Digital Art Project with Movable Books and Toy Theaters from Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature ( Under...

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Material Information

Title:
Digital Art Project with Movable Books and Toy Theaters from Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature ( Undergraduate Internship Project )
Physical Description:
Video
Creator:
Scott, Rachael E. ( Author, Primary )
Ketnick, Ben
Publisher:
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Digital Humanities
Digital Art History
Student Project
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature
Movable Books
Toy Theaters
Digital Art
Toy and movable books
Genre:
Toy and movable books

Notes

Abstract:
Undergraduate student internship project in the UF Digital Collections that developed from a course with faculty member Katerie Gladdys (http://layoftheland.net/). The undergraduate student internship included many technical areas, including imaging and digital photography, and application, critique, and exploration of those skills in refashioning historical materials and utilizing technologies to create a new work. The internship included work on the Alice exhibit, with pop-up books, and developed an interactive animation that reinterpreted the pop-up book.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Permissions granted by the creator.
Resource Identifier:
sobekcm - AA00005204_00001
System ID:
AA00005204:00001


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LES APPARTEMENTS1




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HOW TO USE THE TOY THEATRE


This book will help you to
see the story of Cinderella
from start to finish .
The first act begins as soon
as the book opens.


Set up the book on a flat surfacE
Sand clip the covers together
Then you have the whole
/ story of Cinderella
before your eyes.


If you place the book under
a light you will get the best
effect, and be able to give
a real theatre show to
your friends ---
your -


Patent No, 495,153.


LONDON AND
Printed in Great Britain


GLASGOW


The Baldwin Library
university
of
R m lorida


,ff /' -


COLLINS :




















NCE upon a time the wife of a rich man fell very sick, and as she felt herself to be dying
she sent for her only daughter.
The little girl came at once, and began to cry sadly when she saw bow weak and ill
r dear mother was.
" Do not cry, my darling," said the sick lady, "but dry your tears, and listen to what
lm going to say."
The poor girl tried to keep back her sobs, and then her mother went on:
"When I am dead, my dear child, you must go on being good and kind, and Heaven
U help you in all your troubles. Your fairy godmother also will hear your wishes and
rry them out for you, but only if they are good ones."
Soon after this, the mother closed her eyes in death. Day after day the little girl went
her grave, and spread flowers upon it.
She kept her mother's advice in mind, and was always good and kind to all around her.
By and by her father took another wife, who already had two daughters, each of whom
Is older than the little girl.
The father did not live long after his second marriage, but died in less than six months.
,en came a sad time for the poor little girl.
Her two sisters hated her because she was more handsome than they were, and in every
.y they tried to make her life hard and bitter.
" Is the stupid little goose to sit in the parlour with us ? said the wicked sisters.
Ihose who eat must work; send her to the kitchen, and let her do all the dirty work."
So they took away all her good clothes, and gave her an old, ragged frock, and coarse
Des.
They made her do all the hard work of the house, and kept her at it all the time.
She had to rise in the morning before it was light, carry all the water from the well,
ht the fire, scrub the floor, and do all the washing.
At night, when she was tired out, she had no soft, cosy bed to sleep in, but had to make
e up in the kitchen as best she could.
As a last touch of cruelty, her sisters named her Cinderella.
Poor Cinderella got no rest. She cleaned the plate and the stairs. She bad to scrub out
r stepmother's room, and also those of her sisters.
Her sisters slept in lovely rooms with mirrors hanging all round, in which they could
i themselves from head to foot. But if they had only known it, Cinderella, in all her rags,
,ked ten times more handsome than they did in all their grand clothes.
One day news spread through all the town that the king was going to give a grand ball,
iich was to last for two days.
To this ball all the young ladies of the land were to be asked, so that the king's son might
Dose a bride for himself.
The two cruel sisters did not know how to contain themselves for joy. They felt quite
re they would be asked to the ball; and so they were.
When they knew that they were going, they called Cinderella, and said:
" Now, come here and dress our hair properly ; then fit gold buckles on our shoes, and
out our best dresses, for we are going to the king's ball."
Cinderella asked if she
s to be allowed to go also,
t the sisters laughed her
scorn, saying, "What I A
ty little girl like you to
to a ball No! no! You
ly at home and look after
i house till we come back. I
So poor Cinderella choked
-k her tears, and began .











