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Planters' Punch

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Title:
Planters' Punch
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Herbert G. deLisser
Publisher:
Planters' Punch
Place of Publication:
Kingston: Jamaica
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals - Jamaica   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Jamaica

Notes

Scope and Content:
Content: 1. Dutchess and Jamaica Ladies. 2. The Witch of Rosehall: a Stirring Jamaica Novel. 3. Miss Jamaica. 4. Cuba and Jamaica. 5. The Dancing Girl of Old and of Today. 6. Double Dummy: a Tale of Adventure. 7. An Entertaining Account of a Journey to New York. 8. Kruger's Millions. 9. Lively Sketches of Men and Things Jamaican.

Record Information

Source Institution:
National Library of Jamaica ( SOBEK page | external link )
Holding Location:
National Library of Jamaica ( SOBEK page | external link )
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier:
nlj - P57
System ID:
AA00004645:00008


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Full Text

Are You Insured?
II I


VOL. 11. NO. 3. 1929 PRICE: ONE SHILLING

PRINCII.\I. CONTENTS._
DUCHESS AND JAMAICA LADIES DOUBLE DUMMY--A Tale of Adventure
By Her Grace the Duchess of Atholl
THE WITCH OF ROSEHALL.-A sIirring Jamaica Novel. AN ENTERTAINING ACCOUNT OF A JOURNEY TO
By Herbert G. de Lisser NEW YORK
MISS JAMAICA
MISS JAMAICA KRUGER'S MILLIONS
CUBA AND JAMAICA
THE DANCING GIRL OF OLD AND OF T(OD-Y LIVELY SKETCHES OF MEN AND THINGS, JAMAICAN




BOURNEMOUTH BATH
WINI)DWARD .i) OAI) KINGSTON JAMAICA.


























HOME OF THE BOURNEMOUTH CLUB.
INLAND SWMlMINNG POOL 150 fe-t lor e. 65 feet v.,a- PROTECTED SEA BATH 185 feet long. 100 feet wide.
Up-to-Date ~vili Water Chui.es. High ardI lo. Diving StagL, ei.c Enclosed by torpedo netting which renders it entirely shark-
etc. inoli.idu.l Dre.-sir Ro.:.m-'. Freh Wat;r Sho.'.eis and proof. Fitted with spring boards and a 100-foot Sellner Water
S.aritlr Converience'-. Toboggan Slide.
DANCING : Sclendid Dincing Hall overlooking the Pool with a sweeping
vi-.'. of the Harbour. Open on all sides, this Dance Hall is considered
the coolest in Jamaica. The very latest Dance Music is supplied.





PLANTERS' PUNCH


LASCELLES deMERCADO & CO., LTD.

KINGSTON, JAMAICA.
Cable Address: "LASCELLE,". JAMAICA.



Nearly Fifty Years' Experience of the Produce Business Backed by Sound
Business Principles has made this Firm One of the Leading
Firms in the Island.


LASCELLES deMERCADO & CO., LTD. export SUGAR AND RUM.
COFFEE, COCOA, and all other descriptions of Island Produce.
They are large importers of MiERCHANDISE and hold several valuable
Agencies.
LASCELLES deMERCADO & CO., LTD. are Agents for THE ROYAL
NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO., THE COLOMBIAN STEAM-
SHIP CO., and JAMES NOURSE LTD., and the steamers of these
several lines dock at the Wharf premises illustrated above.



LASCELLES deMERCADO & CO., LTD.
14 & 141 PORT ROYAL ST. KINGSTON, JAMAICA.


1929










PLANTERS'

MIXED BY


PUNCH


Vol. II. No. 3


HERBERT G DE LISSER. C.M.G.


For the Year 1929


2Duchess and


Jamaica Ladies


W E have .reat pleasuiiI'
in pluilishinjg in this
Silt'sue n1 Mtesse l,
which LHr (;'rai' the Du,:less Lii
of Ath(II liao 1.si-riilly 'ril. r .
ten ti. thi l;Ily rieahlrr- nit
Plaivint .O Pu1iih. Tli- Iiih .,-N s
gives advice. an.4l she. is in Ih l lt
happy Ipisiti.,n lit In\ ini... ,Il ,'
what she ad.vi.se it is iit
pire-ciptl 1nly that sihe inlul-'es .
in; the pii r tiir e io f hI' r dli ii.
j in'r h s ma, irk ] lled r :).-thi r ,'^i^l
and iii, tiil life.
lIiH r (;Ir.;ic- It-lici ev. Thlla
on wVL.lerI as we Ivtll u n. -ll l
depends the ilti intenaI l. i'a oiiI
greatlies it'f tlilt Lriti-si EI ii.
pire. anI i l si is rcin\viiiiteil
that the u,.nuien (t lJaliinaia
can IIl tleir share in iiuph.ld- .
inl the British Empire. Slhe
has certainly done hers. To-
day she is head of the public*
educatiiiun t Eniglanil: whliin
quite .youniti sie wa.- eiig;.el l
in the oiganisi. aiilof ini ril.n
for the Enipire's souli i.er: and
as a siirerssfiil woman states
man shel fully illustrates the
part whiiih women canu lilay
in politics aid adminiisratiion
withlnout losing their distinct .
i\e cliariiteristic of feminine
chllrn).
Site stands among the
wel\ve most prominent living
women in the Empire. That
is a re.lat distijti in.tiiu it is
wonderftil positi filr any
voinaln ti o,'lcuipy. Her ener y
is ]nagnificen.t. [During tihe
IEER GHCE TI
three weeks she spent in Ja.-
malia, in March 1928, she
fonmml time to v'iit any. number of public
in.stitution.., meet many pIveriple leprles.enlinlg
aill soi.ts of intereLsts. and anldlress several meet-
ings. Slie lhal hut little leisure, but she nPever
slgge-ted that ise \vanited anyv. Slie ]re;ardsi
liierself. it is quite obvious, as ,at the service of
otlilers. \ lereverl she may be. Her life is spent
in servi.ie. PI'r-iitalle work for the Empire's
people is evidently one at her ideals, and she
lives up to it. Altogether her career has been
highly beneficent and a stimulus to others.
Her 3Message to the Women of Jamaica
will he read with the deepest interest. The
readers of Planters' Punch will thank her for
it. We are proud to have her as ia fnntrilluitor
to tliis miigazine, aind we Ihoipe that thlii will
not lie the lals writing from her pen which we
shall hlae the privIlege of publishing. We
hope too that Jamaica will have the pleasure
of wel'lciinii her again. A distinguished
woman like the Duchess of Atholl -cau never
visit us often enough.


HE DUCFIE- OF ATHOLL. P.IKI.IA.IENTTARY K( REF. AR
IN THE BALDWIN GOVERNMENTT

The Message.
Nmy way home from Jamaica I respond.
to the invitation of the Editor to send
a message to the wimen readers of
Planters' Punch.
It is not easy to do this after so short a
stay in the island, where, with the best will in
the world, I have not had the opportunity of
meeting many planters' wives, but I think that
even the little I have seen of Jamaica, co.in.
lined with mny experience of other parts of the
Enmpire, helps miie to iunilerstand a little of yoIuI
lives-of the lack of many things that we in
the Old Country have in plenty-libraries,
music, art, the company of relatives and
friends. Again, diffiiclties of housekeeping
which are pressing more hardly on us than
formerly, press acutely upolin you. Worst of all.
the edmuatin oif your children may mean their
prolonged absencee from hime at that stage in
their lives 'alhen you ave most anxious to retain


FOR FDn .%TIO)N


Central Bureau


close contact with them. These
iare oilvious disaldantages,
bur they are a reminder to us
that tli burden of Empire-
lililiinug does not rest on men
a;lone-that were there no
w\lInen to cheert'flly endure
these draw~uba.lks for the sake
of hIs ianuls and children, the
Empldire would fall to pieces.
The Woman's Sharc.
B'IT in yo.ur case it seems
to me that a share in
Enlpirie 1 nildinrm is open
to yo.u,. more direct than that
which usually falls to British
w.,menii in the Tr opical De-
lendenlicies. No sticl gulf of
religion ,r lang uage sepat ates
yvm from tfiv native Jamaican
w ,nirau as that which separ-
ates the Englishwouman over-
seas f.rom, say, the woman of
India iir of Africa. A sphere
of influence, therefore, and a
pler'sonal (.contact are open to
you which limanry an English-
iwoanin in tlhoise countries
night envy.
To you Jamaica must
chiefly loo k to si-t those stand
aids of hoime life without
which Ino. state can he secure.
ly built. You also can do
nllclh t"i promote a better un-
derstanding of health and hy-
giene in the holes of the peo-
ple. not unly Iby your own
w(,old and practice, but by co-
olier'ation with all effort, offi-
cial and unotlicial, for the im-
ir'.vemnlent of health-and
many endeavolurs in this great
cause are radiating from the
of Health in Kingston.


Further, as it seems to me, you can do
much to help towards a solution of another of
Janmaica's [proble-s, that of finding employ.
ment for the girls now ipassing out of her
schools. In a country where industrial and.
commercial openings are few, there can be few
opportunities for women except in domestic
work. The advantages of such work to the
girls themselves are obvious-they should go
far to ensure better health andl comfort in their
own homes, but tact, Iunderstandling and im-
proved conditions may be necessary to bring
many of the younger women to realize this. and
to recognize the dignity of all lalhour.

If the women readers of Planters' Punch
c.a1 help to bring abl;out this desired end, they
will not only be adding to the comfort of their
own surroundings. lit will be rendering a
great service to Jamaica an(d her people, and,
through them, to the Empire.
\






PLANTERS'


THE


WITCH


OF


ROSEHALL


BY HERBERT G. DE LISSER,
author of
JANE'S CAREER. REVENGE,
S Etc.


A Novel of striking incidents, woven around a character notorious in
Jamaica history and legend. A vivid picture is also presented of life
on a sugar plantation worked by slave labour in the Jamaica of a hun-
dred years ago. -


CHAPTER ONE

THE NEW BOOK-KEEPER
ROBERT RUTHERFORD reined up his horse at
the stone and iron gates that opened on the
estate; half a mile away on an eminence that com-
manded a wide, sweeping view of canelands, hills
and sea stood a building, the ame of whose mag-
nificence he had heard when in the town, of Montego
Bay, some ten miles to westward.
White in the golden light of the sun it stood.
the Great House of Rosehall. It dominated the land-
scape; it imposed itself upon the gaze of all who
might pass along tie road that ran in front of the
property; it indicated opulence. Young Rutherford
knew that it represented the pride and arrogance
of the planter caste which still ruled in Jamaica,
and whose word, on its own plantations, carried all
the authority and sanction of an arbitrary will
scarcely curbed by lav\s passed in recent yearsifor
the protection of the bondsmen. Behind him, a few
paces from the outer edge of the road, rolled and
glittered a vast expanse of sea, all blue and purple,
with snowy breakers rolling lazily to the shore.
Above him stretchedl a vault of azure flecked with
clouds. It was eighr o'clock in the morning. The
month was December; the year, 1831.
The cane. full grown. flowed up to within a short
distance of the Great House, a spreading carpet of
vivid green. In the midst of it, to his right. he
saw the sugar %ouk-. from the chimneys of which
floated and wavered in the breeze long columns
of grey smoke. To the left he spied a building on
rising ground which he. guessed to be the overseer's
house; and on this side also, well within sight of
the building, he saw a village of huts embowered in
greenery. He had been long enough in Jamaica to
recognize in this the slaves' quarters.
He twitched his reins and the horse moved
forward.
As'he slowly trotted up the long path. leading
southwards he noted the slaves, clothed in coarse
blue osnaburg, busy cutting canes in the fields, wo-
men as well as men armed with scythes and ma-
chetes and hacking at the roots of the slender
green-topped plants. Waggons drawn by oxen and
by mules stood in the paths, several feet wide, which
divided field from field; into these waggons the
workers heaped the canes they cut, and as he pass-
ed he saw some of these vehicles moving on their
journey towards the sugar mills, with a creaking
and groaning of axles and amidst shouts from sable
drivers who ran alongside of them cracking ox-thong-
ed whips four yards long and calling to the cattle
by name. He saw other men armed with whips
also whidh they brandished menacingly. though not
at the oxen and the mules These were the slave
drivers, sturdy fello.ws whose duty it was to see
that the slaves did not. loiter or slacken at their
work; yet in spite of them some of the labourers
lifted curious eyes to gaze for a moment at the
strange white man who seemed to be going up to
the Great House where lived the lady owner of
these domains. The drivers glanced at him also,
but asked no questions, for he was white and there-
fore one of the masters who gave commands and
put questions, and so was not there to be interrogated
by such as they.
But before he had achieved half the distance to
the house he perceived a white man riding towards
him. This was the only other man on horseback
discernible, a young man like himself, the estate's
book-keeper doubtless. He paused in his progress
and awaited him. The man cantered up, made a
careless gesture of greeting, then enquired, "You
are Robert Rutherford?"
"Yes; you expected me?"
S"The overseer told me last night that you would
be here to-day; we expected you rather earlier,
though; at daybreak in fact. You are going to be
told you are late, Rutherford."
"I had to ride from the Bay; I shall be up in
time to-morrow morning. You are my colleague?"
"Yes. My name is Burbridge, and I have been
doing the work of two book-keepers for the past
week. They cleared out the other man as soon as
they thought you were nearly here. You see that
house?" He pointed in the direction of the over-
-eer's residence. "That's where Mr. Ashman, the
busha, lives, and I know he is there now. You had
better go up there and report to him. I'll see you
later
"One moment, Burbridge." Rutherford stopped
him. "Give me a hint as to the situation here before
I meet the boss, will you? Nice place this?"'
*I have stayed with you too long as it is, old


fellow," replied Burbridge quickly. "My job is
waiting on me; all I am supposed to do-if I am
even supposed to do that-is to give you directions
where to find the busha. I don't want to be blamed
if I can help it. And look here, don't, like a good
chap, repeat anything that I have said to you, will
you?"
"Well, you haven't said anything," smiled Ruther-
ford, "so I can't repeat it. This seems a strict
sort of place, doesn't it?"
"You'll find out all about it for yourself," ans-
wered the other man. who all the time had been
closely scrutinising Rutherford. "You have never
been in the West Indies before; I can see that."
"No, I have come to learn planting and estate
management."
"Humph. Well. you'll learn. I must be off now."
"Just a word. Shouldn't I go up and see the
owner?"
"Mrs. Palmer? You, a book-keeper, to call on
her? She doesn't have much truck with the likes
of us, Rutherford, unless-well, you'd better ride
on and make your apologies to Mr. Ashman for
beinc late, and then he'll probably send you back to
me to set you to work. I am senior book-keeper.
you know. Where's your luggage?"
"Coming by ox-cart from Montego Bay. It will
be here some time to-da. "
"See you later."
Burbridge cantered off, but not before Ruther-
ford had observed his keen glance in the direction
of the Great House and the overseer's residence.
Evidently the senior book-keeper was anxious lest
anyone should have seen him wasting time. Ruther-
ford smiled, a little amused. But he did not quite
like the atmosphere of the place.
Yet he had heard of the hardwihips to which book-
keepers on West Indian sugar estates were sub-
jected as a rule. A sort of chief slave-driver, the
book-keeper was in some way a slave himself. He
had an inferior status, a poor salary, and (as he had
heard) unlimited labour. But Rutherford's ,spirits
were unruffled by all this, for he was here to learn,
and schooling, he realized, meant discipline. He
had seen Burbridge eyeing his clothes with a be-
wildered air; they were certainly much superior to
those worn by the ordinary book-keeper or overseer.
Burbridge himself was very poorly clad and seemed
to think that any book-keeper who got himself up
as though he were a person of means was either
mad or looking for trouble. He was clearly puzzled
as to how to place the newcomer.
Young Rutherford pursued his way inf the direc-
tion indicated and soon came to the steps of the
overseer's house. Three or four savage dogs rushed
out the instant they perceived him, barking and
showing their teeth at him; then a black boy quick-
ly descended the steps aui ran up with the ques-
tion: "What massa want?"
"Mr. Ashman; is he in?"
"Yes, massa; massa come in?"
Massa would; he leaped off his horse and followed
the boy to the verandah, where he vas bidden to
wait. A moment afterwards a stern-looking man of
about forty-five years of age emerged from the in-
terior of the house ja,.ketle's. his soiled corduroy
trousers thrust into the tops of knee-boots, a day's
growth of beard on his chin, and an inquisitorial,
imperious look in his eyes.
"Yes, sir. you want me? Will you come in?
Your name is-?"
"I am Rutherford, Mr. Ashman, the new book-
keeper."
Mr. Ashman figuratively stopped dead in his
tracks; his manner of welcoming host giving place
instantly to that of a plantation boss -who was
accustomed to being a despot
"Oh! Why are you so late this morning?"
"I must apologies. I couldn't get away earlier."
"What ship you came by? I didn't know one was
expected yesterday or to-day."
"I came a week ago."
"Then why in hell didn't you report at once?"
"Because I was not to turn in before to-day;
that was arranged when I left England. We made
a quicker voyage than we had anticipated, and
when I got to Montego Bay I found I had a week
on my hands. I brought a letter of introduction
to Mr. M'Intyre, the rector. I stayed with him."
"Letter of introduction, eh? The rector, eh?
Well, you are a stranger with a lot to learn. But
book-keepers don't go about this country with-letters
of introduction, and many a man has lost his job
for being an hour late. And jobs are not easily
picked up here, let me tell you."
"Perhaps not; do you. mean that I am to lose
my job before I have even found it?"


"Damn my soul!" shouted the overseer, genuinely
astonished, "is this the way you are going to be-
gin."
"I expected a different sort of greeting," said
Rutherford quietly, but with a glint of anger in his
eye: he was striving to keep his temper under
control. "I am a book-keeper, yes; but I might be
treated courteously. I have just arrived and you-
keep me standing on your verandah as if I were
a nigger slave."
"Perhaps," retorted MNr Ashman, "you would
like to ride up to the Great House and be received
in Mrs. Palmer's drawing room? Now look here,
don't commence by playing the fool or you won't
last on Rosehall, I can tell you. If it wasn't that
you were engaged in England you would be going
out of this estate now in double quick time! You
seem to be quite a high and mighty gentleman,
but you have a lot to learn and you'd better se-
about learning it damn quick. Sam!"
"Yes, massa!" The boy made his appearance
suddenly; he had been listening to the colloquy
behind the door.
"Take this backra to the hook-keeper's quarters
and show him his room n When you have been
there and have had something to eat," he continued,
addressing Rutherford. "Sam will take you to Bur-
bridge, who is your senior, and who will tell you
what you have to do to-day--and to-night. And
remember in future that the overseer of an estate
in Jamaii:a is used to being respectfully spoken to
by his bookbkeepers, and when you address me
don't forget to say 'sir.' English airs and graces
won't do here!"
Ashman turned on his heel and went inside;
Rutherford silently walked down the steps. mounted
his horse, and followed Sam. who ran in front to-
wards the sugar works. some half a mile away.
Quite evidently, thought Robert. a book-keeper
did not count for much here; \ell. he had been
given a very clear hint of: that by the Rev. Mr.
M'Intyre and his family. Hi- father had not known
of these conditions, or of a surety he had never
suggested this job to him. Yet it would be worth
his while to stick it through. After all, he would
not be a book-keeper for more than a couple of
years, if as long.
At tcenty-five years of age one u-ually sees the
world through the brightest of tinted glasses, es-
pecially if one is healthy, well-connected and not
ill-endowed with means. In the island of Barbados
was a sugar estate, one of the largest there, which
belonged to Robert Rutherford's father. The older
man hald never bhimelf been to, the West Indies,
the property had been left to him by an old uncle
who hal lived nearly all his life in Barbados and
had had no legitimate children. Mr Rutherford
never contemplated the possibility of his going to
look after the estate himself. that was a task, he
said, for a younger map. and Robert. his heir, was
naturally and almo.it inev-irably that man. But
Robert knew nothing about planting or estate man-
agement; he was still y,.ung. he should acquire some
experience in those art- To send him out to Bar-
bados at once would. Mr. Rutherford conceived. be a
great mistake. In the first place there was still
in charge of it an attorney \ ho, so far as could be
gathered, was tolerably honest: he wouldd continue
to perform the necessary cork of supervision for
some time. But if Robert went out .t) him to learn
the business, the fact that he was his father's son
and the heir to the property might prevent the at-.
torney. from putting the boy through the mill,
while overseers, book-keepers and the rest, would
naturally look up to the young man, flatter him and
endeavour to spoil him; thus. wirh the best will in
the world, Robert might learn very little. Mr.
Rutherford knew that his son was made of good
stuff, but he did not want him to be exposed to
sycophancy and coddling when he should be acquir-
ing useful knowledge and experience by practical
work. So it occurred to him that Robert should
go to some other West Indian colony to acquire the
knowledge he would need for the management of a
sugar plantation, whether he should afterwards de-
cide to reside on his own in Barbados permanently
or to visit it at frequent intervals.
This view was placed before the younger Ruther-
ford, and he fell in with it immediately. Robert
was fond of his father. liked to please him, and
thought it would be excellent fun if he. a future
West Indian proprietor, should begin planter life in
the humble office of book-keeper-for that was what,
he was told, It was best to do. Of the duties of a
book-keeper neither he nor his father had the slight-
est conception: but when a firm of West Indian
sugar brokers in London, who had been approached


PUNCH


1929








PLANTERS'


PUNCH


A PICTURE OF BOSEHALL PAINTED IN 1825. HERE ARE LAID MOST OF THE SCENES IN THE NOVEL, THE WITCH OF ROSEHALL


by the elder Rutherford in the matter, informed
the latter that they could secure for Robert a posi-
tioon n the Rosv-lall estate in Jamaica, the trans-
action was settled at once. although the post was
worth only fifty pounds a year, with board and
lodging. Robert Rutherford had all the money he
was likely to need in Jamaica; the salary was of no
consideration. But this was to be kept private, for
the boy must win his spurs like any other young
fellow. Mr. Rutherford was quite enthusiastic about
this. He himself had never been called upon to
begin on the lower rungs of the ladder, he had
never worked hard in all his life. But he had a
great admiration for those men who had carved
out their own fortune, and he wanted Robert, in a
manner of speaking, to stand in the ranks of such
self-made heresri
The Rev. John M'Intyre, rector of St. James'
Church in the town of Montego Bay, had known
Mr. Rutherf.rd year, before at Oxford. To him
was sent by Robert a letter telling of the Rutherford
plans and enjoining secrecy. for the reasons given
above Mr .'Intyre. knowing the local situation,
did not at all approve of these plans, but said no-
thing. He liked the young man at once and, learn-
ing that he was not expected at Rosehall for a week,
invited him to remain a week at the rectory, at
the same time advising him not to make his arrival
known to the RiOseiall people before the day he
was expected. He would not have thus invited an
ordinary book-keeper; such a one could have no
social status. And had Robert, the son of his old
friend, been dependent on, this job for a living and
a future Mr. M'Intyre would have counselled him
to push on to Rosehall on the very day of his ar-
rival, being aware that a book-keeper must not
claim any leisure save that allowed to him by his
employer. But he did not imagine that Robert
would remain long at Rosehall, or in Jamai ca; and
he hoped that even if the boy chose to stay in the
colony it would not be as a member of the Rosehall
staff. That was the one estate of all others that he
would have warned, his old friend against had his
opinion been asked in advance. As it was, he thought
it wisest to say nothing; Robert must decide for
himself now that he had come out to the colony. He
was a man and must work out his own salvation.
Robert Rutherford, twenty-five years of age, tall,
strongly-built. with laughing grey eyes, a kindly,
humorous mouth, straight nose and curly brown
hair. was a handsome young man, even a distin-
guished looking one. He was a graduate of his
father's university. an athlete; not brilliant as a
chbolar, though ht had taken his degree, he yet had
done some reading and had travelled for a year in
France and Italy after his graduation. The voyage
out to Jamaica had tanned his hands and face but
slightly; the clothes which he wore, and which he
had been told would be required in his job, were
tailor-made and of excellent quality; he looked ex-
ceedingly well in them and "was fully aware of
that. His hat was a good felt with wide brim, and
he wore it with an air; his knee-boots were of the


best leather. The grey horse that he rode was his
own, he had bought it, at a good price some days
before. In spite of his curt and even rude greeting
by the overseer this forenoon, therefore, he was
feeling satisfied with the world and not dissatisfied
with himself; he could not pretend that he appre-
ciated the atmosphere of Rosehall, but on the
other hand he was conscious of a sense of adventure,
an anticipation of interesting and strange experi-
ences, and he never doubted that he would be equal
to any situation that might arise.
Robert did not consciously realise that had he
been an ordinary, poor fellow endeavouring to make
his way in the world his feeling would pro-
bably have been very different; that instead of his
present composure he would have been dreadfully
depressed. He did not admit to himself (though the
thought must have been somewhere at the back of
his mind) that if the worse came anywhere near
to the worst he could always shake the dust of this
estate off his feet and fare forth to hunt for pastures
new. What he did think was that, in spite of the
apparent churlishness of people on his planta-
tion, he would do his work cheerfully and to the
best of his ability (which he felt was of a commend-
ably high standard) and thus would please both the
old man and himself. His mother (dead now these
last five years) had always striven to please her
husband and had always impressed upon her son
the virtue of doing so too. Mr. Rutherford had in.
spired both wife and son with a real and abiding
affection for him, and he amply deserved it. Robert
knew that if he quitted Jamaica altogether and
frankly told his father that life in the West Indies
was impossible, the older man would feel that his
boy had honestly tried his utmost and was not to be
blamed. Therefore he was determined to do his ut-
most.

CHAPTER TWO

ROBERT INTERFERES
SRECEDED by Sam, Robert came to the book-
keepers' house, a low, -unpainted wooden. struc-
ture of three rooms, with a narrow verandah in
front, situated near to the boiling house of the estate
from which issued pungent odours of steaming cane
juice and continuous sounds of voices and move-
ment. He entered the room indicated by Sam and
paused at his first step, revolted. A wooden bed
unmade, with a mattress which had long since seen
its best days, a couple of board-seated chairs, a small
table, two bare shelves against the wall upon which
had been placed the little odds and ends of the
former occupant; that was all the furniture of this
room. It was clear that he was not expected to
have a large supply of personal possessions, for
there was no space where these could conveniently
be stored. Comfort in this cubicle was out the ques-
tion; quite obviously it was considered unnecessary
to a book-keeper. He noticed a door leading into
the middle apartment, opened it and stepped into


the latter. Here was a somewhat larger table, two
or three empty boxes and a few more shelves. No-
thing more. Sam stood -lightly behind him. "And
where does Mr. Burbridge live?" he asked.
"In dat room, massa." Sam threw wide an op-
posite door which also opened upon the middle
apartment. Robert had a glimpse of male garments
hanging from a nail, and a distinctly feminine
article of apparel fluttering close beside them. This
was not altogether a bachelor's room, then; it seem-
ed as though it were a menage for two! But no
married man could, with any wife of. any sort of
position and breeding, inhabit that one scantily fur-
nished apartment, and half share the centre hall or
whatever it might be called with a bachelor or an-
other couple. "This may be interesting but is not
enticing," thought Rutherford; but he remembered
he had made up his mind to make the best of every
circumstance.
The door of the outside entrance to Burbridge's
den was suddenly flung open and Burbridge himself
appeared; he walked over to where Rlobert was
standing and said briefly to the waiting boy:
"Sam, go and call Psyche; she's somewhere in
the trash house."
Sam ducked his head and sped away; Burbridge
seated himself on one of the empty boxes and mo-
tioned Robert to take the other.
"Mr. Ashman has just sent to tell me to put you
to your job, Rutherford, till he can see about you
himself," said he, "so I took the chance to come and
have a little chat with you. Well, how do you
like it so far?"
"So far," answered Robert judicially, "there has
been nothing to like."
"Don't say that to anybody else but me if you
want to keep your job; for when you lose one in
this country it is hell to get another."
"Is that why you stick here?" enquired Ruther-
ford curiously.
Burbridge did not answer; instead, he himself
asked a question: "When are you sending back the
horse?"
"It is mine."
"Yours! It's a damned fine horse, that. You
mean that you have bought it?"
"Of course."
"Then you won't want the one they provide for
you on this property?"
"Perhaps not; I can't say. Two horses may not
be too many."
"Mr. Ashman is the man to decide that, Ruther-
ford. But I am wondering- "
"About what?"
"About why a man who can dress like you, and
have a horse of his own like yours, should come to
Jamaica for a book-keeper's job. It doesn't look
natural. You don't mind my forwardness, do you?
We have to work together and I am lonely as hell
in this place, so I would like to start off being
friends right away. When the two book-keepers on
(Continued on Page 16


1929







PLANTERS' PUNCH


7MAISS


JAMAICA


By Sub Inspector

Harvey Clarke


r'-.s ,,, I t *D ,rr
MI S EDNA DA IS


BEFORE I beiiin I de-.ire to convince one and all.
that I am entir-l, serious, antl in earnest, and
that I am not latinllnt-. It Fi tot, serious a subject to"
laugh ar Being urterly incapable of writing down
an thing about women--or -irls rather.-like all
writer., un this lus'iv.e. inlangicile subject I must
endeavour to appear, myself. intangible and elusive.
If, then you cannot gra-p the clear meaning of any
part of this-or all of it-put it down to my intan-
gibility. Wonderful world! Wonderful subject! Any
man who in writing about woman deliberately sets
out to catalogue their virtues and their vices with a
baldness only equalled by rural correspondents to
local papers, is merely asking to be told a few home
truths about his miserable person and character.
Therefore, gentle reader, I will hie me to my sub-
ject with required vagueness and, or, respect for
Sthe truth, naturally.
The Jamaican girl is fascinating. There, you im-
mediately exclaim, there you go doing just what
you said you despised-summarising. Not so. Fas-
cination is a quality sufficiently elusive and slippery
to set down without any hedging. The particular
fascination peculiar to Jamaica and the Jamaica
creole-by which I mean anyone born in the island-
is one made up of such components as languor, sud-
den sparkle, as sudden stillness, a caress given un-
expectedly, sulkiness-for even this has its own
iraw-quick temper as quickly quiet, and silence.
I have to admit it, but unless she has grown to
know you very well or is one of the exceptions, the
Jamaica girl has not an easy flow of conversation.
But even in that you get a very singular type of
fascination which appeals to the inborn vanity of
man, who loves to unburden himself of his woes,
fears, hopes, desires and conquests to some sym-
pathetic girl-and the Jamaica girl is an excellent
listener. Silence, even if it conceals but little (and
here I do not by any means infer that the silence
of the Jamaican girl means a void within), silence
carries with it a challenge to probe-to endeavour
to find out what lies underneath that silence. Silence,
I grant, can be a fearsome thing carried to embarras-
ment and uneasiness, but silence judiciously used as
it is by girls out here can stir men and, as every
woman's urge is, challenge him. Perhaps, being
very young, I err terribly and irrevocably, but I
state boldly as I said I was not going to-that coupled
with silence a man loves an occasional flickering
jet of gossip, and here I am quite decided to start
afresh, rashly, with a new paragraph.
GOSSIP! It always behoves a man writer to use,
with discretion, exclamation marks. I use one
here. I use it without apnoh.rg: and I use it merely
for a means of sensation. After all, sensation is
life, and where, oh! where in the name of the Seven
Parables of Woman, would life be without gossip?
Life in Jamaica is necessarily narrow and insular,
but however large a community, however broad-
minded a nation or sect, where is the one to be
found whose women do not (just very, very occa-
sionally) indulge in an exchange of views regarding
th-ir own or someone else's neighbours?
In this a woman-I very nearly said "through
practice"-is cleverer than a man, more subtle, more
intangible The Jamaican girl really has few ex-


Photo by Cleary and Elliott
MISS HELENE MYERS

citements and fewer pleasures. Her English or Am-
erican cousins have a larger scope of amusements,
"irertairiiimiit and general "pass-the-times" com-
pairId with ihe Jamaican girl. So scandal as spoken
'out bert is naturally of vital interest to girls bud-
ding out into life--to a life in which A knows to a
sixpence how much B earns a year, and when that
Affair ended between Mrs. B and old X, and how

-


S,' S
.' .; .. -


MISS PAMELA GRIFFITH, ONE OF JAMAICA'S
YOUNGER LEADING SPORTSWOMEN


Photo by Cleary ar..r Fl ..t
MISS DOROTHY WORTLEY

long Miss B has been wearing "that rather terrible
little clbich- hat she got cheap at Johnson andu John
son's sale last Juhie". Let him who is with.iiut l
chuck the first jolly old pebble Per-o.nall: I di-.
like stones. The Jamaican girl is tr.., go'.l a haud
to fling stones about She lob-i a ihrell riamrri per.
fectly delic'iou.sly, and I take off-haven't got one.
but if I had-I'd take off m. hlat to her
E all were, more or less I suppose, in a natural
state in the Beginning. The Jamaian girl
is natural even to prinmitiveness at times. Secretly.
men like that, although they are attracted at times
by artificiality carried to a pitch bordering on the
absurd. But this palls. So does nature unadulterat-
ed. The Creole, however, can pour tea with the best.
dine with the highest in the land, conv.rsing in
correct if rather stilted English. attend a garden
party where "form" is ever "rhin-. then go hime and
indulge in a wordy battle in the native vtu acular
with a fat, perspiring, black cook. She-the creole.
not the cook-carries a slight air of boredom which
ideally languor brought about by our steamy hol
cimatic conditions. In that state she is given
to moody fits lasting aonrding to company or cir
cumstances.
She delights in that flutter of bustling and emrm
tion which the presence of someone new brin'igs inu-
her life. New faces, and the longing to kni.w whar
they think of her, of her ways, her d..ingsi. ber
figure, her face, her all, makes her shake off langu"r
at meeting with a stranger, and, although remain.
ing natural, bestir herself to please. Upon getting
to know them well she is apt to sink back into that
languid state when a tiny streak of selfishne, '; ~l
generally make itself felt.
The Jamaican girl is generally rather seltish
This, perhaps, is brought about by the over indult.
gence of proud and notoriously kind parents. The
Jamaican father and mother have rather more :f
the Southern piethoii of bringing up children than
the sterner variety found abroad in told climates I
refuse to believe that climate and the conliti.,n.
created by almosphlere have nothing to do with
character, or. ftr that matter. figure and general
physical bearing. It has. The uff.-pring of Jamniacan
parents are brought up slightly spoilt, if ver.
adorable, and one of those most to blame in thi is
the kindly old black "Nana" to be found with almost
every Jamaican family. Nana, a good natured. large
personage, marvellous in knowledge of childrenn. yet.
as a rule, inclined to pet and "let off" through h.-r
over-kindness, is often the "fetch and carry" for
everyone, especially the children. The baby girls.
and boys, etc., suffer for this, the eirls perhalip
to a greater extent owing to the fact that girls are
never spanked, or never very hard! Girls out liher
invariably come out into Society with an image of
Nana fetching their slippers. running for little
trinkets quite unnecessary. bringing little present.
daily. This, coupled with the fact that in most
cases the Jamaican gill takes her place in society
at an age when her English cousin is doing French
in the schoolroom, is apt ro make her desire to
carry on the policy'of being fetched and arrivedd for.
Doubtless I have enlarged on this at too great length
We will leave it and turn to far pleasanter aspects.


.K


1929


.,i,.i I'llt, .1


:

:' !a;,
~r
i-.


i.


"








PLANTERS' PUNCH


Miss United States


Little Miss England


MI"S MAJORIE CUSHMAN' MIN < RARR.RA STBRRBS
11l~l Mnjorie Cuohmrun'- people hail from New England. anid ,he received This picture was specially taken for Planters' Punch through the charming
part of her edumlion in Englanil. %o her hhort lifre up to now ha been courtesy of Lady Stubbs. It shows the Governor's daughter in a reflective
rpent in Americn. Enclanrd and Juami(an. and we are -nre he har been liked mood. On looking at the broad intelligent forehead of Miss Barbara Stubbs
in all three countrie-. io- i. l pi-.all). imerlrn n iharni .and hrighine- one guesses that she has a future that will not be undistinguished


PHYSICALLY. I bii, rn,. the [ -rfei th n- .,r o.: i
girls There are v--i te nitih inshapel-l. riul ---
and those n ho do not reach the 11111'. la i :-i.
rally manage to dres. t. fl'-.tn-l\. so-, .is rio hi- de-
feels and Inins out plen .'ii f'-at! rei Althiiu l'h
lacking in the warnim collrinll \vlig t i makt-, girl,
in cooler liiiati. l -. -o er\ attl.i.rij -.j rh.~e .'1i a Ja
maican is c-leve: with ither t ;net.ie nri uhir .. Wlho
in these steaniy. h Lut surr.l'.llll riL -. iatr.- ileit ry ii-
for thih'? W ith -eye- that :ir g- e eri.ill blr Iit.-1
facial feature. hair and eye-lashe-s rhat ar.i- lu Iiur:iit
and curl.\. and an inborn kniwlht-fee ,,i ithe- \'-y ,lji -
way to d-res.. the i-revle i. plati ing tIo look uljrn..
The knowledIrge or idrt. is perulian perhap-, m riijr
the Jamaica cirl i-i ne-ver guil or irverdri-r ed. fin
tropical silrroundine.r nllht i'r -upli'sa-l it, laR e.
but Lasti is expressed fr'.ini Ih.-r ute.r ilttl- ial t .
her expeniiveily demur'-e shi.--v anlli ir-ti:liz- Shli.-
and sto king mean sit very miuL Tii,- Jamnaicr u
realises thi-: Ironm the ,hop _irl io tihe ,i|uu liter ar


N the preceding sketi h a \i-r' vune nian -i.rei-
ses his view of MIiss Jamaica. In tlhe A aent and
pleasant things he says he puts ;a ir.p tof at-in now%
and then. perhaps to improve the rldvoiir He ii
looking at the girls through the eye- ..f \uith. but
that will pruhably make what le -a.-, all the m,,r,-
interesting to them and to other young men And.
maybe, to older people.
An expression of our owin -pirni~ .n on .o- ,r ,.,=
of the characterietics of the modern y.oune lady Ina3
not be out of plare. For instance. Mr. Harvey Clarke
says that the Jamaica girl is Inrlined to Ie srlrlii.
but is not selfishhess. or what is considered to Ihe
such by others, a trait of girls in general in these
days? The old ideal, expres-.ed in su. h hubok a'
"Little Women" and "Little Women Married." n~a
the selfless girl always thinking fr l others. ulway-
working for others: she looked after her younc -r
brothers and sisters with sut:h an unwearying srili-
citude that they must secretly have hated her and
wished her dead: she adored father. wvas devoted to
mother. and was 9o gentle in dealing with Iiei
husband that he must hane got tilt~l of her a'ter
the first six months of married life She aimed ti
be, she was represented to he. a most lovable crea-
ture, a sort of angel in the house But she suffer-ed
from anaemia or the "green siiknes.'." and now and
then, if we remember our reading riphtl%. she died
a beautiful death to the sound of slow singing and
was translated forthwith to heaven, where she may


ith- hich-t. theii leet are above reproach. Whilst
"n iie -'unjie.t of feet, walking comes into one's
iniidll a j (oIoilaiy to those limbs. A walk that
i-. Lin i. ;i thing of sin. Pretty walking is an
i-iid priilliarity that starts with market women,
l-n lini baskets on their heads, swinging gloriously
.a!.n. .ran'ld i'io ri ds upwards to Miss Jamaica daintily
niakii.- a ft'e purhliases along King Street. It is
anl rr Il r t h.ianilt be acquired.
In thie tne i.,f sport, the girls of this island,
nhtei. -porr i .i very exacting and powerful god,
a.1e 'aijajll. i.niming into their own. Tennis is
tfa'viu'rit. wth riding, golf, siwiniming and hockey
t[.lon irn WI'e hare some "white hope-'' in the ten-
int- lirnt- hr. havy- been favourably cmnient.-il on
I.\ v\i-itin- players. and who lose none of their
Shajmn ..I ilaintiiess on the hot, hard courts. Tennis
i a gem.- i-, skill which offers to women an oppor-
iiillry t,:, bi grac-:eful, and many Jamaican girls are
,i -hi--i Illieght ti. watch striking the white ball,


lh.i\ l,--% ni m..re welcome than she could possibly
lihae In-Li on e-Crth In these more riotous times we
think 'it her a-. crody goody." R-[Ile-entative- of
her typ.- hardly e\ist today.
Solh was the old ideal, but how many girls
iiimlure-i l up to it? That some approximated to it
i- dolllie.ss true. Here there is an ideal there will
I,- an -ffiii t to :.mbody it in actual conduct. Yet the
.,irunjee ptneration must always have been possessed
.y rii- h, very natural impulse to express themselves
fteely. to ac-t according to their own ideas, to de-
tiandil f life more than it could give them; in a
Noid. tl'e? al had the same urge to selfishness
wi,:h rtleF modern girl expereinces and i-slI '-r.s- It
wa1 i url-ed. undoubtedly; it is curbed somewhat now
Iy ali really nice girl, But it is nothing more than
a Very htiman impulse, it is also the expression of a
pDint! of view. The fact is that youth does not see
lite as its elders do. The young think that their
ild-rs are wrone And sometimes their elders are
a rnec. Perfect wisdom is not necessarily associated
writlh clay hairs
The point always is: how far does seltifslines- go?
Th-re is a limit for everyone. The modern miss has
to find that limit for herself; when she goes beyond
it she i- not merely ordinarily selfish-which can
easily be forgiven-she is hard and callous, head-
stron,. foolish That means trouble for her and for
those who have to go with her; of such we say


I have no objection to a game skilfully and grace-
fully played by girls, but when certain "1880's"
girlishly give themselves up to the "abandon" of the
age, cum short skirts and cum no sleeves, then,
preferably, let Miss 1928 look on from the verandah
rather than bring tears of laughter to the eyes of
onlookers by the obvious contrast if she engages in
games with elder players. It is not fair to the older
players and savours too much of a desire to benefit
by comparison.
Finally, and in conclusion, I will add that Ja-
maica is a land where oranges grow. On the orange
tree is found orange blossom. Orange blossom is
used in weddings and well, the average Jamaican
girl is much too good for the average Jamaican
man. But she seems to bear her burden with
fortitude and remarkable courage, marrying him
and making an excellent wife and mother despite
her numerous and ardent critics. All Jamaican men
should agree with this view.


that they must lie on the beds they have made for
themselves. People, however, feel, even if they do
not consciously think, that if the beds they have
made for themselves are uncomfortable, it is the
business and duty of others to find better beds for
them. The individual everywhere regards himself
or herself as the salt of the earth, and is grieved and
indignant that no one else does. But on the whole
the beds we make are not so bad, and we reconcile
ourselves to lying on them, and usually grow so ac-
customed to them that a change might actually be
uncomfortable. To put the matter differently, the
nice girl does not carry selfishness very far. It
may be just enough to give a piquant flavour to her
actions. A little sauce improves our food. It is
when we pour in too much sauce that we spoil the
platter.
Perhaps the girls realise that it is in the period
of their pulchritude that they have their best time.
Then they are praised, sought after, courted, and the
men (and not merely the young men either) go
about saying, "love me and the world is mine."
Comes a time when responsibilities increase, looks
fade, court is paid to another generalionl. and no one
considers the matron as at all an adequate substi-
tute for the world. Even if a girl dioe not give a
conscious thought to such a future, she may have an
instinctive realisation of it. Hence, in the day of
her beauty and power she shows selfishness. It is a
passing phase mainly.


1929
1929









Some c-Mothers of Jamaica



And Their Little Ones


MRS. PLAICE (FORMERLY MISS FAY WESTMORLAND)
DICKIE AND NANCY


WITH


MRS. J. H. PHILLIPPS (FORMERLY MISS NANCY NEW) WITH
HER LITTLE GIRL, JANETTE


MRS. G. J. deCORDOVA (FORMERLY MISS DOROTHY BRANDON)
WITH HER LITTLE GIBL, PAUILA


MRS. KENNETH COCKING (FORMERLY MISS HELEN MILLINER)
WITH HER LITTLE BOY, KENNETH


PLANTERS' PUNCH


1929 ,







PLANTERS' PUNCH


CUBA AND JAMAICA -)


BY HERBERT G. DE LISSER, C.M.G.


THE crowd waited. expetant, in the square.
S Close packed it stood, the promenading there
had been for some two hours hitherto was over;
there was now but little room for movement; soon
the New Year would davn. anl it was to celebrate
this event that Santiago u C.'tuba had sent forth
thousands of its people in this New Year's Eve.
To the left of the square. .is one looked straight
in front from a balcony ut the Casa Grande Hotel,
rose the twin towers of the Cathedral, the largest
religious edifice in Cuba The spacious, elevated
pavement surrounding the Cathedral was thronged,
Like the square below. with eager, chattering people;
Sthe verandahs of the neighboring buildings were
crammed to rapacity, the lights from the electric
lamps in the park. in the hotel-. in the buildings
about, illuminated a scene tof variegated colours.
For this was a Hiesta, this was an occasion of re-
joicing, and the folk of all ela-ses had come forth
arrayed in their finest to ,alure the New Year with
every demonstration of joy
There was a sound of martial music. Presently
a band emerged into vie". marching with quick
step, and behind the bandsmen came a company of
the Rural Guards. Foilo.nel anrither band, and after
them a company of soldiers. Someone said that the
Governor of the Province had already arrived and
was somewhere below, and the other notables of the
city were with him. The highest and the luwe-t were
awake that night andi assembled to bring the New
Year in.
The bands and the guards and soldiers tra-
versed the tour streets of the square, and the blare
of trumpets and the throb of drums were almost lost
in the hum that arose from ten thousand voices.
They halted, the music t.eased. a sort of silence fell,
for everyone now spoke with muted voice: the mo-
ment was nearly come. Every eye was fixed upon a
flagstaff rising above theh municipal buildings that
stood opposite to the Cathedral Midnight hovered
in the air.
A call from a bugle broke out, a long, piercing
call. It was answered by a rattle of drums. The
sound rolled out. the notes of the bugle shrilled
higher, a great bell began to clang forth the strokes
which divided one year from another, announcing
the death of the Old Y,ar and proclaiming the birth
of the New. Then sl:'wiy. sio',ly, there floated up-
wards the national batuier (if Cuba, the red, white
and blue with the silver star. which is the cognisance
of the Republic All new. and of glistening silk, it
streamed In the light, and as it floated over the heads
of the vast gathering it was hailed with a deep,
full-throated cheer And notw a tremendous clangour
pealed from the Cathe'iral .teeples, and tie ball.
below crashed out a triumphant tune, and all the
city was filled with a tumultuous uproar. B-lls and
Instruments and hum.n v''i:e- vied in a wild wel-
coming of a Ntw Year, in a maii, joyous greeting to
another brief era of man's life In the streets, in
the square. men embraced each other, girls kissed
one another on both i heeki. hands were fervently
clasped, hats raised and thrown into the air in a
passion of emotion, and still the Cathedral bells
clanged and clashed and the diums rolled, and the
blare of the trumpets continued
Then it was over. iddenli. As at a signal, the
noises were hushed. The New Year had dawned,
the ceremony was completed here, as in every other
city of Cuba, where, also. the flag of Cuba had been
raised and the bells of churches had welcomed in the
year.' The crowd began to disperse. For hours
thousands of it had strolled about below, seemingly
tireless. In blues and pinks and reds, in white and
green and every intervening hue, the girls had
moved around on the paved walks of the Park with
the glare of the electric light setting into brilliant
relief their sinuous foi mt and pleasing faces; and
now they would go home. or repair to some pla, e of
entertainment. where they would finish the night's
festivities. In a little while the plaza was all de-
serted, the leafy trees and the lamps looked down
upon a silent square. but from both the hotels that
faced the Park came sounds of revelry and dancing.
In these places the society :f Santiago was gathered
to dance the rest of the night away, to feast upon
choice viands, to consume champagne, to jest and
make love and not to depart until the sun should
rise and the day come -.weeping in from behind the
hills. And in scores of other places to-night there
would be feasting and rejoi.ing also. For this was
the New Year, and the Cuban,- were giving themselves
over to all of its joys and its delights.
Thought how differently we welcomed in the New
Year in the neighboring island of Jamaica. The
difference is perhaps characteristic of the Spanish
and the British civilisations and customs. Both
of course have public festivities, yet in Spanish-
American countries there is far more communal en-
joyment, the several classes mingle much more in
the open-air life of towns and cities When a King


is crowned or some great national event like the
termination of a successful war is celebrated, all
orders of the'population will come together for an
hour or two in a British West Indian city to rejoice
over the event; but the promenading together which
we so constantly see in Spanish America, the taking-
of ordinary public pleasures in common, is rare
indeed in the British West Indies. On this New
Year's Eve, I thought, there will be no congregating
of a misi.ellaneous trowd in any town of Jamaica
for the bringing in of the New.Year, though Cuba's
hotel parties will be paralleled in the halls given at
the Myrtle Bank. Bournemouth Bath and elsewhere.
1 could see Myrtle Bank and Bournemouth in King-
ston, the Casa Blanca in Montego Bay, and other
resorts also: I could picture the bright crowds of
dancers thronging them, the aay music, the suppers
made merry with lauclit-r andi wine. I could see
the island's picture theatres filled with applauding
throngs, could hear the sound of bursting rockets as
the Old Year died and the new Year came to birth.
But nothing like this scene in the plaza of Santiago
de Cuba could be imagined, for nothing like it would
be found in Jamaica. What we should find in the
British city but a short distance away, were the
Protestant churches filled with reverent people at
prayer, for in Jamaica the last hours of New Year's
Eve are still regarded religiously. The night of
New Year's Eve is a solemn occasion for tens of
thousands who love to begin the New Year, not with
cheers and testing, but on their knees and with
supplications on their lips.

THE next day I left Santiago for Havana. It was
eighteen years since I had travelled through the
island, and in that interval many changes had
taken place. Santiago it-ieit had altered. in that its
shops were larger. many fine and spacioius buildings
had been cr-,eted, its population hall gio%%n and its
streets had improved. To the eye of the complete
stranger it might seem that the streets of this city
i.ould never have bI-en wors? than they ale today.
but on.e they were niuniteiv worse, were indei-crih-
able; and even though .some :tf them now -xhiiit
yawning holes and se-em never t, bIe pairede, they
are better than the cesspools through which one had
to walk or drive in the days gone by.
Santiago is the second port of Cuba, a port of
considerable importance. Its people complain that
money is taken out of the province to beautify and
enrich Havana, hence Santiago's neglect. It may be
so; but Santiago is certain to be improved, however
slowly; it is the capital of the province of Oriente,
which is four times ih. size of Jamaica. Oriente
is the greatest sugar producing division of Cuba
to-day. the iron and manganese mines are situated
there also; it can grow coffee, and there the
famous Baccardi rum is made. It is potentially
rich, and much money is made there even now.
True, the people talk of their poverty, but its many
bright shops, its cafes, its consumption of cham-
pagne, the beautiful houses in the Vista Alegre, its
fashionable residential quarter, do not convey an
impression of poverty. What the city itself does
suggest is that, in spite of Cuba's connection with
the United States these last thirty years, Santiago
is still in all essentials Spanish-American, a city
whose inner life has not changed.
The narrow streets have not been widened; the
sexes are still separated by barred windows and
doors, and through these bars one sees courtships
conducted under the eyes of every passer-by. In
little shops literature of the utmost ob-cenity is
openly sold, though emigrants and tourists are
solemnly warned not to bring in such literature to
corrupt the Cuban morals. Such o.'rruption would
be quite impossible, since Cuban morals have long
since needed no assistance in di-eeneration. the
flagrant contradictions hrrrweien precept and practice,
however, between the law and the quite open vend-
ing of what the law condemns. is characteristic: if
all the excellent laws passed in pani.h-American
countries were observed, the people wmildi hbe angels
Santiago has the laws, but remains true to the
traditions of Spanish-American acceptance without
execution. It is not quite the same ro-day in Havana.
but Havana is over five hundred miles from Santiago
That enables Santiago to remain more Cuban than
Havana, though Havana is also Cuban

THE journey by train from one city to the other
occupies about twenty-five hours; and unless you
travel by steamer there is no other convenient way
of getting from one to the other save by rail. They
are building now the great highway through the
island which is to enable motor cars and other
vehicles to pass freely from east to west. They have
been talking about this road for over twenty years;
it is something that they have commenced it at
last. When one is about fifty or sixty miles from
Havana one catches a glimpse of it from the win-
dows of the train; you can go from Havana to


Matanzas by this road even now; some part of it
has actually been accomplished. When it will reach
Santiago depends, I suppose, on the finances or on
the administration of the finances, for the loan for
the highway has been sanctioned. It depends also
on the energy of the Cuban Public Works Depart-
ment. But, given time, it will be built, and then
the motorist will have his opportunity of seeing
Cuba by some otherr means of conveya.nce than the
railway. Meantime I do not find the train journey
uncomfortable, and the scene. as one makes the
journey, is full of interest. if one remembers what it
was some eighteen years ago.
The countryside of Cuba has been remarkably
transformed. The dominant note of the scenery was
once struck by the forests of royal palms one saw on
every side; by millions of the slender, stately trees
it h their tapering white boles and towering crowns
of green and waving fronds. There were other palms
also, for Cuba was a land of palms, they grew every-
where, graceful even if, in their multitude, some-
what monotonous. Bdt the multitude has disappear-
ed. There are still palms, but in some districts these
have actually had to be preserved. They flourished
on fertile soil, and the day came when a great demand
went up for Cuban sugar. So the axe was laid to
the roots of the trees, the palms fell down
and the luscious cane was planted in their stead, and
now, for miles and miles, and yet more miles, scores,
hundreds of miles, and as far as the eye can reach,
one sees cane and yet more cane. a va.t. spreading
carpet of it, light green and rolling away from side
to side across the whole breadth of Cuba.
It is when one sees this country given ,ver it
the cane farms, and beholds factory after factory,
town succeeding to town, that one realizes what
sugar means to Cuba. There is hardly anything else
that matters. You ome to a station which, eighteen
or twenty year. before, you remember t:, have been
but a little settlement inhabited by a few listless
people, a beggar or tno. with a couple of shabb.
shops-a mere .-rupping place upon the way. Only
the name has remained unaltered Everything
else is (tnanged beyond recognition It is now a town
lighted with electricity; its treest. the principal
ones paved, run to some distance at right angles to
one another. There is a plaza not far off. with
parterres of flowers and of palms, there is a band-
stand where music is played once or twice a week,
there are benches where the idle or the weary may
rest. Many houses. built in the rural style, are
observable, red-tiled single storey buildings, coloured
blue or pink, and with wide verandas in front of
them. A church or two dominates the scene, and
some public edifices; the shops seem well stocked.
and before the little cafes are -eated men sipping
drinks and diobtless disr.us.iug politics and, wo-
men. Forming the b.ukground of this scene are
the great stretches of cane, the giant factories with
their lofty chimneys, and the rows of royal palms
which are now maintained for o, namental purposes.
And this picture is repeated again and again along
the way from Santiago to Havana.
All Cuba has grown. The population now is a
million more than it was in 1909. It was perhaps
the richest spot of its size in 1919 and the-year
after, when all the world wanted sugar and the price
of that commodity rose as high as a hundred pounds
per ton. They speak of that time as the day of the
'danm e of the millions"; men made great fortunes
overnight and flung them away carelessly; it seemed
as if the good fortune that had come to Cuba could
never end. It ended dramatically. It ended with a
crash. The financial princes of one day found them-
selves beggars the next; sugar had sunk so low in
price that ruin stared thousands in the face. Many
committed suicide. Some went mad. And since then
Cuba has been fighting and struggling to stabilise
sugar prices, to prevent herself from producing sugar
at a loss or at but little profit. But the crisis is
past, though Cuba still considers herself desperately
poor; the worst is over, for the factories still grind
sugar and the people do not starve. Meanwhile the
towns remain, lighted with the electricity generated
for the manufacture of sugar, and the improvements
effected persist. The cane flourishes, the royal palms
no longer grow in their myriads. Except for the
tobacco fields, the fields of hennequen, the coffee in
the mountains of Santiago, the cattle pastures. Cuba
is one great sugar country, the largest in the world.
From this industry comes the livelihood of the peas-
ant who inhabits a shack in some village a hundred
miles away; upon think industry also is founded the
magnificence of the pleasure city of the Caribbean
islands, Havan., the beautiful.

A journey through Jamaica, such as I had made
shortly before going over to the republic, re-
veals also the striking development which has taken
place during the last few years. But in Jamaica one
sees, not so much the long green leaves of the cane
as the great split fronds of the fragile banana. A


1929


2)







PLANTERS'


PUNCH


1929,


THE PRFSIIEN r'i P.AI.ACE IN HAVAWA. FACING IT IN THE RIGHT FOREGROUND OF THE PICTURE, IS THE STATUE WHICH H\A'
EREtTED TO SENOB .ZA .YA WHEN HE WAS PRESIDENT


marked expansion of bnanan.i (tjii atlon ha- occurred
in Jamaica in the last four vea-'s After the war
it was calculated that if Jamaica produced yearly
twelve million stems of this fruit on the average,
she would do well, with other products of course,
such as sugar and coffee, ,...conut- and cocoa and
pimento and orher minor IIhinL:. But in 1927 she
exported over twenty-one million stems of bananas,
and thus easily placed herself as first among the
banana-growing countrie- of the world. That posi-
tion had once been hers. she lost it, she has regained
it; she may keep it for the next twenty years. For
everywhere now the banana is grown, and with it
more sugar is produced; there has been a spurt in
production here, and the result is seen in the towns
of the island and the lives of the people.
The repaving of Kingston's streets, the elimina-
tion of Kingston's dust, the building of more and
better residences for the middling and the upper
classes, all this has proceeded apace in the last few
years. Month after month sees more automobiles
brought into the island; the moving-picture places
are better patronised, all the girls above the status of
menials adorn themselves with silk stu,.kings. and
silk dresses are for them quite ordinary wear. In a
single decade a revolution has been wrought in their
style of living, and at the root of this change is the
progress of the banana industry. It is not exactly
in Jamaica what the cane is in Cuba; it is the domin-
ant industry, but as yet it represents but a little
over fifty per cent. of the island's exports. There is
a struggle to keep the other industries up to a cer-
tain standard; to diversify production; this is done
far more in Jamaica than in Cuba: Therefore, econ-
omically, Jamaica is in a healthier state than Cuba.
But the Jamaican knows that the hurricane, which
will hardly damage the cane plant, will lay the
banana low. That is one of the weaknesses of his
chief industry. It has to be endured since for it
there is no cure.
On the flat lands of Jamaica one sees the banana
farms with their weight of maturing fruit, and on
hills far distant from railway stations one sees the
banana, and in tiny forgotten' valleys it is there.
Along the sea coast the eye is gladdened by the
sight of rows and rows of coconut palms, slender,
lofty, swaying in the breeze, and each tree laden
with a wealth of green and golden nuts of which
tens of millions are exported every year. Dark
gleaming rivers roll silently along their deep beds
towards the sea, little streams flash in the sun,
waterfalls roar downwards, iridescent in the light
The caneflelds here, nothing in size like Cuba's, but
of considerable value to the island nevertheless,
show their lighter green against the darker hue of
neighboring mountains or surrounding verdure.
And everywhere are the roads. Here is the most
striking difference between Cuba and Jamaica. In
Jamaica you may go anywhere, get to almost any


destination, by motor car or carriage; a net-work of
roads is flung over the country and continuously the
m-nd1'j-r are busy at these arteries of communit-ii .
tion. Thus the whole country is open and is made
one, in a manner of speaking. In Cuba, save for the
railway, each district is isolated, lives by itself.

THERE are two main approaches to Havana. one
I by sea, the other by land. From either one it
stands out as a yellow-white nmeitropolis htbilt mainly
on the flat but partly also on some ri mn ground, a
eity of clustering houses, clean and bright, with more
than a suggestion of opulence about it. A closer
aquaintanceship improves the first favourable im-
pression. There are two Havanas. There is the
Havana of the old Spanish Colonial days, with its
narrow streets and congested area; there is the
Havana of a later date. This new Havana spread
westward and became a place of wide avenues and
streets, a place of parks, theatres, and handsome
residences, and to-day more than one of its residential
suburbs is a small city in itself.
When I first saw Havana it was in 1909. It
was then fascinating as it had always been, a capital
with a stirring history, a home of romance. Years
before, James Anthony Froude, the English historian,
had written of it as "a city of palaces," and the
buildings he had described as palaces are still stand-
ing. The Prado is here, the National Opera House,
the great Tacon Market. But the last eighteen years
have wrought a wonderful change in Havana
Froude's palaces in the lower Prado-the chief pleas-
ure avenue of Havana-and along bth Malecon (which
is the seawall and great drive of the city) have now
become furniture shops and rooms for the exhibition
of motor cars. Their polished flooring of many-col-
oured tiles laid in patterns remains, their marble
stairways which lead from the ground floor to an
upper storey are there. But their former glory as
the residences of the Havanese aristocracy is no
more. They are the homes of commerce, though
their upper storeys still house persons of a social
standing inferior to that of those who inhabited
them some fifteen or twenty years ago..
For Havana has grown with magic-like celerity,
and now if you would find the houses of its better
classes you must go, not merely into Vedado, but into
Marianao, which has become a separate municipality
and where there are indeed palaces such as Froude
never saw in the Cuba of his day. The long new
avenue which has been driven from the boundary of
the Vedado through Marianao to the wonderful park-
like residential area where live the foreign repre-
sentatives and ambassadors accredited to Cuba, where
the wealthy men of Cuba have their town houses,
where Secretaries of State live-this avenue, with
the paved drives on either hand, the centre section
planted out in palms, and in parterres where bloom
tropical shrubs and flowers, with bandstands at in-


tervals, and marble fountains and -toile sc-ats-no
city of any size has anything riner titan it. and it
typifies the aspirations and to k,,nme extent the
achievement of the new Havana Take a walk in
any street of the old quarter of the fown. These
streets have not been widened. but the tramcar lines
once laid there have been torn up hor the convenience
of l'~lerstrlui1 and of motor traffic. aiid the streets
themselves are paved with smooth asphalt, and
high buildings have been erected in the place of the
lower ones demolished, and the shops display goods
equal in quality to those that are sold in Paris and
New York, though at a much higher price. The
Prado itself is changed. It was onme the centre of
Havana's public social life. It still is. But gone
are many of the old building. especially on the
eastern side of it, and now art.aded shops and gor-
geous clubs have taken their place. And these
clubs deserve the designation of palace..
They are beautiful buildings. Of coral stone
and marble, brilliant with a thousa.nd lights from
massive but elegant electroliers. they are structures
which would stand out in any Europeau city. There
is no soot in Havana to tarnish the whiteness of its
buildings; the air is pure and bright, for the winds
from the Mexican Gulf sweep through the city
continuously. So these houses and clubs and hotels
and theatres shine yellow-white in the gorgeous
sunlight, and the streets upon which they are built
are'among the cleanest in the world. The city was
once a pest hole. It once harboured deadly diseases.
But it has been swept and garnished, and an agree-
ment with the American Government makes its
sanitation an international obligation It is to-day
among the cities that can proudly boast of their
health and their appearance. In these things it
takes second place to none.

IT is dawn in Havana. The city awakes early, but
Before the sun has risen much above the horizon
and the skies of pearl have glowed into pink and
gold the scavengershave been at work and the city
is cleansed and made sweet for the day before it.
The markets hum with life. the shops throw up
their shutters, the tramcars and the motor cars and
other vehicles begin to roll into the streets, and
pedestrians emerge from their homes to seek their
occupations. In the trams and sometimes walking
you will see to-day in this Spanish-American city
what would have been almost impossible a couple
of decades ago. You will see girl clerks and shop
assistants hastening to work. and though some of
these will be American a good many will be Cuban,
for the Cuban girls are going out to work at last.
This is by way of marking a revolution. For the
seclusion of the female was once a religion in Cuba,
and still largely is; but even the Cuban world must
move, even Cuban ideas of propriety must be modi-
fied; there is the influence of America pressing al-







199 P L T E S' PUNCH


ways upon Cuba and other. is the tconimli. presarlle
In homes that art nut affluent So n ow when .ne
enters a Cuban shop or store on-). n-ll rind Jmany
girls behind the counters, and they aret brisk. in-
telligent. buiine-;slike, good-io kmin. t o., which i-
not a disability. Their m.othb-r.; rust have -uffered
many a misgiving when rir4t it nas pr,'po,.-ed that
these iini;s should go out into ,rk. The father
must have A.ndre.red if honour tould be preserved
in the untsielteied life of business. But whatever
the double. and fteaie. it has I..iin- abuut that many
Cuban girls dJ' wor.k. andi if -ome do on now. monir
will later on. The iron barI, before the d oor-; and
wlnd..~'-. to keep .away the young menl without -e~n-
ous and normal intentions. hlart'- bcri- bient if not
broken Tht, dapirtiires are wider. iheri it a -ug-
gestion -f r gprtater fI. ed-lj
By riue o'. lo, k the it.i'- life i i n lull l wing.
and tlI- s ep rta. l it prl'i ent. i-; an inal.t-d Hj'vana
contain -uni-me d1 hiundled and i tfry (lJ.il-and ~i uls,
is the fil-t -eapitr orf tie rerp'ibli andI un.- *.f the
world' liatl.--,l toll i.t 1I -,nt-s Itr needii- niu be
a bus ,.. ntr.. t sr'.: ia.lly in the itnprit --ea.:dl i: Iheii
it is at it-. lit i'ite- anti we o-e tIbhe "itt.-rirj.- -ur-
face it andir i ait- ire- to woitider .alohnir %%hatr _iee
on beneath tlihat -.irfa,-
Thl- -ti l:in er nll,.vini_-i r'onUd11 11 111J at ir I..:
into d ipartineut tori-- where t-r.\M thinii i. .ii,
or int, m :ill e.-rd.hll hml.nlt. i[-it' li-in. in -, nt-.
face puL\tilelr and the I. t He -nte-r- lIIt-I ..i-
and drink- B... .ir'li ,. ktai -. Mai'ttinI .-, l:r il-.
whislk. :.nl -..I l and it. like. Th-ti,=-e a. i%- t.? i iteap
thinu-7 in Ha\v.an na th,- ktail- '1inl til taxi- A
taxi ill take i:Le or ii -.:. pe.pl-e ai'. di-ran>: e
within the it'%. lirm i. t.,lur tLwteitv iir-. :iii 1. ilthe
ra(t:ijuI-e at t Ol!tntal Paik. ahl..ut -v n nill-- a'.av
tron tliun h- I, i l nt.l i- t ll tiake .hr- n l itl r\i pt.
sons and lin tir hee m i ac -k ivaitinll-6 'te '1-,o .-r tie i.
boui, m t r tid hr. r: inil i. r .1 jat P i-t l'hrlc. e illa ani.
a half F.-i thi t:, a : t- -r ,u tif -,r. a t l lici-iil-
co(kluil. Ex'epr in comie -p-..ial l.n.--. inl'i-d,
dri k Lt n].i vei o-. r. tn-ivt- inll ('1111.1
Fi.nm db.-ioalI ni):Ou h II ]ni tg i ,- I" Tlt T'uhian
has his o iesia sl an nhi- iu i -I t n. uh hi n l -l :.. i hoi m-
to luni:h. Ii, ihily takin-' the mnial s ith lim Tihe
strand ei ts at d hiis hotel i,-1 t -z nie ,re-~ ilpraiit
Here hlp. i uty niN et n i at w CiLan is i ..i 11p1r i the .. itr
froum outsid._. but the priplr lie -, ei i.inly are
foreigner like lnims. lfr.. Ibnillt upon havinuiwht lhe
consider a ie. liic time Hir lunch mnr:y nt him
u nythine Buta a a nitaat r uo fais.. at ,i n,:u -ih. iur
best hotels, a man nimay lunIi.h quite .ell for a i.ouple
of dollars t eo a pl, litwopeople i3may .rer thiern-vea i
ery well ijtilrne for fiei dollars, with e h..ktil.; in.
.eluded. It deprund.s upun tit,:- size :.4 one'. appetite
perhaps. but thie av-aLe n lv i nill 1 an llion There
aje decent places t..ir. (C'hneie arestaut i nts n and
Cuban eating plam:e-. uchle hyir lum.h m.ay nt coti
you more than a dollar, rnd lesu. if you wish. Bui
one goes toSpan laie like the Inplaerra or Plaza. anr
the Sevilla Bilinm ore. t hli h is called the hi..tel if
millionaires. One ian lunItn h well ai any Tof the-e
places for a couple of dollars, and dinner nlad n,'.t
cost one much mole.
The foodd iy Spani.h, or Cuban Ther ,te.okin- is
Spanish. Spain niarqueied the New i,.rld. andt
where she hai be+e she has left an indelible iam
pression of her i:ulinart art alnd ta tes. Thus tie
foundation of the Jamaiea cooking iq Spanish, though
the Spaniards were all driven out of thiis i-land over
two hund ed yearCu ago: in Cuba. where tens ofn
thousands ofl Spaniards are. and where the natives
-are Spanish in eesrient and in manners. o yu have
the rich grave. the special mixture, the flavouring
of garlic, whih-h the Spaniards love. And it is gpod
stuffand wort t y tl ahe aten: I hold iht ihe Spanithe
Tpease and vegetable in ups cannrt he platen any.
where, and the Cuban moorish ra. ouft whih ing i
the huge laws will repay attention. are a deliracy
which olne lonves for, wen out of Cuba. Orf ourse.
in the hotels are restaurants where you may have
dishes done in the American or Europeane t.lse But
It is not at all a ad idea in eat in Cuba aa the
Cubans do.

tHE stranger in Cuba vi.-its the places aihin-
tioned in the guidenboks as oara outstanding in
terest; he goes tth ougih the old fortre-.es, wanders.
about old uonvenit, drivtt around the b ity by night
and day viewing monuments and thint. of that
kind. But for his aemusem ent there are special
pleasures provided, and foremost amnione these are
the races and the dasinoe
SGamblinge, pen. inensiers nienely exciting, is
the reason of the Casino's excise. The artitminimum
take here is a dollar: the maximum is anything
you may like to make it. The Casino ne Havana
Ia situated in the gardens of Marianao. a -pacious
building of white, a glittering huilding of light.
with a playing Inuntain in frint of it. a group of
statuary, and with dining rooms where you may.
on special evenings. have dinner at five dollars a
head. This indeed seems to be the set prie for all
special functions during the tourist season in Hava-
ian. The Ziegfield Follies come down to Hasana to
give a few nights' performances. The best seats are
all at five dollars each. The artists of Cuba give
their annual ball The admission is five dollars
each. The Casino allows you to have dinner within
ito precincts. The charge is five dollars Wine is
extra. That may amoini fto whatever you please.


OI IPO l TETRIFT. H.VA.A. ONE OF THE CITY'S FOREMOST SHOPPING TIIOROIU(HF.ARFS. THE BUILD-
IN(..t ARI: MIiI)I.K. "I) T1H1 I BUN THERE AND IT IS-A ONE-WAYIt STREET FOR MOTOR CARS.


And IdJaui.e- e -iv'en at tli- Casino, and some-
timi y:3ou are in. ted tlj hear a celebrated singer
there But these thing- are but side shows and
avcidenitals. The great event of the night, and of
every night. for about tour nmnths of the year, is
the .ambling. The unihling loo-m is not very large.
But in it are al all orts oif devices for ind ingin the
viiltor to try his luvk. to see if he can win against
a .y-tenm which, in the long iun, no'man on eaitli
has ever been able to beat. You may win at first.
In about ten minutes *:.ne night I had won twenty
dollar- at a game which consisted in turning a
circular cape in whi:h there were three dice. If
you raked o:,n. say. the number four and it came up
once. you were paid a dollar on your dollar; if it
lane up twice-and a- there ni,-re three dice in the
rage. it sometimes did-you were paid two dollars
.n your one. and if came up three times, as it also
sometimes did. you were paid three dollars. So you
can win-for a time The thing to do I, to stop
when you are winning. The better thing, perhaps,
to do is not to begin at all

THE white-painted room. brilliantly illuminated. is
Crowded with people. some playing, others
watching the games intently There are roulette
tables. with the white and the red holes and the
,.pinuing wheels. there are the die cages I have spo-
ken of. there are nmet hanial whist and poker tables.
there is a game which you play by pressing electric
bulbs and causing lights to so shine that you may
lose your nmoney-and turse ,your luck. The atmos-
phere of the place is .lose. for there is much smok-
ing. It is tense. for. in spite of the effort of every-
one to appear <.alm and unconcerned (a very suc-
cesslul enort on the whole one senses the tingling
nerves and the tension of expectation. One feels
this tingling. The very feet seem to tremble and
grow iold as the wheel spins round or the dice
rattle against the sides of the little cage; as piles
of money are handed to some successful player, or
the man in charge sweeps off from the table what
many have lost in a few momEnts or so., I watch


the faces of the attendants. They are grave, they
are stolid masks; if one attendant makes a remark
to another it is in quiet, monotonous tone: only
once did I see one of these men smile. They Are silent
as they rake in the bank's winnings and eqlually si-
lent as they hand you over what you may have won.
They calculate rapidly and with wonderful accuracy.
How they do it, so swiftly, so surely, is a marvel
to the uninitiated. Have you won a thousand dol-
lars? They pay with not a twitch of the facial
muscles; it is nothing to them. Have you lost that
amount? The absence of emotion is the same. If
you want explanation they will give it to you; their
business is to induce you to play. But, like the
machines they tend, they too seem to be nothing
but machines. I believe that they work no more
than four months a year and are handsomely paid.
If anyone attempted to work a whole year at a time
at such a job, I truly believe he would go mad.
Clothed in black jackets, with white shirts and
black bow ties, clothed in black like clergymen, with
their expressionless faces, their grave courtesy,
these men do actually look like clergymen. I don't
suppose they ever gamble thenm-elves. They know
too much and have seen too much. It is not skill
at the Casino, it is not even chance that decides in
the long run, it is playing against a system which
makes it certain that if you play long enough you
must lose, and often you lose from the very begin-
ning. Yet you may win now and then: many do.
And when you have won, and your luck begins to
turn, the wise act is to walk away; but how many
have the wisdom and the courage to do that? You
are a stranger; no one here knows you, will ever
meet you again, or cares half a dollar about you.
And yet each and everyone is conscious of the gaze
of the others and does not wish to be thought of as
mean or cowardly-which in itself is cowardly. So
you continue to play until all that you have won is
gone, and you still continue to play in the hope that
you will win it back. And as you lose your own
money you are not so jaunty or loquacious as be-
fore--though there is as a rule, at best. but little







PLANTERS'


PUNCH


1929


BOURNEMOUTH BATH, THE POPULAR BATHING RESORT OF KINGSTON AND ST. ANDREW, JAMAICA. IT IS BEAUTIFULRFOR SI'ITVATION. AND ONE OF
THE BEST BATHING PI. CE, OF ITS KIND TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE


chatter in the Casino. You are silent now, with
every nerve stretched to its utmost. At last, after
winning, and losing, and realising that you have
losi and will continue to lose, ybu cease. You take
a grip upon yourself. At least you have shown that
you are not a coward. All may be lost except hon-
our, though it is difficult to see where the honour
comes in.
*'I saw a young Cuban lose a hundred pounds in
less than ten minutes one nieht, and he had lost a
hundred pounds imnieli ateiy before at another
table. I saw two Cuban girls (of one of the best
families, I was told i lose hundreds of dollars. But
they seemed not to know the value of money; I am
sure their indifference was genuine. The strangers
.come and go: some come to lose so much and will
not play further than the limit they set themselves;
a few (young marli-il :cou.ple on their honeymoon)
will do nothing but look on They are very much
in love. They need no stimulus to excitement. And
they have just made all -,.rt- of gtod resolutions as
to the life they iutendl ti. lead. Those resolutions
have an immediate value in the Casino.
It is one of the principal attraction ,. of Havana.
WYou see it afar off, a lilaze ot white light, a great
illumination against the background of the Cuban
.night. But the stakes are too high. the atmosphere
.too feverish, however nimuh of ail-,guise there may
-be to it. I weary of it after a while. And I think
that many will agree with me whhen I say that after
a hectic week in Havana one can long fur something
else. One longs for quiet travelling in the country.
*quieter sea bathing than you will flnd at the Playa,
the sumptuous bathing place in Marianan. less of
'tourist life and more of the real life of the country
land people. That is why, after a couple of week.
in Havana, men and women come down to Jamaica
and surprise their friends (who have not had ex-
perience of the contrast) by exprEssing a prefer-
ence for their new surroundings

THE pressure of Ameritan official opinion and
regard for the pislition which Havana shall
hold in the world have induced recent President-
of Cuba to the attempt ti- rid the city .f its old
reputation for open ex-ual vice S., now the thea
tires "'for men only" ive but tame perforinances e s
compared with those they presented twenty years
ago. and there is no re-cognised "red light district "
Or rather there is a red light district. but it is so
dull. so drab, so common. so deVoid of all spectac-
ular attraction, that ordinary iesplectability is bright
in comparison. The "daughters of 'joy" once 'seeg
regated in the San Isldor Street and its neighboui-


hood have been scattered; no longer do they throng
here, sitting at the little x, .:ket cut in the great
doors opening upon spacious courtyards and lure in
the passer-by with winning smile-, or more open in-
vitation. There are still a few women in the old
street; you see them loitering in mean bar-rooms.
Fat or scraggy, ill-dressed, their youth long past,
their good looks gone, they are more objects of pity
than of an thnli else. No red lights gleam here;
even the white electric light glows but dimly. The
city has been 'purifed but has it been?
For now you vuil find the ladies of the half-
world elsewhere. rlhese p..:r (.ratur'es in San Isidor
do not count. 'You % ill inid the "ladies of the life"
d(iuii: with their trmpourary male friends and pro-
tectors in expenil\e restaurants, sipping ,.o>:ktails
in the .afe.. llilvilug aloue the Malecon. living in
handsome apartments along the Prado and even in
tile V\eado Viic. hba-t ut been abolished; how can
it be in a modern city? It has been gilded, it has
been to outward appearance refined, it has become
more expensive than hitherto, for the price of all
things has risen steadily in Havana. But it is there;
as much of it as )ou wisli And it is not only native
but foreign. Those r ,: eldeli men, with ibat pretty.
dashing girl: I imagine them to be her rather
and uncle.. Anil how they seem t, love her! It is
a delight, this pitr!'.- of undisuise.1 affection-at
first. But soon the expressioiuI of afftctit n become
too frank, too deniuntlatiai.e ti., daring. and then
they grow hookingg andl you know. The girl is from
the Stares: the men also. Havana Ls a happy hunt-
ing ground for ".igjd lookers" of this sort, \when the
tourist sea.uni i- in full swing, and when the wine
is in the truth is apt to come out in public caresses
that can have one mneauini only.
So, the Cuban Government refuse-. torecognise
any longer that there i.i a ,lass which it must seg-
regate. just a- tlihugh it wer a British Govern-
ment. Anll now it i-. Kinesron that has a red lirait
dliitri.t i which is lighted wlhit i andil it Havana:
yvtr there is no lua in .Jamaic.a c(mpell iny women of
an aet-old willing to lerd together in any particular
section It is preferiuce which sends them in King-
stln to a certain street or two; preference and a
kunoledge that the str.'-rt itself is a means of pub-
li it\ for them But the kind of girl you will meet
in a Havana cafe or in the Grand Stand at the race
course. or in the Casini). nr promenading the Prado-
that type is hardly to he .-,e-n In Kineston. One or
toi may travel down in the tourist season; one or
two do.' But the atm.osphiere is not congenial to them.
Thre'e does not seem to be much gold in Janmaica
for'the professional gold-digeer


V ISITORS do arit c.iule t... Jamaiid -.o much
for a hectic a-; ftor a ni-.e time It can be
hectic enough here Nightly dancei- at the hotels,
the Clubs and at Bournemouth Bath. ea-bathing. at
the latter, and at Myrtle Bank, Titchfield. Montego
Ba3' anli tihe open sea-baths on the northern coast
of the island: racing IIi the season, dinners, these
will give to the lovers of excitement all the excite-
meni tihe desire There is another side to the life,
a side from which even the stranger is not rut off
in .lanaii.a as he is in Cuba I have said that in
C.'uba one -es the people but never meets them- the
gulf between ia fixed But it i. easy l-nough for nice
people from abroad to meet the residents .iof Jamaica.
In the small k'iuurry hotels stranger-, teel immediate-
ly at home They are iutroduiced to the lo(al folk,
they tinrm friendships, they corresponnl with those
the:, leave behind them nbhen they return to their
homes. In the larger hotell- they meet the residents
of the neighbourhoodi at the ilan.-es, and it is sur
pricing how soon a.:'uaintanc.esihps are made. and
n..i yuesti.inable a. Iuaintanceships either. For in a
s.iall it.untry like Jamaica the questionable people
are ve-ll kninn And because they are well known
they are not knownwn" They do not frequent the
alas_. of enterrainment patronised by the better
orderly Yuu can meet them. of course, if minded to
do so: but .iiu will not I e troubled by them. you
will not unwittingly be thrown amiing them. as may
so easily happen in larger centres of population.
And there is the present great advantage which
Jamaica poi sesmes over i'luba. hr thousands of
miles :.f roads over which the automobile may speed
Most persons wish to see surmething of the country
they visit, the city may be attractive. but by itself
it is not enough Hence the visitor to Jamaica
take. a car and minds himself in the heart of the
mountains, where the air is exhilarating and cool
anil the s.Enery wonderful, or travels by the shore
roads, where he is ever in sight and sound of the
green and purple and silver sea He sees a kindly
peasantry, and at least he understands their dialect
Conmmuinication is pisible There is no shrinking
iron the scrutiny of thei- tranger. no reluctance
to answer his question. he speaks English. and
that is a bond between him and the humblest
peasant. So if Cuba has its attractions, and the.
are many and compelling. Jamaica has hers also.
and these possess an appeal of their own In Cuba
the attra tions are spectacular. vivid. sometimes
garish In Jamaica they are simpler, deeper, more
enduring. Perhaps that is why so many visitors
return to Jamaica again and again. Yet I must add
that I too have returned to Cuba And I should bt
sbrry ro think that I should never see it again


a- -


B i.il




F-
1929 PLANTERS'





I he CDancin


PUNCH 1





Girl of Old-


THE QUEEN OR "MAAM" OF A .IAMAIC( "SET". IN
HER RIGHT HAND SHE CARRIE- 4 IHAT IS
SUPPOSED TO BE A SCEPTRE

YOUR dancine-girl is one of the earliest and oldest
creations of civilized and semi-civilised com-
munities: she goes back to ancient Egypt, she per-
formed before the kings of Babylon and Assyria;
she was probably well rewarded for her grace and
skill, for we know that Salome asked liiod the
King for the head of John the Baptist on a charger
as the price of her amateur but exquisite perform-
ance. And the King paid that price, though what a
young girl could want with the head of a preacher
I have never been able to find out. It is said that
her mother put her up to getting John's head he.
cause of some uncomplimeutaiy things that J,.hn
had indiscreetly said about the lady But Saliome
does not seem ti have been the sort of ecrl to (are
much about obliging mamma Anyhow, we know for
certain that she danced, and we know that there


CAnd o;


were dancing girls in the Greek and tile Roman and
the Persian and the Indian Empires Wherever there
have been men to look on. the women have danced.
In Jamaica they danced almost from the beginning
of the English occupation, and they are at it still.
Thanks be!
Yet there has been a hiatus. a wide space. be-
tween our dancers and our dancers: between the
days when we had the "sets." and these later da)la
when we have the "troupes." there is fixed a gieat
gulf of time. Almost every Jamaica girl. of any
class whatever, could always dance, of course, but
these performed for the most part with their male
partners. and not professionally. so to s-peak. The
professional dancers of old were the "sets." bands or
men and women, hut mainly of women. wlo onc
,perial occasions got themselves up in all the finery
of their era and went about the streets of our rownis
gyrating and leaping to tlhe sound of mutiic and the
clapping of hands. This was in the days of slavery.
and when Emancipation came the custom began to
die out. The reason is that these "set-i" were gen-
erally dressed by their mistresses, who took as much
interest in their success as the dancers did them-
selves, When there were no longer any mistresses
there was no one who a.,uld alford the elaborate
finery required for the proper appearance of toe
dancing ladies, so gradually the habit of dancin-:
in sets died out. It had quite disappeared about
fifty years ago. and then there were no more pto-
tessional dancers. if even for but a few days of the
year. in Jamaita. It had begun to be thought. too.
before this. that professional dancing. dancing for
money. dancing in public as a pleading or amusing
spectacle. glancing in sets. was not at all respectable.
Your nice girl of the wuoiking classes would no longer
do it; that sort of thing, it was felt. belonged to the
old dark days of servittle when pride was at a dis.
count and religion had no force There was n-.. objec-
tion to regular mixed dancing. to quadrilles. lancers.
waltzes, polkas and the like But no more appearing
as a band in the public streets or in an. encloiaure
to which the public might be admitie-J to look on.
after paying entrance money and no credit given
So the "sets" disappeared. And it is only within the
last few years that the professional girl dancer las
appeared again.
But how different from tllo-e who went before!
Save perhaps in the matter of complexion there is
little or no imilarity.


f T-o-da


THERE used to be two principal "sets" in Jamai-
ca. the Blues and the Reds. The first wore
blue and were usually the more popular. the
se-ond wore red and strove mightily to equal their
rivals. How did these "sets" originate? No one
knows positively: by wsmeone it has been said that
the Blues represented the Navy. when Jamaica was
a great naval station, and that the Reds represented
the Army: for in bygone days a large number of
white troops used to be quartered in this island, in
or near many of the towns, and their red coats lent
a picturesque touch to the otherwisee drab tropical
human scene. Between the blue water boys and
the red-coats there was always some jealousy, and
this. it is maintained, was reflected in the rivalry
between the "s-ets" that danced at Christmas-time
everywhere in this country where mistresses could
afford to equip their girls (o:r help to do so, for the
girls themselves did something towards making their
appearance hideou s. But there -s at least one other
theory as to the origin of the "sets". It is
that advanced by a writer ,aver a hundred years ago,
Matthew Gregory Lewis.
He says that once uponl a time on the Jamaica
Station an Admiral of the Red was superseded by
an Admiral of the Blue In those days the Navy
seems to have been divided into two colours, and
where such a division exists there will naturally be
isome feeling. some belief on the one part that it is
-uperior to or different from the other..
The Admirals ga'e ball to the Brown Girls of
Kingston. and, in consequence, the city was divided
foreverr after into two parties, one taking the red
as its cognisante. the other the blue. One also
learns that the Reds represented the English and
the Blues the Scotch, and it would seem that while
one party in Jamaica welcomed the coming of the
Admiral of the Red. or English. the other party re-
sented the taking away of the Admiral of the Blie
who stood for Scotland, oatmeal and whisky, and a
great love of feminine society. But if it was the
brown ladies who first started this rivalry, how
is it that the white ladies became iso prominently
identified with it? And what about the black ladies,
who sometime- Cdlrri-d the war from one of mere
colours to one of tinged' nails and some admirable
Iatting with the head These last also did all the
public dancing and promenading in which the Blues
scored many a victory ,.,vpr the Reds. Truly there


A JAMAICA "SET" OF A HUNDRED 'EARS AGO. THESE PROBABLY REPRESENTED THE "*B'TES"


It r






PLANTERS'


THE BUTTFL TOUPE, AB AT TE PA E T E OF K 111.
THE BUTTERFLY TROUPE, A BRIGHT BODY OF GIRLS %H% O MADE. THEIR DEBUT AS DANCERS AT THE PALACE THEATRE OF KINGSTON


is a mystery here. What indeed was thie true origin
of the Jamaica "sets"?
It does not matter now; what we do know for
certain is that the dancing of these "sets" became
a regular feature of the Jamaica life until about
half a century ago, and that some of the highest
gentlemen in the land did not hesitate to contribute
towards the expenses of the rival'bands. The girls
,of tin wore real jewellery, lent by their mistresses
for the occasion. These mistresses, enthused by
loyaltine. perhaps also by rum, watched the pro-
cessions and sneered at those who were not of their
faction. I speak, of course, of mistresses not in the
first rank of society; these did not display their
feelings so openly. But they had them. They too
belonged to the Reds or the Blues, and experienced
emotions of the highest virtue rien popular opinion
gave to their side bhe %tinning vote.
EACH band had a Queen, and she was the
most wonderfully attired of them all. I don't
kno w ~beher she was intended to represent the
Queen of Beauty and Grace, or Miss Jamaica, or what,
but she and the rival Queen were certainly the most
conspicuous females in their town or district for
quite a few days, and e t: haih her attendant court.
Her followers were dukes and duchesses, earls and
countesses, lords and ladies! There was hardly a
commoner among them. And as thle parailed up
and down the streets, night and day, they danced;
they danced instead of walking, the sound of their
music was heard in the land. And in truth it must
have been something to see, in those bye-gone days,
scores of dancers, all brightly and gaily clad, in every
town, and sometimes in the villages and on the
estates themselves, disporting themselves for days
together. It may have been garish, barbarian, laugh-
able. But it meant real merriment, a break in the
nionouony of life When the custom died out it was
written that it should never be revived.
But though in those old days no one pretended to
exceptional virtue, though living was '"freer" than
it is even now and the o:,nventiouns sat lightly on the
people, it would have been tihoebhr indec.orou.. ,bhnnwe-
lessly immodest, for the dancers to have appeared
but partly clothed or wearing tights. Such a spec-
tacle would have been shocking, could, in fact, have
simply not occurred. The truth is. of course, that
the style of dress for dancers and for others, in those
days. was quite different from what it now is; in a
hot climate It was the custom for ladies to wear an
abundance of tilnthes, and long skirts with crinolines


were regarded as beautiful, and one wore heavy felt
hats ornamented with flowing feathers, and one per
spired greatly and endured much for the sake of
fashion, and those who should have transgressed
the prevailing fashion, and appeared as your danc-
ing-girl now does upon the stage, would have been
Lconldnedin in scathing language as lacking in all
aeniie of propriety, 'as abandoned creatures quIitre
No one, save iperh;aps a philosopher, would have seen
that all this horror and disapproval was but the re-
sult of a belief that what existed was right and would
not alter. For in the fields, and even in the homes,
the young women who danced in "sets" completely
covered at Christmas-time, went about their labours


with but one garment as a rule. and that exiguous.
But that. it was thought, was right enough where
work was concerned. Work itselt' probably was
so highly iorrecr and virtuous. that it did not much
matter in what sorrt of costume it wa, accomplished.
so long as the costume facilitated expedition. It ras
different with play: there, in public, one had to
think of what was then accepted as the standards
of decorum Thiose standards were tixed by tEli
dominant class,F- and no one dared to ignore them.
THIS feeling lingeredl -o long that when, some
fi\e-and.twenry or thirty years ago, Variety
S('otd, ired on Pa'e 21.)


