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Title: Scholarly Publication, Institutional Repositories, and Author Rights; Guest lecture for Africana Bibliography (AFS5061) Handout and Teaching Notes
Abbreviated Title: African Studies Course - Guest Lecture Materials
Physical Description: Handout and Teaching Notes
Language: English
Creator: Taylor, Laurie N.
Publisher: UF Libraries
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2011-2012
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Competencies
 Notes
General Note: Created for AFS 5061 Africana Bibliography.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00005202:00001


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Week 7 ( O Guest Le c Today’s T I n A S c R I R Notable R A f D O P e Example s S c N U A ht O ct. 4): Schol a c turer: Laurie T opics n stitutional R e uthor permi s c holarly publ i elated resou r R @UF Demo n o Permi s o IR@U F R eferences f rican Studie s OAJ has man O pen Journal S e rmissions, A s of Other Sc h c holar Curat e ew types of p FDC – digital A fricana B tp://guides. u a rly publicati o Taylo r e positories s sions/rights i cation r ces and exa m n stration s sions forms F s Quarterl y y others S ystems (OJS ) Survival Gui d h olarly Publi c e d Collection s p ublications: humanities h B ibliogra p u flib.ufl.edu/ c o n, Institutio n m ples from U ) supported b d e, Susan Bie c ation Types t s : Internatio n dLOC ; online h andout p hy (AFS c ontent.php? n al Repositor i F b y the UF Lib lstein t o Note n al Farming S y exhibits 5061): Hpid=6493&si d r ies, author p e raries y stems andout d =1480100 e rmissions/ri g Pag g hts | 1 e

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| 2 Page Africana Bibliography (AFS 5061): Teaching Notes http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pid=6493&sid=1480100 Week 7 (Oct. 4): Scholarly publication, Institutional Repositories, author permissions/rights Guest Lecturer: Laurie Taylor OVERVIEW Today I’ll cover: Institutional Repositories Author permissions/rights Scholarly publication Related resources and examples from UF IR@UF Demonstration INTRODUCTION Scholarly publication is the broad top level issue, with Institutional Repositories and Author permissions/rights as related concerns. Common Definition for Institutional Repositories/IRs: Institutional repositories are often referred to as IRs. Institutional repositories are normally defined as the online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating in digital form the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a research institution. At UF, the IR is defined as the digital archive for the intellectual output of the University of Florida community, and includes research, news, outreach, and educational materials. IRs as a concept began as a way to support preservation and access. a. The concept was that the institution where the researcher is based has funded or supported the research in some way and so should be a central access and preservation point for that research. Note: institutions do not claim ownership of scholarly works; this is a claim of responsibility. b. IRs and other trends are critical for scholarly works because the point is for scholarly works to create and disseminate knowledge. That can’t happen as effectively as it should because of the ever increasing costs of so many journals that make subscribing to them impossible for so many institutions in the US and around the world. IRs are most often supported by Libraries in academic institutions. Some IR like places are PubMed Central. PubMed Central is phenomenally successful because the NIH Public Access Policy requires scientists to submit final peer reviewed journal manuscripts that arise from NIH funds to the digital