to dress their hair; and all the time the sisters spoke of nothing else but what they
would put on. Col
I," said the elder, shall wear my dress of scarlet silk, and my scarf of point lace."
And I," said the other, shall wear my white satin dress, and my new necklace." thi
They sent for grand new sprays for their hair, and Cinderella put them in carefully.
She must have been a good little girl or she would have dressed their hair badly, so as tul
to mock them ; but she did it neatly and they gave her very little thanks for her care. st(
Every now and then the sisters thought it a good joke to say, Cinderella, would you
like to go to the ball ? yo
The little girl would answer, Alas I Don't make fun of me ; you know I've no clothes
fit to wear." ra
You are right there," they would reply; "the guests would laugh to see a Cinderella he
walk into the palace." gh
At last, after much pinching of their waists to make them very small, and much looking
in the glass to make sure of having a nice smile, the sisters were ready, and went off to the mi
ball, while poor Cinderella turned back into the house with a heavy heart.
Cinderella tried to busy herself in work about the kitchen, so that she might forget the thl
gay scene in which her sisters were taking a part.
But, good girl as she was, she could not keep from thinking how unfair they were, and
at last she sat down, and began to sob as if her heart would break. wl
Suddenly her fairy godmother stood before her, and asked what was the cause of her ha
sadness.
"I should so like-I should so like--" Cinderella sobbed so much that she could of,
not go on. pr
You would so like to go to the ball. Is that what you mean ? "
"Alas, yes replied Cinderella, with a deep sigh. ch
Well, well," said the fairy godmother, if you are a good girl, and do as I tell you,
you shall go to the ball. You will wear a finer dress, too, than any other one there. Go into go
the garden, and bring me a pumpkin."
Cinderella went at once, cut the finest pumpkin she could see, and brought it to her he
godmother. stl
Her fairy godmother scraped the soft pulp out, leaving only the outside shell, which she
struck with her wand, and it at once became a pretty gilt coach, ha
Next she went to the mouse-trap, and finding that it held six live mice, she called to ch
Cinderella to come to her.
When the girl did so, her godmother told her to raise the door of the trap a little bit, so At
as to let only one mouse out at a time. bo
As each mouse came out from the trap the fairy godmother gave it a little tap with her
wand, and at once it became a pretty little grey horse.
Thus six fine horses, all as like as peas in a pod, were found to pull the coach. ev
Go, Cinderella," now said the godmother, and see if there is a rat in the trap." ba
Cinderella brought the rat-trap, and in it were three large rats. go











The godmother chose one, and giving it a tap with the wand, changed it into a stout
achman, such as you may see sitting on a Lord Mayor's coach.
Then she said, Now go into the garden, and you will find six green lizards. Bring
=m to me."
Cinderella had no sooner got them than the fairy godmother, with a tap of her wand,
rned them into six footmen, dressed in gay, green clothes, who sprang up at once and
)od behind the coach.
"Well," said the fairy godmother to Cinderella, there is a fine coach for you. Are
u not well pleased ? "
" Yes, dear godmother," said the girl ; but you know I cannot go to the ball in these
gs," and she touched her old dress. The fairy just touched her with the wand, and lo 1
r torn frock became a grand ball-gown of pink satin. Then she gave Cinderella a pair of
iss slippers, spun by the fairies-the prettiest slippers one could ever see.
Now quite dressed, the girl went into the coach. Her godmother then told her that she
ust not, above all things, forget to leave the ballroom before twelve o'clock struck.
If she waited one instant after that hour, the coach would become a pumpkin again;
e horses, mice ; the footmen, lizards ; and her dress, rags.
Cinderella said that she would be sure to do as her godmother said.
When she got to the palace, the servants took in word that a great princess had come,
iose name no one knew. At once the king's son went out to lead the princess into the
11 where the ball was going on.
No sooner had Cinderella set her foot within the door than a murmur arose on all sides
' Oh, how lovely she is "' The dancing stopped, for all the dancers were gazing at the
incess.
The players, too, ceased to play, for they, like the others, could think of nothing but the
arming princess.
All the ladies there were looking at Cinderella, and trying to think where she could have
t such a beautiful dress.
The young prince led her to the seat of honour, and sat down by her side. Then he took
r as his partner for a dance, and in dancing she showed so much grace that every one
hired at her, and could not help doing so.
When the grand supper was served, the prince waited upon Cinderella with his own
nds. She sat down beside her sisters, who did not know her in the fine dress, and were
armed by her speaking to them.
The evening passed away like a dream of delight, Cinderella dancing only with the prince.
last, however, she heard a clock strike the third quarter past eleven. At once, rising, she
wed to all the company, and went off as suddenly as she had come.
When Cinderella reached home she found her fairy godmother waiting there.
" Oh, thank you, thank you, dear godmother," said the girl. "'' I have had such a happy
ening, and the prince himself was very kind to me. I should much like to go again to the
11 next night, because the young prince asked me to be sure to come back. May I, dear
mother? "
The fairy promised that she would let her go
again. No sooner was the promise given than the
two sisters drove up to the door, and at once the
fairy godmother went off.
How late you are said Cinderella, with a
yawn, as she opened the door.
If you had been at the ball," said one of the
sisters, you would not be yawning. A most lovely
princess was there, who treated us just as if we had
been her friends."
"Was she well dressed ? asked Cinderella.
Well dressed," gasped the sisters. Why, she
was charming to look at ; she had on the prettiest
dress we ever saw."
What was her name, and where did she come
from ? and Cinderella could not keep back a faint
smile.
/ That is the funny thing," said the sisters.
"No one in the whole palace knew who she was,
or where she had come from. But it was quite
clear that she was a great lady, though even