"FRENCH" SET GIR.S: REFUGEES FROM HAYTI. AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 19sru CENTURY,
BROUGHT OVER THEIR S..AVES. TIHEE FORMrED THEIR OHN ".sErT" AND DRESSED QUITE
DIFFERENTLY FROM THE NATIVES


PUN CH


1929


. h :.".' *7 .,


-ih







PLANTERS' PUNCH


Planters' Punch

4 Jamaica Magazine

i|FOImNII 19411i


KINGSTON. JAMAICA. 1929.



THINK FOR THE MORROII'.

MR F G CL'LMlER. an Englh-h writer w lli lia.
dev)t-ed years of study to insurani.e iluestioul.
has written-* It is no little omitforr t.:. a young man
to know that. should his life be icut sh.rr premature,
ly, his wife and chiblren would not be lett penniles,.
as in ni't ircumi.tatuces the wive-i- anid children of
most lungg men woulhi be if there were noi such thing
as life insurance. Those whli. are able to inpres-
this palpable truth upon the li-v% of all y',utlis en.
tering nansialod are doing a r.al niiaional service'"
These words have inspired this j.'urnal to de\ute
some spteial attention to lite insuran e Andi a-, other
forms of insiuran"-e art als) of tile very high-sr im-
portanr'r. those t.',) arle Jdealt with on this page
Insuiranie iP a saft'eguardiri- 2agaiust death. a.
cident-. rire-s. hurricanes and los, of all kinrl-. ann
the man who is not safeluatdi.d b' it is a niin whn
runs a terrible risk day atter dt. It is a risk
which, i Iandv rir.umstante-.. is aliolnst riminal
For it almost always involve,- their r peopi: not onl'.
th0 uninsuredd individual suffer, when deadih or tire
,or accident I: cilir.. but others il-peudeut iipun iill---
family. enipl,', ee`. or 'rreditir- as tlhe Iase nmay I-
II ha been -aid that no man liveth unto hinti
self or tjeth unto himin lf That is one ri-.-Sin f't-
the various firnim of insurance


SUPPOSE YO' DIE.

THERE is nuie of u- inJ Janiaica wbn h .ha not
heard of .ome family being left destitute. or at
the very least in straitened circumstances, ttirough
the death of its breadwinner Men die at any timn-
A man of forty or rifty. with perhaps a wife and
Jour children. may pas, away after a few w-ek-'
SIllness, though a year before such a .ircunistance it
would have been thought that h- had twenty! or
thirty years more of life before himl
In the great majority of instances a man here
who can afford insurance is either an employee or the
owner of a business which he has been striving to
put upon firm fioundations. but whith he knows- will
demand from him years of care and thought lefire
It can be considered as well established. His bu-i-
ness may be a shop or a small banana plantation.
Or he may be a professional man. But whether
he be in business or in any iune of the professimions. or
an employee, it is not iu-iial inl thu country to rindl
him so comfortably mixed that without an\ life in-
surance. be call leave his family in a position to
face the future without hardship and suffering until
the children can begin to earn something for the-n
selves.
Surely then that man owes it to his family, andi
to his own peate of mind. to provide for the former
in the one way in which people of limited means
can decently provide for their dependents. Let II.
suppose that las happily is in many Instan,.e- true
such a man takes out a policy on hi- life when he ie.
still young He pays his premiums half-yearly or
yearly, and the amount is small: for the y-unger
you are when you take out a policy, the smniller is
the premium. It is safe to say that the annual
amount which a youne man pays on a life pjll.y
of 500 or even a Ll..tii1t would often be spent with
out a thought on treating friends a little more. or on
additional entertainment. or on some expensive \wear
ing apparel, in a word on something which, when
done without, is not missed. That man marries.
children are born: he may then think it wise t,,
Increase his insurance. And that is what he indubit-
ably should do if he can pnosibly afford it For at
the very least he knows that. with a life insuran. e
policy, he cannot leave hi family utterly unpro.
vided for in the case of early death Not even if his
business went to pi ees at his death, and could not
meet his liabilities, need hi, life insurance money
be touched if it stands in the name of his wife He
'has made a certain provision. large or small as the
case may be, for those for whose support he is
responsible, and the law of ever i country A-n recoig
nises and respects thi. act that it exempts from all
income tax the amount of a man'. income which he
pays as premiums on his life in-urance
The man who has one or nlore life insurance
policies goes about with a feeling of security He
may very properly want ii do more than he has
yet done by way of safeguarding his family', future.
but at any rate he knows that he has done some-
thing, and that makes for peace of mind. And ot
only that: he is actually freer to spend money on
the present enjoyment of himself and his family than
I he had no life insurance For with no life in-
surance he must. if he has any decent feeling at all.


Ih' i..nstintIlly urgeil by prudenlce and consctileht e to
put away money fpr his family,, or to seek foi in-
vestmenits that will yield them something when he is
aone. But what investment is there as gnnd 1a life
insurance -'
You take outi a polite- fiir. say. t5111t It may be
ifr lite. It m.ai he for twenty years-there are many
kinds of poln ies A'ccrding to your age and the
t,-rmi ,f t1he polity, you piay 12. 15 or 2ti a year: we
use aipproximat- t figures. How could y.ou invest this
.ImouILt aundua1lly so) as to be -ertain that, if you died
five years matter nIj inconmmeni.ed to do sn. you would
leave at least e.1 ti- your people? For this s, the
special advantage of life inLsurance: if you die im-
mediat-ly .a-tt-r yoiu have paid the first premium.
the full ;anlount fir which y',u have iun-ured must
be handed over to your heirs You may have paid
2"i or tl1.ii, death cime, anll the 5,1i of insurance
tiich you have taken our is without aun question
the property of th se for whom you intended
it It i- this fact that makes life insurance the iimost
popular torm of providing for one's family But it
ha,s uther advantages ailso.
To mention but one. The insurance companies
pai. bonuses otr ilividends every year or every three
yeals ,o1' every live years. a'clording to tile cionstitu-
tion i.'f the (c.mpany. You may consider these divi.
ends or bonu-es as interest on your money. and a,
a rule they represent extraordinarily high rates r,
interest. When a man is informed Iy his insurani.-
intanpany that. on a sun ot money bhich he has paid
t, ins.talments for three or five years. he is .ninw
iie.itedil with a larger sum than he lia hilad to pav
ill premiulum- for ione or en two years. and when
a- tlime goes on this b'onius keeps i.creasine-snm.l--
ti-ll- it duuhleos itself within a comparativelyy short
peritot--U begins It realise that lhe has madei a \very
lu.rr tives a. ell as as t eir sure Invest-uleni And if he
'.it idels toi allow tlihee ollnuses tl hbe adll-dd ti the
.apiital sum if I.s lif- insurance polity le nima leat,-
at his de.tll fifry per tentL more tilan lie wa- in.
Jured for, and even oue liundredi pir cent nimore
Thi.- nofren happens Life insuran,.ei is tlheretore not
i-tly a rnoral ot bligati t. ii -ne' family. not only a
safagilard iut t[hl tatllily' fUtiiire. b iut tie r easier and
i.iie of the most profitablt. formni f tives trint that
could possibly ie devised


THE CRY OF FIRE.

HEN an alarm of fire i- giveti the wihle neigl-
bourhbiid rushes out to warih the flame- The
ulanging of the tire engine hbll sumon-,n all those
,who hear it to, the place of Htie cuiinacration. The
Interest is intense. The general danger is immediate-
Iy realized. And the question that tomes to the
mind of everyone \ho s -s or hears of that fire I,.
"I wonder if poor S,-and.So was insured ."
It it is learnt that lie was not. the feeling for
him may be onte of sympathy. but ,uch sympathy is
invariably tempered by astonishment that so element-
ary a precaution against I.ss by fire should have
been neglet:ted. One knows that the persit.i who
has suffered sulch a lo,.s has partly brought hi,
fate upon himself. There was at his disposal a means
of prolteting himself: he iould have iu.-ured hi.s pro
pertr. If he is now homeless. that is ntr[ only [bi
mistortune but seems tr be verse mu.h his fault.
If he will not now be able to start in business
again. it is tell and said that hl- i.,uld nor be a far
seeing businessman if he took no steps to inLsure his
191siness For no onue can tell when a fire will
break out There is n.i foreseeing such a car.astrophe
And no one can say what a fire will not do.
Ii may start in the next street. But the windl
may hibtw the embers hundreds iof yards away and a
whole bIlotk may be destroyed, or parts ot t-nii or
three different blocks And even if a rire never gets
beyond the confines of the premise- in whih it
,.:c.ur's. it may destroy e-verything \l thin those
premises W'hen such a 'alallity occurs the manl
who has properly anti hone.-rl in-tured lis house or
his place of business. his furniriure. his srvk. or
what not. can set about rebuilding and starting
again with a fairly light heart. There is. ..f course.
the inevitable inc.unenience until everything is made
right Thai is one thine that cannot be provided
.iaainst. But imagine the situatiiiin hen he has
no insurance or is very miih under insured He
feels then that he ha-s I.st ever thine he has been
working fo'r His home whilhih was t.i shelter him
and his( during his lifetime. twhi.h was to be a home
for those for whom he 'ares-that is now but a
heap of t barred wi.od and lblaikened stone andl abhes.
Hin business. to whit h he devoted so mu> h care. has
disappeared in smoke He must now begin at the
,ort.mn once more. and be thankful for that iUhance
His hopes, his expetltations of futuree comfort and
prosperity. as well as hli' eujoytment of a present
onmpetenie--all that tioo has vanished
Ytt this inuld quite easily have been avoided
Insurance against fire lmeanis that a number i:.f people
p"iol their risks, as no one know' whose property
may be destroyed, and as the loss o.f even the small-
-st property may imean a very heavy burden for une
individual to carry, hundreds and thousands of in-
dividuals agree to protect one another against what.
ever loss nay o iiur But the payment rif earth in-
dividual. \while protecting him fully, is individually
small And his great. his overwhelming advantage


is that hl- i. protteced: that if lie i- the victim of a
tire he cannot be a heavy sufferer or pauperised
The honest man who insures his home or his
business. or his furniture. or anything against tire.
does not hope that a fire will enable him to (tlinl
his insurance But he kuows that if there is a nre
he is safeguarded: consequently he can go about his
daily conce-rns without tnauntine and harassing anx-
Siety. Fire insurance, in fact. is not merely a [liot
viitonl again..r is,. It ist a prevention of mental worr'
which not only hinders present happiness but. sub
tra ts from the energy which one hlas to devote to
one's business and other affairs It is not ionl\ wheii
the uninsured man see. flames rising Ihre and
there that the terrible fear grips his heart the lear
Is there all the timer. Always is there in hii mind
a sense of serious risk It is wisest. fruin all point-
of view. to eliminate that risk


|PA Y, PA Y. P.A Y!

HE Jamai(a new\-paper'. at'r- i,)onstantly reportinE
aciIdents t.i motor i irz iii these day- Niw we
ri~ad that outside the Palace Theatre a car aueghi
tire. or that oin his way t fiilril an appoinimii nnt His
Ex -llenc-y thile ti.iernl air's ar vollilted with st'iul
other autouimllri. that a boy was., run .ver on the
Constant Sprina Road. that a bicycle was dashed
aside. that a \woman had her leg broken. that a was badly damaged through skidding, and so inu and
si) to.rth" all in Ltlline. tion with motor cars or trucks
But the case-s of a'.,idents reported in the n- a.
papers are not tenth .,f those that take place.
Naturally. it i.s only the more serious accilients that
get into tlie public prints, hut ttie others all cost
mi.,nev. and sonimene has to pay that cost
The hi ef dread of the motorist is leI-t he should
bump inr.: sonil human being. either killing or in
jurtug hii or her. Inl s l i h.- r ii dlue to i criminal
neeligen.e on hi. part. to furious driving ii gros.
tarelessue-s. he has not to fear tri his life or his
liberty But there are damages to pay He may he
Lalledi upon to cotmpellate a man's family for the loss
of its breadwinner He umay ie called upon to sup-
port a man oIr woman for years. or to give in comr
pensltion for injuries received a sum of money that
will ripple him for life if his tar be not in-
sured But if he is insured against what is tailed
"third parry risk,.' he has taken outr (n his tar a
polity that makes him free from personal financial
liability should he unfortunately injure anyone The
ownership of a motor car is not then a sort of menace
to, him as it otherwise mu-t Ibe As the likelihood
of .aclidents in, reases with the increase of cars upon
our street' andi roads. thil menace steadily grows
greater in the case of those who are not insulid
against it The worst -if it is that it is not only
after pr.,Ilouged use of a car that at(.ident i.s likely;
it may occur in the first week of ownership, in a
journey of a hundred yards as well as in one of a
hundred miles That is why a larger and larger num-
her of sensible people take out nimotor car injsurjnce
policies.
But it is not only the injuring of other people
that the motorist has to take into account There
is property damage also If a man's truck or car
runs into another man's vehicle or bournes badly
agailn.t a fence, it will not tulfflie for him to say
tha hel is sorry. His sorrow will not be regarded as
an adequate redress by the suff'eer-r It is ounl just
that he should make cud, tile loss intlit.red and
that mieht at any time run into a toumiderable
figure But if his tar ir truck is insured he lduei
not worry about this His inlluran e company takes
tare of it. that is what he pays his premiums for.
that is what the company undertakes to do. and that
is whar the compi,:ny does
There is. also his own JI.r- Suppose his tar
skids and runs against an iron post or a bri-k wall
or a mountainside: i.ir suppose it catihes lire. or is
st..ilen anti either partivh or wholly destroy. ed by the
thief. Eat.h iof these ,,ontiingenie, ul mens a loss and
sometimes a heavy loss Rut that loss need nor he
borne hy the nmotoir car ow ner If t hhis taken the
precaution to insure he can have an easy mind about
accidents
Motor tar insurance is becoming mnore- general
in Jamaica. not because people like to pav premiiums.
but be, aaue they do not want to be called upon to
pa\ heavy damages. or to restore and repair their
.iwn tars at considerable personal expense. They
prefer an annual in-,irance eaginst grim possibilities
which may at any moment be transformed into
actual nastv fa ttsi to worr., annyance,. anti an ex-
penditure not only heavy. but perhaps of so i.ousid-
erable an amount as to make one little better than
the finnincial slave of a person injured There is a
sound basis and reason for insurance against accid-
ents. and while there are sone who resolve to take
risks it is noteworthy that tlese are most bitter in
self-blame when the risk becomes an actuality. Wheii
a judge's adverse decision falls like a bomb on the
man who ha, refused or neglected to insure his motor
vehicle. that man has no critic- as scathing as him-
self.
It is always easy to be wise after the event. but
such wisdom is terribly costly Real wisdoin is
that which anticipates and provides against the
event


.M z .


192








14 PLANTERS' PUNCH 1929




THE MAYFAIR PROMENADERS

A Body of Jamaica Amateurs, Selected and Trained by Misj Ermyn Ellis, Who Gave
a Series of Performances at the Ward Theatre in April 1928


"THE BEAUTY CHlHRI *" OF THE IMAl.AIR PROtMEN.ADERS


MllB kAIHLEEN l lit Ilitkil .H ANI M.iK.
EUGENE MARTINEZ. IN THE "UDAN(CE 01
TIE l UNDERWORLD"


MlI!., EHRM N ELLI. IPHIN('IP.L OF THE
MLlF.I IR .(lCHOOL OF DANCING


MIi. n .&1naLrE.E.y .ri. 1.1nyi .1 P IN ( II ^a L
D.TN.EU'E OF THE MA.IAIr. (CHOOI.
OF DAN IN4.


THE -LAVE (IRl.i. IN "THlE DAN(E OF THE EVENN VElI." lOFi HIf 1 II MI FRMYIN EI.LI ~l 1 % THE 01LOIST


qrtf ind I.li- t


i c





PLANTERS' PUNCH


"DO UBL


M Y story opens in 1'92I. at whlic.h time I occupied
a position as messenger to the old-established
-firm of H. W-- anid Sons. diamond-merchants of
London. it being my jol to convey stones and other
valuables to and from their clients and agents.
When not thus ,occupied I was expected to make
myself generally useful and help the utfice staff aLhen-
-ever assis-tam:e was required The firm wa, pr',sper-
ous enough not to worry aliout such things as ae'on-
-omy and efficiency. and the whole place was over-
.staffed. so that I rec koned I was on a soft thing.
The '.asual way in which old "H.W." engaged me
was tDpical if his methods You would have thought
that a hard-headed diamond-merchant would have
demanded some %ery convincing references before he
selected a fellow tl take sole charge of little packets
of precious -tones worth many hundreds of pounds,
but-luckily for me-it wasn't so.
The only reference I had in my pocket when I
presented myself at the otflch.e. in answer to an ad-
vertisement. were ione signed Iy my old headmarti.i.
which said 1 wa? "punctuai and persevering," and
one front the Army. in wnh-ich my Colonel testified
that to the best of hi, belief I wa., sober and indus-
trious-and a marksman'
The "boss." however. nEver even asked to see
them: he just picked me out ',f the bunch of ap-
plicants waiting and told me I'd suit. It seemed a
rather slack procedure to mte. but I soon Jis't.overed
that old "H.W." was very cute. and as far as I know
he never had a stone mistarry.
In the course of business. ce tainly. lie took the
precautions that custom ani etiquette demanded In
-Hatton Garden lie packed the "'stuff" in an attach#.
case and was guarded, in Whirtehapel Road. t, the
little rof. where the shabbiest of shabb) Continent.
als congregate to Iuy and ,ell precious stones, he
carried immensely valuable gt -ni in his vest pocket,
bringing them forth on ru-quest t,.r inspection just
as if they were bits of glass. .
One June afternoon I hail no packages to fetch
or deliver, and so Joe. the office-boy. had claimed my
services--ostensibly to assist him in the addressing
of envelopes, but actually to discuss football. I was
Just being'let in on something really choice in the
way of football secrets when the hell rang. Joe
answered and. returning. jerked his thumb over his
shoulder in the direction of the private office of old
"H.W." himself. -intimating that I was required to
present myself threat with.nut delay.
I found the "boss" in liir den going over some
papers and chatting to his secretary, Roseman. He
looked up ab I knocked at the door.
"'Ah! Good afternoon. Gibbs. Come 'in. How
-do you fancy a trip to Paris tomorrow '"
"Very nice. sir." I said "When do we start?"
"Oh. I'm not coming with you. Gibbs! I'd like
to; I could do with a holiday. but I've got to meet
S Van Riebeck in Aldgate tomorrow. Now, listen care-
fully. Here's a little business you must see through
on your own. but it's quite simple. I want you to
take this package to our agent in Paris. Monsieur
Fourneau, who will give you a letter to bring back
to me. You may have to stay in Paris for a day or
two, but Fourneau will make you comfortable."
I knew this well. for the kindly little Frenchman
and I were quite old friends, and notwithstanding the
difference in our positions he had always made it
his business to treat me hospitably on each occasion
that I had visited Paris on behalf of the firm. The
"'boss" went on: 'Now. I want you to take great care,
for the package contains some pretty valuable stones,
and I'd rather not lose them if I can help it." He
chuckled, and then added: "But I don't suppose you'll
forget you've got it to carry."
I happened at that moment to bewatching Rose-
man. who was putting some dies in order and trying
to look uninterested, but somehow I had an idea he
was listening intently Mind you. there wasn't the
lightest reason why he shouldn't. for he was entire-
ly in the confidence of the "boss." but for that very
reason it seemed queer that he should be so curious.
Surely he had known all that there was t.- be known
about the package before I entered the office' I told
myself. Anyway. it was probably only my fancy
"There'll be no examination at the Customs.
Gibbs," continued Mr. W-- ; "I've had the packet
sealed at the Embassy. so you've nothing to do but
keep your eyes open and go straight to Fourneau.
You must catch the 10 am train from Victoria and
travel via Newhaven-Dieppe. This is important. On
no account go by any other route, as I have instruct-
ed Fourneau to meet you at St Lazare Station in
Paris, and you mustn't miss him
"Anything you don't quite understand? Right!
Of you go. then. Here is the packet, and a slip to
the cashier. Oh. by the way. you are to travel
irst-class on the outward journey. Good day. Gibbs "
Back in the main office, I collected some.money
from the cashier, put the packet in an attach&-case,
and bidding Joe a fond farewell, floated out of the
office at exactly 4 p.m.
From the time I left the office until my train was
due to depart was a period of eighteen hours, and
you will probably be rather surprised to think that


DUMMY"


I should be entrusted with such a valuable package
for so long a time in my own home. As already
explained, however, the firm of W-- and Sons were
rather casual in their methods.
Apart from the possible risk of trusting me,
however, they had been business-like enough. In
order to avoid the inconvenience t.f the examination
at the ports, The package had been inspected. sealed,
and cei-rir-id by the authorities in London. and ail I
hal to do in order to pass the Customs was to prod-
uce the certificate which I carried in my pocket.
Directly I got home I packed up a few things in
my bag and sent it off to the station. Then I ate a
pretty substantial dinner and went to bed-to dream
not of diamiond-thievei. but of a certain snug little
cafe in the Boiilevard St Nlichel. Halfway through
tht utglht I awoke, to tind myself possessed of a brain
wavi-e
I recalled Ros~'man's peculiar attitude of camou-
flaced atteutivene-s- and. turning thing, over in my
mind, I came to the conclusion that though in all
probability there was nothing in the wind so far as
he was concerned, there could be no harm in taking
a few precautions. I therefore jumped out of bed,
lit the gas, got busy with some paper and sealing-
wax, and soon had a passably good imitation d6 the
sealed packet lying beside the original. Then I
climbed between the sheets again and fell fast asleep.
Next morning, with ample time to spare, I pre-
sented myself and half-a-crown to a porter at Vic-
toria, whereupon he put the coin into his pocket and
me into sole possession of a first class compartment
on the LonlounNewhaven.Dieppe.Paris train. Punc-
tually at 10 a.m. we were off, and at 11.30 a.m. we
were transferring to the Southern Railway steamer
at Newhaven after a showing of pa.sp,.irs. anl. a
very perfunctory examination for 'ontlraband.
My private bag had been registered through to
Paris, so I had nothing to worry about save the
attache-case and my appetite, which latter a hearty
lunch in the boat saloon soon dismissed. This left
only the case on my mind, and that didn't weigh
very heavily, for at three o':l.o:k I was waiting in
a very cheerful frame of mind for the disetnmarka-
tion at Dieppe to comffmence
I had kept my eyes open for anything or any-
body suspicious, but the boat was half empty, and
the only interesting person aboard was the young
lady who was now standing on my right, absorbing
what were evidently first impressions of France-
and she certainly wasn't at all suspicious-looking.
She was, indeed, distinctly good-looking, and had at-
tracted attention from all the passengers, though she
appeared to be ignorant of the fact.
To tell the truth, I experienced great difficulty
in keeping my eyes off her, in spite of the fact that I
was well aware that young men on business such
as mine ought not to allow their attention to stray
in the direction of attractive young ladies.
I deduced from several little signs that it was
her first visit to the country. One does not, if one
has been there before, murmur in a tone of delighted
anticipation: "France-La Belle France!" on arriv-
ing at Dieppe, for no one, however kindly disposed,
can say that Dieppe is beautiful. Nor does one usu-
ally hang around gathering impressions once the
boat is made fast, for it is generally recognized that
to do so is guaranteed to rouse the all-too-easily
awakened suspicions of the Customs officials and en-
sure the laggard's luggage getting a thorough over-
hauling.
I saw the look of pleasant anticipati.,n die away
on the young lady's piquant face. to be replaced by
one of disappointment, and then I lost sight of her
in the scramble to get across the gangway.
I was practically the first person ashore, and a
few\ minutes later was making myself comfortable in
a first-class ,mpar'tment secured for my sole use
in the usual manner. From the window I could see
the Customs examination proceeding with much hat-
raising and argument-politely persuasive at first,
then politely vehement. but always polite. I had
watched the scene many a time before, but it is a
spe-itacle of unfailing interest
The crowd had thinned considerably before I
again caught sight of the pretty young lady Appar-
ently. she was just getting another fondly cherished
idea knocked on the head-an illusion concerning
the inexhaustible patience and courtesy of the French
examining officers. A seaman had dumped her bag
on the counter and, having received his unjust dues.
had ungallautly left her to the mercies of the French
official.
"Vous n'avez rien a ,it llarr,, madame?" de-
manded the officer.
"Pardon, ,monNie'u,--er-I'm sorry, but I cannot
speak French," replied the young lady.
A pair of heavily-braided shoulders shrugged.
"'Ave you any tabac-cigarettes?" He did his
best with the words. but they seemed just as hopeless
in English as in French. The girl did not answer.
"'Oure:-Open. madame!" said the official, brus-
quely, and proceeded. to rummage through her per-
sonal belongings. Silks and crepes, filmy stockings
and underwear, were tossed and tumbled, unfolded


By Ho


The odd little adventure that befell a
diamond-merchant's messenger on a
journey) between London and Paris.
"The deltil' are absolutely correct,"
writes the Author, "but for obvious
reasons names have been suppressed or
altered."


oW /I]O3LR


and crumpled-all because she couldn't speak French.
To add to her distress the train gave unmistakable
signs .,f impending departure.
Officials .wre' ordering passengers for Paris to get
aboard, but the stolid Customs man continued to
"visit" the posses-louns of Madarme, impervious alike
to sweet smiles and kind words. She w-a rapidly
getting hysterical. and looked so charmingly help-
less that, flinging prudence to the winds, I hopped
out of my compartment and went to her assistance.
"Can I help yoNu'"' I asked. The girl looked up
into my face, her eyes brimming lunh tears, and
almost threw herself into my armii
"Oh! ileaste!" she said, gratfully. "I must catch
this tra in Can you stop this man turning out my
bag' Do help me to get out of this."
Thereupon I spoke to the offlier and pointed out
why it was that Madame had behaved so suspicious-
ly-how utterly uns.iphisticated she was, and how
handicapped by her complete lack of knowledge of
the Fren,.ch tongue.
I parried his reply that he had addressed Madame
in English by explaining that tie lady was Scottish,
and therefore unused to hearing "*good English." Ah!
Braided Shoulders' stolidity vanished, and volubility
took its place He had deceived himself, he told me;
he had thought Madame's inability to reply a matter
of conscience He expressed ten thousand regrets
and, becoming practic-al, assisted me to replace the
cont.-nts of the bag.
A few more words, a shove or two, a scramble
and a jingle of coins. anti the young lady and I were
seated together in the compartment that I had left.
Throughout this little episode I had kept a firm grip
on my precious case, and now, as we settled down
and the train slid gently out of Dieppe, I began to
wonder if I had been ise to take the girl under
my wing. so to speak. She looked so pretty and so
trustful, however. that I reproached myself for hav-
ing harboured any stupicious thoughts about her.
"Don't you speak any French at all?" I asked.
"No! I'm afraid I'm very ignorant," she answer-
ed, smiling sweetly. She went on to thank me for my
help, but I soon stopped her. "It's very awkward.
you not being able to speak French." I said. "Where
are you going to when you get to Paris? Please
don't think I'm inquisitive, hut perhaps I can help
you until you meet your friends'"
"I should be very grateful if you would," she told
me. "Indeed, I am very grateful for what you have
done already. I have an address to which I am to
go. I'm an actress, you know. My name is Minnie
Tyrell."
Seeing I gave no indication of having heard the
name before she hastened to add "I've not been at
it very long, so of course I'm not famous yet."
"I spend a considerable portion of my time travel-
ling, so I know very little about theatres," I told
her. I felt convinced, however, that Miss Tyrell
must indeed be a beginner, for the most timid girl
that ever tripped itin the chorus would have known
how to handle the situation in the Custom House,
At any rate, she would have made a fight for it.
We chatted quite gaily as the really fine scenery
slid by, and our acquaintance made great headway.
Presently I risked another question.
"Is it a theatrical engagement that you have in
Paris?" I asked.
"Why. yes!" she answered, unhesitatingly. "It is
a great opportunity, I think "
"Would you consider it impertinent of me if I
were to ask you for the address of which you spoke
just now?"
"No, certainly not. Here it is. Tell me-is it a
nice place?"
I glanced at the card which she handed me. "Oh,
yes, I know it." I said. "very nice-very. Have you
never been there before?"
"No. the agency in London gave it to me."
The address, I should explain. was in one of the
nastiest quarters of Paris--a once fashionable street
of large houses, now let out as common lodging-
houses and tenements. It was not exactly a place
of ill-fame, but one to be avoided if possible. Still,
everything might be all right. Possibly it was; pro-
bably it wasn't. I had beard of young girls being
sent abroad on the pretence of theatrical engage-
ments, only to find themselves stranded.
It was pretty obvious that Miss Tyrell wasn't
very worldly-wise. Still, the people at this address
might be quite respectable, and there was no need
to alarm her unnecessarily. I would find some ex-
cuse, I decided, to see her to the house and also
keep an eye on her during my stay in Paris. I
could easily hand the package over to Fourneau at
St. Lazare, and then help the girl with her luggage-
that is, if she would let me. I hoped she would, for
I was decidedly interested.
"Oh, yes, you'll be all right there," I repeated, and
was astonished and secretly gratified to note how
(('Cort, red on Page .8).


1929








16




The Witch of Rosehall

(Continued from Page 3)
an estate are not friendly it is very hard for both
of them."
"I .houil very much like to be your friend, Bur-
bridge," .-riel Robert heartily. "And I'll-tell you at
once that I am not exactly a pauper; I mean," he
corrected himself hastily, out of regard for the other
man's feelings, "I have some means and so can
afford to buy a horse and any other little -hinc I
may need."
"Good for you," commented Burbridge moodily.
"I have nothing but my pay, like most book-keep-
ers, and that is never enough. I have to stick
wherever I get employment, for if you leave two
or three jobs the overseers and attorneys come
to think you are no good, and then you're done for.
You seem to be all right, so you don't need to worry
so much."
"You are English, of course?" questioned Robert.
"Like yourself, yes; only, you are a gentleman."
"Let us, hope we are both gentlemen," said
Robert, but he had alr-al noticed Pi hi iwl-e',- broad
accent; just as Burbridge had caught the tones of
Robert's cultured voice and observed his easy, in-
dependent manner.
"Can't afford to be a C-eoirtliema." said Burbridge
with downright candour; "gentlemen book-keepers
don't last long here. I'll get Psyche to look after
your room till you get a hLll-ke.-- .r. Rutherford.
Psyche is a good girl, but you will have to get your
own, for she has a lot to do for me, besides doing
her .i nlina i:, work in the trash house."
Shvi'- .our servant?" But even as Robert asked
the question he knew from something in Burbridge's
attitude and from his praise of Psyche that the
girl, whoever she was, was something more than a
servant to his colleague. His eyes lifted themselves
automatically and again he spied opposite to him,
hanging from a nail in the wall, that fluttering
female garment.
"She's my housekeeper and a very good girl. I
think I hear her now."
True enough, it was Psyche, a middle-sized, pleas-
ant looking damsel of about nineteen years of age,
light chocolate in complexion, and therefore sambo,
with bright black eyes and a merry smile. She wore
a single robe that reached her to the knees, but
it was not coarse osnaburg such as Robert had seen
on the women in the fields; it was of much better
material and must, Robert concluded, have been
purchased v.ithl Burbridge'-. money. Her head was
tastefully covered with a large scarf looking like
a chequer-board of bright and diverse colours; her
feet were bare. She had nothing of a slouching,
timid demeanour; on the contrary, she flashed
Robert a merry glance, bade him good day, then,
to'ij,:inc Burbridge liehtl~ on the shoulder, asked
what he wanted.
Thi is Mr. Rutherford, Psyche, the other book-
keeper," explained Burbridge. ""He is going to live
in the next room, like Mr. Fanburg did, and I want
you to fix it up for him till he gets somebody of his
own to do it. It won't be too much for you?"
"No," grinned Psyche, looking Robert over with
an-appraising and appreciative glance. "An' it won't
be long."
"That's so," agreed Robert. "I suppose they
allow a servant, don't they?"
"Yes, you are allowed a servant to do the neces-
sary things," said Burbridge, "but not for all the
time, She will have orthe work to do."
"An' dem all is tief," said Psyche decisively.
"Dem all rob you, except you is their sweetheart.
But you will get a sweetheart, massa, specially as
you is such a pretty gentleman. There is Millie, me
cousin; she just twenty and she have good ways and
is pretty. You want to know her?"
"No, no, Psyche," laughed Robert with real en-
joyment. (The eagerness of Burbridge's lady to find
for him a special helpmeet, and her unabashed
frankness about it, affected his sense of humour
keenly.) "I think it would be much more proper
for me to select my lady-love myself: don't you
agree?"
"Yes," agreedl Psyche, "for, after all, what I t'ink
may suit you you mightn't like; you' taste may be
different. But Millie really a good looking girl and
can work, an' she is a tree girl, massa. I will
bring her over to see you soon; dat will be no harm,
for you needn't teck her if you don't like her. What
you say?"
"Just as you please," laughed Robert. "There
can be no objection to the lady calling on me, if that
Is a custom -td the oiilntry. And of course. I shall
like her, though that does not mean that I shall
take her. And here is something for you, Psyche."
He handed the girl a dollar, at the same time
glancing at Burbridge to see how he would regard
this gift. He noticed that it was by no means re-
sented by Burbridge. As for Psyche, she crowed
aith delight Robert perceived that the advent of
Millie was likely to be hastened.
"I live here," said Psyche, pointing to Bur-
brhidgt's ro:ni. "an' Millie could live dere," and she
pointed to Robert's room; "an' bote of us could
keep dli- place nice and convenient, and we could
be happy an' virtuous,"


~


PLANTE RS' PUNCH


Robert stared. Then remembered that virtuous-
ness must mean to' Psyche something quite different
from what it signified to persons with a better
knowledge of the English language, though 'not
necessarily with a higher appreciation of the value
of virtue. That Psyche was convinced that she was
living a hiilil.\ virtuous life he did not doubt for a
moment. As for Burbridge, Robert realized that
virtue meant nothing to him; he would have said
that it could not I...--bl.y have any part in the life
of a il.ok-keeper--.hi' .l as- indeed the universal
view.
., -"That's all right. Peith-." cut in Burbridge,
speaking with real kindness and affection to the
girl. "You need not go back to the trash house till
you have fixa-l up Mr. Rutherford's room; but don't
be ilng or I will be blamed. We'd better be getting
along now, Rutherford. You will see when your
boxes come; we aren't going far from here."
"I wi' bring Millie," was the last word from
Psyche; then the two men mounted their horses
and went cantering off.
The sun was now high in the sky and beating
fiercely down upon the countryside; the whole scene
was lit up brilliantly by a hard yellow light, and
the flashing blue of the sea to the north challenged
the sapphire of the radiant overarching canopy that
reached from the horizon .to beyond the hills to the
south, and spread away to east and west, forming,
to the eye, an immense inverted bowl painted in
flaming colour. The sea-breeze had waxed in
.-tr,-ii Here and there stood groups of slender
coconut palms, towering skyward, their long fronds
waving wildly and clashing as they waved. Like
sentinels on guard over the fields, huge cieba trees
lifted giant branches into the air. The atmosphere
was permeated with the smell of sugar in the making
and of new rum; from far and near came cries of
human voices and the lowing of cattle; overhead
floated, with scarcely a movement, large black birds,
the John Crows, a species of vulture which were
then the only scavengers of town and country.
Burbridge was interested in all this not at all;
he was thirty years of age and for eight of these
years he had been a book-keeper in Jamaica. No-
thing was strange to him, nothing new, and little
was rl-ka-:rit With Robert it was different; his re-
action to these tropic scenes, to this exotic, life, was
keen; it intrigued and thrilled him; to him this was
a holiday and what went on around him might have
been staged for his amusement. He felt exhilarated
as he rode by Burbridge's side; in spite of.the heat
he enjoyed it all to the full, But even as he drew
rein at the still-house, where the rum was made,
there came to him a shock. He saw a stout black
fellow lift a whip and bring it sharply down on the
shoulders of a girl who was stooping to lift a
bundle. The girl howled and crouched, but did not
dare to move, for the whip hovered menacingly over
her. Three or four other women in the vicinity
trembled violently, bent over their tasks with fever-
ish intensity: the moment was one of tension. Then
Robert remembered that he was a book-keeper, and,
as such, the boss of the driver who seemed to be
about, in a spirit of brutal enjoyment, to strike the
girl again. "Stop that and go and attend to some
other business!" he shouted t6 the man pereimptur-
ily. The fellow started to give some explanatit-n;
he was evidently astonished. The girl turned ap-
pealingly to her unexpected protector. Burbridge
said nothing. The driver hesitated, Yet he still held
the whip above the young woman. Angered by his at-
titude Robert rode up to him and kicked the whip
out of his hand, the man uttering an exclamation of
pain as he did so. Then Robert and Burbridge passed
into the still-hbiuse.
"What was that brute lashing the girl for?"
asked Robert.
"Some neglect of duty, perhaps," replied Bur-
bridge; "but I guess he was really taking it out of
her for a private reason; possibly she wouldn't
have him and he is shijwing her what she mibht
expect for her rejection."
"But these people are not allowed to flog without
express permission from white men, are they? I
thought that in Iheie days only the hire men on
the estate could give a flogging order."
"Practice and theory are ,.,metimis different,"
answered Burbridge dryly,. "and if y,-u prevented
these drivers from using the %hip alitgether you
would soon have Etry slave raising the dev-il.
There's plenty of hoeeing -"n Rosehall, Rutlherford.
more perhaps than on any other estate."
"Are the slates here worse?"
"They are pretty bad."
"But a lady lives on the property. Mrs. Palmer
herself lives here, and she is a young woman, I
have heard. Doesn't she take a pIr.,jnal interest
in things? What about her influence?"
Burbridge looked at Robert with a curious
smile. "You had better find out all that for your-
self," he said.

CHAPTER THREE

EXPERIENCES
N twenty-four hours Robert Rutherford had learnt
a great deal. As he sat on his horse the morn-
ing after he had entered upon his duties at Rosehall,
ualthing a scene which he knew would shortly


develop in a fashion revolting to his feelings. he
,concluded that a mere description of the position
of a book-keeper, however detailed, could never have-
brought home to his mind'the nature of that em-
ployment as his brief personal exprilenie :of it had
done.
S Robert was a man in splendid .on'iirnon: but
even he already felt horrified at the tax put upon an
unfortunate book-keeper during (tro.p time on a sugar
estate. Yesterday he had picked up the rudiments
of his work and had discovered that tie would not
have a single book to keep tall that sort of
thing being done by the overse-r i. Iur that he as
expected, after a day in the field. or in the boiling
house watching the sugar made, ti .-peinl Every other
night in the still-house where wa q. kept the terllenitited
spirit and in which it was rour-'1 into un :li-.ins
for shipment at a little poit iteo ,,t rhr,-- miles
away. Last night he had taken up his p,-t of
watchman in the still-house. Thter- h, had hadl t. re-
main from about nine until f,:-ar 'rli.nhk iu the
morning; He had seen the rutm ,liran ,oit ':t ithe
huge vats in which it was -.ir id. hall seen the
puncheons filled and sealed by rhj norker-. had
seen to it that they were ca'reilly lNa dell "n ir the
waggons that were to convey thie .vaay. ay, andi en
during the intervals when thler- w-.s little ,1t no-
thing to do he had hardly dar-'l t.. lo~- his tve tfor a
few minutes' sleep. He had I"..an v.riiedi a',ain-t
this; the -ia\-- would steal ar th- -Illt--i ,.ppti.r-
tunity, he had been told, anid heI w,..ill I e liell re-
sponsible. He had observed, r.., thlat thl- il.-da~ a
half a doz,- nii., v.ail:li-td illti ft'uri\-l I. .-\'vtl-nly
hoping foi iomit la'- nip- i parr' (U)n,,- hi- had
i.i-re.ll t.o fall a alt,=, aiind Lr--enily there was a
movement -ii thle E 'air ,if tr men r...v aiiui- a tunm
vat: one of these men ha da iti:k.-r ill Iii l:iiuid.
Robert stood up suddenly inil li'the ii-n niltied
into the shadows. How one l,.-'l;.-k.-p-r t(.',ild per-
form a night of watching iti thi ill-hlu-, three
times a week, and accomplish ii-- .'linar. ',.rkli in
the daytime, seemed to him a i'pr.bl'-in '.'.nh ItI i he him-
self would hardly be able t-. I,1- y. tr Biirbridge
appeared to manage it, shee' t-'I, --,,:. i ,ij-lling
On leaving the still-house \,irli ir- ire-kii: raum.
Robert, fatigued thli..uh he wa-. IhaI ,:ul f turioi-sity
wandered over to rrh- boiling ho:'- \.liere :li, -Ie'ar
was being made. All nillit tll,- -[tdari hiI Ibeen
in feverish i tiii' ,. It .*.ia: u.-'iii.';n during the
taking off of the crop t.r .a .i ,srd deal o:f hiht work
to be done, and on rili- hi-, fi-t night a. a hjok-
keeper at Rosehall a night .-1ll-li 1. h iitin in full
operation.
At four o'clock in the ml'nin--t [ tlh-re \a-- i- yet
no glimmer of light, no sign .it tli in- w which
would break later on; but tlhe LlA.in \%:- I.ieirted
and illumined by millions oi ,burine -tari-. Abich.
in that clear atmosphere and at that period (f .he
year, shone out with a wontlri ill g.olrien briliiuanmy
By their aid, and lith eyes a,.tuurconied to iie
surrounding darkness, he pelr:ceivedi the tarts drag-
ging their slow way .towardsl the boiling-hou-pe in
ah]i.lh the mar hintciy wa- ,Jitduared. lie saw shadowy
human forml mining about singly or in groups,
heard the of gangs. and the sharp) rack of the whip.s nith
which they ernphasi.-ed their orders. The men who
were lurking then would retire shortly. and the
day labourers would rake their pla,'e All night the
toiling and the shouting had gone ,ni. And at in-
ttrvals there broke out shaip peuls of raucous
laughter: There' were shrill women's voices in-
timningled with the harsher tones if' the men. and
some of these men and women pa,-.-d hinm ,aiilessly
chewing the cane they had ut for ilitmselves, and
talking in a dialect he could not understand. He
was to learn later that these people were eat.h en-
titled to a small daily ration of sugar and rum,
from which they drew seme of the energy whii:h
enabled them to prusecute the arduous duties demand-
ed of them. He was to learn also that, in spite
of all vigilance, they stole lar more than they were
supposed to have and ons.unl-ed immense >quantities
of juicy ripe cane.
When he entered it, the Iboiling house seemed like-
a corner of Hadt- A three roller sugar mill was in
operation, a mill with three huge -teel cylindle'rs or
rollers, into none end of whit.h the >ane was liilusl,
Ahile out of the other end the extratted juice
poured in a steady yellow streanm through an iron
gutter into large open reteptadles. somewhat like
great hollow globes cut in halves, which simmered
and bubbled over fires on a long brick replace
iai-edtl about two feet from thile level of ihe g'iiound.
The .two mills on Rosehall were worked by wind'
power and by steam; when the wind was slight
resort was had to steam as on this night. and now
the furnace was' oning and the heat it generated
was infernal.
The men and women were feeding the mill with
cane and the furnate with fuel The men were
clothed, -a, h. in a pair of trousers only. their i wear-
ing hlaik torsos and mutuular arms glistening in the
glare from the flames Men were feeding the fires
under the -hallow cauldrons. or teaches as they were
called, and crnstantly the cry rose for "'wocd. more.
a-i.d'" With ladles houe handles were several
feet long the aittndarnti -kimmed the boiling, pun-
gent-sweet !,iu.'r fr m on: ta- h'. to another.'and the


1929
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1929


thick substan..e it.essautly rornied bubble, wntiL.I
burst as in,:.es.iIntl. Ringing upwards a thick spray.
The voice of th- big negro headman, o tr.itnman.
who was in charge uf the boiling house that night.
rapped out orders to the ladlers i.. "skim liEht!"
There was a continuous movement. There was a
perpetual babbling of voi(e-. What these commands
meant, and why there should be such a tumult, in
all that glare of flame and terrible heat. Riobert
could not for the life of him comprehend He re-
mained in the boiling hou- for but a few minutes.
noticing that ino white nan was in charge just then.
The black htadman vwas evidently a trusted and a
competent man Not tor an instant had he ceased
his labours of super\viion and harsh tommannltin
because of the unexpected advent i..t the new b.ook-
keeper
Robert was elad to escape into the open air once
more. which wa, delightfully (tool at this hour He
went straight to lbi quarters, flung wide the only
window it possesc-sd, a window made of wooden slats
or blinds, which permitted curiou, peri'so to peer in-
to-the toom unimpeded as sinn a.- t was open. That
there might be inquisirive eye., gazing upon him
did not matter to him in the lea-t just then, indeed,
he never thought of ir Thoroughly exhau.,tui ihe
tossed off hi.' cioth,-. thr-w himself on the rmdiffer-
ent bed. and fell sound asle.-p.
He na,, otit of his room at eight o'clock. Bur-
bridge had been up at daybreak and am-ing the
fields, he had had no night duty and there-fore weas
expected to be at hi- work whntn the slaves should
begin to take up tlinii ta.,ks. But be spared a ,mo-
ment to ride up and say a few words to Robert
when the latter emerged after a very hasty break-
fast; he told Rober't what lie was to di.. until fur-
ther orders. The latter. still feeling an interest ini
what went on about hinm despite his fatigue. had
during the la-t h.'r been taking in the bus) scene
that was set out before his gaze. The (utting of
the cane went merrily on. the loading of the (arts.
the unwearied slhiutiig. jtist as he had seen and
heard it yesterday But now his more prartisdtl or
more closely ohsrvant eyes natited other things
also Und-er a grtrdt sllade tree. a silk to.ittn. he
saw little babie- lyirjg on heaps of trash or hIits of
spread cloth, witrh one or two, witmen looking rafter
them. There must havt' been twenty of these ur, h-
ins. none of th-em more than two years old. most of
them younger. and they lay on their baik.- and
kicked their feet in the air. or rolled about, carefree
with the irresponn-ible freedom of infanc- They
were the children i:,t wonl-n who were at work and
who bad brought them forth from their hirs. ac'
cording to custri-m (to where they mihet su.kle them
when necessary. Meanwhile the little ones were
placed in the char.lge of a i.i'uple of women wihuse
business it was ti se-e that tno harm came ti t.-ni
There were sonne other children also, raneing
in years from five to nine. and these were by no
means idle. They ran about i.c-lei ting bits .,t trari.
which could be used in the furnace. and picking up
cane leaves and other edible substani--s for the feed-
ing of the hogs and the :atrri of the estate This
was the Piccaninny Gang. the gang of minors. very
young, hut neverthele-,- ii-eful. and over then-a; as
put an elderly woman, arme-d with a switch. whose
duty consisted in seeing that the pieraniiinin- did
not fail to do something towards defraying the 4(ist
of their keep.
But Robert's attention had been diverted from
the antics of the childrenn tiy some preparations
which he saw beinu made not far away from where
he was stationied It was now nine o'clock. he was
feeling somewhat fagned, and these preparations. the
nature of which lie fully understood, rould not tend
to an enlivenment of his spirits. Burbridge had hasti-
ly told him that morning that three of the slave, were
to be punished for tlmsdnemeanours. and one of these
was a woman, the -,ame girl lie hail sav\e from a
whipping the day before. The ,lave driver hadl
reported her case to Mr. Ashman. eiving his side of
the story, and Mr Ashman had decided that the eirl
deserved punishment. Robear Ju-pet,:ted that hi, in-
terference had had much to di" witth this decision:
he was to be taught a lesson. Tilsi was. in lai. (. :i
be a sort of ceremnonial punis.hnlelt. There were
some twenty persons assembled to witness it. clear-
ly the more obstinate of the bond.peotple Bulrhridae
and Ashman were on the spot. Robert had n.,t
been summoned, hut from \here he was he could
see what passed with a fair deReree of distinctne~-
The three culprits, backs exposed. were awaiting
their punishment But there was. as it seemed to
Robert. a deliberate procrastinatiton Suddenly he
glimpsed a figure n horseback approathline from
the Great Houise and attended bfy aniorther, thle rid-
lag was rapid and in a very little while he per.
celved that the first rider vwa, a woman, white, and
at once he knew who it must he. "-Mr, Palmer."
he thought. and felt certain that at lea't there would
be s6me palliation of the sentence of the unfortunate
trio who stood in si(h abje> t attitudes anticipating
their torture. The girl micht even l.e spared. A
woman surely would have some sympathy with her.
The riders arrived, and thr- fir-t was r.-sp'(tfully
greeted by Ashman and Burhridge. The lavess
around einiply prov-lled at th- sight of her Her
face could not be distinctly -een by Robert hut he
observed that her figure was 'light and girlish her
long riding habit sweeping diown below h.r -h,-es.


her feathered bra\er placed jauntily on her head.
Her lighr t and lield a riding whip. She sat her
horse perfectly. He guessed from their attitudes
that the condemned persons were beseeching her for
mei' y.
He morved hisi horse a trifle nearer to the scene.
No one paid any attention to him.
He saw the lady nod to Ashman, who gave a
signal. One of the men was seized and tied to a
post. and a heavy whip rose and fell with a re-
sounding whack ,n his skin. The wretch screamed
out in fear as well as agrny. a piercing scream that
must have been heard a quarter of a mile away;
but that had not the slightest effect upon the man
who wielded the whip. Twenty times came down
that terrible instrument: the full sentemre was exe-
cuted. and then came the other man's turn Then
it was the girl's Robert, forgetting that he was
only an employee (o the estate, and that on his
father's own property in Barbados a similar scene
might at that very moment be taking place, dashed
swiftly up toi the group, though wit hout quite know-
ing that he hall dine so or what he was going to
say or do. He was given no opportunity to say or
do anything "Gi back and wat( h those slaves load
the wageon. Rutherford!" sternly commanded the
,overseer "'What di you mean by leaving them when
you wer.- not sent for?" The voice was arrogant,
intolerably in-.nlntr. and, as Ashman ceased, Robert
heard Mrs Palmer say: "What is he doing here?
He isn't needed." She did not even glance at him.
Her gaze "a fixed on the trembling, weeping young
woman, and Robert Rutherford realized that he
could not possibly aid the girl and might even make
her predicament worse if he dared to say a word.
He noticed that the driver he had stopped from
heating the girl the day before wasthe man in charge
of the flioggine This man flashed an impudent,
triumphant leer at him.
He turned Iis horse and rode back, revolted, to
his statil-n As he moved away he shuddered, for a
long. terrible i ry broke from the girl's lips and
:ontinuri:d until her flogging ceased, though only
eight la-hes were administered to her. She was
floigr-d, to her knee,
A wave of disguer swept through him. He was
not squeamish. he lived in an age when labourers
aere treated harshly and callously; in England the
men who worked in farm and field had a hard time
of it. long hours, heavy labour, wretched remunera-
tion. so that their position was sometimes contrasted
with that of the West Indian slaves, to the ad.
vantage of the latter. And soldiers and sailors were
unmercifully whipped for trivial offences; the use
of the whip was believed to be indispensable if dis-
4ipline was to be maintained. But he himself had
never seen a human being flogged before, and a wo-
man at that; and tihe circumstance that another wo-
man. young, of cood breeding, and presumably of
ordinary humane feelings, should stand by and see
such punishment inflicted startled and shocked him.
lie knew that slavery was doomed. Emancipation
had already been decreed; in a few years there
would nt be a single slave in these islands, and
the bondsmen. aware of it, were now muttering*
uoinoiuly and show ing every inclination to disobey
their masters and rise in their own behalf. He had
notis.ed stiniething 'if this spirit in the nearby town
of Montego Bay. lie had heard about it from the
rector; but here on this estate of Rosehall the evil,
retk(.AIs spirit if former days seemed to manifest
itsel f: the dancer that threatened was ignored; here
hie was back in the eighteenth century instead of
being in the early nineteenth. And a woman was
the mistress of this estate.
He had not se-n the face of the mistress of
Roselall. only her figure. He had heard that
she had looks to boast of, was beautiful; but he
thought that her countenance must be hard, lined.
cruel, that it must reflect a soul that delighted in
suffering. Only a devil would willingly watch the
amony of others ais she had done, was the tlhoueht
that ran in his mind
The punishment over, the group, broke up,
Mrs Palmer. accompanied by the ov'ersi-er and her
neern attendant. riding off to some other part of the
estate. She was evidently making an insp.ipttion
Burbrid-e went into the boiling house- RiH.ert
agail gave his attention to the task immediately
before him. iHe penteived that the slaves around
went ahliit their work with a sullen. mordiant air.
now and then -exiliringin. a renmarl: with onll an-
other in an undertone. he had a feeling that they
were dangerous, deadly, though held in stri t sub-
jection He believed he understood now what was
me-ant hb a smouldering human volcano.


CHAPTER FOL'R

TWO WOMlEN

AN b:oilr passed. and then he saw the mistress
,of the plantation returning. The sun was
cruel now in the open, unsheltered landscape, al-
th-niih this wa the cooler time of the year; but
Mrs. Palmer did not seem to mind it. She rode
easily. with Ashman at her side. She was coming
in Robert's direction. but he kept his eyes fixed on
the slaves who. aware of who was approa. thing. re-
d Aihldl their efforts and began beapinz can- into


the waggons standing by the path. Not so had they
toiled all that forenoon. The man on horseback,
big and strong though he was, had for them nothing
of the terror which the slim woman who was near-
ing them so evidently exercised.
"Is this the new book-keeper?"
The question was asked in a clear, musical,
carrying voice, a voice which, though not lifted,
could yet be heard some distance away, a voice of
rich quality and of decisive, vibrant, exquisite
tones. Robert lifted his head and stared in its di-
rection.
It was as though an electric shock had passed
through him. He found himself gazing into a pair
of eyes which he thought the most wonderful he
had ever seen. They were black and of a peculiar,
penetrating brightness; they looked through you:
gazing intently into them you became conscious
of nothing else; they absorbed you. The brow above
them, though partly hidden by the riding beaver,
was broad and smooth, and smooth, glossy black
hair covered the ears. The nose was slightly aqui-
line, suggesting strength of character, a disposition
and a will and an ability to command; the mouth
was small and full, the upper lip too full, the lower
one a little blunt and hard. A fascinating mouth
nevertheless, made for the luring of men; and under
it was a rounded chin, well marked, definite, strong.
Her complexion was brilliant, her colouring
indeed was part of the attractions of Annie Palmer
and had not been affected by her rides in the
sun of the West Indian tropics, probably because
her horseback excursions were seldom taken in the
bright sunlight. She sat upright on her horse; sit-
ting thus, she appeared to be a mere girl, though
her age was in reality thirty-one.
"Yes, he came in yesterday," Robert heard the
overseer say in answer to her question.
He was conscious that Annie Palmer was scrut-
inising him closely, studying him feature by feature
as it were, sizing him up, calculating about him.
She did so quite openly, in no way hesitating or
abashed. She must have seen the impression her
beauty made upon him, for she smiled a little smile
of satisfaction and triumph, forgetting the book-
keeper and thinking only of the man. Ashman
noticed this by-play, and a dark expression gather-
ed on his brow. Ashman to-day was cleanly shaved,
and anyone could see, in spite of his coarse mouth
and insolent eyes, that he too was a handsome man.
He was well-built, muscular, a masterful man and
a quickly angry one. Anger showed now in his
glance, in fists clenched upon reins and whip. But
Robert did not notice it. Mrs. Palmer did.
"Mr. Ashman," she remarked casually, "I will
ride back to the house alone; you need not wait for
me."
"But you will go over to Palmyra this afternoon,
won't you? There are some matters I should like
you to see for yourself."
"I am not sure I shall go to-day."
"But you said you would, Mrs. Palmer. We
arranged it on Saturday."
"And now I say I won't"-a note of imperiousness
crept into her voice-"and that settles it. You can
go over to Palmyra yourself after you have finished
what you have to do here to-day. I will go another
day. I'll not keep you now any longer." She moved
her horse slightly, so as to put the overseer behind
her.
He said nothing more, but stared one long mo-
ment at Robert. Not liking the man, and noticing
the look, Robert returned the stare, and fancied that
there was not only hate in it but also fear, distinctly
fear. Yet why should an overseer be afraid of a
mere book-keeper? That would be to reverse com-
pletely the established order of things.
Mr. Ashman touched his hat and rode off. Mrs.
Palmer's face broke into a brilliant smile as, to the
surprise of Robert, she put out her hand to shake
his. "Welcome to Rosehall," she said gaily, "though
I wish you had come at some other time when I
was not obliged to superintend the punishment of
rebellious slaves."
"Thanks," he replied: but, bewildered though
he was, and fascinated, he could not help adding:
"how rebellious?"
"That is a long story, and I could not tell it to
you here. You don't know the difficulties we are
having now with our people. Unless we inspire them
with a proper dread they may rise at any moment
and cut our throats. You look incredulous! Wait
until you have been here a month. I suppose you
think me cruel?"
"It is not for me, your employee, to think you
cruel or to think anything disrespectful about you,"
said Robert humbly. "That would be impertinence."
"Not in you!"
Again he was surprised. They had just met,
and, as mistress and book-kpeper, their positions
were such poles apart that it was very condescend-
ing for her even to take ordinary notice of him The
usual course would have been for her to fline him
orders, if she had any to give. through the medium
of the overseer. Yet here was she talking to him
on friendly, on familiar terms. as an equal, as though
they had known each other for some time and were
on much the same so ial footing. And she was smiling
(Co':.it -ard i on Pag 2?.1


PLANTERS' PUNCH






PLANTERS' PUNCH


1929


75he Dream and the JBusiness


THE ANCIENT Mexicans had -a
one of their puoerfil dr;iies a
Water God. To this god human sar ri-
fices were offered, and the ground
about its altar was frequently ilremn h
ed with blotid Iso that the l ad nltihi bh-
propitiated anti tile earth i be idrenhced
with rain. The pierce droughts from
which parts of Mexhio perit.dically utif
feared had made water an elemrnnti ever
in tlir ithughts andi *inIielou-ness 0 o
a people depending upon agrit.ulture,
ani who fromn experil-n e knew lhut _
terrible privatiou- anil nunilierle-
deaths occurredij h len tle hea-n- a
above nerie brave. the river beds but '
long and tortuous lintl, orf diry sand
and boulders. and the turri',tndlig l
vegetati, n parched andi iIthii-,r, d :in I
dead.
Every tropical a iilnltural .-coun -
try has had occasion tip realize ,hlat
lack oft water mean,. and '.\en in ial
island like Jamaica. lhooe ol 1tnal
name is "The Land of Springs". there
haie been periods of severe dlre a'-.il j h
er There are distrii .-h hirh lihve
had to be neglected. ,-i but p;rtiit i.ul I
tivated. because the rainfall there is
un certain Dry ar-ai- in a land .'
springs: soil of rivli natural fi-rtilit,
developed in part hit- uill ir'caIe01 at f
insufficient moisture! Thar is av.jte.
a traged.r : but i.he tragE-'d:, is teadily .
being tranf-ormni) d int u a ay erv nie dy
of living green fieldis mind pri.r'i.hntivte .
farmsn. for since the uater niay not al.
ways come ifrom ahiboe efforts arn' ibe.
ing made to bring it up t'rom Ihelow.
the springs are unit all on tile -.lurfaie.
it is now known., nthe riv..r, are noiit
all visible to the I'ea u.al e)\s- W it-lc
flows below the .1 i oft Janiiaid The
dream has been to tiliet it fir the-
purpose of creating wealth, the bhsi
ness is to make [his dream a l.. ratir \
reality
Thus we have the dream and the
,business.

THIS dream wa- fir-r dlleailnt bi
Mr. A. W. Farjiihaison. asso-tiat.
ed with whom. amine. others were Mr.
E A. dePass ;of London, iandI Mr tI. E
deMercado. The hug- ilistrii.t :.f Veie. MR
containing perhaps the richest soil in
Jamaica. soil not surpassed by any to be found in
Cuba or in Haiti. lay arid under the sun. It was al-
mo.ist an abandoned waste it was c.alculated that ihe
lbest land in Vere wasu n.t then woltlh more than abo-ut
4 per acre. Some tobarto mieht be grown. a little .-u.
gar. and in the pa-tur-s sheep and po.uulrry might ibe
rearea. But it was all done at s-nnm risk. the rains
might fail for two it three years and might nverl beh
sufficient for even these minor and limited piirpos.es
So Vere. after heart-breaking efforts had bieeu made
there in the earlier days of the English settlement.
and fortunes had been lost, came to be abandoned.
and then it was that the dream of supplying the
plains with water I.rought up frnim b-laow and
also from unfailing ivers many miles away wasi
dreamt The first reservoir was built at Raymond
and was known as the Raymond Reservoir This


1. CECIL LINDO. JAMAICA'S CHIEF CAPTAIN OF INDUSrB

failed Wells, wetre al-o i~nk Later on the irriga-
tion of the plains by means of water brought from
the Milk River was decided on. thle puniping of the
und.ler's:und supplies having proved unsatisfaitory
and ,tey expensive Thus came the eugar estates
fi \'ere into eXistencL And after tile Eroup of Far-
ituharsun. dePass and deMlerado hadl been at work
there ai pionee rs. losing money ott-n, improving the
irrigatioiu ork-.. fighting against adverse natural
indlitions, blt never ceasing to stru gSle. there tame
.. V'erc some fifteen years, ago Mr. Cecil Lindo andi
his band of brothers. and they I with twc. or three
-ingle owners divided \'ere with the group who
had at first started the work of development on a
>onsiderable scale Then in 1927 new developments
took place. It was announced that Mr Cecil Lindo
had purchased the Vere Estates Company and the


Aniity Hall CimpanI for a quarter
million -r-rlina Burt nomlethin;4 .lse
had al.. take-n plare. In -.pite ori .he
irrigation aiork- Vat er ;,till was ,,are
in teretot tile pr!pertsi.- puri ha .eil.
n~,w water begun r[, rne plentiful. How
thi iiha happen-i \-. ill bh rtliI a little
later ln If Mr -Cecil Lindu WVel'r he
i.vtjurite of stome ljnlia wate goud
h-:. ildid not htae been better treated
tlian he l ihas ieen ilulrine i ie last cou
pit pl *' .\ -rs in .i tar i-, -iapplies of
ater aire i n. .ine- i. FoIrun.- has in
-tlii re ec(.t Lf.it) Fred hiin inll ls-nsely.
SF 'otun, ha- the liabit if f'aivuriing
men. n n, .-,e .lraie anlnunt. to auda
.at.an ad It h t,' b titlus- i their courage
and nrw e pri.-e. and itL thev :ie .till
'tulrti; en utlith to .*arr. >n lthe ,tiigi glr
Sper-,,nally. .I tlLire tLit means of
"laun-i hinz ,ur bollly uil-n larLe linan-


1 OT I I. A. t i.. Mr. (',.1i LLnd. pur-
,.Ita.i-d- Clierty -anidens estate in
thile pari-l1 .it S. S 'arlierint, it had
been a cattle pr.1perty nmainl), with
somIe citrus fruit; it had e\x ell.:nt pas
turage: the -oil ias of gl ud Uia;ir ;
Sbut the old story f il ins ficiientl -r un-
dependable rainfall explained its gen-
erally uneconomical condition. Mr.
Cecil Lindo calculated that he- would
obtain from the St. ('atherin,' Irriga-
tion Works about 2110 ti iihii yards of
water per hour for Cherry t.ardeus,
S and to this lie would add F50 cubiic
yards for' which lie .wa, already pay-
ing, and which could be diverted from
Iis oilther properties in Sr Cathlirine.
But [he was told, casually as it were,
that in a little cavern on the estate
there was water. People hail -een it:
it was about ten feet helow the surface
of the ground: it had never been util-
ised, for there seemed no means of
utilising it: but it was quite good
water though probably stagnant The
talk of water toiu r Cecil Lintlo. since
he has become interested in Jamaica
aei i..l ltural development. is .i tne
soidnl of tilted trumpet to the old war
horse He litter up hiis head. lie npen-
eth hIi nostrils, he trieth "*Aha'" Hav-
ing heard (f this little pool or what.
ever it was in the cavern on the prop-
city. Mir Lindo had a ladder made to thrust
tiro the hole. and down this ladder lie climbed
lintil in the darkness he saw the gleam he had been
told that he wutild see As his eyes became ac-
cut-tomed to the gloom he perceived something else.
It was an eel. and he argued that eels do not live
in stagnant water. This must be a running btream.
an underground stream. and here it must have run
for years and perhaps for centuries But how much
water per hour fIlowed through this cavern. and
mi iht it not give out at any time? Experiment was
needed. very delicate experiment. fiir anything like
blasting away the rocks might divert the stream
to) some lower depth. He had a dynamo placed in-
side the cavern. the power for whin.h would be sup-
plied hb au engine situated ton the surface some
yards away from the cavern's mouth Pipes were


WATER GUSHING FROM ONE OF THE OLD RESTORED WELLS. WITH MR.
CECIL LINDO WATCHING IT


& MODERN LIGHT AQUEDUCT ON THE LINDO ESTATES. THE WATER I
PUMPED FROM A WEI.L


i








P LA N T E R S'


carefully laid into the cavein and carefully the
pumping began The natet rose and flowed into
the open. a gush of liquid silver. Hour after bour
it poured forth, and then day after day. The work
continued. Four hundred cubic yards per hour was
the supply. and more wa-s possible. The quantity did
not diminish, andu after six months of 192S. a time
which ir- recorded as one of the driest spells in Ja-
maica especially in that part of Jamaica in hi,-h
Cherry Gaidens is situated) this underground stream
continued to yield four hundred cubic yards of water
ier hour, anti all that it has been necessary to do
has been to con.struct a hannels to utilise it for the
irrigation of the fields below.
Here was good fortune placing itself at the dis-
osal of the individual But the individual to per-
deive it. to know whar could he done with it. wias
as neci-ssar. as the aaier itself. It flows by gravita-
tion. Two hundred acres on this _-ide of Cherry
Gardens ate tii,w irritated by it. and excellent c itie
is growing there Bitt beyond thehe t-wo hundred
acres the land ri-es and it would be expensive to
lift the water on to thi is nd. Across the main road.
however. lie the othel part otf Cherry Gardens,
hitherto detailed to pasture- A channel i-ut to the
edge of the road. a tunnel constructed under the
road and I-ading into) tle pasture land oppoitte.
could lead rh- water to that land The (hannell iha
been dug. the tunnel made. and on the other .ide if
Cherry Garden-i cane will shttrtl flour-th whe!e
on0l gras lfrev-.w betute And sinse one sitreani i
known to flw Lheaiath itLe s- rfate of Chei ry. Gatl-
dens, .,tier -trearns may ile there ai-.. Water
may blie eci. mni, ally available by punlping. That
test will lie mnadle. anornhil bi property may be de-
veloped in sigAr by this pumping of water. The
sight of that el. which indicated running water.
was an omen ro the rumind of the- man wivho firi't isaw
it.

WYELLS Ihadl ben --unk on Amity Hall and Miti e-.
SInrl.s iv catid. rnenty. year- a.i The mien r.ho
sank theti then believed lthiee iwa- water bljene:atth
the .oill andl ibh.- weie licht The-e wells w-re
splendidly tonstru. t i-i. they ate there ti.-lay in
excellent condition. But five-and-twvent. y.ars. 01
even fifteen or ren years ago. pijnipine was vrely
expensive tipeiation. It had it)o be i done v. itii coal.
the cual had tli be brought from En-iand or Amernit:a
to the very spot. and the apparatu- was- nb.t fully
perfected. Sometimes the flow uf water was gotod.
sometimes it would -Lelse: and by -onie pe-rsins it
was thought that the undeigroiund stieamn-, applyingg
the three great wells and more were but one ritier,
and that when one w-ell ias Fyielling to capacity the
others would gie hFut poor return-i The fault how-.
ever was not in tlh,- -upply i.f water under--griound


but in the as yet inefficient means of raising the
water. In tbese circumstances the owners of the
estates could not depend upon the wells. They de-
cided to pump water from the Milk River. as has
been said above, and they constructed the Raymond
reservoir But Jamaica is a country bhiefly of lime-
stone formation and the water disappeared. No-
thing daunted, in spite of this disappointment they
treated the Vere Irrigation Works known as the
Cockpit Sbhmenit. with a capacity of five thousand
cubic ards of water per hour. and the channels
were made so that the flow tould be increased, with
additional pumping apparatus, to ten thousand public
yards This saved Vere. It was very expensive.
some dependence upon rainfall there had to be. but
in dry periods the canes could he watered and kept
alive by irrigation, and when the lains fell the
supply if m,-ist uie would lI-ad to the obtaining of
bumper ciitip-. The idea was that s.ime iday ten
thousand iibhi yards of water p-er tour would be
thrown upon the fields. but much capital would be
required for the extension of the water work- andt
.if c:ultivation. The old companies. the V'ere E-tates
and Amity Hall. could not -upply this capital. and
then it wa lhat Mr. Crcil Lindo came upon tit-
sce-ne a ith his ..-fi'r to purchase the estates

H E ptite[vead thile possibilities lie knew that the
dream was soulndl. He took over the prpei tie-:
in July 3if 1927. Hi- was aware that water ptumipino
had noiw iiee-n carried to 4ui h a rutr.h ft develop
nment that thenl- nre encini--. reIit-e eneine- '
they weit called, which could be worked with atLy
sort of fuel-that on Cherry CGaiden?. for instant.e.
is being np-iated with wiJ...d -'_i wn within a few
,3ards oI the itenginte lture, and wood. trash andi
other i ornibti-tble mat-l ial we-re at hand on th i
fields .:.f V'ere. Cu-tine nothing' but It little labour to
collect and prepare for utilization, this fuel it- dirt
i[heap, antid the engine' i uf to-day are middle prl'-ist i
for this .-rt of stuff So IMr Lindo had thII. old
wiilr ovelihauledil and tested. and be piJt th- puminps
it woiik. and when in June of t192S. after -ix inouths
of dioulgbr in Vtere. thlie pireent wiliter -toioi be.-id
one of the-.-- ..ld ivell-. he -aw the v.a-ter g sli-
ini out into ctonreted channels. and opposit e lit aw
the i-hlds tf young bananas alii h. planted oiut bilt
tuI 0:l thuicc months before, were at the moment
hi-althy. viioruus. promising. a fortune cri.attId by
the Expenditure of a comparatively small amount
of capital on mita hineiy. ploughing and planting.
For this particular .stretch of land. and the ad
joining areas that yet have to be dealt with. had
not bet-n cultivated for a hundred year-- Perhaps.
they had never been cultivated since Jamaica wa
a icoverI.d Thus thi- soil is wonderful and the Ie.
turns will Ibe immense. It was a mistake, however.


to b-liive. as was believed, that when Mr. Lindo
puir based the Vere and Amity Hall estates he was
about to grow less sugar than ha'd hitherto been
produced upon these properties. His plan was and is
to produce both sugar and banana-.I but he is pri-
marily a sugar man. and his output of sugar for
1927-2S was. something over 21.1.1i.1u ions On his pro-
perties in Vere alone, at the close tf hits last financial
.ear. 11.2m,) tons of sugar were pioduli-d and ex-
ported, andl lii4.-tii gallons of Iunm This was not
the estimate, estimates are always made on a c-on-
se-rvaiive hbaia- Thus the estimated crop for 192S-29
are liU.tni tons o'f sugar, l ,.ioiim gallons of rum and
3.i.ioi.ii.n stems rf bananas. hbut it i-s ionideletly ex-
pe' tld that the a,:tual production will be much more.
Lasr .3ear'S output ot uear anti runm was the
larFt-st ever kIoi n in ithe history .f Vere Next
3ear' tyia.v lie larger -oiill There i- plenty. i island
for boih suipar and hanani s. the fruit produced here,
rn extraordinary -oil. and "ell irrigated, will be of
a quality whi.t i will uommjaii lilt price-. and the
eloninE itf both bananas and : aines will enable the
oianer to undertake inll tlie future ,t rotation of
Sr.ips wiii h is one iof the be-;t known ni.au-, of rest-
tipg and revivifyine the ground And all the while
c-lo-s attenti, i- I, piid to the water questilii. The
pump. t .r n all the estates wned by Mr I-indo in
V,-I,_ i lotli tllo-i whit h h, i ha,.l efir a nild those
wii. h i h [1, has ii.uireid re-:t-nrl] i yield about 5.000
*.ul.. yards of water pr1 h.pur. the otlicr necessary
.:'.in I i.Ibie var.ld- being .lbaineda ii rni the C'.ckpit
Irri-ati,.n S lit nl-. Duplhiat-. m:i hinery for the
C.,.Kkpit W..rks Lha i.een ald-ireld. Thi-, A ill enable
.uiipili,- r i-o o tinnu- ilthrioit an intiner i.-ssion for
-.even i ,.t- a '.e,: iwha-n ...ne set. *.: nia.hinery is
Lilting 'iei haul-d the oithier set will otuni immediately
ii... 1i1e. thbl-re will hei. ...e atiun ol the flow from
the C.-, kpil for an hour wlien- thlit duplicate ma-
,.hinii-i e y i -i t- t-
Adld iti'nal -ell- are ltltimipliall These will
lit- -untk at onnveni-ri t loialittie. meanwlnile Io.000
-uii.. yal lt of iater p,-r houi are now li itn thrown
...nit the f imn. rendering thin alm,-t r-tiretly in-
litpendent of raii, and dnbliijn, the am.,-tint io water
tli-]y pleav.ittl' y r->.Pic-d

MILES ..,t li-hlit railway iiltirt t lt [lte banana farms
atid silIar fa t..rlies' with tll- pirt of Sa r River
whi li i- nuow bteiitt equipped as :t first.,-I l s-hipping
IuLt i..f it- kind Tl. s-iiar of ( Vere is shipped from
C'arlisle- Bay. The bananas of Vere will be trans-
pia-tid by a fl-tl ..f liphter-is drav.'n by power lugs
fi :m Salt River prut to -teanmers v.hicth will tall at
ilh- mniuth io the Salt River. theite being .taf'e an-
rhoiage, at that p..int The ietihir- % were being
Ie:n-slituited in June last. aid bIy the time this article
appealrr will all have been rompiete-l. Th. buildings


BRIDGE SPANING THE RIO MINHO WHICH FLOV-< THHROUCil THE I. INDO PROPEHTIE-' IN VERE. THEIE I RGE.T PRIVATE BRIDGE IN JA.MAICA. THIS
IRIDGl.E E0T C.alu.in AN WIAS CON-THKIl 1 ED HI ME-S9R. HlF.NIQtE-t BROTHER<


1929


P UN CH






PLANTERS' PUNCH 1929


in Salt River will be made of greater capacity than
hitherto, work during the busiest part of the banana
season will proceed at this port night and day. and
Vere will become not only an important sugar centre
but a place where a large quantity of some of the
finest bananas procurable anywhere is grown.
The development of the cane in Vere is being
pressed on with untiring attention and energy. The
fields, according t0. quality and moisture, yield from
25 to 50 tons per aore. As 21 tuns per acre is con-
sidered a good 3icli in Jamaica. these figure, show
what Vere soil, if irrigated, is worth But it is not
mere chance, it is not the L..il onl.v. it is the
irrigation system along with the soil. that has
brought about this heavy oItpurIt per acre There
was, also a good di-:,l fI experimentation hy [hia
old companies. Seedling plot-, were laid out. and
the results carefully watiheil and recorded. There
is a cane in Vere today, a cane called AWl. wiiclit
is yielding from 5. to 7;i tons pier acre. Janaicans
know whom the initials "A. \\" stand for: this
ranei is the Arthur Wildmnan FJrquharson cane and
it may yet supersede the other varieties planted out
in V~'re. It may y.-t supersede the other varietlie
planted out in m,.st or all the ugar di-,tricts .ti
Jamaica. Here agaip the alreanm was o' a cane w hii h
should give splendid iesults in iluautit. and quality,
and the dream bids air t)o come true. Bie capital
is endeavouring to makli it a r,.ality. On'e lorle we
see the relation of the dream to the business.

BEHIND all great lIsiuernes.,- there must have been
a dream. In the beginning was the id.J a The
originators of the m-nterpris, in V'ere had a drt.irnl.
the idea, and Mr (Ct- il Lindo i als-i a man of ideas:
without them he had never suiccieded.
When a mania .e,** possibilities in any moaintry.
in any venture, what i, it but that he ha, a certain
vision of future developments' The details cannot
be in his mind all at once. He may see ionly the
first two or three steps nimediately before l him
But he perceives the poss-ibilities. those exist as an
idea in his mind: he hai. as it were, a idr-am of
them. The retaliation of hi, idea may lie ilin'trent
from what he originally thought it would he. may
be larger or maiy piclaeed on ,omUewha oirher lines
than those he had first ronceiced But behind all
these mutations. this unforeseen development. lies
the idea. So that when one speaks of Mr Cecil
Lindo as a practical man. one has always tn re-
lmember he is a man of vilio)n also. He appreciated
what was in the minds of those who first w.-nt to
Vere when it was an arid wa.te: lie knew that their
vision was true. Had it not h.-en. there would have
been no foundation for himt to build upon, and he
has known what it S lIt lay his own foundations him-
self and to build on them. He too has done pionl:er
work
Whether he himself begin- upon wholly new
ground or takes v,> -r work for completion he throws
himself into what lies. before him with an tn ergy
which many a youlrngr man micht envy. and with
a courage not to I:. sulrpaise;d in Janmaica A keen
intelligence, a arl'. li apa itry tar rser.-onal effort and
supervision, a fatr o itl. k, .alilit ) to handle men
these are ne(-essait i.- a i aprain of industry. But if
he lack courage lie iiiust r urvte under othirc- or re-
main in the third casl s-: utnly the man of daring
will rise to supreme c-ommalld. the man wlio Ipluicks
safety out of the very jaws ,of danger hecaau-e he i.an
confront danger and not tie afitaid Such a n.mai is
Mr. Cecil Lindo.
He is to-day Ilt.. largest individual Iviwner of
land in this country ; Iiethap-s he owns mlorle pro-
perty than any of the 'reat companies trading here
Some S4 square miles of Jamaila soil are regti.tered
in his name. He ha- tcosideraible interests in Cista
Rici He must fliiinene his bit_ ,-nterprises. must
watch over them-hlin has onimptent and able aF.
distancee of cour.--nlln must face reverses as well
as expect success He doe, it all irth an equajnimity
and cheerfulness which indicari. j firm will and a
courage indomitable What man app-ar as ;riat
risk to others may inot tseem to him to be uchl ,at all


THE ENGINE TH.A PI'3MPi TIHE HIO MINHO ')WATER INTII THE C.iNAI. % .TFM OF VERE. A DUPLICATE
PLANT IS BEING ELECTED


A FIELD OF YOUNG lBAN1NANS ON A LINDO PROPERTY IN TERE


He is al i.,m!ied toa itkinlr ri-ks. uanl wh-hn hb has
struck oat mnint bldly. then has hi- a.hi.-vemernt


I-i-n f mn .-ji i il i andl nm t a on-pih uous. C 'ai-aanly
iit ha.-S I :u i'. in J inait a


MONA GREAT HOUSE


This Hotel is situated 5! miles out
of Kingston on the Hone Road.
and within walking distance of
Hope Gardens.

The Scenery and Climate are unsurpassed

Most Delightful Walks in its own Gardens.

The Cuisine and General Appointments

are thoroughly first-class and will
appeal tc the most fastidious
tastes.


HOTEL.


THE OPEN DINING ROOM

s immrnnsely appreciated by visi-
tors. the large trees around it pro-
tecting it from the glare of the sun.

SWIMMING POOL
Hot and Cold Running Water.

liatel porter mrrts all Crains aninb tramnrra
WIRE OR *RiTE MANAGER-
M. B. AUSTIN.
Liguanea. St. Andrew.
Jamaica.


- --------------------------------------- ------------------------------------ -----------------------------------------..-...|I
-------- ------ 1;1---r


Ir----------------------------------------







PLANTERS' PUNCH


What Does the Future Hold


for You?



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.11/ claims are setlled locally by the .Agents.
LIVINGSTON & ALEXANDER,

20 Duke Street. Kingston, Jamaica.


THE DANCING GIRL OF OLD-AND OF
TO-DAY
IoCiontiai .-I -I',' Palli 1 !..
Companies came to Jamai' a and pgav pe-rormniah..
In such building' as wer-e suited to the purpose. there
was'much specula.iion a- tu whether It was quite
proper to witness uc-h pertorianiin.e,. Fior the girl.
sometimes danced in rieht.., and there was -omething
troubling. even if alluring. in such a sperita..le. The
tights won out. however. and in an incredibly .h-A .-
space of tinre we all wrie a.-sur'-d that these wi-i
artistic exhibitions and that. for thie -ake of art. one
Swas Justified in getting into tilht'. Almost \ve~iyt'in
became a devotee uf a.lt a, exprti.s-ed in tlstlt' ,an'j
.the dancing which tights facilitated. A -'eat tior ar.l
step had been taken in the al Itit.tii edluciattln o.f
Jamaica Came anotller develoipme-nt Px-opl: gi-ll,
from this country to Lonli.n. ParLis and New Yorik--
and all classes of Jamaijiianls are r-ir tl'rarVel~l'--
returned with wonderful storiesi otf mtnaai danI.er! .wi i-
Swore no tights at all. but who all.,iv:ad thitir linmi-.
to a quite appreciable extent, to appeal unclothed.
'The news was received with a gasp if a-it-litihment.
What a change had taken place in the worll! But
'the news was true. fori dill u'.,a thi- dancine in phoio-
plays show clearly that thh, lively aoutig ladiile tfl
the theatre had diisl.wpnsed i nth lights' Tli.- War
btad wrought re-at changes. This --urely was one i..f
them. It may have been flouaut to make the vworli
safe for democracy. It may halu, ibeenu fought to enld
all war. It certain. had failed. -a. far at onie ci.ull
see, to end all war. and the world e- _-tued less
safe for democracy than i hadl f.iamnirly ibe:n Cut
one thing at least hadl lbe,: at hi-veil ll se.\eral .oun-
tries it had made the trage -afe fur tht dtanier with-
Sout tights.
That fact being frnmil r-ra-pedi land it Lock
not much time to gra-p it ti.-re t\ei- 'llen a s,. ries
Sof highly sutcesrful entertainments on the sta.-e
of the Kingston Theatre. lv ladies' and Ce-itlennlai.,
Shifted amateurs, memberel of socii.y, anl thi ihadie-
V wore no tights!
Jamaica commented on this But J.nmaia hill
long since made up its mind alrout this. Art must
be allowed free expression. it iwas derided: tlihre
Swas nothing reprehensible in such direseing lor non.
dressingg) and in the dances performed. Nor Ywas
there, as a matter of fai.t. for it was all very nicelI
and beautifully done; thus what would have been
drownedd upon and shouted down in Jamaica fifty
Sears ago was praised and appreciated in the Ja-
maica of to-day. The Great War had not been cn-
.'ttrely useless after all.


