 2,-
494,000; Tennessee, 3,23 ,000; Alabana, 2,-
920,000; and Miesesippi, 2,130,000.
Inoreases in the estimated 1949 -population
over that of 1940 included:
North Carol'ina, 29),000, or 6.2 per cent;
South Carolina, 101,000, 5.3 per cent; Geo ia,
73,000, 2.3 per cent; Florida, 597,ooo, 31. .
per cent; Tennessee, 318,000, 10.9 per cent;
and Alabama, 87,000, 31.1 per cent.
In the Southeast, the increase in Florida
was well above the national average of 12.9
per cent. Also, Florida's gain exceeded that
of all other States except Arizona, Nevada,
Wlashington, Oregon and California where the
immigration of residents of other sections of
the nation has been unuenally heavy.


sAuinees inventories at the end of Sept-
jneber amounted to $54.8 billion. After
I~djustment for seasonal fluctuations,
the book value of inventories in September was
8150 million above the August level, the first
monthly increase since the all-time peak wacs
reached in November 1948.
-o-0
Personal income in September was at an an-
nual rate of $210.8 billion, compared with
$211.4 billion in August. Nonagricultural in-
come, a measure of the income received by per-
sons from nonfarm sources, increased at an
annual rate of $1' billion, and wasB higher in
September than in any previous month of 1949.
-o-
Total value of new construction to be put in
place in 1950 is expected to equal the 19 9
record of more than $19 billion, according to
a joint report of the U. 8. Departments of
Commerce and Labor. The number of workere em-
ployed by construction contractors during the
peak month will be about the same in 1950 as
in 1949, around 2,400,000.
-o-
Gonstruction activity during October wpas off
only. 2 per cent, a less-than-seasonal decline
from the September peak level as further expan-
sion of work on new housing schools and hos-
pitals largely offset mall seasonal declines
in most other types of newr construction,
-o-
Independent retailers sales wrere 6 per
cent lower in October 1949 than in October 1948
the Bureau of the Geneue reported. GOtober
sales were 3 per cent ahead of the September
level this year. Only motor-vehicle dealers
reported sales in Gotober higher than in Oct-
ober 1948, reflecting an average increase of
15 per cent.
-0-
Effective December 31, all types of rice
will be removed from the export control rPosi-
tive ListY thus permitting shipment in any
quantity and to any destination without a vali-
dated export license. The December 31 export
decontrol date is the same as that set for the
expiration of international rice allocations.
-o-
September production of heating and cooking
equipment continued the upwaird seasonal trend
writh significant increases over August in prao-
tically all types, the Census Bureau reported.
Inventories of these products decreased at the
end of September compared with August 31.
-0-
U. 8, manufacturers used 75,503 long tone
of new rubber in September as compared with
7q,726 tone in Auguet. The September total was
16.9 per cent below September 1948, due largely
to a strike against one of the major fabrion-
tors.


PAGE 3


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


iB~ U S I N E S S T RE N D $





Malleable Iron Castng Sept. 1949 Free
Mehncal Stok~ers Sept. 1949 Free
Steel Castings September 1949 Free
Gelhtin_. Except Photographic July-Sept.
1949 Free
Heating and Gooking Equipment August
1949
Shoes and Slipprs Aug. 1949 Free
MISELLNEUS

Employment and Unemployment States and
Areas Part I Proceedings of the Third An-
nual Technical Seminar, Association of State
Planning and Development Agencies, U. S. De-
partmnent of Commerce, July 26-29, 1949 Free
State Income Pments in 1948 Reprint
from Survey of current Business Free
The Corn Picker Development and Industry
Outlook Free
Fundamental Techniques in Frequency Ad-
,jstment of Q~uartz Crystals Circular 0-
National Bureau of standards 10~
United States Coast Pilot 296-page book
with illustrations New Edition Govers
West Indies, including Puerto Rico and Virgin
Island Provides important general naviga-
tional information U. S. Coast and Geodetio
Survey $1.50.

BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICE

.C~he Business Information Service
Sof the Department of Commerce
of intconstinuemany Srntheasmter basi-
nesses. Some of the more recent in-
cludes the following:
Hoel d Pl948 Operating Ratios (F ee)
Operating Ratios (Free)
194epartment and Specialty Stores -
Inf dein nory Clean ng Basic


BUREAU O)F THE CENSUS

Provisional Estimates of the Population of
the United States. BY Regions. Divisions. and
States: Jluly 1, 1949 Series P-25, No. g2 -
Free
Sources of State Tax Revenue in 19 -
G-8F49-No, 5
The Monthly Report on the Labor Force -
Oatober 1949 Series P-571, No. 88 Free
Cotton Ginned Prior to November 1 in Tenn-
essee, Mississippi, North Carolina, O~klahoma,
Arkansam, South Carolina, Alabama, and in
Specified States (Beparate Reports) -Crops of
1949 and 1948 Free
Fuels and Elect~r~ioEnergy Cnsume Census
of Manufactures, 1947 Series MC100-9 Free.
INDUSTRY REPORTS

Canned F~ruits and Vegetables October 1949
Subscription rate,$1 per year Issued Quar-

So Late 08tubdrM194hly.Subscription rate
r FACTS FOR INDUSTRY

Container01 801osues mbAugu t 19A9 o Free

Consumption by Uses September 1949 Free
usCut inge ofe~elected Men's Garme~nts Aug-
Commercial steel Forgings September 1949-
Free
Gray Iron Castings Sept. 1949 Free
Red Cedar Shingles September 1949 Free
Aluminan & Magnesium Wrought Products -
September 1949 Free


U.S. DEPARTMENT E
FIELD SERYlCE .._
Atlanta Regional ff ce
50 Whitehall I~teSW
.Atlanta 3EP~~
OFFICIAL B 8m~ k ~~3
PERMIT NO. 1009

Vol. 3 No. 23 November 30, 1949


-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOUl WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORMATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIIlIllllIII ilillllllillilllllll IIIIlIIII II lIIII
3 1262 08748 8531


FUAGE 4


BULLET





RETAIL SALES TREND DOW9NWARD

R etail sales in independent
ammmmnamm es tablihents inpae trihe
108Southeast were generally
the corresponding month last year,
~FlOonly four of twenty-two cities
and area in which the Bureau of
the Geneus conducts monthly sale
RETAIL STORS trends reporting increases*
Aside from an 11 per cent gain
in Augusta, Ga., 9 per cent in Biloxi, Mlise*,
and 1 per cent in Savannah and Kingaport,
Tenn., the trend was generally off, with de-
olines in sales ranging from 2 per cent in
Johnson City, Tenn., to as high as 12 per cent
in Atlanta*

Available now at all Department
of Commerce field offices are
the Retail Trade Reports for the
South Atlantio and East South
Central Areae and the U. S. for
October 1949, They are free.
In comparing sales for the first ten months
of 1949 with those in the same period of 1948,
increases were found in eight of the twenty-
two cities and areas, and declines in ten
other. In four there was no change*


TWIO NEW PUBLICATIONS ISSUED

wo new publications have
eastern businessmen, and
two other have been revised,
The new ones are:
f ~~Establisin and Operatin
$5 MAAMB ( A Letter Shop. Prioe 194
The Ruhr Area. Prioe 200.
The revised ones are:
Establishing and Operating a Flowersop
Price lf
Guides For New World Traders. Price 154.
These bookrlets are available
~Cat all Department of Commerce
field offices. Order from your
nearest office,

The booklet on establishing and operating a
letter shop is intended to show persons who
are skilled in duplicatin "work- how they may
develop a business of their own in that field.
The publication on the Ruhr area was issued
to meet the need for information on a subject
which is current throughout the world these
days as discussions of world issues are held,
The twro revised booklets contain much new
data for the benefit of those wishing to enter
the florist field or to become world traders.


ill:,j i
//


LNIbifll) SilAnkllif DIEPA RTIVErill (31 (COAAttitC:E
FIELD SERVICE








THE STAFFS OF THE FIELD OFFICES OF THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WISH FOR YOU
ATLANTA 3, GA. SAVANMAIII, GA. JACKSOlIVILLE, FLA. MIANI 32, FLA MO)BILE, ALA CHlt~LESTONl, S.C.
60 Whitehall St., S.L, Room 218, P.O. Bldg., 425 Federal Bldg., 94)7 Seybold ldg*, 308 Federal Bldg., 310 Peoples Bldg., *
Tel. Mllnut 4)121 X1-453 Te1. 2-4755 Tel. 4-7111 Tel. 9-7633 Tel. 2-3641 Tel. 7771 *