the prince knew nothing about
her." &I
Oh, I should like dearly
to see this lovely princess/ let
Will you not lend me one of up
your old dresses, so that I
may go to the ball witheyou g he
next time ? "
"What It cried both pr
sisters, "a little kitchen-
maid like you expects to go p ti
to a ball! No! no! Look
after your work here, and ga2
don't think of things that are f h
not meant for such as you." os
Poor little Cinderella felt
the tears come into her eyes no]
at the unkind words of her
sisters. But the promise of s
the fairy godmother came h
back to her mind, and she on
smiled again.
How eagerly Cinderella upI
waited for the next evening.
She went about her work
quite brightly, and then wo
helped her sisters to get
ready for the ball. ___ for
Cinderella had hard work
trying to please them, and it seemed as if they wouid never be ready. But at last they went we
off to the palace, and as soon as they were gone from the door, the fairy godmother appeared.
Again she touched the girl with her magic wand, and lo her shabby dress became see
changed into a handsome robe, which sparkled and shone like the rays of the sun. Each
time she moved, a thousand bright stars seemed to twinkle all over her. Sh
Cinderella was delighted, and, putting her arms around the fairy godmother's neck, she
kissed her again and again.
"Good-bye, child," said the fairy, "have a good time at the ball, but don't forget to
leave the room before the clock strikes twelve." the
Cinderella promised, and drove off to the ball.
When she entered the palace, the guests were more than ever delighted with her beauty. wa
"Here she is again," they said in soft tones, "and she looks more lovely even than before."I at
Once more the prince was very kind to the stranger, and danced a great deal with her.
At last she chanced to look up at the clock, and, to her horror, saw that it was almost wa
twelve o'clock.
With a faint cry of alarm, she rose and fled from the palace. thi
Lightly as a fawn she sped on, dropping in her eager haste one of her little glass slippers.
She dared not stop to pick it up, for the prince was coming hard after her. he
He could not overtake her, however, but had to content himself with picking up the little
shoe, which he carefully laid in his pocket. M
The clock began to strike twelve as Cinderella got to the outer gate of the palace. As
soon as it ceased to strike, her lovely garments vanished, and only a shabby girl was left. qu
Cinderella reached home quite out of breath, and almost in tears. She felt sorry that
she had forgotten the words of her fairy godmother, and had stayed too late at the palace.
The splendid chariot and the gay footmen were gone : so, too, was all her finery, except
one little glass slipper.
She sat down by the fire with the slipper in her lap, and looked at it sadly. "Alas,"
thought she, "my fairy godmother will trust me no more."
Soon the sisters came back from the ball, and a great story they had to tell. The wonderful
princess had been there again, more lovely than ever.
But, strange to say, just as the clock struck twelve, the princess had rushed away without
bidding any one farewell.
"The Prince," said the sisters, "hurried after the princess, but could not find her
anywhere."