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archive P u funding, h Unfortun a publishin g OPEN AC C 1. Open A A f D O 2. Author T h c a C C p M b a t P B i u bMed Cent r h as forced pu a tely, most I R g rights. Sch o C ESS MOVE M A ccess journa f rican Studie s OAJ has man O pen Journal S permissions / h e movemen a n exercise t h urrently, mo s opyright disc ublication. T h M oral rights a r a sed on cont t all, but it is n P ermissions, A S u elstein r al upon acce p blishers to al R s can’t hope o lars normall y M ENT: TWO M ls s Quarterl y y others S ystems (OJS ) / rights t here is foc u h eir rights to s t of the disc u ussions also s h is includes m r e important ractual agre e n ’t based on r u rvival Guide, S u p tance for p u low research for anything y assign right s M AIN METH O ) supported b u sed on havin support sch o u ssion is ove r s upport disc u m oral rights, c to note: r p w t c i d b a t r c m p u b e ments and p o r ights. The m i u san u blication Th i ers to follow more than s m s as a part of t O DS b y the UF Lib g authors le a o larly commu n r ly focused o n u ssions on ot h c ultural herit a Mora r ight to have p seudonymo u w ork. The pr e t he work fro m Mora c ertain types nternationall For s c d o. We provi d b ecause we h a rguments. Ther e t o scholarly p r ights are so m c opyright an d m useum/libr a p ublic domai n u se an image b ecause the h o licies, and t h i sunderstand i s NIH mand a the mandat e m all amount s t he publishi n raries a rn their righ t n ication n copyright b e h er rights an d a ge rights, an a l rights inclu d a work publi s u sly, and the e serving of t h m alteration, d a l rights in th e of artwork. T l y. c holars, supp d e attributio n h ave to in ord e ’s a wrinkle i p ublication us m etimes use d d moral right s a ry/archive h n can require of that work h olding instit u h ey may nee d ing on rights a te, backed w e s of success b n g process. t s and retain t e cause it’s th d their impac t d many othe d e the right o s hed anony m right to the i h e integrity o f distortion, o r e US are sup p T hey’re much orting moral n and proper d er to make s c i n this, thoug s ing images o f d falsely, to c s allow a olding a wor k e a licensing f e This is very u tion may be d to do it to p has resulted Pag w ith the pow e b ecause of t hem so that e biggest iss u t on scholarl y rs. o f attribution m ously or ntegrity of t h f the work ba r mutilation. p orted only f o more recog n rights is wha representati o c holarly h, when it co f artworks. M laim that k that is in th e e for schola r complicated able to do t h p rovide the s e in some | 3 e e r of they u e. y the h e rs o r n ized t we o n mes M oral e r s to h is e rvice

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| 4 Page institutions charging ridiculous fees for scholars to include images of artwork in scholarly publications. Because this is a very complicated situation with actual property rights also being involved, the best method for improving this is to share information. In Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein recommends that scholars publish the void and the reasons for the void. IRs, Open Access journals, and author permissions/rights movements are changing the dynamics of scholarly publication in order to ensure scholarly publication meets its core goal: contributing to and disseminating knowledge. These factors are also changing the fundamental definition of scholarly publication. The capacity to make scholarly publications widely accessible allows for new ways of showing scholarly impact, including through new ways of doing scholarship and doing public scholarship. SCHOLARLY PUBLICATION Turning to our third topic of the day, Scholarly Publication, this class and things like it are critical for scholars with the changes and possibilities with scholarly publication. The syllabus up to now has covered different resources from more established sources and venues. Dan’s introduction notes from the first class situate both the class as a whole and scholarly publication itself. In the introduction, Dan writes: “How are library materials organized? A broad understanding of some principles of organization is helpful to the researcher encountering a large library for the first time. At each stage of their creation and maintenance, area studies collections are "messy" and more difficult to support and work with than disciplinary collections. Scholars and librarians must work closely with each other if the collections they create and use together are to be dynamic, relevant, and useful for ongoing teaching and research. Area studies collections are more diverse than disciplinary collections along as many dimensions as one can imagine.” ( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec /africana/introduction.htm ) Several points from this are relevant to discussions of scholarly publications: All collections are messy. Especially digital. We often hear that we’re living in an age of information overload, which is true but it isn’t anything new. This was already the case immediately after WWII when Vannevar Bush wrote of his idea for the Memex to cope with information overload. While his concept was based on microfilm technologies, the intent was access of the type made possible with computing and the internet. In acute information overload, simple access through more digital and digitization doesn’t necessarily help the situation. It can easily hurt if it isn’t accompanied by the necessary supports.