CAME sw iftly another development. It ma,
seem -trange, bur it it1 perfectly true. that thec
working and lower middle cla-.es of Jalmaca, evtli
at their hall-. attire themc-slve in more lothin than
(lt the tashiiona.l.ie -i-i.iety people Semi-even\ ing
tire-- rather than full evening dlr.ss is a garh of
the girls Hardly tne of them will dare -o the
length of a ver. liow-Cut bodice: thete is 'il.me fe-lini
.: Ir-stiraint in their following ..if the modle. of thuoe
ih the upper s ,ial i.i'riles The -uge-titi i is i lial
,i.n.ity folk display a little tr:. mui.h ,.f their per
soin-the ladie ..'tf colu'i-. Dut I am sure that the
i..t11promili- efl F t-d i tilhe thers i tlhe I-ciult of
a lack iof coutrarce. Theliy iave never led in ftsbhiohi..
thl-y have alwa).\ foilt.wicd. tail they hale anot ven-
r el d tito follo r,..ii c closelyy Thus it is sate to l ay
that n. troup. ',f dau. lug : irl'- would river I ai
appeared oil a Jamalln.a lstae. as pri'ofe-'.ional. with.
-lit tights even in lthie-- diay-. iail not lady aiuateuis
--.- the example. But whi-n tile example e had been
s-t the thing itself rci lv -il. .-.. rto 'peak. the. im-
irini. ita r 1-f propri.-ty: an'i then i.anie into being
tme first Jamaia troupe oit proftesioaijl da.ilelis. the
Dutterfly Troupe, and Kineston twa-, i nraptlurI-d with
it. and when it appeared in public tht places where
it periorlniled wNee invariabhly crowded.
The Butterfly Troupe male it-s irst appearanm e
:at the Palc e Moving Picture Theatre in Kitneston.
For some lime it cave part .of the elitt-rraiinmenirt
a,2ven at thii and at sA.le othlier pitrlltie theatres The
2irls wiee tiained to their work. they were paid.
.and they endllav\ ured to emulate the pri.fet-sional
(iainiers of the music hall stage of other tounlries
With -tyiliih cap rli..,-.rirtitin blidi re. short kirts.
s.,lmetimes with til-hts. --.nmetimes without. they
danced andl sang and promnlis-ed a perinijnent feature
in the .Jaimai..a progratlnje of pleaiu.re. But your
danier- a~nd ac-ftrrese t eveil where are highly teui-
peramn ilt;al. they don'r often hold toeetllr: always.
,hliane'- aire taking place .iamone themli So it is tltat
tie Bilttrfly Traiipe has dis pp-eareil for l -one time.
but the idea itself is unt dtad. It will be revived:
.e sihall have' -tber troupes: the members will he
i1.tter and better trained: Jamaica will then have
her ..wn native proft'e.-ional ldaiier- and actors and
aclet'es.es, who will be -is different from the old "sets"
as the dawn ii from the sunset Yet those "sets"
were the forerunners of the troupes of today, just
as lie girls i.f a hunirtd )years aco were the pro-
penitors of the eirls of the present.
Amu-seent is now hecoming more organised
in Janmaica To provide pleasure for the thousands
is a business. Professional dancing as part of this
pleasure is being looked after: from the United


States there 'oitnme iancuer' peridi ally, and these
invariably enjoy a good rectpti.nu. But lwhen a ton-
pany of colouled pe iiorm'ners came 1. this island in
April. 192S. it was remarked that the girl inembers
of it w-re by no mo-un- as goud-loloking as tile girls
Shio hail danced profe.-sionally on the Jamaica
stag:-. and ni re u.:.t a bit mre skilfull. They were
not as attrativ-e. So Jamaina will prefer her own
eirl!, a d.ani !', r. anl thi' opens a new avenue to local
talent Ambiliijuus irls of ood figure and pleaiiing
au)untela.nicE. with pati-ince enOgieh to submit to the
l ioiurs of' allr .iate ttraininc, will tfllow thi- avenue
it a gratifying uc:(i. s. There is a real apprecia-
tion awaiting thtir r-eriformanices H G. D




CECIL B. FACE
P 0 BO 103 CABLE ECAF"
168 HARBOUR STREET.
KINGSTON JAMAICA. BW I.



Nlanu la ct urer's iepresen tati ive
a nd
Coi ni isission Agent


Agent in Jamaica for I lpiporiant
Houses in England, Canada,
U.S.A. and Ger nany.


Manufacturing & Exoorting
TEXTILES, HARD V'ARE,
DRUOS. CHEMICALS, PROVI-
SIONS, GROCERIES, IOTOR
CAR ACCESSORIES, ETC.


Communications always welcome.
Enquiries given prompt attention.


1

Kingston, Jamaica.




,,-- _...... -- .--... ..... ,_.


Are You Free from Anxiety?


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THE

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LIVINGSTON & ALEXANDER,


AGENTS


20 Duke Street,


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i' ""' "' "' """""'i""I!"' """""' """"" ~""'"" "' "" "' ~"" "


1929


=."r ........ T ... ..... ......... ur. .......... ......................... :.~







PLANTERS'


The Witch of Rosehall

(Continued from Page 17)
that dazzling smile of hers-what beautiful teeth
she had!-and looking at him with a soft alluring
look. He had expected in his youthful ardour to
neld strange adventures in Jamaica; but of a surety
]be- had expected nothing whatever like this.
"What is your first name?" she asked, seeing
that he made no comment on her last remark.
"Robert. My full name is Robert Waddington
Rutherford."
"A. rather aristocratic appellation: I shall call
you Robert. My name is Annie."
"I know, Mrs. Palmer."
"My name is Annie," she repeated, with playful
insistence. "It isn't a pretty name, is it?"
Robert Rutherford was not only young but a
gallant gentlenlan He forgot all about his book-
keepership; it was the gallant and the fascinat-
ed youth who answered: "Not by any means as
pretty as its bearer." He added, as she laughed de-
lightedly: "But what name could be?"
"Good, good!" she cried. "I can see we are going.
to be excellent friends. But you are a flatterer, you
know.",
"Rather one who perhaps speaks the truth too
boldly, but only the truth."
"Better and better! But you puzzle me, Robert
How is it that you came out here to be a nigger
sl:'ie driver? You don't look the part." She eyed
him swiftly up and down, noted that his appearance
was rather that of a proprietor than of an under-
ling.
"I came out here to learn the planting business,"
he replied immediately. He forgot entirely that his
,atr',iot- W a not to be advertised abroad, lest it
li,.uil Inllit fere with his gaining of elementary
knowledge and experience. "But the sun; surely
you feel it, Mrs.- "
"Annie," she interrupted. "Yes, I feel it. hlut I
can stand it. Better than you, who are rnot used to
it." Her voice fell a tone or two: "I thought. when
I saw you a little while ago, that a man of your
appearance was hardly cut out to bh a holk-ikeeper:
you are very leiand-'lme. Robert."
A.linbetd at this open compliment. RehiLt clani.edI
lolnd to see if it could possible have been over-
hIlar'd; -.nie of the slaves were quite near. She
no)hii el his movement.
"They don't matter," she said indifferently. "we
are practically alone here. "They don't count; they
have no feelings."
There was supreme if unconscious contempt in
her voice, in her look. The people about might have
been stocks and stones so far as they, affected her.
"It is very dull here," she went on. "I am glad
you came. How does Ashman treat you?"
"He hasn't had time to treat me well or ill as
yer. I have hardly had anything to do with
him."
"He will treat you properly; he must. You
needn't be afraid of him."
"Him?" queried Robert. "I never had the slight-
ti intention of fearing him. Why should I?"
:"Others have feared him," said Annii Palmer
with a slight smile; "he is a pa'-innate man with
a -trnie will."
"But what has that got to do with me, Mrs.
Palmer?"
N.-thinc--mahbe. And yet it may have. But
don't worry about him; you won't really be under
him. I reside on this estate and at Palmyra-that
is the estate behind this one-over the hills: she
pointed southwards. I understand all about this
planting business. You say you want to learn it?
Well, you had better learn it directly under me, and
then you 'will have very little to do with Ashman.
What do you say to me for your 'busha'?"
"It would be impossible for me to have a more
charming one," he cried, falling in with her mood,
intoxicated with her beauty and her evident liking
for him, flinging to the winds every shred of
prudence that tmi-cht have suggested a circumspect
attitude in such strange and original circumstances.
The West Indian ethos was already afrte-tin- him.
He felt at once inclined to live gaily, i iotii.iy, dan-
-- c..i-ly to-day and let the morrow take care of itself.
"Or a more comipe-tent one," she added, with
peculiar intonation and laugh. "LordI how b.r-ei
have I been for a long time. Not a soul worthwhile
to talk to for weeks and months A dit:ai. drab
existence-dull as hell! Don't be -ho..klid: I -pi. .
literally, not blaplen..uiily. Hell must be a place
of utter boredom, which is the worst torture a soul
can have. Torment from flogging or burning could
not be so dreadful. To be bored day after day, no
change, no respite, only the perpetual lepe-iti.,n of
the same thing Until even madness would be wel-
come: that is the worst misery that a man or a
woman could have. And I have had something of
that nlei-ry for some time here. Only last night I
felt that it would be a positive relief to me to see
the Ro.ehall Great House in flames. I actually felt
that!"
"A dangerous feeling, Mrs.-- Annie. Don't yo-t
known that Nero burnt Rome down because he wished


to see what a great conflagration was like? Perhaps
Nero was bored, too."
"Very likely. But of course I couldn't burn
my house; I haven't many palaces as NeIo had.
And then I think my:boredom is over now I came
out here this morningto see some malcontert larve.
punished and I found--you."
"If I can amuse you, I am sure I shall be glad "
"Your tri'nendihip can make life very different fto
me," she answered softly. "You will i:ome up to the
Great House to dinner to-night?"
"I promised Burbridge that we should dine to-
gether to-night," he hesitated.
"He won't hold you to that prorriee. I am sur_."
she said dryly. "I suppose he has been talking tr:
you a lot about me? Old hands always- talk about
the proprietors to new-comers, you know," -h, t-nt(-
on, as if in explanation of her questi,.,n
"No; he has said nothing."
She was piercing him with her eye; a- lh.
answered; she seemed convinced that he "as peak-
ing the truth.
"At half past seven this evening. then. --h.
said; "till then, good-bye."
With eyes aglow with admiration. -Win. h had
grown and deepened as tlhy had ajuier-.,l. and
which she had seen with intensifying pratnfiai.tin.
he watched her go. He saw her hair at th.e Iblilin
house and send a message to someone in it. Pre-
sently Burbridge came out, hat in hand. and -i .-
talked to him for a while. Then she turned, gaily
waved her whip in Robert's direction, and ,aur-ered.
off towards the Great House. Burbridlee naitel tin-
til she reached it, then slowly iamne .ver rn
Robert. His manner was diffident. troubled. He
spoke with constraint.
"Mrs. Palmer says she has asked :,..u up to
diinnel: you can knock off at five ,'el.,ik if I:.u
wish, Mr. Rutherford."'
"Mr. Rutnerll:lrd! Burbridge, what the devil is
the matter with .y..ii'" asked the young minan
"I meant nothing, Ruthert'.:frd: I -ish y,-u iu.k"
"Go e.'n--.1u have F:nmething else to -ay "
"No-o. I don't think so. I';l 6e. y.it tI,;
afternoon at our di(ini- -
"Now what's the matter wi;h Birl..tid rI ."'
thought Robert, who had not observed the s-iar. 1hiug
glance with which the other man had sl:.aned hi1
ra. BurIlidg,- hhad seen in the txaltati.rn in
R,.hl' i' countenance, had heard in the new ielbra-
tion of his voice, all that he wished to. know "He'a
fallen in love with her at eight.' thoutiht Bur-
bridge. "Well, he is not singular; but I like himl
Let's hope for the best."
And Robert: everything had changed t'fi:r him in
the last half hour. She liked him; every .word -he
had said, every look -he had given him. was eloquent
of that. Why, they had almost lieen making Irve-
to one another nii the 'ighti .f all men. in the nmidst
of open fields, and she had spoken of Ashman as i..ne
who might be dangerous. Did Ashma.n love her?
That was very likel. rery likely too that Buri-ridge
'did. Any man would; she was so extraordinarily
lovely, so fascinating. Not an hour ag,. he had
been regretting that he had come to RoF1-hall. now
there was no place that he would excilange ft.r it.
What eyes she had, what wonderful eyes! Andl
what lips. And she was lonely here and bored: and
he was lonely too, and would be borel hut for her.


1929


He was only a b>,.'k-ketper? Tut, that was nonsense:
lie iwa; a We-it Indian proprietor like herself, or-
"01oud he -soime day. meanwhile his worldly fortunes.
werei- ftuite re pectable. He could meet her as an
-ejual. bhe had understooel that from the first. She
haI known him for what lie was. Burbridge wished'
Itinim luck: wf-ll. he t 1i, very lucky. He could not
ha\e imagined, much less expected, this amazing
Cliod fortune, this swift transformation of his whole
ittilook
He noticed just then that some "onmen in the-
canepiece had almost entirely ceased work and were
-tarinr at him ith what lie regarded as a (urious,
imp.-rtinent air. He turned to them sternly and
..rd-red them to re-ueni their task. One laughed a.
little but they all became busy; yet he could see that
they threw glances at him as they toiled, and talked'
amningst bhem-.tlves. about him obviously. He was.
still onung enough to blush at this, for he felt that
it might be about the mistress and himself that
all thle slaves on the estate would soon be talking.
S.mnie ,:f them had heard what bad been said. Did!
they fully understand? Annie said that they had
ii t'.eiiing'. sp.-ke of them as if they did not matter..
Ani indeed they did not matter; what they might
thlilnk i hild ha fe not the slightest sort oft -igni;iance.
T.o:.nLht he would be with her, see her face again,
hia! her tMondertiul vice. He had never seen eyes.
like h-ers hltfis'e. e.% ; that s-eemed to draw and per-r
uidi- aid -ubdoie it. u. eye' that (omnimanded. eyes.
that Ir..iked into yiou very soul.
The Inne mouint'ul howl of a concheliell sounded
jurt then and thie slaves threw down their imple-
iieuts ofi hlabour and hastened to their mid-day meal.
Many of them. squatting on the ground, drew out ofr
bundles they had with them cold plantains and
roastedl yam'. with a flavouring of salt herring, and
I)-ean to nmun h thcre edibles with hearty aippetite.
Seme hastily built a fire to the leeward of th.? cane-
piecer- and proceeded to cook some raw food. They
were now shattering freely The punishment which
'.'me of them had w itnes.ed in the forenoonll did not-
atnfe-t their appreciation of this moment. and Robert,
a.-- he rode on to his roiom, reflecled that they
c,:uldl not really he unhappy if they .rtuld take life.
like this. so bhrl-sttrously alnd with so much laughter.
They were not treated badiy: his judgment. hadI
bien far too hasty Annie had to be firm. but she[
was a- kind as she was beautiful. He had no doubt
.,f that
He Iearhed the br'.k-keepers' quarters and ran
u ftor a snack He tound Psyche all excitement,
prrtenitous with importance. She bustled about, ex-
Ilained that Mr. Burbridee was having his lunch in
the b,.iline house that day. placed the meal on the
table in the middle api tin.ent. then said:
"Millie >omei nia'a "'
SMilli-e?" Robel t iwa. at a loss to understand her.
"Ye., me cousin: I bring her fo' you to look at
he-."
'Oh: liut-well. I do aant ~nlmeoine to o romy
,hare of the work here: but Millie doesn't belong to
this estate, I think you said."
"N.o. mas-a. but dat don't make no difference.
M illie'"
Out of Butbridee's room stepped the lady off
that name. A tall eirl of about tentey. of golden-l
It .'uni' ,, tIl on Page :' i)


.PUNCH


RI:hIIIND) TIIE MIAN

ACWK iof ever nilan r- bacik f ever
family---lack if every licine. stand-
the Bank -- the guarrlian the counrsell-rr jind friend c realizing the un ertainty ol to- lmorrow.
provide for it-, emergencies out llf ti' --day's
resources.


The Royal Bank


of Canada

Kingston Branch W. A. Clarke, Manager
G. \V. Steve ns, Asst. Manager
II Monrego Bay Branch H. W'. WXhittles Manager

_


-- .ii




PL.4NTER S PUNCH


Still Stilling For You-


'/ '


f il


-1 ~h


HIINI


J. WRAY & NEPHEW
WINE & SPIRIT MERCHANTS
KINGSTON. JAMAICA. B.W.I.


LTD.


' i l


--


1929


;k-,


t






24



The Witch of Rosehall

(Continued from Page 22).
brown complexion and long, slightly frizzed hair,
Millie was much better looking than her cousin, better
clothed, and had an air which the other completely
lacked. At a glance Robert noticed that her feet
were shod, an unusual occurrence among girls who
lived outside of the town of Montego Bay, and not
common even there. Millie wore white, which was
spotless; her straight nose and gleaming eyes were
attractive; she carried herself with self-conscious-
ness, as a girl who had known admiration and had
learned to estimate her charms at a high value.
"Good morning, Squire."
Robert noticed that she did not say "massa."
"So you are Millie, eh?" he replied, "But how
did you get here so soon? You don't live on this
estate?"
"No, Squire; but I come here nearly every day.
an' me cousin tell me that you-you want to see me.
I was here yesterday too, an' I saw when you ride
in. So I know you already, Squire."
"And you want a job to look after my part of
this house?"
"I think I.could look after you well, Squire."
"I don't need looking after, Millie; but the place
does. I am told that I can be supplied with a
servant here, but perhaps you would do much better."
"A servant?" asked Millie. Her face was
troubled, disappointment plainly expressed in it.
"A housekeeper," corrected Psyche.
"A housekeeper?" echoed Millicent. "You like
me, Squire?"
"Of course I do; you seem quite a nice, tidy girl,
but liking has hardly anything to do with our ar-
rangement, has it? You are a free girl, aren't you?
How much wages do you expect?"
"We don't need to talk 'bout wages now," said
Millicent hastily. I can read and write, an' I saw
you yesterday, Squire, an' like you." She paused,
not wishing to say much in the presence of a third
party, and without definite encouragement from the
Squire.
She glanced at Psyche, who had sense enough
to perceive that Millicent wished her away for a
while. So Psyche went outside, to get something.
she said, and Millie stood with down-cast eyes wait-
ing to hear what the squire would decide.
"You can have the job if you like," said Robert
indifferently. "You will come every morning?"
"Don't I am to sleep here?"
"Where? There is no place that I can see."
"Then you don't like me, Squire?"
"What do you mean, my good girl? Must one
have a personal feeling for every dependent? Of
course I 4ike you! Are you satisfied?"
"But, but-but if I am not to live here, Squire,
where am I to live?"
"I can't solve that problem for you, Millie; you
had better think it out for yourself. Did you expect
to live here?"
"Yes, if you like me an' I am your housekeeper.
You would be my hubai,,id. don't you understand? "
"By Jove!" cried Robert, startled, but amused.
"I get your point of view now! But I didn't tell
Psyche that, though it seems to be the custom here."
"I am sorry," sighed Millicent, with a full flash
of her eyes at the handsome face of the young man
who she proposed should be her "husband." "Psyche
didn't tell me ever thing. An', as I tell you, I saw
you yesterday, an' I like you when I see you. A lot
of the young bushas on these estates want me, you
know, but I don't have nothing to do with them.
You are different."
"You are very kind to say so, Millie," answered
Robert, feeling somewhat embarrassed, yet flattered
nevertheless, "but there has been a misunderstand-
ing. You won't take the job of looking after my
room and my meals, thin?"
The girl thought for a moment. She came to a
decision.
"Yes, I will take it. I can wash and sew and
cook, an' I can read and write."
"Your qualifications are excellent," smiled
Robert, who was too happy himself not to wish to
make others happy also. "As your cousin would
say, you are very virtuous."
"Yes, I am virtuous," agreed Millie gravely,"
an' you will find me so if--"
"Sufficient unto the day is the virtue thereof,"
interrupted the young man quickly. "Well, you can
take charge whenever you like."
"All right, Squire, an' I will sleep in this room,"
said Millie decisively, indicating the middle apart-
ment.

CHAPTER FIVE

THE GREAT HOUSE
HE finest private residence in Jamaica, the Great
House of Rosehall loomed huge and imposing
in the gloom of the early December evening. It stood
three storeys high, broad flights of hewn stone steps
leading up to a wide portico from which one entered
the living rooms situated on the second floor. A boy
was waiting for the expected visitor; Robert threw


PLANTERS' PUNCH


1929


him his reins, quickly ascended the steps and found "Three times!" He could not for his life
himself facing a magnificent pair of folding doors, avoided the exclamation. It had been uttered I
four inches thick and of solid mahogany, which hung he was aware of it.
on great brass hinges and opened into a spacious Yes. three times And they are dead; my
and lofty reception room dimly lighted now by a pair husband died of apoplexy. the second one went
Sof silver candelabra. There was an instant sug- tried to stab me and actually succeeded, and
gestion of wealth about this room. even of magni- stabbed himself. The last one-he was my
ficence. But what caught and held his eyes was the husband's nephew-died of drink, and yet I
figure of the mistress of Rosehall. who stood by a in Montego Bay seem to think that I was respol
table placed near the doors: as he entered ,he moved for his end! How could [ prevent anyone
forward to meet him with eager. outstretched hand. drinking himself to death" Do I look strong er
and now. for the first time, he noticed how small to keep the bottle from a determined man?" He
she was. that she smiled as -he asked this question. t1
She had looked a bigger woman when he had her face was not distinctly visible in the dim c
seen her on horseback that afternoon, clothed in her light.
riding habit. Perhaps, because of his own splendid "Not exactly." he answered. smiling also.
height, she seemed to him smaller than she actually you have been unlucky above the lot of wi
was. But all the stronger because of her slimness and And yet you don't look as if you can have
the apparent fragility of her form was the appeal married more than oni.e. You are so young!"
she made to him; robed all in white. with throat and "But I was married first at eighteen, an
bosom exposed. she was daintily graceful in spite of husband lived 1onl until I was twenty-one The
the spreading crinoline which, in accordance with two married me for my properties. I think; an
the fashion of the times, she wore. His heart pound- one who went mad died less than two years ai
ed rapidly as he took her hand in his and felt the became his wife"
soft. unmistakable pressure of her fingers and heard "I don't think anybody could marry you thil
her words of welcome. of anything but yourself." he protested. "Wha
He had changed from his working suit Psyche ynur properties compared to yourself?'"
had been put to work that afternoon and had ironed "You say that." she replied. "but you are (
out his things. which had been sent from Molntego ent. I can see that. I have been a widow no,
Bay the day before. He was dressed now as though three years. and I made up my mind never to n
he had been bidden to a banquet; she noted this at again., o have nothing more to do with men:
once. and was pleased by his obvious desire to had enough of them. you understand. The one
appear at his best in her ,ight. was a drunkard us.d to beat me; he would ,
"Sit here," she said, pointing to a massive horse- me cruelly sometimes, and I could go to no on
hair sofa. "'dinner will shortly be served protection. It was an awful life After his de
The sofa was to the rieht of the room. among resolved to shut myself up in my estates, this
the shadows; he placed himself by her side and she and Palmyra behind. I have not been to Mo
began to talk quickly, almost feverishly, as one lab- Bay for two years"
ouring under some i great suppressed excitement. "What an existence!"
"This is where I live, where I have lived for "You may well say so. Even during the i
many years." she said. "and I an all alone in this rarely move about on the estates, though now
huge place; not a very cheerful life, is it?" then. like to-day, I have to make an inspectic
"I wonder why vou do it." he replied; "Montego had to he present at that flogging you witness
Bay is not far: there would he company there. hated to be there, though I could not show ii
society for you. Ant of course there is Spanish weakness would be fatal in dealing with the s
Town and Kingston." But I had to be present, for they would have
"All nearly as dull as is Rosehall or Palmyra." treated far more harshly than they were had
she asserted. "You don't know them And the been. That was why I was there."
people-horrible! The3 are narrow. fussy. inquisitive. "I thought so; I was convinced of that."
full of envy and bitterness. always talking about one "But not at first?"
another. and nr-thing eood to say. Wait till you "No" he admitted. "not at first. I was s
know them!" surprised to see you watching such a scene
"Then you prefer to live alone, hiding your understand better now."
beauty here?" he asked. though wondering at his "I want ),mu to understand. for later on you
audacity, hear that I love to witness the suffering o
"Doi. you think I am so beautiful, then?" slaves-a manifest lie! If people, white or I
"You know you are!" deserve to suffer, then suffer they must: I don
"Thanks You do say pretty things. Of. course." why the. should be pitied. But if I look on
she hesitated a moment, then went on. "I haven't they are being punished it is through a sen
always, lived at Rosehall. and I haven't always lived duty-and to prevent too much punishment.
here alone. My husbands-" girl to-day was only given eight lashes I could
"H usbands?" given her three times as many."
"Yes; I have been more than once married; I "I am glad you didn't! It would have
want to tell you about that. I want to tell you be. her."
fore anyone else does You see. I believe we are "Oh. no: it wouldn't. These people have
goina to be great friends, anti I have no friends to as tough as their dispositions, and those are toi
speak of-none in fact. And I should like you to than you will ever guess. But slaves are val
know how unfortunate and unhappy I have been. I now and they have to be pampered. Fifty year
have been married three times. Robert ii'onltin ed on Page ?it.






| THE


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hav
before

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nsible
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day I
w and
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't see
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unable
sr ari


- 1 1


108 Harbour St, Kingston.


mm




"w


1929 PLANTERS' PUNCH -2
I I


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The Jamaica Mutual Life

Assurance Society
ESTABLISHED 1844.

DIRECTORS.
SCol. A. H. Pinnork, V.D. Chairman
r Leonard deCordova Esq. -Sir William Mlorrison
ST. N. Aguilar Esq. Alfred H. D'Costa Esq.
I W. Baggett Gray Esq. L. P. Downer Esq.
Hon. J. H. Phillipps


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l Travelling Agent. Asst. Trav. Agent.

ERNEST B. NETHERSOLE, Secretary.
liil
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II


IIIV7 ----






PLANTERS' PUNCH


The Witch of Rosehall

(Continued from Page 24).
we could burn them alive for a serious offence; to-
day we are afraid to whip them, and they grow more
insolent every hour. But I wanted to talk to you
about myself, not about my people. I was saying
how for three years I have lived in this place, and
the one behind it, a sort of woman hermit, visiting
no one, being visited by no one, and traduced by
many who have never even seen me."
"They are base to treat you so," he exclaimed
indignantly. "There is only one explanation; they
envy your beauty and your wealth."
"It may be so," she answered softly. "But, of
course, had I wished it, they would have come to
Rosehall. There would have been plenty of men to
come; some wanted to. I would not encourage them,
desperately lonely though I was. I wished to have
nothing to do with them: I believe I had almost
come to hate men.'
"All men?" he queried, knowing what the answer
would be, for had she not shown him favour?
"You know I couldn't say that now," she laugh-
ed. "I myself asked you up here to-day; I am with

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you now, telling you my miserable little troubles.
If you were ungenerous you would say I was bold
and forward, and pushing myself on you."
"If I were a fool and an ingrate I might say
that!" he cried, "and even then I don't think I should
dare. You are kind, very kind to me, an unknown
stranger who is only your second book-keeper. Why
should you be so, unless- "
"Unless what?" she asked, prompting him, for
he had paused.
"Unless you have a kind heart," he concluded.
"I don't know that I have. My kind heart was
warped long ago. But I want to be nice to you,
Robert, because I like you-an unwomanly avowal,
perhaps, but I have long ceased to care about what
is called womanly by women who rob other people's
husbands and lovers and still think that they are
virtuous and good! I like you, and I am tired of all
this loneliness. I want you to help me; and you
would not do it as Ashman does-for money. I
want you to help me as a friend."
"I know nothing about this country, I am afraid,"
confessed Robert; "and you know nothing about me,
remember. We have met only within the last few
hours."
A rap sounded on the door to the rear of them,
the door opened slowly and a girl's voice was heard:
"Dinner is on de table, missis."
"Come," she said, rising, and they went into
the dining room.
Somewhat smaller than the hall they had just
left, it was nevertheless a large, lofty, handsome
apartment, running the whole length of the right
wing of the house. In the room, besides the side-
board and a score or so of highly polished chairs,
there were two tables, one, a huge oblong mahogany
piece; the other, a small circular table set for dinner,
with a two-branched silver candelabrum in which tall
wax candles burned with a steady flame.
They seated themselves, two barefoot slave girls
attending them. The meal began with turtle soup,
and one of the girls filled their glasses w, ith madEira
A glance from their mistress sent these waitress-
es some distance off, .ll,>ughi their eyes were vigilant
to watch, the diners so as to anticipate their wants.
The girls looked nervous, painfully anxious to make
no mistake.
"You know nothing about Jamaica. yes," Mrs.
Paimer took up the conversation where it had broken
off: "But it is not pI:io .feion ial help that I want, it
is advice, diia.iel.te-id -ilgcge-i l,o You said to
me to-day -lut y.'. hadi ,.'- outi to learn about
Ilant in You are not a-regular book-keeper; any-
one can see that. Won't you tell me something
about yourself?"
He told her briefly all that there was to know.
He told her the truth.
"I might alrn,.,t have guiesed something of the
sort," was her comment. '* ulihiil if you were a
mere bookkcreper it \uulll make no difference Jo ma.
You would still b- you, don't you see; someone that
could assist a poor. unfortunate woman who is badly
ia need of genuine friendship'"
A girl (ame forward to, remove the soup plates,
another filled -.he wine glasses; again they with-
drew.
"I am at your service," said Robert awkwardly.
"Tell me what you want me to do from time to time,
and I will do my best."
"You shouldn't live in such squalid quarters,"
she said suddenly. "Would you like to stay with
Ashman, the overseer?"
She eyed him narrowly; she looked relieved
when she saw distaste registered in his face."
"With the overseer?" No, thanks! I shall be
much happier where I am."
"I understand. Ashman is not very pleasant to
subordinates, though you are not going to be a sub-
ordinate of his. Would you like to live up here?"
"Here? But how could I? You and I together
in this house? What would Ashman and Buirbri-ilge
and your other white employees say?"
She made no effort to disguise the contempt in
her eyes and voice. "Do they matter?" she asked
"But the people in Montego Bay? -Tour own
class. When they knew they would-well, you-you
can guess what they would do, can't you?"
"Talk? But this isn't England; it is Jamaica;
and we are miles and miles away from Montego Bay
and anywhere else. Besides, what would there be
to say? We are together now, aren't we? Where is
the harm? Where would the harm be if you stayed
here to-night, in one of these many rooms; what
real difference would it make wlipther you slept
in a room upstairs or in your own room in the book-
keepers' house? What would the actual difference
be?
"None, actually; but-"
"It is what mnichtr se-m. not what really was,
that you are thinking of, isn't it? But you are
independent and so am I. This is my property, and
I am mistress here. I don't care now what is said
about me; I .have -nff'-red too much to care. Are
you less brave than I, Robert?"
"For your own sake-" he began, and she laugh-
ed.
"I can take very good care of my own self; had
I not been able to do so, where do you think I should
be now? But you can decide what you think best;
only, remember that you can stay at the Great


1929


House if you wish, and her-- is thi o1nly plane on
Rosehall where you should -ta. They it it
haunted," she added abruptly. .\ul adrnil a .le \v.a l.hi
him keenly.
"By ghosts? Of whom?"
"Of the men, the people ho have died iere.
Another of their lies. I am a ,rtman antil I stay
here alone." She swallowed anoth lir glass, ot lone
quickly; she had been keeping pa -e with himi iin hi
drinking.
"And you do not believe 1, 1 ~h,.tr,. at ,:,:,Lr-e!"
"Do you?" she asked.
"Frankly, I don't know \lil,: ko.ws- if bhe
doesn't? But you haven't an!s\ ,v:-i me."
"Ghosts, Robert? Spirits :f' ti- ifiad Spnirts
of hell? Yes, I believe in t..miii. I kn..iw that they
exist; I have seen th-mi' Doin' I nbt- iartl'.l. I .
not raving; I tell you I have ~-.ln tlhem E. R-..s1
hall Great House itself is r.-t iiaunitel n-. 1 .ue
can be haunted if there lives in it u mn.ii ,i a uiman
strong-minded enough to defy ianyii,'.. an'.thiiig tli-at
might wish to return from thi cirave i:t rev isit bthi
scenes of its bodily existence. I .,an ki-p ai.wa- ainy
spirit by the force of my mind. thtiy nlmy .- ,iit-
side this building, they may : r-p a i I .r!a.I e-',I.
close up to the windows, to the tlirre.li,.1. of' te do:- i.
but inside, where I am, they can nrt\vi ..,me. It i
not of them I am afraid; I de-pi- 'h..-nm in death as
I despised them in life! They -%re weakr than I
when alive, and I am still stin-.ir t t than he. u
now that they are dead."
She had spoken fiercely, bitterly. hanled with
wine as -h- was and filled with a ens- ald feeling
of her own power. He gazd-' ar l-i at'ouinled,
seeing her in this new mood. he was getting a
glimpse of another side to her i harua.-ter. a strnouaer,
fiercer, more iltperiu;i s infinitely n!,or selr'-relianr
aspect of a )_-wiilhderng though fa.s inaring per..,.n-
ality. She rose from the table iiith an abrupt move
ment; they had drunk more than tti-y hal eaten.
"Come," said she, "I will shr-w you the hijus-. the
haunted house, where I live by misel." f.
She bade him take up the .arndelabrum and led
the way into a hall behind the eri-at rnom in wvhi:h
she had met him. Here he hadi a glimp-e of a broad
polished stairway to the left, lbi .h obvioiusly led up
to the third storey of the building, a -itairway [ sI
mahogany with carved ornaniientarl n anmi well 1in
keeping with the magnificence (of this spacious West I'
Indian home. He noticed particularly now the deep
embrasures of the windows, whose .ills of mahogany
were comfortable seats; he glanced up at the arched
doorway, high and ornamented. which led from the .
room in which he was into that wlher he had been
received an hour before. "We'll go upstairs later
on," she said, and led the way outside
They stood on a flagged piazza. uabhov, them a wide
balcony extended the whole length of the upper floor
and upon this balcony doors and lindons opened.
Seen from the rear, the house vieemtd 1t be of two:
storey only; but Robert knew that this was because
the ground floor with its many apartment, lay under
the flagstoneb he trod. In front oii them was a little
wooden structure with sharply sloping roof. and in
the midst of it an opening into whi(h a flight of
brick steps descended. But the lady did not offtr
to take him down to this region; she turned to her
left, indicating a suite of roonts which was- atta> h(-
to the main building by a paved covered wa.y wlhic:h
was the segment of a circle in shape. and curving
outwards. This suite stretched straight from the-
end of the covered way toward, a rii-ing in the land
to the south. On the opposite hand was another
covered path and another sui:- A flagstone reran
dah fronted each suite.
Taking the light from him he led the way.
She flung open the first .ft thrl-i door, in
this range of rooms; he saw within the room thus
revealed a large billiard table, evidently long un
used, for ihere was heary dust upon it. The second
apartment was a concert room. as its appointments
showed; the third was a bed room, a guest room
clearly, and that too gave signs of not having
been for a long time ic upied.
"All built regardless of co-t." she said with a
little laugh; "but people were mutl ri,:bher in Ja
maica then than we are to-day. There weren't so
many missionaries in those days to preach to them
and stir up discontent among their slaves"
"It is a place well worth having." he answered
for the sake of saying something
"But almost a prison for a woman who has t1.
live in it alone," she rejoined.
They crossed over to the other side. through a
sort of fruit garden with full g rown trees standing
about it. Just as they had nearly reached their
objective a puff of wind suddenly coming down from
the hills to the south, which rose behind the build
ing, extinguished the ,andlles, and they stood in the
soft darkness, with the trees giving and sighing
gently, and the dainty, white-robed woman looking.
as it seemed to Rbert's fanc.y. very much like a
delicate ghost.
"I don't mind the dark, do you?" she asked.
coming close to him. "I can call one of the girls
to get a light, but these rooms are not very interest.
ing; they are for the house servants, and that one
at the end is the kitchen. You can see them any
(Continued on Pryge .30i.






PL A TE R S'


George & Branday
(ESTABLISHED 18791




WHOLESALE PRODUCE MERCHANTS
COMMISSION AGENTS
STEAMSHIP AGENTS
AND
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DEALERS IN:-


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Pork and Pork Products.

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Montreal.
Sugar and Flour.

SAMUEL DOBREE & SONS,
London.
RicE, Margarinc, Etc.

PROVINCIAL INSURANCE CO.,
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Fire Insurance.

CANADIAN PACIFIC STEAM-
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EASTERN STEAMSHIP LINES.
MUNSON LINE.


DURIE THE OPTIMIST

M R. lWaitier Durie dinir,: ut to, J.mraiia wbhn about
i.Vit-ic -one t lar' .., iia e Hi lani- as a i'ung
reporrl- t'i lor he Gle-ii'nr n\- w paper: tlite' were
uth-i i .- I.,for n- lii ni tinl oi-' or it\' after i liii : lie is
rth .nl- .-in,. t all th tee y...iiig mn n i\hi. i, still ton.
Li.. t-I a tlli t l a aih a.
And he- lha' e'.ii iiiafti.l,-d to r'e-mli a ne ,-.
pap'.i' nlan. H ; iii)ot a v.irltkin_ journalist any
mnllil- nbut a- he-ad t' f tli Tinimas Cl'iiupaniy. wnliih otwns
and iuihli'-hesi. the .In,,t-i.r Trr. ji.urnal which he
estallii.-li nman\ yeiar.s aon, he- naturally has a place
in thlic i:onriaterni f juiurnalistq And at heart
he i i a jiiurtali t. seefin many thint ,itbh thte
dranintii vLi.i:n of the newspaper man. He ha- not
es-aped thri influence iof his ea ly calling and has had
no wish to do so. Printer's ink ha, entered into his
soul. The merchant rmniain. the mani with a love
for the ne-.N
W'beu still ronre. ted with the W,li,,r, he ,tart-
ed tile Tine- Il'i 'kly. with some old machinery he
purchased on the instalment plan and with no capital
ti, speak of By all the laws of probability he ought
to have failed On some occasions he had the great-
est difficulty in bringing out the paper. even in ind-
inc stamps to send an issue through the post An-
other man would have eiven up the struggle in
despair, and no one could have blamed him. But
Durie was always quite confident that next week
would see a change for the letter: things were al-
ways going to improve. He was easily and gleefully
certain of this. he could n.,t see the dark lining
because -of the silver cloud. This was quite absurd;
and yet. the paper did win through, the silver cloud
did shine forth, the impossible was a..omplished.


MR. WALTER D'BIE
Su, h was tite trt-stilt if iii orric bit o,rptirnn ism
Then he b l ughlt tihet booki, ll I u-tlrinc-m ,f .ti be
late- Arrhur H lton He did ui. kn.i w a thine aout
4t:llivi books but he Lbeleried that hr- ,i:ild l aI rn He
hald n li: pr'-)l io.i. exp erien e i,' l ,ii' .n S-. but he saw
no Ieas.n wih\ that shouldd not bi. aciqlitiil He hail
assistant- w li, liked him He was i.n.vinicd that
Jamaica would prove. better and better off anid that
he yiuli pro-per with it tile i.- .-rs w.in i on
and th,: iu -ineso glw. anid ioin it i-anhed propor-
t'ons1 ahiih aust.-dl people to begin tI talk ai.out it
In the meantime Du'ri had left new:- aper u,.rk and
iwas devoting all his tine ani. attention to, pi-hln
on the store. The foundations ere firmly llidj The
super-structure Errw and hbi-iane larger anil larger
What it is to-day is well known Againi it was u
ti iumph i f i,.ptimisn-a and al)iit;
He was in politics heti for a "ntle ai a memnier
of the Mayor and Co'in il He nay lie in poliite-
aza in in .Jamaica. onie nevtr iUn t.ll. At pre-ent he
.spend- half his time it Enclaiani. bu ii n gaooild for
his local enterprises. bitt lie las mnany years of life
b),'i'r. hini. humanly speaking. ana he nicm settle
down in Jamaica in the end HL- iv.ill alway. bhe an
at tive man. He set himlll lf ullt to atccompiilh ..e-r
tain tliinc-. to win t.i a .ertaiii e.l. and he haq
a htri v- i1 a m liirns iCit one'.-n ambition' grow
aL. Ion as ,n : lia vitality : fI't in-t.ia e,- he iuow thas
a diluS: itore andi a gr.ICerv and a dry mo lds e-tablish.
nml:nt a part oi f hi- is eneal bli.ine-s activities: later
i.n thl.re imay he oiheir lines. And i:,n ,he
-tiler side of hi- are.'-r there- may be other lies also
If be ,der. tnot enter public if.t in Jamnaica lie may
do sn it England This writer hlieves that sanle
thinoc of the sort fornis pait of Durie's amin and am-
hition-: if it does he will ac hieve it And if it
Inok- iriimrobalhi. that !s all the nlior rea-iln to
b.lie\e that he will achit ve it He is made that
way.


LONDON

GUARANTEE

AND

ACCIDENT

COMPANY

LIMITED.




The Pioneer Motor Car
Insurance Company
In Jamaica.


VALUE OF INSURANCE.



Extrad from English Newspaper of 19'h June, 1926.
"The value of insurance
was well exemplified in the
case of Mr. George Brooke,
a motor engineer, of Clap-
ham, who was mulcted in
5,100 damages and costs in
an action before Mr. Justice
Salter. It was alleged that
by his negligence Mr. Brooke
was responsible for a motor
accident at Oaks Corner,
near Croydon, whereby Mr.
H. J. Glashier was severely
injured one leg having to be
amputated and a metal plate
screwed on to the bone of his
thigh."


Such a Judgment would mean Bank-
ruptcy to 90% of Motor Car Owners
in Jamaica and serious financial em-
barrassment to almost every one of the
other 10%.


Moral- Never Leave to
Chance that which can
be Guarded Against by
In urance.


For Particulars of Cover and Premiums
APPLY TO

Harvey & Bourke
CHIEF AGEN'r'-,
.AN IA ILA.


Wy. -


I


1929


PL .V '_ H







PLANTERS' PUNCH


"Double Dummy"
(Continued from Page 15)
implicitly she trusted my judgment; her slightly-
worried look while I was examining the card van-
ished with my favourable report. "You'll allow me
to see you on your way, I hope," I continued. "Per-
haps I can help you with your luggage, and get you
a taxi?"
She thanked me prettily and then settled down in
her corner to admire the scenery. Presently the pass-
port officer came along, stamped our passports, and
disappeared.' Tickets were then collected by another
courteous gentleman, and we were left in.peace.
"Thank goodness! That is the last of those fel-
lows for a bit," I said. "No more papers to be shuo n
to-day!"
"In that case then, I can bring my contraband
to light," laughed-Miss Tyrell and from some hiding-
place she drew out a small tin of cigarettes, evi-
dently highly delighted at having "done" the
Customs. I couldn't help smiling to-myself. What
a childish trick-to smuggle twenty cigarettes
into France! She looked so pleased with her daring,
however, that I hadn't the heart to inform her that
the concealment was quite unnecessary. In fact,
I played up to it.
"It was very foolish of you to secrete tobacco on
your person," I told her, gravely. "You might have
been fined ever so biuch."
She quivered excitedly and laughed.
"Still, they'll be ever so much nicer after all the
excitement I've had to-day. Will you have one?"
I accepted one, and we puffed away in silence.
Presently the girl appeared to tire of the passing
landscape, and closed her eyes. I took the opportuni-
ty to examine her features more closely. Undoubt-
edly she was extremely pretty-golden hair, rosy
cheeks, and a dainty little figure. What a child she
was! I smiled at the recollection of the smuggling.
It wasn't safe for a girl like that to travel alone.
It was fortunate she'd met me. Very mild, these
cigarettes-ladies', probably. Not worth smuggling
.anyway!
I glanced across to the sleeping girl again, smiled
to myself once more, closed my eyes, and went to
sleep.
I was aroused by a vigorous shaking. In a semi-
conscious sort of way I noted that someone was
hustling me unmercifully and that far away a faint
voice was repeating: "St. Lazare, St. Lazare." Why
couldn't they let a fellow sleep? Ah, well In-
stinctively I felt for 'my attache case. Then, in a
.second, I was awake-staringly, startlingly awake--
for the case had gone! So had Miss Tyrell!
I sprang up and then fell back into my seat again,
partly because I liad a bad headache and felt curi-
ously weak, and partly because there, in the same
seat that had been occupied by Miss Tyrell, sat old
"H.W." himself with Fourneau by his side, both of
them chuckling like a couple of idiots.,
As I looked at them I suddenly remembered
something I had done just before I met the girl, and
the change in my expression-from horror and alarm
to gentle relief-must have puzzled the old man.
He stopped grinning and when, after feeling in my
inner pocket, I burst into hearty guffaw, he looked
positively startled.
The Frenchman who had so roughly awakened
me, and who had "railway detective" written all over
him, was the first to break the silence.
"Monsieur was drugged by means of a poisoned
cigarette, is it not?" he demanded.
I felt my throbbing head and said it was more
than likely; in fact, I was prepared to bet on it.
"But Monsieur appears not to apprtliate the sig-
nificance of the happening,"' the officer went on. "I
understand from these gentlemen that you have been
robbed of an attache case containing a package of
precious stones?"
"Oh, no, my dear sir," I replied. "Only the attache
case is gone; it is worth perhaps fifty francs. I
will not make a charge.' Let the culprit go, if you
have caught her."
"Ah, monsieur, if we had caught her!" He sighed
softly, with a gentle tendlerness. "If we had caught
her, Monsieur, we should have caught Mdlle. Renee
Chamard-and we should not have let her go.
Mam'selle is being sought by half the police admin-
istrations of Europe, But, p'sieur, had not the case
the package within?"
"It had a package, but only a duplicate. Here is
the real packet," I said, proudly producing the
original, which I had placed in my pocket immediate-
ly after passing the Customs. "But why do you say
that Miss Tyrell or Mdlle. Chamard is French?;'
She could hardly speak a word of French when we
were- tt Dieppe."-
Monsieur," replied the detective, solemnly,
"Mademoiselle is, I should say, the best actress in
'Europe. She is French, and' was born at Tours. The
ci.i ridur attendant desi ribed the lady; and apart from
that, the job has the cachet, the seal, of Mam'selle's
handmark on it." H-se' sighed as one who has 1lst
oppOi tunitie.- .- ..,
W**'.ll. well!" said old 'H.W.', who had now re-
gained his usual composure and was chuckling again
about something "Come along; we can do no good
he-re. Thanks very much for all your trouble, Mr.


l'upin"--to the detective. "Come with us, Gibbs."
Shortly afterwards the three of us were seated in
the hotel at which the "boss" was staying.
"Now Gibbs, the explanation, please," said the old
man.
Thereupon I told him that I had distrusted Rose-
man and accordingly taken the precaution of sub-
stituting a dummy for the real packet, only carrying
the real one in the case during the time I was act-
ually in the Custom Houses. The precaution had
been justified, I thought.
"Well, open the packet then, and we'll check the
contents," said "H.W."
I broke the seals and wrapper. I was feeling
rather proud of my little performance as I removed
the lid, but when I lifted it I got the shock of my
life, for the box contained nothing but pieces of
sealing-wax and bits of string! I felt so unutter-
ably undone that it was some minutes before I real-
ized that the "boss" and Fourneau were literally
roaring with laughter. Old "H.W.' was rolling about
helplessly. I didn't think he could be so hilarious.
"Excuse my unseemly mirth, Gibbs," he gurgled,
'"but this is'too rich! Apparently there is another
dummy in this episode, unless you've mixed up my
packet with your dummy." And he chuckled again.
"No doubt there is a joke somewhere, sir" I said,
somewhat nettled, "but until you've found your
stones I cannot even raise a smile about it. Still,
it's your place to laugh if you want to; they're your
property. I get fired, anyway, I suppose?"
"No, no, Gibbs; don't worry," he answered. "If
it will make you laugh and cheer up, here are the
stones." He pulled a packet from his pocket. "And
really, you know," he went on, "you owe Roseman
an apology. He is most useful to me, so you mustn't
offend him. I suppose we ought to give you an ex-
planation, but you must clear your mind about Rose-
man. He and our friend here, M. F.urueaii. got
wind of a plot to intercept thestones.
"I recognized the people concerned as Ieirn< dan-
gerous, and I reckoned that we should have to be
careful to get away with our tufff It' ome this gang
had set their hearts on it. I there-t'if used you as a
iort of red herring to draw them to Dieppe, whilst
I took the goods myself, via'Calais, some hours be-
fore you left London. Much js I trust you and rely'
on your honesty, I should ha v, been foolish indeed
to allow you to attempt to arrayy this stuff through
,the lines of the clever gang to which Miss Chamard
bclon -
"You must understand, then, that you never real-
ly had the stones in your possession; the pailcei I
gave you was Dummy Number One, and the ent-rante
into the affair of Dummy Number Two merel pr'l"
.vides a little light relief. What. did y.u put in
your dummy, Gibbs?"
"Brown paper, sir."
'"Oh, good! Mam'selle, instead of making off with
van extraordfhfary haul of string and -ealiiig-.wax. has
decamped with a quantity of brown paper, cih?"
"Yes; but who put these crooks w,-e- to: the trans-
action?" I asked, unable to forget Roseman.
"Someone in the office in Paris. Someone else
double crossed him, and so it got back to M. Four-
neau, who communicated with me. The scheme to
hoodwink the gang was thought out by Roseman-
which may account for the unusual interest you
thought he showed.
"I therefore wrote Fourneau here, giving him in-
structions to meet you and full particulars of the
stones you were supposed to be carrying. This in-
formation, as we expected, was passed on by the
traitor in the office to the gang, who, no doubt, rub-
bed their palms and placed the matter in the capable
hands of Mademoiselle Chamard.
"'From the time they received word that you were
to be the carrier they concentrated on you, and so
left me free to go where I pleased. The only thing
that worried me was the possibility that you might
be the victim of an attack by force, but knowing the
methods of these people, and they prefer finesse and
strategy to violence, I chanced it."
"I'm pleased that you've explained, sir," I told
him; "but I.don't suppose you will need me to carry
your stuff any more, after what's happeneil'
"Why not, man?" he- reported. "You've shown up
to your credit. Don't you think so, Fourneau?"
.('C(.,, n.-, ',tr!" cried the Frenchman.
"Most certainly!" continued "H. W." "If you had
ever had them you would have got the stones through
to Paris, wouldn't you?"
"Yes; but I can't forgive myself for letting that
girl hand me a lemon," I replied. "No sir, I'm not
proud of it."
"That's all right, Gibbs. If all Tupin tells me is
correct-and I know some of it is-Mam'selle has
handed out similar fruit to some of the brainiest
people in Europe, and if you've been dished you've
been dished by an expert. As a matter of fact, though,
you have put one over on her. Ha, ha! Brown
paper! Good! I'd love to see their faces when they
open it!"
The old fellow started (bhuikling once. more and
proceeded to hand out cigars.
"No, no, Gibbs; you did well," he wound up. "Be-
sides, I owe you an apology for having risked y.,'ui
safety. Just take this little cheque and see if you
can amuse yourself for a week. Rep-ort to me here
on Wednesday next."


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PLA T TERS' PUNCH


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PRESIDENT : T. 0. 0l Mller.
I AN AGER: Lindsay P. Do\vner.



i! I
CO PERATING extensive Estates of their own, and
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AIO rA4V AWd~rr~W~rVAr*WVAAr*jW**rA


--


1929








PLANTERS' PUN CH


The Witch ofRosehall

(Continued from Page 26).
other time; indeed, there is nothing in them to see.
I will take you upstairs now."
She took his hand to guide him; he closed his
fingers over hers with a gentle pressure; he felt
her answering clasp, tender and persuasive.
They regained the rear hall and then went
back to the dining room; she still leading him, for
it was dark in the house. She placed the candelabrum
on the big banqueting table; then stood still for a
space very near to him. He heard her sigh.
"Can I relight the candles for you?" he asked,
but this she did herself, not answering. She handed
him the lights. "Hold them high," she suggested,
"or the breeze may put them out again. We'll go
upstairs now."

CHAPTER SIX

ANNIE PROPOSES
THEY moved slowly up the broad stairway, built in
three short flights; arrived at the upper storey,
Robert, walking straight in front of him with the
candles held high in his hand-for the windows were
open-came to the door of a room which faced the
steps, and paused. Annie hesitated for a second;
then seemed to make up her mind to speak. "My
first husband died in that room," she said laconical-
ly, "so I keep it closed. The silly slaves are always
hearing noises in there, though I have stopped them
showing fright when I am near."
"And there," she went on, indicating the next
room, the one further on, "is where my second
husband died, and in this one"-she pointed to an-
other-"was where my last master passed away-
drunk. It's a beastly story, Robert. I tell it to
you because others will do so, and they are not like-
ly to tell the truth, or indeed to know it so well as
I. You will probably hear that I keep all these
rooms closed, and that is so. They are never open-
ed now."
"Not even by the house slaves?" he asked, gaz-
ing curiously at those three rooms where the men
who had been successively the lords of this lovely,
brave, vivacious little woman by his side had breathed
their last. He wondered how she could find the
courage to sleep night after night under the same
roof, believing as she did, as she had said, that the
spirits of the dead could return to earth from hell
itself.
"By no one. Such rooms are really graves, or
like graves."
The courage of this admission struck him.
"But if everyone closed for ever a room in which
a man or woman died, Annie, he urged, "the largest
house would soon become an empty ruin."
"True," she answered, "but I have a wish to
keep these rooms so. There is no one to use them,
so why should they be opened? This place is far
too big for me as it is."
She took the lights from him, went towards
the other side of the landing and threw open anotlier
door, stepping inside. "And this is where your
little friend retires at night to her loneliness and
friendlessness," she explained.
He peeped in; he saw a great canopied bed hung
with a white mosquito net, a huge mahogany four-
poster with the uprights richly carved. Three chairs
of expensive wood were in the room, a large dress-
ing table stood in front of a tall mirror; a mahogany
press, and a heavy rug spread upon the floor, com-
pleted the furniture. It was a sumptuously fur-
nished apartment, more sumptuous than elegant.
She entered it; he stood at the threshold. "Come in,"
she mocked, "there is not a single soul to see us,
and to talk." She put the candleholder on the dress-
ing table and fixed her eyes on him. There was
provocation in them; an invitation scarcely to be mis-
understood.
He stepped inside, looked round, and went up
to one of the windows; he was hreathinc heavily as
an unpractised runner might. He saw the lands of
the estate rolling away until lost in obscurity, could
distinguish the darker shadows as trees towering
above the cane, caught a glimpse of light far be-
low and knew them to be those from boiling house
and still-house and book-keepers' quarters, and,
raising his head, gazed for a while on the innumer-
able tropical stars which glowed above in the soft
silken blackness of the sky. It was all vague and
still and lovely out there, and here was he, a few
days after his coming to this strange land of slavery
and passion, beauty and mystery--for to him it
seemed mysterious-in the company of a woman with
a strange history, a woman alone, who had passed
through more heart-searing experiences than fall
to the lot of most women, and who was, to his
thinking. the most beautiful of her sex that his
eyes had ever seen.
And she loved him, wanted him: he could not
be blind to that.
Elsewhere. to some men, she might seem bold
and forward, as she herself had suggested she must
appear in his eyes. But here it seemed that every-
thing she did or said was natural, inevitable; for
her circumstances were not normal and the hard-


ships ani distresses of her lile were r ur'ely a war-.
rant for her splendid indep.-uden.ce. She iovedi hll--
bh wouldd nuot use a awakel word.. though alway-, in
hi- lelatirins with women. Lie wa- mnilest And he.
-Ih- had n-er faldl i-:eriou-Ily in love with a woman
betfire. lut [or this one he felt that he could do any-a
thing. brave any tceill'sre. fa.c aull Ue-erate risk
She had taken him absolutely into her i .intid~lenie.
told him. at almost theii \tery rilr- meeting. the stinr.
of her bitter mairird life. She had appealed to him
for his -iympathy and help. and he had promised that
thiey should be hlei to tho e lull Sh.. wa; riead to
bra[e- the wirurld's liners and calumny for his sake:
shat hudl ml.re than hinted as mu,:h. Could he be
prepared to doi les for her?
He turned frum the v.indrw and walked towards
her: she was standing by the side of her cauopied
bed. her back totar\rd it. her hand, restinei upmin it
Again she caught his eyes anrl heli them. with Ithat
Curious magnetic gaze that had struck him in th'-
c:an.ields that i'iretrmnn. But while it had then ap-
peared hard and cimpelliiig. now it wat alluring and
soft. for the light of love wa in her eyes. and the
warm flame of an appealing desire
"it i. a very beautiful view from that window,"
he began. banally., for it was not about the outer
scene that lie wished to speak. The words sounded
puerile in his own ears The wine he had drunk
was still heating his brain, still causing his hl.iidl
to course through his veins in a hot stream: his
pulses throbbed under the infuence- of this bewitch-
ing woman's beauty. She nodded her head. agree-
ing. but looked as though she expe Ited he had nome.'
thing more to say. His arms went suddenly out;
he caught her and drew her close n himn. tightly.
and kissed her hair. her bw. her elips in a frenzy
of passion He felt her answering kisses. they
burned upon his lips. She ga\v- herself up nt him,
a complete surrender "So you love me. Robert.
love me a- I love you'" site panted. and as she spoke
a thunderous noise tilled the house with weird, nerve.
shattering sound And the lights went out
"Heavens' What is that?" Robert was startled
into an expression tof fear He had started balk.
but she plai'ed a quick hand upon his shoulder as
though to steady and reasi.ure him n"The wind is
stronger now." she answered. "a puff of it causedd
one of the door.r, downstairs to bang I have spoken
to the women ahout that before: they should fasten
the doors so that they should not bang; I shall
have to see that this does not happen again '*
"It sounded as though it cwre up here. as thoiilgh
someone had struc-k a teilriri blow somewhere near
to us, opposite. I thought it was an earthquake: I
have heard of them. You are sure it wa. not up
here. Annie?'"
"Quite ure." I kniw it eemied a, though it were
very 'lh.o.' to us: but ,sounds are peculiar in this
house "
"Th y ,would he w ith tho-e there roo.ims kept
always (< sed." he munuerl-d. for a dread ot s.ime
thing in-.piliable had r.nlme upon him. a dread born
of the menmiryo of three d.-ad men. one a lunatic.
who had. a- .ihe had told himn. stabbed her and then
taken his io n life.
"Let us think of c.urjl've-'." ehe wh.i-peted.
nestling up to him i Let us think .tf our.elve- only
in all the world. and of our li,.- for one another
There is nothing to fear"


G. C. Wainwright,


1929


But noIw tile -,umil of a horse'. houts tame dis-
rinctly ti, th:ir ears. and immediately a murmuru of
viin.es below was heard. That someone had arrived
uieipe-te-dl'y wa .I-dlar. Annie Palmer did not seem
Inlliii:d to allow that incidentr to trouble her. hut
Robert made lh.iate to liichrl oe ri-ie the candles,
thenn looked at tier questihninegl. She answered his
ion.k with an autuiji-tellr notl: -he knew that he
would nlot remain up there with -,imite viitor or
messenger waiting for h-r do: stairs. They went
dow n together aiid found Ashman in the dining
Itjom i.and ing. He how.reil to h-r a- thle entered
SI have jljt onI'p 'roma Pdalm ntr." he -aid at
,nice. *I t'uand the -lve- there in a vrclv tba fi'tu.l
tif mind. I .urpri-ed sulome of theim at a secret nmet-
Ing they were having in one of their hltrs -the ring-
leadeir. I mean. Tiuey heaid me loning. so I didn't
quitiie catch hat they were plotting, but I know it's
,omte ras.ality. All over the pari'h there is trouble
brewing. Mrs. Palnter. a. I have told you before.
and I think \w sh.uldil do something about it right
away "
"Si that'., i. is it?" she asked. 'But you could
hare waited till t.nlmorrow to tell me this. I can't
do anything to-night."
"I th..ught it it a.- right you should know to-
niich "
"Yonu thought lou wo.:uld pa.\ me a visit," she
replied. "Hate you got the ringleaders. as you call
them. locked up sh that they ian't get away?"
"I t.,.uk jolly pgoud care about that! I told them
yoIsu were. certain to give it to them hot to-morrow
and no noilllense about it."
"Tllere' going to he no nonsense about it! It
is their skins or our lives. and I prefer our lives
V'.ry well. Mr Ashman; thank you You can call
for me to morrow morning and we'll ride over
to Palmyra together. I'll be ready at seven."
'You're going down. Ruthertord?." asked Mr.
A.hman. now addressing Robert for the first time.
SOur way is the same. and I want to talk to you
about some work ill tile still-house that's got to be
done to-morrow "
"Mr Rutherford is my guest to-night. Mr. Ash.
nman." said Mrs. Palmer. not giving Robert a chance
to repl-y lIe will go when he is read.\. and you
rJneed lnt wait for him The rii h tones of her
\vice. which Robert s.o much admired. aere rather
hard now. There was a metallic imperiousness in
her voice which neither man could fail to reioenise
"But the estate', work has to be done," said
Astinnan stubbornly. "and it is late already."
Late! Are you goi.lng to dictate hours to me
or to nmy guests?'"
I am in charge of the estate. An--Mrs. Palmer."
"'Undler nim. I give tinal olrdr,, here. Orer-
-eei-rs may tlomie and overseers may gol. but I remain:
.di Ii.u unllderstand'" Your manners need mending,
Mr Ashnima."
"Thank youn fi r diti.overing that' 'ell. .ou are
the owner and so can do w that you like And you
are quire ritht when you say that ,verse-er.i can go
I tan eo. ffor instance."
'I am not getting rid of .ou. at any rate." she
answered. -oftenin ;lier tones a little. For Ashman
was angry now and -enlcmed prepared to go to any
lengths
She went up to him "Mr. Rutherford is out
here ti le-arn the plantingt bu.mnLe-s. he is not an


-'is?


SMlanager, Kingston Branch.


RE -- -


EXPERIENCED SERVICE


Based on its record of over 40 years in Jamaica,
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THE BANK CF NOVA SCOTIA.


Capital 2,000,000.

Reserve 4,000,000.


Total Assets 52,000,000




BRANCHES AT:

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LI"1 ~~~~~"""""""'"""""""""" """""~~''~~""'"' ~"~~"""""""':*"''""" '"""""'~ "'""" '"""!""' '' '"""" '"I"~''~"~'~"~"'" """""' """ """"""' ''~"""' '~' '" ".'YYY~YY"~"Y.~YYL~l~ll~L~. ~I





r~:-

1929


ordinary IIio)-le, pT. i." tlP e I t.x\piauI td kI n-\t :Ib,.,ut
him aui hi.- p tople iln Euiiaul. aindl tiat i % wh:, I
take an inteire t in himLn .u'ri 1., .il.. Jhin' 1
knowuv htuv ]evotel \'u ui 'c t':> nl. I:tnl. t -r-, L. t l .,u
tnf d hno I ~t lia ar tl- 11'itu to llgEt- :..:-is 1... .i
m anner,-. i'So y u v. ill til lo tI me at ix iu tle
morning" An. L hi tlln al .talk ImIJ it-i'rs ,uer-
everything? \ hX -i Ir :..-'ur r.i- '
hte- had it-rin .-iitl. in'ip.-iling hni [:. arni:. the
door a- hlit pi k-. aul 'it- i uldl i.. nothiieh -"i'.-
move il t h, dli'..t, ri, tlBat ih-, AiL-h-b'd !nm to BR t
he did nt.,t bid :,o, ri. t gi-i d-imiieght V. : InI, hIui
ridden iff she retiirnllll
S"**Cmi pet.ent o\v'r-l are'l not I.:._ ea-ily" pitk: i
up in Janiabi a." i.he explninined. ,i litrl, itr'.atil,.-:-I.
"and just at itii tinit i uol'i[ '\\i t r -.) rlid .'I L a
man. Lit if hle tnl ltiUl-- t., r.- i n..l,: Li. v.ill hain-
to go I -1 Upr"'-s that d L ,, .1 -,. I Jll,-t i t Pil,'t [J It il
with everything h,. -.,,. lie wil ,.- ru ,.- oni .I' ni:
enemies Do.i't pi. o, t_ ar-niri.-iin ri,. har Ih ii-. -
or says. jus-t Rke i a,\na ['!'iii him "
"That is ur.[ ea;. ', .. Ini i rht- .ivi-r.-.lr
Robert p...intd outt. but I aii ,t Ilk- .l :. t --. t l.
his c.-nipany I di liked he ii ua-ir n ir>,ni [te Iir-t,
moment I nim-t linli
"Keeip -n dislikin- hl in W here -hall .,-
now?"
"Loik at II..-.ie .l...-r! A. mil tit- :lit rn.it an,
wearing her tlue-ti..n. He had jii :t noli,-.d that Ill
doors were t'fat-neld b 1. I;.n arij. -o that th_.-- at lea-r
could not possible Iha.tie imatl L tli- r-'vel'i)i-tratiue iiOi -e
that had startlei-i tht-in a ilie i.i-t...- i Tli ..-e
doors did nit aug "
"'You firgret tile ilraw illn ro'lim idol-ors Tht-y are:
much hearier that iliie."
p "Let us lntk at them."
But tli!ise til., vert securely loi.ckedi
"No-w what made that n.rie.:'" aski., Rolbell.
"could it liave bei-n an1 earthquake'"
S tell you it wai i..ne itf .theq- .i, urs Tti.- tn jUi nr
must have heard tilh. nr-i--. and ran in and faqt-ned
it so that tihe :,i: i- ill iit h1t- e blam-l f.ir n-egi-i t And
it is no use asking thrln an-tihing about it: tile.
would lie for th- uiere ak-e ft' lyinig Dto you l -\oidLi-
now that I have -onierimen t- punish themm"
He saw that that niut be the right ,xpiana
tion. "Shall we sit in the dra.iing room?" lit asked
"Wherever ynu pleas-.'" .lhe answered softly. "'but
I should like to look at the night: it is very beauti-
ful, and I Aaut t,:, Ioiik at it with You Come with
me where we can see the .ky and the stars and talk
about the little things that C(un crn ourselves Wi'i
Syou come?"
"Anywhere that yo'u nish'"
She lifted her fa e towards him; he bent down
and kissed her. The doors leading to the coulrt.ard
Stood wide open. but he frigot that or did not mind
it now; her disregard of peering slave eyes affected
Shim also; what did it natter what they ,.aw? She
slipped her arms round him and clung to hitm: he
listedd her sheer off her feet and kissed her again
ad again.
"Carry me upstairs in your arnis." she pleaded.
"I love to feel how strong y-.,t are. You can go with
daybreak. Robert; not before. My darling, m\
dearest, how I lo\,v you!"

CHEAPER SEVEN

THE BROWN GIRL

T -E West Indian dawn was breaking when Robert
Mounted hir horse and rode away toward, liti
quarters. He glan-cd back and upwards when lie
had reached the lower ground: from the firot win-
.dow of the room above there peeped out a faie. and
Sa hand came forth \aavug farewell to himu.
Early as it was the house servants were astir:
one of them had even offered him coffee beifoie lie
should leave, hut he had been anxious to get away
SHe was not yet hardened to the I.allous frankne-.s
ofa Jamaica liaison, he now, felt ashamed that thlise
menlals, slaves though they might bh. should vee
him, know whence he cani-. and be able to talk about
it-freely to their i.onmpanions The elation ,of the
boors before had vanished: he was secretly staitled
that he had so quickly succumbed to what he had
heard at home were the manners and customs of
hifs country, with a disregard of all concealment. a
,,careless acceptance of any conflitions and circum-
stances that might appeal at the moment, however
fagrantly might be violated every principle of cir-
.ctmspect conduct. He was suffering now from a
reaction. His mood was depressed, his attitude to-
wards himself was critical.
But for a moment this mode ,of censoriotis in-
tplecltion vanished before the nlnring influences of
tBiescene that disclosed itself to his admiring gaze.
The sun was surging upward. away to the itbht;
along the edge of a bank of nacre ther-e ran a line
of gold. Clouds of soft blushing pink floated lazily
ai:nst a background of delicate blue; to the left
Skies were golden, and the green of the earth
alternately dark and light, with deep greys here
there, and splashes of bright scarlet whe-re a
ft poinsettia reared its long branches high above
fields of cane.
I: There had been heavy dew in the long hours of
a-lght. It sparkled now on every leaf and twig.
-ione, a million crystal globules, as the sunlight

-1: x.p.


.-VrEpt ulv. iLi po tlie ea irtt, silver aid emerald glow-
ii c.\eryahli. it wa-, as though all the land had
i..i-,i ati-il in cel- timl waters. There was a'tang
in tbt air trom tlhe sI.-a beyond. With the dawning,
, liLil ainil liihad -'iung up; it fanned the sweeping
expani-e :ot the (.'.tribl'aii. fretted it here into frosted
a;zU':-. tianri-f..-rme-d th-re into a flashing mass of
.,im.iln-i The I.r.-l'i idame laden with the scent of
.- line watere, .ol:r, a exhilarating. And even as
lI;iert -ili... at -.ii., nis horse motionless in obe-
tiln,- L.- t. it-, mnilj,... tilI sun soared swiftly into
SIL'tlt
ir ..,at1 i '.tti a trurnmphant impetus, as though
ii kilt-W it irie It lir.I of day, beneficent mainly,
Ilit ruel at tiin.-- w hlie its burning rays would
,. itl h-l ii-, ,jl itt t-ill-. ,: nsume the liquid in rivers
.1ian i np."ii-. t.u-- il.in and beast to I.-!i-li, and,
ii;, ia,-r dli\. .ve-jk jit-tr week, would flame down-
%rai-~, ...ir oi a ljid aitIn brazen sky with a heat like
j hlai-t tr, m i-li 1 rBit ni:.w it was all glorious, and
rih,. iinl ii.lil-i it .ll r i. i g, and the cattle lifted up
i1~.' ii,:,1i5 in a. dti-p. grateful lowing, and men and
aii-iin iJi.t-J -j iLu ir-t i-attle warmth. Robert drew
a .I..p Ireth ilI.i kin.w that in a little while all
tI.- nic: -tilite at hi- fti--t and on the vegetation around
w.,1ulii hdae i.lia'leteaed. that the softness and sweet-
it..s 'fit thi. e-arly i mailing would be gone. But for


Esta >I i' i e< I I
E~l~i~ll>7.S


WVHY PAY R


this 1 i,:-- hour the feel of life was perfect. tlhe im-
pulse in one's heart was to shout aloud f.-r trie m-i e
joy of being alive. Something of this must have
been felt even by those in bondage, for while he
stood and looked about him he heard a chorus of
merry noises which seemed to come from carefree
hearts. Then he gave his horse rein and began to
move forward again. And his thloiuebit returned to
Annie and his adventure of the night.
Annie Palmer had not appeared to him to be
quite so young in the chilly dawn of the December
morning as she had the night before, or when he had
seen her on horseback in the fields. There were little
lines across her brow, slight it is true, but indisput-
ably there; and just the tiniest of crow's feet about
the corners of her eyes. Her full lips which quivered
with passion had hinted to him of fervent, over-
whelming desire; they were the lips of a woman in
whom sensuality was temperamental and domin-
ant. She was all fire; there was no restraint about
her; but she excused it, defended it, on the ground
that she loved him madly; again and again had she
told him so, and he believed her absolutely. He
believed that she loved him, that he loved her also;
yet, he knew, felt, that hers was a volcanic passion,
that hers was a tempestuous temperament, wild as
the sea fronting Rosehall when it was lashed to


Incorporated
1898.



ENT?


The Victoria Mutual Building Society
xvil assist you to purchase, build or
repair your home.




PAY


U.


F hl'I







A VITAL QUESTION FOR YOU.

WHY PAY RENT?

'I'll;t lit te home you have longed for all these years--why
ni.,a make it a reality by buying one with the help of

TIIE VICTORIA MUTUAL BUILDING SOCIETY.

You can get it for a small cash payment to the vendor,
a;intl the rest monthly, like rent. Not only a home, but a
wike investment for the future.

RE YOUR OWN L\NIDLORD!

LO %\S are granted at the rate of 71% per annum for Interest on amounts
not exceeding two-thirds of the value of Freehold Property.
PROFITS are divisible among Members.
SHARES cost 2/6 per month each.

THE \ALUE OF EACH SHARE on maturity, at the end of 10 years, is
211 0 0 of which you will have paid 15 0 0 only.
BONUS. OR SECOND PROFIT, is added YEAR B1 YEAR and was paid
at the rate of 2 12 6 per share last year.


Receipts for Total Assets at
1)26-27 30th November, 1927

15.Iiab 8 6 469,516 12 2
DIRECTOR!
T N AGuILiA ESQ., J.P.,Chairman H A
M [1 ALErANrDE-. ESQ., J.P.. Deputy Chairman NOE
HM
'/ E M.IANTONl ESQ., LL.B. H.
COL
H E. Bo'LTO E0.O., J.P. TH-
LEtNiAD D- ; OF'DOVA, ESQ., J.P. W. B


Permanent Guarantee Fund
represented by Liquid Assets
at 311th November, 1927
23,762 6 6
*I-
.. LASELVE SIMPSON, ESQ., O.B.E., J.P.
L B. LIVINGSTON; EOQ.
ACAULAY ORRETT. ESQ., J.P.
,ONEL A. H. PiNrJOr,:K V.D., J.P.
MON A LTAMONTE. DaCOSTA, M.B.E,, M,L.G., J.P.
B. GRAY, ESQ.


AUDITORS.
W. BOWMAN, ESQ. Chartered Accountant.
V. St.CLAIR DORAN.


sr'R TrT 1Y
,DNE .' ,-- IcC.jTHTC iH ES' I.1 E J E


,Ol.I( IT-nRo
P1..l r HAF' E'I ,. ,FCUPKE


OF FICE :
No. 6 I)L.'IKE SrIEET,
Kilngst

- --


PLANTERS' PUNCH







PUNCH 1929
-*


fury by the winds that rushed down from the north,
fierce as the storms that sometimes ranged over this
country, devastating it in an hour or two.
He had pledged himself to her. He had gone
to the Great House the night before with no such
intention in his mind, although she had fascinated
him. He had entered it as a guest, he had left it as
a lover pledged, as a lover to whom- she belonged
and who was hers without reservation; so both of
them had passionately asseverated. He was tired now
and weary in mind and body. For two nights he
had hardly slept, and even his abounding energy
was taxed by the exhausting excitements through
which he had passed. She had laughed at his pro-
tests that he would have to work that day, asking
him why he should wish to ride about sun-baked
fields or sit sweltering in a boiling house redolent
with the odour of bubbling cane juice and of sweat-
ing human bodies; but he had insisted that he must ,
play the game with Burbridge and she had given
in. Nevertheless the task before him was distaste-
ful. This estate life and its exigencies were new
to him ard the malaise in his mind conflicted with
the necessities of a day's laborious and sordid
routine.
She was beautiful, strong, passionate, wealthy,
self-reliant, and she loved him. He would not live
in the Great House with her; on that he had made
up his mind; for one thing, he did not wish to leave
Burbridge, who so obviously wanted to be friendly
with him and who would feel that he had become,
in some sort, a master instead of a colleague. There
was also his persistent impulse towards personal
independence. He had not come to Jamaica to accept
anything from a woman; he could not stay in the
Great House and not be, in a manner of speaking,
a recipient of a hospitality which he could not
return.
But how long, in any case, he asked himself,
could this life, that had just begun, endure? Annie
was a white woman; she had been married; she
was still young. Women like her did not, even in
Jamaica, contract open, unlegalised connubial re-
lations with men; he knew enough of the colony to
be aware of that. Whatever might be done in
secret, there was some respect shown by them to such
public opinion as existed. Their husbands and sons
and brothers cared nothing what might be said
about them. Robert had been told in Montego Bay,
by his friend the 'rector, that these men, even if
married, openly maintained other establishments,
talked about them, could not imagine why there
should be any secrecy or shame in regard to them.-
But a somewhat different standard for women of
the upper orders obtained, and Annie belonged to
those orders, was assuredly in the front rank of
them. Here was something of a problem; how was
it to be solved? By marriage? He had not thought
seriously about marriage in his life; he had cer-
tainly not considered it a likely, or even possible,
consequence of his journey; neither of them had
hinted at it last night. But she had been three
times married, and if he loved her, and she him,
what more logical, more natural, than that this sud-
denly-developed relationship of theirs should end in
marriage? But what would his father say?
Robert knew. His father would be startled at
hearing any.suggestion of an alliance between him
and a woman who had already had three husbands




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Rates on application to

the MANAGERESSS,"
ST. ANN'S BAY,
JAMAICA, B.W.I..


and who had herself admitted, that she had many.
enemies in this island who traduced her and kept
away from her-who shunned her. His father would
be grieved, resentful; there would be an estrange-
ment between them. And he himself; did he really
wish for marriage with Annie? Would he willingly,
gladly, make her his wife, vow to be everything to
her, select her as the companion of a lifetime? He
dismissed the question hastily, saying to himself
that it was mean and unworthy of him to ask it,
feeling indignant that it should have obtruded itself
into his mind. Yet the very hastiness and.indigna- -
tion with which he strove to eject it, put it from
him, instead of facing it and answering it fairly,
caused him an uneasy twinge of conscience; he felt,
though he tried not to feel, that he was endeavour-
ing to deceive himself. He said to himself that it
was unnecessary, premature, to think of such a thing
as marriage now. He meant, and was secretly con-
scious that he meant, that he did not wish to think
of it at all.
He rode very slowly, his horse going at a walk.
A delicious coolness was in the air, the sky in front
of him was all rosy, with soft white clouds shining
in a mellow light, the green of the canefields stretch-
ing away, a wavering sea of vivid colour on either
hand. He could see the wavelets of the Caribbean
break gently upon the white margin of beach; the
tropical birds had awakened and were calling to one
another and singing their morning song, the cattle
lowed plaintively as they were driven from their
pens to begin the day's work. Now and then a
shouted order, sharp, but the words unintelligible,
reached his ear.
He suspected that his figure, clearly outlined as
it must be from his eminence on a horse's back,
must be perceptible to every eye that was turned
in his direction; perhaps Ashman saw him, Ashman
who had arranged to be at the Great House that
morning to accompany Annie over to Palmyra. Ash-
man's conduct last night had been extraordinary; he
had acted as though jealous of his presence in the
house. Ashman had seemed disposed to make
trouble, would probably seek for a reason to do so.
Ashman would know by now that he had spent the
night at the Great House, and draw his own conclu-
sions. There was some complication to be expected
here. Conflict was being ingeminated between him
and this aggressive, bullying man.
He hitched his horse to a post standing by his
quarters when he arrived at them; he observed that
the door of Burbridge's room stood ajar and guessed
that Burbridge himself must have already repaired
to his duties. But before he could reach his own
door, that of the middle apartment opened and
.Mlli(nti appeared. She wore a .looser dress than
she had worn the day before, and her head was
lightly bound up in a coloured headkerchief which
she must have tied on just a moment or so ago.
He was surprised to see her; he had not expected
her to take up her work as housekeeper so early.
Millicent looked worried, anxious: there was a
strained expression on her face.
He would have passed her with a nod, but she
stopped him. "You was all night at the Great House,
Squire?" she asked.
"Yes," he-replied shortly, resenting the question.
"You can get some coffee for me."
"It's boiling already; I soon give it to you. I


"Truth is but another

S name for Fact."



We must never forget-the sweet-

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bitterness of POOR-QUALITY.


It is not the HIGH GOST OF LIV-

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Lt is a fact that the best of Gro-

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THE ARMY & NAVY STORES,

Kingston.

Corner of Orange and Harbour Streets.