__











" Indeed," they went on to say, "he seemed almost out of his mind, for there is no
ubt he wished to ask her to marry him."
" Yes," one of the sisters said, he came upon a little glass slipper, which the princess
fall in her hurry. He picked it up, and did nothing for the rest of the evening but gaze
on it."
Cinderella heard all they had to say, but did not speak. She only slipped her hand into
r pocket, and felt that the other slipper was still safe there.
And now we must return to the palace, and see how matters were going on there. The
Since looked everywhere for the fair stranger, but could find no trace of her.
He asked the sentries at the gates if they had seen a princess pass out; but all replied
it only a shabby little girl had gone out, to whom, of course, they had paid no heed.
Next morning after the ball, the prince came to his father the king, holding the little
Lss slipper in his hand.
He told the king the whole story of the lovely maiden, and said that he meant to find her
t and ask her to marry him.
" But," said his father, how can you do that, my son, when you do not know her name,
r where she lives ? "
" I shall tell all the people of the land," replied the prince, what I mean to do. Then
hall travel from town to town, until I find the maiden whose foot fits this slipper.
" Perhaps she will be able to show to me the other slipper, and I shall know her to be
r missing princess."
So a grand company set out with the prince at their head. After him came two heralds,
on white horses.
Behind the heralds came a page, bearing upon a velvet cushion the little glass slipper.
One herald blew his trumpet, and the other shouted in a loud, clear voice that the prince
uld marry the lady whose foot the slipper fitted.
One after another the noble ladies came forth to try on the slipper, but it was too small
any of them.
At last the prince came to Cinderella's home, and the two sisters were very proud to
Come such a grand company into the house.
They ordered Cinderella not to show herself, but she pleaded so hard to be allowed to
ithe company, that the sisters gave way.
So Cinderella watched her sisters, as each tried in vain to crush her foot into the slipper.
e could not help laughing, and this made the sisters very angry.
At last Cinderella said, "Let me see if it will fit me." But the sisters only laughed.
A page put the glass slipper on her foot, and it fitted her perfectly.
The surprise of all the company was greater still, when Cinderella took out of her pocket
t other glass slipper, and placed it upon her foot.
At the same moment the fairy godmother appeared. She touched Cinderella with her
nd, and at once she was dressed in robes even more splendid than those she had worn
the ball.
Then the cruel sisters knew that the lovely princess whom they had admired so much
s their own sister.
They threw themselves down at her feet, and with tears begged that she would forgive
*ir bad conduct to her.
Cinderella was too good and kind to bear ill-will against any one, and she freely forgave
" sisters.
Then she was led in great state to the palace to meet the prince again. He thought her
,re beautiful than ever, and, a few days after, married her.
By and by, when the old king died, Cinderella and the prince were crowned king and
Den, amid the Joy of all the people.








HOW TO USE THE TOY THEATRE '"


7~A~


La d o
L44/Cn~


This book will help you to
see the story of Cinderella
from start to finish .
The first act begins as soon
as the book opens.


Set up the book on a flat surfacE
Sand clip the covers together
r Then you have the whole
/ story of Cinderella
J before your eyes.


If you place the book under
a light you will get the best

a real theatre show to
your friends. -
your^


Patent No. 495.153.