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| 5 Page The solution for scholarly publication is the same as Dan has already explained for researchers working with disciplinary collections, and it bears repeating: “Scholars and librarians must work closely with each other if the collections they create and use together are to be dynamic, relevant, and useful for ongoing teaching and research.” Scholars and librarians must work together for Area Studies, and this library scholar collaboration is a growing need for all fields. This collaboration is needed to gain access to traditional materials and to ensure the products of scholarly research, of your work, is accessible, preserved, and usable. “Usable” for scholarly works means many things including that the materials should be supported in a systematic way to allow the research to thrive. Research published only in print can survive and be accessible, albeit in limit ways, through the work of libraries in cataloging, collecting, preserving, and generally supporting the printed materials. Research that is electronic or digital, born or re born into the networked world with the Internet, can do more than survive. It can thrive. This is what scholarly publication changes seek to do: build from a tradition that sustains access and preservation in order to increase use and impact. This can be done by: Adding research to an IR or subject based repository which is optimized for search engines to increase findability Increasing sensibility by contextualizing materials with other materials that speak to each other. This can mean curating digital collections and exhibits as well as work such as creating contextualizing material. All of you are doing this work in the class in creating annotated bibliographies. Lecture Conclusion and Q/A This concludes my lecture for today. Are there any questions at this point? IR@UF Demonstration I wanted to share the permissions agreements for the IR@UF. This is the same text that author/creators agree to in paper form and online. [Showing forms] Please note that this is permissions based. This supports concerns for author rights, and for the more inclusive concerns with moral and other rights. [Showing the IR online] Any of you can use the IR@UF. Faculty members are automatically able to submit thanks to PeopleSoft roles. To submit as graduate students, you’ll need to login with Gatorlink and then send an email or to register for myUFDC and check the button to request the ability to submit. [Show registration; Gatorlink login; Contact us link ] Examples of Other Scholarly Publication Types to Note Scholar Curated Collections: International Farming Systems New types of publications: dLOC ; online exhibits UFDC – digital humanities handout



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Page | 1 Africana Bibliography (AFS 5061) : Handout http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pid=6493&sid=1480100 Week 7 (Oct. 4): Scholarly publication, Institutional Repositories, author permissions/rights Guest Lecturer: Laurie Taylor Topics Institutional Repositories Author permissions/rights Scholarly publication Related resources and examples from UF IR@UF Demonstration o Permissions forms o IR@UF Notable References African Studies Quarterly DOAJ has many others Open Journal Systems (OJS), supported by the UF Libraries Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein Examples of Other Scholarly Publication Types to Note Scholar Curated Collections : International Farming Systems New types of publications: dLOC ; online exhibits U FDC digital humanities handout

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Page | 2 Africana Bibliography (AFS 5061) : Teaching Notes http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pid=6493&sid=1480100 Week 7 (Oct. 4): Scholarly publica tion, Institutional Repositories, author permissions/rights Guest Lecturer: Laurie Taylor OVERVIEW : Institutional Repositories Author permissions/rights Scholarly publication Related resources and examples from UF IR@UF Demonstration INTRODUCTION Scholarly publication is the broad top level issue, with Institutional Repositories and Author permissions/rights as related concerns. Common Definition for Institutional Repositories/IRs : Institutional repositories are often referred to as IRs. Institutional repositories are normally defined as the online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating in digital form the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a research institution At UF, the IR is defined as the digi tal archive for the intellectual output of the University of Florida community, and includes research, news, outreach, and educational materials. IRs as a concept began as a way to support preservation and access. a. The concept was that the institution where the researcher is based has funded or supported the research in some way and so should be a central access and preservation point for that research. Note: institutions do not claim ownership of scholarly works; this is a claim of responsibility. b. IRs and other trends are critical for scholarly works because the point is for scholarly should because of the ever increasing costs of so many journals that make subscribing to them impossible for so many institutions in the US and around the world. IRs are most often supported by Libraries in academic institutions. Some IR like places a re PubMed Central. PubM ed Central is phenomenally success ful because t he NIH Public Access Policy requires scientists to submit final peer reviewed journal manuscripts that arise from NIH funds to the digital