A VERY MIERRY CHRISTRIAS AND A HAPPY NEW
* ** ** ** ~* ***w *****


YEAR
*~* *


VOL. j NO. 24


DECEMBER 15, 1949


RELP FOR FEDERAL INCO0KE TAX PLAYERS
TdIh ntdSae eaten fCmeo il fie

now have available for distribution five publications
to help businessmen and individuals to solve their
in o e a Federal income tax problems arising during the coming tax-
paying period. They are:
Your Federal Income Tax, 194 Price 250. Disousses all
phaseesof t noe ta a, such as exemptions, deductions,
and so forth, incorporating provisions of the revised lawr.
Bulletin F Income Tax Dercation and Obsolescence Price 254. Contains detail-
ed information on depreciation ofea and pesol property.
The BSmall Businessman and His Deolara-tion of Estimated Tax Free. Points out cer-
tain problems of taxation not fully recognized by small businessmen,
How An Unincorprated Business a Use An operating Loes To Obtain A Refund On Pre-
vious Yeare' Taxes Free.
Your Rights of Review Wlhen The Government questions Your Income Tax Return Pree.

) (Order Then From Your Nearest Department of Commeroe Ofiie)





WHOLEBALE SALES DECLINE SHARPLY


TRENDS IN WHOLESALERS' S troops
SALES AND INVEFETCRIES* several im-
(ervice and Limi ontis e
Function Whalesalers Ondy) suited in
INDEX 1939 MONTHLY AVERAGE = 100 OVerall dO-
we clinee in
gg5 RES MMTMLYAVERAGE WrhOleeale
t7 Inven(TOr.Y- YEAR-ENDO sales in the
300 Southeast in
October in-
cluding 12
per cent in
ersoal~1 the South
Atlantic and
15 per cent
in the East
'" son I~s~ ~~fBl` South Cen-
tral area
as compared
a with sales
LPe II, 19r setP lso Iees 1915 IP6 PI inl the same
BASED Oil REPORTS COMIPILED FRIOM THIS SURVEYL 19 80-

cording to a Bureau of the Census survey.
The commodities in which unusually heavy
decreases occurred included electrical ap-
pliances and specialties, hardware, industrial
supplies, and dry goode.
Lesser declines were registered in sale
among full-11ne electrical wholesa~lers, lumber
and building materials dealers, beer firms,
non-affiliated full-line wholesale grocers,
and wines and spirited dealer,
Decreased were also reflected in the two
areas in comparing sales for the ten-month
period of January to October 1949 with the
corresponding period in 1948, including 8 per
cent in the South Atlantic region and 10 per
cent in the East South Central, and for
October 1949 w~ith September 1949 in which
decreases of 6 and 8 per cent, respectively,
were reported.



opeobe el949ncompa eds nihSeptember 1949 and
from the corresponding period In 1948.
EXPORT 00NTROLS EASING


IE or "oto ha re ntis no primarily
re shipments of specified commodities a riy
o rear of Cm ere Chare Sa yr er th

Export Control Act of 1949 and Second Decontrol
Act of 1947, just issued.

F This epapta iso Commabe eat
Field Ofiies. Price 15#.

domW most materials b dn psobcse inoample
Department of Commerce to remove a large num-
ber of commodities from export control, the
report points out.


POSTAL GUIDES NOW AVAILABLE


m ~tal Guide.
-- E- The Postal Guide is wide.
c~l- -~ IIIIly used by sh~i~ppers~ and cor-
respondents as a source of
instructions end general
information concerning the
international postal service
Including the rates, fees
and conditions of mailing
which apply to the various
clases of articles in the regular mails and
to parcel poet packages, the air-mail service
to foreign countries, and the treatment of
incoming international mail*