ONCE upon a time the wife of a rich man fell very sick, and as she felt herself to be dying
she sent for her only daughter.
The little girl came at once, and began to cry sadly when she saw bow weak and ill
her dear mother was.
Do not cry, my darling," said the sick lady, but dry your tears, and listen to what
I am going to say."
The poor girl tried to keep back her sobs, and then her mother went on:
When I am dead, my dear child, you must go on being good and kind, and Heaven
will help you in all your troubles. Your fairy godmother also will hear your wishes and
carry them out for you, but only if they are good ones."
Soon after this, the mother closed her eyes in death. Day after day the little girl went
to her grave, and spread flowers upon it.
She kept her mother's advice in mind, and was always good and kind to all around her.
By and by her father took another wife, who already had two daughters, each of whom
was older than the little girl.
The father did not live long after his second marriage, but died in less than six months.
Then came a sad time for the poor little girl.
Her two sisters hated her because she was more handsome than they were, and in every
way they tried to make her life hard and bitter.
Is the stupid little goose to sit in the parlour with us ? said the wicked sisters.
"Those who eat must work; send her to the kitchen, and let her do all the dirty work."
So they took away all her good clothes, and gave her an old, ragged frock, and coarse
shoes.
They made her do all the hard work of the house, and kept her at it all the time.
She had to rise in the morning before it was light, carry all the water from the well,
light the fire, scrub the floor, and do all the washing.
At night, when she was tired out, she had no soft, cosy bed to sleep in, but had to make
one up in the kitchen as best she could.
As a last touch of cruelty, her sisters named her Cinderella.
Poor Cinderella got no rest. She cleaned the plate and the stairs. She had to scrub out
her stepmother's room, and also those of her sisters.
Her sisters slept in lovely rooms with mirrors hanging all round, in which they could
see themselves from head to foot. But if they had only known it, Cinderella, in all her rags,
looked ten times more handsome than they did in all their grand clothes.
One day news spread through all the town that the king was going to give a grand ball,
which was to last for two days.
To this ball all the young ladies of the land were to be asked, so that the king's son might
choose a bride for himself.
The two cruel sisters did not know how to contain themselves for joy. They felt quite
sure they would be asked to the ball; and so they were.
When they knew that they were going, they called Cinderella, and said:
"' Now, come here and dress our hair properly ; then fit gold buckles on our shoes, and
lay out our best dresses, for we are going to the king's ball."
Cinderella asked if she
was to be allowed to go also,
but the sisters laughed her
to scorn, saying, "What I A
dirty little girl like you to
goto a balll No! no! You
stay at home and look after
the house till we come back."I
So poor Cinderella choked
back her tears, and began J .-


COLLINS : LONDON AND GLASGOW
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to dress their hair; and all the time the sisters spoke of nothing else but what they
would put on.
"I," said the elder, shall wear my dress of scarlet silk, and my scarf of point lace."
"And I," said the other, shall wear my white satin dress, and my new necklace."
They sent for grand new sprays for their hair, and Cinderella put them in carefully.
She must have been a good little girl or she would have dressed their hair badly, so as
to mock them ; but she did it neatly and they gave her very little thanks for her care.
Every now and then the sisters thought it a good joke to say, Cinderella, would you
like to go to the ball ? "
The little girl would answer, Alas I Don't make fun of me ; you know I've no clothes
fit to wear."
"You are right there," they would reply; "the guests would laugh to see a Cinderella
walk into the palace."
At last, after much pinching of their waists to make them very small, and much looking
in the glass to make sure of having a nice smile, the sisters were ready, and went off to the
ball, while poor Cinderella turned back into the house with a heavy heart.
Cinderella tried to busy herself in work about the kitchen, so that she might forget the
gay scene in which her sisters were taking a part.
But, good girl as she was, she could not keep from thinking how unfair they were, and
at last she sat down, and began to sob as if her heart would break.
Suddenly her fairy godmother stood before her, and asked what was the cause of her
sadness.
"I should so like-I should so like--" Cinderella sobbed so much that she could
not go on.
You would so like to go to the ball. Is that what you mean ? "
"Alas, yes I replied Cinderella, with a deep sigh.
"Well, well," said the fairy godmother, if you are a good girl, and do as I tell you,
you shall go to the ball. You will wear a finer dress, too, than any other one there. Go into
the garden, and bring me a pumpkin."
Cinderella went at once, cut the finest pumpkin she could see, and brought it to her
godmother.
Her fairy godmother scraped the soft pulp out, leaving only the outside shell, which she
struck with her wand, and it at once became a pretty gilt coach.
Next she went to the mouse-trap, and finding that it held six live mice, she called to
Cinderella to come to her.
When the girl did so, her godmother told her to raise the door of the trap a little bit, so
as to let only one mouse out at a time.
As each mouse came out from the trap the fairy godmother gave it a little tap with her
wand, and at once it became a pretty little grey horse.
Thus six fine horses, all as like as peas in a pod, were found to pull the coach.
Go, Cinderella," now said the godmother, and see if there is a rat in the trap."
Cinderella brought the rat-trap, and in it were three large rats.