C~,n.- l,:rel at about eijlht ri' l.:k last night an' tind
you ,r.ine t,.I the House. I hardly -leep a \\ink all
nightt'
"*W'll. I dOn't see that that oilermql mie," he
saidi rritably: is it thlt cutom her, for servants
Or htlieket-p-ri. to sit up hn their employvir. are
ava'"
H., walkId inti. the rmon and seated hillrnel'
on t he tdge df ie hid Tlihre i as a c loe tistly I
smell about the place. iit liisusted him: the (ontrat,
ba.tven thie (;r-dat HI.uset and thi-se v i-ti:[ietd dig-
g1ras wa., over belnllml
Milliiriit bhad i idently been preparing for his
morninllg arrival. She -enr t in h, k the bak ti e liu.se
aun pr.--ently brought in a large mug ot steaming
ci'.-rfe andi a larpe roasted nm. with a hiunlh of
ria-ted dsittish ilavnur-ed with l uconut oil. She
plae.-d the-e o..n th table and waittdl I(, -ee him
eat.
He drank the ,'..t'fee, whiih r'resheii him omne-
v.hat; the food did ni..r appeal rt him. though it was
ordlinar'. .1oo:d biJ uk-k-,ekP- r' 3 far'
He fMlt in i Il-ittel mol. n, after his co,tffee, he
lo-'ked at Millal:iit Cu d-humouredly. So yO.u a ere
up all uight. :h? YYou hav. taken .harg- early, but
sittin: up is not a part of y.uur job."
"I ku..n that." she replied :almly. and, to his
astonishni-rti. s.dteil herself on the bed beside him.
'But I was anxio,u' ah.,ut vou You a elt to a had
plaI; "
"The devil! Mil. goo..d girl. you may be free. as
you havv- told me moretL than iice: but if .ou are
goline to. be to. fr-ee with .\ur t.ingue y, u will cer-
tainly regret it How darep ou speak of your mis-
tre.s's hloulse as a bail place' "
She nor m) mi-tres.,, for I am free-au" edu-
cated." add-id Millie. tith emphasi-. "I don't belong i
to hier. An' it r a bad place. it is haunted. All
sort of noiae and cri.-s you hear in dat hou-.e at
niaht. an' oimetius irn rl- day too A i.t ,.if people ,
ilie in lier-i.-an' the- die fiiinn. You going bark.
aeaiin. Sluir,." i
"This .i impertuenii:e. Mlilli-." Riobert .oldly
replied. You ai .: gi now. I don't need you any
lliitrl "
Tars _arherf.-d ill Millii'- eve. -,hei lu,,ked hurt.
And.l Iobl.-rt. ahIo i\') n naturally kind beartiEd, and
hli.- i uldi notl but h.ie hat thil,? \as a very hand-
-nical'. r Ill built earl ho hadi not the sliehtest in
tl-ni:on of offe.nding hini. rel.nt.d After all. he'
rh-oucht. nalntrl.l 'vt- i'r i-V fr T'- and -asy; in thl s
S iolntlr. : he hai r,.il. ri rl iR1 Mnt,-p, Bay that even
-lavtrs .--; feiel abi.- to take- liberties %itli their mas-
Itl'9. Arnii ilii.. irl ina n. -late "Now. din't be
-ill." hi- -ikl. "I didn't mt -an ., liiiirt .iur fe,.-lings." J
Bil I -'i iui rr tth-ni all thIe arn-e. an' I illyy tell
\'. 'ihat I Irll \,i hli aus- I don't want nothing to
idapr'in .to y",u I > iulnin't ie--p all nielit lIr,,-ra_ a
I was f'lrettiing f.,ir ii Et il spirit is in that iCroat
-Hols.. an' (-'.l ii-Ip .iI if Youi Let ii their Aav!'"
"Bul Mrs Palmner li-t., the-re-. Millii. rarld ;hc is
not afraid ,iIt thc.- '-vil ci pirit- yjti speak of, "
"-She kuon, hy s nlr. is not afraid." returned
Milli. ent Figniticantly. **though sh..- should lbe de
riist t., he afraid You -was itl h-'r last uniht?"
"Thia will do' .Juit tak- those tlnhiri-? and gn!"
I aill g, if .-.u -'-nd nit, a. wa IIut I tild you
vye.te-rda that I like you. an' I thiuhlit yout was
oning! to like me.. r.:o. an' that i- \n h I c.on)ie ton


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PLANTERS'






1929


keep your hlouie. I an ni.'t a pool e-,irl Ljokiin-' for
work. MIe lan'tfather-you nill ,ioon hbar who lie
is6-don't anut me in \orfk for anV manti: lh is rich
an' stroug-as ,Io..nn as Mr- Pailnn." r Millie spiuang
to her feet "Andi that i- n~hI I :ain talk to: you as
I talk: I don't afraidI fin Mi-. Palmer and all -he
can ido. Shie take .ou iul' to i. (:;r.at H.,use last
nighl---i. I knuon-lik- -he- take up d.-he' men: an'
yrfu will come r. their sane end if viyou dIn'i c:aeful
I pray ti Go.ld all night last niiLlit for .\.i,. aind I
going to ask inn eran'ifather to protect you. But lie
tan't help 3\ou it' you don't Ihelp .youielf"
Roheit lookeil at the girl as thi.ill sh -. were
inane: and indiies'. il did -ieem t:o hiul that she
must he sliiihly toured Oft' what was i she ravine?
"I don't think I n.e-i d evn yo'r grandiarlier',
proiet-iuon." ihe laughb.l. 'iut your pial\ers will ln.
doubt he utefuii"
"You laugi-h atu what you dinn't intd.r-.taun." [het
an.werred aadly. "Wait till y-.ut knoiw nir. .in'
then you mightlit ant to cry. I wish yoiu wmuil leave
dia plar--' -" lih e .laimlled ferv-nlts. "Dr..n't s ay
here: leavr a' nunL k ah you tanu-and ntake tue id
.t'u I will grO ill y u anyda nli-he e. H-arm!i \\itl l inoit
to youil if yui retain, an' tlienn me he-art niould
break."
"You are exr ir-ld '. ,i:.ur lont e nilht's v Nil." Lhe
said g intlriy: then. s,-ein- that -lie didl not ilnder-tani
him quite. Iih aided. "you should n..l late s tated
awake last night Well. run outside n,-w: I have
gr t to co tio work at on.- B tline iay. I amn fe'olin
wear)\: i.an I get a ituni pun h or anvthiun I lk;- that
here? There niu-t he i:oie ium in I Mir. Purbtiidg-'s
room Perhaps P.s het-"
"I can att it out of de rmni without :alling
Psyche." oaid the girl. "'"ut rum sno early in the
morning is had. Mlauy rlillires fror EnElatrd die-
because they drink soon in the inm ninei Youin don't
want soime monlre i.oIe- in tadt?"
"No: [ nI -ed ,'il metliing triainit-r. Everytriiuin
that I se-inl tr-. \anit yi:n i n-ider Iad. M! lili- and
death is ever in y ur indii. Ytiu iar- te fntnie-r.
serlali I have -wer hada "
nCamei.- a yourV hou-7-keeper.r. nit a; a aI. LantI."
she retorted. enmpha.si-itg thie wljrd housekeeper.
giving ti. it the sicnifi anr e :of its .Jamn ai.:a iie-aning
"Anl." shie Ijoldly added. "I wouldn't i ar i what y.ou
did, ot whether y.-iu lie or die. if Io didn't love you
So there!"
She went tl g-t ilhe rum. anil he mnused athil.-
This was ixtraiordinarV: two t wiom nit..:i..i tnhite. the
other hrown. and rothb indubtitahly lhandlsme in their
respective waS had told hnnl %vitlhip a very fetw
hours that th..y Inved hinm. Thi'- tas flatterin? to,
his vanity.. buit he piri eiv ld that i-aloiniy nii:hl in-


,nig .ndered between rlie two: thin hi'owin airl already
-poke as one bitteily jealou- She had just -'aid
something about AnnIe taking In tile Gri-at House
other men twho I had o.nie to 'i.I.- inmpl.-a'aunt enl-
other men. what the d',vil i.il the little nigger
mean? Other men Oi' Annii_'- former hu-i3hands
of course-. and hi.t.anid thIree [bail di-il ,poor Annie
.aS [Iehl as inll Sne wav r'e--pn.n.ilble for thLir death.
Shei hadl -aid that soie -in.h tIalk .ai-nt aliurt But
lie wa, unlt .oinn- li he.. a -s-rttant, vnrn. er if' she had
ind=pc lndent an nii .. Jndi ..pr-uly i...t'fe--s i l,.,t, for
himn, -peakin in-ilienrl aoni ili-,i rl -i,:ifuily l f Ri f .. r
;lill's mnr-trT,.0-
Mlillie -:amef bark xith tl,- iiquol andi hanildd it
to him nwith cvihi.nt nr-lu. tanre: It, rtok it silently
andl culrpel it diti, n. at ...na.e h'- ft'.- u'-l w energy
i.oirse throughh hisi \u-in- Hi- hblii.i s-wam. fljr the
rum was puitt-nt and tae qui.tiarityv pi-ntiri'nl. I Rlnt it put
hini in pi...il -pil its He \was nir iyipi.-ed tI be
harsh with Mliii- niow: indet-- lie Ic-uili-ibly rialisied
that he .rather Ik-il thi hl bnr'wn i itrle 't \b dared
to go' great li-rJfth i- hji-i.tau r-e h-.: a.i- "'free ai1d
etdjueatnd" ani bher graniilfath-nr mas. nianl '*, ealtil
and power. H- dle\elioprip an inteair-t in thins won.
dleriful eerandftI rh-r. \tidij.-nt Ih nna a periron of
maik. ItH hez-an li. e;it Ii' bl.aki'a3t. aundl lihe ate
he talked]
"'[*- our lgranidfathher a thite man. Millie?" he
anked
lOne iof' t[iemn lad-: but tie'- lead. lie In as ime
father's rat li-r."
"Theu tihis ,,tli.r i ranidfathnlei t' y.fIr- \hi.-m
y..u invoke with sulih I--'rvern..e ainl ai.e?"
Sh.- looked rpuzzl-d
"My language." he niiled. "i. p-rlh.p-. ni.u suf.
tici-ntly "e-dut.atedil' I mean I\h. and ihnat and of
Shliat colour is rhi,- ..thr erandt'fanlt h-i yourr,"
"He is black '-o al blan k. and iti tall an]d oll.
very ilI. Ih- ii a -;uina mia aandi 'A !--' He ,.an
talk r... r.pirits. like i-l .ii wviti:h in ,ie Bible, wiho
call nup Samniu m Me g'-t'an father i- V--ry r*.al: en: ry.
hody h--re afraidd [i-i him-e -,i n Mr Palm.nr!"
"I -ec.:' An Airih;in anin hat yni call omt here
an nileahlmant Is that it?"
'Y iet-i-4: bt hi'.< Inre trani a ,i..-n anlimun More
p: .en ft'ul "
n-6nrinall; ann Aftlian \witch d.o t.r., i Isuppose,
and' a hlio-r\ .Id iountlel L.et hinm rak-- iare he
dj.,ein't er int., rlniul;1l.. Mili "i
"The-\ ian't Ic. him an thing. i, him i- r..i. troii a
He Pjrintie'i rueni. an hei- nan prote. yi. ito.. itf You
want Biut o lor- as .ion -tavy hlere y iii a dre oit oft
his irea-c. Y onu hrtner leave. Siqine T'ro:ble co.in
ins fir ylou "
"I ill -tay and] m,-r it And. lih k l o-r i Millie.


I won't ,-end yu a"ay a- I IrhL.-rat-ntll .i, do a nhile
aza.'. But y nl aie to unlin-r'tailld that y- nnilist -ay
nothinn- rude ab.utt the ladiy otf this property. Lio
you hear'"
illi- nodd-ld Lli r liiad .-adi "I Ih.-ar." sh-
daniei'i. "and I udant.-r-tain You ii .ve ier. aln' y.ii
d'lil't Il.. ile ,'
SPelrf'.tl. in ,i i t ible." l.ughlled Rol,<-rt. now
ri' .,r-.d Ito the i.,-h t Of hilnii ui i by hi- rink for
that ia- the .- etf.r whtlnih drink it-ually had up...n
him "Perihal.-.-" ilil aded paily. "I will love .1i.m
too." Tliien. Ir. iii- 'wn arr.tzing saurri-.e, for hI.-
had rnot '.onterniilat- d riti. -ii>: .itac i n. he ,b.nr i riverr
and ki[ -a-, Milli, .,ii tile moutli. anti aily, sallied
ft.i th .A; f..i tli- unir -lit- l..il -tack still. tin killed
tI. thie- niar.'w ,:\ltl...l t, th,- seventh h heaven of
delihlit. A ian iiiph.lant glal-re -li'ione in her -ye-,. the
ligilt ir f via tily J id r i wlwh nni .i- hall trhoui ilt iish
had l.-t evr i.lt lii n..- 'limp-e-d a prospe- .t ,:a t ill-
tinitne iriunllmt ant -ii-..e-'
Oin th.- infant li-r tniiind wia- made up. and "Milli-
t.tet had i resolutin.: ind. She was co-in tlo fig lt with
Mr;. Pjlnii r liel -Ilf for l....' -' -inn jf thi minian
Other .girl- like hitr had '.i,u lht a ith .- hir ilily .priai.-.
ladit-s lIefi)r in this -aminl puri-h. .ind had w.'n.
Millie determini-l tr. -ieek .Mr A-linmanu ith...ut ii .
lay anni to ,-nIl-t lim a- i -i ally.

CHAPTER EIGHT

MILLIC'ENT ACTS
F IRST -i- I ildied Rob-rt'-- ri.,,.,m. throiiih that had
not Ibe,-n niU dli iturled. and she atte-ndel- to flie
roir in \"hih i;-he had -.ta id the nieht bfoi'e
Then -lie iwvnt t.i the. trash lioute. where P-y.yhe
%ta-. usaIally r.,t he found pil nin Ih. dried ri-e
fuse of the prLi,---,l nari. whii h iwa-. uned tivheti
reir i i'r,- a- furl f'.r the mill Shce inid P-s :h- nithat
-hle nmu-t liik ,rif:r rh. lun.:lin hi-f lih f r he t.-.uni
ias.-a- rhat ii a anil atterl dflin r to i iie.:e ---t'-.i
bhi.. M illii.ent. nm ii t i i t i.e I..:i.k liefo. uiclit Sihe
already kn-w tlhat l Mr Aiiih-l inlani .nA. L..n tr. PallIn ra
rhar day3. onc ,t the ladi lhad whi-pereld the n-lI
early that niorninn H..e might ii..e I. ba-k for a
couple of day;. .ind -'lie wii-liedl i., e .t m a- e-a lI
a- po-sihie. She taa- if a .1i0, k. inmpulsive i lial-
ai- t--r: ihe- lhat'-d pri- 'ra.-- linalliin and nn. .-e-p ially
she "a-. in a feeVr.h- lat i.t impact -n.e. She nlu-.r ;n t
She prep.ired at i.n. e for he-r j.iurinev t.. Pa.-ilmyra
That e-'rante. % hiclh ttas niu h la r t in' ,lu I o".-i'"
hall. as s.itiat,-,i h-ehinnd and 1o th i- south of it. -ind
\Vwas .WI inn [ti-ld w -tli Ro-ehall by a bridle path land
in;g ',er thn iilerveniin hill- It l.iy 'i a liollow .
ir ",a; t\orkii" i\ tar m) 0le lave-. than tnei.- to


II
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_I'


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I iN iiiii


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EX


he car with features of cars more than twice the price,


TOURER t240


COUPE


SEDAN


-255


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ROADSTER '250


J. SUTTON BROWN. LTD., HARBOUR SI REET KINGSTON.



|| i lll illlll iii$ i Iij $ f$ $ i W$ iiiI lllillilll i iiii l i ii iilllillillil lillii ii lll $ l ii i l i i i Mii il lliiulllulilllll i i i i lii i ii iiiiii iiijiijii iiiii ji iiii ii llillli I iiiii l (ii i ill iiiu u ujii i iiiujiii


THE VOGUE

OF TO-MORROW

Ioller T .iii I Srteering
Roller To;i1[.ls'
.A lth in llu lI'r 1ii-Illib.it alI (_i\-\'
Tunng.iitrj Sieel 'al\*e.
Bendlix Selt' Ener,-isinj' lraIl,.
Slpiker Ujnitei sal .Tiiiin
B.Ill Btlring rr.i :m r lUl.-iin
Elect.ro LDck
Bal.iucedl Rittlihig I' Panl
i Not .,'liy I.'n aik Cr n iha t altd
IECaDn Si;mit. Inut aI-t FI \I11 hel.l.
(_'li1l lI Tralt.illji'.s;ii l I an lli (rivll
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BEST VALUE

OF TO-DAY


~!IIIHllllilllllllIIIIIIIIBIIIIUIIIII


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lllllli~


PLANTERS' PUNCH







PLANTERS' PUNCH


be found on Rosehall; it had its own Great House
and overseer's residence, and all the other appurten-
ances of a great sugar estate. Mr. Ashman was in
charge of both properties, his energy and capacity
rendering him quite capable of handling both. Ash-
man was an able man in his way; the financial
success of Rosehall and of Palmyra in these last
two years had been due to his competent manage-
ment.
Millicent knew that he would ride over to
Palmyra, and so be there long before she could come
up with him-she did not know that Mrs. Palmer
was riding with him that morning. But she cal-
culated that she could get to the next property
soon enough to catch him at the overseer's house;
if he were out riding round the estate, however, she
would have to await her opportunity of speaking to
him. What she was going to say she had not yet
thought out; she must feel her way when she met
him. But she knew that everybody said he had
been Mrs. Palmer's lover, that everybody said he
was still enamoured of her, and that lately
there had been a coldness between them that had
preyed upon his mind and worsened an already nasty
temper. That he was a strong and determined man
Millicent was well aware; that he would fight to
regain his old ascendancy over the mistress of
Rosehall she guessed. She wanted him to do that,
without harming Robert of course, whom Millicent
regarded as merely a victim of Annie Palmer's.
Millicent, young and, on the whole, unsophisticated
though she was, shared to the full the ordinary femi-
nine distrust of her own sex and was ready to attri-
bute what a man did that was not right in her sight
to the wiles and machinations of some other woman.
Robert, having come to Rosehall but two days
ago, she told herself, could not be blamed for any-
thing he did in connection with Mrs. Palmer. It
was the lady who was responsible; it was from
the lady-a very terrible character-that the
young squire must be rescued by any means; and
if those means were not fair Millicent would have
not the smallest objection to them or experience the
slightest sting of self-reproach in employing them.
She walked with a rapid stride, swinging her
upright body smartly and easily as she marched,
communing with herself, filled wholly with her pur-
pose. The young "massa"-she called him so in her
mind, yielding to custom, in spite of her freedom
and education-had kissed her, and, in spite of all
that she had said about Mrs. Palmer, had decided to
let her stay on in his service. He had confessed
that he might come to like her. But he had been
with the white lady all the night before, as other
men had been, and she had heard a great deal about
the fascination which that woman exercised over
those who loved her until she wearied of them. If she
could break that enthralment at once, the young,
handsome squire would be saved and would leave
Rosehall, taking her with him, as she was absolutely
determined that he should do. He was not the first
young white man that had liked her; others had
suggested an establishment to her, and they were
not mere overseers either, but owners of their own
properties. If she had remained "single" up to now,
it was of her choosing; none of her suitors had
touched her heart, or, as she put it "filled her eye."
But Robert Rutherford did; he stood forth in her
imagination like a god. She had seen and loved
him, just as Annie Palmer had done. She was as
resolved to fight for possession of him as Annie
Palmer was.
It was pleasant walking; the path led through
leafy woods and the sun was not yet strong enough
to cause discomfort. Besides, Millie was well ac-
customed to lengthy peregrinations; walking was
second nature to her. But she was some time be-
hind Mr. Ashman when she came to Palmyra, and as
she neared the overseer's house she saw at once
that something unusual was forward.
A sort of court was being held. Half a dozen
men were -being tried for plotting something; just
what, no one was certain of, for the men were ob-
stinately reticent and asserted that they had met
the night before, in the hut in which they had
been caught by Mr. Ashman, for purely social pur-
poses. Ashman again and again pointed out to them
that, if that had been so, they would not have ceased
suddenly to talk when they, much to his annoyance,
heard his footsteps, and would not have at-
tempted to bolt, an effort which he had frustrated
by flinging himself into the doorway and barring
their egress with his body. That they had been plan-
ning some mischief, he averred, was beyond all
doubt, and Mrs. Palmer, who stood listening to him
and to them, nodded her head in agreement.
She was looking very grim and serious this
morning. There was resentment in her heart
against Ashman, who had spoken plainly to her
about Robert Rutherford as they rode over to Pal-
myra; she had repressed her feelings (a matter
of difficulty with her) and that repression was cla-
mouring for explosive relief. There was relief to hand.
These slaves were unruly, secretive, dangerous; at the
very least they had no sort of right to be where they
had been found by the overseer last night. To punish
them severely might be to lose their services in field
and sugar works for some time, but to order their
condign chastisement and to look on while the lashes


were inflicted was a joy and satiifaction wllkih .-he
could not at that mlhmuliet toai2,.
Annie ruled her people by terror. whitc and
blai.k alike She had witnesses' whippings for years,.
and year, and her appetite had gi'rown with what it
ted on. The rir-t flogging she haj. -een ha.d mane
lier ill, yet she had found a terrible ta.cination in
it She had gL ne to 'ee another, and yet anotlthl-r.
that lir.-t lasting i:t bluvd. a- it wei-e. had awakened
a certain lust in lier rhltilh hail "r.iwn and -trength-
ened until it it had blciiirle a powerful land abtiing
obsession Had lie li;ed fifty years bef'.re. awh.n
-laves could -till oe p!')roc!'i frlii the cai ts of
Africa. and when the law cave lthe slaver.wner far
more power nv,-r th- lite i..f a -ial,. than it did in
these days. she iw.iilli -oomeriii'- ha.ve had an
erring hond-iman or woman whipped t,., d,-ath in her
presence. At tlisi nimment her full lips wern- ,-et hard.
and the little line- running tromn the nostrils to hli
corners of her mouth were grilnly prieptlible. When
she spoke it waa in tnln -. 'if ruel finality
"Give lith m tw tenty-., :, u lashes eaIch it :ou-hti
to he more. but we want their lb Iojr ti,.day. Lay (on
theh laeshie il. theouch nriak tht-ni teel' That wiil
teach them to plot m-i. hief a!alu' '
There -,,re two e\ecuiirs-t n ithi., oi.cas iuli. for
one would be Ito tired to apply rhh blows with .ul.
ficient viiouri cn all the culprits condemntld Milli.
,ent had seen something ilf thi- s;ort before -h',. wa4.
?i k with disgiit and anger bi lut -he (lid not f.-or'-e
her purpose. She worked her av a- j.1..3 to. Ash.
man as she ciculd. and thein fix\re lier .aze upion i.i
face with thp idea of i.n.mnmuni(atinr. tio im hin
movements, of her t-ye-e that she wished t. r'nta-
ti hinm
When thle flagging wa' finished and the nen
ordered to resuni. their wr rk immediately. Mlr-
Palmer. castingg a -lance over thos- whlo had beenl
summoned to witness this vinilirairicn of authority.
uoberved Mlillicent staring at Ahliman and, int re-
nembering her, nnticing to.. the girl's gpond :look
and superior attire, asked zharpl,. "W'lh is tl lat
young woman' Not one of my people. is she"'
Ashman turned and. saw Mlllli fjr thle ril~
time. "No." he said. "she's old Takoi,'s grand
daughter."
"Oh!" A inote -Of inteiret rrept into MlNI
Palmer's voice. "I have heard of her. I must have.
seen her before troo" She looked piercingly at A-h.
man.
'She evidently hav om- to youu h.-h i, staring
at you. She i- very prett~. Jolihn
-Yes," dryly.
'Treat her nicely: she look a.- if mhe wa.- wurth
it. You like pretty things I shall see y..iu at the
Great HIouse when )you come up."
Mrs. Palmer rode off with a knowing smile, a
smile of great satisfaction. She had at once con-
.luded that this girl wished to see Ashman for in
timale reasonin. upon which but one coun.-iru:tiiii
iould be plated. and she wa- glad that Nlilliih-nt
was so well favoured. Ashman's talk that morning
had aroused in Mrs Palmer's heart a dangeri'uu
feeling towards him. hut she wil-hd to avoid trouht-l
with him if that \were at all ps- bible. He waa tc, o
useful to be dispensed with lightl..
'You want me-''" briefly demanded Ashman He
was in something of a hurry and did not wish ih,
devote too much of his time to a ;irl on huim lie


1929


It.d -niled in the pa.-.t but w hi had shown only
toi:, .leaily that t'.ir him she had not tlie slighte.r
iise. and "a'. nevi- likely tit hav .
Ye'. -ir'"-- illie stole .to peak her ivst: "I
want to speak to you--private"
"Well, I haven't muc-i time Comrie thi-. w'ay and
tell mie t ha it is"
HI.- took Ihir o.uur .ft the- hearing, of ith. pei-lple
alouijna. but he did nut get ift hiti hor.e to listen
'What i i it" lie demianiled imipatjtnrtly. seeing that
ihei hesitated
Shie rook heir loutrage in botth hands: -he pliine-d
intiu hIr tale n lthiut cilriumloc-tuily preliminary.
tti.'igll it h[id l.-,n in her i ini l til lead graiduall)
up it., iie heart of it
Yoj know ir tht ite new bhroik k,-plelr slep .at tlhe
(;i,-at Hiu ase last iigtii ? Yiiu know he was ther-
"% id Mr.5 Palnler""
"Anil what te hell ha. that -ot tlo 1o ith
u'?" Lit bur.t nut. -iandalised at her tilling hlni
thlis. iit-ati ing it .1s a i.rois offencfi. partly icdUse
tlih .-r'x tact thar slie -tat.-,i l aa rankling in his
1lt-art
Don't hell mn-. Mr Ashman'" returni-d Milllr-eur
%iith spirit Doi't Il.i ime' I am not one it f yi.ii
lhave that :olu lt an floe like a ding, and me gran'
fathrb kii..-- hoi,. Ir deal wi,.l anybody who ill-tirat
ni.
.Y ,ur Lran tl'atht-. C a:Lu ,) tO h-li as ",ell a v iJu.
souiie da:, ht- will s\,ing tintm .aLailo,- And d nt
i.e it,. ii.- that I ia int l' fl .'i nl and Ia\. a rine f~. i it.
it ',u are inipe-rtin-nt MIr'. Palm]-r woul, have
.oii flg Le n:w. on tlie .-pt. if I ,niy told her what
y'ru have just said to ,me'
Mlillicent realized, with a sit.k.-nini spasm of
,far. that \uat he said wa. oaiil- too trii.-: Mrs
Palmer might. in a paroxysn of fury. order her to
be whipped until she bled. no, mattel what the after
inrl.-ellen.-,..- inlizbt be. Sihe hall ione -.rme daring
thiing-in itie open light of day. anii .om-e still more
titrible. h,.Irifying things. by the dim Imiht of
,.atndlks vtihin the ht-av\y walls i-t RH,.elall. if what
,%as I hi]s pe-ed :-Jbliut her was true. Nilliecnt
t. cnbled
But 4he held her Lronund arid slie Splioke out with

"Tr' it itf ou dare." she \'vlleyred back. "-Tr
it. anr' .i.- sure as there i-. a G;d ill heaven me
grandfather %aill pois-n both y.iiu and -ile before the
ee-k is. over
A.mhnian iralieedi in his turn thiar that alsr was
\vry probable TakAoo a ]riild i iln..ubtedly tak-e ven-
geani'e for any injury inflicted on his granddaughter.
no ,oni who knew him lon i dIloubt that And he
da- i.on.sidereti in these parts a imaiter in the art of
n,-.-inine There ',sa.-. a lhit,- plan.t-r who had died
in aen' iiandi Takor had been su'.peited-though no-
thiung rould le provtd tl inain-t him. A-s,htanu letr-

"If that is all yuji lh e i:.liue here to say. y.iu
had better lear out." he ord:i-ed
"I i.,rne here to tell you that-that v.tl .should
try all' stop this thing between MNr- Palmenr an' rhe
ni-.o book keeper Ift y.n dol't doi it Low it nmghti
1t touo late next wer-k. andi .,ioi won't like that "
"Oh." lie said grimly "But you ilon't car-r
a curse abut me. ,o )r's not ii nmv intiere-.i :,io
are rpeakin- W hat i ,oiilr oiijet', '
i f On1111 t ti I ll Petm? ; I


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THE EDUCATIONAL SUPPLY CO.

16 King Street, Kingston, Jamaica.






Booksellers, Stationers, and Printers.








SCHOOL( L BOOKS, REWARD BuO\KS, NOVELSS?

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1929 PLANTERS' P LN CH 5


\\'hat cheer, my lads, what cheer
From the land of the buccaneer!
We have sailed, we have sailed both near and far
For a Planters' Punch and a good cigar
From the land of the buccaneer?

Would you do the same again?
Would you sail the Spanish Main?
We would sail, we would sail as we sailed of yore
For the same good cheer that we had before
We would sail the Spanish Main!




Treasure Trove

In the old days men came to the Caribbean
islands in search of treasure. They sailed away
laden with Spanish gold, and laid the foundation
of romances which have since thrilled the world.

Today, Jamaica---perhaps the most historic of
these islands---has gained a great deal from
modern improvements. All the comforts of
civilisation are here, but the old romance still
lingers.
And you can still depart laden with treasure
---with Jamaica's choice and exquisite cigars, a
worthy souvenir of your stay, a most acceptable
gift to your friends.

BUT you must have the best. Whether you
wish for a choice smoke at a modest price or
Jamaica's best at a higher (but still moderate)
cost

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t.,./ s ,it ,'-h t,, ,ic l .t,, p ,'


. "m .






PLANTERS' PUNCH


The Witch of Rosehall
(Continue from Page 34)
"Say what?"
"What do you want; what are you telling me
this for?"
Millicent dropped her eyes.
"I know you been friendly with Mrs. Palmer."
"That is none of your business. I will thank
you not to mention it again."
"An' if she love this new massa she not going
to love you any more, an' she may turn you away
or-"
"Yes?" ominously.
"Well, you know what happen sometimes when
she done finish with anyone she used to love."
Millicent spoke in a whisper, as one very much
afraid.
"Yes?" There was now a fierce harshness in
Ashman's voice. Again had Millicent echoed his
own unpleasant thoughts.
"And"-desperately-"I like the young massa.
an' I am his housekeeper."
"So that is it at last! Now we have the motive."
He thought a moment, then suddenly looked at Milli-
cent with a new light in his eye. His voice became
friendly on the instant. "What can I do, Millie? I
don't see that I can do anything."
"Can't you turn him away as soon as you go
back to Rosehall?"
"I? But she would take him back if she wanted
to. I would only be making a fool of myself if I
did that."
"Then why don't you tell him all about her,
massa? You know everything. Tell him!"
"He wouldn't believe me if I did; and he would
repeat to her everything I said. It would be no
use. But you-you could tell him. Does he like you?"
"I think so," diffidently.
S Ashman was ready with advice; he had made up
his mind.
"That is good! Make him like you more. Don't
leave him if you can possibly help it. Stick to him
all the time; show that you love him. You are a
very pretty girl; I am sure he will like you. And
tell him all that you know, Millie; tell a little now
and a. little more later on; but rub it in as much as
you can. And look here, don't, for God's sake, let
Mrs. Palmer know that you are his housekeeper,
for she would give orders that you were not to put
your foot into Rosehall or Palmyra again. You
understand that, don't you?"
"I know."


He thought a moment. "I tell you what," he
said. "You'd better come up to my place some-
times as if you came to see me. That may make
her think that you are coming to me."
"But suppose Mr. Rutherford think so too? He's
a stranger. What will him think of me?"
"He isn't likely to have any thought like that;
and you can always find a reason to give him. But
if Mrs. Palmer imagines there is anything between
you both-God help you! You ought to know that."
"I know that," said Millicent miserably. "She
is hell. She is de devil himself. She is the worse
woman in Jamaica!"
John Ashman looked at the girl with a lowering
face, thinking that she was saying things distaste-
ful to hear, almost unbearable. It was impertin-
ence in her, stark impertinence which, in other cir-
cumstances, he would have regarded as intolerable,
but did not the whole parish say the same? And did
he not know it himself? Besides, he and Milli-
cent must be allies now; they both had much at
stake. "Do what.I tell you," he urged, "and now
go back to Rosehall."
She nodded understanding, turned, and retraced
her steps.

CHAPTER NINE

THE OVERSEER
MR. Ashman was sitting on his. verandah, moodily
looking towards the slave village where dwelt
the workers on this estate; the scene was so familiar
to him that while seeing he might be said to see it
not. The huts of the slaves stood in their own little
gardens in which grew the fruit-bearing trees and
vegetables that those people cultivated for their
own use. Breadfruit and banana spread luxuriant
leaves above and around the houses, creating a
welcome shade during the warmer hours of the
day; yam vines clung to sticks stuck almost up-
right in the soil; the purple of the potato plant
showed itself on tiny hillocks in which the tubers
ripened. It was a settlement, this, and those who
inhabited it were mostly at home at this hour; work
had ceased in the fields and from numerous fires
trailed upwards into the air the blue smoke of burn-
ing wood with which the bondswomen cooked their
families' evening meal. The fires themselves could
be seen shining in the dusk, lending a touch of
bright picturesqueness to the village. Stars were
peeping forth, and the breeze of the December even-
ing was delightful after the heat and turmoil of a
strenuous day. Mr. Ashman looked upon it all, but
gave it no thought, for his mind was on far weightier


1929


and more ijntiaintl. sIubject-. He \\a- detle ps- i. tr.lllled.
and anger m.u.ulered in hinm. Hi is .rn.ern aa- tI
find a wdi; ny t\iil.li to, -silve his rlt.itUlltes. aDu.
no way tij.t proUnij d uiilc e s could 1 e tli-.i- ru d
the momi-nr. thinkk lie never o le-) d ,
As th ima in inchar.ge' of Ro-s'eh-l arnd PalmI.l
he was alnn.what huxioua ab,..ut the atiailr-leu ii
nation blikil he knew \%as dl.-i-lopingl in [his. paint
of the iuunt!ry, and perhaps; in tir.\ ,ih.-r parirh.
though just what uiln wh-.h til, s I.iiiniu.lx i\wold ie l i
could rint u.ess. Tlihre \a' trsu'ill, abroad. Word
had got brilt tht t a die.l-ce nlhii-h fr'L e J the -lt iv
had arrii.l ftr.-in England anli jd wa:- l iji kept bak
by the niast.rs. and tine irrilrer .esie i i ita tale
of danger.,u :xclti-temn-t. Thle ilk on es-ate,- went
on as Lusual, t.rl'e ir haljit anl liar ., it' tlie ip
were still p.,ts- tr t ili the--.- i e'i.pi But r rili.r- te% i
grumbli;le,. ihI.ltin-- s. an.id tlt, helil.-f nas prehdlirl
that, at -a.'.Le ldal. tilt ,Jr; ar t .andl t a Li'tii -nignal.
the slate- vmilli l iis. i\'.t L the prI.p-lrrlt i- .u r to
the flame- l.-..it. Iilrde-r their laa-l i r-.. ani thus
would take W b dtd%'Le' ni-:, ii ,.hat tht. believed a a-
being wti -l t'm th-hm i f th- That so.me ourbl)r-ak
would o:s,.ur iMr. A.-imniau Lid unt tiiubt hiut in ihe
meantim- hi-e kinw i- i:i:,iild dio i..tijlin-. Evrn the
whipping thi.' sx me-n lhad h-eni given at Palnmra
had not a runi: a tnrlri' l i r, l .,f s ntf.-,-,i..ni
from t;hl.i (Orie i lt" id ..nil v.'.ir andi h li- vigilant
And, a -iih.wa ti. thl'reJtnin-. rian eti. rlih.ugh ii
might !i, -i .ll i-u:. ann '-; a r il: oif mU re inllrmp.,ranlr
to him wan O-. + i. l;-.lI1t.r lhr r nit-,Is.a -d him pI --,n.Illy
and alcite Jni and trinl an aiiog'.-il-l tiin'ter-nt c iaiidter
For tItr-- yea r,- ha lie lii1.a -t it rra. tir .il:., master
of Rosthall and Palnimra. thiir anrfair- lihain Ir-een
entrusted tu hi Rmnianagiement He hall bl' een mIIor-
than that tro): lthe had h en Arint PainIl'-. lover
He recall-d their firrit meetirin Arnnie'- hiiusand
had been diadl a m.nlb. and hall. as w-, the tli-.tnr.
been buried Init the e;tar-. andi s..-nl- gl runi-ullr.i
had floate-l 1) a iurt a t ts ihe ian-- it l hi- Ildejth The
slaves .ft' i.seiall hadi whikperrii. thie -. iire nme
chanics anti bhok-keepe-r-h hal al.ro alkedi. bel,-Inv heir
breath; tIut nl osle had iisitle t'ti', wait ti muakei' ani
positive a~ lerlitl .inti hre w.iulii be ;a Ihhlil :.ffll er -o
the lav.- a Ii..I h.ihuld i hiarc i-' li,- owner o'f gi-at
estates, .ini a ,.mali at r ihat I ith li Lirll er. unless
th poss-e the- amplfr-t. mnst (r.-nvinriln prr.oof
Yet Monteae, Bal aondelr-dj aid. hinttil. anil hs- had
heard this talk He had gpne to the Ra.oy oin lbutin-es
at about this time. he having terminateil siis i.in.
nection within a property in \Ve-tnir)vi-and and being
engaged in i[,oikitiii for another Dp.jirtln that -hould
suit him He had an excellent repiutalton a- a
capable over e.-r. he wva i f .,J'ii rt i ii o P.Irsj" .;' i


NE-



-00






THE NEW MARMONS


-- 7S& 6






FAMOUS FOR


















32 STTON ST. KINGSTON
I .ofrSedBouy uoiiy





--- @







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'Ihe House of Issa !


OUNDED in the vear IS94, E A.

Issa & Bros. have had one long
unbroken record of achievement in
N the Wholesale Dry Goods trade! E\ con-

sistently adhering to the original policy of

the Organization, namely, B-csI Quailitis

-Low Prices Courtesy and Liberal

| Terms, E. A. Issa & Bros. have becn able

to maintain a reputation in the trade that

cannot be equalled by any other concern!


4 All importations from the best markets

N abroad, are made on a STRICTLI C.ASHI
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For QUICK SELLING-P R 0 F I

EARNING M\erchandise. the "HOUSE

OF ISSA" is the storekeeper's BEST

FRIEND!


S5 E. A. ISSA & BROS..
153-157 Harbour Street. Kingston.






___ I-





1929 P L .\ TE S' P \ C H N;7





BARCLAYS BANK

(DOMINION, COLONIAL AND OVERSEAS).
FORMERLY

THE COLONIAL BANK
Incorporated by Royal harderer 1836.
R e-incorporated by Act of Parliament 1925.
With which are ainalgamated

THE NATIONAL BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA, LTD.
A NI)

THE ANGLO EGYPTIAN BANK, LTD.


Authorised Capital 10,000,000 Subscribed Capital 6,975,500
Capital Paid up 4,975,500 Reserved Fund 1,250,000

"Deposits" 31 3,28 56,846,859



LONDON OFFICE (Colonial Bank Section). 37-39 King William Street, E.C. 4.
MANCHESTER OFFICE, LIVERPOOL OFFICE, HAMBURG OFFICE.
21 York Street. 25 Castle Street. Adolphsplatz IV.
NEW YORK AGENCY,
44 Beaver Street.
CANADIAN AGENTS-THE BANK OF MONTREAL.
BRANCHES IN THE WEST INDIES -Anitiiu.. Barl:l:,. [Dmini,_a;. (lTr..lrlaa, St. Kitt-, St. Lucia,
St. \ ii'nv it, Trini l:i1.. aniil
BRANCHES IN JA AIACA--Kiin-stoi, Antt.: B, F:iliiinutlh. Li...,un. Mont.-.i, M, ranit Bayv,
Portl Alitunio,, Port Mairin, S;ti;iiin :-la-li-inar, St. A-nii'-., P;iy.
BRANCHES IN BRITISH GUIANA-Demin i. Bierl..ic.


AGENTS IN THE WEST INI)IES FOR ''HE BANK OF MONINTREAL.


(ver IJ0 Briinche1 s tlirotl-hout Briti.ih IVe.-t Aftrii,, F-.\lit iir.l thlt Smian, Tn -,\;aul, lhii,--iai, ('.pei
Province, Natal, OIrange- Free State, Swazilain1. lPirtIi_- .se Ea-t Afri.-i, ,.iith-We-t A fri.'a, T nii.anyika,
Nyasalaind, Kenya C.'l.h y, Mailtai, irilr;,ltiir, Pailetlie an iMauiritiu.l. _

CURRENT ACCOUNTS ARE OPENED BY THE BANK IN
LONDON AND AT ITS BRANCHES.




REGINALD V. BUTT,
M manager. Jamaica sBrainches.

\V. A. NMARTIN, Asst. Manager.
i ~iis
al ii m i m iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii
i--







P L NT E R S'


The Witch ofRosehall
I I ll lllllle i II Polw, .;;
frutille. C'-rLta il3 lie hail ne iver thbouL'ir it o rt nrakii
appliiatI n toi the owI ne.r o Ro--ehall, w.vuild haiv
lau llhidil a it A .ii e~l I.in thatl he -h.unili d.*. L.,l
w\ille be stayed at MoRlnte,. Ba.> Aurie P.ilm ni r i h.I
ridrndnL Int. lo n ..ii- ornin Chan,.l i.lIIou h lihei
ithl I.,dtirii lAu-e at Inrhih Iil. hl.pp 1e .n l in r li
lOrridor leadin- i- ti tile .linini rinm Ith.- men t tliar

.John AIhlimai .A- mnil-, ulat'. w-ll -.-t up. arr,..
..ant in i'wlii ,i'iipl i in m anrner. hl j l A ..e r,. .itt
ha rutu-jniri -- -if iwi hiii I h e Ia-. vei'y ii 1 aL arie
Annie w.- i .laint. briilht. alluring -. w rh .anIll i. t.Ir
.I liie-l.lookiir niml I anild a-- f.' Lhie iuri.-e--..i n ,l
anyonli e sh- frantl iei Hern' iuiillie- I e -1 i li itnitnI .
lri w ill ml.ei i,,i:. -ni ,n l-r uil.- oh-l .a le- itll !nt
palhi with .i riJ m. -S ..rlh .rlnd l .ie a.l l .fl u...n e- lie-tliL
Sh -e did n..r ki v. w I. i 1 1tr i m %%i 1 w hi- ll.i .e 1"
at onler thl.t ihi : aA.i Wn!lltan ured inii ll ar I.- ,-: i-il
at b -r iintE inv l'. i will adlii lariiili H lalin i Ii 111
'eyeu He k:iil whi ii L w i u ird had v'n .
.liout the h..utl thl- t Mti- P-alm r ,.-i f hi ..R.s hall a- n.a n
it. anti 3 t rirl't s I i oth lt h, li._.- a.. .w. e ht l illi
wouldd be nio other thaii thlie w...ii, in abou w io all
the t.,wn haid l een taikii i. lie w nal im \l ilOii m,--t
people hi:ld hl-iun to whilp-t it a- .. ft dr.iful ial.
ae-ter even IIi a land where_ thlire i a-. ia not niii h ile
li:ac(: anld w iIi-r. the uniei taintie- or the iinini,.
diate future -l iue- to tie rulmoui ed i -huiltion )it
slavery and tllh eq1lall-i-tg ,z f lila-teir and Ilan ei) haid
souredl trimpel-r anl tlurne.l uan'," men into, dii-
aruntled bhruite. She, --tenme tuj Aslimn miuore lovely
than er-m' ni.in report had painted h-r. mn're lasintat-
ing Lhai it h: .1lil poss-ibly have- drearned H.r I.har
ace '? What did he i.are abut that: or ratl .-r. it
rendered hlir more enth in I t:- himii. 'for nit- hlie
was filled with adlmirattion o-f lher for :e and dariniz
It ianie to him swiftly that only a hold amid ambitiou-
man desF'-ved t.i win and hold su-uh a woman. and
if any man failed to hold her and p-riished., there waa-
little rea-non to wate- tears over sin h a weakling
But Ashman. e-ven a- he.. thruhbt. while., lith
unennsrcious ruitieness h.- -.rareil at Annie. dlid not
dare to pur himself forward. in his own mind. a-
the vounitL t ilow's iihror. Her hlu-ibands had eeni
Lentlemi-n men in independent positions and of the
i-lass that ruli-d th. Country: hlie was but an o\er-
-eer. A domineering. imperii'iis man wlho had wlon
upwards irom the ranks of the book-keepers. bil l an
overseer only. and suc h did not a-piri- to the lhanld..
of great lades ttunl.ss tho-.e ladies showed for then


a marked prefterei-ne. And even thirn it wa. nrot
marriage that was usually uggest.-d Larrier:e <.i
s la --" i.,.- l. l iit:1, 1 V Il 'ivl, -O lm etinle --.:1, ... ,,; t i
ri-r >i-i, t 'lR ii
An ii. Palmer knel'. [m [t h Ji+ a Iu'l t hrie- t irIir3 t
aniD the Ini lpuIl-e- i' of n. and.l ..imll -tli iii ,:t' f ihar
wa.a tiatm>n- In A hlniian'- mind 4h:- urnlelii loid | lie
aw that li-i star-e va. not it art .f. i.ln ,-it" .11)i It
,a-. tat .i, man "ho \ia t.aket-ii l. -a iliideii aJ d.
rnl!l'dl! ,u.l. ,,h, ilito r-qtinreII i Duu li It l, .-tl.:..iti'az-n .llelt
r, bei- bhrouilit t, lovel. i OInrai- l- r SIi,- eiz, (i
tli, ,I!poltunit:t J trirlilln- I.li.-ttlu -- M llt r, i- tIe.
ilin!ll ro,.m. [,tav...'"- ipei ld au l -la.'luailtancT-hlli
Lb-rv,-en rh.-m. Slhe toll hirn that -h-e- autetl -..in.
. lne t, r natia L l:- i. : ta l e:i it M thaL 1ir1' la, hlij-
odanll ta5 i-dal Sie- I-larnt fr.-m Iiri i that hr- .',
ti :e., .lih n tiii.\ pa tired tlh:t ia Ii h i.li. bht- ap.
{tintria V.'re-i -r it' Palniri. arn Ri :.rn- i ll. \with r- ure
thatn .ir ov\,'ir ,-r'- -.n.,,:-rali ahthori ty \V'ithiin tlh"

relnti.i.rn-hir l i hald intl rli ll O.r inl-.r l thriiee i I. Iii
th ii .- l aii l Lr.t l. -'i hre vii i tly t i -hliie b .l gl] nf
.iiJ. nI r, dil l Ji. i o -l: al wit i Il "a arki ne-l ith1
himn. Then liappei l [thfe aiv,:nt v.( R.-htlt FIRiutti r-,
Itir.1. and Ai nhman halli It.ali-:l l. r hat be tniu t fi'-'ht
f',-r li-u atrendijLarn r i i, .-iveri'. thi in. n iu-t 'tl- "
the inlima :ty b l ne.-n Aut ,ir- -it ndi li t hip-i at r ilo I.
sprer,.lly br..ik,iin hirinilf
Hie had llnev r litvdr at .ir [i i, -.Iat Hoii--n 1i-
Painier iha' n.ie-r -ug;i--trei1 thar ie- -.:h iild ,, i
Bit th-en hi-. liuar-r. n' ti- f,,nilf.-rtabhl.- indl aln i l.
fe-. r i.t kee .i-n ltanit b arjt h i o'.er ll. rhilarI a H.-
iad ilio-n n ft-n and ir at [the Gr rat H.nus. and
had 1.arnt. inilirectly. all that l ri- as r. h ar-l
alout Re...-ehall and its pr'-'ion- ojii ne-r H-t dild lit
duibrit rnow [hal the' hatd -om.n to tlliir en d by vio.lenr
means. Annie Palnier iwas capable ot anything that
her pa-usions '.ir her interests might prompt When
*-nce she was on her e-state- sh.- mliade little e-ffort'
t. disguise her di-,pon-ti-i.n. it \ia-. irksomei-. pr intfulj
to her lt be aniythina hut herself; she had for to,
l.'n2 eiveu free vent to her feelin. s iieline swiftly
lto the inclinatious she erxper'ien'.d. to care to pie-
tend before him. She miahlt mak- him her lover.
but -lie did not forget that he va-i hir inferior. and
she -ias not accu-irtonied to Iarln ab...urt what her
inferiors miiht think of her. They were the-r,- to
obe:;, to adminin-ter to heir iorvenlt-',n'e_ or her plea.
-lirwe If she ,.|,st. to h e prat ioul to them, that \vkas
kindne-- on her part. but with them ?hi- would b h
lierself always Queen of iRosehall hy uniiriuestion.:d.
imprescriptible rieht. her suhj.(ect- m rust Fubhmit to
her will and be delighted when h-le rshovwed them
the snialltst degree oi favour


1929


Bltt if that favt ,ur w.tl-e w'.itlhldra. n' That wia-
thi t ought hlii h larikled in John Ashman'.a brain
ju-r now A week ihad r a--,- -0_re Robert's Ucitnin"
t. I llu-l. hal. ,iand all',-udy -iti rumninRli- tlhiirn s hail
Ihipp-tL-- I a-t niclht I lobert lhaji been tIr the Gr,.at
H..u-e ag;ain. A-liii.un himsnlelf had Seeii hiunm rIlI-
away from it this morning. Y-.est,-rda. Annie [.ila
.Pllt [for h.r iclir-sei r ani. lisirutiltil hi111 to .-mpi.
another liuk-kI i-. ier a nian \ h.o miililt d1i fit a
t-lip',raity ju.rI on the -estater A ,ii hlth.-r manl i ne,.i-lei
Johln,.' Mi-r Palimer had said. "Mr. Hirrtherfioril
it r ai r i-tomi-d t.-. hi- riii k. and it i.uld bl e fill:.
to di..-pnd t,.,j muChl upon hinhim
Thii-n Ir.hr nit .- rid 'if iIm. A-.\hlnian had i..,i
unlI.-ea nal.ii, a-kri d \ h'li\ Ieer a ui-.i le'- ptn r-'-.i
i-rn the .it-il
"He i- liet- I.. 1arn ptil ntinv._" she repiil-i
"i lia exjiia ineil that t .:i i hu .-fi're. And he i.- a
ifri-nd o.f niuiir That I- aniiolh-r vi-ry L.cid rea-.oi "
SL-r u- unide-tand '.ne anontler plainly. Annie.
A_ -hatn.,u old This l,,..k k .-pp-r wa- with %% :u
on trli- iei., tir-t in i llt Lie i .ame to Hl u-c
hall \Vhar i ris hi- iiean? Thai \.ui ihaie rak,-r
Ilim a- yi'urt --' I-' pLau-.- l ulon an ugly 'iiwrd
IHe dill n'.,r ui-ih ri pr-ess the iiiar-rel i.:i, far
"Say i.hat isi in \our rninlhd." .sh- s. miled. lookinil
hiim -traieht in the eves-. "D.n't think ahbut nm
feiliitr-. I lieg oif .iii. D n'tr li.t me trouble iyou in
the siihlit,.-t. ;... ,ii! I anim rakin1a him as mni
v hat?"'
"You are thiroAini mle -iver tIr lim?'in
"You haven't leen so mntl ll ofI a dt%-ited lover
,f late. have yiwu?" shbi asked him. i\ith a litinl
.netr.
"Are you trying tiu miak.e tut that I an to blanit
for your treatmenlent of m, "
"'Well. there are .youi t\\ills ,ioer at PaIlmirsa
you kInow. Johni. and the-y art- not yet three months
old And there is-hut thisk is all unneressary Y-.tr
are a giar.-d mran on the estat-. andt you know li )u al',e
welcome to remain a oiverl'eer. But ptleas,- re'nlt
ber that w.- are nor husband and n wife"
"Perhap. I am luiiky in that.' he answered
erimly. -tunF to a -ignfii ant remark.
She started. XAnnie Palmei hated any allusiin.
however indir(et. In t- lhe death of hl'er husbands: she
would ocia sionally -peak of them herself, hi t gre,
white w.itli anger iw.ithli which was hleniled dread
whlenlev'.r she thought that someone else w'as hiinting
a it Ashman had heen wise hitherto to keep off
rhat forbidden prn.ind Jealrusy and temper bad
Uow betrayed him onto it
Aninie's gaze nai ro i-d. and for ohe long niinute
-he sat sileur. Ihir finetrs heating a tattoo upon the


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11


2 TEMPLE LANE






PL AN TERS' P LUNCH


table at whi,:h both iof tlhem er-e ,ittiln Sh. uld
have ordered tithi, nman pt-remptrit o'lit O tier ii-hir
and off the premni-e- at onLe but tliar t t ro tp nutlS
be taken off day by da3. nowi, andi that ltte-l were
disquieting rLumouittIi about it ,: li, d itionll anid Ihl.t
tings of ithili .aV B at. iti uu now. t litth iatei
certainly .%Ashnian mu.i.t r. But f ii h knew tIn.-
much-and lie wouldd have found out much in these
last thief_ .l'-ar--va it --afe thair h shoullid be
allowed tit p'.. with a thllst for reIvenge in hii. heart?
That wasi a qun' t -tn eI ib an-w'erd latl itcl on
Ashman a.i- the look it, Annie's tac-., had a
startleil reall.aton -.f the tir.nd of ih r iLll-uiii r an i
when lit had left litr yesterday it %.a- wiith It-e
self-assuran.:e than he- haild t.er felt He hald v.ound
ed Anni.-. h- had evii-in:l. i.tasd I to i.- t.'r liru
who inder.d hall never deeply cari-d for him lie
must b.e .ar' itI i- r mo'vellmntsr now. sh. would
plan t, k,-:p lhim sil.-nt if she oiu:ld unot keel him
tame. But if Rutherfor'i itclli be roit iid of?. In
that iaSP. prl'etnr t di-acrir ieniiirl- iiiphlt u f'orei-tr-n.
old relatiun-lipp risumei nl he- \ ii-shi- that,. [for nl
his ovwn fajllhin he -lutvd. thlis txtraorlinary w'n:man.
But how to get rid of Rutherford' Annie had killed
one .rf her husbands., it %a-s -aid. %%itn thi. aid ot
the old devil. Takoo, and by hers.Ilf th.i orher-. hlut
Takci vi%,s trhi- cirl Millitent's u'lanilfatri.r. and
Takoo .ouldl pr.i',.i t ihe I-jn, Be-iideS. nimuldter
S vas terrible. it lie -tru- k at Huth,-rtiIrrl he c-.tld
never escape suspicion. His only hope i as lthat
Millicent would bI- able to i.:.i\linee Robert that he rin
an awful iisk by ici.tinuintg to he Annie Palmer'-
lover, that she .iluheil hei able ti, a-ur!'- thie neri
book-keeper that tie wniman had he-eu thrih- a nmur-
deress. and that. -hloiL.ke ant rend-rilred afraid. .oiung
Rutheriord would fl As i,- his r!emfain ig as a bo,.k-kkt-eper that iwa-
but a mern far E n oE n nw h-. AshnIian. via-
waiting tor tll. mau fori ahonl lie had Jdespatihed
Sa mesf.enge.r that amae itday aft-r receiving Mlrs.
Palmer' irdefler that Robert was tI b.- relieved of
much :.'f lie hatlder wi.rk wlhiiih a Ilookkeeper w9as
expected to perform Rob-ert lung to his bonok-
keep-r'< rnom. shame. pride. a fei.ling of loyalty
to Burhridg-. all operating in his mind ,t kerp him
to that der-ii-.in. but .\hman w,.ndetred iIho lone
it wOalld Ie before lie broke down under the pressure
of Annie's i lh and -dhil itatlii s-ftor Annii- hadl
said plainly t, John Ashman that Robert might
come shortly i to Lake i.\er une of the vaant roums
in the GrCeat House Annie iared less than ever
she had done for sut h public opinion as existed:
her strong will would undoubtedly itliruence the
young maln A-tliman had s-een many a man arrive
from England with the noblest resulves and the
highest ideal.. and somietimres in a week these all
seemed to di.-appear a- .trmnpl-ttlya as if they had
never existed W\illh shollid Ruthlerford lie diffi-rent?
He was not a-insg dlifferently an.\h.iw. Lhotiilt .4iAh-
man with a bitter -niilt
He saw. for there was a young moonu in the
sky. the figure of a manl app'rioahitig hinil. a Uhite
man quite e\ildentls. H1e kne I wli)j it via-.
The straneer appriac:h-dt the verandah .onfid-
ently, but 9`aiteil at the fo-ot if the --teps leadline
up to it bi-fori venture to asc:endl (Comie tip!"
Ashman orderly., and the nln obi.ey-ed
Even in thf ob-i,:urity of the e-randah it (iuld
be seen that thii- pe-rs.n wa-. in -hahhy attire, and
In the light his slioe.s would have been peri:elvedi tr
have gone smni.- nay towards disoliition That
he had walked it f!rotm where lie had i.ime. too.
stamped him at oi -- as a poor white. "a nalk foot
backra." a man who iwas tdoun in the world prt.ny
badly, 'snine ito alk itt a land whe-:re all white men
rode or drove% F na- a flauitin.ti advertsemen.-t of
poverty and degnerieation
"Yttu applied to ni- for a jo)b me monnthi ago.
Rider," Ashman began without any preliminaries
"Do you still \want a job?"
"I do. sir"
"And ou think you i-an keep suri: iently ,.fit thr
rum during this crop t,. het worth your keep?"
"I should hope o 'TIs ; t in niorltn to com-
mand success. but-"
"You are not in the Ipulpit nw... yoiu haven't
been there for many years. Mr Riler. ,.:0 you needn't
preach to me." intilruipte-d JIhn Ashmani rIulihly
Yet, curiously e-n. iuh he hall a sort of irt-,ie.t
for this peculiar. -habbl3 in ivitdual -taniling quietly
before him. fr lie knew that Rider was ,: n-rilt-edi a
'highly educated man Ri-,ihaid Rider. I A. had
been a curate in the Kincston Parish (hurch ten
years ago. and would probably have h-een its rector
In another ivre .eais but t,,r lii- pred lh.- tion filor
drink He hatd drunk himself tut iof a chur-, that
had been quite ready to ,ov-\' rlk neoiasioinal lapses
and even a constant state iof inttuxi.ation whith did
not include exhihition- oif itlret staggering and ly-
ing down in the gutter but when Mr. Rider had
been often drunk hotli in atid otit of ihnirch.
his bishop was compelled to tiak te ome notice of his
actions. Accordingly. Rider had been demoted to, a
country church. but there free from all ri-traint.
and finding nothing in the mann.-rs and moral- of
his congregation to inspire him with the belief that
they cared sixpe-nt- ahiout religion. he had become
:.more frankly an adherent of the bottle than even
when In Kingston So he had heen permitted to
retire from his oRff-e as practising prie-.r and had
Sfoind situations as a Iook-ke.eper in those time!


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1929






PLANTERS' PUNCH


when he kept sober; for there were occasions when
he was comparatively sober for weeks and months.
Ashman, who knew a good deal about him, hoped for
the sake of the work to be done that the present
was one of the sober interludes of Mr. Rider.
"You can live in that room," he said to him, "point-
ing to a little annex to his own house. "The other
two book-keepers live together and there is no space
there for you. How long you remain here will de-
pend upon yourself. Where's your luggage?"
"It is not considerable, a nigger could bring
it on his head."
"I should think so. We'll send for it to-morrow.
If you go outside now they will give you some
grub."
Rider went off, but Ashman continued to sit and
stare at nothing and think his own sombre thoughts.
It was about nine o'clock now; the fires in the negro
village had long since died down, the slaves had all
retired, weary from their long day's labour. A sound
as of footsteps again broke the silence; Ashman ob-
served a figure which resolved itself into that of a
woman as it drew nearer. She came right up to the
house, saw him, and ran up the verandah steps.
She seemed to know the place very well.
"Millie? I have been expecting you. Sit down."
This invitation was a token of friendship; Milli-
cent looked about her, noticed a chair in the corner
and plumped herself into it.
"Well, how goes everything?" questioned the
overseer keenly.
"He went up last night to the Great House
again, an' stay there all night, Busha."
"I know that."
"It don't do him no good, for when he come
back home he wanted to drink. He drink more all
day to-day than I ever notice him do before, though,"
she added truthfully, "he went to work all the
same."
"I know that too," said Ashman moodily; "and
have you said anything to him?"
"I tell him about Mrs. Palmer; what she is and
what they say she do to all her husband, but it don't
make no difference. Sometimes he insult me by
shutting me up, sometimes he only laugh and say
I forget myself an' that I better be careful. But he
don't seem to care."
"Did he say he would tell her?" anxiously asked
Mr. Ashman.
"No; I ask him straight if he was goin' to, an'
he say no, but that I am running a big risk. But
it's not doing him any good, for though he been here
only a few days he is different already. He's more
careless-like, don't seem to mind nothing at all now.
She is doing him bad. I hate her!"
"So it doesn't seem as if he loves you, does it?"
enquired Mr. Ashman mockingly.
"I don't know." Millie hesitated. "He talk to
me now more than before; and ask me a lot about
meself. I think he getting to care for me, an' that
is natural, Squire, for I care for him an' I am
pretty."
"Millie," said Mr. Ashman, slowly, following an
idea that had come into his mind, "don't you think
your grandfather might help you? He is fond of
you, isn't he?"
"He love me to death," said the girl proudly.
"But what he is to do? He is strong, but" (dis-
mally) "Mrs. Palmer strong too. She is so strong



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that she can live in a haunted house, where they
hear all sort of noise day an' night, and yet she get
no harm."
"The haunting is probably done by some of the
damned house people," remarked Mr. Ashman scorn-
fully. "That banging of doors and murmuring is all
the work of one or two venturesome brutes who
want to keep up the story of duppies in the place
for their own reasons. If it was worth while I
would investigate it. Perhaps your very grand-
father put up one of the house servants to bang
those doors! I have long suspected it. Mrs. Palmer
is not as strong as your grandfather, Millie."
She shook her head doubtfully.
"Your grandfather must know that you are liv-
ing on this estate now?" he asked.
"Yes, he know, and he don't quite like it. Only
yesterday he say to me that trouble going to come
on me because I live here as Marse Robert's house-
keeper, an' I tell him I am not a real, regular house-
keeper, but he say that I will be-and that make
me glad. But me grandfather very sorrowful; he
warn me against Mrs. Palmer."
To this, for a while, Ashman said nothing. He
was buried in thought. At last:
"So old Takoo thinks you are in for trouble,
eh?"
"So he tell'me, but perhaps he is wrong."
"Perhaps; but suppose he thought that Mr.
Rutherford had anything to do with your trouble;
would he be angry with him?"
"Lord! He would kill him!" exclaimed Millicent,
raising her voice in sheer terror. "Me gran'father
is awful when he get out o' temper; and if you or
anybody else do me anything he would never rest
till he revenge me."
Ashman knew that Takoo would not consider
as an ill deed the taking of this girl as a mistress.
or "housekeeper," by any white man for whom she
cared; that kind of action Takoo would look upon as
normal and even as highly meritorious. But should
Robert lead to any harm being done to Millicent,
whether by Annie or someone else, the old man
might hold him responsible; and, of course, it would
be easier for Takoo to wreak his vengeance on a
mere book-keeper and a Stranger, than on Mrs.
Palmer or even the overseer himself. Ashman wish-
ed no particular harm to Nlilli-enr. though he saw
no reason why he should particularly wish her
well. She was a mere pawn in the game he was
playing. He had always been hard and selfish; his
life, his circumstances, had further helped to make
him so. He was known as a stern taskmaster; his
object in life had been the material advancement of
John Ashman; his great ambition had always been
to rise from overseer to attorney, to the position of
a man in charge of many estates, with overseers
under him.. From that to ownership was often but
a short step, as he well knew. He would have
worked with Millicent to get rid of Robert Ruther-
ford; if that end could not be achieved with the
girl's aid, why should not her grandfather be the
instrument of Rutherford's disappearance from the
scene? She might suffer, but she would have to take
her chance of that. Robert Rutherford must go;
must go absolutely; there must be a complete sever-
ing of the ties that now existed between him and
Annie Palmer. And Millicent had just given a hint

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as to hbin Robert's elimination might be brought
.ibh'J t.
"It'- d-Ctrrig :late, Millie." said A.hhmau. riiutn
"C(,l!ern l nd' lte ni,.- oon a-:ain. ani tell Il. tever.v
ti'liLg tlinit Ihippi.-u-. B.\ tlie \ ad.. arie Yi.i going to
Mlai e H-,herr to nliclht
"Y>-..' he- liS\\e-itr l lllpl'.
\\'.1i ;.:.idi nightt"

CHAPTER TEN

THE EXPLOSION

W ITH I pid striijd- aid -iA .,nl -..i| v. ineling of lb,.
hll, : ill, '-nt took hli r -,a\ towards ilhe l.',.k-
P p>.r'l' iiin'rr r-. Ste khiie itie ,,uuld lind Rolert in
li i' n' toni cht. ftoi Buribridei1 wivuldl -it up in the
-rill hili.use To-.liii'rron. ni tht ac'ild hbe Iu.jh rr!' t [ rn.
if i h. i-t.ir-d [1. ilidn ertl ake thil'- djit F r it .as tiu
:longer'i ..onipulkir.r Ifor him. and she had heard that
anoloIh-r hbo? k k-iretl'r v.1,l0,i I), ihout i lni thie f',Illiw.-Ii
dai.'. Ei ll' lit .-ti l was hl ing allowed t1u m1l uc:h
:.- r il', .-;a-> .i
When h,- read:edt'J the little ho1--e V-he p:,erI.eNvedl
da li li .f[i.iiuie thlroiieh tli-e .re i. .- She wa.s iitiL.
to ItU,- i-'.iUt lii bh -1i.- hlad. %\itho)tt inviratioin ..r
-p-i, irit: !i,- nimi- lon. iade lil'r :1 11. w\hl n she a aih.ai:,
heir niinl ShI e koi.k-rl at Robeit'- tdwr.








BE THRIFTY!


The Government Savings Bank


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I.





2.




3.


-ffords the undermentioned facillies lo its
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Free Postage, when cor-

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Exemption from Stamp

Duty on Withdrawals.



The operation at any of


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1929


anll


I






PL ENTERSS' PL' CH


"Come in." hiis \~-i I.' Jl'de her. and slt- entered
to ind him s.itini b h, his table. a elaa-- .f tumn and
water by his hand. He hail thrown off his jacket
and wad takinL- a iiiPlh-i:t l prior t.i e':ll" t
bed.
W-I-i. Md illn:nt, what'- all ih. ev..-.: iie ai-k
her Lordialiy: "..inat bri' -: yo)u hltre-i at this time it
nigh t""
'"Yii kno:, I li e liieri- inl (I? next ro,.,! -ai.1
Millicent. hI...kin- I.l ity l at h im "an' I thI,-,1 _]ht[
as I would ask Li; w '. u iit- an' tell :onu guod nigill
"I am v.ry ,re-li.I lI. nk ;,ou. Millh-. thlDi'ii I
have had a [prieftti -str.i- uoiiii E ik if it."
She did not I .uLlii n"Lr "- tretiiiou- n m[n nr, lutl
guessed itl. nieaiiin-i.
S"Yoiu was up lu-t ni'Lht'." Tile eullliry V..-
really an afirmniailn,
".Yips. mnielnor. I 'was up flome pair utf th nlil -it "
"You didn't .nru.- in till uoiirning. an' vyu .'.or'k
all day ti'il.a. Tait don' ( t ioaoi tI.:r you. MiaI -e
Robert: dth.n r YIli kno~w ouii nmliay get -ik. alu'
die?"
"It is p,[iii il FBuir [ -ay. Millie I u, -i.r mni
agined ii-n I I.t-r Eir elani th.it I ltiruld iriid her.-
a brown lady who w. :ilrl take- su:ch an iutlrei'i ill
my welfare annt leiitul rle i.-.n he trrur [ niy way'-.
Is that c(us:toli ar withl hijuit-keeper'?-
"Yei,- if th.-. likue ou T.-II me something,
Marse Ruobert."
"What is it?"
"You e.-e sa\ anything i..i Mrs Palmer atiout
ime' Yoiu eve0Ir tell her I am lo.king aftel'r you '"
S"I ha\e.n't me-ntliiui yio. no." a id Rrhl-rt.
conscious now that It. had ideliberately refIlaiied
frnm saying an thing abour Milliceit to Annie. She-
of cours-e had aski.l Ihim nwiho w'as atti-ndine to hil
creature ci-nifl'rtls in his qludlaer:, and hb had as-
sured her Ihat Biirhridge had made ample arranc.E:
ments f-r him Mrn Pallur had inie to the .oLn
clusion that l Biilbrliidg.-' servant \a- arrten.lin upon
Robert al,)o.
"Don't tell her."
"Why?"
"Betal.., lhe might v.'ant to -tp nime. Sh. -:an
prevent me iLoming here. .uli kni,-' "
"Of i curse. But tfankly. Milli-. "hy slhouuldn't
she if sh.- ant ti t?"
"You want her to'.' a-k-id the girl plaiiiivein.
Robert look-ed at heri. She wa.- iindenially
pretty. anil tiiueh hi, guessed h he rould hii.,Id her
own and did oLi, iac:k tr -.treirn; h : .hata ter. sihe
was very gentle in dealing v ith bim. He felt lie
should be vr.r z .rry if Milii-enrt were to liai'- hi-
service "\Vell. nn. I don't '.allt her ro)." lie ai-
mitted.
The gsirl' fa.. litviit eii, 'i in a flali. A lbalpi'
smile shoedii h 'r \hiiit- alaiini. v.en tethli and
shone in her eye.. Then yi- u Iielt. me. Mari-e
Robert!" sh. .ried .junrilently You lik me. or
you woruldln't mind whelilir I -.i r tiay. lDon't I
right?"
"I think I have told you .,tef'r.e that I do Ilik>
you. Milli." hie laughed. lsippini Iiis rumn and -\arer.
"though yuu hiae been a\vt'ftilly < lieek.- "
'Bet.alue I t-ell you about lMi-. Palnier"
"Yes. Had you be.n a man. Millie. yv:iu wiuuld
have been out of thi.- plain long a',... But I all
afraid I an weak where a 'inlr.an i .:riinerneld.
especially a pretty v. oian."


Slie i-. niti- ti.eii'e to him "Y LlOI think I am -
pretty '"
"You kln..w you are.
Ye- I knw I aI. Iut I wv.inI 1, know if you
think -i0 too. You think "
'I aim -ork yiLO arI-. illi,.-"
Yet you like lie mi'tres, b,.tter than me. Be-
causL- .he i. whiiit. .in you are vlhit' But -hi-- don't
Ite y,.',l tte l' thalln I I.:.. A dd -he i: '1 i,.kd. I tell
\i..t. n, ii kei- '
M illi.:ent' "
I[ don'r ie. it i I 11 i. All' I till ; OU SO
rieciau.-e I lv-e :'..ii an' I alm atiani about what
mi-,'hr happen tu iu \Y.,,u l,,n' krni.w \el'rything.
Yj runninL a I.-ik ri k. It may kill .\-iu "
Rubhe-rtiLiiat il Iliar it wa.- r"..a.-in to Annie
tor him to allt.i. t[ii- d:hurllrd diam-el it,. run on in
thl. way -hlie i- a dojn. i- ti permit her tor triadue the
%woman ti \%il h. ld "!hall i.ti .rrnal devotion;
andl yet. hli asked hiiiiieif. li-.v ..tuld hii prevent
it? Sh. was ie-ialiniL ilie.. of :-olir-'-, IuJt -Lle be-
lieved them, and it' ihe re-peared them it was be-
cau-e of her iin er'- affie.rin for him He could
not be a biuitl- and iurldr lihr anLay' He loved
Annie-lan iiead'. lu ili-lninll in hii- niind made
him inonder w hitr ihiie h lho\vei Anni-. ;a much as he
.aid he did a!id a- h'li .-arl, i,u_-ht. but again; as
'lj prBviolij,. ii asionll -. trilrd to dimiis this
q(uetion fr-inm hi- niii m I i Put hle liked this girl also;
%%ithi eomethine lik, -,omni:- dii may Ihe hall dicover-
ed that. in -pit.: it all iie had hlilievied to the
ontrary. a m1an .iiildil are ft'r more than iine wo-
man at ll.- -am- time. et.n if nat v.'li thle same
degr-e uf initenn:.ii He did not re-aliie that Annie
Palmer ifasCin i-id lini huit that lie did not love her
"illi sui li ievrli:-ii that no tliher onmaiin mattered
to him. he "a not -.rphi.-tii ateil. le had faced
f[ir a few mniilnerti thll- i qu--tiu ,tif rnairrying Annie.
H-l had htrri.,lly ilismi'-.d it. He hlad airepted the
existing -it:uiion had niti ti t..,i that Annie lier-
selif nev-r iiin:e meinti,,nilld marriaL-. a but -eemed
i-,liten with their pieriilr irr-i;alar relations Hi-
father wi.Jhil iot appr.v,: ,if tlienm' No: but his
father wa-. thou'anid- ,of miles. awa.. in a different
land. itn a diifrernt aorld Why should he bother
ti, think of' ha t was .o disaiit? Thi-i was Jamaica,
anid wv ,.-.uld he ni d.. iln iJamai-a as others did?
To lie a miltIl .-.f viri.l lie Ire woulil beh m-erely to
makeI ie.elt ritiiil]i..ll In the meanlltime here was
M11ili,ent. anil li-t -.i ieti. wa- no uiinpleasant
"I ani iiot afraid if heicm killed." he said with
a lanut He rini-lii.i hi. drink of ruim and water,
and nix.ed himnl-l.f an.ither. He rather liked the
flnavur .,'I Jama.a rulnli
You d n'r i't eliev,- v hat I tell yoil'"
"Of iiour-. ni.r' i am uit cainL t i, believe every
lie that y,..u hlia e hl ard. M illie."
i*Some da -.h II. ill klno\ tllat I looking after
yoiu. an' -Ihe i ill .i r.,.r iile Iii,:t t.. come )a< k to dis
plai:e W hat .\t will say t hen'.:"
Stlltf ielt to tiiie dlay N the evil thereof. Millie.
NMeanltime y'j arei till hel-r. anl., a.- you want to be
lhter. that ,ih.tild I intent ou "
Ve-ry v eall. Mar-e Robert She looked at him
in silli.re Ol'ir i few momentli. then added, in a low
voi.e. ".t-loodnrl'i-_ht "
So .orn''n' he- a-ked adi drained his glass;
Why don't youii ta\ 3 little longer'"
i '..n, i -,i 1o P1a : .' .i


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-- ---


1929


. I







PLANTERS'


"O.K."--MAKER OF OPPORTUNITIES


N the United Stati, of America a favourite word
used to describe a pushful and energetic business
man is "aggressive." To be an aggressive salesman
or an aggressive promoter of enterprises is to merit
approbation and to win success; you are pictured as
attacking the problem before you and solving it in
a conquering manner.
There are businessmen, however, whose demean-
our never suggests the application to them of any
term indicating downright forcefulness or pugnacious
determination. Yet these businessmen seem to win
to the top with a swiftness which is only equalled
by the lack of noise or fuss with which they achieve
their goal. The present writer was once told in
England, by some one who knew the first Lord Burn-
ham, that he was one of the quietest and gentlest of
men to meet; we remember it was said of him that
non-aggressivendss was one of his distinguishing
characteristics. Yet that man took hold of a small
printing establishment and transformed it into a
great English newspaper. So it seems that one need
not be obviously aggressive in the popular Ameri-
can sense of the word in order to achieve success;
and we see that this is so when we think of the
career of a Jamaican friend of the present writer,
Mr. O. K. Henriques.
If we were.asked to mention the trait which
would impress anyone on first meeting Mr. Hen-
riques, we should say "quietness." Doubtless he
is quite capable of raising his voice, but we for one
have never heard it raised: when he is annoyed, or
deeply moved by anything, his tones are actually
more subdued than usual, there is a sort of concen-
trated quietude about them. He can argue for an
hour at a time when argument seems to be required,
but we doubt much if anyone has ever heard him
bluster. We doubt if anyone has ever heard him
bluff. One would think of 0. K., with his gift of con-
centrated attention and quiet, pleasant, s. nimatlietie
attitude, as admirably fitted to become a doctor. His
"bedside manner" would be pert.- t ion His patients
would like him and feel assured that their welfare
was constantly in his mind. His lack of obvious "ag-
gressiveness"would appeal to them. Yet this man,
who might have been one of the most popular physi-
cians in this country, is to-day one of our most suc-
cessful businessmen. Therefore, in spite of his ap-
parent lack of "aggressiveness," that quality must be
developed in him to a very high degree. But it is
tempered and mastered and masked by a natural dis-
position of pleasantness, general good humour and
thoughtful placidity. Hence the number of his
friends, whom he has every right to feel proud that
he has won.
He has done some striking things in the- way of


MR. 0. K.F .ERIQOUES


business. But to get a true linl,- '' IIn- 'iititi.- ..-:,I
must remember that he is intrr' -teil. ,,.. IIn .11: lIU-i
ness only, but in many. Yoi i hiiik .' lhim imil you
think of Ford; but you siluitl.l thi-k of huim .ini
think of iron work also, and ilt .,.ll~Iiu..n .t.lirk
And there are other matters Fi,' he i .a mn.ny. -..il
individual.
In moments of relaxati..n 0 K lias a s \.=
of speaking of himself as "a por little Jamanta
man.'* The remark cannot pos-iblv refer r~ hi- .ize,
which is quite respectable, nor to0 h!brain. ftor he
has a flair for big things anti a i.apairi ft',r .r :r-:m.-
plishing them. The remark nmut be taken as na.
tional and not personal; it means "-e poor little
Jamaica men." It means that. i..Onsidered from the


Larger urll'A point of viet. \i Jamanan:- app'd"
. ry in.-.ienili,.ant and that it behi.ne- i to remem-a
bhr that. Ibellin little J.imai-a imen. niih i- nit e-.
liectedl .of u and tno nilreh i\e heed not -expelt l't
oiurselvels. But the L lJamadiiia. .a r:lircrs.-ntil-1 by Mi.
0. K. HenritiesI, i.s not at all hunimle in his hart. as
the quoted (-,pi-,si.n I.f hi miiiity niiht seem Ln in-
iliati \\'W e p.,O r little Jainair.i li-L i i.lievlet thdt.
given oppitu lnit, %te do as .3-II a- o,lier-. ioilt.
suole of u- halie -.1et otut to sho Ithat n i.an make
oppiortunlit .. or for. ibl) s.-ie h.il .,f it
There are- nimany tlihughttful pii.ile i i.. rElgr t
that tile Iiniiline i. thie Frankliel Ijralnli. line wa_
inot eitiLiteili t the timn of hliii h 0 K. 1. A rIpri-'.
n-ritativ.-. But the-li it i:j- liiiihllght that a little
Jamaica IhA i ouli1 hi:.\'-i ac hi.-v\' "msa h da \,I.rk .t
iagniitulde." So it ta.. civ\tn 1t, -'.nieuile eis. and
it iost tli ...re- thI.i a, i L-tinaltedl If tull.h a
co awarded in .lJimai a For thi "p.,i, little .Jtaina.:a
leih'"' arle atidl. iom ing i i t, thli-ir .%%n To duo
th'ii t titv hitl\i- hai d i1 -..i,,\ Ili -hot il Spa.-'
uf time. tli. t they iln i i .lii r itli. o .iL-. i.aii iakei
.,.ld. <.an ca rrdl! he in I e'-.l LCI ti, (!.-. '- a It is
i im ai kahl- hI ) h ,i lh it'.r. ,.,IrI|hl n i is liad in
.lanrji. an- i r il..\ tlhain >.-En fit- y,-ai- j.- Thlis i.
iiue in tlilta t mripllis-hi ent '.. iv Jaun i..in xvho
liaS '_ri'en llhii n'm.-lf a nil il:in A pr.pli-h t I lilt
atrll.,l- t d.l in Lii ,.\% n im i lni. unlril Ip-. hid- .::l hoi .
tr'la _l t 3 ilt li- tr..pl_-ci t -i n n-e 'tu- r It r11:1 E-en
liaur. but. aftl r all. II.:.' elte arc yta hlin jidgi' a
Lpr'ilnI But for evt:r.v nian in .lani.-tiA h. dles
p l'ov- il-. nenl ien.%. \ t a i tl o tlll h re bt liitell N.
thei-re i- ii. that i. d nll '--- It..i la Ii l.j l ik lieyonl the
( ,LiUtr'y lor mi-In ot ability Jinl i harai.ter .Anld ien
..iriile ,:.f Jilamai>a -h.-., t. verl' tl- len l y t.o reIp' oei
tut.r in tile Jamain ll'- a;>.t i:ien>l. So that one ian
rnow say ilth real pridJ-. et:-n it u!iner Ithe mantle
1if a hIUnior',-,li humility. lth.t Ir i- a little Janliaa
i a I
(U K bei.ling ..t ill In the longerr generati,. ,if
JaaiiL ija bu-ine-st men He i.s lit forty ear- of age.
:-o hi-s bicue-.t suih.e.N!es nauiy [iil I>- Inr front' f him
Nor that he has any le tio t t) l iomniplain if what lie
hia alre.ai d: ahieve hlie may justly rejole andl be
e-i e-eding glad H- hli.s earned every bit if his
S.liLess He has worked ftir it. ahove all he has
th.oiuht fur it He ha- liail to think, and lie is al-
%way. ithinkim4 There- is real brain hlbhiud all sui
(*--siful buinte-.s at vhere, It i -brain ttaves--a
-teady sui.:es.ion of theni-that have directed and
will Itre t thie ihuinIei- p-1il y ,if him-elf and his
liiitllhi-i Tllh.- boy.--but they must he written
aliut qlulie -ep. ratIly. for ev-i'h one ha. nimuch to his
o\in credit Ea. h stanljd ill hi- ownli lioe


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Six minutes by car to Bathing Beach.



Rooms with running water, also

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- --- ----- --~-~-Cr,---,


PUNCH


1929







PLANTERS' PUNCH


The Witch of Rosehall
I r'Co,. hifdl ri ,1 t Page 11l).
"'You jnian it.' ,ViI Wd uit me to stay?" Milli-
* cen asked fagterl%.
"'Of coursee I do Takie chair. Better still-"
He dre, h-r idoiwn tlo hini and sat her on his knee,
laughiner tle whilt Thu he kissed her. She
threw her arnmi nildll aLout his neck and kissed
him in pa-.siurnatv return
Millietnt'; e-;.,- -ire shiningg now. Her grand-
father hail rold. her. only the day before, that she
would h-ee-tme thie l oung h.o.kkeeper's "real" house-
keeper. and it siem-tdl as though this prediction
were in the .ay iof bh-el fuIlfilled.
Robert -trrjk, hi i.liheek gently. Then he
slipped hi I-ft arm r.uiind the girl's waist. "You
want iu kno.i it I think yoii pretty, eh?"' he asked.
"I think %...u ,e!i z ,-et aid lovable, Millie, and
I am giad that y-.i9 'Eit for me. Do you like to
hear that?"
For ani.w-r sihe kissedil im; then:
"YOjU till leave hri, Mlarse Robert?"
"L-a\.'Ve l .r but lin, '"
"i t. ou lov- ni e mn..rl than you love she, you
will Rut I would t mnnid .i much if she was dif-
ferent TIhe t%.:. ioft u, ..ildi have you. It is because
I am afraid that I \ant y.ou to leave. Don't you
understand.' She imay kill .,ou an' me together-she
will hate nime. anii if ~he think you don't love her
as Y..u should--
i "Dou't talk abhrii Mr- Palmer, Millie!"
i All rilit" Vwilil a iph i "But you like me all
the same-?"
"Yes: I l.i. ani I nam i going to keep you with
me always di. v,.1 hear V',u are going to stay with
-me and I anm i-niue ti, ar for you." ("Why not?"
he muttered t:o hiu--lf "Othier men do the same."
Why -hiuld I hit a pruil.- ?"
"Yoju dni't uant ni r:- -to go into my own room
now?"
No. vou arn, oe nm rn .ray with me. You don't
mind?"
"I want to." ,.he said 'imply, and her arm stole
round his nick .,nie more
*
Not more than teni minutes had passed before
they hear the --.und iof a galloping horse. It ap-
proached and halted bhfiore the book-keeper's quar-
ters. Somone alightedi. ianie up the steps; then
there wa- a -harp rap on the door.
Who i- that.'" Rhoer-t i.alled out sharply.
"I. Can I see iv- fitr a few minutes?"
"Mrs Palmer!" \ hisp-red Robe-rt, startled and
guililly ill at ea-e Slip into the next room, Millie,
and be quick. for ;God's sake."
"In a moment'" hie -aid aloud.
In a couple e -.f ninute- lie opened the door and
stepped outside: but Annie Palmer did not choose
to talk with him on the verandah. She passed into
the room. he fh.lloiving She glanced keenly around
noticed the idr-,r that l-d into the adjoining apart-
ment and pointed to it. "Who lives in there?" she
asked dire(tl.
Robert. elancing at her face, saw it dark with
anger and suspi,.ion AnothFr thing about her sur-
prised him. She aa- dlressed in man's clothing, in
a black suit ahich had evidently been made for her.
Millicent had told him that she was in the habit
or riding about the estates at night, habited like a
man, but he hail thought that this was but one of the
inventions of thie .la\is. who felt that their mis-
tress's eyes were always upon them. Now he knew
that it was but the slber truth. Annie, looking more
diminutive than ever in her man's clothes, stood
'before him, a heavy riding whip in her hand. And
her manner was imperative and stormy.
He was about to answer her question. ~aying
that the apartment wat occupied by the girl who
looked after his meals and room, when she suddenly
walked over to the door and gave it a push. It
yielded, after a slight resistance; for Millicent
realized that nothing was ti, be gained by her strug-
gling against lMri Palmer's determined resolve to
enter.
Milliecnt t a-, standing and breathing heavily.
Annie Palmer looked her up and down with a wide-
eyed contemptunus stare. "So you have Ashman's
woman as your servant an 'housekeeper'?" was the
question she flnin at Robert
"I am n-t M!r. Ashman's woman," volleyed back
Millicent. stung tr. a spirited protest by Mrs. Palmer's
assertion She. I.oke-d sharply at Robert to see how
le took this renim rl..
"Speak when yiori ar. spoken to!" ordered Mrs.
Palmer. She turnetil ri Robert. "I could not sleep;
I thought I .would ,o for a ride about the estate:
I have to do that ,omtimi-i -. to see that everything
[I in order. I fancied that perhaps you might like
to come with me. You didn't tell me it was this
woman who was looking after your room, Robert,
or I would have told you she is the last person that
I care to have on Ro-Phall. She is a well-known
character about here. I suppose she is trying to
get you to make her your 'housekeeper' isn't she?
And has perhaps already succeeded?" Annie spoke
with an effort at co-mposure, thinking no more about
what Millicent might feel than she would have
done had she been speaking about a dog. "If you


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-want one of this type," she went on, "you might
select a better specimen. This one is rather notori-
ous. Anyhow, if I had known she was here I should
have seen to it that she did not remain. I only
hope she hasn't yet stolen anything from you. They
all steal."
"I am not a thief, Mrs. Palmer!" cried Millicent,
furious now beyond the restraint of fear. "I am
neither a thief nor a murderer, an' that is more than
everybody can say!"
"Indeed!"
"Yes; an' the reason why you don't want the
Squire to have me for his housekeeper is because
you want him for yourself an' you are jealous!"
"Jealous of you, of a creature like you-you?
Girl, are you mad? Do you want to be whipped within
an inch of your life! Do you remember who you are
talking to? Dirt that you are, how dare you! Leave
Rosehall this minute, or-"
"I won't!"
"You won't?" shrilled Mrs. Palmer, and that
shrilling voice was new to Robert and shocked him.
"You won't! Surely you must be mad!"
"I am not one of your slaves. Dis place is
yours, but the Squire is a free man an' a white man,
an' if he say I am to stay here to-night I can stay.
And you can't flog me. You can't!"


99 Harbour Street, Kingston,
Jamaica, B.W.I.


"We'll test that now," said Annie softly, nar-
rowing her eyes. She lifted her riding whip and
brought it down sharply on the girl's shoulders.
Swiftly she raised it again for another blow.
Robert darted between them.
"Annie, Annie," he implored; "remember your
position."
"I am a mistress of slaves, that is my position,"
she retorted; "and this woman is little better than
a slave. Leave me to deal with her Robert; I know
her kind."
"If you touch me again I will dash your brain
out," shrieked Millicent, seizing a chair. "I am free
like you are, and, so help me God, I rather die than
let you beat me!"
"We shall see," replied Annie, shaking off
Robert's arm. Her face was set; there was a light
in her eye which indicated an irrevocable determina-
tion to chastise and humiliate this girl in the young
man's presence. Robert realized her resolve, and
nerved himself to frustrate it. He felt sick, ashamed,
loathing himself, and the scene in which he played
a part. Yet Annie seemed .to have no reproaches
for him. It was the girl alone upon whom she was
bent upon exhausting all her fury.
"You cannot help her, Robert." she said with
icy finality. "She .has to be floeeed for her im-


1929


I


RG-


AN







PLANTERS'


PUNCH 1929


pertinence, and if not by me it will be by one of my
drivers."
"Annie, be reasonable: shd will do you hurt!"
"She wouldn't dare. Stand aside. She won't
lift a finger to me."
The whip was raised again. It was about to
descend when it was seized.
She swung round, furious and astonished. A
tall, gaunt, savage looking black man, with grizzled
hair and heavy features held the whip. Deep-
set eyes glowed as they answered the glare from
Mrs. Palmer's eyes; a long, deeply-lined upper lip
closed firmly over projecting lower lip; old though
he was there was nothing feeble about his appear-
ance.
"Takoo!" The name came in a gasp from Mrs.
Palmer.
"Grandpa!" cried Millicent, frantically joyous.
Robert .az..d at the man bewildered. To him it
was a thing astonishing that a negro should thus
have dared to stay the hand of Annie Palmer.
"Patience, missus," said the old man calmly.
"Remember Millie is my gran'child; I am begging
you, for my sake, to spare her."
He spoke very good English, but though his
words were humble his demeanour was not partic-
ularly so. He still held the whip.
"What are you doing here, Takoo?" demanded
Mrs. Palmer.
"I was about you' estate to-night, as you some-
times allow me to .come, missis. I knew Millie was
this new massa's housekeeper, an' I wanted to see
how she was getting on. I was out there for some
time; I see you ride up. We didn't know you would
have any objection to Millie; but as you object I
will take her away."
But Millicent, who was never a coward, would d
not stand silently by and hear her fate decided by
others. "Grandpa," she sobbed, "Mrs. Palmer say
all sort of bad things about me. I never had any-
thing to do wid Mr. Ashman. I love the young
squire, an' the squire love me-"
"You fool!" Mrs. Palmer burst out, "how could
a gentleman love you! Do you still forget your-
self?"
"Patience, missis, I beg you to have a little
patience. She is my gran'daughter," said Takoo. Get
your clothes an' come, Millie."
Millicent glanced at Robert, but knew in her
heart that from the doom pronounced there could be
no appeal. He could,not help her. She was to go,
and that immediately. Just when she had triumph-
ed her cup of joy was dashed from her lips.