The Postal Guide prices are:
SPart I 1.5
Part II $0.70
supplements t1.00,
Also, Part I of the Guide shows an alphabet-
ioal list of post-offioee by States and coun-
ties, as well as those discontinued and names
changed during the previous four years. Part
II carries, among other things, an alphabet-
ical list of foreign countries with specific
requirements applicable to mail addressed to
each*
The Supplements are issued quarterly and
contain changes in postal savings, post-
offices, money orders, and so forth given in
Parts I and II.
The Guide has been referred to as the most
helpful boog ever published on the use of the
numerous services rendered by the Post Ofiie*
SOUTHEAST LUMCBER PRODUCTION *HISH




i uAlaC ma liloridaiG o gia, N th Carolinar
compilation contained in the September 1949
issue of the Lumber, Plywood and Allied Prod-
note Industry Repr~;t of the U. S. Department
of Commerce. ( subeription Price $1,00 a


the Uni ed Soatheaw ras 8404emihlion feet.oet

oithe: nati:"' ati: st:::ll in:'. oeaio "-
compared with 53,109 for the nation.
A reprint from the Report entitled rWho
Produces Our National Supply of Lumber" avail-
able for distribution fromn all Department of
Commerce field offices shows the production of
lumber in 1947 by regions and mill-aise claea,
rith :"".ir i~i Imi'"i!!i andote:13h.Italso

There is no charge for the re rint *


Commerce Field Of-
fices nOW have a-
vailable for distribution
to southeastern businessmen
the 1949 edition of the
United Statea Oficiial Pos.


UNITED STATES
arrIan L
POSTAL GUIDE


PAGE 2


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE











CENSUS OF POPULATION SHAPING -I digii --r pr-


A bout this time
1 next year, every

J(hamlet in the Southeast
pand other regions of the
SUnited States should know
whether they have added
any resaoents since 1940, because by that time
the Bureau of the Gensus expects to be in a
position to announce the complete results of
ite Seventeenth Decennial Census of Population
for 1950.
As some evidence of the magnitude of the
undertaking, the Census Bureau has released
the following outline of its preparations for
the census:
Some 140,000 enumerators will be in the
field directed by 8,300 crew leaders, who will
serve under 450 district supervisors, who in
turn will be under the management of fourteen
area supervisors.
They will assemble facts and figures in-
volving 150 million Americans, 45 million
homes, and 6,300,000 farms, the latter to be
included in the Gensus of Agriculture,

Note: The Field Offices of
the Department of Commerce will
serve as a reservoir for data
to be collected in this census.

In Washington, 8,500 temporary workers will
serve under the direction of the Census Bureau
permanent staff, using hundreds of high speed
tabulating machines to sum up the millions of
facts collected by the field force.
The enumeration will start April 1, 1950.
On December 1, 1950, official figures for each
of the 48 States wrill be sent to the President
of the United States. The census, by law, must
be completed by December 31, 1952.
-- -- tear here - .
ORDER BLAN
(List The Material Desired, Tear This Form Out
And Mail It To Your Nearest Department of Com-
merce Field Office. Your Name And Address Are
On The Opposite Side)


rose national product was at an annual
ter of 1949. This estimate of the mar-
Itet value of the nation's output of goods and
services was about j3% billion below the cor-
responding rate for the second quarter and $7
billion below that for the first quarter.
-o-
Business activity in October continued mod-
erately upward, aside from segm~ents affected
by work stoppages in the steel and coal in-
dustries. Production of most soft goods Equaled
or bettered September levels, while the sharp
cut in supplies of steel and coal did not slow
output of most durable-goods industries using
these materials.
-o-
Under existing international debt agreements
a total of $1j.4 billion is scheduled to fall
due to the U. S. Government from foreign coun-
tries in the period from 1950 through the year
2000. The total is made up of 1(9.2 billion of
principal and $4.2 billion of interest, based
on agreements with foreign countries where
schedules of payments are stipulated or implied,
-o-
Total sales of retail stores in October de-
clined about 1 per cent from September after
adjustment for seasonal factors and differences
in the number of trading days. This maintained
dollar sales at about the average level of the
first three quarters of the year.
-o-
Sales of chain stores and mail order houses
in October were estimated at $2,374 million.
After allowance for seasonal factors and trad-
ing day difference, October sales were about 3
per cent below September.
-o-
Manufacturers' business slowed appreciably
during October as many industries were directly
or indirectly affected by the coal and steel
stoppages. Sales totalled $18 billion, a decline
of $1l.j billion for the month. The value of new
orders also fell below September levels. In-
ventory liquidation was continued by at a slow-
er rate than in recent months.
-o-
Operating revenue of the Inland Waterwrays
Corporation, U. S. Department of Commeroe, in
the fiscal year 1949 was 23.8 per cent higher
than in fiscal 1948 while operating expenses
rose only 1.39 per cent in the same period. In
fiscal 1949 operating revenue amounted to
$10,199,o51 as compared with $8,235,826.
-o-
An increasing number of small manufacturers
seeking to diversify their output or to replace
articles for which demand is blackening are
searching the Register of Patents Available for
Licensing or Sale as a potential source of new
products.