The godmother chose one, and giving it a tap with the wand, changed it into a stout
coachman, such as you may see sitting on a Lord Mayor's coach.
Then she said, Now go into the garden, and you will find six green lizards. Bring
them to me."
Cinderella had no sooner got them than the fairy godmother, with a tap of her wand,
turned them into six footmen, dressed in gay, green clothes, who sprang up at once and
stood behind the coach.
"Well," said the fairy godmother to Cinderella, there is a fine coach for you. Are
you not well pleased ? "
Yes, dear godmother," said the girl ; but you know I cannot go to the ball in these
rags," and she touched her old dress. The fairy just touched her with the wand, and lo 1
her torn frock became a grand ball-gown of pink satin. Then she gave Cinderella a pair of
glass slippers, spun by the fairies-the prettiest slippers one could ever see.
Now quite dressed, the girl went into the coach. Her godmother then told her that she
must not, above all things, forget to leave the ballroom before twelve o'clock struck.
If she waited one instant after that hour, the coach would become a pumpkin again;
the horses, mice ; the footmen, lizards; and her dress, rags.
Cinderella said that she would be sure to do as her godmother said.
When she got to the palace, the servants took in word that a great princess had come,
whose name no one knew. At once the king's son went out to lead the princess into the
hall where the ball was going on.
No sooner had Cinderella set her foot within the door than a murmur arose on all sides
of, "Oh, how lovely she is The dancing stopped, for all the dancers were gazing at the
princess.
The players, too, ceased to play, for they, like the others, could think of nothing but the
charming princess.
All the ladies there were looking at Cinderella, and trying to think where she could have
got such a beautiful dress.
The young prince led her to the seat of honour, and sat down by her side. Then he took
her as his partner for a dance, and in dancing she showed so much grace that every one
stared at her, and could not help doing so.
When the grand supper was served, the prince waited upon Cinderella with his own
hands. She sat down beside her sisters, who did not know her in the fine dress, and were
charmed by her speaking to them.
The evening passed away like a dream of delight, Cinderella dancing only with the prince.
At last, however, she heard a clock strike the third quarter past eleven. At once, rising, she
bowed to all the company, and went off as suddenly as she had come.
When Cinderella reached home she found her fairy godmother waiting there.
Oh, thank you, thank you, dear godmother," said the girl. "'' I have had such a happy
evening, and the prince himself was very kind to me. I should much like to go again to the
ball next night, because the young prince asked me to be sure to come back.. May I, dear
godmother? "
The fairy promised that she would let her go
again. No sooner was the promise given than the
two sisters drove up to the door, and at once the
fairy godmother went off.
"How late you are said Cinderella, with a
yawn, as she opened the door.
"If you had been at the ball," said one of the
sisters, you would not be yawning. A most lovely
princess was there, who treated us just as if we had
been her friends."'
"Was she well dressed? asked Cinderella.
Well dressed," gasped the sisters. "'' Why, she
was charming to look at; she had on the prettiest
dress we ever saw."
''What was her name, and where did she come
from ? and Cinderella could not keep back a faint
smile.
"That is the funny thing," said the sisters.
S"No one in the whole palace knew who she was,
or where she had come from. But it was quite
clear that she was a great lady, though even