She went into her own room to gather her few
articles of apparel, while the others waited silent.
She returned within a couple of mniutes, and looked
with open-eyed malignancy at Annie Palmer. She
passed out of the room, followed by her grandfather,
but at the steps of the verandah she turned round
and flung out her hand with a fierce gesture.
"You will try to murder Marse Robert as you
murder you' husbands," she hurled at the stern
woman who stood tapping the table with her whip.
"I done tell him all about you, you bloody witch!
Some day I will live to see them hang you in Mon-
tego Bay!"
Old Takoo uttered a cry of warning and anger,
and literally pushed his grand-daughter down the
steps; Annie made no reply, but a rush of blood to
her head showed itself in the sudden crimsoning of
her ,lmp-lPs.in The accusation, openly and defi-
antly thrown at her was terrible: that it should have
come from a native woman constituted the quintes-
sence of an unbearable insult. This girl regarded
her as a rival, had dared to struggle with her for the
affection of her own book-keeper. She trembled with
pas.sion. held now in restraint by an almost super-
human effort of will. But she said never a word.
"F.Iol," hissed old Takoo to his niece, "you want
to dead? She will never forgive you!"
"I don't care!" exclaimed Millicent. "If there
is a God in heaven He will see that she is a beast.
An' sooner or later she will kill him, Tata."
"She may kill you first," muttered the old man,
as they hurried away. "You must go far from here,
Millie, an' you must go to-night. It is hell you have
to face now."
"I don't care."
"So you say now, but wait."
"She is a she devil. She is a witch!"
"Y\. an' what that mean for you?"
"I have you, gran'pa; you can protect me, and
bring the young 'qcliri- back to me."
Takoo answered nothing; he was thinking of
the blow with the whip which Annie Palmer had
dealt to the one being on earth whom he cared for.
He was thinking also of Annie's certain future ven-
geance for the words so daringly spoken by Milli-
cent. He knew the mistress of Rosehall; she would
strike at Millicent; such an affront could never be
forgiven.
He had been Mrs. Palmer's tool more than once;
they had been secret allies. Now he saw her as an
enemy and an antagonist. And he feared her.


CHAPTER ELEVEN

THE APPARITION
ON the chair upon which Robert had been sitting
Annie seated herself. She was thinking moodily.
her fingers tapping the wood, her eyes bnt upon
the floor. She had seen Robert's face when Millicent
had openly flung at her the charge of murder. Its
expression had not been wholly reassuring
She mastered her voice; she wished to speak
calmly.
"You see," she said, "it would hait b--ien better
if you had decided to live up at the Great Hou.e.
You would have escaped all this. Ttihee girls hang
about the white men on the estates for li hat they
can get out of them, and oftenthey a tlaer n
nigger lovers at the same time. Thi. one seeni- to
have deceived you badly, Robert; she was A-hman's
mistress; he told me so himself."
"He is quite capable of lying."
"You are defending her, then?"
"There is nothing to defend. Sh- is gone; you
saw to that. But don't you understand. Annie. how
revolting all this is? You are a -whir. noman. a
lady, the mistress of Rosehall, and you conme here
and engage in a row with a coloured girl. a row that
might have been a fight if her grandfatlihr had not
happened to come in when he did. You say that she
is a common woman, and she says tlia-"
"I killed my husbands. Oh ye.. I heard her
very di-tin. tl. Well, and what do .you say to her
story?"
"It is all ruhlish. of course; yet sli will repeat
it. She or her grandfather will probably tell other
people. white people, about what happened to nitht
There doesn't seem to be much reticence in this
country. Your name-"
"Is gone already," interrupted Annie brutally.
"Any number of. people here know that .tou have
stayed all night at the Great House with mei: there
is no secret about that. Why should you care?
Why are you always dwelling on what other people
may think or say?
He gave no answer.
"You will soon get over your prulishness." she
smiled bitterly. "Indeed, considering the company y
you had to-night; and after having been with me las:
night too, I should say that you were already the
complete West Indian gentleman!" She sprang up.
placed both her hands on his shoulders and looked
searchingly into his face. "Robert, don't ler us
quarrel over a woman-especially a woman like
that. You know I love you; I am yours entirely;
(Continued on Page 461.


SOUTH CAMP ROAD HOTEL.
KINGSTON. JAMAICA. B.W.I







I*'











S.
Equipped wilh every con\enience neces ar tor ihe comlorl ol visitors.
Rooms w lh and without private baths.
Convenientl lluallon \lhin seven minutes drive of the town.


NOTED FOR ITS EXCELLENT CUISINE

I OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND.

NMinimum inclusive rate t I 4s per day Special Summer Terms


Fur further particulars and reservation please communicale with I

iII Nh1Y A-. EVEICLYN.
i IResident M\anager

C.ii R r.DhE- ,.
||_ _FNHNR_ EV F .l.-1 II_ k L


St. James' Benefit Building Society 1


MONTEGO BAY. JAMAICA.

ESTABLISHED 1874 F. M HOYT, Secretary.







Why Pay Rent .



This Society makes it possible

Sto own your own Home. -





SFor Your Savings: :



Our Deposit Branch pays Inter-

est at 4 per cent. per annum,


payable half-veariv.


See t e S r fr


E See the Secretary tor Particulars.


~'jId' 'iF PS ;v 'siF1i~#


I






PLANTERS' P LUNCH


.I il


Built of a Quality that has been tested




Senior SixB o


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Ranks with the world's finest
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VICTORY SIX

Sweeping get-wa\. smooth flexi-
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friends of all who drive a car or
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4;- lip


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SIX;


JOHN CROOK.
DEALER
9ti-100 HIlarbour St kiingston


GRAHAM BROTHERS


TRUCKS


BUSES


--Ti,,. -T,.N. 1 I.T,.N, l-T.N & ~1.-T,,N.
B U I L D E R S OF B U I N ESS.


I


I


1929







PLANT E R S' P UN C H


The Witch ofRosehall
i ',ioiii i t i" i 'iee Pai.: 'l
you believe that. don't you'? This is miy own little
kilgdomn: we have no ne-ed to bother our.-elves about
out-ider'. (.Corm to the C(;leat House with rmei. .tay
there, if you ntant tme r.. marry .o-u. I aill. and a,
soon a- you 'l like It yo u don't want to .e-t. married.
it doesn't natter. ,o long as. you are mine and I
, ours You cian eit- ia-cter here if 3you like- You
will stiik t,. me. won't you. darling''
"Yes." lie said. hbut iithlutl. any great heartine--s.
"luit I non'r. live in the Great Houi e. Annie.'"
"A tIIl that girl wiii Inot eL ni, hai.k toi R.-Lhall."
Alhe rapped ol ut. herl naturally higti tnlepelr ettine
the better t t thi- priIelein e ititli which -hie was oen
deaiou inE to. reillat- hE-i words and conduct jultt
nOW
"She wo uld be wi-e, not t.i," he ansiweied drcily.
and h-he winced He wa- .iludint lciitc obviously.
to Annie's thi-r for lililtine sorpotal punniimni t
on trbhers.
;She changed lit- -ubjee-t
\ '- have a ineii hi..k-keeper. R -be r. I Ir..;i \ uI
\e wel l going to get one. You will ee him ito
imorIIow."
"Yn e "
"Anil I Iwant .oii i ..oI le up t thll (.Griat H.iusei
troniorcow for lini hl. and wt'ill talk ..ii r matters
You must not he hard in y.ilt y ii dgenent of mce;-
remember., if I lon- miy remper to-nieht it wjas
hevause of \tI I t.*uildi nmet bear to, sE, that girl
making, '-nioe isot if laimn on y.,u You don't hiamc-
ime fr that. di .,..,u.' It w. ut liln't have liatti-retd to
ime if I did not lioe- v..u."
He could niit bilt li. mollified by this. she was
pleading no.. u..n t fighting, aind there were actually
tears in her eyes a- she ga-ied at hini
[It i- all righl. Anntie. don't oievll 1up.n it Ye-s,
I will (.,'me to t[e hou-e to m,,rrvw "
Go.d." sh- *rietd G.i;oainiui t. Robehrt!"
She kissed himn \armly li3 e look he-r it. wh-re
ilr r horse w.-t -tandin ic. she Itapt into the -addle
easily ani rode away. He returned to his room
to think
As hi- r'uIoii dol.r closed behind himtn a mtan.
wi ho hald heen hidd- ill the shado..-, on the ilutherii
side of the buildingg camne tlorrh r.iutrloisl and made
his wava on fo.:,t towards the overseers quarters.
A'htman had heard enough ti know that hi-s plan
lhad failed. He haid not alh.ulatedl lpon all tihe
rpossi abilities ..f failure: indeed, how iould lih have
foreseen verthi A terthin Milli,-it hlad -eft him
that night lie had hurriedti up to nMis Palmer atnd
tolld her bluntly tiat the girl and Iobeliti RHither-
ford were lovers He had pureteuded jealous anger:
he knew that that alone mcouell he his ex-cuse fulr 'oine
to her with the story He had told her bluntly that
Rrherlt wa.- her speciall protege and therefore r:iill
piote-t Miillitent on the e-taie. butt that. for his
part. lie wished to forbid Millii.ent to tome near
the estate again and would like to cha tise her for
deceiving him. He hail silgeseted deep resentment
that Robehrt should have taken Ihoth herself' and
Milliient frim hin. Then he had left. still in simu
lated anger, had ridden to within a furlong of
Robert's qiarrer- dis.,mounted. antid ,\en his horse
a -lap on thie hutto'. k which had sent that animal
cantering to its .tables. On t'oot he liad crept down
quietly tco the boiok-keepers' himise. intent upon learn.
ing all that should subsequently pass For he knew
Annie Palmer He expected that. oi l hiat same night.
without delay. she would bri n matters to a crisis.
What lie hoped was that she would surprise
Robert with lillicent ias indeed .h, had orne- and
that Robert. not daring to oppose her, would allow
the girl to be badly] treated Ashman. living mainly
frr his own advantcem.ent. of a naturally coarse disE
position. and feeling .:onident that the opportunity
of being Annie Palimei's lover land so virtually


nid-ter ,Ir Riose-hali would outw.i-lgh an tender
eelmina that Robert mishi have tio MAillii.eit. hal
not imagined that the young man would try to aid
the girl Milliceut iould therefore feel the full
effects of1 Mlr-. Palmenr'is rath alnd vtenLeance. and
moAI l bie 'llln igu.loniii ilo-uly a i] n in Iitt!.-r painI atud1
humiliation fr'onm ilobert'-, pri-sente-. Hier grand.
fatihtr oi\tuld h-arl ofitt" Mr Asliiiin had umadle up
li1s tiind that Takoo -hould. and Takoo. w,.,uld hld
the young man at least partly re-ponsible. He
injull hesitate to strike directly at Mrs. Palmer;
ei erybiod feared that lady, who in her turn
de-p i.'ed ,ithe-. But of Ro bert Takoo would
iiate in dread at all. and wi.uld injure him. thus
avengintg his graud-.dauLhter ani at the same time-
iiirring Mc'I. Pallni-r A-hmau hopcd that the cil1
. izardJiand niirllli'l-.- for no olle (lItuht-ld thar Tako.,
'va t,,,t -i iiilil _ile-in RoIIwrt FRuet felford efiire.
a h..:4e4 tlad elap-acd Thlii a dancPier'd. riv-al wiv:iold
he disposed *if. :iiId white ni i-n ii the be: i rtit r l 'r.
alIeadIy sU Du i iJou- ot R..-i-Ill aiil It- rlli iti *-l-s.
'ni id in thi- fi'uuliui- i e n.i n-dar r tliat liro[iei rty
thaih itr gate
But Tak.... it ri nw o i, t clear, a- wv tililna ver
hi-, grandi.lild; bh ;:1 curi.ld niiSehand .e thle old
l'rn an _iJd ,.i It oi i lh,= 4p..( t iliIriit:V the ir.'rm vy
i-ne in Roh irt'. rIoIn He had taken Mlii..ent
~ai fet. away. he imult ihate notiil.el that Rolilert hadl
erieai.Hiared ti ilp i-Iand bh-frieni (the '-'irl Takoo
i-.tuli noi IIt.w nuile a..-'int t the new htiok ke-per.
w1mlint he knew waa euillitl'--,- if any rnt-i.,r %\hat
Tak.:.n wviild considerlr ito h.e wr-nc.e---ain M lilli.
,int Tht pl.a hail failed
X\l.i,n Ashman p.,t hai k lto li; hlii- t 11 ,,a toi
rind hlri Palmn-r aasitilin him H- ias surprised
ft thi-. Ilit had a tale ri-aidv tu account fior his
alsen..e fronl home. To her query here he had been.
silhi- lhn- had exipet-ied t:o iind hini at home. hlie ie-
piled that hb- thad gonle fto a walk. a li'tial, to see
rhat ever thliniLc na- lixed light fir thei nipht. It
.ka- ihleat lite -snm -tinie-, ill. and Arnnii e e1-vi l u-.
ipe.ted that ther- wa\a any i'ason t f doubt him.
"And ihi ar.- .oju tet." lie a-kel. .Anytllinc
ti p.: 'tant '
Y' li e ani- i lit e point ait dlie : shl
kniew that in another fev. Ihui Ashiinian inic't hie-ar
ori ici e ciinnt-r in the i'hok ki-epi-r'-: ron.n Anni,
wa t it- well a.'litainted with the ,i ii;tt-rn- if h(er
e-tate andI it- petiplie rto d-ubt ia tthre hlad 1 Iben
ear- r, hlear' ald -tye'- Io -e'- what had paisedi: Bur-
bridl e s li..ii-ekeeper. si realiiedI. rl iutI1 t ha ve he nr
awakenel by ilth sound of voile-i. it' indeed. she had
be-n asil--p Anil thclireI- inai lave. been oiither-< in th._
nierilbi-iihl h odl: VOnl nie- l wouldd tr ll A'bnian w.iulil
kiio J ,i-[ aqs iell that hlie -il uld hear albit it
all frnim er lip.s
She toldi hinm lriefl.. "And 'our tiIirl ient nff
aith her grandfather atter speaking to me as no one
has ever done Ihbefore She doesn't care a -traw about
nme. John "
"I ian see that
'*She i uchlt tto be punished for her impettinen(-.
and woirse. to me"
"But limhow"i Hit as interested in her r-nmark
He was n.t very quick witted, but it amnt- to him
suddenly that. if R hob rt trul\ liked Mlilli ent. a- it
seemed he did. ainrthin i done against her hb Annie
might drive the young man in anger and disgust
awa% from R-ehall. a possibility whiii h Annie in her
oriffeneid pride and ji-aluiuy had ni.tr p-ri.eived. Aeh-
man hims-lf had learnt a I-t about Rohert's iliar-
acter in the last hour or so.
"I don't know huw-- et Perhaps you could say.
Bit first uf all wie must ind i nut twhre she is. She
has left the estate. of course, she is out iof it already.
Can youi finil out wihille he its gone to?"
He did not wish to appear too eager. '"If she has
gonte." he aid. "why deo you want t. follow lher?
Isn't that a gi-..d iddance -if bad irubisIh?"
"And am I to, reqt content while that wretch
spreads lies about nie. and while elveryhbody knows
that she abuseP t me to y fa -e and was not punish-


WILLIAMSON Bros.,

LIN ITEI-)


ESTABLISHED 1890.


IMhIp()ORERS O)F



Provisions and Hardware


of every desriplion.









Builder's Materials,


Estate Supplies,



Stock Feed.





Planters are well advised

to get our Quotations.









WILLIAMSON Bros., Ltd.


9.11. & 13 KING STREET,

KINGSTON.



"The Home of

Reliable Goods"


,.. .... ... ... ..... ..... .... ..... .. ..


THE MANOR HOUSE HOTEL

CONSTANT SPRING P.O.


Chiarmingly sit in beautiful and -. GOLF-- Links adjoining the
extensive grounds, 600 feet above g- -- -rounds.
sea level, offers first class accom-
imodiaion, six miles from King- TE S
ston. Delightfully cool all the B.-lTHING,

- 'ear. Charming WI'alks, Motor trips to
- Quiet, sclect, and a favouritc re- all places of interest in the Island.
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PROPRIETORS: CAPTAIN & MRS RUTTY PHONE 29X.

.1111IIIIIIIIIIIl1IIIIIIIIIIIIII I11111111111111111111111 JIIIIIIiII JIIIIIuIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII| nIlIaIsIngIIIIIn InInIIi gi niilUII I nIII IIII IIII nIII IIIIIII


1929







1929 P L A NT E R S'


ed? Be-ide --well. I have airit yon u nm r edan.-
But he finished her ientenit e in hi, mnind "'Bet
sides, my lover may seek her out anl ihe dmai ,haie
him with me. and that 1 aill not have at any c.st."
"I ,ill try to rfnd out where she is." lie i-adl
aloud. "but you have to be careful, Annie You can
.do nmluh as you like on Ro.ehall andi on Palmra.
though vt n herie. in thtse days. ouu have tu be
careful Outside ut the e-tates you run a great ri-'k
if you _eo beyond the lati. The missionaries are
Tery active now. and they [uiire the magistrates t.,
take action."
"Ar- .vou. aln. stugge tiing thar I murder people""
:she demanldd harshly.
"I suggEst nothing I am rnily thiukine orf y.ujr
safety. Alter all. you kii.otv rh.i I love ;.ou. Annit '
"And lote vynuirelf In.le." she snel'red, "rnt I**
mention the estate ie-ntill- 13it dot't I)e itliil(I
There ar. more aays of hangilg a dog be-ids put-
ting a rope romunl its ri-ek. I will show you icsmle-
thing, John: I will show vrol that I have other mean'
of dealing tith these people than the vb ip and
Toen darb-t-it is death r, thlitm in mnoth,-i firlm. and
I .annot be hurt by the law." She wa.- brought
qp to the highest prt:,-ble tension her eyies wI re
.blazing: there "j, a; n t-vil l:.i.,k in tii i 'Call p
01ome of yiour people." she i lmnilile, Il 'tii any pre-
text, send them outiSid-. n1it ti.o far YoU'llI see."
I What is it. \W'har ,I,. you intend t,. do?' he
emandeil. startled
"Do what I sa.\' Dinu't a.lr ui'" shle il! d pFi
implorily and lie i -iii oi.-.il- tind sh.l .it: i 'i:I
:1ome people ti.' Oinii. ilt He thouitlhr. he said. thai
a ow had e-capeid tlom her pen anid was roaming
about thie rild near thile Iol l-.. tnat wa'. the fi.r-
ie~ruse that c.amen to Ils mind, and all Ihe more
readily, as cows were always breaking out
Three or tour men came tumbling out at the
aound of his voice. aind with them the Rev Mr
Rider. the netw bIok-k.-epci. Ti-' ian towaards the
field indicated, though no sound I.aimt- from it
Annie Palmer srood o.n Ashman'- reiaidali srarinll
towards the fitld Sudilenl\ Ashman gave a gasp
Astonishment and horror
SAl the sanie moment a terririedl .liek bul-i f'r.n
he men who had gone to search the field for the
errant croi and they camn- flying hack. all except
Mr. Rider They rushed upi to the verandah, their
teth hatterine their eyeballs gleaming white in
the faint light of the moon "The lihrse." they
gsped. "the Three-footed Horse from hell!"
And igu uIniJder. pl.iwing phosphorehientls.v loom
ed the figure of a gigantic horse, which seemed to-
have one lee in front and which h loped slowly on. as


though ci.:oting towards them. a horse like to the pake
-pe.tre dles- ribed in the Apocalypse and ridden by
LDe:th. frighltial to look up..n. adv.rlnspilitn'., terribly.
ing
It stood out distin t. buit 111ade n,' -ound. Tile
frightened n-gr..,es ui-hdideI d abje.i.tly and mian'.d
Even A-ljman.I wi.o iiad turn d pale. uiiitterei blas.
phenmie-. a if that i.ould protect him from whatever
ian"cer niiaht threaten
Then. in a flash, the apparition disappeared.
Mrs. Palmer laughed sbotly. Leani3; o.ver the
balustrade i-f thi \-randali 'he called d out to the
t-ri' ifird slave--. YI.. see what.i yNou have to tear if
Vyoii da.- to fiulei .,ii.selvei'? You hlate 5-eln with
'..iit ion i uyese!
SSenmi thlimil ha. k r,. thei-r beds. .J.hn -she on
tinilud, they hiavei't hlia a lesson like thi- slince .you
hav'- been h l-*. 11 ut it w .as abou tinl- thar tlihe
hadl one Ti,-. t\ ill tell the otli(r- h.i, is. thii
man?"
Sh, alluded t... Rider. whilt. v.as liA wly .,.mllltll
to\.ard. Ihem
R id, r th- mian we em, pi'..'l t.. night
-" ite I, .'ok k-epL 'r He -e in-- t%.i ii,,rn: halaiit
"ie ii prri.l'abl 'lrunk. irr a f,.l. W h.t w that
thlin- i., t ,,i:t i.r. Annie'.
SY.ii it iard] hat tlihe hiEel. -aild-the Threie-
[o,, dti- H ,I-e '
But I alv.av-. elt-vlil that thai was a tlotlish
riptrs'irtiu." pr.'i, -iteil .\ human. tir-i ling li ihtly.-
in spite of hi- etlffr' ts ait -it' iortril I i-ve r he.
] ,, i. r t im ad -tor ."
"You II w f,:fi toisir l idi't y..u?
And ..u-- il s.tiinin..'ne it'" YNiL kiii, it
.- i hld I') there ?'
Yt-. and no-w iy.u kn:,ow h),t I .ran d-al waith
that ii irt.lihe eirl if >'ill:. I fid out w.vhern- -lie i-.
if inrly I can brillg her within my p.iwer: aund I:.
-;.d I [ w ill itdo it'"
.Annlie." :aid J..hln Ashman. andl thete "as fear
andl revulmio ii in his v.ie,-. they have -aiil atboirr
li,-re that i..ii are a "itli l I Ihavt never litenild to
that talk. Rut this. ihis-what does it mean? That
thing tiat I -aw out there 'amne fitm hell. and .vyto
i ir.uhi i i"'
"I Iroiucht it." she admitted, and there was
mncking triumllph in Lhei tone: 'anl now you know
nitre of me than even .yo'u did before. So be careful.
J..hn. and find that girl for me."
"If Rutherford still sticks to her"-he began
"So much the wirse for him also'" she flunt.
cout .avagely. "1 am stronlgelr than lie or you or
aiinone else here. Beein your t.iquiries to-morrow."
He to.k her down to her horse and she rode


awa3 riilht through tl, spout wiiere thle strange
animal bajd shoine and then d isalppared Ashmian
shbuddered. He would not have gone alone into
that tield that night fo''r auny ie.iultpense: he was too
shaken in nervie It came into Iis mind that Rider
alone haid Inot emed much perturbed And ipe did
not really think Rider wa- dri'iink or a fool "NPer-
haps." he thouipglit. "It is because he is a mlan of
God"-for agaii iill iluer respect for this dissiolute
priest asi-erted itself He wi-nt to his silebi..arll and
Iitxed hiti-.eltf a stlioii i auLght ..'f rum and w\rter.
MeIantime Annie F'allltii-r cailoped honie and in
a very little w hle >anie Ic th- Greatr Houme. Her
-eriant. knew b1li. nmiuIds f'Omni tile tu.nes of her
.-ii-c : hearing her .tall nowJ thby hastened Out pre-
cil'tatelIt. itirvou-s and apprl'eheniti.. Sihe rnllle Iinto
the iiouse- andl up thli- great stairs: arrived in her
ominm, she thill,-w oien a frontt tindiow from tshi:h
-llit iA ull urti'\ th pi..pr!'t. dlmtm'n to tile Pate. and
s.-ec in tl'e- dittni[. % th-e I.iw -rnimall bmuildinul iii wthiich
Rlotiet t l utherf..r.I liv-ed Shi- lalf I,-aned Oii. ,.tar
inc ri\edli in that dir l .tionl. her teeth bit int,.. her
lower Ilp. oi. of iltld an.ier half huked liher She
li.tel him Slihe l iicd aloud tlat -he love him.
hiar he wit thie i..noly iman she had eve-r ,lved. ntid
that he raied hut little t,'r her after all: wta-i only
raken with hl-r a.s a Ilidl _migi ht hb1 witl a Iine t.,y.
Ibut was I-.il'. 1 dil,-.rt let--hi- fel-t that ill her
h-artt B ir I .n't etlt Ihim." -lie caspel. "I won't
1It hiiii' He- i- nine. and rlhat iretli ih hall iiot
iake- iiini tromni meni- or AXihnman pi event me from
.i.[in ,li3t I pl'-as- Asnlaii' I[ d n't tru-t hinm .
i.. i-, torkine t't hlinim el L,-r him )ii ar-etul'
That i..,imanr will di inl a se-K. and nol one ill
ever dare to say that I had a hand in it "
She felt deathly tweak Her vitality was enor-
nimtus. blit she had taxed it greatly that night. She
liad duilitteil t., A.linman that it %iA,- le% who) had
vokped that pale. va-t spectre. a Ireat horse with
but line ive inl fr.ilt. Ill, Threi-.ftooted Hor-e .(f a
profoundly held Jamaican belief. which hall been seen
oIn Ro-eh.lli h..bf.-.re. antl which. -mne said. had only
le,: -een lien n'lie iif liher hIIusbandlt was about to
die. It had been associated with her: it was al.
may- tlie i eral- i d .f ,.''-r. terrihie liappening: it-
appialance haii illevital.ly served to i strengthen her
hold on her t.ullitn. bitterly-disiconteided slaves It
twas inot only biy hbodilv fear that she liell them. by
dread o-f [he whip and th.- iron chain. hut Iy far
ni-ie potent spiritual terrors. lv the report, the
isnvii tion. that l-hI cic.uhl summon fiends fromn the
Pit to wtork her will if she vweire? minded to do so.
And to-nig-ht shie had done so: but the effort. and
I (I'll Ino lri 'l oiA PTlle } 1


0*

/g.k


cr?

N .
St
\*


S.'.c,

'Z
*


Enquiries Solicited.


Salesmen cover the Island.


PUNCH


-


ONB~

'4i



-Ii

C
-a- -
0


S


- ___~~ __~~






PLANTERS' PUNCH


AN OLD LEGAL FIRM The Witch ofRosehall


ISAN

13
KINGS'




BUS]

S.-We
SAmericai
Chase at
THA2

S 2.-We
S best tern
M THAT

3.-We
S trading <
THAT

4.-We
Sing our
SStaple ai
S Shoes, el
THAT

5.-Cou
tablishm
where-
THAT

6.-We
Customer
money
age-
TH.-IA

7.-Ou
their civ

1TH.1;

8.-Ou
quick re
S THA;

9.-W(
just suit
S THA

10.-W(
their pa
THAI

11.--Ou
Sus and
Sfriends-
THAI

S12.-W
p prosper
THA:



SA
K 1G
SKINGS


IUEL &

1 HARBOUR STREET
TON, JANMAICA, I




INESS CRE

visit the Continen
n Markets annually,
lowest rates-
'S BUSINESS.

purchase for Cash
us-
"'S CAPITA.L.

keep up our reputa
on perfectly honest
"'S GOOD POLICE

Share frequently re
large and varied s
nd Fancy Goods, Be
tc.-
T'S TTRACTIIE.

untrv Traders visit
ent before goin


T'S PRUDENT.

_ realize that gi\v
ers the best value f
is to our mutual


T'S COMMON SE

r Assistants are kn
ility and courtesy-

T'S GRA-TIFI'ING.

r Motto is small pr<
turns-
T'S WISDOM.

e keep the class o
able to the trade-
T'S EXPERIENCE

e thank our Custor
tronage-
T'S GRATITUDE.

ir Customers speak
recommend us


T'S KINDNESS.

e wish you a hap
us New Year-

T'S SINCERITY.



LMUEL & C
31 HARBOUR STREET
STON, JAMNAICA,


? IHIl IIIl III IIII IIII n-IIIl "III IlII III -nI III II III II I. ---


-
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CO.


3.W.I.


E ) --

ED: D

tal and -
to pur-




and get




tion for
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plenish-
stock of
oots and M




our es-
g else-




ing our
or their
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"NSE.

own for




fits and




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ners for




well of
to their




)py and






0.,
B. I.
B.W.I.


HE present writer remembers vividly when he
first saw the late Mr. Wellesley Bourke. The
present writer was then a very small boy; Mr.
Wellesley Bourke was a grown man, black-haired,
straight, bright, full of energy-his son, Mr. Alfred
Bourke, resembles him strikingly. He had come
down to Falmouth to contest the seat of Trelawny
and St. James in the Legislative Council, and in
those days he made the acquaintance of thousands of
people in Trelawny.
It is a legal family, this of the Bourkes. One
is reminded of that when one recalls that the year
1928 marks the golden Jubilee of the firm of Harvey
and Bourke. Along with the late Mr. Thomas LI'yd
Harvey, Mr. Wellesley Bourke (second of that name)
started the firm of Harvey and Bourke in 1878; and
this firm has as its head to-day the third \Vellefly.v
Bourke, whose partner is his brother, Mr. Alfrted W.
Bourke. It is a political family, too, for the eldest
Wellesley, who died just fifty-one ye-ars ago, was a
member of the old Jamaica House of Assembly and a
man dreaded for the pungency of his criticism and
the courage with which he expressed his views. In
those days men talked to and about one another, in
public life, as they would hardly dare to think in
these milder times. And old Wellesley Bourke set the
example of startling candour. He believed in free
speech.
All the Bourkes, down to the present ones, have
believed in free speech. But though grandfathui-
and father were in politics (the late Mr. Wellesley
Bourke having been Mayor of Kingston as well as a
member of the Legislative Council) his eldest son,
the present Wellesley, has as yet shown no dis-


-~!llllllllB1111111111111111111111111


(Continued from Page 4it i.
the emotional stress through which she had previ-
ously passed, had exhausted her. Slowly -he sank
by the window, in a dead faint, and when she :ame
to herself it was dawn.
She had been through a desperate :risis. and
her waking brought her no surcease of agpiny aud
apprehension. She had never had to fear a riial
before; it was she who in the past had s-ii-.kned or
the men she loved, or thought she loved. and wihen
weariness and distaste supervened, when an uncon-
trollable aversion asserted itself, she had succeeded it
ridding herself of them. Ashman hail ni, .:laim as
a husband, his existence could not rtanmnil her
actions: he could not venture to exer, i-e authority:
that perhaps was why he was still alive; hcsid~s,
he was very useful to her in practical affairs, tar
more so than her husbands had been He had to
cease being her lover when she willed it so, he under-
stood that clearly. But she wanted love. bhat she
considered love, and this boy, some -ix Niar-: her
junior, fresh from England, tall, manly. hand'ome-
her senses had thrilled at the sight of him. her blood
had grown hot with desire for him; she felt that she
would gladly, willingly, make any sacrifi,.e for him-
and he did not love her! Attracted, yes: fascinated
undoubtedly; but nothing more. She had seen this
in his attitude of a few hours before: she would be
much exercised to hold him for much Innecr now.
The girl with the brown complexion and the defiant
look, that grand-daughter of the negro most feared
in all the parish of St. James, had deliberately
challenged her, Annie Palmer. and might yet draw
her love from her. So again must she strike. and this
time with weapons that might not succeed with a
white man and by means that must not easily be
detected. Through fear and horror she must rid
herself of this rival. But what if those instruments
failed, as they might fail? As Annie thrit herself
upon her bed, In the dawning, for a few hours of
rest, she vowed that if the means she proposed to
use should not succeed, other and more material
ways should be found to achieve her object. how-
ever great the risk might be.
CHAPTER TWELVE
WHO IS ANNIE PALMER ?
THE three book-keepers were sitting at dinner: it
was abuiut eight o'clock. A half-moun glowed
in the east with the greenish tinge of the tropics.
An hour or so later Mr. Rider would take up his
station in the still-house; now he wa- nialing Ihe
acquaintance of young Rutherford; Burbridge he
knew already.
Rubert was in a silent, surly mood. He had
launched that day with Annie, as arranged. but the
lunch had been a depressing function. Each party
.had something to say to the other but had refrained
from saying it: each felt that a barrier had sprung
up between them since the night before: was .:on-
scious of it, but wished to disguise the fact from the;
other.
Annie had, casuaRy as it seemed, asked him
if he were coming to the Great House that night;
he had answered, no, he did not think so. and she
had not pressed him to come. Indeed. she had seemed
relieved at learning that that was not his intention.
She had made no reference to the scene of the night
before. although it would have been very natural
for her to have done so. He himself did nit. although
he wvulid have liked to ask one or two questions. But,
she was hardly the person whom he could question
as to the whereabouts of Millicert.
He had .cone about his work that day with a
clogged determination. though lie had no inclination
for it. Psyc.he uas looking after his room and his
food now: he had asked her that morning to uuder.
take that duty. Rider was to live in the minall build-
ing attached to the overseer's residence bit would
take his meals with the other book-keepers. At this
ninment he wa-s trying to appraise Robert; already
be had heard a good deal about him from Burhridge
The talk on the estate that day had been of the
appeartani.e of the strangle apparition so diitinctly
seen by many persons on the previous night The
news had spread with the rapidity of a cane piece
i:nflaerationu. there wa not a slave. not a while
man, on Rosehall who had rnot heard of it by this:
on Palmyra als. it was being discussed. The people
could think and speak of nothing .le. The slaves
were frightened. The Horse with three feet, lumni
ois, ominoust. of whi.:h they had beard all their lives
and whirh they believed to be an infernal spirit|
dominated their imagination now that it had been
-ten by to many living witnesses.
"And ynou yourself saw it?" said Burbridge tl
Iider. not for the first time
"As I have said more than once before, yes. It
was very distinct, very horrible; it had only rhre
leg;. and the foreleg seemed to grow out of th
creature's chest; it was just as negro tradition an
supe-rstition have described the Three-footed Hors
as being."
'Then there is such a fiend," muttered Bur


... ..... ......................... ...............................


position for the noise and dust and contests of the
political arena. He once .aid to this writer that
there are more kicks than thanks to be had there.
Yet the love of politics mu.t be in his blood. So one
wonders what, in this connection, the future has in
store for him. We may yet see a third X' i cle-ley
Bourke in politics. .
Fifty years is a respectable period of time for
any Jamaica legal firm, especially when It is sti!l
cnmdiuc-ted vigorously. But as a matter of fact the
house of Harvey and Bourke (an. as it were, trace
its descent from Georgian days, going back for over
a century. For the prede-vLs.,ors of that hntl.e wer.-
really Dick and Hill who flourished in the earl]
part of the nineteenth century: and though
the fim i hanged its name as time weni on. there
was always a Hill in it. .Just ibetore it became
Harvey and Bourke it was Hill. Airey and Harve:.
That name Harvey. is the.- onnecting link between
the old and the new firms.
The late Mr. WEllE.tley Bourke. whose portrait
we print on this page. was a firm believer in "the
single tax." He held that as from the land came
ultimately all a nation's wealth the land should
contribute all the needed revenue of the country.
To this writer he lent iiumer.iu.- book, all on this
"single tax" question, striving hard to make a
disciple. It cannot be said that he succeeded; but
he left an enduring impression of a bright, interest-
ing, many-"ided personality on a young man's mind.
All his life Mr. Wellecley Bourke was one of the
first menie Jamaica. and in the Legislative Council
he was always a force to be reckoned with. He had
many friends. He is still remembered and spoken
of in Trelawny, whose honoured representative he
was. He was also one of the men who founded the
old Daily Telegraph, the first Jamaica penny'paper.






PLANTERS' PUNCH


bridge, troubled: "and it is seen on this estate ,of all
othbels!"
"Is there -u,h a fiend?" enquiredd Rider. with
a slight smile
"You just .aid that you y ourself saw it." Robert
reminded him gloomily. "You should he far more
convinced than we "
"I am merely w.indering i itr was a friend Rider
explained "ThaI I did see something. I admit Ex-
atlly what was its nature I am not prepared to say
It may have been a tiend ot a host. that i, possible
But, again. it nma. not have been."
"Then what waq it?" demanded Burbridge irrit-
ably.
"I do not profess to know. I think I have made
that quite clear But I heard to-day that the-e
strange visions appear only when something dread-
ful is about ti happen on this property You have
heard that ti.u. ihaten't you. Burbridge?"
"Often."
"Then. I suppose. we had better hb: looking for-.
ward to trouble. to dreadful ocu Urrenic.-u7"
Burbi idge glancedl doubtfully at Roberr. He did
not want an thiine he said to be Ir .pted toi NlMr
Palmer.
The glance was intercepted: Robert spoke ouir
"Frv.m what I have heard." h.- .aiil bittcrl..
"dreadful things seem a specialtyy in thi. place No
doubt all thee tales are lie.i : they -et on one's
nerves neverthel.-ss I am beginning to regret thar
I ever came to Rosehall."
"So it.on?"' interjeitted Rider lihlitly "-Well.
being sober and in my richt mind-a dreadful ltate
that will not la.-t for Ionm--I am inclined to apree
that )ou are right. I ran speak out plainly. you see,
Rutherford. for my tenure of cffiie here is not likely
to be length I am very find of resigning "
"You would nor he here if I w.-re rioinE my work
properly.'" -aidl Robert. with a ruoih of self-con-
tempt.
"Please .inriniue in your bad (Ours' for a little
*while yet." urged Rider. "I need t. recuper.ite bE.
fore I become a centlman i.f insohbiety and leisuie
again. Pardi.n the imrpertiii-n e. Rutherford. bur
you have people in England. haven't .ou. people in
good rircumrtanie ?"
'Yes: why do you aak?"
"No offence Intended. old man: but of course I
know yeou are from a 'varsity. like myself. and your
sort don't become book-k.epers--if .ur friend Bur
bridge will excuse a remark which it not intended
to be rude I am a book-keeper now. but that is
because of circumsntanes 'How art thou fallen. 0
Lucifer. son of the morning"' And I have no people
in England to whom I could turn: a nephew and a
couple of cousins only. and their interest in me is
very properly nil. They ]do not specialize in thei
appreciation of black sheep You are diff-rent And
since you have Iegun to regret coming to Ro-eliall
you will certainly e on to regrertinL that yoru ever
came to Jamaica The logical -seuence is that you
should leave Jamaica as soon as you (an. But men
alas. are not Puided by loich."
Robert smiled. in spite of his depression: he
rather liked thi- quaint parson who was so obviously
down and out, and yet who spoke so well anti seemed
so intelligent
"You take a create interest in me. a stranger.'"
he replied
"I do. Both sober and drunk I am one of the

------------------------------- ----






G, M. DaCosta & Co.,




WHOLESALE
PROVISION
i ERCH A NTS


51 O0
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Agency


most curious of men. I don't want to appear a Nosey
Parker and that sort of thing, but I have heard all
about last night's little business in these rooms; it
is all over the estate. And that, coming just before
the appearance of that peculiar-looking ghostly
animal, suggests trouble. I am not courageous! I
would always avoid trouble precipitately; hence my
warning to you. I don't think you are quite en-
snared by the tropics yet?"
"What do you mean?"
"Well, there are men like me who, having once
got all this sunlight into their bodies, and a good
deal of the fermented canejuice into their veins, can
never get rid of the fascination of the tropics. Add
to these influences a pretty native girl or two, and
they are completely lost. They are bound to these
lands forever. I have escaped the wiles of the
feminine sex; the bottle has been too powerful a
-rival to them. But I am doomed to remain here;
and so is Burbridge; with him it is financial dis-
abilities mainly. You-you don't seem to suffer from
all these hindrances and drawbacks; therefore I
don't see why the devil you are here."
"But I am."
"Quite so. And last night-all righr. Burbridge,
our friend, Rutherford, is not the sort that blabs.
you need not signal caution-last night showed that
you are in a somewhat dangerous position. But you
can escape from it if you wish."
Robert did not appreciate this direct interference
with his affairs. He wondered if Rider could have
any ulterior motive for speaking as he did? Had
Ashman set him to it? He threw aih angry, suspici-
ous look at the ex-clergyman, wob understood it in
part, but smiled easily.
He sat facing the door. He rose quickly just
then, staring towards the dusty path that led from
the gate up to the Great House.
"Our mistress seems to be going for a ride." he
observed, indicating a figure on horseback which,
followed by another, was riding towards the gate.
That it was Annie was quite evident. Another
rider attended her.
"This is the first time since I have been here
that she has left Rosehall at night," said Burbridge,
surprised, after the two figures on horseback had
passed through the gates.
"An unusual occurrence, eh? Then the object
of her ride must be unusual also. That is a very
singular and striking woman," said Rider.
The lady and her attendant had now turned
their horses' heads in die direction of Montego Bay.
They rode at an easy pace; later on, the road being
bad, they would have to go at a walk; they would
not rea.-h lMonteeo Bay before eleven o'clock, if that
place were their destination.
"It will be late when they get to the town," con-
tinued Rider; "and that virtuous and somnolent
place retires early. Now, what sort of business can
be taking Mrs. Palmer to Montego Bay to-night?"
"You are very curious," observed Robert with
a .shirt laugh, but he too was conscious of a great
curiosity.
"I am curious," confessed Mr. Rider. "I have
already said so. Mrs. Palmer's doings have exercised
a good deal of fascination over me ever since I came
to this part of the island. Who is she? What is
she? She has had three husbands and-well, it is
a fact that she has had three huslanids and that all
three of them have died. She is a determined wo-






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man; she can bend people to her will; she is feared;
she can call spirits from the vasty deep-or things
that look like spirits. And last night she threatened
a young coloured woman with condign punishment,
and nearly inflicted that punishment herself. Now
she goes riding out at night, with but one boy attend-
ing her, and that is hardly what any other white
woman in Jamaica would do. She is a mystery. I
can't say that I like mysteries unless I can solve
them."
"She can be very friendly when she wants,"
broke in Burbridge haltingly. "And she is our em-
ployer, after all."
"I am here for just so long as it will take Ash-
man to get someone else to fill my place," said Rider
derisively. "I am merely a convenience and there-
fore not affected by that strong spirit of loyalty
(which seems to me indistinguishable from self-
interest) that the ordinary book-keeper may
be expected to display. I am here to-day and gone
to-morrow, friend Burbridge, and the benefit of such
a situation is that I can speak my mind plainly now
and then, knowing that, once I depart from any
estate, I am not likely to be employed on it again.
Anyhow, after what happened on Rosehall last night,
I don't wish to remain here long. A few weeks will
be sufficient for me; it would be a few days only
(Continued on Page 53).

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PHONE 361.
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1929


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............................,ij .......... ......... .......................... ... ,, .....


4


1929


K IN GISTON.


iyIrtir iTtank liMt l,







PLANTERS' PUNCH



Business Thrives Where Confidence Is Inspired


M R VeI'nl.,n B. Mler-, is not ..-t o:ry years of
age. as his appea'rame indicates. But it i-"
some y-ais since we began to hear about him, and
linow i-men spak of V B. in ternm congratulatory and
admiring. ftr in Jamaiia ie admire the EuCtessful
ian-andi env\' lhim o ten V B. however. disarms
llnvy. ..am-els out potential dislike. by his very modest
disposition: which di.spolt.i ion leads one to conclidlti
that there are two V. B Ilylerse: There is V LU.
Niho is naturally retiring, simple. cheerful, the sort
of personn you ilk.- aud reter to as a jolly good fellow
There ii \V. B the business man who built up Motor
Car and Suliplie-. Limited. thb keen. untiring, push-
fil. hopeful. determined man whuoe soul is in tlil
'u.iness The general public knows the latterI li-.
frici'ln s andl a-sociates kinw lbotli \'. R.s aild coI mi
I-in.r hetri in th.-ir minds. They long since rt-alied
that b[h.:r, is steel beneath the \-lvet.
It wia in 1i2'; thar Mr V\,iuon Myers organised
tlihe Mltor t'ar an.j Supplte-. Limited Had he p,:-
- .edtl Ijrg.- fund tot private .apit;il. that harl bheen
(t.a ewiiugh But. like most Jamai:ans who have-
i-i, ,Ideil,l V L had LnIn fortune at his bai:k-he
i'rieil his fOrllline In bio head. He could not d o
i,. L _luup of loi al .apn als -ts anid sa. to tbh. i m "L,.k
]Iire. I think tllis thing is a : eaiud proposition aind
.- hadl all Ibetter get in on the gtiounid floor I ill
l-it up s-i many thou.-andl. and iou fielli.ais ei ii.
ltluidj ire glood for -, niuch. Wh lat dii \aou sayo Il
i a tldeal." That lour ie \a- not op-en to him But
i- kneli that in order to, do ii.ilin e;l you mu-t have
]ii .ine) and be niui havi. said rt him-elf. "I will
i-r this uniney anid "ill iiit riieh in the attempt."
'\hatever he did sai., we know what he did. He
-raveilled about the island anti worked to interest
p-lple in the venture lie wished to establish. The
'orn'imil inpany had not quccteded Somethinll new
nlu-t ari-se A ft'w -iound men in Kingstin., who
ieew V' B lMyers and believed in him. -toodl behind
:im They may have followed him with their pray-
er;,. as ihe toured the country. hut that is doubtful.
ifr Il'iiiness men are notorinu-ly lacking in religious
ditivrn n. Yet he had i.ertainly got their blessing.
for they had pledged themselves to put money in
the new Motor Car Company: and when a business


'rlB M.,i L iled i--'.i di ii t, i ari h:. in. --- pu r- ni.n.i -
in a in'. eflt r irp i--. t n- ilini -t \,- .- iai 1 i -. -:a .it
**I \h vT, iven mi-. llfe. ml., -,il l. m ,all "
Fl it thies.: nien -le l i 1... .i -1l1 .l irn7- 1ki .'- rht. ir
V' B .1 ,ier' nh l':li-1 .-mJd that I. ol,.i .l l, ee,
An,1 thi- 'folk Ini the l.,ntri dir.lts thL-iv h a.lwj,
-:onim ewiv ar [.Ir' ..ilI- 01 K In -It..n I>. V.' inter'eStiil
The ". ame a. r:.-.." Th,:- >..ugh ,Il tip the- doujL "
They drii tho-e nii.es-.. thing-- for whi.:it thie Amn
eri.u in i .h, h. a e iha itit-rI A l.iian uagi.- of their .iwn i


have coined the appropriate deignatiion-- The tbjtal
amount, we believe, was ni t very large No one was
going to plunge too heavily Any business might
fail. Therefore, tiautiun! Ytt thr-y did what waa
iou-didereld necessary for a start: the-y shoinled their
faith by thei-r awi:rks, and th.;i-e work.- consist-ed in
signing their namt.- to i h-u.-i--,. Canme Mr My.ers
lihak to Kingst,.n. anid had le been a iman iof hsI.
mildest. chara.'-t.er he might ihatve ex linimed. "I aent,
I saw, I got theil: i.h But he i. not given to :elf-
:l;aitulatory exclamation-. He devoli-n potential ex-
clainatory eler'gy t.o lo.,:kin, after hli: ui-inet-..
Anil to-day we all proi.laini hini a -iic te-, and
Iis friend' are proud of tiini H... .i itau till under
forty, is the (cneiral Man.C,t_ ,of a big J.mai.iai buii-
iies anid a Directlor oif his oiiilany It i- nt often
lone. Sone ican. the mar.it .an't-' t.. ri-e wiftly, and
surely, to a in to the t tre lI- .t th.e litad--you
have, to I.) all tiI thi ( ,. ---. c e .u.luelhini tiat diffter-
i'tliate- ..ii 'frli.in tlii. nia- Yoi u h.it tI I just a
little different It i- that little Iiff-rei n.. hat i illurs
Luck help- a man. .-ay man:. Of I..-1r.-.: Lik
idits. Bill i o a e f ti iire .nt on the ; it whenI l- k is
l:i.r ,,ilt. hI if ,.:,u have ii...I. th ee:, n to -..- tli t bit
if luck. if -\ai lhav-- inot placed youis -lf in .,a p:isitijn
to bene-it by laick, in-k inply ..iannuJr Ihelp :,.u
l'usiiin-'!S nl-. knl .-.w thiS The. kun-, thi-y -.we
iii:'th.l.in2. t o goidJ fortune Thtl-, kitow I here i- a
tide inl tlhe' affair' orf men whii h.. t:ki-n ait ihe fln.-d,
leads In to ftLorune. Bul [thwy sense. eviin if they
llo not. define, the fact that :. u. liave t. I.- leaily lu
tak: the- tide aind that i.-.Ir on \Wtli ta;llk.-. t at the
Ail.hr miiinent, in.tinctii-.t lv a' ri il-. rther-- :ir- thou-
-and11 wh.. rni.er .-ee trhi title .t all It t"weepi by
then unh-eiledi That is .ihat V. IM MI.-rs did not
permit the rt,le ro di He lauin, hed rait upn it,
'.vth hopi itn Ilil h-airt, lad. ini -plite of hii- nathir
ni..ir .. witii a real, firm faith in hL in.ielf Arid he
mnlae h>1 iandrlni fatnius-ly anld -tand to liay among
thii abler Jatauiiians ,.f ti-. generation. Withal. the
m;nite old V B rhe young IlIJn of eaisy natural
maniicr,. haild-working, intelligent, shrewd. reliable,
a thioroughlily ikeable personality as well Ia- J a -otur
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,-


1929


MR. VERNON IH. MIER,%







PL ANTE RS'


The Witch of Rosehall
I t'r iftri tf l ift"lf Pul+,: i' I
were n,,t my ext-helIuerI in a deplitable ct-nd itiion. I
am now _)oiUi to keep wnat>h and ward oi er the
still-house. nhli..h i a den ot thieves I -shall en-
dearoul. myself. to keep my hand- o.i1 the ru'ni
He laughed, but made no movement to loave-
Inslied uf rtht he iapi.-l into thought a- li houcl
Eomethin g were oti hi. mind.
"We know what he I.-, tI.re ,r Ie-s," aid
Robert. a. if to hinismi-If. 'but down iin thr Biay. I
reemmber tnow, even tile e' ,.tor wn-a puzzled ai to
who lie a-. antd ahi-re -he uriginall] ci;tme iit.m
He said s ,nE thlin o(f the soit to, me "hei he Ikarnt
I was i.ining here to iw .,ik The mniatr steuiz .,
have been liitih ijti: iised. Iut t 'Oneu i aill tihe
wiser.
"Thi i nt.tttetr ihas hli n nmu h li-, u-~ ed. s:tul
Rider. waking out f hi- t 1 v-rie. Al per-on.il
matter' ar. i.iinva' -ed in thi ii.iin try w ith a .-.rl
deal oft llneigy -ind evr-n riire imp.iritinence Vitiit,
our conversation now But Mr-. Palin-er Iha-l not
been i-tinimunicative Still-"
**".'ij kn.'w s n. illiltl '" quti kly enlu!ire! i Bur-
bi idgt
"l e-.-l ruloair- i tiii I fan, the:. adir title
Yuu see. 4Ie Iiveil : 11 Kitl-L.tn heture -lie dappearedl
as a bride in St Jam.--. -,iil Kinc-ti.rn i. a town
where nws sri pr.e-a- fa-r mn.ri- rapiiliy lthin it (an
dow'i tiere I vas in KniinLi.... v hiin i n s .aid
11, was ,.iniae to uliaril John Palnmer. and ai he h a.a
known ai -.int? iif tile iiigge-_r ..t thi- piantrci. and the
owrier of the tin-i. r i,-idi in(e in rural Janidiit..t. ii;til.
ally there wias -'iitie talk .haloint tlie "\nman he hadi
ielecti'l'l a- hii- wife. Sorme f thi-, lalk aum' nimy
way: I %ais theii curatt in the P.tIi-li L urI, L. anti
the pr-ip-ri tinn is that all the Ci-OIp lhoul] liee
related to the .lei:. alppareitly ir a-isi-s tlim in
their -piritual work
He pnaus-ed fori a m milnt. and the otlihr umen
waited extipe tantli, nriit twlhing tr pres-s limi tio
-detail the -arly history if ;a wim.n. Iur eaer tto
hear it nevertheless
"I fotrgeat now widhat lihr mahidein name was."
resumed Rider. "but that d',esn'r matter'. The story
was that sh. came tI, Jamaica from Hayti."
"Hayti" irnell Riobert: "then she is French?"
"Prol.abiy botl Freni.h and neero.' suggested
Burbridee: I hear there is a lot of mixture cof
blood in Hayti. she may haave -nme. That miehr
account fur het w itc.herieF'"
"Ther- is hardly an\ need to find the blood of
. the negro in every villain. male or female." chuckled
Rider. "tlhugh that emns to be the fashion in the
West Indies The -worldl i- not divided into black
devils and white angels: anyway. we three ouild
hardly claim to belong to the angelic inftraternlty.
could we" Besides. there were plenrt of white per-ple
in Hayti oncet"
"Yes, but after the French Revolution the neero
leader Dres-alines ihad thie all drive out or ma.-
sacred," Robert reminded him. "Thto.e who seemed
to be white and were allowed to remain really could
prove that they had some negro blood in their veins
I wa- tirld that in France Annie may bh one of
those.
"You foiret. n. friend. that Henry- Christsrnlie


sucteded e le..-lines a- ruler of the northern part
:if Hayti. and he allowed white people to settle there.
wihy. his own doctor was a w white man And in the
-soith. Peti,.n. th. Pre.sient. e-i.uu iaged white pi-ple
to remain. No:: r..u art ijllte wroni: about Annie
Palmtr'i origins. Hier mio.ther ani Ifather were said
ro bhi Irilii. -he h' er-elf \-a, born in Eniland .-i
IreljuIj-t',th noiintries iave be-en mentillued-but
they took her over vwilli-. lh w\a-. yet a little girl
She speak- Encii.h pi(rt'-ittv. she -would ha.ie learnt
it ftrom tmrh She pri.ably .-peaki Frenm.th tijentiy.
tlhoutbh l'. ,i.n heie hl'i htarld hetlr .pek in that
lanalinL- She mlut I ha'iVe heliardl alII seen --u'iI
strati'n,. tini E I in Hu.'ti: it 'was th i.-. if t an. wh-re.
thi.t -he- lii-, Sv.-i'-l she had lpci' -.r i.o It >t th.- or
(il iina A- 1d :r -,,. n l%. ilrl -be n ul-,t hate I.,, atn
tv'tn !iDtr. i h iautii'!l than slhe 1- ui:nw. atnd if h-er
pjiirn'- i' ere 11 i ifav ur ith either C ri.-t.plih o


i, -r i,..ij- I itrtn..u Lfearl-s d',o t yulr -te h iie wa- ilit
the aio t i f uPirl itln t S ia l t s pIpl et f oilld hav i'

'I i un ii re l !- ainialn th t." i irl [ ]o r-lr. *bi.i .h:it
'allows r ,n, that?"
**T iIt----a i- ~u i h P-li -a i'la t.i- n l miiine. iliut I
iidn'r .l w y iv -h, ul. nt ite rit e- thi, \oo i i r ii.t-
tquir ..1e r vi rs-id ilt all the al l .Al ri. s rh --r. .
tand ln .,-hld I. unde i- ra d howii .ri tl i-i nen i the minid.-
T..h t ih r flipep- in all -.I t ..ti e t-xtraoldinury \a hrn .
it.1 i li r.-i- e- .n in thi- %\oundi-rfuil v.uu-i Chi l I' .Il-
.,. lilt [p. hibilitiea : i. atn i hintr n [,pl. Asurnr Itn teaq BI-
Iin her lit o t. il. it e .l -t. piOn.sc il ai itie< She knR r.
lihns I") t1:1iii 'ie- the pl.ple on hi.i owu -, ari ri:-t -he
has a niey kenriin t She ia.n ibeat Iloaun ti- re
-iita ith ,,t hlf w h i ne m e1 h =:* ke!-" tlhih Ii,.r:='-iif. I ha. ,=-_
Isipk- ail:,oui t t Hatyr i' i prieJm t. and sir n artr o.
tali:t. tli- Iri .re- s enr e H.y.tl are luite at: powelitul
in iesy tna aas influenttial. as thulir male rolle auee.
Giv'n a w,.narin [of that lesi .riprion thrown into
,,ntal.t with Annie Palr ier 1hiEn h( % wAI at croin .
i I tto nimanhi,. i., when hla-r mind 'war Tlmartrie .
n lie her curio. it was ti t is kT-eni.,r and anything
iliehbt haplun. She may have had a v,.-id.o prie.,re..s
-fr urcse tvh n her par-nt.- tok hltr to Hiyti. it is
quite likely. And Hayti. wg all kmnon. is he ih. er
st i nghold f devimlt rft in it part th e world
Thlire the people see vi-.ions and tlih deal are brou hlit
Ieut of their glra'n \e-. ddr s-in t et tD nt
**It i.a alli tu.s iand hearsay." iurnlured Bur-
l Trihld .
"It I- mo.-t ofa it oujeeture" admitted Rider.
SI -said a s iu.'h at the heainnin!: and that is whi
I hai e. never mention d the ll latter. dIefoi le Still .sh
dlid come t'r.om Hayti' rto Jamai.a. and shie was of
English aIr Iri h parent e. s-o rnui b wa-nelieved
in Kingston. anId tht belief would no t have got about
if it nad not its foundations in fact The rest niay
not be tru... l.ijr I think it is The cirrcumbtances
:ui guest that it is.
"But I have heen talking too mu.h.." he ailded
abruptly. "1 must io on 1) the still-house nov.'"
He ri.r-e quickly. nodded to thie others. then went
ili way RobIert turned to Burbrlidce.
"That fell.,w has bpen -dying .onme peculiar
thine-s." he rn.mrk>-d. "Tell me. do you believe these
+t>'arie< about Mr? Palmtr's murdlerel hu.,i)and "'"
"i.il ( God. Ruthb-rt'ord!" exclaimed Burbridp -,
"'do ou wi.ant to get i1,1 in trouble"'"
"That que:-tion alone is an adniimi ion." said


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Robert grimly. "Rider clearly believes that there
is some sinister history connected with this place,
and so do you. And I am coming to believe it my-
self. That is the worst of it. My mind is plagued
with doubts and suspicions."
"But you"-Burbridge hesitated a moment, and
then pursued the topic resolutely: he felt he could
trust Robert. "You are not like us, as Rider just
said; if you don't like staying here you can leave
when you please, unless-"
"Unless what?"
"Unless-you won't mind my saying so?-you
are in love with Mrs. Palmer. I can understand
that you should be. She is a wonderful woman."
"I will be frank with you, Burbridge; I am and
I am not. She is wonderful, as you say, and she has
been extraordinarily kind to me. But since you
know what happened here last night-of course
Psyche told you-I don't mind admitting that I am
startled and disgusted and afraid. I am not afraid
for myself, but for Millicent. I don't know what is
going to happen, but I feel that something is. I feel
mean when I speak like this; I feel as if I were a
traitor. Yet"-he broke off abruptly. "Have you
any idea where Millicent may be?" he asked, as if
changing the subject.
"There is no particular secret about that. She

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1929


P UN C H


II







PL .A TER S' P UN CH


has an aunt who lives just outside of Montego Bay,
on the road to Hanover. I suspect old Takoo took
her there last night, but I don't suppose he will keep
her there for long. He will remove her as soon as
he can, if he wants her whereabouts to be unknown.
IM.-Aintiie. as she is over twelve miles from here, she
sh.ouid hb safe for the present."
"From whom?"
Burbridge did not answer.
Robert, who had suddenly discovered that he was
interested in Millicent's welfare, was frankly and
sincerely worried; Burbridge, though personally
indifferent, felt that perhaps there might be much
to be worried about.
"You, or Rider, said a little while ago that Mrs.
Palmer was going in the direction of Montego Bay,"
insisted Robert. "Do you think-?"
"I would not dare to think anything," replied
Burbridge, lowering his voice. "I don't want to get
mixed up with this business, Rutherford; I have
enough of my own difficulties to contend with."
"But surely she wouldn't dare!"
"I don't know what you mean," said Burbridge
guardedly, "but I believe Millicent is perfectly safe
where she is, for the present at any rate. She is
probably in bed by now, and even in Jamaica a
man or woman is secure in bed. There is nothing
to worry about."



Jamaica Government Railway.


TRAVEL BY RAILWAY.


The Railway journeys afford the finest
views of the magnificent scenery of the
hinterland.

KINGSTON TO MONTEGO BAY-
112 MILES.
This journey takes the passenger
through Spanisli Town, Williams-
field (-Latiinu fir Mandeville---"The
English Villag e" over the Greenvale
pass (1,705 feet). Between Maggotty
and Catadupa the railway runs
through the famous "Cockpit Coun-
try," a series of circular hollows and
hills of great depth and height, and
of peculiarly wild formation. The
Railway cuts into the side of the
hills, and tunnels through them in a
bewildering series of curves, and pro-
vides the finest views of this unique
"Cockpit Country."
A particularly fine view is afford-
ed of Montego Bay, across the Bogue
Islands.
Montego Bay-Doctor's Cave-one of
the finest coral bathing beaches in
the world. Wonderful sun and sea
bathing recommended by Sir Herbert
Barker, the world famous bone-set-
ter.
KINGSTON TO PORT ANTONIO
-75 MILES.
Through the Bog Walk gorge and
the fertile and picturesque St. Cath-
erine and St. Mary Country. 25
miles of wonderful coast scenery. Ex-
cellent bathing at Port Antonio.
KINGSTON TO EWARTON-29
MILES.
Station for Moneague, Golf
course; bathing at the famous Dunn's
River beach.
KINGSTON TO FRANKFIELD-
56 MILES.
Through the fertile Minho Val-
ley, and to the foot of Bull Head
mountain the centre of the Island.


TRAVEL BY RAILWAY.

Tickets, available for one month, for
the whole railway, 4 each, first class.
For particulars as to trains, fares, etc.,
apply to the Traffic Superintendent,
Jamaica Government Railway, Kingston,
or to
J. POWER,
Director Jamaica Government Railway.
Kingston,
Jamaica, B.W.I.


W \ ill |] \.:I I nu O uit h% r Il' 1 ,t.,mn1i It-A' 'A IItotlIt
fail. ju'lt hvnre -ihe i'?" o.-ke-l Hobert' r "'r. you
gei iln. intorniaiiuOn.' I n ili pay .,ny \[pen-i-s that
n :ay Ih,.ir'.l \V i l .i. "'
"'I Ili i :, |j'omi [ e i Bi j'dlB iL-': I a .111 .iin1
a i,,,.\ i ...i '.t.t l,. i p t l tih U;i\ ,,nI 1an i rrand. AII
lI. \\ il]l *"... .1,.nl t, i h I [ a I>,- Ia I 1 i . M ,li i,. t i 1 t i i 1 -n rin .:.ii r **
n l-,- ii i ." 111 9 : H.1',hl r't .-I. I inlr to nIk .wi
] i..[',:. ,- -. rj inl "';
V rIv =,... I "
E ..hI n i. ni th in t -.. lit l h t I. ....ni-

SliAPT'TER THIRTEEN
PUTTINGG; FEATH
M EAN. \ HILE Alnni i lind "-A .ttr miml.ii t ".. r-
1 l i. 1 h ihla l i ll .,..*,' ll I in ... R, ti >
H l+ l al....\. I '... i l, ll .... w illni..h h l u'.u l t r_..n
iM tw -,(i r' li- t lhI. I ill- ,ll u" en i.., h iu .I, t le '.,. tyl
n!..'. n.. \.iti'-r .lid thn' ilib- The- E -. iva Ipole bl h le,.
s a Ili l. kl It' hr l.ll-d tl .I I I .llhi, t' 'aul i. : al
n,".h. J l a t.ilr, a i,'.. ,t ri | n iln i m mr.in l tl wVii: i n. |D
i t I ll-ti ..n l air ..l I lle aIc 1t. rne l p i r .-illle rhi
il.- -.tl, ,' f anl-it- ti l .-i a:. A uiIurl ir il' ,:.i i Iht
:'r"ii th,- ., andl v;. jl. .l -' 1id lthl: \hi p:j rin -
i.il .. .-- t.l l. I h. u ,... a in ii a h ti ti n% [ i'\e- 1 i
s i l v e'. r .' ib l t l in t. u .:hl .l-h l h I h. .i '
N,..ov and r ,fn tllr i ,,, tlinri .4 ,-ui-. ,ol',el ly thi. k
Smlmn:s i of au.ten_ ,-, a diii t y liat.i.un o.ft" ;'pa mpIl| TlO.
inI:th Ov_-n mirk-,l' d the -it M ,o i -.'.A in u p-. It _r.i'w .:t n
li :Ield I ,i -eVt' al t_'c-t. iti fl _.-hv. unhl :ahhliy. l[O. :kinl
]>av,=-. .,f b,:,ttle _'-_..nr [ I t i,.[ot-. '-u. rloit. r(is sted.,
.,:l ih;.". li t k p ',r il.tnii .-i f ', a foot andj m aII ,tl' vor.-
ille ... zv :il [fr nl l.l. r'o- a r.a nk i nllplea.ant
, l,, a, l sId l,..k, i like ti1.u.'. ll f snakes un-
' rI I-- ttin t-t-.l e- Iindtlir tie- .ha',o s .' the t're.q
and in th,- -lim Therl'e ai- -.im -thing initei'r
,i, ur th''-- nianriL'', ,: i.li l-. and tlie-il, ind o, ii
p ',lhri>t u eIl toie ,.ncet'"r.il, n'., 1.111 uit A .hichll nidl
l'n '- ,"y (. l t l-' hh nl.nii iii Voa tilu e % eiinr, .,If the l. ri'-dJj
dldt.ki 'jt-i t'etve-r. fr,,ni wu :ih r.h'.(v' ,trl wias aimn jt
hoilpelss But thl:i[t a-. ,i knu n in tlit.se da. s
]I mLn nhunnvd:l h.: minnan ,:t, it "wa mainly inauyei
tf ir i- i rii, ara l' n, ananil :.lt,.' the. ulir1i uhl-y ,{ making v a.y
onm:iug thoi:i.e Iproitubt..rant. -n.ik\ i..itr W hichh at any
r nnilennt niht tiri t up the uni..., t -irelul perlestrian


FORH


aid .ail:- him 1 O [] _,ilun lle ne,: i]n g int i, fetid mul,
The riadil to l'.nt,.L:i Bay mail r'u,-uh and ro
itIi,U. ridii I [t iva, full ofi rIutl. a ind the surface
.:-. *.If tlihe -lali- of .-tone with w[lib.h it waw
- tre'-.V Wa ;ipp'- r Ap. l.u til, I Ir'ia-'il- and among
ihE i. amp~rn .I i.- ni myriaul .Is 4f irabl', reddish-
imi k t in hute. .q iitt iii th:-ti pointed 1.-e-. with lawi
riplitttJ in ii-ilh.t.. : or I nt -na .t The.i were ot
.nmail -i.,' iuli .i.i nui.th:lrou.- rtliit ith -. ratedtd a dA ii
tlhi1 t .-iiluIil 3.- th y -c-irtled tio lhiot iti[, t or |A.ltsied t"rom
r n. spr't t o auoler ,A. tlil ril.less. wetirt by. Annie
kLt-a I t t .i it i iti: r -.i- lie thiIt ait anly ni.-m .nt slh
nilln i.t ...ui.:- pii i 1 r:'O l 1 i iil h. i:rai lin1 out of
a -vwaj ilp that *..jd_-l li- road. ih, miib.rt t'.ret h' itself
a..IO- [L-' % ia Iik- i. :.. of' 1.."l" but -.l'.- knef
al-.-, rti..,i tLhi e t At ur. i.-,ili i,.. fri Lt,-un.-,l by the
a[IrOa. h 4.. th,1. l 1,r-.-s aldl .\c-.hbl h tly av.ay rather
rlthi.n a ti,'k II thi- Iaii o:if thi.? O.. liu riy. ton, their
vi-re not phk-iitifil. Yet -hi- lik [pt on ,--ye on the pahi
i.-o'ie t i -i. -in-.e lb,.i wL- n.- r.-n.n wUly any un'
ine.. -.rly l ilk A..ill I,.-l i i in hir l.-ii wvas nu I Tr
S,,*]lrl- huill
\VX I.- .i. i.n'i. ri I,- -nrijau.: of the town it
-..t eii- r,.l .1-s Iliet!\ a- i,-. i.il,-. givingg a signia
I, l -r aitt- .lian t,, _'.. .l ly vShe ,liil not wish ta
l,. p rcl civc!dl She Ij.lic (( that. --v i- si should therd
I'e any1.'.i l.n.IIt AI thilt ihairj!. -lt:i h uldUd escape
,i .,illl l i. l it-\.e!llli-.--s hle knliei that the mere
pr--e- t ,if w white wiuinl riii'i. thirougihl Montega
FBa\. at thir h.'i.u .i t thl.- ni lit -\..ull]d a aken con
il-rable >ii -i-ity [It i:noulll l l~e ininm rniertI upon thq
f..II.A,. ine n il iii'i-_,. ,i injelli 't e- n uilIi Ile afloat. II
inret of olIrs. ll Ibr thought thatt itoii' Iblated woman
ial h-bee prDrs--iing oun to: her hoilue perhaps the wire
*i.f ijo: tof thi -nmall-r planters: Ie--rLainly no lady ol
p-, ito ,ii That wnld render hri sat e from detee
t'-.n but hi- preferrei-l that no livin; Soul should
have a l;lmp-e iof her goinii or roniirng. and on the
Shi.Il'. she- tlru-ilte that no onet w..uld
Shi-. tiust-.i ri-,htly T ihe. little t'o n. built upon
.1 -lopini_. r:.'sc-lent--h .pei ~wee-p of land backed hI
ln.o, lull t s, '.utlh and -.ar. lay in ob-:curity There
Sia nII liblitini -.avfe ilitt frini the moon and stare
and, th.m moon na- nir' . the we't. and thlie Iull.linglin n thl town threl
[.art- nt f li- s.reet- in shaidiow. All wa,- silent, sav
ft.r Ih: r-tal.ato hiaikinii of stadrelinc doeiN that wan,
I tjilt ii n : 1 1I P 1 .; F .


A N'S


I For the Gumns.)
A good Foundation for Fine Teeth and Good Health.
Purifies while it beautifies.
Hecunmmended by leading Dentists. On Sale at all Dealers.

UL'SE FORHAN'S NOC) AND A LXVAYS.
ENCOLURA(;E THE KID)DIES TO USE IT TWICE DAILY.

CORINAI DI & MACDOUGALL,


Sole Ag. nis.
'Phone 541


- 43 Port Ioynal Street. Kingston.
I'.O. Box I1.5i.


SMichael Marzouca & Sons,


BLAKE HOUSE.

WHOLESALE & RETAIL NIERCHANTS.

NIONTEGO BAY.


Branch:- T H E


STAR.


Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes.


Furniture, Cricket Goods,


Crockery and Enamel Ware, Etc.





The Largest Dry Goods Enterprise Outside Kingston.


1929


..~..~~.~~~..~...~ 9





1929 PLANTERS' PUNCH 55


Foremost in Town

FOR
Pri vate

and Connmmercial

Stationery

Office Supplies,

Account Books

Fancy Goods

and

Photographic

Dealers






GARDNER'S


I. C. KAUFMAN.


Sole Proprietor.


HARBOUR ST., KINGSTON.


'U


F. A. McKAY & Bro.,
DRIr(I.TTC;I STS
22 KINC(3 STREET
Opposile Bank Nova Scolna.





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the HOUSE that OFFERS YOU


service
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DRUGS, CHEMICALS, PATENT
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You save MONEY when you Buy from us


.1C
CAPT. MICHAEL deCORDOVA
years he was in Prance; and when we mention that
he served at Ypres, Hooge, Loos, La Brasse, Somme,
Vinim. Plugptreet. St. Ovniton, Merville, Cambrai,
Le Cateau. 'Vendiges and Valencienne, it will easily
he realized thit he knows what active service means.
Captain d,.(-,rdova regards some of his exper-
IeCti:is in the war from a very humorous angle.
When ad-kli about them-for, like most of those who
have .ervied in the war, he never speaks of them or
himsel'-he will mention that as an officer of trans-
port lie had charge of the condition and repair of
ibh rirst sev.-n tanks sent over from England to
Fran,:e Whiat seems to have appealed to him spec-
ially. when iluiig this very responsible and import-
ant work. were the names of his tanks. These were
killed Crein.- de Menthe, Benedictine, Curacoa, etc.,
and we fancy that, as a Jamaican, Captain deCor-
ilova rather wished that one had been named Pi-
menti, )Drjm. These tanks were his special care,
and when any of them was battered by the German
shells the i.mnipetition between his side and the Ger-
man- wa, da ri whether the first could salve the
remains it' the tanks to repair and refit them, or the
orlier party ,culd shatter them to bits.
The, tank. o:, course, were something new in
warfare, and the- aim of the enemy was to put them
uut of comnmri.ion as rapidly and as completely as
possible Tlihu those in charge of the tanks had
a busy and rather perilous time.
Captain reCordova survived to return to Eng-
land and to beco,.me a director and manager of Messrs.
Cogwell and Harrison, Ltd., who are manufacturers
of sporting euiins: his part was in the technical de-
partment if this organization, and he was placed
in chargege of its Paris depot. But he had been born
in Jamaia, like his fathers before him. He thought
that he w.-auld like to return and settle here. So in
Ju.\l of 1927 he I.ame back to the island and joined
the motor bu-in--is of Messrs. J. Sutton Brown, Lim-
ited. as a Dire. tor and Manager. He undertook to
aid in the re' on-truction of this business, and since
he has been here he has also been greatly interest-
ing hniml-If in wireless communication and is now
i'cndul tin inmprehensive experiment[ in local con-
ditliu-ti si a- to be able to introduce and popularise
suitable wireile,. sets and apparatus.


I,---


A YOUNG VETERAN
CAPTAIN M l'ICAEL deCORDOVA, whose portrait
illsiltrat.re- this article, is a son of Mr. Joshua
dt-C.'.iriJjt; whu ',tas for so long part-proprietor and
Maiiiii DLire-t[ri of the Gleaner Company, Limit-
-I A\s a1 I:.JIng-ter Michael was sent to England to
a prepa. lar'.i : tool, and after he had completed
Iis itirali~ tiai'ing he went to King's College to
-iludl the pr..ite-ion of civil engineering.
H.- hil .Iealy manifested an interest in scientific
mec:haln i and at King's College he made marked
pri'Lic-.- iii hi-ngineering studies. On leaving Col-
tle-e hi- .ervedl ft a period with a consulting engin-
-erl itn \'i t. ia Street, London, and then b):,.jnm.- in-
t-r,.st-d in tth Ilanufacture of a light motor car,
ill Lth mnakine .t' which his professional training
nutiirally .:,,i liim in good stead. But the war
I. iK oiurli. .Il thie youth of England had then but
a sir tli. irh, ht
There ta i noii conscription, but the call of duty
waisi ;1- inimltr-itite as any conscription could have
bii. li. iil- \,-r. month that war was declared Mr.
Mi, liha isi'.rd..va volunteered for active service.
Hit was at;-ct.til in September to the Mechanical
Tianspirrt L.D-p.rtment of the Army. From then un-
til Januiary 1!i1'i he was a soldier, being pr..iiirl
tr Ih- C(i'.irl. in March 1916. For nearly five
7 .-. ---- -.. .


7 o: .,,. .,..
.
.,,.-..,>',. i'..


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Louis


on acre-


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and be satisfied.




Cecil DeCordova & Co.,
SOLE AGENTS.


Roederer



I Champagne I





PLANTERS'


PU NCH 1929


The Witch of Rosehall

(Continued from Page 54).
dered about the thoroughfares hunting for food among
the garbage and offal that stood exposed in heaps
and in open boxes in front of shops and dwellings.
Smells arose, assailing the nostrils; the dust lay
thick upon the ground, but served to deaden the
thud of the horses' hooves. Not a human being was
abroad.
On the eminences commanding the town and
overlooking the wide bay from which the town
derived its name stood the residences of the larger
merchants and the urban homes of a few of the
neighboring planters. These too were shrouded in
darkness, but Annie gave them not so much as a
glance. She directed her horse westward, passing
entirely through Montego Bay; presently she had
left the town behind her and was riding along a
road which cut a sugar estate in two, an estate
which began almost on the border of Montego Bay.
Here she quickened her pace. Stray cattle might
be encountered, but human beings hardly; besides,
they would not seek to come near to her or to
speculate about her presence there, as would the
townspeople. Soon she was passing through a sombre
avenue formed by overhanging trees, great trees
that grew to a lofty height, with huge branches
covered thickly with the heavy foliage of the tropics.
Here and there the moonlight streaked through, but
thin and wan and ghostly. Fireflies danced among
the underbrush: the darkness was irradiated by the
swift flashing of thousands of phosphorescent green-
gold points of light at one moment, to be rendered
denser when, as at a signal, every one faded out as
though myriads of tiny lamps had been extinguished
by the turning of a switch. Then the trees disap-
peared and Annie crossed a bridge under which
rolled a river, dark-gleaming, and about a mile
further on she pulled up her horse and reconnoitred.
A little while before she had been the subject
of discussion on her own estate, and Rider had sug-
gested to his friends her probable origin. By a
coincidence her thoughts at this moment ran on
Hayti, as she reflected upon what she was about to
do. Rider, with the intuition of an educated man
who, before his downfall, had studied the history and
condition of all the West Indian countries, had
almost hit upon the leading circumstances of Annie
Palmer's youth. Annie often thought of her youth
in the near-by island. Her father had been a mer-
chant there, attracted by the chance of making


money under a black King who did not pursue tlhe
policy of his predecessor and forbid while people to
enter that part of the country over which he ruled
She had known King Henry Christophe. a t.rant.
a brute often, but yet a man of outstanding person-
ality who forced his subject, to work and maintain-
ed order with an iron hand. One (lass. however,
though he had made war on them ai nfrst. be had
never been able to suppress. The priests and priest-
esses of the Voodoo defied him in as t if not by word.
and In lonely valleys and in the depths of dark
forests they sacrificed to the great green serpent
which symbolised their chief deit.y and the sail-.
fices were sometimes human. She had known a high
priestess of this cult. The ioman had been no nurse
of hers, as Rider had sugIecsted: she had been a
woman of position and property in Cape Haytian.
a woman who had marched with the armles of Desa-
lines and Christophe when these set out to free Hayti
from the French domination. This woman had been
in the habit of bringing the petty little childd somen
presents, and once she had given Annie a beautiful
diamond necklace of great value. She seenmedl to
care for the girl; she wa- clildles-,. and hier hu--
band was dead. Annie's pjiitnt- thou-hr it nmtre
advantageous than otherwise that a woman. whose
husband had actually been a baron of King Christ:'-
phe's black Court, should be kindly disposed towards
Annie, and consequently toward- them Her friend.
ship was well worth having. It- benefits ere eenn
in the number of the Haytian ahibr. patro-ni-ed the
Irish merchant-for he w:as Irish H-r e-nmit.
might have been a thing uiplea-ant rto contend with
This woman, whose title in Northern Ha.ti
was that of Baroness, gradually won an ascendancy
over Annie. In her way -he loved the white girl,
though, on principle, she hateIl the white race. whom
she regarded as the natural :'ppressorI o'f hL r people
Annie's mind dwelt on her n:,ow. i-veni a- -hi scan.
ned the road and the landmark. t-i richr and left
She remembered how the Bar-nl..i---lt had taken
the title seriously when sh. lived in Ha.ti-had
talked to her about the spirits that wandered about
the earth and the air, tli.- -pirit, who inhabited
and animated everything, and Ihow human begins brv
determination and practice atnd eipei.illy bi belief'
and faith, could acquire power ov-r theie -pilits.
The girl had been fascinated In an atmosphere
charged, so to speak, with the -uperrnatural., whei
white as well as black believed in the oni.ult. in the
mysterious, in the traffic of earthly heings with
those who were disembodied or of utnearthly origin:
in a strange, dark land where. amonc the mo:unitins.
in the dead of night, and in spite of the Kiicl'5


d. lte-es the --ni- sound ot tie \onodo- drum wouldd
hi-heardi stabbiiin through the silence and the dark-
ness. it was not surprising that Annie should believe
what she wa? told. espec- ally as tie Baronei-s show-.
ed her how the common peo-ple worshipped those nwhbi
called them to thie midnight orgies or blasted their
disobedient into insanity or death.
Then the Barones told her that she too had
the capacity to dio wonderful things, and taught
her the secrets of the Vo.dtlio. And Annie iarie to
beli-vc~ that she possci-ed the power of a god
\What would have- happened to her eventually
had she remained in Ha.ti she wouldd never know.
An .pideminu ut yellow Lever had swept bhth her
parents an.ay within a few day.- A nll.niiti after, the
old Barone- -,Was alis dead A few hit e men in
Cape Haytian -,aw that Hayti e.iuld hb- lno plaice for
a youns unmarried nhit_.- woman to live in. they
g5iie-ted Jdnamaica to her She had some inear s,
and -lie was tir.d of duil andi harharons (ape Hay-
tian. Slhe ame toi Janiaita. met J-.hn Palmer short-
ly matter. but -oon ft.undl her new home more t-di',ius
and dull tlin ver ithe old one had heen Had the
Briones.s been living Annie might have returned to
Ha. ti Th: oldl woman had hinted to hler that there
w.as no heluht to whiih. in that country, she might
not apiire. no powi-r -hie aliht notattain. What
would have been r-n others a fatal iisabilit). her
blood, her whiteness., would have aided her with
thie papal-i. and mm3alois. the pliie ts anid prieistest-a
of Haiti. on her side. and uith ler superior in-
reillect. be stlen tb of will. her feailessness. her
I1,autv. she shouldd have dominated them. But the
Barone,-s was di:-ad. the sturdy, (oal-bla, k female
fajratic-. and so)meinme- r it Iniusr he addled i female
fil-.I. Waias eonr forever So Ha.\ti \as )out of the
iqtitiin, and Annie had no -desire to gi to England.
. ht re her mintlier waa. horln or to Irelandl. fr'.m
wlien.-e her fatlih r i.atiiie.
She always s telt that in England liie not.ili coint
for but Ilttit: there .would he no supreimlacy for her
theri. In Jamaii a there a-, Hert -lie c.Iul live,
to .iii.me eixt.nt, unfertered, the lift she lovI-i,
i life oft domination and of se-nsuality Here she
t,,ild pDii to thi- pilof the power, -hli po sie--..d iand
1,f nLbihi shile wa itnordinatl% proud Tonight she
was ca in about to put them to the proof These
people wiire almiut as fearful. as ,-u perstitious, as
thloie of the country of hier girlhood. And one if
rh-ne hald dared to defy her. A few days would
,how ever yone who knew of that deria.nel- hoi tenri-r-
alriou, and hopeless it was for any woman to pit
Iherself against Annie Palmer of Rosehall
She had walked her horse slowly forward while


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...... .... ...... .. .. ... .. i


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F : :






1929


giving tree r' ill r. iher Irt inii i iei.ti L.liS a. l iler
thougiir nla. law oi. i t a ujrUrt li oi a till- .ItWdVy [fir.il
the -p:pt iwh.-ie ilse ha ha lted. lle ? checked heir lhoir-e
again. She wva sa.itlfliedl that he hact arriv''e at hel
dertitlsit.a n Ii- dismuntruled ;and lune her r.-in-
to tie boy. From him she t,.,ok a piarit thit hli
had be-i carrying driefuli. : then lhe bade him wait
for hti and ,ellt on her way al.lte on toot. She
Shad nout far t, gii Soi-.n she .tam. to a path that led
S inti .im.- sniall pro aiitlt'y. a path ft'.r v. hith I he hail
lmnki-,d ai, elh .- she walkedi ..,iio
This narrow wa :,. iti.1.h r'.iun LIt -ien ..' r\ i n
he t'l.i'oliaan ed trele. \a- a- il.t k us :t tIuIn -l i.it
t, through the bowels of a iniiutain H[i-e in. Iii-ndi:.
firedflit: 3anc-dl wih .-s1 c lrfilll llii inatioon. h'-.s- n.-
ele.i r i iiin til'.- ,n.on i.o '- i" -i -i "it"- A ll .I : ill
bre and still. w ith a i iiiiln- .[. r i- IJ.r A'TinI-"
did ni t Liesitaie.
She- \v -nt slowI ly. a Le ullv. In tliai t a.in-':- itialk-
ness,. i'ht v.ia Iml ie ita-.-i-ians t, i hei she namd
alnim. is t l h-e \l h r a.~ Bi lt hlad itnqitria thet
whel eahtlll s of thiL pla.e m- I O- wil.,u-i% hil Ill..i.
tmatin.: h.al b-en plr-1 ie. Sli di'i nil t lthi k -ii-
bad failed tu biind It
The-'- nii~hrt e i' 1,.,s. biiit -. e "a:- pielpa.e -i f.r
ihemr Not only \vwas -he ar. arnd ith.i a n- i'y Iihlin
whip. but in the parci -l n hi.h i shI ji ied t:' .'.
bits o' neat Nio poti r li t i nflmlllI i itir. .t t.,"iiit r-.
pidt would ire-ii ?u th:ls i J feas t. heshiI.- .1 p_.-l.ila'i'-
drig wa- hil ar.il: a haik at l .I ilit. n anil r w.mruin
Nntilln disturtitlb her pl.-rch_--.. however, noithnu
brokl- the s-ilense i. tlHe night. She eknitml the s.iil
livnC r.-au rtatr nriivine al.-utt ar ltha n ui..Tmir
Soon -h,- .'t,,nl _,l rathlie-r than -a *a iW jiip,-
r',,Im t :otia'[-- standing: in ..lie iide of a litti. leai
in_ Thii- wa-s "hAt -h'- tsniiht
SLir tolei up to thli ver'.. ito. r l .f tile lile I- l .II,--
and paus.-d There .a till] no' -ouni. -rir.
thatlh s1hts kne-w thati i-hinil hli.ii it. r humn i n .in':-_
were -leepine
Fromnt tile pali ill iher hl il ishi n-.,. ei]-.
fith a q>iueer r I nd tiil biet. it s 'a .. .hill.s -kull
Bmeardi \vitlh hlood To it 'AdS ai iitt I. I hy a pite-.
of wile. a I it \f'hite dArdbhoi rd She h-eli .tlit ,wa'
:tumpletil) nle-i~-d in tin. envir.iiin il larkne.- huti
her nioiv-1n1-int- sires .1re i.i ise,-I--- ,. rhou, .( .- *i
She ian bl r lands o\ r thi liutta ,.,f thi- slnorr
and wins.ioa : hs-r riniLer <-anm- in I..ntact i"th a
nail: ii "as -i.inething of the sort he had Ibeeu
fe ling ior. The rirIt liart i her task. .ite klin-w.
would noaw be -a.:.
By tile same bit of %ailt with whith the little
Soblune cardboard iias atta,.hed to the skull. -i-e Ilhun
tht gruesome oij.- [ on ito the nail: it would be hs.-
first thing it --trike the eye Iof anyone emerging
I'rni, the house in itr- lmorniting. -.rI allpr.as bing it.
Then she dild a irli.-ange thin ('..nitentiatint h le
gaze IJupoini tile sIsr. AS. ttim ti h -Ih- ',i..uld piie:, -
with her visi.'nl [liusnii the solid d wso,.l. h- i -.1it i-
there ten-e and e-r'-.t HIer hdandusl "e i lenchedl.
her eyes tfix:i and elarine as they hlial bI):-n on thp
night heftre wivith that we-ird. awful glnwinlg -.rea
n re had appeared hbf'ore the horror-itruck !retgai1 ti
Ashmanu and the others at Rosehall Her liguidty
wa- tlat L a t.atalepiti..
Onie minute. two. three niinuite passJed. and
SAnnie did not stiTr.
Of a iilden there tiame a cry tinim within th,
little dvaelllIn. a I ry of eagonr and ir-rrr and
Sderairl
Acalu and again it rose: somn,-ine w'as s I:inc
out in nim.'tal fea., in bear 6tric:k-n panic
Annie Palmer heard. and slowly relaxed. She
reeledl slightly. But a smile ft triumph wriearhied her
ips as site caught the ,-u-lnds ansd exc.nlanmrllon. o
Confusion that noia Iiroke out il tile house. sharp
calls and iuestlinn. smllceeding to those tei-rrifyin
t(reanis that had issued frorn the lips of a frightened.
startled wimau within She stepped hai k silently.
Sbut more quickly than she had entered: she nmde
her way hack. -ometinti-, stumhlingp. s.rtlninie.s al.
most running. to where her patient slave 'tord with
,the horse; she nmounted. strus k her -teed a sharp
blow and went as quickly as shl dared alone the
Road. over the bridge, through the town and back
to Rusehall. It was in the early liouar >of the minrn-
ing that she reached the Great House. anil there she
repeated her previous instructioni to the bIoy.
"Remellber. you aie not to -) v a w.: rd alisoti
Where we went last night: I neut for a riir- and
Syou acutnipaniel mne. Do youi h-ar?'"
"Yes, misss."' lie agreed. nhjErily
"If you disolbey-well. you kn.,'w \Nhat to ex.
ulrie"
He knew. As a niatier of fa.t he hall seen
nothing thar she had (I.ne. But that she ltad been
to the plat,- wh--re old Takmo's daughter lived he
was well awar,. and when a fewi\ minutes later an
elderly slave woman, who acted as a kind of house.
keeper for Mr- Palmer. seized hold of his arm as he
was Poing to ibed and a.ked him whisperingly abour
his nocturnal mission he itid her what he knew.
For he was afraid of this woman, who was hand in
glove witlh Takeo:., aith Takoo aho was dreaded by
.every man and woman on Palmyra and Rosehall.
As dreaded as Mrs. Palmer. and even more in a
peculiar sort of way. For the slaves believed that
Takso lould read their minds. he wa. African. a
witch doctor, aud it was madness to try to deceive
him. They had often deceivedl Mrq Palmer. and


PLANTER S PUNCH


~ .~ ... ............................... *mll **'ll lll l IIII llll lrlll II IIIIIIIIIIlllll1111111111 11



SGrace, Kennedy

64 HARBOUR S'T
SKINGSTON, JAMAI<

CABLE ADDRESS: hj
"*GRAKENCO"
^ ALL CODES USED.