PAGE 3

Page | 3 archive PubMed Central upon acceptance for publication This NIH mandate, backed with the power of funding, has forced publishers to allow researchers to follow the mandate. Unfortunately, most IR ts of success because of publishing rights. Schola rs normally assign rights as a part of the publishing process. OPEN ACCESS MOVEMENT: TWO MAIN METHODS 1. O pen A ccess journals African Studies Quarterly DOAJ has many others Open Journal Systems (OJS), supported by the UF Libraries 2. Author permissions/rights The movement here is focused on having authors learn their rights and retain them so that they can exercise their rights to support scholarly communication Copyright discussions also support discussions on other rights and their impact on scholarly publication. This includes m oral rights, cultural heritage rights and many others Moral rights are important to note : Moral rights include the right of attribution, the right to have a work pu blished anonymously or pseudonymously, and the right to the integrity of the work. The preserving of the integrity of the work bars the work from alteration, distortion, or mutilation. Moral rights in the US are supported only for certain types of artwork. internationally. For scholars, supporting moral rights is what we do. We provide attribution and proper representation because we have to in order to make scholarly arguments. to scholarly publication using images of artworks. Moral rights are sometimes used, falsely, to claim that copyright and moral rights allow a museum/library/archive holding a work that is in the public domain can require a licensing fee for scholars to us e an image of that work. This is very complicated because the holding institution may be able to do this based on contractual agreements and policies, and they may need to do it to provide the service ing on rights has resulted in some Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein

PAGE 4

Page | 4 institutions charging ridiculous fees for scholars to include images of artwork in scholarly publications. Because this is a very complicated situation with actual property rights also being involved, the best method for improving this is to share information. In Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein recommends that scholars publish the void and the reasons for the void. IRs, Open Access journals, and author permissions/rights movements a re changing the dynamics of scholarly publication in order to ensu re scholarly publication meets its core goal: contributing to and disseminating knowledge These factors are also changing the fundamental definition of scholarly publication. The capacity to make scholarly publica tions widely accessible allows for new ways of showing scholarly impact, including through new ways of doing scholarship and doing public scholarship. SCHOLARLY PUBLICATION Turning to our third topic of the day, Scholarly Publication, t his class and things like it are critical for scholars with the changes and possibilities with scholarly publication. The s yllabus up to now has covered different resources from more es tablished sources and venues. the first c lass situate both the class as a whole and scholarly publication itself. In the introduction, Dan writes: How are library materials organized? A broad understanding of some principles of organization is helpf ul to the researcher encountering a large library for the first time At each stage of their creation and maintenance, area studies collections are "messy" and more difficult to support and work with than disciplinary collections. Scholars and librarians must work closely with each other if the co llections they create and use together are to be dynamic, relevant, and useful for ongoing teaching and research. Area studies collections are more diverse than disciplinary ( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/africana/introduction.htm ) Several points from this are relevant to discussions of scholarly publications : All collections are messy Especially digital living in an age of information overloa d anything new. T his was already the case immediately after WWII when Vannevar Bush wrote of his idea for the Memex to cope with information overload. While his concept wa s based on microf ilm technologies, the intent was access of the type made possible with computing and the internet. In acute information overload, simple access through more digital and digitization necessarily help the situation. It can easily hurt supports

PAGE 5

Page | 5 The solution for scholarly publication is the same as Dan has already explained for researchers working with disciplinary collections, and it bears repeating: th each other if the collections they create and use together are to be dynamic, relevant, and useful fo r ongoing teaching and research Scholars and librarians must work together for Area Studies, and this library scholar collaboration is a growing need for all fields. This collaboration is needed to gain access to traditional materials and to ensure the products of scholarly research, of your work, is accessible, preserved, and usable. terials should be supported in a systematic way to allow the research to thrive. Research published only in print can survive and be accessible, albeit in limit ways, through the work of libraries in cataloging, collecting, preserving, and generally suppor ting the printed materials. Research that is electronic or digital, born or re born into the networked world with the Internet, can do more than survive. It can thrive. This is what scholarly publication changes seek to do: build from a tradition that su stains access and preservation in order to increase use and impact. This can be done by: Adding research to an IR or subject based repository which is optimized for search engines to increase findability Increasing sensibility by contextualiz ing materials with other materials that speak to each other. This can mean curating digital collections and exhibits as well as work such as creating contextualizing material All of you are doing this work in the class in creating annotated bibliographies. Lecture Co nclusion and Q/A This concludes my lecture for today. Are there any questions at this point? IR@UF Demonstration I wanted to share the permissions agreements for the IR@UF. This is the same text that author/creators agree to in paper form and online. [ Showing forms ] Please note that this is permissions based. This supports concerns for author rights, and for the more inclusive concerns with moral and other rights. [Showing the IR online] Any of you can use the IR@UF. Faculty members are automatically able to submit thanks to PeopleSoft with Gatorlink and then send an email or to register for myUFDC and check the button to request the ability to submit [ Show registration ; Gatorlink login; C ontact us link ] Examples of Other Scholarly Publication Types to Note Scholar Curated Collections : International Farming Systems New types of publications: dLOC ; online exhibits UFDC digital humanities handout