the prince knew nothing about
her."
"Oh, I should like dearly
to see this lovely princess I
Will you not lend me one of
your old dresses, so that I
may goto the ballswith you
next time ? '"
"What 9 cried both
sisters, "a little kitchen-
maid like you expects to go
to a ball! No! no! Look
after your work here, and
don't think of things that are
not meant for such as you."
Poor little Cinderella felt
the tears come into her eyes
at the unkind words of her
sisters. But the promise of
the fairy godmother came
back to her mind, and she
smiled again.
How eagerly Cinderella
waited for the next evening.
She went about her work
quite brightly, and then
helped her sisters to get
ready for the ball.
Cinderella had hard work
trying to please them, and it seemed as if they woued never be ready. But at last they went
off to the palace, and as soon as they were gone from the door, the fairy godmother appeared.
Again she touched the girl with her magic wand, and lo her shabby dress became
changed into a handsome robe, which sparkled and shone like the rays of the sun. Each
time she moved, a thousand bright stars seemed to twinkle all over her.
Cinderella was delighted, and, putting her arms around the fairy godmother's neck, she
kissed her again and again.
"Good-bye, child," said the fairy, "have a good time at the ball, but don't forget to
leave the room before the clock strikes twelve."
Cinderella promised, and drove off to the ball.
When she entered the palace, the guests were more than ever delighted with her beauty.
"Here she is again," they said in soft tones, and she looks more lovely even than before."
Once more the prince was very kind to the stranger, and danced a great deal with her.
At last she chanced to look up at the clock, and, to her horror, saw that it was almost
twelve o'clock.
With a faint cry of alarm, she rose and fled from the palace.
Lightly as a fawn she sped on, dropping in her eager haste one of her little glass slippers.
She dared not stop to pick it up, for the prince was coming hard after her.
He could not overtake her, however, but had to content himself with picking up the little
shoe, which he carefully laid in his pocket.
The clock began to strike twelve as Cinderella got to the outer gate of the palace. As
soon as it ceased to strike, her lovely garments vanished, and only a shabby girl was left.
Cinderella reached home quite out of breath, and almost in tears. She felt sorry that
she had forgotten the words of her fairy godmother, and had stayed too late at the palace.
The splendid chariot and the gay footmen were gone : so, too, was all her finery, except
one little glass slipper.
She sat down by the fire with the slipper in her lap, and looked at it sadly. "Alas,"
thought she, "my fairy godmother will trust me no more."
Soon the sisters came back from the ball, and a great story they had to tell. The wonderful
princess had been there again, more lovely than ever.
But, strange to say, just as the clock struck twelve, the princess had rushed away without
bidding any one farewell.
"The Prince," said the sisters, "hurried after the princess, but could not find her
anywhere."


Indeed," they went on to say, "he seemed almost out of his mind, for there is no
doubt he wished to ask her to marry him."
Yes," one of the sisters said, he came upon a little glass slipper, which the princess
let fall in her hurry. He picked it up, and did nothing for the rest of the evening but gaze
upon It."
Cinderella heard all they had to say, but did not speak. She only slipped her hand into
her pocket, and felt that the other slipper was still safe there.
And now we must return to the palace, and see how matters were going on there. The
prince looked everywhere for the fair stranger, but could find no trace of her.
He asked the sentries at the gates if they had seen a princess pass out; but all replied
that only a shabby little girl had gone out, to whom, of course, they had paid no heed.
Next morning after the ball, the prince came to his father the king, holding the little
glass slipper in his hand.
He told the king the whole story of the lovely maiden, and said that he meant to find her
out and ask her to marry him.
But," said his father, how can you do that, my son, when you do not know her name,
nor where she lives ? "
I shall tell all the people of the land," replied the prince, what I mean to do. Then
I shall travel from town to town, until I find the maiden whose foot fits this slipper.
"Perhaps she will be able to show to me the other slipper, and I shall know her to be
my missing princess."
So a grand company set out with the prince at their head. After him came two heralds,
upon white horses.
Behind the heralds came a page, bearing upon a velvet cushion the little glass slipper.
One herald blew his trumpet, and the other shouted in a loud, clear voice that the prince
would marry the lady whose foot the slipper fitted.
One after another the noble ladies came forth to try on the slipper, but it was too small
for any of them.
At last the prince came to Cinderella's home, and the two sisters were very proud to
welcome such a grand company into the house.
They ordered Cinderella not to show herself, but she pleaded so hard to be allowed to
see the company, that the sisters gave way.
So Cinderella watched her sisters, as each tried in vain to crush her foot into the slipper.
She could not help laughing, and this made the sisters very angry.
At last Cinderella said, "Let me see if it will fit me." But the sisters only laughed.
A page put the glass slipper on her foot, and it fitted her perfectly.
The surprise of all the company was greater still, when Cinderella took out of her pocket
the other glass slipper, and placed it upon her foot.
At the same moment the fairy godmother appeared. She touched Cinderella with her
wand, and at once she was dressed in robes even more splendid than those she had worn
at the ball.
Then the cruel sisters knew that the lovely princess whom they had admired so much
was their own sister.
They threw themselves down at her feet, and with tears begged that she would forgive
their bad conduct to her.
Cinderella was too good and kind to bear ill-will against any one, and she freely forgave
her sisters.
Then she was led in great state to the palace to meet the prince again. He thought her
more beautiful than ever, and, a few days after, married her.
By and by, when the old king died, Cinderella and the prince were crowned king and
queen, amid the joy of all the people.


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