GENERAL IMPOR"
COMMISSION AGE
WHARF OWNE
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FIRE INSURANCE AGENTS AND
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WE ARE AGENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING FIRMS
MENTS FOR ALL KINDS OF

FIRMS.

A RKADELPHIA MILLING COMPANY .... Fl
ALLFELD & EGLOFF .... ... H
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF SOUTH AMERICA A]

BECK'S BEER BREWING CO. .... B
S B)\\NE LTD. .... .... .... B
- BRITISH EXTRACTING COMPANY .... S(
S BIRD & SON .... .... .... RI
SCA LIFORNIA PACKING CORPORATION CA

CALUMET BAKING POWDER CO. .. B.
CIMENTERIES ET BRIQUETERIES REUNIES Cl
ED\WARD COOKE & CO. LTD. .... S
= DOREMANS & COMPANY .... .... B]
DEPARTMENT D'EXPORTATION WILLGO PA
C. H. DURHAM .... .... .... SA
S )DoMINION POTASH SUPPLY COMPANY F]
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FERGUSON HOLNESS& Co..... .... T
GODFREY & COMPANY .... .... BA
GARNOCK, BIBBY & CO. LTD. .... R(
GALT FLOUR MILLS F]
GOLDIE FLOUR MILLS ..
G. H. HAMMOND COMPANY .... PA
HERRING-HALL-MARVIN SAFE C. .... SA
R. J. HILL & Co. LTD. .... .... CI
P. \V. HEYMAN A/S .... ..... B
S 1M. A. HIGGINS & Co. .... .... D]
- VATT HEPBURN & CO. .... .... F
SJOB BROS. & Co. LTD .... .... C
JOHN LUCAS & Co. LTD .... .... PA
LAMBORN & COMPANY .... .... SU
SMCDONALD & MlUIR .... ....
MlAYPOLE DAIRIES LTD .... .... I.

H. R. MCMILLAN EXPORT Co. .... LI
S I.ARATHON BATTERY COMPANY .... FL
NITRATE AGENCIES .... .... FE
NORDAL & COMPANY .... .... BI
NORSELAND CANNING CO .... .... SA
NORDSKOG & COMPANY .... .... PA
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58

though she was dangerous she was less so, to them,
than the gaunt negro of whom even some white
men stood in awe.
Mrs. Palmer might whip them cruelly. Takoo
could send ghosts to haunt them, could plague them
with remorseless evil spirits. Let them gravely
offend him and they might end their lives in agony.
CHAPTER FOURTEEN

THE OLt) HIGE
SOU want to go to Montego Bay?" asked Ashman
slowly. "It is unusual for book-keepers to get
off during the day in crop time, but I suppose you
can do what you please."
Robert frowned slightly; he did not like the
suggestion that he was a sort of privileged pet.
"Thanks," he answered shortly.
It was about one o'clock. Burbridge had been
as good as his word; very early that morning he had
despatched a boy to where Takoo's daughter lived,
beyond Montego Bay, and the youth had learnt that
Millicent was staying with her aunt. That had been
easy enough to find out, for there were many people
at the little place to which he had gone with some
made-up story to disguise the real purpose of his
visit, a story which he found he was not called
upon to tell. Something had happened there the
night before and the news of it had been bruited
about. There were many free negroes in the neigh-
bourhood; these had left all that they had to do and
had assembled in Takoo's yard to offer sympathy.
Just what had occurred the boy had not been told.
Of all this Burbridge said nothing to Robert.
The young man would find it out for himself, if it
concerned him, Burbridge thought.
Robert lost no time in availing himself of Ash-
man's permission to have the rest of the day. Ash-
man himself guessed that it was something con-
nected with Millicent that was taking young Ruther-
ford to the Bay; Ashman knew about the leaving of
Rosehall by Annie Palmer the night before, knew
how late it was when she returned, and had no
doubt at all as to where she had been. It was he
indeed who, at her command (which fitted in so well
with his own desire), had found out whither old
Takoo had taken his granddaughter. That some
crisis was impending, if it had not yet actually
arrived, he was certain. And he sensed that it must
result, and that quickly, in Robert Rutherford's leav-
ing Rosehall Estate.
Robert himself knew that he was going to find
Millicent, to warn her. About what and against
whom? He faced the question quite frankly; he
realized and admitted that he was taking this girl's
part against Annie, realisdd also that that was
What few white men in Jamaica would openly have
done. Secretly, yes, many would have done it. But
he was not hiding his action, could not in the
circumstances do so, as a matter of fact. If the truth
Inust be told, he shrank from the course he was
taking, shrank with every nerve of his body, though
his determination held. He told himself that there
was nothing else to do. He was convinced that in
some sort of way he would be responsible if any-
thing happened to Millicent; he felt he was perform-
ing an act of duty; anything like passion, like affec-
tion, he did not conceive to be a motive at all. Bur-
bridge took a different view. Burbridge's own opinion,



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146 HARBOUR STREET,
KINGSTON, JA.




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PLANTERS' PUNCH


nrentioned to no living human heiln. was that Nilli.
(ent had \.i.i Robert 'romil Anniet Palmer. that Annie
had realized it. and th tha the-e t wi, \vomi.n. differe-nt
in iolour. in pu-ition. in poster. in .ilmu-r e\-iry.
thing .-ave a bold anu dietiant ilitpusition. \-le em-r
barked on a dieadl3 *truggl'- vei:ti, irt-le i o\v'ing
swiifily to a i.limax In a .way Burbridgt pirTi-i
Mtllicent
Pilrsenitl' Robert oille out ..t Rosehall.
At thl. lIot althoutll-t i t "ad. late Dr-.ilutlber.
fhit sun'4 ra.%, ere s-harp. utit the heat r a: temrn
p.lrel anld tiad- e,-Ily l 'nUdural.le lyt the wind whiii.b
bIl,_- in t'r-i' ly ft' l l ltm ltr w ilt. ,p.,tn .<.a, a --a that
gliteltr'-d 0id Ilashed dte1i-i lu, anil cite.n and purple
-.% huse .-5wa-. nn .allatel]d by thli wind. cii:lrlld and
. url--il ihei-i el'vie,- av in-. rm.k-I t litni e hea I I avy
saund. libeaKin2 in a e-lter it trn-trw,- w'hiti. l'i-niti.
a- ih,. ria-limlne wjatei-r letreatiid 1i. r.-tliiur again anil
a:ar in I it- t.a- -el-.-.-. iute n itti-nt rushi and tl-'.
Ti Hob. it'- left r lay the i ulti\ ated rieli?. f a rane.
a n ii e expatL e i..f lieht -litti-ring grii'e n lih k-t b
:ih. Iw IIIt.\ l aiit0 n, tlHat Iiit- a litle farlthEl r l be.u-nil
'Th-r-e n"eie people on thie- rI't.ai alavr- ,.lad in c!rayd
,.,r blue isnijlt. I T!ig. ri Ir- ouvyr l iiW..iol- n vload1 ..k
]iewi\ nlat'i- 'U'aIl and ,if runm to pni.lntr f e-nih.irlia-
lh.n. t io ti little'- oves and pi, frlitnt \vhich i-state
pl',,l.ie n \ t shippeild into ti., -allin.* hoar- i thi


-1


1929


tliu her- i that ui.ulil take ii *in t:, Kiring-tirn or the
Bay Th.- ndaggons We-re dra\n b) i.ng t-leams of
,,xin. at whose sile iwalkid mien aried with great
ulIip,. who, kept up a .ntalinu.:j-. bhouiring which
seenc'd ti>I bt udni-rstrod i.l the. plntlding. patient
beaist Rlobt r o'h- bL3.\ iieS- nit p' receivingg that
-:ini: i of them evecd hinul urli'ly. never" ob.erving
Ltar th-iee Ja- in thliir d*-nim ani..ir a tui,:b iof in
s:'.In-t Ileltianl e an(d that but iew ni' thfllrl gave him
It. ellu: I mi( aluratiinl
Had he be?-n le.: aib.,rl.,e i hi ,i t o tn ii:houghts
[i- In 'uld hliariil. h.ve tailed rto lornice this hehh\viour.
Other \\litl mren hadi r'.itark,-.il it t',fr .:iume time
nlow He iinmielf hadI heard Burbridjie -Spetak of
the ihangs- h i L hail coat. over the slav;s in the
paii-h. a ihanet- \hii:h i na attributed to the in-
I -li-nte at tilh mis-.iji arit-.I. t. a r inulir that the
piopl hadl already been 'grnt.-id fri->dl..ut bait that
their niw right-- wie e biiing i ithhelil frliu thi-m
But he had paid liitl. attenr ion t... all this. he hadi
I)i-, n tar i.t, tnui Ii t t upi'-d Oiter i*- And to.day. if
all days, it \w..iul har. t.ak.-n s'i- i e i- xtl'a.rlll nar. a(:
tiorn in tihe piari if all rii,-: i -huting drivrir and
itr'dl ing mi in t*i ,id -v Ira iittentii-n .peiiall ir i-eir
atritl.i e t:. ward- him
Hei- lnt-aled tli- t .in. aml ti up Ito (ie little f,..rt
iihl trle annon p.-.intiir-n tiwarlds its u ieawairdi ap


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KINCGTON. .JANIAICA,. It.V.I.



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1929


proach. -a r t lhetl Ir'i-diatd -,oldiel- ihlbout the plae.- .
and hurried .i. He ro:e int.. Mnileiego Bay. thriout.h
iLb narrow' ilu-ty street: it was hiusy i inoliu-h at
this -eaon.u, for the Christimas. holiday. v-were ar
hand anti tlrad. a. hlrisk Slavet- ni..vled abouLt on
Ihe!r masters' oul ilni- hiI tll.- strl'et iolln rl-i s uatl-
leti wi.,iit-ii. aiiti.l almost r ind,-entll iaid. w iih
b.u l-. andi trayis Iheapl-i with fruit oir will .tii.ky
cakes i iiaile of -ligar III trini i' trh-ni Free
neileareF ientt ablilo t their pl ir-I I drl'es- 'i -.i. o)f
Iheru. in thlie a-~i..ffi cloriint on.,- -..r!,n by the
while li-oile, in rhii artire neuret-l Ibrii,.ad rimmedi
tup l.iir and lihta\ y llnraditih ,'vercoat-.
It "a% warm ill the torin The l'liildingc .er,
small anld iinc A A ha ei.i, I ti- -iira b h..i-i'i-c
wire about. hut tle rnl. i .t i Ilub.talnite who liail .iime
iil1 the r'.iin n Ou I, u- e--: w e *in lli.lsi-la. k .I',,% -
ers. i.ver--er anrlid .ittlirnin\r nd the-i l i'\ init
man3 Robri-t kniioW hi. c -ne w l!. l%.il iili.-v'\-d
it .f't'-n iliriig ii- ~i eek's s tay in M I-l -'.. B a It
appeared to iii nio'i l i-l'lir d lnowi than \ -r -eft''re
On mad!a na- thl -n iin.- (.. lhim. a land fif prI.l ili-. : f
glor!oii- suns, hiln lIu lhiln per -ple anid bit..' kili
ailid ntr- hre. He h'id ii.. hiftin l :I. si- thar btilw-
the. surfi.-' il-er was nim l aii u)oit il ih lite that v Jas
drat. unutiteCnbly i :.ar .-. ilimiy i sini-tei He fiar'ed
witllhut quite kniowin 1ly. I) liati te n hilil -hirtl\
(ome into in)iriiate orinta..t with i.nitr 'f tile i lra'ed.\
that lay implii it in iii. halt.-,,iniu eitr., 4.;ii-ilffiu -d
tri'pi al life.n
fE-ti' liersons IL [ii rown i ii: .niu -eii andl
saiui.1l bitii t n iiLed him i.' ta.I a lndi l e a ruin
puni h wilh them, Ifr ho-pliraitiy -a. ever ti.- ,i.ii-r
oi tbhe diav in thil Ray H-e thanker-d thln an.li ilde
linedl, iii pau-inl i- 1 oal a -'.. i l-'a hir arnil i-
wihWi-tl i.i hJi a t-ln ti it. thliiiii no.t io t.u kly a-- It
fcalju i..ni ienr in a i l i- p l .: h l' li ir, i ri.ii ii ,,li
bII- d-acil, a.aken-pdr He p .-li,.d L 1 nv .irdli lettl
the t ioa ll. i.---l tli-t bl iL I ar i A line P.ilni-r lil'
paisseid c' er the- -!it h ,-fl '.r-. alt.. i a 4I .le li-T
Pluird i Mnd il-l ,lif ml ein I'ie dlIi o LMle te 11 t i
where the oldi niin Tak.I,'- ilaul'-iIh. r livt-,d TIlt-
nanie. Buibrl .-i e had i dI i hinm d I i"iiili bI e ni1li kn.inii
about hi-re He I'fiirnd that it iaj-.
Thri.-- 1 n hom li i- sp ke eyed hiii i ,li iii-ly.
iit.indrin'i lh at a 3ilinig w 4l ti- an I i ,.uld bid.VE toI
di. with Taki.. anld iIi-' p.--,ple Bul tih:y ih're.tedi-
him willingly ,enouijh: I -- was I. I nk. ali.ut hall a
nmil- furi-li-r *in. for a path in l ii 1.-ft llaiild that
lfd irinarld to prlopert; : lie i.oulid not mi-s it.
but did iint nii massa ;it o-'Oieon- 1I, [ake him ni there-
That seeme.i a ,i..,,l sueg.--tih. lie av I-ed to., hire
a cguie Buit i\hii hie came .. lihe place that lie waas
see:int hI, paid andn lili i-i, d hic tuidii He- .ant


The "('Cnn ul"

A. -tl[-lli Tia : tr Phaltlti ulie-i.In-Id L,'l
'. k in t uldll-i thi- nio'-t 'svi- t. i oitiditinli-.
All-,-ti i oii-llru-tlion. Filted with simple
-ell-lift oirperated f I iO the tra tor sed. anfl
aiih ivl :r-coiitilleld raWbar I ll(b inabtles-
tLe fr rirnLt tirriow tth bie .Opletiip--t- LUt OI.
f di eiir. -i. a-s wheiit ploulghling up-iill. Sizes.
-t anlid .1 furr\. 12' iti 14" ut. Als.i tIie
Vi t-(OIl llI" oii r iatirer Ie-. *tI'renii tl
work. .; ani 4 lturroJ 1'" ior 14" t Lit.

The "Daunnles" -'ize -31
A nidall iillrivatror sp,-ucially d. iueu d Lor
nwear tanr,-e cultivation. Fitted with 5
- i 1 LIt sr,'i.I [lues,. Ihav'ing_ rer ie ablt
iouiin A tri-nchiic bnody can be siippli,-d
niri making i idges- or furrows, splitting
ridri:-- oir idgif uip ri.w-- of promiing plants.
S'I "I-,ie luohl-s inland -talks cani alco be su tp-
riel iti ill'rt ing e-iarh 'n io to te stools
Ltter niiulnimritl. and t"ui -niuali stl'-.il litie-
-itilable rir -i'kingp uip 1', 1'" deep 4:2in be
firt-l flr -Lubi,:iiinIg hiet-n :-n r so- ru oi -ane.


THIE -D.tINTLESS" AS 5-TINE (UL.
'TIVA TOR


ed nul pgairuloi it inesses to spy upon anLid talk lb'.illt
liim.
[ih :i tlian -'-..on~l- he iwa. Ief'iior the house.
Ar once it Ilru k him that something unusual
it.is aftour. The space in ifrnlt Lo the little dwelling
Nas cl:iolvAed liilt pi-uple,. all of whliom looked at hinm
in -urpirise aI, n 1'i wirir keen, questioning. in'Iu i-itive
llanli e- At lthe ili'reshiild of one d'Ior oft the
hou..- lithi.k -u1ok.- \as slowly a-cendine fr.'m a
pan rill-il with i'hart looked like herbi and bits of
'refli--. Tite s nh- r gi'en off w as overpoi erlia andl
hlitti It 'wa- like intense i-burnt iL honour or pro.
piiatiion io evil piners Sranding o'vi-r it was Ihe
o1 mlin \IIho lad res11 s rd Miiliic-nt from Annie Pal.
ir tri, nigphtr- Ie.:'e His faite wa- set and broiad-
ing Uipin it \as stamped ter-rrr anid a niihtyi,
Silonuld iriI li angeCi.
lioli-rt lelt enlbl.irr;l' ?sei. He iiad n..tr .xpeieil
.ii.h a laurlienie- otf li-, aldvent And nlow i that lie
.a, r lil-re lie did oit quite know liaar t[i av. How
ti) explain wti4y lie had uonile? Hon to a:-k fior thte
ai'l in ih.. pr-sr-n..- .if all t-hems people-'
Takio -a~n\ him. hIsked at himn intently, and
f:,iie.l o cu i---r, 1 heh wa-s thete He av>i-hd his
aimn. JI u t e lite ttlr iownl ire- ban k. He iame up
It wiheire Robliet .at in his horsli'e: "You heard al.
ir.aily. Si'liie.:" lie a-keld.
'No: I have hi-ard nothine- 4 hat i- it"" Ie-
niljndi-. l Holieltt.
i_',Iii in-ide." saul Takroo a1iouLiall: v
R,.blert leape-id otf Iis horse and followed the
,,1.i 1]iih In rih,- roo.I into whliiih In- nas led.
, r',,ii:l.I in a -hair bI the sidle of a tbed was NMilli-
r-nt. Her hIead sa n iidd-n between lier lianild. a
-,Lindl ,If ni:.:- ninn i snie fi..ni her lips.. lher il;dy
v a.itd -I,:,N ly t in ii fr,..
ll,. errjilfarlt -ter t(jll lied h1.-r i lon tin- shoulilder
L..1; eupl" I'n ..w nimandr-d
li,- ,,l,.ye l i~,~mn in!.dil _e ,aw i 1- y,, nl1'
ranl' t..-l.e bi.n-lline Ildowln m ti a look .t ..ionu u trni
ti ll. i f io tle.iiiiiln of h. trrir iipii iit li-r io n
ta. e i .a-- if rhe i i'il-l r .fI ashe a.il] dra13 .-,hie
-.'- n-ld hi-,.dl_. -.. mand feai that almo-t anlmolined
.i mnadnie-s ilar-d i i Il iof ier ees.
Sli- iattelid a ry and threw out lier arm,'.
Slithcir to R.ob:irt' knees Oh. Squire. Squiret."
,lli- rild. helpp m. za'pe nme. for i.od' sake .ave
ni-' [.I %hat -l '..u-an for me. I am dying
;,l.i GC;odl. Miliient'" he riled. ""hat is thi
matrtr? NWlhy are 'you like this?"
'Wlait is the master?" he demanded rie-rcel-I.
tilin nEt t, thIe old man "Can't yiii .-peak?"
'Tell him." o. ul T-ikoo to the pill. \ith a ,-rt
.,f Lrim ii lieinet.s


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PLOUGHS & IMPLEMENTS FOR THE
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Ransomues Sinms & Je/fferies, Ltd.,
Ipswich,
Ein g'anrl.


THIEF "Y. (. P. IW."


"Last liil t., it hlappeued la-t night." -lie whis-
pert-ti
**Ye-? What happenedd"
I \a.- sle ,pi nii. 1. I dnnl't kllno what time it
wva. But I wake tip all of a -udden. ft-r I knew
there ns isoellletina in dk. r.-.om \ itl me. I bi.ard
it
SIt wa.s drk., f.:r everywhere wa. shut up. the
tniudio. as well a- rlit dolr But I heard it It
L.i-,Iet nidr tI.I Ii.. and then I saw it She paused
and slurlitred I.onvul-ively.
'j"Yo si'.1:- i Buti it .asl dark. Mlilllic." he
rimillndPd h-r i retl ",inderingl what nias tile tltoryi
-l.- iihail1 I tell iiinu
"Iti IV- lark but I -saw it It wa "I 'ijman.
Srilri-. I krji.\\ tli.t thiou h the taice nas all like
a % hite ,.oild. Her hJand,- a- slret. i-il iiit Ti:-
W.r-i'j uie. ;,id thlie-v i.atci and hliol Le--:aiglht
my thi.aut I[ o:ildn'r ram I \nant-il t'. -,:ream
an I i.tiudn r And I wIanted to trugle an' dicht.
bilt I ..,uldn'tr It a-. Just a- if -om-ehody take me
,I.renihi iinais Anld ith wiomau thine put Ihir face
air-ai r e r.t'.i m Irut tilo intoi my' tal e Sli-e it- ite
here"-Milli. ent routlied a spot belt-eiin heir breasts
-"a --h31p. '.rel hite--!ruel. Andl she ui ik me; I
i'.n't kin." lih,i ln Tlhen I i".r-am oiut, an' i-e di--
appear. an' nim aiini r an l hier djIii-Ir canie in.
An' v., knin- % hat ii as: it wa- anl Ilhi Hite, an
nonr\ nl roilii .ant -a- Ime I am ill lnc. (.0 my
(;,'il' 1 am 'I1 inI An' I am i..Il, twenty. Sillhir, an"
I l.'\I' \, u -o imuI h
Roil it r,,.ik b...th her lihands firnily in i.<. He
feli r-lliv'-l nou thai ie had htardi hler .iii'
"Li-et'u. l illi-ent,' hr. ail iid uietly. "I kinow
whIi I- rthe nital.ler with ..Il 'Yoll had a bad night-
ar..- la-i nielit. that is all Youin wn.- worried and
oert' ri Iiit.'hl. -.u unili-r-ta ild.' Y-ii, % ri-- %orriedI
.l er wha l !ia i i.l >nl l liL. I iinh lii, liel'ore i nd i.
lir.ti i. lip i 'ir itidr So' yo)u ireiamt d llthin rhing,
aini vnu lrta e alliedl it t. trrr,,ri .t .iu Ift ou
.id u...t i,-lievie in all rlh,--, 'i.' li-h uiiper-t.snitlins you
anri lil haI e ltii et.. il ;I ..ilir ldr-ll' I \, l'i ).- ,)lu e t
a'wak.- Yi,'u Ill Iiii-I l iau n ', th .-rI- i. niothiig in
IF
Sir.- sol.bedl iuo rl rl. ti' ,-i s of id pair RiIob-ert
lo,,kEd ar Iie old imail liy -il -iolLe Th('i-re a-' in.,
il.l-epiaqne in1 Takoou -;fa_ o>'f wiat -*--u:led tihi- right
and national explanati.i iif w liat hailed 'i o iurrld It
lame I, R lbert Rutliei f'..ii that Ii- ni-" i' r ti o fai.e
nith a terribki prl'ilem. an tnshakaljle I.rniii.iin in
ihee pe-.pl'. 'miindc
H. ildrw Millii.eiit ently iuto a ilandina pos-
t l re.
N.wi I wanri yoli i) t, hi -.Lensile." he .aoid patient-
ly "Don't yoii ee that you hare had a horrible


The "Dragnnn"
A self-lirt Tiract. r )Dis Plough, entir.-i
Lu.W' aiil ..it e xceprional .treugrh. doing
l.irf' it..irk unid.-r' tie mr i-n t exac.n ..'n-
d1I[II,.1 FittI id rw I| l pi t Piii li-llt't orp-'it,_Iil
iiri tnh li. rrait.olr t. L\i-i hav\ beeln en-
rir.ll -iiitiaited l d i ,jiai- tji l lt- f ir 'Jtrith
.iri Uiale b nmiet.- oif i' t il tia d -i.l'eas.
".Z,: --. 4. 4 .air t' 'lirro ei.asil%"y .in-
S -ii hl Al-o th- Hu,,-ar". a i niil.ir
rp i hicli !athr liicl 't r SIZes from 2 tj 'i
tiri r-c.

The "Y. C. P. W."
[.i.i ially deienred to m.eni t the rettlirem'iir t-
ir: \\'-r I1iliai n ae lrillrtlire. and silar i. il-
tltation in p arti-uiar. Thin d .-rp steel br-an-r
Inalbi- it to be used for layinu up high
-.iiik a, weil a l or ordinary I)loughiin-
Ex' -pLrial I'-aranl e i t proiili.-dl t ,i all'o'
,1-~ 1. pl-ilr linii oi r II:- t :i- .-ai any rough hei -
I,'.- Sune ..f furriw -iup t, 12" vn'ile \
1II" deep. Weight witll head-wheel about:
;6 It.. If di..sired a riding body witli
:..iceL brea-it- d-ilned ft'ir cane ciiltivatoi io
,an I.-e itlted. Width of furrowv at Dop:-
[rom .36" to -i"


THE "DAU'NTLESS" WITH TRENCH-
ING( BODY.


PL TER S'


P L,' CH' H


_ I I


IL






PLANTERS'


P U N CH 1929


-dream and nothing more? How could a woman, an of fear and 1a -l--e f' lteiple--ine- s sept hir...u.h Taki.-., poke- 1.\it and with empha;sitl Mrs
Old Hige as you call her, come into your room when him. "1'hy. the it-ll do y,:u all think sui.hi flight Ialmer itle .:.ut .of R.isehall lar night Witeri- tc.
the door and window were closed? Did you tind ful, hellish things. You ill live in bell with l-.iur Sl.- c:am.i- bheie \'hii I heard it i.i.v--io I knnw
them open when you got awake? Did anyone?" degraded inlimginlatilu ; thl-h ii- uothin .L-a.u antd eil thlk rlat talt il;- :e in Ro--bhall an' Palmy.ia
The girl shook her head, still sobbing, healthy about 3\our minds Your ~'uls are biiat lKr --I .aUme siraJi.ght lif:r di piuae. I knuw i \iiietbiug
"Very well, then, no one could have come in: than ever youl ki-l itculd bi, U.,'r i tti .iiu -<-. you lild bad lad h.ipened The riit tiling I a\w. masuia.
that's quite evident. Can't you see that you have fool. tuat y.:,u are tortulriin y'ui g.iran idauiihtet bh. a- ii- -l kull .an1. pitee o-f I.dard. and though I
only been imagining that something evil has hap- ncouragin: hliti to Ibeliee th,- ilik tfully that -t-eari v.a afraid-lor [ kn.iv, m u.. than ..u about de-e
opened to you?" like meat and drink it yuu P;. ;.hd. ift I hI dJ ti- tLiing--l take tihm downi Thb-n Millitir, tell uir
"Look here," whispered Millicent; "tell me your- power I would rfl.., half t .. tldath any mian that wli.it -hI- -ee 'and eel Ia-t uih it Ania I :knw tli-p
self what you see." Talked nonseteui ab.iior Oldt Hties and rhi.- ,-t in till- ,iNr "
She opened her bodice. Two firm, rounded presence Lor thild]i-i L,,k iettie it'i nuw an. "B i ii t-ii .int lbeitev-i
breasts were displayed. In the little hollow flanked .-e what ,oui J.iiiUng as din.'" Tai,..'.-.i :,.- r ,e abtiuptl. ptssionatl,.l: is
by the soft promontories was a blistered space. aboul -"If iny ody .1-.- ->a- t, i all nit ..id in.:., ma:-A.'" self..oi ,trl. hi'\L. "i i -tt.:.hg it ally tite h- d .i iv'.'n
the size of a shilling. Purple against the gulden said Talke., 'lm -ill.. "lie nlild .-e I)le...ri lu- I va "tI Ib.liee.. I ILuv..\ til.ti that ilam n i tlilt. wi.,
brown of the smooth skin it stood out; anud the whether hi ur ime w.a ia e l i,..-. BIu I uliidrstandj on. itlat iit.i. that Olit H~.cei a- v.- hre la- t nilt.
skin was almost broken. It looked as though it had y.,u. I kniw li..- ..u le.-.. i\.:.iiac na--a. an I Iam i n, thatn shi-c a- in Iis ri m -ti':kiing me il.ai iilihd
been caused by a blow which, a trifle harder, would -ratiful l ...1'., t.i t Y'.u ate a ,-i..l man I Ilhi'd' Slh. .i, liere. it i .i in.- r. utwm i init uricer-
have drawn blood. won't f[rgeti y u." it i- not tile nli'-t tite hlie li,..- li:it PiB -Io li-lit it-
Robert gazed at the mark with astonishment I don't ,i. .i daiin wlhei-'tl ., i .:Ii t t .11 (ii.iio. it i .,,sin to. be ir la-t i I .I.a r i t',: Mill,:'
in his eyes, with a sense of sickness in his stomach. not! What ar- OLI 12 I t1 ..I d- to ril .i ut g-r]iii.] It... I ill ev rfVe.- htl'-'
But he rallied his commonsense. This might have daught.-r if t' tl, iid-n ti-:, Wi.Wh t >an I i.. Lint fuor hi r i- ln., v ii iV erlpi..'irini. ajni-r.
been caused by some perfectly simple and natural Can't you su' -_gt s .tithinlni Tak,.. i..Lild not have v.i-ititred 10 -'pek like this
means-must have been. Its discovery by Millient. "I1 doini ill I :au .ji-t iin." -ail Takeo:. n.i' He wal uttering terrible ithielts against a while
coupled with her nightmare, had made her gitve to I will dio th, utmii-t it 1 Mi. Palmer lti ii.-l r. it n.i.iin iv.il. ii:\. .-i nltit h -hLe imiight he tinnl
it a significance that had no basis in fact. "It is kn,.-w i I-- -,be!" lbro:,.e in MIIIh. tt b.h ii-r o-.'ti :lais. ciouli lainim th proit tith ii:t Iii.l
"Millicent, boils and blisters are very com lmou." vildly "'[ didn't t- Litit- flr ,1-11 -i ,:.-'r hli-r 11t la1i a. in-t a Wivll k ... Ln leainan. ,,e "... ..s
he urged. "This is only one of them. You have a (omn int thtI .ootm. iit I .f-l It ia-7 -Ii. shit. a- wvat.ieil bIi .h tutlhor.itint s I hli had l 'nW- ,iant-t.1 i,
dream and a blister, and you put the two together here. suti-king all ti- l'. [ ,t d. 'lie i- an l id Hi,. .1 [ iet ur i u lii t-ilEn.. a'zain-t hiim ri --nil hini m r
and make a fuss about it. Nonsense! I will go uitarh. a dilv S n r, kill in.- leitai-.. shi- want prison oi tI tie gall|iv. RIIut .INw he % a- ia.ei-i
to the Bay for a doctor for you and he will have oyou oou f'or heli o\tn :-eilt wit'l gri.f ni.ladenld I y \11 atl al-o. and iva< r.-k-
right in half an hour. But if you go on moping "*'What i this Ol(J Hi-?'" acain ua.-ed Ri-beit. ITi PerhPi.it-. too. lie kn\.1- | well the ,1..iv g mnin
and mourning as you have been doing, you will cer- with a n.it f It i-nitatItin a lii hi,,ice- Tlhu- ...-Lij w.:,tiuld not l:il'athe to anyinrje -l-t a word that lie
tainly make yourself seriously ill. Have you sent tor ed to I ni utlin adiitiil aeaitn--r .i | .ait.iLi i a l '-li-f sai, l .Bla.k and whnitei- 1l andi youi n. nmaist~ r .nd
a doctor?" he asked Takoo. Tjak.o r'lil) luni in a i'ew n.irdi -,'n. akilta w i- o, -- ex -ini-v. Ihe i- ad thii i in-e iitii inii nmiiht.y I.uim
"A white doctor can't do anything for her. v.. hilo h l l 111 di.iulit _ha -t',r j ti-h-r i tintn t-m,,llcoiunl i: -%impath for lthe -ttf.-ritu- Cm L l bI,.-ol
massa," replied the old man heavily. "What ithe say knowleal- .,ian re -i-nial -xp'rii-n,:e. An 1.Od Hig,- Utern. heart-r.'ruiw tiir liir preditamnent
is true. Old Hige come here last night an' i.uik was. a oman n ,.ithli h: pv..'ir tl, diie-t h.:i--,t i.. 1 -. O1hert s h ad -i h ared Tiak':in's vi-li.itnit o.i i- T[li
her blood. We may save her, but it won't be by skin. and to, retierili-i' rsI-e iu\i-.Slile. She -.eichrb pe iple nutP i 0 li hiad eiradually been dirawin i e;,!,-r 'r,
doctor's medicine." .:mtl proplle vhi s bIh:lo1Id !*,- de-irl.. Ibabie a- a tih L..is- while ri .,llo .iiy Isihh. proceeded Tlir
Millicent had sunk into her seat acain rule. and .;uiked theanl i d acleit A Crtin., pei- ti \:xt.lani.arii i...v. i.nii.- -ia pl. ti th.- ear WaIs
Once more her arms were clinging about Robert's iould not so easil\ and 'luitkil\ l de.ilpriv.;\d of hi- in iI ex-Inlamnatnn-. a d i i irse.. Some iof th n.e a uti
knees. It was as if she felt that in himt i..a'- ,r ler blood. hut o -li.. that Millin-nt's t le tii. t. .1 it'- i:'n t in. ii-ic a t li,-teria,. -oni.-e it I tti t iiavie
some support, some help. She clung to him a-. to .a deathI y t ..tl.lt m ean-. hail i .i--ilt ditrintluei iiU o,. ts huiih ,il.im-nt-il
last pillar of refuge. Takon addtd. an oiieaLi -p-?ll. a cur-.e, hais al- I. .-n Rl.-itr -aw thar thei atimosphit-er. -uper-lihait:d
He placed a hand upon her bowed head. An iut upun li.-r tili: night lh..lor The- pr',- ft' itl ai.; '.' !tii siri-i littitn 9tid e\x itenient a. it wais. mustaI do
awful fear possessed him. He remembered that ride there Milhli.-ut an imutmn-e am...~it ft' liamn. Tlie air
of Annie Palmer's out of Rosehall last night, and He went t-utsille andi iame bhatk with Ia ,i.hll' oif ii. riiu iu lhich seli F3- at. wi:, as ti',-. attl
the strange creature which, on the nichlt before skull and a hit of' wuhit,- tratlbioard Tlhere wav- ni. foetil nIllI tih,: IluiFr .tL btliruin iunush and vi-.ai-
that, even white men had seen. This girl's sickness other human Ieing in thlt:-e premi.- It-x\c-pr Rli.eiri .tturated caiment-o It si Kketi-d him
and despair might well be some devil's work, who l should have dared ti handle th.r.-t o.hject. "Won't you -en1 ou- .n som of thuieo people rouside
"What is this Old Hige she is talking about?" Takoo pointt-l to thr- bit tif ardnil)oard S.ket:chdi away"" he -iiestrfee to Takoo. "I want i.t rake
he asked Takoo. "Is it a sort of ghost, a fiend. upon its white surfia,:-e .,as a i.~itu. and in tih Milli>.init tnut tll heIpEti air for a while It will do
some wretched African belief? Why do you people coffin lay a shriudled nir'l The f'ce \Vi unmi-tak-l er e :...l.
IEllie such horrible things g ust of anger horn able It \va Mlilli;ent's t '..itttti il 1, P.r./ ,o i





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PROPRIETORS :

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IMPORTERS OF:

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S WHOLESALE AND RETAIL WINE AND SPIRIT MERCHANTS.

21--35 Orange Street Kingston, Jamaica, B.W.I.

11 Pechon Street






PL .-A TERS' P LUNCH


k)


, 9


The Handiwork of FRICTION


If motorists could watch the treacherous
actions of inferior motor oil, they would
scrupulously avoid it when purchasing their
motor car's lubricant. For inferior motor
oil does not-il cannot-protect your en-
gine from the devastating work of Friction.
It shirks its appointed task of protection.
and invites Friction to break your engine to
pieces.
Inferior motor oil is unable to withstand
the terrific heat generated in the high pres-
sure motor cars of today. It "thins out-
easily, leaving bare metal surfaces to rub
against each other, with resultant ruin to
your engine. Poor grade oil has not the
adhesive and cohesive qualities of "Stand-


ard" Motor Oil that carefully refined
motor oil perfected only after 5S years -of
painstaking effort.
Motorists should insist that only "Stand-
ard" Motor Oil lubricate their engines. Use
it consistently and drain and refill your
crankcase every 1.000 miles. You will be
rewarded with a longer-living motor car
free from the trouble and expense of un-
necessa r repairs.


.** Ir t, .ilt be yoiur



STANDARD

Nkte/r


West India Oil Company

"STANDARD"MOTOR OIL


~clhLI


lp,


~,~i~i3~
~r-~~







PLANTERS' PUNCH


7Th Witch of Rosehall
(Continued from Page 60).
Takoi, bowed his head and went outside; he
returned in a few moments to say that the visitors
had gone, though as a matter of fact they had only
withdrawn out of the yard into the road, standing
ready to return as soon as they might.
Only two women remained; Millicent's aunt
and her daughter.
"Can't you walk, Millie?" Robert's question
really affirmed that she could if she wanted to.
She rose with his help, staggering a little; it
was clear she believed that she could move only
with great difficulty. Her fixed belief that her blood
had been sucked and she was doomed had sapped
her will, and her body reacted sympathetically to
her extraordinary obsession.
Robert led her outside, impatiently kicking out
of his path the pan of smoking bush. He guessed
its purpose. It was all so puerile, almost obscene,
he swiftly thought, and yet he was far from dis-
believing that there might be something in these
strange, degrading superstitions. Annie Palmer
had openly proclaimed her knowledge of the ex-
istence of wicked spirits, of their prowling presence
on the earth. And these people would say that she
ought to know, since she had traffic with them. Be-
sides, did he himself utterly disbelieve in them? In
his heart of hearts he knew that he did not.
He motioned to one of the two women, Milli-
cent's relatives, to bring a chair; this he placed
under a spreading mango tree, the thick foliage of
which afforded a welcome shade. He asked for
another chair, had it put close to the first one, seated
Millicent and then sat down himself. Here in the
sunlight he noticed, startled, that her pallor was
more deathlike than it had appeared in the darkened
room. It was just as though she had indeed been
deprived of blood, as if her veins had been drained.
And there were dark circles round her eyes.
She looked very pathetic, this girl who, a
couple of days i.-f,,rt, had been so full of vitality,
so confident in her Ilreni-ti. so upright and virile
in her bearing. A poignant pang of pity shot through
him; he felt stirred by something of the same rage
that had possessed the old African and had caused
him to utter wild and dangerous words. It came
to him that something must be done, and quickly, to
rid this girl of her conviction of approaching death;
otherwise she might die of sheer terror. He had
heard of something of the sort happening in other
countries. Fear could kill.
"Millicent," he said, holding her right hand in
his and fixing his regard firmly on hers, "I am
going to help you. Do you understand me? It does
not matter what has afflicted you; I am going to
help you to get rid of it."
"How?" she asked, while tears of gratitude
filled her eyes.
"Well, in the first place, you -were christened,
weren't you? And you are a Christian?"
She nodded her head, murmuring "yes."
"That being so, you must believe that God can
aid you, can restore you to health, that He is more
powerful than all the Higes or fiends in the world,
don't you?"




CLEARY & ELLIOTT



Recognized as Jamaica's
Leading Exponents of
Artistic Photography


PICTURES FOR:-
T. R. Hs., The Duke and Duchess of
York-The Wembley and Toronto
Exhibitions.



ORDERS FROM:-
H. E. The Governor, Hon. A. S. Jelf,
and other prominent individuals
entitle us to be considered as
such.



WE CAN PLEASE YOU.

STUDIO:
89 KING STREET, KINGSTON.


Again she said y .-. liii [l l re .renkim l I111) tgrat
[iI'I, ot' (cof tion lehlind, her agarremenrt.
-"\Vl. thllen. I[ inml i'rIn to ask tlhr- 'et.llur .f lhis
pDarih. to-day. ru, play fo.r ;r.,u. aid"--in his r!',IJlig
ori ar-i.-tance- l I'- r'-mellllhel't.. Rfidri, tlie bl...k.-n
,le;%0 i m lan -% ho i n jevrl' ele-. ii b l niltl .r-t,- od
it. .rill a .iergi m n.an, au. a man nf real kilidllnes- ..it
lilrl't. lt e pitE his tfaille'D ,tai[ ; aUl I atn olti
ai-,, i, aak jantinihi lpal o:'n ,i D'- i'ra. W loq. a man
U ,h kn, O n- Mrs Palmer. ,inil I' not iai raid .r[ i'-r.
.\rn J [ ail 2.Jii. -_ L., i,[- l i .:. *It a y t l t. ir It ; .. 'i
,believe Itj ;God ou .nnrJ'.,l lli, ha- t t int D il i-
sitri'o:ge tlian Grd. >anD .\,i.' And it v,.u mIj ak, up
\3,,I r lhnn rl tu I .-r ell,. if i ill Ya i u -ee It i all.
iln't you ?"
Even ahile ,. sIKe o> -ll-mpdi I. hin ihim --lr.
anid evr -n mawI: kili ria lit e sh.Iaill ih.- t lkint *,I
rilcirs i. anil pra3cr. and rpar--n-. Ih, -ali, hari nt-r
done anl.thiri.- .. til- -il l bjr-:i ,,II \ Ih.,s -,,mii
lihave shirider'.-dJ o i ink .1- liimi,ilft' l.inine it But
.a liim ai Illie at lea.r at a hirani l., Li'r ra ,s,,ri lipghtt
l>, at tak.- And it i \\ei- .\Ann.- i : had.i -. -..r
il. Dirlualit rie g- irl 'to thi-. p --. *ill N ,- p.-. w "
..l4 r-limhn as mo -i a. ..t hlan h I. nri lh nlll-:h hei.
ii ,-iEdri to l sav'- .M ii,:I -nr
Y'%iiI will pi ro i i h, ,.. youllr hbAn Ir:o ir
*ii'*" lie ai k,-d her.


SYe(.-. I pr'itio i.t. : I will try: bat." lit.- aik'- ,
Ij..'t you kni ridatl h-b "ill harm uti hi Ift' h.h-
kn.. 'i'ln i nni, e .i --.e me. and rll r. h-vip[ i m Slit'
natl i.-, .inld -he ioing to hate you too She's like
I dil'nl i re .ai i r her bat,- I u III [ e her i
or ail .oun- e-i-. 1 .:u it anr:ll .rni deternl inei t..s Isilp
\. 'ih. M illit-'. .' l may ifepe l on j ll that.
A gladi Iook t 11 1.[, Millii ent si ,-.ie.rid ,i jtint .n
.ani rhien it [.iai-j a a ay annl lier l -ad itrolj-i o il'..
m.iO- She ni.,is nteepinr again. Watching her,
i'thi-it l ad hnirrelf to .tiugFgl- to keep tear froni
li- ry,:
S i ,.. ,ii -: -.:i d ftly. "I pIlr.mi you I ill
tr'. buh [ i:i't lr ink \ i ,n t ia e lle I kLi:Ji
I'," I lI- 1- la-i it'hlb :in hIo I t-:l n.:. Sh
i,:iztl 11 ll; in1ii .i llh su l ,'n fr.tr (e "lh, m y Go.Il."
-h riil, "I1 witiJ.n r if I will e er -,.- ou as aill'
H.-.- .'iii l.rts ii lir.. I i.lo L er He rose- abrtiptl.I3
.lid i':., kronedi ro Takou. telling hinm briefly wh-.t be
inItirn-dil Ir. doi in the i nmatr,i .:i th.- nin lt or n Y...
niui-t I-:l lim krj.i,, lo sh- '.-t.r oil." hi- -.ali. anin
if ,1 an.:] t .i rr i 3 i. ..L i u 'ah aL e all thar i neri-scar3
Y.l w ill ep ,tI liher't::-
Nt,., Sht 'A.- g,.iDng tj lie- riemn1 I .-si tiha il.ay Bull
Takl:,, prornised that lie monil let t-he y:iinr .-quit-
SI s',sl i ,.' .,l P.'i I


SASSO & MILLER,


Slb KING STREET.







Do You Know


STnat for 21 years we have been very closely associated

with the Best Hetail Trade of the Island. ano tiiiat we are

to-day in a better position to supply your requirement s?



Do You Know


That our unswerving Policy towards the Shopping

Public never varies, which accounts for the extraordinary

Confidence our Customers have in us?



Do You Know


That Iusiness to-day is Courtesy, the art of handling

people skilfully, and with infinite tact?--this krcwledge

is ours.



Do You Know


Tnat it does not take a Business Liar long to stumble

over himself, and that under no circumstances would we

wheedle you into making a purchase against your will ?






SASSO & MILLER 81b King Street




i The House where HONESTY is not merely

a POLICY but a FACT.


1929





PLANTERS' PUNCH


On the Road
W HEN the miles are ahead and time is a consideration-it is then
that a reliable car is a necessity. Every driver knows the feeling
of security he has when he is behind the wheel of a machine that he
can depend upon to "get there" without trouble.
THAT IS THE FEELING OF THE MAN WHO OWNS A

FORD ROADSTER

AGENTS---THE KINGSTON INDUSTRIAL GARAGE,
34-38 CHURCH STREET. KINGSTON.


I






PLANTER S' PUNCH


The Witch of Rosehall

(Continued from Page 62).
know where she was later on. He had not yet made
up his mind where he would take her to; he had to
be very secretive. He did not dare let her future
whereabouts be known.
"Not that de Old Hige will come again like she
did last night," he -.inil. "for we will be watching;
but she might do something else."
"I wonder how much of this is sense and how
much nonsense," said Robert sadly.
"Mr. Ashman an' Mr. Rider saw the Horse two
nights ago,'' said Takoo slowly; "saw it plain. I
saw it before Mrs. Palmer last husband die. Young
massa, there is plenty of things you don't know,
that is why you disbelieve. You can send de doctor,
but not later than seven o'clock. After that him
won't find any of us here."
"I -will see you again shortly, Millie," said
Robert; "meantime, believe you are going to get
well."
He took her hand in his. "Promise me that you
will try," he said.
She was loath to let go his hand. "I don't
believe I will ever see you again," she wailed, and
as he moved away her heavy, despairing sobs seem-
ed like blows falling upon his heart.

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

ROBERT INTERVENES
ROBERT got back to Rosehall in time to meet
the other two book-keepers together; they had
finished dinner, not having waited for him. His
meal was being kept warm by Psyche, who had been
relieved from all extraneous duties to act as cook for
the three men. But he refused to have anything to eat
just then, he was far too anxious to face food: later
on, he said, he would eat something.
Burbridge would be off presently to his night
work, but there was still some time for talk; and
Robert wanted to consult with these two, partly
because he wished their opinion and advice, partly
because he heil the need of someone to whom he
could speak openly as to a friend.
He told them where he had been that afternoon,
though both of them already knew, and just what
he had sebn and heard.
"It i.n iuexpli-able- to me," he said, "how these
people can believe all these weird, horrible-things,
and yet I saw the mark on.Millicent's bosom myself,
and there can be no doubt that she believes what
she says."
There was silence for a couple of minutes when
he ceased. Burbridge broke it.
"Who is to say that the girl isn't right, Ruther-
ford? Queer things happen everywhere. You don't
know that there are not evil spirits plaguing men
and women; the Bible tells us that there are. I
never laugh at what these people say. Perhaps they
know more about certain things than we do."
"Then you actually believe that this girl is
being haunted, haunted to death?" asked Robert,
"and that Annie Palmer is the prime cause of it?"
"I don't know who is the cause of it," said
Burbridge dourly; "we mustn't be too free with
names. But I have seen people on the estates die
from ghost-haunting. and I have seen some go mad.
It isn't anything to scoff at, I can tell you."
"What is to be done?" Robert put the question
tensely.
"Whatever is to be done will be done by old
Takoo; you may rest assured of that. He told you,
didn't he, that your doctor could do no good? But
he is a sort of doctor himself, where these things
are concerned. Perhaps he himself has put ghosts-
death-on people before now, so he knows how to
handle such a situation. Maybe this is the retrihu.
tion that has come upon him. For what he has
done his beloved granddaughter suffers to-day. He'il
feel that "
"Then all I have to say is that that is damned
injustice!" broke out Robert harshly. "But you
think that Takoo may cure Millicent?"
"He may be able to; he'll have a try at it, any-
how. I wouldn't worry much about it-yet," added
Burbridge kindly, for he saw that the young man
was distressed. "After all, Millie wasn't anylthini
to you; she hadn't really become your 'housekeeper,'
bad she?"
Roblerr gave no answer. Burbridlge continued:
"Whatever there is to be done for her, Takeo will
do it; you may rest assured of that. And it won't
?uit you, Rutherford, to mix yourself up too much
with this business."
"And yet perhaps." said Rider, speaking for the
first time, "unless Rutherford does mitrer s hinimelf
in it the girl will die."
"What do you mean?" asked both the other men
at once.
"You both believe that Mrs. Palmer has had
something to do with Millicent's sickness," Rider
went on, but- with-lowered voice. "You-don't know
how she has acted, but you look upon her as the
real cause of this trouble, and I have no doubt you
are right. Well, I am wondering whether Takr-...
however powerful an obeahman he may be, can


sucreed if he arts alone against Mrs. Palmer's will
and influence: but if \e could hrine her in as a
irt .f kindly or ftnrgiving aeenry. something mighr
he done Takoo micht ask her for help. but is she
likely to heed hint? Rutherford might ask her: we
all know that she-that she has a liking for him She
may do something for him-at a price. That is ju,'
possible. She might be coutent if. say. the girl went
to the other end of the island. though she msay think
.lanlaica too small fir herself and a ,oloiured. free
'oung lady who dared to defy her and to harge
he-r with murder She is terribly vaiu: her vanity
has been i Jrrage'l by Mlillient's presumption. and
forgivena-s, (ome l hard to a .oman like Mrs'. Palmer.
indeed. -he doesn't forgive. though she may inot
insist upon revenue But her intervention mA\ oi
Millicent's only hope. Do yoiu think it wiortlh ynir
while to appeal for it. Rutherford? Youu wouldn'tt
harm the girl any more than she is harmed al-
ready. anyway. for if she believes she is goiuii t0
die, you may take it from me that she will die"
Robert and Burhridee shuddered. Rider. suir
though he was. was sober enough now, and he was
speaking with a quiet t.ertitudE that carried terrible,
conviction to the mind- of his two companions
And no, one could doubt that lie was sympathetic.
*Then .\ou are sati-fited that Milliceut is really%


1929


haunted?" asked Robert. "You believe what th.
people on the estates believe? ls it all true, then
"I have told you what I saw the other ni.h
with my own eyes. haven't I?"
"Yes. -you were very clear about that. thoub-
"No. I was quite sober; I haven't touched
drink fur nearly a month It was not, either, a case
my imagination being affected by the imagination
the negrnes. Remember. Ashman indicated that
saw it al-o. and Mrs. Palmer spoke as if it we
a ta. t You have. therefore. the testimony of t[h
white people, all of them presumably sober. A
non you bring us this tale of an Old Hige, which
only the Vampire of other countries, Rutherford. t
Vampire whirlh is human and which lives on blood
He stopped as though to think: his audit.
waiting breathlessly on him. for he seemed to ha
-onme explanation of this miserable mystery to s
ecst.
"W'\e noa rest assured that. whatever else a
did last unght. Annie Palmer did not take off h
skin and pa-s through wood in order to get at 1
uirl That -ort 'if relief is sheer nonsense.
Millicent saw. or felt. something-a presence-
her riinm with her. anti there is a peculiar. suggest
bruise on her 4hest. And there is the child's i
i t'',inlu uiite ion Pagel "r;i. .







PLANTERS' PUNCH


The


Garden


Parish


of


Jamaica


T HE I.aril ,: 01 t .Ann calls itself and is called
rte iGardeIn :f Jrfaaii,.. it is proud of the beauty
or ifr-: -.-ner.. it rnij uli-.j take pride in its historical
a- .. i l ir ,n ..
Ir i heq:rutiiul -ex.i--lingly. Situated in the up-
lan.iJ ofr Jamnil.a. its pastures have that park-like


edition fixes the site of that encounter on the second
of two rounded elevations which one sees distinctly
from the rear verandah of the Moneague Hotel. At
that time the country was more thickly wooded than
now. There was no broad macadamised road lead-
ing from Spanish Town (out of which the Spaniards


OM WHOSE BACK ERANDAH MAY BE SEEN THE BATXLEGROUNOD OF THlE
LAST FIGHT BETWEEN THE ENGLISH AND SPANIARDS


appearance whlichl remindltr one of the English coun-
trysile. ir miountains= tro\-er up into the clouds, and
where Ibe around I-reak, suddenly into precipices
one ,.an .-. -t ret: hin i re the horizon, smiling valleys
miist-lovirCU in the eail.v morning and shining out
later in all th: gl:or.3 of variegated green, with splash-
es of" vivid t im-nou here and there. St. Ann is one
orf the ,ioilest pariihe- in Jamaica. Here, it was
know Ion'- ago,), ee-n white men might work in the
i-eln- andi <.jom to no harm. for altitude tempers the
heat t r the slIni I da. anud at night the atmosphere
I; delightful It i- i-, e-ven in the summer, and in
winter nlle pets ,iilletliing of a touch of cold, the
.:old o' the trropi.s w\vhi-h never pierces to the bone,
but imerel:. e-xilaFatr.s. There is something tonic in
it. usometiin_' tliar rfill- i ,ne' ith the joy of life.
M ONEA(lIiE i- lh niu,-r, celebrated spot in St.
Anu,. It a..- ii-- rthat the Government chose
a, the -irte of a i ,otol s..olr- iliirty years ago, and here
is still tl ie fot'ndl nrje of thie island's leading hostels,
Ih. rei'niezbvofls t' oI.irI't in the winter season, the
report 1.1 J.aniail:;ani ini- liri -.ummer months.
I hlir a,:gu Hlotcl ha htr:n l rialgedl and improved,
I, nii're and ilore hl,.- it- popularity grown. Its
g:. lit k iib-.i are a 'iret atti.tction to golfers; to its
I-rnuii I.,'urt-, j- plr. nt only from different parts
,.t. tlhe pari-i. lit fr,,ni Kingston, forty-two miles
a ca:. .o -, pluav miarlch- at week-ends. Thus there
is al,.iav\ lhie andil ..v i-iit at this centre; besides,
it is but 1 f'- miii'- ft'lmin the famous Dunns River
Fall-. thri [athin Iia e i i St. Ann, where an inland
river i n :a-il r,,1i. .1 -a of flashing blue and silver,
thir f-irini :i larh i :i rirer and sea water with
.Ell,,w -nids .:,i .lith-r i.. and curving groves of
'r..ountir palin I .thlii-i [i.ce where hundreds may
be. aI cojini:odlar.l at r .,n,. rine.
Thei- unrtlh.r -ole :t..fi Jamaica has had its
prai ,r- ':iunt an-'al dndi again, but nowhere is it
more i.eautiful lthan ralon that part of it which
formni thre Inr,-ith-rn L .:iounlary of the parish of St.
Ann Here- anrh- th- inv -treams, eight in number,
whivth the Spani.irrl-i aimrn- the Ocho Rios, here are
aluo the: R..drinr_ Rivtr Falls, the finest to be found
in Jamaii a Arid lihre air. coves with a romantic
intercrst. from IOie 0of thlmi embarked the last ac-
credited Spani.-hl Gov'ern.r of the island, Don Arnaldo
de Sa-si. ivwhi hi- li.d abandoned all hope of holding
Jamaii. against thte steadily advancin-. and con-
querine Enelish. Hele al-so i. Don Christopiher'3
Core where C'olunibu- i-re.aired his shattered ships.
IT wa- at M.:.n-aIue.t that the last battle between
English and Spaniksh was fought in Jamaica. Tra-



L .'


had been driven, and which was then the English
point of departure) to Moneague, where the Spaniards
had established themselves. The popular view is
that as soon as the English had marched upon Span-


ish Town, then known as St. Jago de la Vega, and
had taken it (the Spaniards surrendering), the latter
were cleoaedi out of the country. Bat it was not so.
The Spaniards retreated to the north, they fixed
their headquarters at Moneague; for fifty years they
disputed with the En lish the possession of Jamaica.


They set their slaves to harass parties of English
prospecting in different parts of the island; they
met and fought with detachments of English troops.
And all this long while, for some ten decades, letters
went from Jamaica to Spain and Cuba begging for
help, for men and arms; and begging vainly.
At last the time arrived when a final blow was
to be struck. The English forces crossed Mount
Diabolo and came upon the Spanish soldiery at or
about the rising ground which one may see to-day
from a verandah of the Moneague Hotel. The Span-
iards were wretchedly equipped. They were really
volunteers, they had lost all pretence to being regular
troops. But such as they were they put up a resist-
ance, they made a fight; among the trees the struggle
went on, a pitiful affair from the point of view of
a battle, but nevertheless the contest which was to
decide whether the English should or should not
become masters of the whole island of Jamaica. It
can not have lasted long; when it ended the
Spaniards were in flight. The issue was determined.
Thereafter no Spaniard was to set his foot in Ja-
maica save as an alien and a stranger.

7'0-DAY, as one saunters al,but the -paci..s grounds
of the Moneague Hotel, and watches the golfers
pursuing their game with that almost religious in-
tensity which golf develops, or hears the quick,
merry cries of the tennis players on the courts, or
catches the buzz of gossip arising from the patrons
of the tea tables or the shouts of laughter emanating
from the bar, one wonders how many of these
pleasure seekers know that they are standing on
what is, for Jamaica, historic soil. How many of
them try to picture to themselves that spot as it may
have been when the Spanish held it against the Eng-
lish, desperately clinging to a country in which they
had been born and which they felt was theirs?
In this same parish of St. Ann. Christopher
Columbus lived for one whole year, his ships in
sad condition, his supplies giving out. Columbus was
both a man of action and a dreamer. As a man of
action he must have explored what is now known as
the parish of St. Ann, and there he must have had
further visions of discovery and colonisation. One can
picture him standing on one of the hillocks of
Moneague and thinking. He must have imagined
this pleasant part of the Land of Wood and Water
as the home of many Spaniards in the days to come.
He himself was to be made Marquis of Janmaica, and
to-day there still exists a Mil.i-|ui of Jamnaita in
Spain, a direct descendant of Christopher Columbus,
on whose Spanish estates are bred the best fighting
bulls of Spain. So the first future Marquis of Ja-
maica, wandering about the district of Mn.neague.


liilt ,.'tles in the air and thrilled at the thought
that he had given many a fair land to Spain, and
this by no means the least of them. And to-day
British subjects and English-speaking visitors wan-
der where he did, and to him they give not the
vestige of a thought.




PLANTERS' PUNCH


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1929


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III


PLANTERS' PUNCH


1929


. I!, ..


GAIETY


I.


Sloria Swanson -






68



The Witch of Rosehall
(Continued from Pagy i; 1.
that was hung up outside of her i.'um. whiih Luri-r
have been put where it was fo..id.. aid .al-. a
sketch of her lying in her coffin. The s-kull ana ;',n
sketch are pure obeah-witchcrafi iaiinami-]ry: ltie
are meant to terrify, to complete : thl- nt rk l-i; il
so-called Old Hige. They are MNillii nrt' iiiEld
death warrant, so to speak. A reAl Vamiirre. a ii.i
Old Hige, supposing that such a thliiIin -xit-l. wuil
not need to employ them. The bl.'..."J -iu kin-' w,.li
be enough."
"The people about here," inti uptr d Lurl'i ilug-.
"believe that you can keep an Ohl II1i a a'.I if t.,,u
know she is likely to come at yoii Tuak,, doing
that now."
"Yes; but they didn't know I:l-t nIir1 that rur
lady of the Great House would be ..n ith p!irisl: aund
if she were powerful enough to I'a-, i.itill I,....:>i
doors and fastened windows she w,..uhl iia: .',
sufficiently powerful to kill the -irl t. otriAl. ,I,
must have known that she was itit -':,in- to aa:l;
Millicent with her hands and te-rtl \ it-ni -I,. r.lok
care to prepare the skull and ske;. h iti. tn',ld
she have run the risk of being i.unild in te iri....'
Even as it is, if it can be prov,.l tlit it ;- ri-
who put that skull and sketch li.--re thlt .\ .t
found, she could be indicted for ira,;:ti.iii]j ,.i,.ah
But she is not a fool. She knows. tra lilr :a 1 v uitl.-
woman may be suspected of mu:-J. lr,no .iii ,....l.l
readily believe that she practised o'eii. Trut i.'-,ui j
be thought highly unlikely."
"Then," said Robert bluntly, '*von she sent a ghost into the room i,:1 Miilln,-nt. -,>init
damned wretched creature from ti'- pit ik'- th.. .n,
you yourself saw here the other nieiht? Slh F
witch, then, as well as a murdere---lfor I have ti._e-r
felt sure she wasn't a murderess ,vc silcC I i' -irti
the story about her, although I blaiI nl t wI.,nte-l
give it any credence. Indeed, I .lh:Ijild still! think It
a lie but for this last thing that lihaprpienine "
"Yes," said Rider slowly, I hIlieve that. tl<
sent something to prey upon Millicent's mninl: Ibar
what was it? I too saw som-etliug Ilthri-- tigsh
ago. But what was it?"
"The Three-Footed Horse, the Hoi:t.e t'r.i h.-I."
said Burbridge bluntly.
"That's what it looked lik- Isu't ihat iwhat
Mrs. Palmer intended that it should lo,,k like?'
"You mean-?" Robert pausti. igimp-irig a lirtl,
what Rider had in his mind, but not iulite able tIo
express it.


PL A.N TER S'


P LNC H


IY '. hea.tIl,.i [ l r 1 -iInI r I Il- ln in EuEl 2liLandi. oi
IhErn n tile C'utin.LI.Lit. Rurliherhortin ."
S Ye a little. t 1 t mi li, I I V.i.'hl' int"r,.- ld "














itt -i it. |,ll, '. n ,lt ,: lia ,it, li' i; t ,:'.th l'. ar -'ld id
M Inm. Ir > iAitm t i aordina'i.' pi n.ii-t a ind iid
j in t;tle itx'i- ,.i l -ti l l t alut, I, Fra.ll t in hljl- ll i.--
iI'n. I awe and i.- a t ti I iE .. ir, nllll lII 'ul. I a i-I inlyi
iLh.. nie th I. ll il 1 ph -..pl, tI hey n. ] : I llir'I
ImlII ter I l r -I. I. I h.ve -ad'.il .' th -.atf i e kii i ofr
thin l t-uh 'n.li, -i [inl i t '.' herIt l- ii oIk' .r- ..( -
I in. f i. i t-,: 2, 1 ;iill -. [' u -r j.ei Hni
. '.-.ile hi h fin l It ni ..n .1.. t i itha t i h.t
i..ll..i l i.. .. rhl.r Ilie [,n --ha t.1 t I \. in:lt. n:tl n- h iit
t ll .:.i i la, i -. lil ,1 .. I.:. it al -..' T ie i~r i- t r
i, piLI' ii' n- il. i.it ur..e 'n:tn rNi' l ,it all
I ._.. i., i th i: l .- .1-, t. iU r D ib, r iri' i, i ,.k .,il
!.li?.;le l Th .- ,ik k :a,- a little .l ,,, hin,
I h iv W. a .a.I l- inn.i Even it a 1i11untri
[i-:r, -' -f, F. l1-i 'A it ,',li. ,Ai th .1 iL t'-ul llilt n tfir(
1 v as. ll oiir t,:, I ,ii, :v,- t1 .tt th l'ie P- a F'- ai .,u il -
aug ,'l- l. l "- 'i k i'- r,:. i.. ri t ll ni d i n all i An---
th. n h1..-i, ti h, I --:.l- At tli]h- V'it- li ..I End .r.
, i lr I l. l.-,l l h l-'i ,,p h -t S:1 llit I I..l Ip .: l
,.f hI, 21'al" T [heli im S I I Itpl u .1 1 .. 11 ii i'.r I,.
l \t j 1 it'1. 1- i i11 I ., imal 1 1n 1hility r... ,i-- i,11i
On111101 i l.- .r[ildit- Th,.l- ti- a r [,hl nt, '. i.'[,hl inI
ED L..lian, tloi:., |l', ll iI,'., iII c.hI.'-- th it, ar i
ni.i.r .i rii.r-',,n it iiit n t I 'tB I .t r n ._, r! 6 l. rii a ll,.
,I [ I".IPt I,.,u A -n e P[a lm1ii, mI.. i :, h .': ." i pi'V.. 1r
k hi. n i ,,' hf rt inl l li-, .( 4 I' ll '
"But h.l I.. .I,. I i: f h. ll n-,evee .t ,l Ih....-hert
li.i--. 1 -'nJ l y. \']i.-,r lzt +I : IIt? Ft l'r !i lhri li l,,-,E
i t ,i-.l 1 ir I' i1 rn l I, I that -it.. ,- l1 i h -r n
-[ iir'1 Ml ill .A-i t itlI -,11 -th'0 l- ;..l; ut Mi F I-, lri ;,=r'.
,irn r. rni hE-r I.,ild h.lit : Il t1,1 .- ro...m % h hi- !"
a,-t nn lht -tur,-Iv that.u -l.e: It~ h li. p.w. i '
In a 'r you a1-' ri'lht." -:.nLinii,-di RIdeI
itlittl.'. "iiht v. l r I n .-.in i I l I r t,- 'hap,. .I- .a j u -.
pe' ,)l. r. ,., t2 r inIu .- .th- h.'i li ritin.A t t il. i s a
vision .t- ,-r m1irnd tlhat -hi e pIl.,.iA.L int., --p E W ni'.-
in h t i'li of a:.[ -lii. r al [,l..-e. n.'\ in (lih- I..I'rn,i
At a sha.iill..n ampir. Mark y.o". I don't -ay -ie
dowsan't ho-t-lf inm uine that sle W.allk up he--e n lW:ipm
tf'rom h-il. or from the grave. Quite probably she
,:l,:,e. Sli. h-: b eil l maya n t i e able to explain her
own rwev l-. anl :i i-.- i iimorl ikel it... pray rt:, t IN
Dtil than I. Goil -ihe wuuld htliEve. and ,lilyv
lbeliev-. lhat sh- ha- iniluen :ce : r the world d P-,
;vil A v..-nian likI tat would lie inteitely lrmid
of her power--puffeil up-and what hitter tu:,dj for
vanity than a convicIion that ,ven hmvil .- ybu h,.: .'
Going. Bu-rprlue? '
"-Y ., I ha ,ve got to be otf now BEit listen: I
i:qan ti u-t y.,u f[,l,,ws. and I tell yOnu 11.1. quitp
frankly, that I believe that that djamnid %onman up1
thare is in Iniue with hell. She i- ua itlh. anil .w


1 929


fOO1 af s I *au get. an.jthlli! jub h mI- 1 )Hi a i If o-ehall.
I have bail -ti..'iih of it'"
He janmm-Jd i.; hatr ..I hi i-adi .an,] marched
adady. RhIti l'.Iokeiad .at him inl th a einilr 'His
Litl. e ic t :.,:rlI." it siili id yr Ruila rii.lg. would
1.:e .a dinz'la l iut ru .l;a.[v, i.,rhmlir [l-. ilall.:,n He
1H3ay a t>. t'.fr e II O th li. II [ lh lt 1t.1.. vc!.r: rl.ly
Therl : [i _- o-,nl th l ..i tli .ul i. OI thl l 0lrc. l lif'uore
l,.ihi. Ruth aeritorl : ~elct rlhi p Cii-il- i. i that."
The? ... inoir it I.r.n .- t l di Imnit.. I'I r 1 eior yo
It -,.rem to m,- that ..ul- > ilt .ianii I.I.- mil tin wipe
n put -omr I:t' tI- l in iquil tlh at -;ter' h.i ai ."
M-. a n'.. I. n ir I i'.pe- In l li' lI- ,i, i.nEjtred
Pr irt ait (i r in.ll hi tv -n tiild Mr IliI dor-r
H .. 1,.tt- i .l- re reL i n I- ln rl -ta t !
i Yiil I ..t t h ii I. l, 't .',: Iu. l ,nd I -'ti th'l. ia they
i l.t '-.. n ai t ., i lh i ,ii "-r u' r-ti hillth l r ilhi
thib -at ah .- .'affir ,t M ill..ni '- It' -hi- liit ie>n
b.:v' .h lii .r i tll.- ioe.1 an]' M. '.- ig rstr. ] ii at.
ea I t h aI : it, T ak .. ..- i..' i ru ir ione ni d otln
He.lp iher 1 .In ieus t lha.t .:. iilur-i i .. Itl i l mi-
trhI a ao-.m njiJ i t- h'i ol I, n-.lih-i I t11:.t an Old
H iegh I -lii,.kL]IL i' ainj that -l itv- d:omi:,' I ... die
V'. l]hm n [I '` ,.Is -1 [I \ D n, h ,r I, iffid i ltL t, eA l
M11l r nt t. bel ;ev, itbat. Ill hEr !It =. .li,- Irist I3 bi-n
ulirrounlld bl y -uir r-='ltrh -h- h.:- =i i- on, i rEd
tliat h..r ll itiad l l r ,,ihnt .. ,- h.- l.r an1L il -,in iork
%..Litlrs She kn..v.-- that li t Mi-. Palmer is li]'r nermy;
.:.nly MI r- Palmir. th -lir :ill nlhii .- hI, I, l h li-eve
ht h .t .he it i.i l.,o n er l-,% ,t hI ,l 1, ill r: l tl' .:.)h'e,.
- ii n i- -, .. f n, that a l.iiler-r l i [s app.,-ai'- -i ,n the
- .Iii, wlhvlrs -. he iiio' Ir i--, tl ih 1,[l Lt, kel i her
The. -irl 11 in n i i i .-,,'kin1 on ]?her hco1y: that
i- h...w I hidelr-tiand lh lfmati,-i S.. I think that
,nly. MIA r P.alnil-' >I I l n lrini- hitr I, i. eli. e ve that che
V, ili vet itell I M rs P'dalrnI r II rna % l ,,r'ta..k(- t., do
rthi it' you he- he i tJ. lib r -hl: witill dlemaniiJ a pri'ie :or
the I', %It.\ And it v ill ie damned awkward for you
IO ask rlie t'avoulr I riatlher like tlhe girl ithoigi l. !
iknv. her er ll rtlyl. I)-fiv p I Iianm- h- 're. amui I knew
liei g.randfther- the \ii.tie. ,)ie. He died not so
l.ill a .-.. aind hi a. to:nfl .I h>-r in hli I< wa he
i:hd a good deal tor hlr--and ',,r mn:. ... far a.b he
rild HI. a- kind to: me sh..uldJ like to 0ilink
I could di d omenithm e ht '.,.uild bi- tthankt'ul t'or ."
RiIelr'- vnie Ijij :ii 111 t ho.vh h li. :!re in.Indulging
in :ionite ,. ret rl' i. ni-.el:e
W ilth elb.:,w6 I)lant[iil (.,1 knrlfr w'ith his I fae
hiir'i1- in hi. hli nild Robelt pinderod ov,.r \\hat the
.ther man had -aid Rider was as-ureIl that MAilli-
I-Ilt'i lifee was at stake. and wa, supge-ting inat.
[.p-!hapq. it might be -Avred, hut in one wa. only.
He. Robert. must us, ivwhat infitiince he po,-3essed
nith a v.omian wlhoim. lihe nov\, ai so cl:ariy. Ihe had


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P.O. Box


No. 556
No. 184


Cable'Address: Bryden, Jamaica.


conme to wi-spe t land ei-n tio detels. tholuebh lbut a te%\
days jag. he would halve .-id he loved her
He raishcci Is had.i d. "I don't know if I snall
suLceadJ !11 etring Mrs Palmer to lei this poor gill
alone. Rider." he said. "blu I \ill ti :.. I fr .- that
I ani in rsonie W 'y ii-p-onsiblie fr ihr predil:jrnien
If I had in.r iome he'e. ii I had not enaanJd infl
serv-es. hab.ve all. 11 il he had not be-n waith
me in this place that niclhr--and it was I hi) maniad
her remain--she ,,oulhl nmt re in this awvfuIl <.indi-
ton. I munr- help her if I ian I will peak to
Annie about h.-r, but I am uor hopeful "
"You can luit do yiou ir lIest." said Rider kind-
ly.
'hnten do you think I should Eee Mrs. P.ilmnr."
"As s'irn as posiihlr." an-w,-red Rider pt.rt-ir
"Millicent spokl- r.onlh: the trialtih hen -he toldi y.tni
lie wa idylinc "
Roh-ilrt -sivnreil. thnri r.:,.- abruptly. and went
Into his ,roim H- -niiread- v. nirl a ihat aind l.ik.
for it had btieun ro rain slightly. Dark rcl'ud- lha
swept airloss anid .,..r'li'rer the -ky nhile tlhty bha]
been trlkin. thi- nichr had erri-wn hill and eerie, a
' mating %ini. ,:ame in frrim the sea. It "ias a if
the dark spiirit that hrooded o\- r FRlieball was
affecting even tie- lmatrialI wrlid.
He t:all-. fi hi hou s-e. and one *-1 the l)eii


THE NEWER KINGSTON


1IE~L- RH1)IE rON .RTTT .'1 D COMPANY'S
I:1 II DIN\. HIIAROl S .IOREET

N an.rtheil -ear or -.. Hat :Iur Street, from Princess
Street to Ea.; Stire, will hI Ie completely cover-
ed with I.ujildin.-- it hr tkk.in something over
twenty y-ar. for thii.. oinr thie principal business
tLhorouhfare- itf J.inmara. t.i i. u in to its own again.
But it h:ia hieni welll v.:itli i.Aiting for some time
fir the i rei:- o struck rtin :,t Hl. i'larli. r Street, seeing that
many of the strucrnires n:oi.'.v riited there are sub-
stantial huiliingn,. nrnniil-eiy sup_-ruir to those destroy-
Eid by the earthquake if 19I11. and much better ar-
rangEt- with reiiard it. adequate light and air.
One oj the chief of these buildings is unques-
tii:nabl!. that jt MAls-rs Roie-rt-.rn. Stott & Company.
It wad puit p with p.IrtiiulalR :are and with an eye
to) the- expaniion of thl- hu:ineTi it should house.
With thle ixceptioin of tite building of Messrs. David
Heudtrro on, a Cnimpajuy ii s the only three-storey
tllfigc. in Harbiiur Street, and tile special attention
derv,:ted to it.; fai dei .au-;i. it to stand out promin-
ently anmone.-t th.:- iuildiie- iItI that street. It forms
parr of thle Nei'- r Kintio. Tlih building and busi-
neszs iof Mes-si' R:oblri-t.n. Stott and Company are
now. ort i:ur-e. ..nneei by tihe British Overseas, Limit-
ed. whi. h pur-hased a year or two ago the hardware
concerns of rsisis. Heu>-rsi.on and Company, L. de-
Cnrdova. and Riobert-on. Sirot and Company. But
the local nlanaugenent i- Jamnaiaii.
The present matiinzer of Messrs. Robertson, Stott
and Company is Mr .Aubrey Clarke, who is not only-
knrown as a good busin-essman but as a man of cul-
ture. iMr. Clarke'- interest in painting and music
is neil-known amon:st Jamai'-aun who care for the
arts. his suc':ess as a businessnian also illustrates
that it is quite possible to be a lIov r of artistic things
and an able man itf bhuin.es also. Mr. Clarke's quiet
effivienc.y and unfailing iolurte.y has won for him a
olcst of friends and adnirleis HiH has always been a
trustel and a st;ui-:tS-ful nman.


brought it ri.uniid 1. him afterr a little while. He
mniunttid and rode a ad
When be got to the I;reat House it seemed
plunged in oarkne-s. bur lie knevt that there might
he lightly. and peopl.- .awake to tlth rear of it, in spite
of the hour. Hi; rip at the great front doors con-
\inceld hinm he was rieht in his conjecture; the
doors werre ,oun jp.rneid by Annie herself. She did
not r--llm ,urprlsed t., see hinm.
"Come in. Robert." hl-- -aid. "and take off your
cloak. You nimit be tired atlte your long ride to
Monteeo Bay and hack."
"You knw,, I wve-nt tco M.:inte,:, Bay?" he asked.
"Why. c went to see Milliteint ti.... I ne-edn't say who told
me that. it is imniaterial Well?'
She hai led the way into the dining room as
shbe poke: she -.eared herself now in one of the
hair. and mniotinne.l hint to ano.tler close by. The
(.andelahrum rwa-- plant,_ on the table by which he
sat It briiihtli iilumirnat,.d her face and hair and
hoin, Her bodice. lie notil.ed. was cut very low,
reve.iing most of h:r bro..ntm
Her eye- were fixedi on ha- and the light in them
was soft. H.-r liiis were sl -htly parted. Not a
.atrn)n and driintiraln_.t but a we-ak and helpless wo-
man 'he apr-nared
Aaiin it 'tiUuk hin,. a. it always did, that she


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was a wonderfully beautiful woman. Now that he
was in her presence he wondered once more if the
things said about her could be true, though his
reason clamoured a warning. The fascination of her
was strong to-night; she seemed to exert all her
power of allure and appeal. Looking at him in the
warm yellow light of the wax candles, she saw the
trouble in his face, guessed the surge of emotions in
his mind. He was still possessed with desire for
her. Whatever the stern purpose with which he had
come there that night he might yet be rendered as
plastic as clay in the potter's hands.
With a quick movement she bent forward and
placed her hand on his.
"Are you still thinking badly of me, Robert?"
she murmured.
His impulse was to take her in his arms. A
wild impulse which he fought to conquer. Her arm
lengthened, it crept up to his shoulder. "Do you
think I am the murderess, the witch, that that young
woman called me, Robert? Do you hate me? Do
you believe that I have injured her? Oh, I know
what you have been told; there were many people
in Takoo's yard to hear. He said I was an old
Hige, didn't he, and had bewitched his grandchild?
And you believed it? Your belief in my guilt is my
reward for loving you, isn't it, Robert?" Before
he could guess what she would be at she had flung






PLANTERS'


herself on her knees before him. "Because I love
you I must suffer," she moaned. "And yet you told
me that you loved me!"
He stooped and lifted her up; without quite
realising what he did he placed her on his knees
and put his arms around her. Her own arms
were thrown about his neck and her lips were press-
ed on his. Then she whispered: "So, in spite of all,
you do love me a little still!"
"No one can help loving you, Annie," he cried:
again he was under the dominance of her will, her
beauty, her personality. "You are very lovely, very
adorable; but"-he forced himself to say it-"very
terrible also."
"Terrible?"
"Yes. This poor young woman-everybody be-
lieves that you are the reason why she is suffering,
dying, and that is awful. It is a crime, if true."
"Do you believe it is true?" she asked, modulat-
ing her voice to a cooing whisper. "Do you believe
it is true?"
He remembered what Rider had said to him; he
must not allow himself to forget what had brought
him here.
"I don't believe that you are a witch, Annie, or
any of that sort of nonsense," he protested, "but I am
sure that you possess strange powers, and I know
you dislike Millicent. What at any rate is true is
that she believes that you have everything to do
with her illness, that you have doomed her to death;
and I think that only you can rid her mind of that
strange belief, and I am asking you to do it."
He paused; she made no reply, and he con-
tinued.
"Don't you see that if you don't do what you can
you will be responsible for her death just as much
as if you killed her with your own hands? And
already they say-"
"That I am a murderess. Oh, yes, I know. She
said so in your hearing; she-a woman like that,
Robert, tried to paint me black in your eyes. And
because she is sick from fright you come to me to ask
me to help her to get a stupid idea out of her
mind." She laughed. "How generous, or how fool-
ish, you must think me!"
He lifted her, gently yet firmly, and put her
back on her own chair. That laugh had jarred upon
him. There was a merciless timbre in It.
She saw she had made a false move; she asked
quietly, with almost perceptible sell-repression:
"What do you want me to do?"
"You know," he said haltingly, "what she be-
lieves."
"Yes, I have heard."


PUNCH


"Can you rid her midn of that idea. iaui-se her
to become convinced that she i- mistaken. that ihe
will get well?"
"Why do you think .I .an do tlii-' Who siuc.
gested that I could?"
He would not answer; to d o o would be to give
away Rider, and he felt that -lie wa seeking for
information. C
"Do you, too, imagine that I pur thii \woman in
the condition she is in?" she inist'-d. "andi that I can
take her out of it?"
Bluntly he answered, "yeF." For a p.iture ori
Millicent weeping had risen befiire him. and AniniFe'
fascination had suddenly faiied
She stiffened, anger gleaming fr:ni helr -ies3
"Then I am a very danger:ius pers-on." shee exclaimn
ed, "and greatly to be feared "
Her anger inspired him nith a similar emni
tion.
"That is so," he ansiuere-i a- -iharply. "hutt I
do not fear you, Annie."
"Your woman does!"
"That is an admission thai she ha- reason to
fear you."
"It is an admission of nuthinc! YNou hjavi ,nome
here to quarrel with me on her a:euulnt: puttmigi
her against me! Do you understand that that ik an
insult?"
"Then you refuse to help her.'"
She studied his face for some moments. and
again her mood changed. Again ste became s.'ft
and clinging.
"Robert, if you want ine to help her. of ui uise
I shall; but you have misunderstood me much How
have I been able to injure her? It is her own guilt3
mind, and her own beliefs. that haiv afflicted het.
I left Rosehall two nights ago. yes. but it is only
an assumption that I went to Takon's plate. Tlhere
was someone with me, a boy from this estate. Let
me call him and you can ask him where I went: he
was with me all the time. Can I not leave Rosehs:!
without people thinking, and you above all, that it
is to commit a crime? Good God' have youi no fairh
in me whatever, Robert?"
He made no suggestion that the lad should he
summoned; she knew he would not. That would
have shown brutally that he disbelieved her Nor
that she was afraid of any interrogation. for the
boy had been carefully trained as to what he wa-
to say and would not have dared to add a word of
his own.
"I hate the woman," sh- continued. "bur is not
that natural? Remember, she was with you wheu
I came to your house; she bad been in your arnms


1929


And .t1u. just tlie uight before Ihat. lida been in
mine. \V'hat woman could easil. tolerate that. ;
,.le really Ived .ou"i That girl was trying to take
)u a.wa from n e; you know that. And she defied
Sad t.ur-,ed and abhu, Then Lter name upon her. ille believes I anm a withcl
I hllve tld ,oIu .e ft.:re that we lhae to lule these
peul-le by fear. anil I, a kinman. must encourage
their fooli-sh idea, if I am t., hbold m i own amongst
the:im. D.-ii'i you ever think o[ my positic.ni it-re
in spite ,f all that I hav- sal to y.iou ? And n,~o
y'u Lo'imne to ti-ll ni- of my ltrauge poeels, and .
ask nme t. help her' i answer that I will tr) t '
your sake. but hoiw mni I t) know that I chall
-su.i.eed' I cannot crittirol her mind; I knuow .:,-
thing about what iiscasci. -he ui-my be suffering
fi'rni. I ..nly ku,,w that she has triel to injure nme
But I.-i:ause >iiu ask it I will dri. my best for her
Hoew hall I do it. send her a mni-sage. bid them to
nring iher to ~.-F nmi-for yoIu wojuldi hardly eFXlC..L
fie r.-. io to her, w,,uld you?"
He an tiie diltieulry. [1 can m ke- no suugge-.
tion." he sja1l. I mru-r lai-ve it tu io to find .
way.'
"r'ery well. I will send ti, Takuo and aLk him
I1 i.olnip to mle-: I promise you that I will try my
best I (an dit no miure Are you sati.sfied?"
He was grateful She had spoken with a great
show of sincerity. there was an appeal ti him in
hi-r voici. in her luok "When will you do this,
Annie'' he enquired
"Tomnlorrow%. You may depend upon it that there
will Ibe ni. ununeiessary dela3 And if I suc:ee'd-
what happens ti me. Robert: what are you going
to do with this girl?"
"Nothing." He was emphatic "I don't think
she will want to remain in this neighbourhood "
"Anti you-are you going to remain wirh me at
Rosehall?"
She perceived his hesitatir-n. knew that he wish-
ed to speak the truth. tlid not believe that he spoke
the truth when he answered, heavily. "'Of our6c"
She felt. as she had done before, that he was slip-
ping away frum her: though she still fascinated him
when he was in her pre-ence and she appealed to his
chivalry and his desire She realized that the one
iman she had ever loved was being wrenlched from
her hy circumstanltes stronger than herself
"You don't want to." she said bitterly.
He tried to deny this. did deny it. and she Ie'
him go on with his protestations for a while
Then she rose and came and stood before him.
lifttd his head towards her with her hands and bent
Iont'ieiernl on Pagoe ", .