PAGE 1

Page | 1 Africana Bibliography (AFS 5061) : Handout http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pid=6493&sid=1480100 Scholarly communica tions Institutional Repositories, author permissions/rights Guest Lecturer: Laurie Taylor Topics Scholarly communications Institutional Repositories Author permissions/rights Related resources and examples from UF IR@UF Demonstration o Permissions forms ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ AA00004147 ) o IR@UF ( http://ufdc.u fl.edu/ufirg ) Notable References African Studies Quarterly ( http://www.africa.ufl.edu/asq/ ) DOAJ has many others ( http://www.doaj.o rg/ ) Open Journal Systems (OJS), supported by the UF Libraries ( http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pid=230212&si d=1940482 ) Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein Examples of Other Scholarly Publication Types to Note Scholar Curated Collections : International Farming Systems ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ifsa ) New types of publications: dLOC ( http://dloc.com/ ) ; online exhibits ( http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/online.html ) UFDC digital humanities handout ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA0000 1589/00001 ) Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein

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Page | 2 Africana Bibliography (AFS 5061) : Teaching Notes http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pi d=6493&sid=1480100 Scholarly communications Institutional Repositories, author permissions/rights Guest Lecturer: Laurie Taylor OVERVIEW Topics: Scholarly communications Institutional Repositories Author permissions/rights Related resources and examples from UF IR@UF Demonstration INTRODUCTION Scholarly communications is the broad top level issue, with Institutional Repositories and Author permissions/rights as related concerns. Common Definition for Institutional Repositories/IRs : Institutional repositories are often referred to as IRs. Institutional repositories are normally defined as the online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating in digital form the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a resear ch institution At UF, the IR is defined as the digital archive for the intellectual output of the University of Florida community, and includes research, news, outreach, and educational materials. IRs as a concept began as a way to support preservation a nd access. a. The concept was that the institution where the researcher is based has funded or supported the research in some way and so should be a central access and preservation point for that research. Note: institutions do not claim ownership of scholar ly works; this is a claim of responsibility. b. IRs and other trends are critical for scholarly works because the point is for scholarly should because of the ever increasing costs of so many journals that make subscribing to them impossible for so many institutions in the US and around the world. IRs are most often supported by Libraries in academic institutions. Some IR like places a re PubMed Central. PubM ed Central is phenomenally success ful because t he NIH Public Access Policy ( http://publicaccess.nih.gov/policy.htm ) requires scientists to submit final peer reviewed journal manuscripts that arise from NIH funds to the digital archive PubMed Central

PAGE 3

Page | 3 ( http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ ) upon acceptance for publication This NIH mandate, backed with the power of funding, has forced publishers to allow researchers to follow the mandate. Scholars normally assign rights as a part of the publishing process. Thus, the success of IRs can be impacted by publishing rights OPEN ACCESS MOVEMENT: SOME METHODS 1. O pen A ccess journals African Studies Quarterly ( http://www.africa.ufl.edu/asq/ ) DOAJ has many others ( http://www.doaj.o rg/ ) Open Journal Systems (OJS), supported by the UF Libraries ( http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/content.php?pid=230212&sid=1940482 ) 2. Author permissions/rights The movement here is focused on having authors learn their rights and retain them so that they can exercise their rights to support scholarly communication Copyright discussions also support discussions on other rights and their impact on scholar ly publication. This includes m oral rights, cultural heritage rights and many others Moral rights are important to note : o Moral rights include the right of attribution, the right to have a work published anonymously or pseudonymously, and the right to the integrity of the work. The preserving of the integrity of the work bars the work from alteration, distortion, or mutilation. o e much more recognized internationally. o For scholars, supporting moral rights is what we do. We provide attribution and proper representation because we have to in order to make scholarly arguments. o M oral rights are sometimes used to claim that copyright and moral rights allow a museum/library/archive holding a work that is in the public domain can require a licensing fee for scholars to use an im age of that work. This is very complicated because the holding institution may be able to do this based on contractual agreements and normally based on rights. The misunderstanding on rights has resulted in some institutions charging high fees for scholars to include images of artwork in scholarly publications and in some scholars not being able to pay the fees and thus not being able to publish their work The holding institutions often need to charge something to allow for the digitization or sharing of the work at all, so this is a very complicated situati on. Because this is a very complicated situation the best method for improvi ng this is to share information. In Permissions, A Survival Guide, Susan Bielstein recommends that scholars publish the void and the reasons for the void.