(On Sales Publications, Please Mtake
Remittances Payable To Treasurer
of the United States)


BULLETIN OF COMMERCE


PAGE 3









Cotton System Spinning Activity Oct. 1949
Fate and Oils Ootober 1949
0 I I 01 0 ri Confectioner
y & Competitive Chocolate Prod-


Pulp & Paper Manufacture in the U. S.
September 1949
Inorganic Chemicals U. 8. Production -
Septemb~er 1949
Flour Milling Products September 1949
Superphosphate September 1949
Softwood plywood September 1949
Nonferrous Castings September 1949
INDUSTRY REPORTS

Pulp, Paper & Board Third Quarter Review -
$2.25 a year
Chemicals & Druge November 1949 $2.50
a year
Leather November 1949 600 a year
MISCELLANEOUS

Establishing & Operating a Letter Shop 154.
Guides for New world Traders Revised 154
The Ruhr Area 200
xort Control & Allocation Powers 9th
euarter~ly Report by the secretary of commerce -
152
Salad Dressing. Mayonnaise, & Related Prod-
uote Annual Survey of the Industry Pree
Salesmanship & Prosperity An Address by
secretary of Commercue Charles Sawyer Free


TWO NEW BRALL BUSINESS AIDS


Swo new Small Business Aids des-
Snessman and prospective entrant
into the small business field to facil-
itate plans and program have been is-
aued by the Small Business Division,
Office of Domestic Commerce. They are*
Number 489 Planning Retail News-
paper Advertisementa
Number 490 Fundamentals of Pre-
paigand Selling S~elf-Servie Meats.
Tee and many other Business Ad
are available at Department of Commerce
PField Offices.
-028


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

Census of Mlanufactures
Final State ~,~repo-e:
Rhode Island Price 15
Connecticut Price 15
Kentucky Price 15
d~alifornia Price 20~
Cotton Ginned in Texas, eorgia, and Louis-
inna frmthe crop of 19,prior to November
1 (Separate Reports)- Fr~ee
Banned Food Report Distributors and
Canners November 1, 1949 Free
Current Population Reports Labor Force -
ul-Time and Part-Time Workers: August 1949 -
Series P-50, No. 18 Free
Current Population Reports Labor Force -
Gross Changes in the Labor Force September -
October 1949 Series P-59, No. 9 Free
*Current Population Reports Population
Estimates Provisional Estimates of the Popu-
lation of Continental United States Oct. 1,
1949 Series P-25, No. 33 Free
Monthly Retail Trade Report Independent
Retail Stores U. 8. Summary, South Atlantic
Region, and East South Central Region Oot-
ober 1949 (Separate Reports) Free
Monthly Wholesale Trade Reprts October

FACTS FOR INDUSTRY

Cotton and Lintere Consumption, Stooke,
Imports and Exports, and Active Spindles -
October 1949 Pree
Report on Gotton Glinning Nurmber of bales
of cotton ginned from growth of 1949 prior to
November 14, 1949 (By States) Free crOw


U. S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD SERVICE
Atlanta Regional Office
50 Whitehall Street S.W. ,s
Atlanta 3, Georgia
OFFICIAL BUSINESS .
PERMIT NO. 1009

Yol. 3, No. 24 December 15, 1949

-BULLETIN OF COMMERCE -

SERVICE TO BUSINESS IS THE KEY-
NOTE OF YOUR DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
FIELD OFFICE. THERE YOU WILL FIND
A WEALTH OF BUSINESS INFORyATION.
CONSULT YOUR FIELD OFFICE REGULARLY.


BC-6-JF


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEROY L. QUALLS
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


UNVRITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08s748 8523152
BULLE'~_ .. sumerrt-


PAGE 4


30 10




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