C. J. HANDAL & SON

WHOLESALE MERCHANTS

1301 HARBOUR STREET


RETAIL BRANCH 89 KING STREET


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~*ly.l"l 1 1111111.11-r~1llllIIIIIWIIIIYI_IIIII 1IYlllllllr 111*110111.1111111111111111111111111


1
,~,.i-i~ii~i~i~;-,,,;iii~.~iiiiiiii;i~ii .,,. ,.,.~11I~T~ii~~~~~~~=~li-~;i~;~ ;1lrllllll 1


1929











T tE E ;i- l i. !allu nierh a.Lu pr.i l.Iil\ re!'tr-.ltll.'er
Ml' P (I L.in- a a h i.hublby ulin12 teilliow- at
thi Old C :olleelia te. ii the old diay v. h n l 0. Bill i
tailihr the .,.iuth i...If KlIht t n aid "t tie othe.'
pliriei-.u ti -, i i _i'.l'l n- ibj.iu i ite ah h l.itte'l r. i ievel ,
liidi- u indil s i. ellna il,. tli.n toi i I n'jl:l 'I i t I i ii l .
Jdai t-, .com,. To thae ti,., knew hV. ti lh .-i, il.y- it
m ay rUe li x iaited Ilih t *h i- i Ll ,ll L'..i it t h1.ii.:'.
l'a,. nitll lnI e Oi ri 11 l 11i- iii;i i%'il 1 l! 1-1, \I A
ii i'a J Lo i. rit C l let ial t S. l I..ol. iui Iii ti r l l.l i ili
,1is ofI S the n ,t .,f huni.hlt riial tier- He lij .i iin .
il i, and llis Io1., ,, i, i 1 liiui. u oluid I ,, ih ih,- .ln y ime]i
iK.. lM r Lailh n .ii i. Lh.I- k itin tli,. '- t:-. ,.
pride and Li nt .-i.,tir i 1 hi I'.il.'- .a el al i li r .l i't
i-lain t i I-.er.
S ti O L ihl ph ii l' l i l ill ll l I' i .. l. 1 i
].'in e-ihnI L lrI .. ..I H-r \ i.l. l li t l i l r. i n:H .
Sit ia iia n iE i iI. --.- i- iten l d ii inli -
A lli- h i"a r lthnl l t., i i ll,.- -ui lIt. ,. ..:4 ii,' i .
Lain-. %a a -tiiiiiI-. t a; ly i l, i% n. a- Ui.l "jll
cia r.I- t .. hi lll I i_ ,i' .Ii; l l. I nli m i r Thh 1,I.i I. I
ililii l'ry a nli i,-! 'n Lsli..-. a ll tini i[ecn it : ,ll -'. t i i
a- tl-i 11.tl,.l1- td -]l'pl.\1 ii i litl--in I- i it,=. ".' : .- l al \> \ 'i
ni liJi in the :. Ino. .lii,,y Ml'r La ir_, .-' t.iltn-r v.- a
in1 '01,1 i-i :- H i- il ii i l iii t ,.l i *i'. [,iI i ll-iii -
Si n a i l i -i h .1,i d lii i '. ei t,.. a. rk Ililit 'r i r F-
i-'h- lh. l-!i.-i \ h,, iv 'n thi_-n -iruitet.d ii tih- ijl.ni
it" %1i Ljiin liimni e, f tl i, ipl livl. 21 KiL2 Sir 'iel
hl iierlth L a in tll. i tioul-it. a d I ) uti i li. i
Ill: e llild i-.lll l li \ hli h,. ll :it' I.ii b i lll, h 5 ill5 t) i ll I ll .
i c ill % %n -hhI. h lie I, i.,e_ lint hIiti a-j I! '1-2 rk i ,,"
known In : h hith- If i,.'illd li 1d tl. etni-nlh r Thai
lie % a- dlete m inH ie u I v I i113 1 1i E i,.l[teu t ,ti thl ihi_.
lie could aillJ t hi, ]ine. in ille, ho, ver.l', i. .iholj- n I,.,
hi, early il In l,,[i i, -'V, a p. crinoI in th- ds y wc. oi,-,
Lrai l.- in the e Unl ..i.l dS at.L ,u, if AIncri'.i AftICl s-t1 eL
year-, ii Jama.i,'l.-.i. hI t Fini L.Liin- in [he- lico-u _
of llessr'. (GiniItj-Il Br..- of iPhilad=iphia, w.lier he-
i'.rji. ain.d f'or' thr>-e ye.il Wv tll e retilirUel i t.. J1.
nia thai in l 9 Itt I ai t-.- manage ine ]ate MiM T tN.
Pinncr:k'-. bu-1ine -
Mr. LaIle. rider MI' Pinh ,l_1:. -,tabhii-hed the
L niidon SIore a, a itankh.I f i. ni hun.iines, and mai-
u _.l that until Iie owner i death iin i22 Thenl
iadnl- hi. Ol ppn iiliy He- a '.Iuiretd the -lore ..n hi>
own aI v uni:>oint]. RusJine iIncrea : Ld: he foviInd II t
il.ie--ar' tou extendi hi- J operaI l.-_ Hle e-itall.lsheal
Buni Ma'[i- ln 11 Harbour Street. and hat_ Sin.,. ihan
oeen devoting his attention Lt., these t-o:i establish-


MR. P. C. I.INC.


ni t:L, L. ,F h ,-f o lii;cI: [am e b en i -ihly sua cei(. 3iIul.
II- i- now I,....k i upon .-t fle o, -.ur m ic t Calluble
ru -hn ini I '. ,Illt;, ,l ai ni Hll li an.,oiier <_i Old
Bill' I' Iin .an- .:iaiti tihj t he hasi made 'o",1dI.

t ntioii. airl %ithoInt a k .no'..l.-dge on thl 1':']t if iti
li.. l ,I 1 all it- d i. t il, Ever? ti ii'j i 'h-- a -tu'iy in
it.elt. aiiil in a hu, Ike M r. Lain '' v. heite :ornp,.ti.t
lii.n i- -: keen anld sA o o ,n-i,1lerablie. ..ne ha- always
t.) lti- rhinilu'i-' and 'r.'rkingii it one would win to
a. i I l 'ainll a pO iiIth.ti in thILe Fir 1 rank .'f hi. calling.
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The Witch of Rosehall
1 .,. 11hnH'-,; j ',ti p,nj ? l.1 i
hier tace towaIrds hi I ha e promised' to do what I
i.uu for this firl," she aid: "a]. you not satisfied?
You1 ale all thli uilhl t1.i men. -aould you leave me.
I will rn.maiii. Auin, Iie ripllhd, helpless. For
Sl ie t h li t b lie ....ul i .1 Lir.t iing el-ke.
Stay. up[ heie v'.ittl me '.. tii-'it, and gco on stay-
I1n .' -Lie pl.-ultel whartri' h.ippens-. let us love
onl. anuotherl YniI i.i lu \'hat Vu I ilk- with me,:!
Io11llr t, u.n .vnd ii -re th- onl i n .ln t' \ li...mni that has:
ever bell I I ue" t
"I will stay at Ilo:--ehall, Iut not with you 10-
nig l," hlie ill,-e "I ;au 'n i ai ndI worried: I have.
been living tilte idiil ..'[ lit- ',iince I have- Ieen here..
It 'seei s La thiiiugh I hlid Ih,.Ln at it foi'r months, nlt
nierely \ek-."
"Sweetlhearit.. in' Iat u I a"nt t. nt you ever:
so mlucl! Don't leai\e me in iny louiilinerss lo-nigh.:
f'ir I am very uIInhappy. Tell mI e that youi will.
SLay?"
Slie was on hi-: ki iee'- .alll l[re--.iig cloIs t himni
her arnil s a iibout. Ilia nre, k. her L'fat .,r igintl his. and the
pleatdiiig unle in ith.- \iice. Al! tittr prF.-t Ip.n' er of
alljlrerni-lit setllied alivx, atiil ihtiht upon hi ullrren-.
dlerI He .-p..k.- : n \'...'d in r!-,pl. Bilt he knew thati
tj ill -1 lh hil l rln '!li.-ir i,' a itlh h in .
CHAPTERR SIXTEEN
ANNIE'S PHOINIISE
A r itiit nilie ..,.i,. k thtE n xt morning Robert
.an- at hi, \'.iik in tht ,.*nirt-i .ld- HiS t'3at was
Iltvl\.ii hi-- brow ti.irk with jnL.,r and .-elf-loathing.:
He had wreakl\) i yidtd-i tile t l lantlishmentL of Annie:
after hamvinni mad utip lhi- iiln to break away from'
lher. and bh- halte liirum-elf in cionsel-uelinlc. Yet he!
Ie-pr -ayln' I., linilS-elf thiat only by doing vhat sbei
M -tiedr at lpiJ' eut ':':hll d lie Il-Ip the unfortunate
.l.. un womutiin v ilo l),-ii--.l hei s.l f to I b- e .on the pi/lt
-.: I d ath H. rei.iiirl lred il!t t Rider had -aid, on
th. nihilt lit,-f -r. that i,.t iny ns, i-tan..e for Millicent!
fi'r whichli hb might auk Annie Palni-r he would have
i', pay a i e :
Thi- pli iC-. \.-oull ,ii.v.t- -eemel nothing a week be-
l.!re iltdeeil it wiiul(l hade b'en a privilege. But
jliractin- Lhill. He ii'h-d to gett a\\ay from herf,
ti.-iai he -, a.n thinking o' Enliandl with an almost:
or.i-er'p.:ierlIi r nostalgia. He had bad enough of


.1111 1111m .. ....... ................. .11 ..... .. .. ..... .. ...... .... ......LYIIL ~ IIII .






PLANT' ERS'


Janiaia Yet. .,nl a i t\few hluI i hberoie. lie haii pi .
misei this w,.niman ti, remain nu lli hler. anid not lhe
felt that hPi must iei-ak that promise. i nie v.hlir
might It i- true that .in her -idle t he naiil prionii-.-
to h.lp '.illi-ii, r. and ilu ri, l hinm ..f hi- feelin-lg if elf%
reprnioa h And if sli. Kept her wir l wI ii lie I rui
be moially o)bliged t. keep 111- "
He was afraid ...f her-. hie alimitid that to. hini ,-lf
quite filankl Hlie wa;i a- ,:c:uraulageus as most orliei
mePI who u. wre aIl:tO.,nti-i rave. But all th-11-e dat l
powers of tih.e mind. iwhirh iRider was ..onvrined was
passessled by Mrs PFalmer. and :ill these darker us,-'
that he mnadi-e f th-m. seeimel to hint to I-- niot
dangerous only I)ui )atrh.\ Theri wa \ is iiniilllithie
uni lean about ilr.m. anul ~ ..oueqtUiiiily ahIt h1.-
She vwau -ill \ounti. .hre had haid tljree hli-bando i anrr
all ofJ rhlie haul ,li,'d violent death- L.., ,.,Iulhl
turih Io haried. Her Vanlcv. untied rhroiugh an\
reji tltion .-,f her i.;- Ihi a rije'- ion in t ii i spirit if
not in actuaiil fa t. wnuld arous.- the ,i't dei ijs in
her heart She w.niull knoiw hat lie elt it.- -en-ed
that I.,e had tuli,.,iwed piretiy iiosely th.: va ious
changes 1..f hi; mind rhe night be-fore Sihe wn:uld
ieel scorned. spurnel. and then micht i tnme i:t hier
Ihe irresistible trmnptatrion to i sh..o hini that hlie .ulii
noli reat her iihtlly and escape. Ye ,. he adiniitted
that he was afraid of her. a- -'eerneil iiint i.r -all ot
those who had ome intu .lnse >int,'t with lih-r
That prliups as.n unLted fir her es:apLi- Iu lI no
from the consui-lienr-ep -if n lr act-. tii;hi aind t hel uIn
settled iu-nditun of thi- 'nmunitry and the iliTffiultv
there must ihe in ie.lle:,rin- tru tw.-.rii y exvid'ien.
ag3inIt her. who-% wa.i as wail ah- Shi.e was l :li.
He noticed that Ashmani :ilo nly soiv lt-d at himn
this m.irnine Ashmtan kliew\ where lie hail bh-ee last
night anil raged at the failure -if hi- hl:pe- a nid.
plan- tio alienate him trjmn Annie Palmer MIilli ent
had gone. and Ashmain hal heard. i li hi. Iid s-iucht
the information. of Milli ir-nt's pliaht. he icirn-liildedi
that Mili Fnlt ,a.iid i hortlry disappear trim the
scene aniid itlia Roihelit wi-uh ri.it asi R-t ehiali ]
night he aruedU. Ithire- niut have I.ilen a >omilIote-
reconq.iliati.n betw\ven Ritherfurd a ni Annie Palmnir.
Burlbr!lle also,. RobPrt olbsered. hlil spoki-n ii. hint
neriousli- this niornine. Buibride,- whol: h:id beeni
an ver) oiutsporken i o the previ.i.U. niglit It 'as
S nt that B -irhlilee a, tllull helie'v,-i li t ar hi a,:i d-
woiuld he reported tl.' Mr Palculer. [hl.l ri in the
jealousy that smnitinmes ra e-d aimomnu th. min,.r
employee, of an estat,. anyone was quite ,apable of
mean tiearhery towards another Rut Buthridee
kriew that a woman might eeentiially \thee-dle out
of a imani the tery -,erets of hi- mind He :urs-ed
hinselft for having been so brutally frank. for having
at iast dennunc(dl ,) openly a ,woman whom lie le
teted, and feared
Rut Ruler'- il,_cetinr.rir had nori> I-en jt all dli.'ei -.
ent Perhaps Rider knew that Rohlert had done
his bemi. perhaps Rider had eie--ed what would
happen. Anyhow. there had been nIr r'-sirainit about
hii wheni lie hanl rL reed Robert an hou r is io ,bel'..
And n ow it was Rider vwhuo iaame up t i hl.ti.
caratring anmartl% on his horse "-Asbman ha-. sent
me i.. sutimorin vou. Rutherfird" he aid tquierl3.
when he irew iup at the young man's sile. "An in-
portant nlessage ha. ;ome from lMontegoj PRy. anti
all the white men .in the ettate are -wanteld up at
the Great Hiouse Rurlridge already kriows Ler's
ride alon-n toeh i-lr Tle ? fell,-w- "---h Indiuated


(1!i retail .lboit.rll-- -lllv I''. on working for a few
minutl~- with.olut ou lr t-.e on them."
They i-1, Ift. Rider making no allusion to any-
rhine that had pre\,viou'l passed between them, and
Koherr. rhoi.ii wis hihling to i so, not knowing exact-
ly how ,t open the sulbjerr that was uppermost in his
mind
IIn the diinin: tiim ot the Great House, where
lthei were told that Nlr" Palmer was awaiting them,
they found As.hman. nurhridge, the chief mechanic
and the chief i:irpent.i. lbth young Scotsmen who
lusially kept to ilinimselves and who, though their
st.tlls did. not -Ftm to imply it, were much better
paid ihan the book-k.epeis There was a stranger
th.ire al-.. u man .,fni iddle age, who had come in
ahlrut fiftern minutes b-ef-re
Mlr- Palmer .:ipenei the conversation. Rider,
:r-pii i1-im-.elf" iI the Ibac:kground, watched her
li..(ly ie uould hot but admire her coolness, her
[Iatter ot fanrt attitil-e. Everybody there knew,
\\itl the -ex:i-|ti..n ot thi- stranger, that she had
made ,ne uf henr bork-k.eepers her lover, but that
,Inl nt in the lea.t mhmbarrass her. What they
knrtx and what rtey felt was a matter to which she
'kenled t.) gpiv no atteLtioni at all.
I have pit a nim-ssaee from the magistrates in
M.nieio, Bi." shi- lIIan. in her clear, carrying
vul, "that the .lave- r.f this parish have made up
their ninil- n,.t t. annrk after New Year's Day. They
I.eliove that their freedom has been granted to them
t'frni that ia3. ani It it feared that there may be
ttouhle "
"Ye-.'" hr,-.ke in the stranger, who was a planting
artornev and onnrc't"il with the local militia, "and
rhe slave have alr:.ady heard that Sunday next is to
l oiiuntedl by iu- one of the three days' holiday
tilei- ar- allowed at (Clristmas time. We have heard
tha thIy .1 ill r'-fus- ri:, au Lept that decision."
"ltLfuse'" Mrs Palint-r laughed a little scornful-
Iv
.I think the-y mean it." said the man; "but of
.ur- ir- a mnut not p ge in to them. These infernal
nititi-cr 4aril n, misionari,. "are the curse of Jamaica.
Theiy arie ivia u; any amount of trouble and may
,au-* bloodshed But there you are. We have got
1t fra e this iniiih.-rdiiniatn and put an end to it.
\'e (anI .mnl\ di it it we -rand together."
"Sunday i- Christmas." said Ashman; "and to-
due: is Friday [ don't see why we should give these
p'-npli- front Sinday to W'rdnesday night to go idle
and get drunk. I have already made mine to under-
.tanil that thie-. will hav tr bhe at work on Wednesday
morning Thait' fixed. and they know better than
t,, grunil)le ahout it tr. my face. I have known for
,onim- time that there have been palavers and plot-
rines all urouinrl I havci surprised one on Palmyra
in-m cslf But there w(in't I)b much trouble here or on
Palnini a. I fati>:
"No." said Nlr Palmn-r quietly; "we have put
thie tear of ford-or of the Devil-into their hearts.
We kn,,w hoiw to manage- our people on these proper-
tie Mr Hancock "
'S.i I have been told." replied Hancock, a little
riiylyv Well. lth-re i-n't :oe proprietor or attorney
%we ha\v, -).Muded who doul not agree that we must
include Sunila, as i,ne of the Christmas holidays.
r'onsidleriu; itt CliTritmas. day, and that the law
is that we must gile three days including Christmas
day. we are well within rur rights. I believe that
the par.-n- want .uindayl t, be spent in prayer, and


the lazy brutes we have want to pray the first day
and debauch the next three. We won't have it, that's
all! But we think it would be a good thing for all
the white men on the estates to be prepared for any
emergency; that is why we are sending round to
them. You now understand what the situation is."
"And we'll have it well in hand, never fear,"
added Ashman. "Have you sent to Spanish Town
to let the Governor know what may happen in these
parts?"
"No; we don't think that is necessary; in fact,
we think we'd better not. The Government, Mr.
Ashman, is secretly with these missionaries and
slaves-we are in a devil of a position when it comes
to getting justice and our rights, I can tell you. The
Government backs up the negroes whenever it can;
this Governor seems to have been sent out to do no--
thing but that. We'll never get fairplay from him
any more than from the English Government; so we
have to do what we can for ourselves. But there's
a good lot of fight left in us still!"
"I for one," said Mrs. Palmer coldly, "am prepar-
ed to make no concessions at all. The better you
treat these people, the worse they are. If you give
way on one point they expect you to give way on all.
They will be at work on Wednesday morning on
Rosehall and Palmyra, whatever happens; I shall
myself see to that."
"See also that the white men here are armed




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In the Commission Business for
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on Tuesday," insisted Mr. Hancock, "that is why I
asked to see them myself; and, of course, any of the
chief negroes you can trust."
The conference was over; Mr. Hancock rose to
say good--bye. He would visit some other properties
during the rest of the day. He was doing this as
a duty and as a labour of love. He believed that
the estate proprietors and attorneys were being treat-
ed with the gravest injustice for the sake of slaves
who, so far as he could see, had nothing in the
world to complain of. The unfortunate owners had
all Mr. Hancock's sympathy. He was virtuously
proud of being able to do something for them, his
own class.
The men were dismissed; but Annie gave Robert
a signal to linger behind. When the others had rid-
en away she said to him-
You see now, I need your presence in the Great
House. You wouldn't like to leave me unprotected,
would you?"
"No." he answered quite truthfully, for if a wo-
man needed protection he would not hesitate in af--
fording her what he could of it. "But you suggested
Only a while ago that there was no danger here."
S "It would not do to confess any fear," she te-
,torted readily, "and there may be no real danger
But how can I be certain? If I am alone in this
House and the slaves were to get out of hand sud-
i. .


OUR NEW NATIONALS


MR. RICHARD MAHFOOD


IT is difficult to-day to find anyone who, born in
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for the most part lasted for but a few years. The
number that arrived was not large, but nearly every
one of the newcomers was extraordinarily energetic.
We soon began to hear a good deal about them in
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That they possessed ability was apparent. Per-
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today there are men, Syrians by birth, and now Brit-
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Mr. Mahfood and his brother, began business life
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denly, what would happen to me? There should
be some one here with me, at this time especially.
You will remove your things up here to--day?"
He shook his head. "That is impossible, Annie.
That is the one thinr I cannot do."
She looked at him long and searchingly. "Very
well," was all that she said.
Before leaving he asked her, endeavouring to
speak casually: "You have sent for Takoo as you
said you would?"
"This morning. Two messengers went, one to his
daughter's house and one to his own. I'll let you
know if he is coming to see me."
"Thank you, Annie," he said, with real appre-
ciation, and left feeling far more kindly disposed
towards her than he had been an hour before.
He did not believe that she ran any risk; she
had indicated as much. But he did not realise she had
divined that, whatever had been the reason of his
:objection to living at the Great House before, it was
now his reluctance to be constantly with her. Per-
haps if she had begged and cajoled him again, as
she had done last night, he might have yielded; he
'did not find it easy to resist a woman's imploring.
But Annie Palmer had her upsurgings of pride, and
,now she was bitterly angry. She was more used to
:being sued than to suing.
On going back to his work he met Rider, and


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paui.ed for a f-w \o r'ds He now said what he bad
b-een wanting to -.iy to Rider. "I got her to promise
to help Milli.eni." he remarked. "but I don't think
-hli is alti,g.-rher pleased with me. Rider I don't
-emn able to s.ay or do the right thing all the time.!
"Non. of us are." said Rider sententiou'ly. "butl
I am sure vyu have done y.ur best Leave it there,
Ruther'ford WVe are likely to have our hands pretty
full with otherr things during the next week or s.
Our I\ves tua! be in jeopardy. for all we know"
"You seriously think it is as bad as that?"
"I do: we are in for serious trouble."
'-It may do sood." said Robert grimly; "ir may
end a lot ot' things." Rider knew that he was ihink.
in- of himself and his relations with Annie; he wat
-ntangled and did not quite know how to brenk oul
of the net
It rained again that night, and Robert kept tI
his quarters The next day. Christmas Eve. no
much work was done on the estate. The slaves ha4
hecomle excited, and no expostulations or threat
colld move them to continuous labour: the spirl
of the season affected them as well as some secret
undi-rstandinr of momentous events that were It
,mnit to pass But the spirit of the season affected
the ahite men on the estate also: it was Christma
Eve. and those who were from the Old Country we
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41:- Ifl







PLANTERS' PUNCH


The Witch of Rosehall
(Continued from Page 74).
thinking of how it would be just then in England
and in Scotland; little given as they were to day-
dreaming, their minds went back to their homes
and to the past, and for the time they ceased to be
mere cogs in the machinery of a sugar estate. Dur-
ing the late afternoon Robert caught a glimpse
of Annie on horseback; she was riding about the
property. She passed fairly near to him but
seemed oblivious of his presence. He concluded
that she was still displeased with his last refusal
to come to live at the Great House. He wondered
if she had yet heard from Takoo. He thought it
likely that she had not.
For he too had heard nothing from Takoo. That
the old man had removed Millicent he knew; Rider
had told him; Rider had heard this from Burbridge.
The latter had been spoken to by Rider, who had
made a point of assuring him that Robert would
never betray his friends. When night had fallen,
on Christmas Eve, therefore, the three men fore-
gathered in their quarters, talking of trivialities.
Then, somewhat to Robert's surprise, Burbridge men-
tioned that he had again heard that afternoon about
Millicent; Psyche had told him.
"Where is she?" asked Robert.
"That I don't know; I don't think Psyche
knows, or she would have mentioned it to me. But
she has been commanded by Takoo to some sort of
ceremony they are having for Millicent; Psyche says
they are going to try to take off the haunting, to
lay the, ghost that is killing the girl. Psyche was
ordered not to say where this is to take place, but
I got it out of her. These people have secret meet-
ings on the estates, where they carry on all sorts
of strange practices, some of which are horrible.
There is to be one of them to-morrow night."
"Where?" asked Rider.
Burbridge named the spot. "Psyche is a re-
lative of Millicent's and of course will go. To-
morrow is a holiday, anyway, and the gathering is
to be on Palmyra. I am not supposed to know; if I
knew officially I might have to prevent it. But dur-
ing these Christmas holidays the slaves have free-
dom and even license; it has been so for genera-
tions. It would be madness co try and interfere"
with them now."
"You know," observed Robert, "it appears to me
that you are as much afraid of these people as they
are of you?"
"Of course we are," said Rider: "it has been
a case of fear on both sides. Fear is in the very
texture of the mind of all the whiie- people here;
fear and boredom, and sometimes disgust. That is
why so many of us drink, friend Rutherford."
"I should like to see this exorcism, or whatever
you may call it," said Robert suddenly: "it is
strange that Takoo has not (lomtuni:at-d with
me."
"You forget," Rider reminded him, "that he
probably knows that you spent Thursday night at
the Great House, after you had left his place near
Montego Bay. He may have misunderstood that.
Even if he did not, he may think it wis9et to keep
Millicent's whereabouts as secret as possible for the
present, though this myal or exorcism ceremony of




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L. G FISHER


his tomorrow night, is too big an affair to be kept o-it
tirely secret."'
"But Annie promised me she would send for
Takoo and do what she could fur the girl." miusei
Robert. "I wonder if she has done it. If she ba-.
why should it be necessary to have this Alri exorcism?"
"Has Mrs. Palmer kept her word? I wonder,"
muttered Rider.
"You think she hasn t." asked Rohbrt: "but I
believed she would do that at least She left me noi
reason whatever to doubt that shr would "
"And if you asked ner she might .ay that .lhe
tried, but. that Takoo would not come to her."
Rider explained. "How can ne ever be certain a~
to what she will or won't do? We can only hipe
she will keep her word. Beiides." he added judiial-
ly, "she may actually have sent for Takou and he
may have refused to obey her summunis. He uoulIl
be naturally suspicious, you know. He knows her.
too. in some respects. far better ltha any of u.s
do. Probably he has refu.er.'"
They were silent for a little while. Robert re
calling to his mind how carefully Annie had avoided
even looking at him that afternoon He rica'lled
also that long and searching look she had eiven liim
yesterday when he bluntly refused, and wibh finality
of voice and manner, tio take up hii abode at the


Blanch Manager.
Tradelling Aghis
Black Rivei
Agent Kington


i;reat House. His heart sunk Could she have aban-
ri,ned Mliliiceut to her fate. after all? Then indeed
the eirl's cha.ui.s oit life mieht hi slight. in pinte of
all that others might do to ain her
Mr. Rider seenieil to guess something if what
was passing in his- mind He placed a hand on
Robert's knee. "You have lone all you could." he
said. "and nuw we mu-t leave the rest to Providemie.
Ext.use Imy .sanetinlonious language. ine can neere
whol.l escaape the influence ,iof one's profession You
want to go tl Ihii exortism. Rutherfird?'"
"I would like to. ye-,. if I (could do so without
being seen I suppose thi- people mould object to my
presence?
"They would. unless you consented to take part
in the ierlemony '
"And that is?-"
It is a thing no white man in Jamaica could
do and retain his self-respec.t and the respect of anr
either white man." said Rider decisively -"You woiul
become one of them. don't you understand. a devil
worshipper or something very much like that Noi
that many white men don't wor-hip the Dvil, I
think he is the prevailing deity out here. But thel
don't do it along with negro slaves. dancing an(
moaning. cunttorting themselves and grovelling ib
all sorts of open abominations There are differeal


.____ _


I _







1929


PLANTERS' PUNCH


:.rideti if devil tor-hiip. I MI.n, is drink lBut ,ihe
oleah ordr--ph w'"
"*I. Anim. Paluir alny Vbetter than all oLbe>h-
-ivonlan" demanded Hobei-rt ,ith sarvae i.,.nt-nlpt
he' ad bhtbegu to:, super< t tlht she had trii ked himn
"No: but she wotrk- in her own way. and 'lhat
16 the differenc:e."
"Yet. y\,u think I I.an see this Ireemonu'."'
If you dare tauthiou I will g,) withI ou: %e
may he ab le to hide olouirelv; and watth. at an\
rat, we ian try. 1Ill :n go with us, Burbridie'"
"Ni, my frieimd.' replie-d Burbride [ I am niit
e\-u splpp'. 'id t.- I kn,.i about what i.- gF.ing L tak?
pli't., nd [.. witness at withJU tryinfl to stlopl i
would cormiln.mn mie In tle .? if -,i.V ly prulrit-l '
in Jamaia Your position i- diffelient fi to rniuit
True." launched Mlr Rider a little bitterly 1
Jaml .at i-t hut a tm-nlpurary halnd. anid i.ll- le-t.. l-
meiL a a riespoiniljl.- bh-ine In another iieek I -il ii
probably b,. al tlh- 'irink agein Anl Rulherfordi
dan lIeave on- o-a-, I am ure lie hras d'e Ild-d tou do-
and ht-'ii he all the hitter fil it Well. as I don't
tuuit I :an take ri-ks. and in anr. ry tlriie ln Hi:iehall is rapidly drawing to an ,*nid
Oui liiv-- nimay li rapidly dl r wi' a rin g t. *.n nll :ii-.'
he added
We'll go t-n*nicrroI. li.-n." said Roii-j it "That
ii rlei idei "
Th-re- canit a I r;ip (t the l.-.r A b),. lianl -ll ;i
ii,t.- t.. Robert It a,,. fronm Annri- "I hav, '- iot
bern able to find Takni.o it rluii. "hi -e'- rl hbe
keeping out n-f eight "

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

THE ARRANGEMENT
CHRISTNIAS lda. dawni-d *ool and liright. the
wind i(omine in lriikly fromni the sea whii b.
slirred anld fretteri h. it. lashed anl sparkled in a
gloil (1t iee-L and purphl and broke in iiolu- billowa
upon the -holre Thi lurnished rl'ifac i-s .nl.nL
grcen leaIv-,. narrow -,pear- t thi- auihe plant-,. and
ul s fayirne trondls oi' palnmt. rn-fl.i.ted.l ha.k l th suLn-
light. [:, that the whole earth seemed bathiid in
spltndour and steeped i flanminc IiL tL
Thert \a-, lbriie btness e\-erywihere. e-ery o,)t.ii.t
wa.I suf'llii-ld wilh It In the hollow., iio the hills
whi.h formed thr background to the land. and sea-
i.apt in the midst of which hwas Roseball. masses orf
niit had rolled and as,:ended and floated about an
hour before. hr!ouding the view and spreading like
a sort %aide Ilrnud. but soon this mist had melted
.wa l efnret the triumphant proer'-ss of thie un


. ll u hall -i'lill trian-formed the opal and faint
pink jfr th- morning sky into a dazzling blue. The
[an; i, th.- salt -iea as in the air, poinsettia trees
all iirlier rio l-i Iln pl.ints flamed red in the sun-
tsine in lhi,.h they rejoiced. And though noises
or,,ke the -tillnes.. n.is.-s shrill and piercing, domin--
ant. insiLttent. thy w\eri not those of labour but had
a -p.t-:al inipliation -,f their own.
Fur this morning n., horn or conchshell sounded
it; far. .air\ ine m--lanr-holy note to summon the
slave-s It their daily task. No crack of driver's
wahip or harlih omnintaid was heard. In the pastures
thie att|~t tool, i-llv. from the chimneys of the boiling
lih-ue aro.-ce ii 1 minok- Banked were the fires to-day,
anil lankied ~ ruld tlt.- remain for some three days.
li thb nr,,r. vill.l- ..n the estate men and women
w\niJerflii ahbuir at -will Their time was theirs to
di, withi rtn Iely what they wished.
Th- CI'riistnimas hiliidays had come, the three days
:if cra, iih i \-rtre gVigvn to the people by law, to
pa-s in fr.lii n.id in me'rry-making, or in complete
I'rt st
E\i as' Rijtlih.ri.rii gazed from his room upon
lle I ,_.ne ,outsidl. striving hard to realize that this
wa. d 'hl iirins. I, ia caught sight of a crowd of people
a Ii a:anitt tolwards rth hi,ok-keepprs' quarters, singing
anld dlanLinj Bubrridge joined Him, and together
the\ wNaiteii to see what wu,:ld happen.
.\t -iciht of tliih wiit. mnin the crowd raised a
Sliher andl .anme- hurrying onwards. Arrived, they
-t:.o,,-d lisplai-rd aa a variety of figures, some utterly
ludi l ou,. other- rathLir tastefully attired in garments
of \ail iegated d.oluIr-n. and everyone of them as cheer-


fully vociferous as if none had a care in the world.
Two of them had got themselves up as animals. One
was garbed in a dried cow's skin, with the horns
towering upon his head and the tail sticking out
behind; he leaped and bellowed as though he were a
bull in pain, though probably he intended to imper-
sonate a bull in ecstasy. Another one had rigged
himself up as a horse, with mane and head com-
plete, and he capered about upon his two legs neigh-
ing merrily, whirling round and round, and kicking
out with feet that were quite human and bare. Some
of the performers wore masks, hideous things, devil
faces, with grinning teeth, elongated noses, and
other fantastic appurtenances. But there were also
a number of young girls, clothed all in red, with
their robes trimmed with lace, and with flaunting
feathers in their beaver hats, and these were head-
ed by a leader, or Queen, who took herself very
seriously indeed and gave commands to her sub-
jects of a day with quick, imperious voice. Robert
knew that in these red girls he saw a Jamaica "Set",
and that other "Sets", Reds and Blues respectively,
would be dancing about the towns of Jamaica during
the next couple of days. These girls before him,
Burbridge said, would be going down to Montego
Bay to-morrow to take part in the promenading
there and to uphold the honour of the Reds against
the Blues, with as much zeal (Robert imagined) as
did the rival factions in the ancient Roman circus.
The Red Set represented the soldiers of the King, the
Blues stood for the sailors, and between the two
there was a mighty rivalry. The Rosehall people
were Reds: just why, they themselves did not know.


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Mlak..- after llti,, iii IInutf-e,,;i'vry.\ It;r
,entl i Palli iinI d liv Oil,, knowi n fr.
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th,< f.tv while l.havinl ,. Th, ,l .\ly ;p[>li-
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ehzi1 .-'in t-, p .lt-'-, keeping tlhe cltn'le
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SOLE AGENT:


E. M. MARTIN,


I







PLANTERS' PUNCH


It had been so for years, and so, therefore, it must
continue to be.
The red-clothed girls were now dancing quite
gracefully for the amusement of the white men, and
when Mr. Rider came up, as he did presently, they
hailed him as "parson", hesitated as if in doubt as
to how he would take their gyrations on a Sunday,
and then went on with redoubled vigour when they
noticed that he neither looked nor spoke disap-
proval. From the estate village opposite came the
throbbing of drums, and there too the festivities.
were in full progress. True, it was Sunday, and
the missionaries in this parish had sought to im-
press upon the people that Christmas Day, falling as
it did upon the first day of the week, should be
spent decorously, in prayer and in thanksgiving for
the great deliverance which the Lord was about to
work for his faithful followers. But the spirit of
Christmas had seized upon these people, and, any-
how, missionaries had never been encouraged to
visit Rosehall. Consequently the musicians pounded
their drums with energy, shrill pipes emitted weird
sounds, human bulls and horses, and Red Set girls,
and shuffling couples, moved and whirled to the
tunes given forth, and shouted, screamed, jested and
laughed, and enjoyed themselves immensely.
In the village the cooking fires were already


alight. There was to be a feast that day. And yet
everyone knew that Christmas was not celebrated
on Rosehall as it ought to be and as it was on other
estates. The custom was that, in the Christmas
holidays, the owners or their attorneys should give
a great dinner to all the slaves, a dinner consisting
of roast meat, and cakes and rum, and other delica-
cies. He should throw open the Great House to his
people, and in the big drawing room they should be
allowed to dance the whole Christmas night away.
More, he too was expected to dance with them, he
and the other white men on the estate. There was
always a wild fraternisation on this particular occa-
sion: all differences were ignored, all caste distinc-
tions set aside. It was the rule, and though this
year there were not many estates in St. James where
this rule was being observed, it had always been done,
and in other parts of the island the custom was
still held in respect. But Rosehall was different.
It had long been so. Mrs. Palmer had not had her
people up to the Great House since the death of her
first husband; since then there had been no special
Christmas feast for them; she had not put herself
out of the way to make this her day of rejoicing with
them.
This ignoring of an established West Indian
custom had affected her white employees also; she


li-ld tliem. even at Chri-_'ma- time. at arm's length.
Mr A-inman might haie preventIl ihih to a certain
extent, had he i.ha-eii t1., array out the rule of Christ-
nia- kindlilnes- and ~:cllllderaltion Annie Palmer
mould nt h:aiVe prev.entred hiim So lonc a- shie her-
self was not directly in. onve-leuced it would not
have niattered til her hwhat owas done: it was not the
extra expenidliiire that itludencd tier to indifference
andi ieel.,.t. But .A iiiiian hisniellt was indifferent;
Ie- knew Iie was not lik,-d I-s white or black on the
prpirty anid did not s--e. w l he -hould put himself -
,to an. tlrubl,> to at'a liltrite theinl ,hen lie .as not
dii tly initruii.ted hy thi- nmitre-~ to do. so Two
(l;ia bet'fol''r Chlristtlim; le Ihad doi.t iributd to each of
lthe siav-, th.- t'ew yardi of it ith It'.r liress which
ii iwla% d mi..ind-il.l loiiil hbe -_iven oiin u a year And
:he iT-n pou' nd-if ialti-d rtih. anil tilie s'raw hat. to
ea9c. and the- nerd1l-- and thi thri.ad- all there
]had her-n ihandledl :ou. But the lai, 13 aid nothing
about a Chlriltmp-s iarnie aind a (-'I itnlas feast.
thiJugh pubii : ,opini.n. whither public opinion. held
that tlh,- f.uii ii- part ,of tile rilihts. ..r at least the
privilege aof all thill h, ouil***,Ph=.
So. thi- Chri-tmar.. tlie -hiet' imci-hauii and the
i chief icarpenteri oft Rr-li-hall i lho siip,-rinntn-lned the
toirk loiine itl th-ir r"esp-i iv- lines ,in Palmyra
etilate al.-i., haid ,jn.- if to lMontegot B.iy for the
da iandl Mr A-hnIjii wioulil diiih- al.one. for he
had not ii-n hu iid-n as- in times past to the Great
House for (Chrisl nli i heer Ti, ilani ing ro\d had
LOnii- r'rom A.lniann'- -I,-ebh. \Wh-re tliy had gone
r1 wisl him a merry (C'lriitnl;ci. to lhiiih. he had
Illade nle s-,rt ,tf resipoune He hal risen to the
.,c.Sii'iou otherwi-e and illonatedl i t hem sundry
bittle o' o" licllnr auni a hlan. and lie had piven them
a enL, pie:,e- of nionie. He miilir dil-pise or dis-
like them. hut hie did not reli-h th,. idea that they
should reIard himn a:. "a stingy ha. kra." a parsimoni-
onus bit nl an. H-ere ias tile jiint in hiis armour.
They ) ,i uld pierce i prri'lh and h i- vanity here.
An'i they knew it
N..w tlhlty Werel' I.oUe I :' lo the hlonousl to the
hibokkeepkersl ad to realp their ir eard Of course.
Ihe.v hliouijl nIrst hve ~-nii utp to tie Great House
with their a-re-tinii and their ilaucii hlit Mrs. Palmer
diil ii.t .:.ire t.o I.i listuri, d ei rl\ i.n any m morning,
iiiiis -he hail ediven \)ord ti be i'alld lieiimnie And
thle ilani ei and musicians -lt that he cared little
about tl- annual fijnction in ,their- It would take
pla(F outside oiff the -Greal House latr on. however,
and she w',ould cotl e ouitt on thi- porch and watch
their anri.es. and lhi %:.nulId make the pre.sints that
ni,_ expe-ted ..f her For even Annie Palmer, in-
diifftrent to o) muclh else. could nt ha\e brought
liirself to rei- u-c this po-ple the eratuity which
th- C'liriltman daning drew from ever- other while
plant-r in the i.,untry. She might ni.elect the an-
nuai hall. punuili them r-n ev'rel I -l3 fr i'dinary mis-
demne,:aiur-r. terrify then. dlo things in their sight
whillh others might wi-,ll to, hide from thrni. But
.le vIouldI not i -tr thtni go fnroim herI presencui on
Citri-,tulas day without a gift Theire were cer-
tain acts that no one c-an dart- to i)e guilty of and
Pcaipe s-ltf-ronte-mpi N. one call :completly rise
alioi- tile influene of onte's- time ainil its implicit
obligation-.
Rider had little to pive to these merry-makers,
hit what he had he knew must Ibe offered treely
BiirhridLae .a iln not nmulh hbetrie caeic. But the








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1929


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Jamaican Office: 71 BARRY STREET, KINGSTON.


In every manner care has been taken to so

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} Repre-enlalires.
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LOANS are made on REAL ESTATE in Jamaica and every facility given for Speedy repayment.


tinani al diffti illtii-s of ric situation were sol\ed b.
ib.jhit ho. whe..L h e h though ht they hall seen elouich
. the dan,-.ntE and heard .uii.- a isu]icienc- y of .a..o
pllu... threw a handful of -ilver ailinong tle crowd
This caused -,n Ithi- inst2Lant a wild .- :ramnil it
which thil- hire aJnd the bull joined. these incon-
tintntly ilinginit off tt-eir di-.uiLei- so as the better
l0 -natch at the rullinig in It ,n.s a tairly large
suin tha obi tlot tiuuLL to tliem, moret a they
wiuld a it irom any other single our..e When..
allel mIntu.h jo-tlinI. pliihtttng. u a'ring andt a..rearn-
iiis -\very io ln hlad been pi,:l -d tip. and the rowd.
w-rtu a loud "i MNIry C(hl istma-, Ma-a.a." and "God
ble.s yo.,u. Massa." had 1pitou.:-tedl awa\. tihe thr-e Ilmet-n
wi-ut in-i.l to drink the e i-pi in bi tile rilp ,. beaten
gge and rumn. vwith nutmeg. whi.:h w\as the reil!ar
.'hristmas morn-tinE draught and wlhiih Psyche li-a
pr-eiared steamniung hr. prior to thle piepalatioil -of

Rlut Rider would nolt htaie anl, rumn in li- rflip
And the 'lilt.r two dili not t prel s him to niake an .x-
ception of this. Chrlitmas wa"-.ail
Buibriigeh had Invited Robert and Rider to -.hai:
pot luck with him to-day IDinner would be riaten
at i.ne o'clock Psyche h.id claimed. not wirhioul
reason, to iIe able to prepare a plum pudding
When the dinner hour diew nih th,-y me t ont
the verandah. as i.isual. and began talking about
the lHos-hall Christmas and the festivals celebra.
lion elsewhb re in the Island To Robert it seem-
ed a miracle that a people kn.wxn to be di-con.
tented. alnd itid to be on the eve of a demonstra-
tion. should y'et seem -o happy as had the slaves
of the estate that morning: their conduct. in Viewi
of what \waq imrna int d ab.ui their intentions, didt
not seem to him i o tbe reasonable.
It wa- Rider who pointt d out to him that these
slaves beli\eed implicitly that sufficient to the day
would be the evil thereof; meantime they took ibat
came to them "They may be frenzied rAIh.els to-
morrow." lie said. "but to-day is to-day, o they
dance and enj,.y themselves I don't know but that
they are ritlt' "
Just then Psyche alnouliiced in a triumphant
tone ,f v\'ice that dinner \was ready. the Christ
mas feast that was t, he -ati-n hours earlier than
the dinner of an.\ ordinary day.
They -at duown to it. through Robert felt no int
clination for festive repasts He had to be of the
company. however, if for no other reason than
that he had insisted upon furnishing for it some
madeira for which he had sent to Montego Bay .on
the Christmas Eve.
Psyche's mother had been a ,oo)k. and Psyche


bad inherited a enitis for i..,king More iniprrtant
pet'ihp.. than this inheritance. -.he ha-l neen Latuht
nly lh:r mothi.r to cook. and her abilitiei- in thi-
I .: "-et a Ione reasoLn hy Buirbi de:i ala. felt
that in her lhe pi-e-_cd a; treaurt O)rdinarily. she
had ni v opportunity it di-playing her skill init on
rare self justice. and toida.\ -he had done he.r-elf niore
than juistii. She 'gave them little iv'ter- piL.ked
up -with pippeled vilnegai. She l- rveil ri-h se-'a,-ned
Silh .liill. (nioll iIu anil rit h bulttrr saui e hl r roast
Ie.l was tender and .jui:y annil t .r n..ible flav.u her
Ina-.ted gulliiia hen wjs lone to to pert .rn. And
bhl' pluim puildinii~,. w-ith hli>r Ium and butter qauci-.
%was the real Janmaianin plunm puldding. ll.iik wiith
fruitt and Haviallreil i th i :.,d 1 il runm Un i the
table were iil um and mnleaiiia. the riin tenipereid iiith
,ul icoiotinut xNater. ivhi,.h at this trimne of day ivwa
i.erter than iinti.Juii:- an. d u~iarl
Mr Hideir's e.y s _li.\,'.d v it'll app'ri- nation a-s
the t' f it pro.f-rled. and when Hoiirt. tlnijlir.
1,.591.. asked him to haie stim-e ;inte his I-ye -nap.
p,.d and he was aIb..ur t. a, i-ept Tlihn. n ith a creat
effort. he mn stericd liim inpuki.e "Bettser not. Rnther-
ford," he -nad. "The time i- i.n miinc. I am u raid.
%ihen I shall not be .ibl, It. reiJ.-;. .ind I don'r feel
like retu;.ing even ni'' But ii I touch tle stuff
to-day I nmay Ib- d..n( teor during_ the nis ixrt pl-e i-f
we-ks. or .urge-r I ima3y 1 r. n ill inking a- I:long as
there is aniytlline to drink. .aid tli et I- pDLity here
Still. one pla's mi-litn't huit me perhaps-ebh. what
.do you sa.y But ra. better nrit I want to -e[ to.
uight what i-s Zoin- li.' happen o knoi, x nhat I
mean I amt atiaid that if I otlle la tit.- tht eine--"
Vry goid." -aid Robert hastily. "and I. too.
don't think I should have anything t' drink. Fact
i I have b.,en taking far tou.o much -inD>e I have been
here There hadn't passed a da.y when I haven't
drink sometiring striioe. and liots Iof it s.iil: days. I
drink too mniuh."
"We all ldo." said Burhrid.-e, "that is the cus.
rtin here. annd today bhlin Christnma., I amn not
prepared to abstain I have not been abljtaining If
it were u:ti for that wret.bhed n oman up at tlhe
Hou.e we siinuld lie able to enjoy outi Christmas as
we should Slt- is the bane of our lives!'
"Just as all roads lead to Rome." mailedd Rider.
"so do all Bulbridge's remarks now tend towards
Mrs. Palmert. in an uncomplimentary fashion. But
be is right. strange as it is. we ar a all undoubtedly
affEcted this Christmas day by her actions.
Robert nodded his head in gloomy acquie-cenee.
This turn of the Conversation exprei'ssed his own
mood. This could not be a merry Christmas party


tot antm man with Ihtmane impulses and feelings.
And thliugh he had just said he .idln't think he
PlVtiildlI tlke any IIhqur,. he itiel.halliLilVly stretch-
Ed ult hi-l hani fort -omine int.. and .continued 1,t
drink diul'rLe ldinnler.
He knew that Bturtir'ilge wm.9 noit allowing ani-
thinei to di-turl) him. Buirbridlle hall lone sinII(e
, irt'i- ntl hrden-di to -iEght-i and sound-, and n actions
thai mu-.t have -ho,.kei ad n dmi'gilisted him once upon
a time But Rider was different: periodical drunk-
a:rd though he was. his heart remained tender. not in
a maudlin hut in a real and true senst. and he had
;a enllt man'. instinr, for ifairplay and generosity.
As forr hintmelf. IRobert realized now that lie bad
i.=-mle r. have a etnuine liking ftr the unt'frtlunate
y'ioung noinmani wi.h had so quainti-i and boldly. with-
irt ineaiting tI, he frowi.aid. insli-ted upon in-.allitK
h,.r-i-.lf as hi-i- hi'usekeper Thai. he felt with c-n-
uine s,:rrow. wa n.i arei-ly a t rime to i)e punisheil
almni.t wiith miidness and perhaps .3y aItual death.
ShI wma Ilnaiv-. fioli nh mayhb, impetuoiis and reek-
I.-- Somnetlin,; t a sava ge Bilt had ani (itr-
lupt.--ll. lie kn<:w -ble wa- not tlhat.
Th- meal ended quietl.. Yet Ps:ichie was. ion
th- whole,. well Satilfiedl. for if MNas-a Rutherf.-rd
was .Ailent and showed but a pnl, appetit... Ps.yilie
I;ncw the r-ason. and. a;. Miilli:ent was her i.oul-in,
she- felt that this l.j'- ot appetite wa.- a sitting tri-
hute to tie conditionsn of- a nlmmber of her family
D-inner over. the men again repaired to thliir
verandab. whc-r Burhliridge tilled ihis bhair against
the wall. played thi-_ feet against the railin., and
v-i\ -tton fell asleep Rider dnd llobhert \erre l-.s
-ominolent. .et they tIoo felt lethargic. depressed,
lburdented each by ii[ i,. ni weight of thought. anil
not perhaps tin.ifaltte d by the early Chriktmain meal.
There were ocicasions, when the mneanine r.t his fallen
estate (ame t,-. Rider w'ith a peculiar p'.ilgnanc:y:
to-day hi- felt his position with a nlore than ex-
qui-itely unpleasant keennes- Yet. he said to hiim-
sef! it might antu:illy have been wort-e. He knew
lie wa- l.-lpinu .i1.ung Ruthirf'ordl. anid be tmizit be
ab to aidrl Millicent al-o: that was possible So lie
w\ja not ltqite ueele,-. not utterly an ,1uintast And
maybe. lie tII.oughr.t some daly he might bt-. able to
give up the drink altogether. juist as he could refuse
it to-day. so. he might be able to, refus~. it altogether
in the future. Rut in his heart of hearts lie doubted
Ilis strength.
bWhen the thlilrt amne upon hilnl it uwas pierce
and raging, not to be ruppres.ed. He would believe
sometimes that lie had the :raving under control at
last. and \would beL-in to plume himself upon that,
when. suddenly. lie was tripped by it and then would


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PLANTERS' PUNCH





PLANTERS' PUNCH


sell his shirt for a drink. Many such experiences
had rendered him cynical about his resolutions; yet
every now and then he would make such resolutions.
Even while gravely doubting, he half believed, and
at the root of this belief was hope. To-day it came
into his mind that perhaps, if he could get back to\
England, he might be able to open another and a
better chapter of his life. He thought of Robert;
he too, if he remained in Jamaica, might become, if
not an outcast (for he had means) at any rate a
poor specimen of a man: he had seen such things.
Robert would have a good career at home. It was
better that he should return as quickly as possible.
Even supposing that this girl, Millicent, whose
paternal grandfather had been a gentleman and a
man of authority in the country, should recover,
that would actually not be for Rutherford's good,
unless he resolutely refused to remain in Jamaica.
A lifelong liaison with the girl, and children, and
drink, and no real obligation to work (which might
mean more drink and other liaisons), what was
there in all this save the deterioration of a young
fellow who had fine instincts and was a gentleman?
In the tropics some men throve; those were the
men of stern fibre or of a sort of brutal hardness.
These tropics, with their large servile population


and small aristocracy of proprietors who lived in
a world of the narrowest mental and moral horizons
-what a horror they actually were! If they did not
become physically the white man's grave, they form-
ed for him as deadly a spiritual sepulchre. It was
death anyway.
S Why don't you go back home, Rutherford?" he
ai-kd. apparently apropos of nothing, turning to
watch how the young man would take his sugges-
tion.
"That is exactly what I was thinking of," re-
plied Robert, somewhat surprised. "It is as if you
had read my thoughts."
"I am glad to hear it," said Rider. "This is
hardly the sort of place for you. If you go to Bar-
bados later on, you know, you will go as the head,
and then conditions will be different. But here-!"
"I don't think Barbados will ever see me." as-
severated the younger man; "I have had enough of
all this 'eternal sunshine and happy, laughing people.'
I can almost hear some of them laughing from here,
they scream so loud. And yet it would not take much
to make them cut all our throats, if what you
yourself believe is true."
"It is true," said Rider, nodding his head de-
cisively.


"Well, that's just it. These slave tro)pic( may
look and sound mighty fine on the surface. hut they
are nastily dangerous underneath. Ye-. I have
come to the determination that they don't suit me,
But neither do they suit you, Rider."
"I know that," answered the other -impl.: "I
found that out long ago."
"Then why didn't you leave?"
"I suppose I drifted along till it was too late. I
had nothing to return to, you see; I feared that if
I went back to England there would no loner be a
place there that I could make for myself. On.e here;
I was in a sort of prison. Turn me our into the
free world again, and I should be at my wits' end.
It was all cowardice and weakness, of course, an4
something worse. The life here, for a mat, like me,
was infinitely easier than it could be in England.
My duties were light, my pay was sufficient to keep
me, and I could do what I pleased to a great extent
without being called to account for it. I liked the
life, at first; I didn't realise what it was leading me
to. I liked the drink; I didn't grasp that it was
making me a drunkard. When I did, I was down.
And here am I. But you-as Burbridge is always
saying-with you it is quite different."
"I am going," said Robert resolutely.: "I have


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PLANTERS' PUNCH


been coming to that conclusion. and I have '.iecii-ed
within the last ten minutes. But I think y.,u are
wrong about yourself. You could go riack-now.
And now is the bI-', time to go.'
"I cannot walk upon the wild wave-. my dear
boy. and sea tapiainii doi not r,,ie passages tfor
nothing And if' sent the hat round the results
would Ie trinng. and I -hould -uffEr the shame .,f
having begged in vain Nit that Engli-hmen are
not -isent homni byt heir friend. they are. But I
have no friends, and my few acquaintances would
believe iand c(.uld not be blamed for beliEvingi that
I had merely fallen hack upon a quite' unoriginal
niehod for' raising drinks"
He spoke flil.pantly to disguise the serionune-ss
of his feelin_.
"I have thought of that.'" -,ahii Rrleri: "I
wouldn't have mentioned the mattrt if I hadn't.
But you can get the money for )our expenses with-
out any difficulty. I can advance it to v..u "
Rider looked at him with a peculiar exprt-sijon
on 1Is face.
"Advance?" he said. You really mean that you
will g,,'r me the money"
"I couldn't oft-r a man like you money." return-
ed Robert, somew-hat embarrassed: "hut onic'e you
were in England it wuiuld not be difficult for you to
repay it "
"You are offering it to me in the nicest way
you can think of." said Rider quietly Youi ean
that if I can repay it I may. if I can't. you won't
mind that It's de-uced decent of you. Rutherford.
and I thank you with all my heart.'
"Then yc:u will go?"
"Gladly That is-"
"What?"
"If my resolution holds. If I don't go back so
badly to the drink before we -can start, that I won't
be able to do the little things necessary and take
myself to th: ship."
**That will be all right." said Robert. "'We'll co
together, and even if you are drunk I will carry you
on board. I am strong enough to do that literally.
you know." He smiled as he spoke. but Rider knew
he was in earnest.
"Good. It is agreed then I mieht almost say
that your coming to Jamaica was providentially de-
signed in my interests. Rutherford: I should see a
miracle in this thing if I were not disposed to be
sceptical about any modern miracle. By Jove! To
think that I might actually see the Old Country
again' Might? I am going to! This is farewell to
Jamaica for me "
He fell ,t silence. thinking Lvver this wonderful.
unexpected stroke of good fortune. It was almost
uto good to be true.
Robert rose. "I am going over yonder."' aid
he. pointing in the direction of the negro village.
"to see how those folk are enjoying themselves.
They seem to be having high jinks."
"And you had better get a couple of hours' sleep
when you come back." advised his companion "\'e
: may be up all night."
Robert nodded and went off on foot. leaving
Rider to think over alone the new prospect that had
opened out before him Rider knsw it was through
a feeling of delicacy that Rutherford had left him
to himself.


$r


Y ThIe Piano Tuner

whose work is far


R ahead of the ordi-
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I Try him, then
ference in the
Piano.


E


note the dif-
tone of your


Office:
1091 i'Valer Lane.


Phone 669.


CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
THE EXORCISM
'T HE throbbing of distant drums came to their
ears; it waxed and waned, rolled and staccatoed,
seemed to die away, and then began again.
Other like sounds came to their hearing, from
south and east and west, but Rider and Robert
Rutherford pushed steadily on in the direction of
this particular faint muttering and rumbling sound
from the south, for Rider had carefully enquired his
way and knew that he was right in persisting in his
course.
"The other drummings are for dances," he ex-
plained; "it may be Sunday night, but the people
are making merry, though perhaps not so much so as
they would have done a few years back. You could
easily be misled by all these contradictory noises,
but I know the way. I fancy that where we are
going has been often used before for some startling
ceremonies."
They were both on foot. Horses might have be-
trayed their presence once they had arrived; indeed
they might have been observed long before they could
arrive. But Rider hoped that, by keeping within the
shadow of the trees, they would not attract any at-
tention. Many persons were moving about to-night,


and it would not be strange if two white men should
be seen abroad, so long as they were not noticed
when close to the site of the projected exorcism.
The moon had risen. It was growing full-orbed.
Preoccupied 'with his own affairs as he was, Robert
had yet watched it night after night as it had in-
creased in size and splendour, as it had grown from
a slender sickle attended by one lustrous star, bright-
ening in the west as the sun went down and then
suddenly flashing into radiance with the swift dram,
atic coming of the tropical darkness, until it had
become a globe of silver sailing serenely among the
lesser lights which paled and disappeared as it pur-
sued its progress to the sea. He had seen it bathe
the looming hills and fields of cane, in a soft argent
glow, had seen the answering glimmer from the met-
allic inner surface of the multitudinous leaves, and
had, unconsciously, been touched and moved by the
beauty of the scene, so unlike anything he had ever
known before. To-night, however, he gazed at the
moon with somewhat different feelings. It was like
a lantern set up for the illumination of the earth,
and they did not want to be seen. They were shun-
ning observation. Darkness would be their kindest
friend to-night. But even as he thought, a mass of
cloud, materialising swiftly out of the shining blue,
(Continued on Page 83)


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N De-nimber, 1925. the \V.t .na Mtitaiij Building St..
.it,.v ( niplet.di fifty ..Il ,'f its e iItenl..- 'It2s
i- nto year Wf jibi,.E An it, ri ure, t,, thi[.i t .ear.
"I ill not be ml int 1, .di n d i \a.ni illla. 3he b r qjLiotation LILt.
ril soIlm e tinl. It- ii r 4 ,. ..i)t \ lert J t a ti ti. al stI[t "-
Imunt of It< po :-iln.n ,.,11 -: jolieiiij I I 1, mit[ Fp ,S.-ii
in thi' i-,tln e ..f "'Pidllt.-r' Punrt h". hut te- hOiiLr tii
h. able to izl-. rLijt rutt ,. i in iin our ht, \t i pllplt .-
i ll. 1 MAl-tnintime It ..i v. iti all a.i urance I 1_ said
that it- plrog'r -. ,la I:n .sati.rlvt.ry, iand. lU IIn;
-tl IJst rten .V .Iar*. I l. u li .i li-
In .Jamul :a ;iasi .-ill ua -, ,kl-I il-'e e i irople are tlurn
ing to BuildiuN S I.n. tiL. ljh..rIh .:- a ai-an .. f -iiii
In't i. li i ii-e m i nl if -af riii ui l i iii:t--til' n irney
Tills mn ment l i. lui hi-n 7 mni ll nirkt .l in En ig
lani.d La-r Car it v.a3 -ltat-,il in T"hinu- Buildingl S,.
i'leti[iu Ye':ar Book" tlit TEli. in in l e -i e in the. tpsit.
,ii, the P,'it (.Otfic~ Sa.in-.'it Ba ii k dulu ihi t.n .ears
fl'r opm 19 in t h.. l'e2 47 per -,nt. tlh, In..reaea
Tault iee S lavinign Di nl:.s ;tr.'tS inl to' .:tril e n l .ii t
i.s 51 per cit _nt th- tii in sat ise n Buil in_- SIci:Lt..S'
ai s et wit \,a s 1t'i per i c't." N,.:. ar Wyohne,- h.i ha-.
talked ovn .r ithe pl.ilar.-,s miade Iby u Bi ljin S)ocie[t[-,
in JamainK.a ith pe,)[le hu lir,,.. t]l fat -- niith
itr. Mlt(-uthlir, tof tie Vi trl.i .M utial Buillline S ..
,.iv o'r examiwle. Mr H,-.\ ,1t tMH he So t M JerA J i, den,
Jimt ildin So rier.- ill leaSi n I'h I bothi in the a. pi i
ail t the in.lant i. Kin sti. an nd in i th,: .apiStl fn o thl
northsidi e. ,Monteco Lay. the BuidilWn. Sileti:; hawv
ilevelop ted in the last d e(a 1
An.ly ilie- hii. har s i stltlitbee ina Moii nteo Bay. sJ t
at yearly iut ervtal-; durinel thi la.l tfew' yefr. lniit
lhaveteohb er ed the i.inlIl s itl :i p lc]..e ill th tI tu nil.
OIe will have Uotlih.e-- t e new .-..re -.. the ne l.. ]it Iei-..
At,= gro'tw l of the to nn. Anl. ,of i rl-e. 11M.,nitgo Bay
i. njot the only to1n I.f St JJm.. no aAr is St .JameS
tlhe only pari-h -,r\eil 1I1 the St Jlam s Be t R fli Build
iIn_ Society. AW- t. til.- Vi, t..rA, M uriual Bijw lin[g S.-
ciery. its activitiess arrt uI >rwl'- le every. iliere il
jimuia It[ i- jur large, stuciet.t of it_3 kind. it is a
J "amaea in-.tiuti"n. : >nd tlte tri tl n rin- of It"s po
sition tl hle la-t di ade enable it it t nlinmpar' fitavoml-
;ably with .miniiar instittitions in sums ,f the Me mi t
Irngri ss.ive cities, of the i'orld
In nritine ,on Buit ling StiE. tiO Ireiet-rtly. a Icadi.
illg En li-h pujlia.: lion nia.le s.rme .murk- >, h We n ll quote here with _.nrip let lpri.valj It iwid"
"One of the filAen t feature,.Q, t ill Buil} ingi So riem e-


;i5


97-101 BARRY ST.


IlimovtInll t ; thi.t tile app-al -f i til- lasis ('f invest-
ltnm i el~eii.i. to ri:ii n jnI ..,.'r alike Miany people
If niteanll. with no. Iiilline inte'ntiotns wphatever. are
riati lly a tlatra.e hi ,y ie hetl l larat ;c of intelesEt of-
f('frd. lut the lii:h IiIian' iinldrds dlie ilu lmore wl* el-
'.'ie iltan It- poor1' mia/iS shillings and pounds
lThe ,'a; 11 iland ..i rliiiii. ftllc tion of tihe Building
Soit iE t i- niol e s.-itt'iS t.t,'rl. ilsi.> charged] when it has
rite thr(..-aiild uI l e-tr-', of lnve p.,,utld3 each than
when it It., nve oif L.t.ml1 ean:hi. And tilt- Societies
c.ater f',r ithi.- nmali ianl
As a nmtter jf fact tlih Jamaniia Ruildine So-
Il.ie-. dilr- t t~iir appeal to pieopl:e if iUimoderate
uieant. thi the Vii tot ia _lM tiial Buildini Society
limlit ea,.h ,harehold-Ajr in tli:ese drlay to twenry
!.hare.. balth.oul oi f ,-'ifll e .- t i thil ividlial iCan acquire
the silh rel' t a;u.tlh'l-r -harholde i .h i. desirs t
ui'rrendt le th,. Ailnd wl\il; the milAjorint ,if people
join tile Buildini~ So.i Lt\l will the \'.oy w ise aid far-
,t'eing intenri.n t il pri\idlling thm'.-lvt.i with homes,
a- .3 nieau-t ..it saj in. and inlve trinlt: lni t.i al-o the
Janmaira Building S..n.ietie. ar.e e\t -niei attractive
'%%e will -\ive ,o ne illhl-trjaion
In Dei entillr. 1l17. a mnin took out twetnt.\four
sharet- in tli>. VrVioria Mutual Buiilditng S.oe tly. upon
which he Iaild '3 per norItlit. In Dle.i-ul)ir. 1i27, he
Ie'Ie-vi d a ,heIlti foil 25' t '. .and (ut'. -uit'rIl.\. on
Ihe same 4l.iar-. a t.ielque Cor 12 12 In t-l years.
at r the ea'%y rate off L. perl n..nlth. lit hiad paid in i3II
Sn in init'rest aiind botnli li- iceiied 177 Is Com-
ment is needite- The.-e liSm e-e. lia.i t- tliii.quence
of a EilOden tri.naue
Nor is that all. If a shiieholdetr lwantl,t f'or any
Itsa-In. to eatse payint:L up his .lli.-re. there is nier
anly difficult i abut his etltiuie .la k all thle money
lie ha- paid ill. plus hi-. interest aid ihiiu-~-s. By
pivnl; tuhrte imoi uth:u i notic.- t- the Sw i,-ry hle l I,.,es nW t
Is-ea d p,:-ny: n:hut a- a ll.rter tA fatt Ite due. not
have to wait -a long Theie are ainials pieoplle ready
ianl eag~-r 'o tlak-e up hi-L share- at full ta.e value
W\hy? 1B,-_iaij'e thev-h ar!i ea 'pitlldid f.:,rnl ijt inve t-
rnlen A-. ['l the m-n wlholl lioo monlle in-y to prr'-
\vide him r nitf .!. Vh. i amil tlh la hou, Ihe Ia.1- a<
a. rule lekI- than lie p oalld pai i lelnt eaclh iunth.
and at he r ed of th-e term hi- finils thli.. \bhart ilhb
bonIuses aiid inllleilet Iil hi' mon.eyt. he liha- hail his
loan at I-' Ilhan tive per cent, and ovwn, his .wn
ll.iuse in the l, arain' No w% oiidel the shlipan ,.i ,r-
day i.--Wh/, P.a Ril t


KINGSTON.


PEERLESS


PEERLESS SIX-81 SEVEN-PASSENGER PHAETON


JUST WHAT THE NAME SIGNIFIES




From the gleaming Chrome Nickel Bumper

to the Bumperettes in the rear, you will find

Perfection has been the aim in building the

New Six -81- 1929 Peerless.


J. SIRGANY.
DISTRIBUTOR FOR JAMAICA.


always has been a Good Car.


. .......... .. .. .. ... R'!
-il


mb,


1929


PUNCH


The Peerless


-'' ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~..~~~ ~; ---------

IPr "





The Witch of Rosehall
t.'n tti n iI1 f i',iif i P n I'j .' 1 1i
tl.iated alii ..s tlh- fa,'. I f th- mion in l thlie s _Ltt-
_rt, 4.re l-i, uiai :,.rithr-. a hIli.-ugli a dark iiiroiii
hjdj Ieen fluno a.i- .i'.- ilt .l'ld.i. Prc-.nri:. l.hL, ilcrjn
triL', ld i lout tront blhiiid ilm e --ha-dow. lit nriw R,,I
(rT ini, ,edl rth t brhr- andl the i t ivll l_ okt here oibler
.mnijl ilianks iofr (l.,ij driftinrL.
SL...ok-. as i t i wer- o ell I i dain." lie said ,)

"It i iquite- iktIly it may ramn later o:n; li h re
ha ibeeei a tf.-'- ..f it in lth ir t tur li '. ir- lour l6
ar, eatherine L \' [ i ,f it ji. l n't Fai ". shall have
sp'il: of datkn-ess ..onn." Ride-r answ.-r i
I[ am in iD I pii f'ul tr h t I an i-.-i Inie ;ug W-liI
.lildi hapl._.tn [u. u i ift tilhe e ul,.'ah p( |'lc -.u_1 eht 1 i-
'[ip inF onl th: -m ""
"They nr \ uldl 't halrm I.i -phyv;lll. I .r-nihtli 1un.
1 ,4 rhl. \wer reaid\ fl:,r an in-tiant il i'elak. \which
ir h1Iot pribai'le.t aid!l Rilh r "Biut lithe would
s: s itr l,. tlie \w .L loul n-v-r allow us toI -:p tlieni hIreakl.-
jn1 thl:- lav. ..thi-y are ke nilyll. alive :,'
rulitr ult. ri-, ioni..-niprtluous laighir-r" that is the rine
iI it thalit the.?e people si inink ini The'y mana. thinly;
we are 'foIharely %u flunilt ju l.i r andl &e% ic. .\ et

111111111111IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII111111111111111IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII111111111111111IIIIIIII



ALTAMONT DOLPHY,


IMPORTER AND

COMMISSION AGENT.


KINGSTON.
OLD HARBOUR SPANISH TOWN






FLOUR MEAL

PROVISIONS GRAIN

HAY BRAN

RUNI WINES

SPIRITS.







N MANITFACTIRERt |



Aerated Waters


and


Fruit Syrups.






Enquiries Solicited.





CABLE ADDRESS POSTAL ADDRESS
"ALTY" 37A ORANGE ST..
JAMAICA KINGSTON. JAMAICA
A.B C. 5'" EDITION IIMPROVEDI
BENTLEY'S.

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STHE



'I







IIi







il:






, Hotel is within easy walk


Gharmirn!


I
I MISS ETHE
.l .L ,,,L ..... ... ............. '.."..l --


:he Bes-
ing dsltanc


when we laugh at them for their belief in such things
they have an unpleasant feeling that they look like
children or simpletons, and they are not happy. So
they hide their faith and their curious cults from
the eyes of the white man, though when a manifest-
ation of these cults takes the form of a little poison
in one's morning coffee, the African's religion be-
comes a very serious matter!"
"And they do poison?" asked Robert, thinking of
what he had heard about old Takoo.
"Now and then, but only the desperate and really
dangerous characters. The majority are safe enough
to trust that way. When you consider their condi-
tion, and that they have set their hearts for years
on becoming free, the wonder is that they have never
-attempted to wipe us out wholesale. You could
hardly blame them if they did."
They had now left Rosehall; they had ascended
the low hills behind that estate and were making
their way carefully very near to where the principal
cultivations of the bondspeople were; they had fol-
lowed a trail made and used mainly by the slaves
who had their plantations among these hills. The
custom of the country, now reinforced by law, was
that each slave should cultivate a small piece of his
owner's land for his own family's sustenance. At
least one half day a fortnight, and more commonly
a half day a week, was allowed him for this purpose.
The lands thus set aside were situated at some dis-
tance from that part of the estate farmed for the
proprietor's benefit and were usually among the sur-
rounding eminences which could not economically be
put under cane, or of which the soil was poor. Here,
of a Saturday afternoon, would be found crowds of
the people, hoeing the ground, weeding at the roots
of their growing crops, digging holes for the planting
of the yam or the potato in its season, making pro-
vision, in short, against anything like famine. Thus
they in reality supported themselves by their labour,
and here, as in every other rank of human society,
differences made themselves plainly apparent.


THELHART HOTEL,

S0 N T E G () B AY.











i

.....








Place to Spend the Cold II'inter Alonths in Comfort.
e oa the well known bathing place, "THE DOCTOR'S CA VE" with ihs Beautiful white Sands.


.'TT.A(TI )NS AT MPON'riEGO H.AY
2' Drives. Fishirig. Bathing. Golf. Tennis and Swimming.

RATES FROM 1,.. PER DAY.l t .
RATES FROM 1 PER DAY.


EL M. HART. PROPRIETRESS


Cable and Inrind Teleqraoh Address:
ETHELHART.


SDO YOU WANT

TO OWN A HOME OR TO SELL ONE ?

COUNTRY OR CITY PROPERTIES.

SEE D. C. TAVARES,

AUCTIONEER, REAL ESTATE AND COMMISSION AGENT.
27 EAST QUEEN STREET, KINGSTON,
SPHONE 372.

Large and Small Properties Sold, and no charges made g
for Advertisements.-Loans negotiated on Real Estate.
11111111111111111111111111111111111 1 1 1 1 1


1929


r. r r. .... .. ............ ......... .. ..... .. .. .. .. ._ .


PLANTERS' PUNCH


For some of these people only worked as much
as was necessary to ensure that they should have
what foodstuffs they would need, while others took
particular pains to get the most that they could out
of the not very fertile soil. The latter wrestled with
the earth and from it drew, not only sustenance but
some degree of wealth. There were thousands of
free blacks all over the country; ther3 had been for
decades. These had purchased their freedom with
money gained by selling the surplus of their products,
the yield of their little fields. Ever.,rii.,.; that they
produced was aieirs by custom and the force of pub-
lic opinion; long since it had been found that if this
were not to be so there would be very little effort put
forth by the slaves on these plots of land. The price
of a alave had steadily risen in the last twenty or
thirty years, and still men and women bought their
freedom by hard work and thrift. Takoo had done
so some forty years ago. And Takoo, by what he
made out of lands that he had since acquired by cash
purchase, and even more by what he had been paid
by awestruck people who went to him covertly for
aid against dark supernatural powers (or for means
to bring those powers to do their will), had accumu-
lated what was for him and those in his position a
respectable fortune. Most of what he had he intend-
ed for Millicent. He had said so openly. He had
determined that she should be respected by all of her
class and those below it, looked up to as a young
woman of wealth, regarded as a superior, treated
with deference. He had succeeded in this aim; he
was proud of his success because he was proud of
her. But in the last few days his pride had given
place to a horrible fear. And to-night he would know
whether he had toiled all these years to good pur-
pose or in vain.
The moon shining out brightly just when they
were passing by a clearing, Rider with a gesture
drew Robert's attention to some peculiar object
hung on trees here and there among the little plant-
ations. Tiny bags were a few of these, others again


Er






PLANTERS' PUNCH


were miniature bundle-s lied with dried tendrils or
wirh string. one or two were the .;kulls oif annualas.
cat-, th-y -.eenlet
"Protective tbharms." he explained. "There
are i ll ves every where, and tilel.- c ultivatiun-i arec
left for days, together with no one near them. They
would i e entirely at the n melty of pr.edatory persons
bhit t...r suh.h obeah i.hlurlsii There is hardly a man
within a radius of tent. miles who would ventur-
her Iby day or night to rob these provision grounds.
Hie witiid believe that the miauic. inherent in ihe
c."iitii iiilel w'.ork lnim harin He night even thin:
that ai s j pe iail Lho.t. p.-rlaps a relative ..f tie oeA.ner.
h.aun-td the particular groun.dJ he had ribbid. and
t]lh-li II-- tiate would b. almost as hbal as Millicent's
ani li-e \vould hav'9- to pal sujll- be I linhman heavily to
tal :- thle host offt h11. His pllght would he worse if
it %erte th.- spirit of a ,hild that waa-, piaeuing hinm.
chill ,-i.t-; set m to ie? particularly viet.u';."' Rider
latili-ili. hut sonlew htit taJill YOU.u inary this.
gaill.-r an ida ot'f the dti>cuitlie- Ah~.ih a pras.tisiue
par-tin lia to o:intlnend i ib in this iiiuitiry. The irony
of it i mthir -irni, If ttlenm ihardl.. .\--r --u. *- whit
g.i..n: on und-r their ver. nose -."
Thiruil,. thrunt. delrr!'rru!inni tarliut. Ihruim,
drl-lrrluninim: the noiteie xVd- near3.r nrnw They ihad
*-ft' rlie lave niiltivation- and \ecr-r ccioas through a
v..ii.i TI- '' tw.. nit-n v.er- uiot a i-.tt.inied to walk.
in- In tiee t'rpih bilt the ni-lit wa. rol and excite-
rh. Lt b-li. [1l en: they .i iori e ..u-.'U otf no fatigue-.
Thl- .iitijrdmtie.u, tree- rivahedl hii-h aiovy,- their leads.
the ir h'all i-. .wishilll ptlltly a- a Il wind went
tieall l l ll. iii ln .tlnln It..;' thillinu _ll t the) le hi rd a
E~t-ii-itnar niatr at haili, a lih.-,ijgh -.:.itme Ih.a-y body
,-!. -t-'eal-]inc parali i t.. the-ni at n..i viistr1. ti t .. spa.K
of li nlielt ln e tnima3i:nati)ii. it, ;iglietil. ,ini. the
lne-. ',it \oiildl niove a.jiltoul i n rii .ips on a night like
thli-. Jil d nuhl t:eitainly I).- talkiin- amon, ithenli
seli\ But whate\vr it was tlhe- %oiltl.' we -
wieii- and thrillin- It .nam.:- to HI..lr-rt's mind that
thlie;, igieht alni.. sh .ni.l- ...t thi lei el wvhn l. il ris-i:n flr--nl thlir _'rave'
t.. Ia-t .it a ritual wh.i:rt iy a -tIrui-gl-' was t1 bl .
,ui.llii. ltl again t !iie p ..w-r- ..f llark'ne?.
SlI.\ now. and Lb, careful that iur viiice- are-
iiiI. li-..rd Ridrl.s nadmnniltiin waj whil-pDrerl. andt
rn-i-ling in front of himn Robert i-oulId 'i-e a glean lie.
:v en i rh tr tr- trunk-. notied(li ti.. that the gleam
ia iit Ir.imr some iopen pace- hbc.).nnd. and heard a wail-
:rini htlIan that nii'li-rd with iiie beating ol the
IIt iii :
Thie.\ -ri:l.e- fnrw.rild quietly. until thhe- must stnip
1 -li.-rrtly revt-al their present e. Their point of
vi tri -. was peod Trees shielded thlmt. and they'


stood in shadow About tw:rnty ;sird- .v..3\ a tnro
i:our-st of ipet plate Croliu tliel upcn tlt., g'r..lunl,. foImin
a rude .irclte. and v. itlin this rllil blJaze. :a1 re-at
lire w\hnbl ll hi:-'d and i r!' kled latli tilrew nte.-a,
,parks upwards catme l..iElaiti nit-.i ni-iy I lie' lite
strainited tarin-: fa.t'es of tl, lneiin anrt w'omnl trimn'
hiiose lip, Streamed t',h'rtb an e-rie. cuilri, =aundti
Bodies- .wayli tI.I right at dI l-1 in nii-j..n v.iti ,i-
rliythme of that .1hant. aid in-e drtimrtliiotbi imi.r1kel
ihe :cadenceti ot th,- hymnl of ex\'.il-m It o., nottljiii
that ,even Rider had e e\:r leard. i.eti...r ( .tn i;ti-ai
A terld: or air. it v .a- am editing thaIt h'ai tngii ut ,:if'
A ri-a f ined wai, ienln il.,it-i till T N. Irt it i [it.pi,.i
in tile s-wa.)m ili i. 'ii. h.id i.-- ll h ll in I Al .nA t3.
and in thr-is tll -li 'l and; enl .ti li- tt-i.-:. hjd ti' .lelicil
li. k ti that tla i k ninttic tit tt...ni h ain l .eire I.
iliphping a ain i onl -.imi n -t.- r d.l ll 'inatii lv.e.r anmi
will to liarni. ote i lite ri'it i p iti ith -.:i R ir'ti -e
aind who o.i'ulii ir I t at ii'n.i a-lili ti-ni lii d' I:.in-
hIy mere appeai- .iand pra:..-r- for lit-i. I
It wjas ti- -all. iidllni- hr For ...\- =r iiit hil i iiit -t
tils *..lian have u....ntUtin l i..r i i. r fi ii .iii iii m
t ri-e peprle- iritar.. .-ilua t I..I,. thrie .i I I e h .. i- arj.i
earth. wateIhin,- tlhe i'olariii l-' Il hen -. -is-_irr-. niri jii-
in that loi mr,,oi.ng.n. \.i ..- .idl i t nlitin .t r -i. hat
was to happy n. A -huitledr r[:hi--d- ia Iil,,gih HuRi-ert.
to hiis a surpri-e Ii- fou d thal t Ill it3e ir.i 't.- .li-hti.
moving his biedy to the thytlm of thie -ii..iml d Ri
had himself iietter in hand. but tr- t hin i..i. indi .
ence of th.- s:ene iad nl t lnt.I e himti -i rthr-l iinaff'ft-r
ed. It had an appeal ti liNe- m.re pri'iitive em..-
riotin It stirrie-d tip -oina .thihet in the dr i.tgs of one'.
heinz H .e .,iuld uni lercratit ] li, dt.-- 't I-.-- II, t.i-.sl
lands wvrL ,mov'e-I ar t tiIit alilg.-i to nI"lnge-; -l:
theP all and irnipul-ion of their -trantge and iiorril.le
religion.'.
The_ r,.ll aInd tg lrt .I tht d'- uii v.iic t ion .otud
denly a wild bur'-r of I uLiter rent tlie air and .1
young womat in the f ir rot of tIle laiO- l il lihl
forward on ht-r 'fac e i g ire anid Lti-'hlin- ...n%\ ul
sivvely. twirt liing hl Ir linlh- .i-. an a lit Hy- te rn s hai
seiz i.d hir. iher neiti thad ci -..ii a.y. p I.i.aiiy1 .hi-
,wa. tihe fir-rt inme -i. lihad r'ii.i ite te in -u.ti arn
or'e-. prob:ti.lly sh,- knut Millic.-nr and wx.a- nli-d
with fear iL-r heri-lf t. n io >) c .: I h.lI tr>t t i '!.ml
dauser? But n".. .one rook an) notwe if her QL..
the tempo of tile lana t tilltIL kenlt-d.l th Ere '.t a3 it-
dit .x lhtation in ii nox\. Tii.-r.. w. t to i- w.ntuderfil
mlanife-tati.,n, t,.niiht. and Ih- N s is ts :ofI, rh ol.er
hiernophanr; lejoi:ked antd rev-ilhd in th. sanrti.[iitp.tin
of what was to in ilme Nit ,:fii.n in ii i-y ,darte
practi-.e tilis the rIitual of ait i.ih-. (.it faith. the mnuiad
of Old Afria. The law f.,Ibalte it andl the- ma-ti.,
'-truhk a t it a ith an ir.-n lianil


'Tu ..nt .idalt i iii t iri- 1 'as a lbenc-li. parallel u
tie i iighlt .If the tl.- hidden men, but just now It
was ILawei.llpied. Robert scanned the crowd keenly
o01 ii :mn ilm.s. ifi Miliieiit .nil her graniitather,
thT.v JnIrte h. l,_ih:.-rm i h. twb1. ;,E.< n INII ni.lln-dl lblto ci 'tr,
tiiar at ll. I'arlit i-r uppri ire ( ui e i .f ii. :ir. t-le of
iu nlar Iem -; thie t ir..'n d .uas int par.ke-tIl i i..sely to-
-e t[alr ( n) t.O:lUid a ;i k i.0 i. 1 til', T i.-re- n ithiut l
mniIh i Jiiii .. B~erhl i1t j a den-rj iJli ki es3
_ i-.r[t-.d i\ the it re--- S,.o rn.i-v.ire hi lci't. lie Con-
.ltudi d. ,11ill [:ienr \as i ai.mllc
It .,1 ui ilnight Noi strok,- IJll .tiliiuin.ed
I ,.l .l., l,. ,l ,1t Pl,, *P, r I

r----------------------------------------------- --.....


FOR


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Household Requirements,



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114 Harbour Street,

SKingston.


P. 0 Box
25.3


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Th, HlieiI 1f lI'otti n'. lii'lx Fti ltr.



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SINMST(N. :-: .IAMAI 'A.
II ---------------------------


II


1929


Tr. -leii !ho ie




129 LE S' PU
19i29 -PL P WATER S' PUNCH


II


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........_


- --


..,,,.,,,..,,,.,,,.,,.,,..,,,,,,,,.,,.,.