PAGE 4

Page | 4 IRs, Open Access journals, and author permissions/rights movements a re changing the dynamics of scholarly communications and scholarly publication in order to ensu re scholarly publication meets its core goal: contributing to and disseminating knowledge These factors are also changing the fundamental definition s of scholarly publication. The capacity to make scholarly publica tions widely accessible allows for new ways of showing scholarly impact, including through new ways of doing scholarship and doing public scholarship. SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLICATION Turning to our third topic of the day, Scholarly Communications and Scholarly Publication, this class and thi ngs like it are critical for scholars with the changes and possibilities with scholarly communications and publication. The s yllabus up to now has covered different resources from more es tablished sources and venues. situate both the class as a whole and scholarly publication itself. In the introduction, Dan writes: How are library materials organized? A broad understanding of some principles of organization is helpf ul to the researcher encountering a large library for the firs t time At each stage of their creation and maintenance, area studies collections are "messy" and more difficult to support and work with than disciplinary collections. Scholars and librarians must work closely with each other if the collections they create and use together are to be dynamic, relevant, and useful for ongoing teaching and research. Area studies collections are more diverse than disciplinary ( http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/africana/introduction.htm ) Several points from this are relevant to discussions of scholarly publications : All collections are messy Especially digital inf ormation overloa d anything new. T his was already the case immediately after WWII when Vannevar Bush wrote of his idea for the Memex to cope with information overload. While his concept wa s based on microfilm technologies, the in tent was access of the type made possible with computing and the internet. In acute information overload, simple access through more digital and digitization necessarily help the situation. It can easily hurt ry supports The solution for scholarly publication is the same as Dan has already explained for researchers working with disciplinary collections, and it bears repeating: create and use together are to be dynamic, relevant, and useful fo r ongoing teaching and research

PAGE 5

Page | 5 Scholars and librarians must work together for Area Studies, and this library scholar collaboration is a growing need for all fields. This collaboration is needed to gain access to traditional materials and to ensure the products of scholarly research, of your work, is accessible, preserved, and usable. syste matic way to allow the research to thrive. Research published only in print can survive and be accessible, albeit in limit ways, through the work of libraries in cataloging, collecting, preserving, and generally supporting the printed materials. Research t hat is electronic or digital, born or re born into the networked world with the Internet, can do more than survive. It can thrive. This is what scholarly publication changes seek to do: build from a tradition that sustains access and preservation in orde r to increase use and impact. This can be done by: Adding research to an IR or subject based repository which is optimized for search engines to increase findability Increasing sensibility by contextualiz ing materials with other materials that speak to each other. This can mean curating digital collections and exhibits as well as work such as creating contextualizing material All of you are doing this work in the class in creating annotated bibliographies. Lecture Conclusion and Q/A This concludes my l ecture for today. Are there any questions at this point? IR@UF Demonstration I wanted to share the permissions agreements for the IR@UF. This is the same text that author/creators agree to in paper form and online. [ Showing forms ] Please note that this is permissions based. This supports concerns for author rights, and for the more inclusive concerns with moral and other rights. [Showing the IR online] Any of you can use the IR@UF. Faculty members are automatically able to submit thanks to PeopleSoft with Gatorlink and then send an email or to register for myUFDC and check the button to request the ability to submit [ Show registration ; Gatorlink login; C ontact us link ] Examples of Other Scholarly Publication Types to Note Scholar Curated Collections : International Farming Systems ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ifsa ) New types of publications: dLOC ( http://dloc.com/ ) ; online exhibits ( http://exhibits.uflib.ufl.edu/online.html ) UFDC digital humanities handout ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA0000 1589/00001 )


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