PLANTERS' PUNCH


ENRICHING THE SOIL

BY FERTILIZERS

SHE talk amongst Jamaica cultivators just now
is the improvement of their products. They
recognize that such improvement involves the pay-
ing of greater attention to the soil. Hence the in-
terest they have been showing in the application
of fertilizers to the soil, an interest which has strong-
ly developed during the past year or so, but which
began to manifest itself more than ten years ago.
We have heard a good deal of late about artifi-
cial fertilizers and it has been announced that
through the activities of the Jamaica Imperial Asso-
ciation the Government has proposed and the Legis-
lative Council agreed that an Agricultural Chemist,
with a special knowledge of soil fertilization, shall
be brought out to Jamaica. All this is quite true,
and it means a necessary movement in the right
direction. But from 1917 fertilizers had been im-
ported in fairly considerable quantities into this
island, and the pioneers of this movement were
Messrs. Grace and Company, whose business and
work have been continued by Messrs. Grace, Ken-
nedy and Company.
The price of fertilizers was enormous in 1917.
The war was in progress, the German sources of sup-
ply were entirely cut off, it was ilificult to import
even from neutral countries owing to lack of ship-
ping. But Messrs. Grace and Company strove
mightily to supply planters with Sulphate of
Ammonia and other suitable fertilizers which were
then urgently needed for the cane crops. Sugar
prices were soaring, the English demand for sugar
was greater than the supply, the Jamaica sugar
planter was straining every nerve to extend his cane
cultivation, and in this he required the aid of fer-
tilizers. Only one local firm-Messrs. Grace and
Company-was handling such fertilizers at that time,
and its successful activities were warmly appreciated
by the Jamaica sugar men.
Since then other firms have been handling fer-
tilizers, but Messrs. Grace, Kennedy and Company
still maintain the position in the distribution of this
commodity that was won by Messrs. Grace and Com-
pany over ten years ago. They sell what is called
the "straight article". That is to say, the "unmixed
fertilizer." The planters themselves make the mix-
tures they require, judging what they need accord-
ing to the requirements of the different soils on
their estates.
But the pioneers of artificial fertilizers in Ja-
maica have not been content merely with selling
Acid Phosphates, Bone Phosphates, Sulphate of Am-
monia, Sulphate of Potash and other suitable lines.
They have gone much further than this. On more
than one occasion Messrs. Grace. Kennedy and Com-
pany, in conjunction with the Nitrate Agencies,
have brought down experts to Jamaica and laid out
experimental plots in nearly every line of agricul-
ture among the large and small agriculturists. Cof-
fee, cocoa, coconuts, bananas, citrus fruits-all
have been treated by the experts who have come L".
Jamaica under the auspices of Messrs. Grace, Ken-
nedy and Company. As for sugar, that was the first
cultivation to be treated with artificial fertilizers, as
has been mentioned above.
But it has been said that bananas do not bene-
fit by the use of artificial fertilizers. The testimony
of Mr. Rupert H. Lindo is to the contrary, and in
May of 1927, in a letter written by Mr. Howard R.
Smith, of Weyhill Estate, Richmond, a very dif
ferent opinion is given. Mr. Howard Smith is well-
known as a keen and practical planter in Jamaica;
hence what he wrote to Messrs. Grace, Kennedy and
Company, with reference to a fertilizer he purchased
from that firm is decidedly of interest. We quote
that letter:
"First parcel was applied to young plant
bananas that were growing slowly and were very
backward. In a few months they had pushed
forward in line with the others adjoining and
are now fruiting eight and nine hands.
Second parcel was applied to an old aban-
doned field which was giving poor fruit. To-day
the field has the appearance of plants and fruit-
ing the same number of plants as above.
Third parcel was applied to bananas grow
ing on a ridge which for five years' growth was
only four or five feet high; after about four
months these old trees have fruited-poor fruit
-but the young shoots are vigorous, bulky and
of good colour, twice the dimensions of the orig-
inal suckers. I feel quite satisfied with this
Fertilizer-Sulphate of Ammonia-and I am
sanguine that the yield will be twenty-five per
cent more, and better fruit. The cost of pur-
chase and application works out at 3d per root.
I may mention that without a sufficient quan-
tity of Potash and Humus in the soil this fer-
tilizer will not do its work.
In conclusion may I add that I have been a
planter for forty-five years in this island, and


______ ___~rn


Motor Insurance


Rates


BUICK
NASH
DODGE
CHRYSLER
STUDEBAKER

Smaller Cars


1 16 to 818




12 to U15.


-u.' m pirt li.. t r,tll i / i 'i ,liti ,,ii i a ri
ldture atihid w it'.. fir P'r,.,l,.oil Forit,

TO
J. B. KILBURN.
Attorney
ARMY, NAVY. & GENERAL ASSURANCE
ASSOCIATION LTD.


T1-- o 9




The Modern Motorcycle


IJuilt ti. t. ld e nt un.lder the worst
(OV t ) ;I- :(,,Ii it hi ',.,--'" A RI EL.'
Ovil is i. gol lit IIu---A IE:L"
willi itm y eirii 1i e is i 5rntl-
it lurt lilne.--a-iniple 11'oImD
4'htl i ;l .ce,. a;ijd large tyres.. i.
givin g .- ii. tia l to tlhoutsands
(It itil rsi ilu all pnris ii th11 wv world.
In Ihe utient stretchtes oft o.pei
C.'UiiIItrV wlen1 a 4oC, C'yvele-
muU.sr not fail, this i.. here
" ARIEL" Rliab)ilijt :ia, mighty
I.u-1111 Ji' | i.-r ;i olint-.put i our
tlari in A IIEL "
Thlie rilik.h C'ou li1,iy whihh ri.i
dl 1t,.1 thiIk \\on h.- Ir <,I.r C(-' lt
ai.s0 i.iiluIiices;( vtL .ry (ti ,pIj ii-'itve
pI ice.- the high-i-, a 'ide ARIEL"
C( (l.e


5END NOW FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGLUE
de-erbing Ihe Implov-d dii' C C C td \ al,. 1 r1 d ii5ll C rf T-
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ARIEL WORKS LTD


SSelly Oak,

Biirmingham, England.


FLETCHER & CO., LTD.

MONTEGO BAY.
JAMAICA. B.WI.


IMPORTERS
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have made a tudiy of soils and growing )of iainu-
na.- in two banana parishs.
iSld.i Hrv.wrin R Sa rIi.
One of the most useful efforts at edluatini the
smaller people especially in the use of fertiiizers
adopted by lMessrs. Grae. Kennedy and Company.


has hen the distribution of iilutiated pamphlets ,n
the cultivation and nanuring if different product.
Tht. e are init written by men engaged in the sell-
ing of artificial ft'rtlizer,: they are written by sclen-
ti-ts nho have -ttulied agricultural chemistry and
have iistributel their knowledge through variouii
media of information.




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THE

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Policy

T7 /iiio I ,i p i;t f ri f o if i.nlii. ,


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ANNUAL DIVIDENDS.
APPLY TO
CONFEDERATION LIFE ASSOCIATION,

J. B. KIILB URN,
K i ngstfon,
General Agent.


1929
!;





The Witch of Rosehall
I C;l11,1'tl 11 ,l 0 "''i # Pii ,. N I
the hi t. ;s et t11i kntewt it nmust I. 1 s,. for at that
miniut. at a -iunal troml a \\i.lltan itloihedi in bitet.
the ihanrinll- .eas-,iT Thiere \w a .i-eathi, -.ilenre. a
siltn.e brk n-, o, nly by the ciat king and t plutteri.'
ur blazin'. w\rol. Then \whele the people croum. -lih
sparse-ly. a lalle v 'a\ i rapiidly made. aini trotm au iimon
the .htitel l-ing ti'eer i.nivme a girl. walkin- w ith .-tiff.
shitrt step-.. and a tall ratilit lman l -hit.l lier. HEt
himrn-.:l wias followed lby a tyoth \ hilo iile s'...tii-hiin
in hi! arnim
Fromi th~e 'aist d,.iwn Milli..i-nt -.a-, u rapie-d iii
a robe e.t purest \\hite The tiptper parl ...f li-i i.:IA
was i.a -. lhi-E r rea t-i atnd arms ei- x r .i- d i:nipletil,.
But hier hair n3a-. i ,ercd, ahl-, nith hlilt-, and
where the lliiler had appeared on hiif i liclt \a-
marked v.ith hile Takiie. ia- (itli tih-l froni hb ad t.:i
foot in flamine red. ri-.iw l as a high p ik-t ..-f Sa-.3a-
Ibonisitni oIr siome other p, lEntt poll .f rte Al 'li,:ant fol-
:sts In thi robi i- offii e lie loonid taller than
Robert or Rider Ital ever seen him hiefort. and lt-ile
was dicnit% in1 hi- Rait ld a ginmnly earniie-t Irne in
his Laze that ie-nlme-l inspire that i.robij ing. ileiit
audience with awe Millinc-iut haid bl-en 2iv\n her
instructions: shb- skirt-ed thi heii. Ieat hcdIl tie Ii.nh. l.
and quietly -at doiJn iip.iI it. Her grandfathler plain.
md him-elf directly ibeihind hei. The boy whn foll.w-.
ed him stood by his side. and noci- it vwan seen that
what he carried wa-. a sno, %whlite kid
As the little plr.up took upi its prl-itilon the (hant-
ing re-i.oniniln. ed But towii it wa. louder. qiiiTker.
frenzied: now it was, a pa-.sioate invocation. andtl ie.
ire leaped h aer a- mluie fuel iwas thrown Iupi.n it.
and te hwayin e people b-eame wildly agitatd fan.
liks. sweat ipoinlirn iin ti in their Ibodie-. oan lle(kniil
the li.s i-f n.ot a few. Luider and ]luder ri'e- their
vot e-s: and wlichit the ouidt had ireai.h -d its fulle:'t
vulunme. i s wildeij st :e'..udo. th, \ol..e of Tak.i oo
ttundered 'i'o t -irt. e wir,iti antl in the ni(ist if iall
thaI telmplesl 1f soui ti it niet-ie lie ii.ulii he u.'i-i i
His totLes dItoindated the orlieti a dlid his tatulre.
lid the wild look in his et.-. and ihe ,'-'epini .he--
tres lie wa- now malkiii with his arnti But the
zae I(t lir-bet and Rider wa a rixcl on the unhappy
!il who -.at 'tarinia Into the tire. hardly vonstiiiou. iof
Iat vas pruoieedinE ail-itnd her. pale in that lea!.-
Bi lipht. witli liie-. ..if fatigiie and terru'r sta mped
llpon her far Site looked as though ?he it was whi.
Iould he the sa rilii e ti e be offered upp that night.
Robert, tiinpd sitk. i:lutIhed Rider's irm. He
tblisper' d: "Thi-k i. awful. Rider. it should le v stop-


1I


pcL- That i' l %%ill dit> of- exp.,-dil' it *:,t .i- tli n'
.l- t. n it ll ,l\ % heatl>. nihi-i. I .nnotl In-.,-.k
' Al a ,."y r ,,r .-
"You daiL i,.t iiIte'frt '-." ,Nhiisp.led idlet qui..k
ly "It u.,iull p.jll all that tlleW) .ire trying tl do. and
it is v\,Try rIel l..I hemn If auythlnig happ.ut-d lin
thi..uea u-. tihey \ulild -ay that t\ bhad rioblii Mil.
lii nt i.t l hii one tli lit'ife."
RBt thin. till.--
D.i i i, .in rt t. t .'
R..litlrt ili not an.-e'r. but f.ixt-rd bis ty.'-. .rain
,I thie .: tii- ..ie tIlii- u He folundl that !ie did niot
\.1:| t to l-a\re
H-. <"i2 TI'ak'. .. lut e \-his riht lihandi i tl, thi
'fold- oi bi.- Il'o aiil withdraw it. Hi-, left liaind he
hi l o,'t-r Mitll. int' lihead: hi,- s-eemed l.t be tpi inkling
lier v' ith im.- ,.iWde M.llii'e than un.. i.- ii 'eptue ed
thi' motenlentl. et.' ni-iiiber if' that I.IV.II. -.te
,iilts the y'.uripg omuniii ivlw still laia i'lu-'etitite upon
the ;l'orini. v\.:rt, Iin hinm i ith int.-nt ei-es. Again
hii rIi. ii',. in that thundI erl'.' i ichanrt. :nni at a
sii.nl ftrotl hitli the Otel'.ir -eae-tLd li-r -iri ini. and
irnl. l n- luiintinu.d. hei- a- [a ma3 boil to lt'inii.
hi. Ik -.how-il that. atil hi, inmperii-u.it i liitrinat
illn- it.icIe .uhI.i a nuilt muit hlavt'.e he l (hri-.tilibe.
l ng i.t Ha:.ri. th,. -lave hoi rose to the covirnan ie
of the nirtli if llayti. anld .bwhi. haitd i,-'l hb his own
[iarnIl bur a fe-'w ai' hfit'r ie. ht-n a.: lai.. -.t[i.kl-n
.itid hiiples-.. h- kineiw that tihe 1c-riei hi had rulil
-'t i- mar.hlIin- ain 'r him \ ith death in their
b-art. Lhut lhere Tks ... liould rule (.on! Iy et-ailth
ali( through t-at of hi.s supe.irnatuial ifts. Anti t-
iiijih lie ,,a, calling ujp.i hi. gl-4 ) Loir p.er-in:.,j aili.
li..ir ziinnui. he ita a suplilianiani i., li kt lnw that
lie might lie strivine av;,.it[t p'ai.%l-r' that were
mni.ltwei than hie.
He tca-.iil Silenci fell agaiu. inten-er. ll'r-
ireathle-- than heftlre It was a- tltiiugh -tveriy'.on
held hi- br-atli Tlie ni ,nitni r .it -.ic rier habt 11omr
Wtrh his left hand Takou lo,,i. riok th,- kid
i'rin ilt- bho., and iiihe little r-atuie hi-aretl pitifully.
lie pra-ped it hy the h heatd. hoid inv it over
Mdli'...n't. -vhile, it k.i k ed swiftly In a vain effort ti,
- tie,. itself Frii. Iji-eilatih hi- rbe hlie ihail drawn a
II.niL. .-hinini knite and thli he "laved inl a '.i'tt t
Situal t.i a mni-ni:t .r Ti.. Thltn. ithl a swift
intrien- t. ,li- thrust it iinto. the dnimal's thri..at.
The blood ,.-purted it a hot -tieam uprtJ the
jlit u t thle ai I and a lioarl'e t(.y burst frinm ti.
pi-opl- Deftly tv il l ni mail laved Milli-ent 'with ihe
.lirj line blinrJ, anti n'i.-, theie m as nrO rhi thnm
in th-e -i iUnd,- that ..aliu fi'-' thi lip uif that irt d.
hI r il d-hiin-. iith a i nis An. h:,tiurt .: -jai ulLitioni' <.
fr,.nz y.a aN iil medley itf .:i i And Takeon wi-as -lioit-
intz toor. at theii ill lang.- f Iii -.inourijus tU(e hlie


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vi-, chltarc iniL tlh.' e i il li[in s thari t Iafl takci- pi--l---
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lie hanlthe'l iromni h r nei.ilbourhihriii eve-rlatint gly
FI-h hIall -a> rjfit d. the v% rti:t v.a.i i i i, h ie r.....Ilai lm d
til u ip[li:inrl. his p.,-ver % ,. tI .-! t ie i than liat tof
ani.ryone it had hr91 li2 t hil CIl' dti r aiil hrt~ai to) thit
state. thi. battle h i .a- wn anid the riil wa- friie
Amd. tlihn. -tai thin ly -lI.. _ngrirn~u at -li:h it e atl -
i-rillp. a niewv i ly ro-.e ipoi i the air tini n i hi-an'l
a. tve tile Ishou in It i.-i fr 'l',.In the voi:i-- : f a
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Iled Ite Inanm] :. ,f 'Ch is' "w As terl- II t I na



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-hrleked out to an aguny anil .-.psam ..f fear.
M.-n and nomen who had sprung upright werei
pointing in onie dirmtion with outstreti:h.l armsn
Their motioni at tra(ted utniverial attention and
frm Rober't'- lip i- ao i amie thart ani me exlamation
--0 Christ'
Fur there, abiiutt the sport whence Mlillicent and
thie wlti ih dnotorhi bail e-erged into the licht. ltuod
Ili e grteque fig- a nightt. illshapn llshapen hull
rwi.e tihe natlli: l i t of an3 creature that these peot
rle had ever -elen. andi about its neck hung a .haiu
that igowedl as tIholupl it ,we'r. oft ire. and ItS eyes
v\eic like balls of tirt as th,<: rolled n meuatinEly it
its hid.-ous Ihead. The brute paAed the eilund sliow
ly. as it -tared at th.e gibbhering t. irl. it U as a-
th.:.ueh it were about to advan:ie upon them But
rthey waited Ifor o u in. i:'.. It all happened in a mo
niei orI tto E\vtrryone was i.n his and her feet
Thromllh the tree titl all lub-held. sireiaming: vain
ly Takoi for a brief instant. Iri ilit r-. -tay them:
rilv didin not li-hed him. diid not even se-e ir hear
hinm: their one thliught, their only impuls.e, was t..
lee to saf'tt An]d as they Htftl Rfibert hr.erdi the .-ne
aordl. *Rollin I (-altf!" Andi till thie oitast.rer stoi,.,d
their. though alri ad. it elmtdi.i to he vaiiislhitin
Milii,.ent had hie-n lifted in Tak..n'- armni .i. suon
.as the hil man realie-d that tllhere .a- nritlhing to hie
eainedl iy waiting. Fear "was in his fire also. th..,uch
affection and pride would ha\ve impelled him t... front
even that devil iliait flared at himl \ithli yes tof fire.
hut he knew lie o :I- p.:v.erles' al, ne. Milli.t.ent hail to
he conveyed awa\ : ait this -pot tlihee as Lininiminllnt
danger With the girl in hi., arms the old man
ldiappcarii anltone the trees. Then Rider and Robert
sa that there a, not.lhine whhate've- thl-er- thi.
.rent hull had also goue
""Great _" God' W'h t I- t ~ i meaniun .if thi-?'"
cried Rlubrt. thoueli even in liis agitdiun he r.'-nimnt-
hered i w to i ulilu, his v i.:e. "Rider. what dI..es
itisi mean? What was tlhat (i-vil" I i iuld not have
thought it pussibl, ldid th,-e e devtl-%norr.,hipp, r-
bring it out of the pit'"
Rider smiled. a rini and mirthleis- smile YOu
heard what they said." he vwhispered ca-mltiusly "It
was what they call a Rolling-Calf. an c\il spirit or
devil that is supposed to take the form of a .'ianti -
hull. Even to see It is ilanriius,- Ti, he attacked
by it is certainn death."
"We have been in touch with h(ll to-night." said
Robert bitterly. "it is all about u "
"Hell is about us wherever we are" rl.joi.ied
Rider: "'but don't raise your voice. I believe that
the chief devil is very close to tus now."
"That brute?" asked Robert qluickly.


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NR,. that woman The brute thai m. e all sa,.
Robert. was. believe ule. a figment .f th. niaeini-
tion. It had tno exitenlie utidSe of the had brainl
of the n iikede-t witch in this county y. Di.n't you
unidettand?. S hl! I thonii ht so'"
Rider grasped Robert's arm to -teady hini. Into.
the now dleserted spaie. where tihe fire -till burnt
nrightl). stepped a slight figure hclthed all in bia..k
and like a man .They knew it at on.e. Thcie ".va~
no mistaking It.
Annie Palmer walked over to where lMlillicent
had been hittingg and looked diin upon the dead body
of the kid. w-hich the crowd had been too startled to


ratke away. Then -he cast her eyes -lowly i'oiun
her. -.andiug still f'r a minute. as though to listen
for any oounid that mitbt indicate some watcher in
the w~oodis. She heard nothing The men. holding
their breath as thby looketid. .iw her krick contempt
irisly thli kid's .arcase that lay at her feet: then s-,
laugheld The utniust contempt wa. expressed in thai
peal of iauchlter. contempt anti a ionsciousness (.
rniimph. Shbi turned and went the. way she had
onime.
"She rnde bere: she must have left her horse out
underer. said Rider. when he judged that she bad
Eone some distance. "You see. I was right Sh-


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1929


Branch Managers
Jamaica

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conjured up that vision to frighten the people and
to terrorise that poor girl still further. Poor Mil-
licent' I think this is the end of her now."
"'Good God! Is she dead?"
"That I don't know; but she must have seen
that terrifying spectacle: everybody did. She knew
it was not expected: so there could have been only
one cornlusion for her: it was sent to prove that she
had not escaped, that everything her grandfather had
done was so much time and effort wasted. Mrs. Pal-
mer must have heard of this exorcism; she has prob-
ably been having Takoo watched. And she knew
when to come here too; she must have waited until
she felt sure that everybody was here who was to
attend: then she rode over and took her own time
to strike. She has perhaps killed Millicent just as
though she had stuck a knife into her. But killing
doesn't come strange to her."
"And she promised me to help!" exclaimed Rob-
ert.
*And deliberately broke her word. I always
thought that possible. She suspected that, even if
you had nothing more to do with Millicent, .you
would not remain with her. She was right there,
too: but I also fancy she thought that if Millicent
aot better you would take up with her again. Annie
doesn't believe in anyone. So she has taken no
chances: and now she will lie to you. That's how
the matter stands, to my thinking."
"Rider, we must help Millicent."
"If I could I would, gladly; but what are we to
do?
"I want to find out where they went to-night; if
TaLkuo is convinced he has failed he may now be
willing to try what a doctor can do. Psyche must
find where he is, and I am going to take this matter
up with Annie. We have not failed yet."
It had started to rain. Steadily the dark clouds
overhead had gained in volume and depth; during
the last half hour the moon had shone but fitfully;
then only pallid gleams had struggled through the
veils of vapour; now the light had gone and
every distant star was blotted out, and from tlie
velvet black above came pattering down the heralds
of the deluge to follow.
The rain fell slightly at first; a minute
later it rushed earthwards in great splashing
drops and buried everything around in pitchy, mov
ing. almost palpable blackness. There was no seeing
the path three feet ahead. But Rider knew the
country and so knew how to find himself about
it at any hour of the night and day, though he had
nomei this way but once before, and that but a couple
of hours ago. They were drenched before they left
the shelter of the wood; as they toiled over the
bills on the other side of which lay Rosehall, they
realized that they could not possibly get wetter
than they were, but still they pressed on at as rapid
a pace as the now slippery ground and the murk
oiuld allow, for they feared the chill and the para-
lyI ing fever which so often followed a wetting in
these tropics. The walk was silent; they were too
inucli occupied with the difficulties of their passage
to attempt to talk; besides which, they would have
had to shout in that roaring vertical torrent. Then,
just as they reached the Rosehall boundary, the
rain teased as though it had been shut off by the
turning of a faucet; ceased entirely; and the clouds,
rapidly thinning, began to fade away into the
ether, the blue sky shone bravely out once more,
and the moon rode brilliant and bathed all heaven
and earth with silver.
The transformation was complete, miraculously
swift. Every object now stood out with distinct-
ness. and wherever there was a declivity streams
of water were rushing downward: muddy, brawling.
while from the sea there swept laudwards a delic-
ious wind which, however, the ,odden men enuld
not appreciate since'it struck coldness to their very
hones and made them shiver. Robert plodded on,
nji longer now interested in phenomena which, at
some other time, he would not hare failed to admire.
Then something that Rider murmured caught
his ear and sent a thought through his"brain.
"After light darkness, and after darkness light,"
said Rider. "'The light triumphs."
S "Yes, and it may be an omen, Rider," commented
the younger man. "It seems so to me!"
"One comes to believe in omens in :ountriie like
this." Rider agreed. "We are always, consciously
or otherwise, seeking for a sign."
"It may be one," insisted Robert, catching at
any straw of hope and comfort.
"We part here," said Rider; "your vwa is before-
yiu. and I had better hurry to my den and get out
of these clothes. Don't neglect to strip immediately.,
oni get inside and rub yourself down dry. Perhiapr
you had better swallow a mouthful of rum too; it
will help to keep off fever. Rum is a medicine when
you are not so used to it that it can do nothing but
fuddle your wits."
Rider added that he would be with Robert as
early aN possible in the morning and went his way.
Robert hurried on to his room, followed the advice
of his friend, and then flung himself on his bed.
Wide-eyed he went over the incidents of the
night. Again and again he said to himself that, if
Rider was right, if that monstrous creature with
the eyes of fire that he had seen had been merely the
effect of Annie Palmer's will, then indeed she her-
self was a devil. And he was resolved to fight that


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COMPANY OF CANADA


II I

Issues more ordinary Policies than any other Company in the
British Empire.


Premiums collected in Jamaica have been invested in Jamaica.


0 Loans are granted at the Kingston Office.


All proceeds from Glaims, Maturing Policies or Bonus Allotments
-- All proceeds from Glaims, M~aturing Policies or Bonus Allotments


may be left on deposit if desired.
on these funds is 52%j Gapita
at any time.


Present rate of interest paid
al or Interest may be withdrawn

*


Invested funds exceed Ninety Million Pounds.


d


devil. It was not only with an old superstitious Afri-
can negro that she should have now to deal.

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

ARE YOU NOT AFRAID?
AGGED nerves and a physical frame taxed by the
experiences of the previous night, notwithstand-
ing, Robert abided by his resolution when, after but
a couple of hours' sleep, he rose, shaved, bathed, and
changed his clothes that same morning, for it was
morning when he had thrown himself on his bed to
think. At nine o'clock Rider made his appearance,
and Robert informed him briefly what he intended to
do. Rider did not look hopeful, but made no attempt
to argue. He had some knowledge of human nature;
he felt certain that it was better that the young man
should be allowed to follow his own mind just now,
whatever came of it.
At about ten o'clock Robert was at the Great
House asking for Mrs. Palmer. He was informed
that she was still in bed, but- would be down pre-
sently. He waited in the drawing room.for nearly
half an hour, when she (ame in, clothed daintily in
white, and if she was paler than usual she seemed
otherwise no worse for h r adventure of the night
before.


"Have you come to wish me a merry Christmas
the day after?" she enquired, taking a seat near to
him. "Or to what am I to attribute this visit?"
She was very calm, very collected, even formal;
he gained an impression that she knew it was on
no pacific mission he had come. He had an impres-
sion that she knew something of that reason and was
prepared to have the matter out with him.
"No," he said slowly, "it is not to wish you a
merry Christmas. You had a strange Christmas, but
hardly a merry one. I know that."
"Yes?"
"Yes. You made me a promise and broke it.
You pledged me your word that you would try to rid
that girl's mind of her obsession, and instead of that
you increased it. You have lied to me, Annie, and
quite probably you have killed a human being. That
was your work last night. I can't conceive how it
could have been merry work even for you; it was
devilish work. I know all about it."
"Indeed?"
"Yes. I saw you last night; I was there, just as
you were there. You did not imagine that, did not
expect it, did you? You thought you would tell me
that you had done your best, and that I, being a fool,
would believe you. But I know you now. There
isn't a word of truth in you."
(Continued on Page 91)


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. i i i i l i i iiii l .F


1929





PLANTERS' PUNCH


A NOTED SYRIAN NAME


SIR SAID PASHA .1llOIC0AI


SN this page there appear re... photti:iaph-l The
name of both the men thely repilsEri i.- Sh1i.I.
cair; these Shoucairs are cO..eeii- : I.t:lWi wite- hlrn
in Syria; one entered the -.i.vi,.- t' Ihe Si:iudan
Government in the early nin-rtis -..1 tilted last cen.
tury, the other came to Janu:r.ia trwntlr.irllt years
ago.
The Shoucair who remainiil 1II rile Ea-t Ihr
came chief adviser to the FinniainiI S-.:retarv of
the Soudan Government (wih ii ,f. l'.ur-p is Brii-
ish), was made a Commandtr :of the RPath and thEn
a Knight of the Order of the Bril.-ll Empire The
other Shoucair entered business; in a ;maall way h- rr.
has steadily won his way upward. and today is
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eti fam iely l l hii,., I ..r.:in haU ra.li-id in l] I't1 "
The .lJaiiiana Shuu,:air is %t-,vy rn.itirali'. prt..ud
itf his offl ial t -lati lt.:i i..p lar bi..tli t .lhe
natives of the Silatl a.inl "-itli (the Brnltli pLr"pl.
there Si Sr Sai!l F'-ha Shlirtudi i i atn t>xpL.It i[ I
riancial naitte-rs aii rirmn b-li-v..i ini Briti-h iti.
ilutnc. in rie Ea-t Mr SanI4 Shi>utillr I,\-- Ja.
naila and ir'-.artli It .1- hl i; I hi.- Hp ila.i a -lnti-
mental attachni-nt to. S r!'i.. lit tl iS pr!',ier arid
right. Bur. a I.- l iitr it i, iiis Jamai.-a frtlrtlis and
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The Witch of Rosehall
tI('C Ollturlt l P,,hi Plli: .' l
She sat very till. lenehiii and unieni n hing
her hands, her lips set tight. her eye- widi wibth
rage. Then. to his great surprise. instead of rising
and driving him from her presence, she began toi
laugh. There was contempt in her laugh. He alwa3 s
seemed to catch that r-ntemnptuous note in thes-
days.
"So you were at the n-gr, ceremi.nv for taking
off ghosts, and y-u saw re ii thel' too. and -ou say
that I have killed this slut of your.'! What a ..Iever
soul you are at making corr(-et d,-.lu,.tiun- I didn't
see you. but what is to hinder me from sta ing that
yo+i have killed this girl? What did you Fee me do
more than you did? Why. my dear man. I didn't
even arrive until the people had all run away. If
you were there yo.i surely must kur.' that. I
had a right to he there; that orgy was again-t the
law. It was my duty to prevent or stop it. I sup,
pose you know that "
"I am not such a fool as you think." lie retorted
sharply. "'That hull-"
"Well. that bull." she prompted.
"Was your work. Ir was intended to increase
Millicent's terror, to rob her of her last hope of
freedom from the haunting of whi:h bhe believes
herself a victim."
"Who told you that? For you did not arrive at
that conclusion by yourself, did you? Who is this
new 'friend' of mine that puts ideas into your head.
ideas which you are quite incapable of originating?"
He did not reply. She went on. "Perhaps I
can guess. Ashman tells me that you are verve
friendly no" with Rider. and Mr Rider is a man
who, when Lie is not drunk. believes he knows a lot.
He goes at the end of this year: lie wonlld go to-day
hut that the law conmpel- us to keep the full people.
meant of white men required on the estate at a
iroublous time like this. Wa- Rider with you last
night. Robert? Tell me what he thought of the
result of hi fornier years of preaching to the
negroes- that was hardly a Christian -.rvice was
it?" She lauch-d again "And they seenied to have
called up a chost Well. I believe in ghosts. and all
these sacrifices must be efficacious in raising them
Are you going to hold me re-ponsible for the meeting
last night?"
"I hold you responsible for Millicent's condition."
he cried. "and I have no doubt that 3ou went to
her aunt's hou.e last Tuesday night to obeah her-


that is the lii~ lt ..rdl. and I atnm Iu. going to bear
ihl)oli thii hu-li ar I.'nt~ ri You wi re een to leave
tili- Ilad' a %th -,I v..i had ii,.r ( ine for many
nilth- i .-aw I ou mi -elf. an.l you bi-id a boy with
I.'.o That Il i I- still h .er. (iiea.ih. even if prac.
Li-.Ld Iy w. hite woml09 1a i i against teI- law. and this
tinI it mean l thel life .:1i free fe.llilw-i reatt re. Un-
letbs by this evening ti l litri~e t i- on rhe wnay to re-
io er3.\ Is. Pahlir,. I am -,iula 1.1, the i agistrales
of MNlnteeo Bay ti. lay a harue agaiin-t yuu And I
.hall ". lurth.-r. I slhai l urvge that au i .-nquiry be
made inti, thI death ,if your husbands Takoo helped
you there. I hat- h.earil it said. iur Tak-,o is old. he
love-- his i ranuldaiighth:r. aiid If siie dies be may
think it aoirthi wlillei ti turn King" evidence; he
ian plead fhiar and intlimliaation. and they are not
likely t- dio im ianyilthing if it can bie shown-as I
have no doubt it :ran be-that you were the actual
mirii riii-'.-.s. BRild-. I inalerstand thatr t\\o of the
nui l-rd. rs .. I ....In ittei l by your lf alone You will
he plaiedl in Lthe ilr-.k chaired \with mur-l r and with
practising obeah v.irth intent Ito ciaue death. Onr-
you a arr-rtedi. the hslavte, here. 'U.lln you terrorise.
will turn against .ou EEvidence will )e found. You
see i. hat you have to expect. don't you? Now, will
)ou agreed to ,top your evil nork while there is
time?"
Sil h I l Jei.h. spok-tn too, in a grim and resolute
mianoer. which left niu doubt whatever that it was
niuant. Adnie had niev.r h-ard the like of in her life.
Here was a Iharge dlEtlib,-rately brought against her
by a white man. and for ti. lir-t time she was told
that meni in antlihirity in Mlonrito Bay would hear it
al o,. and she knen thlit it' they did they might feel
(ompelitd to take somir atrion. Slhe looked long at
Robert.- Was thi- he who. but a couplee of weeks
be-fore. n as kis'-inl her lip" pa-iioi.iately. protesting
hi-. undying Inve for her. almost her slave? Panic
;eeizied her. Wa hier beauty waning. then. her power
over men di-appearine? For that would be the
iulimate calamity' Or was it that this boy really
loved tihe mulatric girl who had dared (o herome her
rival? Her vanity would n..t admit that her beauty
was I -e pot.tEir than htfore. This surely was another
Instance oif a while man Ieing bewitched by a native
harpy, vwhn. quite probably wielded influence of a
.iani(ee-ous -hara,.ter through he.r grandfather's
a-en, y Annie firml believed in such influences.
It waas (lear. Here was a threat and challenge.
andI if -he yielded ill licent must be victorious. The
gill woull have Robert: she had no doubt of that.
He miiht say no. might believe what he said. but he
,a- not as steadfa-t as he thought he was. and
Millicint would have him in the end and be able to


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mol.k at Annie Palmer. And she. Annie Palmer. she
would neitr gi\.- him up: he niust be here or-.
Better lie .ere eadil than the lover of a nigger girl!
If she niiimt g without him. so- must every other
wonian-MTilliient or any >othe-r
She bent uveri. .s that shie seemed huddled up
on thle sifa. and. her eyes cre fixed on the floor.
She had tried persuasion. appeal. fascination. She
had other and different weapons. Would they assist
her? At least they wouldd he tried. They must be.
for her situation was desperate.
"I love you and you have threatened me," she
said softly "You have charged me with murder


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and have promised to denounce me to the magistrates
Are you not afraid. Robert?"
"Afraid of what?"
*Of me."
-'No: you cannot harm me. I am not a super-
stitious Jamaica woman."
"You are not. But you saw what the others
saw last night, didn't you? And you believe that I
called it up from its natural dwelling place. You
are right; I did. I sent it there on purpose; it
obeyed my will. And you, white man though you
are, educated man though you are, you too saw it
and trembled, and had I decreed that it should
appear in your own room at dead of night, it would
have been there, Robert Rutherford. It will be there
to-night if I will it."
He laughed harshly. "I know too much to take
you seriously," he said. "Your spectral bulls and
horses are nothing real; merely something you think
up, and it seems that you must be on the spot before
they can be seen. They are visions to frighten
negroes and children. Tell what you have said to
your slaves and not to me: you cannot frighten
me."
"No? One of my husbands said as much to me
once. He is dead."
"You killed him."
"Let us agree that that is so. I can kill others,
Mr. Rutherford."
"Only if they are in your power; but, remember,
I am not. And perhaps the men you killed were
never sufficiently on their guard. You are a woman,
Mrs. Palmer, and I hate to speak as I do to you, but
it must be done. You know I mean what I say.
If a change for the better has not taken place in that
young woman's condition by this evening, to-morrow
I go to the authorities with my story."
She sprang up, standing over him with flashing
eyes and trembling lips.
"Go!" she cried. "This comes of loving you,
worshipping you, giving myself to you, offering to
you everything I possess. Go! Tell your story. You
will have cause to do so, for your woman dies; do
you hear? she dies! and God Himself could not save
her. Tell your story and see what comes of it. The
magistrates have trouble enough just now with
threats of a slave rebellion in this parish. They will
have plenty of time to attend to you! They will
ask you for evidence, and you will produce a well-
Sknown obeahman whose granddaughter you have
;made your mistress and who you will say was
bewita-bed by me through jealousy. A fine tale that
will make, especially when told by a white man
agaiitt a white woman. You fool! All evidence
against me is buried these many years in my hus-


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bands' graves, and if you. a stranger here. or Rider.
a drunken unfrocked clergyman. were to a'ccuie mti
of obeah you would merely become the lauihinr
stork of the country. The nhite people hei-i still
have some regard for their own class and reputarinn.
they will 'know how to take your charges"
"We'll see. Mrs. Palmer. So y.vu will do nothing
for Millicent?"'
"CGo!"
"That is your last \,ord?"
"Do you wish me to cill s'ome slaves to put .'out
out of this house?"
"I wish I had never seen you." he crie'd bitterly.
"And I--I hate the very day I saw \ou! Only


a mean toward would have ldare-d t. talk to me. a
inoman. as )ou hai. done. O(-nl rlv -'mhi in lesi that
a man would have l-it me t''r a thine' su, h as you
have selei ted And it' it will urt \,ou more to know
that you are tihe real cause ?of hi-r rrdarh. I teil yoa
,o n,:,I Had you had nothing to do with h-r eh6
':-nuld have. lived until she withered so far as I wag
(.,nceri'ried But even while you were pretending ti
love me. pretending that you were mine only, yon
ha.i her with yu. chattered to her ahout tme. mixed
mn name in filthy conversations with her' F..rgir(
that ? What do you imagine I am' Forgive! I have
only just begun: I am by no means near the end
yet Think of that when you go to her funeral'"


- I I II I I


~...... .....1 1 .....





PLANTERS' PUNCH


She was raging now; he wondered if she were
quite sane She had let herself go-her fury was un-
o(untollahle. She took no care to keep her voice in any
restraint: she was storming. He caught up his hat
hurriedly and strode out of the room. He rushed
duwn the trout steps, threw himself upon his horse,
and rode away.

CHAPTER NINETEEN

THE DIE IS CAST
A nmment after, Annie was on the portico, every
nerve tensed, despair in her heart. She saw the
recklessness with which he dashed off towards his own
quart'-rs. read in that daredevil pace his resolve to
carry out his threat, to put everything at venture in
his dt'rnmination to punish her. He was lost to her;
hr had become a danger to her; and she was far
from no)t realizing what that danger meant. There
had been too many rumours and suspicions about
her. to a white man of his family and position-for
he would keep nothing secret now, and would be
vouched for by the rector of Montego Bay-the
authorities would be obliged to listen. True, they
would pay little attention to what he might say about
Millicent. But he would speak of her dead hus-
bands. demand why no investigation had been made
into three successive early deaths. And there was
always Takoo, and there were one or two others on
the estate who knew something, perhaps too much.
Yes: she %wa- in real danger. And it was coming
form a source from which she could never possibly
have expected it.
She mu.rt take some action. Frustrated passion,
injured vanity, a wild longing for vengeance all
urged her to it, as well as the instinct of self-pre-
servation. She must act and at once. Every hour
wa prei-tlou. now. Besides, a man who had insulted
her so. and for a native girl, ought not to escape un-
punikhed.
She went to the rear of the house, called a boy,
and ordered him to run over to Mr. Ashman's and
bid him come to her immediately. If Mr. Ashman
were not at home the boy must find out where he
was and bring him.
Ashliman was soon with her. He had seen from
a window i.af his room when Robert had ridden up
to the Great House: had watched for some time and
had noticed Robert dash away later on at a speed
which suggested that some unpleasant scene had
r.i.r:urredl between him and Annie. Ashman knew
that he had been sent for because he was badly
ntUe:(hi-.
Annie wasted no time in preliminaries or equivo-
cations. She came to the point at once; told her
,e'ti,-eer with what she had been threatened, and
liw she hail ordered Robert Rutherford out of her
presence, never to return. She spoke quietly and
tohererntly enough, but with the suppressed fury of
a sq.orned woman who, to her face, had been told
s'ome damning truths.
i"H can make it dangerous for me, John, and
y.3a know I have no friends in this country-except
you. What am I to do?"
"So you have found out that I am your only
friendly. Annie? And you turn to me after the young
man wihoim you thrust me aside for, and insulted
me otr. is about to try to get you on the gallows for
the sake :of a brown girl! What do you expect me
1., do?"
"I expect you to behave like a man, and not
like a thild." she answered with some asperity. "To
begin to fling things in my teeth, especially just
nw. ir. not a very chivalrous action. Will you help
me ior n.,t?"
Hi- was a. little overawed by her downright mood
and felt that this was no time for recriminations.
Shb was in a desperate temper and a desperate
plight: she might do something terribly risky on her
own account without thinking clearly about the
Oiiletijueni-e'.
"I will help you to the best of my ability," he
replied ith decision; "but at the moment I don't
see what we are to do."
"He might want to see me on a gallows, John,
as yu haie said, but you don't, do you?"
SiGod forbid!" exclaimed the usually impious
John Asnhman; "I have always loved you far more
than lie ever could, Annie."
S If yo. are to continue to love me, John, if there
i to be- anything left of me to love, he must be
prevented from carrying his lying tales to the mag-
istrite. Remember, any sort of evidence might be
,'on-idered enough to sacrifice me on." '
"I don't think it would," he said, and in this was
honest. "but of course we don't want any trouble,
or open scandal, though it may be some time before
anD ,fi us here will have time to think of purely
pei-onal matters. The slaves--"
"How do you think he can be stopped?"
He shrik his head; "I can't think, Annie. Un-
les- you can help this girl."
'Impossible. What can I do? Send to tell her
that I am going to save her? She would not believe
it. Takoo would not believe it. They both would
say that I was setting a trap for them to hinder
thenm from doing what they can on their own account.
And I don't want to do it either; I wouldn't do it if I
could. It \would be like your going on your knees to


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beg forgiveness of a slave that had thrashed you in
public. Could you tolerate the thought of that?"
The set of John Ashman's jaw as she asked the
question was answer sufficient. He knit his brows
in an effort to think.
"John," she Whispered, "this whole parish is in
an unsettled state, isn't it?"
"Worse at this moment than it was two days
ago," he admitted. "I have been hearing some stories
this morning. They won't turn out to work on
Wednesday, and I doubt if they will at all until they
are forced. There may be plenty of fighting all over
the country in another day or two."
"And white men will be killed?"
"That is very likely," he said soberly.
"So if this Robert Rutherford was killed...?"
"Annie!"
"Why not?" she asked, speaking very low. "It
may be his life or mine!"
"I couldn't do it," he replied positively. "I hate
the man; but I could not do it. I am only an over-
seer; I would be found out; it would be my life for
his."
"I am not asking you to risk anything, but I
think you would not like to see me in a court room
answering that man's accusations, and perhaps, after-
wards, on the gallows. Don't you think of that?"


"It wouldn't come to that," he said; not wishing
to face the ultimate hideous possibility, and feeling
uncomfortable under the repetition of that ominous
word "gallows".
"It might; it probably would. See here; you
have men under you who are pretty hard char-
acters, haven't you? And there will be trouble all
around. If one of these men-you know what I
mean, don't you? No one would see him if he were
careful, and you could find ways and means to help
and protect him. Money would be no object. .."
He sat very quietly for quite a long while, think-
ing. He saw her plan. It was feasible, and need
involve no risk for him. Yet, hard as he was, he
did not like the idea of dooming a young white man
to death. This seemed murder, and he shuddered at
murder. The killing of a slave would not have ap-
peared to him to be at all in a similar category.
"Have you any plan?" she asked at length.
"I don't like it, Annie," he confessed; "yet you
must be protected. There-is a man on this estate
whom Rutherford has treated nastily ever since the
first day he came; Rutherford kicked him, you re-
member, when he was going to punish Mary, and
since then has shown that he has no use for him.
I know he hates Rutherford, and he would stop at
nothing. .I expect he is planning some sort of mis-


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85 Harbour Street


Kingston.


chief here now, but he is afraid of me. If he got
his freedom and some money-"
"He can have both. How can it be arranged?"
"You would have to give a receipt for a sum of
money which he will say he paid you for his 'free
papers' a couple of weeks ago, the papers to be
given to him in January next. That would be quite
in order, and it would show that he arranged to buy
his freedom some time ago. Afterwards, you could
give him twenty pounds. That would be enough."
"Promise him thirty when he has-you know.
And give him ten at once, with the receipt you speak
of. It's worth it. You can depend on him?"
"I am sure I can." Again Ashman paused to
think heavily.
He resumed. "To-day is Monday, and Ruther-
ford can do nothing before Wednesday, for all the
offices in the Bay are closed. On Wednesday he pro-
bably will leave for the Bay; but, anyway, our man.
can watch him and follow him wherever he goes.
Pompey has been a hunter of wild hogs for a long
time," added Ashman grimly. "He is a splendid
'shot'."
A little shiver went through Annie; in a flash
of imagination she pictured a malignant negro
crouched behind a boulder or a clump of cane at
some lonely spot by the wayside, heard a shot ring
out, saw Robert pitch headlong from his horse and
the slayer slinking away to refuge. No slave would
track him now, none would interfere on behalf of a
white man. This shot indeed might be considered
their first blow for freedom, the signal that was
to plunge the whole parish in blood.
She shivered, for the man fallen stricken from
his horse was one whom she had loved, whom, in
her mad, perverted way, she loved still. But it was
his life or hers, and if he lived and Millicent lived-
for she could not be sure that Millicent would die,
for all her terror: if he lived and Millicent lived he
would be to this woman what he had been to her.
The thought hardened her heart.
"I am doing everything for you, Annie," said
John Ashman significantly as he rose to go.
"Your reward is myself, John," she said with a
bitter smile of self-pity, and he wondered what his
ultimate recompense would be if in the future he
offended her or she wearied of him.
*
When Ashman took his departure Annie re-
mained where she was, sitting very still, listening
to voices in her brain that had begun to speak with
insistent distinctness. It was as if she were a
stranger that these voices spoke to; she heard them
from the outside as it were. The die was" cast, they


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-aid: Robelrt LHutherford was d'omi-d. He wHouldl
dil,. tor tibe murderer wuiuld not miss: hate as well
as iupidity would nerve his arm and direct his aim.
Robert n-ouid die. And what after that? Sie loved
him. he desired himi passinnately, in spite of the
insults he had put up,,n her. of th. indifference he
now showed for her. she wanted him. And if
he died she would never see him again; death wa.
the one irremovable obstacle in anyone's path.
He would not act if Millicent lived, and e\en if
the girl lived. might she. Annie. not be able to win
him back again? Was that altogether impossible?
Without knowing that she did so she shook her head:
she could not forgive Mlllitent: and even were she


inclined to do io. that woman's c ase was beyond b
inter\enti..in now. She could set agencies -,f hat
in motion: she could not control thr-ir effect. PI
haps if ihe hail not interfered last night there won
have been a ibanl.e, now ever thing was beyoi
her po-aer, and what was to be must be. Tlhere w
still just a possibility that Millic-ent would recover
and Robert would not move until he knew the won
But if the girl recovered? Annie's whole being I
voted at the ignominy of having to watch, or ee
of gu.-ssing. Milicent's flaunting triumph.
She thought she might be able lt endure t]
eu, %.e-.ful rivalry if a woman of her own class,
even of her own race: the humiliation wou


BARTHOLOMEW LANE


S. R. REUBEN, Sole Agent.


144 HARBOUR STREET,


JAMAICA.


KINGSTON,


r


1929







PLANTERS' PUNCH


nut tilhen be -1, .ui.mplte. B tBull hle kiiew that Ilhi
Itst would lnver he offered to hler in this ciounirlV.
Thle white woni~tu le re tet. mo-'tt ,of th-ni 're butr
!dlinary looking: shek knue -i-e wa v c ion-if.ield lu Ite
tlbt most be.utitful ioman in all .Jamali .. li-e had
nrotllinc rt... fi31r frrm any .other %\hire ewoma( n N-adrly
all ot them i (had rivals aitung the colouti -d l iirl. but
a.i -ptedl thte ,itu.itioln and -.i brioughL t .abou no. op(-ii
iiuptlur'- with their hii-iand-; But -.he iadil n, legal
-'la it i.n Htljert. :Iili in any l .ir. umn-tanrcet *:.ui
t..kI-ra't- no pre l ..dr 1.1 hib aB' t <.ion. s. He u ist l I-,
li t- Ionl t. Other a biret .\in ien might .,muLpronlis-e aitli
tlih- w.. ti g *:-ndtlition'r and mnak a '-a rrii,.e fori -,i..
-1,tl .'f eiti ti vial picT e. t.Sh ;li-e .1..l It Ilt i -ini SL It h
pilifal net-akn l's ioVir -' h er ti .) lt-ir- pt lti.r aI rtni.ni
liket Atiutim L id r it T ulh huit mahtrei to hI: ..i it eil-
,ta<.'d tI ., .a'r,- for a.iti.V lie hil a :ti''ns n. lo] te-I .oin.
I-i ned -_.i'r But if .-he till iir ri linu -li \ _u111-I
i-Id u tIhlin to thli(.e lwh o alleh n ced her hI- -l,: th,
'trui ul c Iniiii t riou tti iu.- to th -e o (t .l.
S Lr lie (1 I. u\d' :.at : I-l u li.il.a n., r I.,..IitiI.!-
ni.i i rh.v oli. r L- l i ii gi tl t,. A m-l:iih. hI. rtI-lJ.
lih w.Jou lii h hi hel i 1 utcrt r ,-i n iempt if -ll.. di d hli-
.i-Iuld I-!k utl .nl hlr a .1 timorousn t li'-itj n o L ii-
it! k tool. lh-t. iwh hv-i liian l ai wa r e 'j i ilr'J. Asti
tr'I-ng Ipi[e ii- St lf-reliant rr iitSheinh li i ouilij
_nri- r -i ulitr t li .iiir It Ri.-'ri' lar- iilln She w'iuld
I.-pi-. hei -cif She f .w -..l, :I;pi-_ I fr-' lf f.,r ha\.
hii' a llo ihed lEr-'-l t ro .b- tlu piiued
But thle fiul i A a iln th is in b. r brainn
. t-rd her qllue riolji.s., andl they v,-- re %il it li,:l fut ll'r.
\Ihai wouhi lil'e h.,lId in i -lore fi..- lier l liin Rotberr
av:l L'one' 1W a~ ;Ile rli l -lle1m1 nl llit-I all .e Wilh a
tbore who. ri tly. ii.- halid H-lr-n able jutl tt ti. ilitei
l.iillt nli ie.' t'am AR hnj n to bh e her nt ti-.erl'. ehatr.
inga f terrible t.rrer vith her. inil-isting up|on being
her lovjElr? That ten woulbl be a hunlillation .i 1
sp,-akabli. a long.-1rawn oljt rtrtllre ie ilid nd:d m ?ee
hI selif endin rinE' it. h, w iould not
Bit A-himia-in would d he oi n hin t-luali He :3ire t,.r lier. .yes. he ki uu that. lie ared li ause l ie.-
S i..llii not l h:-l p it. hilt li l istr -ti-ri1d her and wviuldl
n..i fail t t l.' a ch li l [.o ~ 1 S Lhe ft'I lt 4le v..oull d
rinever be alible to Fget lid of ii ni I lit opeil di-.
ni.sal. andii th-ri_ bh mi-iht tr\ ... uhd.iid her will
h. threats if eTpIial're T-ho ri \'.'a- iiontii ren 1.,
*ihich v.oli..i hawe to h ai|e r with lhoilhi it ever
.iri-e: n.r b-' ,y tar i.illd i).: rth_ having ti. iendurt
lbi. man \v,..ck alie' week. nonlth after monthh. year
after \ear. .Anl hatirin hlim mori'e and uolre. Andd
,lw 'ing m for the- on.- great I,,t of her life. f.ii t he
mian ->,Whi she i(ri'elf hadl ju-t senten,:ed T., his
diath.
She did north think that ishe wouldd live hlihroi li
ihe fiituie wirbhout Robert. Sihe was no ,lone, r veir


yi'l.lg, arid -urt w"antl- not) man save him. She had
kir.nn the awful agon? ,of a boredom almost with-
',ni relief il tl .- month- before Robert's coming; it
wiJi(uil Ibe llith wttJr-e in the years to come, a night-
ili.te bla.k anti hide,-u- as hell. Think as hard
as she tould i.he saw no way of escape. She had
bill a pri-son about hir Its impalpable wall would
ih,:id iir f;~tt'r than i...uld walls of iron and stone.
faiint hop-e ii ki.-tId thrioulh her brain; she
uitli-' id it altojd. a9- thid-h in answer to the voices
nhii.h e--re painting her future in the blackest
Lhe'. .'nJillt'liini nliglit happen to turn the whole
ui..lr-P :f teti- The hired assassin might be hin-
Ild!er..I fi'.ni *.-rrT. in[- .iut hi' design at the last moment
aim:'s, Roilerjit mnit shrinkk, when it came to the
poiut. frt'im idenrt-int.iL her, even though Millicent
-l,-utld e i1t-.d It tihe-i,- things happened-and life
1a, flll : 1 i h ,out.- the-ordinary incidehts-all
miiiiL ..et i,- p il She could defy Ashman then.
iHlld- t. with Rolbelit alive and Millicent dead, he
%%i-i,[, II- -~ tlm i~- iv- i-n.ough.
Ir t\ai shi 'illitihli.r hope, this possibility, that
-hie lin to fi' r a Alalib. but this mood soon-passed.
A.a.ti -i t,- .as rlim.l!l-'P into despair. She walked
to tihe iideb-'ard i a letu with the silver which her
firr hiusblund hald i',.le,:ted with such pride), and
p.:lured iit for hir-i-rit a glass of madeira, which
-he iliank -i loly Tih- wine heated her blobd and
irain. -he felt -tro'.Liir ti will and in purpose. She
It'ai nt i-l bhen irit.i\-x.ed in her life; but during
ihe- Ilt .year ,ir -- -sii- had taken to wine as
-.iime -1:rt 1 re11 U .tti-'.- itrn the ennui that plagued her.
slhe tli.d io illii-ion : abut drinking. She knew that,
ti rnli g.tilIId though -l t.was, she moii~i pass the
limit ,'f -afetvr in drinking, might steadily drift into
a liahit if emi-intr,-xiatioa, and would in her loneli-
l-- 0 be all the nire likely to do so than other
\timen. She knew how\ drinking stealthily caught
hi.Id of antd itjmpl-teiy captured thousands of men,
3rli sorme Wi-men oil 1,o. in rill;s itnunry. They went
it, it fotr for':'-tfulne.-s and -..d l -ie. IOteni Ilth v found
it a nimater and a terriilet tyrant
But thi-r wr.a no hell) fur it. She must silence
th- doubts andi the tluistii ,nin-- in her mind, doubts
and qiue.-tioning- title like: of hiii:h had never tor-
mented h.r before Shpe must stifle them, or her
will miaht lie ve-akeni-d and she might become a
very fool, not knowing ivbat it, do; not standing re-
tjolute a-t shie had always lone. and so winning her
own admiration. She had set her course, had laid
her pliu: if slhe of her ,wn will altered them now
s.ht might find herself in an awful predicament.
If lan(Ce r Itfait tho i to intervene, that she could
not preven nr ut :l of her own volition, of her own
a(ctio. tot at.i now si ai- to give Robert Rutherford


every opportunity of bringing her to open disgrace,
which would be worse than death to a woman of her
spirit, and which might even send him to the arms
of that daring, insolent wretch if she happened by
some miracle to recover-that would be madness
on her part. Then indeed should she deserve any
horror that might befall her. She said aloud that
she could face anything but that.
Deliberately she poured herself out another
glass of the wine. She knew that she would not
cease to turn to it for aid until this whole crisis was
passed. She knew that she must not allow herself
to think much about Robert, for then the poignant
grief which gnawed at her heart might master her.
She gazed with staring eyes into the glass she held in
her hand. For the first time in her life she needed
extraneous aid to steel her to her purpose.

CHAPTER TWENTY

RIDER AND MILLICENT
IN the afternoon of that same day, at about five
o'clock, Robert and Rider called at the house
of a well-known doctor in Montego Bay and asked
(Continued on Next Page).


Benjamin Manufacturing Co.
MR. P. A. BENJAMIN, chemist, asked some years
ago why Jamaica should import all the patent
medicines it rei-uire i. instead of manufacturing
some of them. iniamw,ri grew some valuable medicin-
al plants. A trained chemist could utilise these
plants. There were other local products which could
be transformed into unguents and oils, toilet requis-
ites, and Mr. Benjamin had the requisite training
and knowledge to do this work. The only obstacle
that might be in the way was the well-known reluc-
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Mr. Benjamin would not admit that this was an in-
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the P. A. Benjamin iimdi-rinal and toilet products
and has steadily built up a large business which
merits the name of a local industry. More than that:
he has developed a certain amount of export trade
in these articles, and to-day the P. A. Benjamin
medicines and other goods are knov.iin thlirouhi..ii
Jamaica and elsewhere. All this has been achieved
by quiet persistence and by the placing of a really
excellent quality of goods upon the market, and now
thousands of people buy the Benjamin medicinal
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1929







PLANTERS' PUNCH


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The Witch ofRosehall
(Continued from Previous Page)
him to accompany them a little distance to see
a girl who was dying of superstitious fear. -It
was not the same man whom Robert had previously
asked to see Millicent. They explained the circum-
stances briefly, not.mentioning Mrs. Palmer's name.
The girl, they said, believed she had been bewitched
and was obviously in a dangerous condition. Did
the doctor think he could help?
He was sceptical. He had come across such
cases in his career, but he had never known much
help derived from a regular practitioner. These
people simply refused to eat, hardly slept; they were
convinced that their death was approaching and it
was almost impossible to rid their mind of the con-
viction. But he would go and see what could be
done. That could do no harm.
So they went on to the house of Takoo's daugh-
ter, entered the yard and saw a number of people
standing about, as on the first occasion when Robert-
had visited the place.
It was dark by now, the early dusk of the
December day had fallen and already lights were
gleaming in the little house. But in spite of the
obscurity the visitors observed that the people Were
hostile, for murmurs arose as they reined in their
horses and dismounted, and no one seemed inclined
to give them way.
Rider had been told of Robert's intentions. He
knew that his friend was about to -do something
that most men would have avoided. He did not
believe it would be easy, if indeed possible, to bring
home a charge of murder against Annie Palmer, and
he reflected that the long wait would prevent Robert
from returning home as early as he had hoped. He
was going too, and he wished to go quickly: he did
not wish to tarry in this country now one day longer
than was absolutely necessary. But Robert's
mind was made up, he-was not to be argued
with; he was in revolt against his weakness and
vacillation of the last three weeks, he was moved to
the depths, determined to do something that should
redeem, him in his own eyes. Rider understood all
this He acquiesced in what was said to him, even
if he thought the plan ratherfutile.
He had been asked and had agreed to go with
the young man to this place this evening, when
Robert had learnt from Psyche that Millicent had
again been taken there. He feared the worst.
And in Rider's mind was a feeling that Annie
Palmer, who had been told of Robert's intentions,


would not be idle in the meantime, could not afford
to be. Rider felt that seriou trouble was impend-
ing, trouble in which he would be a mere spectator.
For beyond a very circumscribed limit he could not
help at all. He had no power, no influence, no re-
putation even. And to warn Robert now would be
worse than useless; Robert would proceed upon the
path mapped out by himself in spite of all expostula-
tion or argument.
The three white men ignored the hostile mur-
murings and attitude of the assembled negroes. The
doctor took precedence, led the way to the door
of the room which Robert indicated, rapped, and, on
a woman coming to the entrance, mentioned who he
was and asked if they would allow him to see the
sick person.
The woman retired, returning in a few moments
with Takoo. The old man, even in that obscurity,
looked bowed and greatly aged. Gone was all the
power and dignity with which he had seemed clothed
the night before when, as the high priest of some
mysterious cult, he had dominated a multitude of
credulous fanatics. He now looked like an old,
broken negro, with all the energy gone out of him.
But at once he recognized who the gentlenmen stand-
ing there were, and he quickly came out to meet
them.
It was at Robert that he glanced, questioningly.
"I have brought a doctor to sec your grand-
dlaughter." said R.,h~ ri kindly. "The last. time, when
the other doctor came, you had removed.''
"It's no use, massa," groaned the old man heavi-
ly, Mlillie dying!"
"You had better let me see her," said the doctor
briskly; "quite possibly you are mistaken. Where
is she?"
Takoo motioned to the door; the doctor passed
in, leaving the rest of them standing.
Rider addressed old Takoo.
"Last night," he began, "you tried to take off
what you believe to be a ghost that is haunting
Millicent-oh, yes, we know all about it: we were
there though you did not see us."
"You there!" exclaimed the old man. "Then
you saw de spirit that-"'
"We saw everything. And we want you and
Millie to understand that it was nothing real; only
something imagined by by someone else who
caused you to see it. Can you follow me? That per-
son first pictured the Bull in her mind and had
power enough to make it appear to all of us also.
But the thing itself wasn't real; .it was only a
vision. Do you think we could get Millicent to
understand that?"


"Understand what, massa? If a woman have
power to make you see such a thing, what Lau .ou.
do against her? And it was real. Mlassa. Rolling.
Calf is real. And it appear just when I was taking
off the su'-kine spirit from Millie, Mlvr. Palmer's
spirit!"
Ril-r looked at the old man hopelessly. h.e spoke
vith such absolute certitude. Nothing could roo
out of his mind beliefs that were now a part oi its
texture. Rider made a despairing gesture.
Robert, however, resolved to see ahat his per-
suasion might effect.
"You know Mr. Rider and I would like to save
Millicent, don't you?" he asked Takou.
"Yes, Squire, but you can't. I fail. you must
fail too. And now you will have to look after your.
self."
He said nothing more, nor did th.\: they told
only await the doctor's verdict. Presently the doctor
issued from the room. He drew the- white men
slightly aside. "It is as I feared," he qaid. "the girl
is beyond all argument and beyond all treatment
She has had a terrible shock; her heart is failing.
It was never strong, though she might have lived
for years and years had nothing much occurred to
distress her."
The two men knew what this meant. yet the
question came from Robert: "Is she lyingg"
"I don't think she will live through the night."
Though Robert had been expecting to hear srme.
thing of the sort the actual words came as though
they were a blow. It seemed so horrible. this swift
passing from life to death of a girl who but a
few days ago seemed so free from danger and serious
care. This was tragedy in one of itn mst awful
forms, for behind it loomed the sinister figure of
what anywhere would be considered as malignant
and deadly witchcraft.
Takoo came up now. "I know what the dortor
say," he remarked; "he couldn't say different. You
want to take leave of me poor child before the go,
massa?"
"Let me see her for a little while xirst. will you"
suddenly said Rider, before Robert could answer.
"She is conscious now, I gather. I had better se
her; I won't be long."
He spoke with quiet, authoritative iniistene
as one who had a right to the interview he requestF.
He seemed to take it for granted that he ,would no
be refused, for he waited for no answer.
He passed into the room. The other men. almo
automatically, drew nearer to it. The people in t
yard came nearer also, moved by curiosity
They heard a murmur of voices within, Rid


11


:~~ ~,~,..~~.~.~~I~l,, ul~u ~ ~~~~~~~~~~1~~~ ... ... .....~~ ~~,.ul..~~ .~~~......... ... I.~ ...... ...... ....~~~~I-.~~.~~~l~~ l .~s~lr.~


~ ~?~uuuuuuu~~r*ruu~~lallll~llllll~~s~ 1


. ,. ..... ...... n. ...............nl.......uu ,.. ...................................................


1929


IMI






PLANTERS' PUNCH


i-,liakin and Millicent replying weakly, and then
tihe heard Rider alone. They caught the words,
'Yea. though I walk through the valley of the
Fhaluov. ..f death I will fear no evil, for Thou art with
me". tlihy heard other words, they knew that this
man. at liout a church, a drunkard, one even thought
to :ari_ nothing for the religion in which he had
bLn i.ired- and of which he had been a eonfessor,
wa- striving to bring some consolation to the last
mnnientr of an unhappy f1llowI-reaturi He was
ih.- minister of souls once more, and perhaps never
., sin,.e i-,lybefore as now. This deathbed touched
hi heart. every sentiment of pity in him vibrated to
irit aippral of a scene than which he had known none
L[. pit,)os. Here was a duty, sacred, solemn, and
he knelt and offered up his prayers with a sincerity
f v, lhi:h there could be no doubt. He alone, at this
rii'r.nint. might soothe the tortured spirit that was
'., -m.in to leave this world.
Tile waiting, angry crowd heard and were im-
-t:-1-,i An influence superior to their own surly,
mnarlin: temper dominated them. There were wo-
mein here who, the night before, had swayed and
writrh, i their bodies to the compulsion of a weird,
heatithen rhythm; now some of them sank upon their
kn,-_ and sobbed softly, murmuring the name of
Jesus And men stood with bowed head and re-
speitful demeanour, who last night had looked with
hljud.l.ht eyes at the slaughter and sacrifice of an
anintl [1 some but half-apprehended evil deity. It
wa- a strange spectacle, for all that crowd was
ilentlly [praying in unison with the voice inside
he ioonm. and overhead the stars came out and
prii.k.Ed with light the enveloping darkness, and the
wind a Ighed through the trees. Then the voice
ceased. and after a couple of minutes Rider issued
forrh. a sirange. sad look upon his face, and beckon-
e-l io Robert.
Thl young man stepped into the room, where
.nl.\ ione woman stood beside the bed on which lay
.Millicent. He went quietly to the bedside and touch-
*ei her hand- lightly; she looked up at him and
Flllll il
"I know you would come,' she said faintly.
He found no words to reply, could not trust
himnelt to speak.
"Take care of yourself," she whispered again;
"take (.art, Squire. You promise?"
He slowed his head and patted her arm, and there
na- ,ilen,.e for a little while.
Whtrn at length he bent over she appeared to be
ele-pine- her strength had given out. He turned
and rip-t...ed out of the room.
There was nothing more to do, nothing to stay
for The doctor was anxious to be gone. Robert
knew that for the last time he had seen Millicent's
fae-. hadl taken final farewell of a victim of strange
and airo:ious superstitions. He mounted his horse
and, with his two companions, turned to go.
Taken came up to him. "I will never fo'get all
[his. Squire," he said, "whatever happen."
\\'rhout a word the white men rode off, and in
Mnnitego Bay the doctor left them, regretting that he
hal betn of no slightest use. He parted respectfully
from Rilicr, too, who, on the way to Takeo'; place,
li had hardly noticed, knowing much about him as
a rnan hIto had fallen below the esteem of all his
dla- The two friends went on, their destination
hI-l.hall: tomorrow Robert would inform Ashman
thai. n,. matter what the consequences, he would
not be- ba,:k at his work on Wednesday. He briefly
told Rider of his resolve and Rider said that he too
would -udeavour to leave, especially since it was
onlC too probable that on that day the slaves would
renmini idle, and it might even be that the white
people oin the estates would be forced to flee into
Monte. GBay. "The rumours are coming thick and
[a'r now.' he added, but did not interest his com-
panion.
Early on the following morning news came by
speirial hbearer to Psyche. Millicent had died in her
ilee'p during the night.

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE

IN THE DARK OF THE NIGHT
DO 'yi. want to leave Rosehall," said Mr. Ashman;
S li- hn do you plan to go?"
"T'niorrow morning," returned Robert.
"Vcrv well; you can go. You haven't been of
v-i- mn li, use here at best. I will send you what
a.:-- aie due to you a little later."
'The wages you caa keep; your impertinent re-
uarkw .,r had better keep to yourself also, or you
w-ill I)e orry for them."
.Hell! Sorry, I?" Ashman exploded. "But I
am inot going to quarrel with you, young man; you're
not north it. Well, sir, what are you waiting for?"
Thi, to Rider.
'I -hould like to leave too, Mr. Ashman, tomor-
riow in..rning."
'You have not my permission, Mr. Rider. This
sritait will be shorthanded and you must remain for
a little while yet. But you can go at the end of the
w-.-k if yu like," he added contemptuously. "I sup-
pose you want to follow your friend."
S"That has ni.ihing to do with the matter," said
Riu-r with some dignity. "You must know by this
that the slaves are not likely to come out to work
tomot row, so there will be no use for me here."


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"If.you were a man there would be. We may
want fbur or five white men here to keep the people
in order in case they begin to attempt any foolish-
ness, but I suppose you wouldn't be of any use for
that. But you can't leave in the morning unless you
want to be prosecuted. I'll tell you what, though," he
said, as a thought seemed to strike him. "I'll let
you go during the day sometime, if nothing happens
here. Rutherford can leave as early as he wants to,
and the sooner the better. I want his room fixed up.
Next time I take good care that we don't employ fal-
de-la young men and deserters on this estate."
The two men walked away without answering,
and Ashman looked after them with a scowl. So Mr.
Rutherford would be leaving early the next morning,
before daybreak probably, to have a cool ride into
Montego Bay. He was done with the estate. He
wished to be soon in the town to begin his criminal
prosecution, or accusation, or whatever he might
choose to call it: he would waste no time. But per-
haps he would never reach Montego Bay.
No; it would never have done to let Rider go
along with him, though the sooner Mr. Rider was off
the premises the better. He had kept too sober. He
too might be inclined to make trouble.
The day wore on. Psyche had received permis-
sion from Burbridge to go to her cousin's funeral,
which was to be that afternoon, and she had set off
betimes to trudge the twelve miles of distance she
had to cover. Burbridge joined his friends at lunch
time, but no one had much of a lunch. Burbridge
had been informed by a book-keeper on the neigh-
bouring estate that there would be difficulty with the
people next day. He had cleaned and oiled his gun.
He knew that Ashman and the two Scotchmen would
also be prepared. Rider and Rutherford were leav-
ing.
But four white men, who could depend upon
two or three blaclr headmen (who would also be
armed) should be enough to put down any ordinary
demonstration. If anything more serious threatened,
the white people would be compelled to withdraw to
the town and leave matters to the militia.
They had little to say to one another to-day. Bur-
bridge knew better than to dwell on the death of
the, girl, Rider avoided the topic with a natural sen-
sitiveness, Robert did not mention it. What now
filled` his mind, occupied his thoughts to the exclu-
sion of almost anything else, was the duty before
,him, the duty of bringing to justice the most danger-
ous woman in all the West Indies, a woman who
'might be insane but who in any age and country
would be accounted a criminal. He tried to think
of the matter impersonally. He spoke to himself
about justice, not vengeance. But the memory of
a wan face and faint voice, a voice whose last words
were an appeal to him to take care of himself, was
uppermost in his mind. He was thinking less of
pure justice than he desired to believe.
.The night came dark and squally, though there
was no rain; and by seven the darkness was dense.
He could not sleep, he was restless, the minutes
seemed long, and it would be hours before morning
came. Rider, he had noticed vaguely, was very rest-
less too; he attributed this to the emotional distur-
bances they had both experienced yesterday, and to
the approaching end of their connection with this ac-
cursed place. He was right as to his belief that Rider
had passed through what was, for him, an exhausting
spiritual phase of emotion; his whole past had, as
it were, come back to him, with his sudden assump-
tion of sacerdotal office and authority; he had been
profoundly shaken; his whole being had been dis-
turbed. And now, suddenly, as it usually did, the
craving for drink had come upon him, his body felt
dry, burnt out; there was a feverish thirst in every
fibre of it. Yet he resisted it as he had not
done of late for years. In spite of the craving he had
not touched a drop of rum that day. But it shook
and tortured him, and he hoped and prayed that his
resolution would last until he could be back in the
town and preparing for his departure from the coun-
try. Rider felt that if he left Rosehall and had some-
thing to occupy his mind amid dinffeeln surround-
ings, with a new future beckoning to him, he might
be able successfully to withstand the terrible tempta-
tion.
At about ten o'clock he came to Robert, coming
on foot, and found the young man seated on the ver-
andah. Burbridge was in his own room.
"I walked over; I couldn't sleep," he explained.
"I thought you wouldn't be sleeping either."
"I can't."
"No. And I marked the drums particularly to-
night. There are more of them than I have ever
heard before, and 'they are not all for dancing, I im-
agine. Do you notice how they seem to come from
every quarter?"
He paused, while the air seemed to throb 'wth
the sound of the. drumming, some of it very faint
and far away, trarveling ifur miles through the at-
mosphere, which at that moment was still.
Mechanically Robert listened to the staccato
boeatr. the low rumblings. that sounded through the
siir!uunding darkuess.
S "Some are drums of the dance, and some of relig-
ious :-ereilmonies, pe-rhiaps: but some, i fancy, are war
drums," said Rider. "There are big palavers to-
Snilit '"
S "'Shall w' taki a walk?" 'suegestie Robert. "We


'IIIIII Illll IIIIIIIlllll1111111111111111111 111111111111111ll IIIlllll llll IIIIIIII 1 1 lllll ll1111111111 1l11111111111111







Monea~ue Hotel
I
= I
i 'iONEAGU E P.O. J AMAIICA. E W 1.


situated in the Lovely Garden Parih of St. Ann,
Sand fitted with Electric Light and modern sani-
I Lation.


teClimate
-i




Built on a most commanding site on the hills of
S.St. Ann, 1.216 feet above sea level, it has an
ideal climate with the thermometer very seldom l
= going above SO degrees in the shade and an a\'-
= erale night temperature of 65 degrees.
-

SGood Table

Fresh supplies from the Hotel Farm every day.



ii Sports & Recreations

There is an excellent 9 hole Golf course

in connection with the hotel, as well as two well-
kept tennis courts, while arrangements are made
-i whereby guests can visit the Drax Hall Polo
Grounds \here polo is played nearly every Sat-
Surday. Other recreations include motor rides
= and horse rides on some of the best roads of the
= island noted for their beautiful scenery. From
the hotel also easy trips can be made to some
of the most beautiful scenic spots in the island,
Such as the famous Dunn's River bathing place.
== the Roaring River Falls and the Fern Gully.

SEasily reached from Kingston by motor car or train.
No visitor to Jamaica should leave without spending
some time at this Hotel.




=: /",,i /ifF t, .i., lt.. appl t, i ,

BEN C. OLIPHANT, Proprietor,

SMONEtAGUE P'.O. :: J.AM.ICA, B.\.I. ,


i
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Ivor NIcI(. Levy 1& Son,

3 PARADE NIONTE(GO BAY.

DRUGGISTS



ENA I.I.,S'I .1 .I.IrElI'IE 'AX I'ILHIIAI < 'E'I TI_'AL." .I'V

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botlh liun't Vili t o -ie.-p L.r u- \ajinl .',T'ill i v' -A li,-ld tI l, an.'l tir-nri-ei\ es !I thh Cl;ri-iji- Ilci.
bit rmu t tiiithir .- Inil'tih ti.wa1rd, thi- minith l'id .jani Ih
Thki< ii .- ionon tfilte in i uith Ru.l e rl,.-s -a. r t": h .uth ow rd.s the hilll. Tihe pir h sl,uth
ni..o.l 3a- neil isa with Robij-t Th>e hiei r lappil .1 ward aVn1 t ha whi I I '1 I o ll th G'-rea Ho.lsie i full that
hi. hUt l [sli t .\ -tirt.-ti ut. ''.a: i ln rk i-ne-.-. a tlhi k r l Ila. k i thI ni t. l' ith.-
"1T h,.i had i .lno a i r Ui -ul jr iljjl i i ri i 1.i ll ;. iii..- i ,itili ,. ,,, P ,rfl tr/in


PUNCH


1929




Full Text

PAGE 1

i4re You Insured? V OL. II. N O.3. A JAMAICA MAGAZINE DUCHESS AND JAMAICA LADIES By Her Grace the Duchess of Athol! PRINCIPAL THE WITCH OF ROSEHALL,-A slirring Jamaica Nove l By Herbert G. d e Lisser MISS JAMAICA CUBA AND JAMAICA THE DANCING G IRL OF OLD AND OF TODAY 1929 PRICE: ONE SH I LLING CONTENTS. DOUBLE DUMMY.-A Tale of Adventure AN ENTERTAINING ACCOUNT OF A JOURNEY TO NEW YORK KRUGER'S MILLIONS LIVELY SKETCHES OF MEN AND THINGS, JAMAICAN \ YIND\Y A R D nOA H In l\' G STO N JAM.\I CA. HOME OF THE BOURNEMOUT H C LUB. INLAND SWIMMING POOL 150 feet lor.g, 65 feet wide Up-to-Date with Water Chutes, High and low Diving Stages, etc .. etc. Individual Dressing R ooms, Fresh Water Showers and Sanit3.ry Conveniences. PROTECTED SEA BATH 185 feet long, 100 feet wid e Enclosed by torpedo netting which renders it entirely sharkproof. Fitted with spring boards and a l Oa-foot Sellner Water Toboggan Slide. DANCING: Splendid Dancing Hall overlooking the Pool with a sweeping view of the Harbour. Open on all sides. this Dance Hall is considered the coolest in Jamaica. The very latest Dance Music i s supplied

PAGE 2

P LAN T E R S' PUN C H LACELLE deMERCADO & L Cab l e Add r ess: LASCELLES", J A M A ICA. Nearly Fifty Years' Experience of the Produce Business Backed by Sound Business Principles has made this Firm One of the Leading Firms in the Island. LASCELLES deMERCADO & CO., LTD. export SUGAR AND RUM, COFFEE, COCOA, and all other descriptions of Island Produce. They are large importers of M ERCH AN DISE and hold slveral valuable Agencies. LASCELLES deMERCADO & CO., LTD. are Agents for THE ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO., THE COLOMBIAN STEAM SHIP CO., and JAMES NOURSE LTD., and the steamers of these several lines dock at the Wharf premises illustrated abovp. LACELLE deMERCADO & 14 & PORT ROYAL KJNGSTON, 1929 j I I I r i t u s h o

PAGE 3

--PLANTERS' PUNCH Vol. II. No. 3 M I XED BY H ERBERT G DE L1SSER. C M G For the Year 1929 CJ)uchess and Jamaica Ladies WE have gTeat Pleasur. e in publishing in this issue a Uessage which Her Grace the Duchess of Atholl has specially \'Ti t ten to the lady readers of Planters) Punc h. The Dnchess gives advice, and she is in the happy position of having done what she advises; it is not precept only that she indulges ill; the practice of her doc -trine has mad;:ed her active and useful life. lier Grace believes that on women as well as on mell depends the maintenan e and greatness of the Britt'sh Em pire, and she is convinced that the women of .Jamaica can do their share in uphold iug the British Empire. She has certainly done hers. To day she is head of the public education of England; when quite young she was engaged in the organising of nursing for the Empire's soldiers; and as a successful woman states man she fully illustrates the part which women can play in politics and administration \ without losing their distinct ive characteristic of feminine charm. close contact with them. These are obvious disadvantages, but they are a reminder to us that the burden of Empirebuilding does not rest on men alone-that were there no women to cheerfully endure these drawba<.:ks for the sake of husbands and children, the Empire would fall to pieces. The Woman's Share. BUT in your case it seems to me that a share in Empire-building is open to you, more direct than that which usually falls to British women in the Tropical De pendencies. No such gulf of religion or language separates you from the native Jamaican woman as that which separ ates the Englishwoman over seas from, say, the woman of India or of Africa. A sphere of influence, therefore, and a personal contact are open to you which many an English woman in those countries might envy. She stands among the twelve most prominent living women in the Empire. That is a great distinction, it is a wonderful position for any woman to occupy. Her energy is magnificent. During the three weeks she spent in Ja maica, March 1928, she IIER GRACE THE DUCHESS OF ATHOLL, PARLIAl\lENTARY SECRETARY FOR EDUCATION To you Jamaica must chiefly look to set those standards of home life without which no state can be secure ly built. You also can do much to promote a better un derstanding of health and hy giene in the homes of the peo ple, not only by your own word and practice, but by co operation with all effort, official and unofficial, for the im provement of health -and many endeavours in this great, found time to visit any number of public institutions, meet many people representing all sorts of interests, and address several meet ings. Sh(> had but little leisure, but she never suggested that she wanted any. She regards herself, it is quite obvious, as at the service of others, where\-er she may be lier life is spent in service. Profitable work for the Empire's people is eddently one of her ideals, and she lives up to it, Altogether her caJ'eer has been highly beneficent and a stimulus to others. Her 3Iessage to the Women of Jamaica will be read with the deepest interest. The readers of Plante/'s) Punch will thank her for it. 'Ve are proud to have her as a contributor to this magazine, and we hope that this will not be the last writing from her pen which we shall have the privilege of publishing. We hope too that Jamaica will have the pleasure of welcoming her again. A distinguished woman like the Duchess of Atholl can never visit llS often enough. IN THE BALDWIN GOVERNl\IENT The Message. ON my way home from Jamaica I respond to the invitation of the Editor to send a message to the women readers of Planters) Pttnch. It is not easy to do this after so short a stay in the island, where, with the best will in the world, I have not had the opportunity of meeting many planters' wives, but I think that even tIle little I have seen of Jamaica, com bined with my experience of other parts of the Empire, helps me to understand a little of your lives-of ,the lack of many things that we in the Old Country have in plenty-libraries, music, art, the company of relatives and friends. Again, difficulties of housekeeping which are pressing more hardly on us than formerly, press acutely upon you. Worst of all, the education of your children may mean their prolonged from home at that stage :i,n their lives 'when you are most anxious to retain cause are radiating from the Central Bureau of Health in Kingston. Further, as it seems to me7" you do much to help towards a solution of another of Jamaica's problems, that of finding employ ment for the girls now passing out of her schools. In a country where industrial and commercial openings are few, there can be few opportunities for women except in domestic work. The advantages of such work to the girls themselves al'e obvious-they should go far to ensure better health and comfort in their own homes, but tact, understanding and im proved conditions may be necessary to bring many of the younger women to realize this, and to recognize the dignity of all labour. If the women readers of Planters' Punch can help to bring about this desired end, they will not only be adding to the comfort of their own surroundings,. but will be rendering a great service to Jamaica and her people, and, through them, to the Empire.

PAGE 4

2 P LA N T E R S' PUNCH 1929 THE WITCH OF ROSEHALL By HERBERT G. DE LISSER, author of JANE'S CAREER, REVENGE, Etc. CHAPTER ONE THE NEW BOOK-KEEPER ROBERT RUTHERFORD reined up his horse at the stone and iron gates that opened on the estate; half a mile away on an eminence that com manded a wide, sweeping view of canelands, hills and sea stood a building, the 'fame of whose mag nificence he had heard when in the town of Montego Bay, some ten miles to westward. White in the golden light of the sun it stood, the Great House of Rosehal!. It dominated the land scape; it imposed itself upon the gaze of all who might pass along the road that ran in front of the property; it indicated opulence. Young Rutherford knew that it represented the pride and arrogance of the planter caste which still ruled in Jamaica, and whose word, on its own plantations, carried all the authority and sanction of an arbitrary will scarcely curbed by laws passed in recent years'for the protection of the bondsmen. Behind him, a few paces from the outer edge of the road, rolled and glittered a vast expanse of sea, all blue and purple, with snowy breakers rolling lazily to the shore. Above him stretched a vault of azure flecked with clouds. It was eight o'clock in the morning. The month was December; the year, 1831. The cane, full grown, flowed up to within a short distance of the Great House, a spreading carpet of vivid green. In the midst of it, to his right, he saw the sugar works, from the chimneys of which floated and wavered in the breeze long columns of grey smoke. To the left he spied a building on rising ground which he. guessed to be the overseer's house; and on this side also, well within sight of the building, he saw a village of huts embowered in greenery. He had been long enough in Jamaica to recognise in this the slaves' quarters. He twitched his reins and the horse moved forward. As he slowly trotted up the long path leading southwards he noted the slaves, clothed in coarse blue osnaburg, busy cutting canes in the fields, wo men as well as men armed with scythes and ma chetes and hacking at the roots of the slender green-topped plants. Waggons drawn by oxen and by mules stood in the paths, several feet wide, which divided field from field; into these waggons the workers heaped the canes they cut, and as he pass ed he saw some of these vehicles moving on their journey towards the sugar mills, with a creaking and groaning of axles and amidst shouts from sable drivers who ran alongside of them cracking ox-thong ed whips foul' yards long and calling to the cattle by name. He saw other men armed with whips also which they branmshed menacingly, though not at the oxen and the mules. These were the slave drivers, sturdy fellows whose duty it was to see that the slaves did not loiter or slacken at their work; yet in spite of them some of the labourers lifted curious eyes to gaze for a moment at the strange white man who seemed to be going up to the Great House where lived the lady owner of these domains. The drivers glanced at him also, but asked no questions, for he was white and there fore one of the masters who gave commands and put questions, and so was not there to be interrogated by such as they. But before he had achieved half the distance to the house he perceived a white man riding towards him. This was the only other man on horseback discernible, a young man like himself, the estate's book-keeper doubtless. He paused in his progress and awaited him. The man cantered up, made a careless gesture of greeting, then enquired, "You are Robert Rutherford?" "Yes; you expected me?" "The overseer told me last night that you would be here to-day; we expected you rather earlier, though; at daybreak in fact. You are going to be told you are late, Rutherford." "I had to ride from the Bay; I shall be up in time to-morrow morning. You are my colleague?" "Yes. My name is Burbridge, and I have been doing the work of two book-keepers for the past week. They cleared out the other man as soon as they thought you were nearly here. You see that house?" He pointed in the direction of the over seer's residence_ "That's where Mr. Ashman, the busha, lives, and I know he is there now. You had better go up there and report to him. I'll see you later." "One moment, Burbridge," Rutherford stopped hiin: "Give me a hint as to the situation here before I meet the boss, will you? Nice place this?" "I have stayed with you too long as it is, old A Novel of striking incidents, woven around a character notorious in Jamaica history and legend. A vivid picture is also presented of life on a sugar plantation worked by slave labour in the Jamaica of a hun dred years ago. fellow," replied Burbridge quickly. "My job is waiting on me; all I am supposed to do-if I am even supposed to do that-is to give you directions where to find the busha. I don't want to be blamed if I can help it. And look here, don't, like a good chap, repeat anything that I have said to you, will you?" "Well, you haven't said anything," smiled Ruther ford, "so I can't repeat it. This seems a strict sort of place, doesn't it?" "You'll find out all about it for yourself," ans wered the other man, who all the time had been closely scrutinising Rutherford. "You have never been in the West Indies before; I can see that." "No, I have come to learn planting and estate management. "Humph. Well, you'll learn. I must be off now. "Just a word. Shouldn't I go up and See the owner?" "Mrs. Palmer? You, a book-keeper, to call on her? She doesn't have much truck with the likes of us, Rutherford, unless-well, you'd better ride on and make your apologies to Mr. Ashman for being late, and then he'll probably send you back to 'me to set you to work. I am senior book-keeper, you know. Where's your luggage?" "Coming by ox-cart from Montego Bay. It will be here some time to-day." "See you later." Burbridge cantered off, but not before Ruther ford had observed his keen glance in the direction of the Great House and the overseer's residence. Evidently the senior book-keeper was anxious lest anyone should have seen him wasting time. Ruther ford smiled, a little amused. But he did not quite like the atmosphere of the place. Yet he had heard of the hardships to which book keepers on West Indian sugar estates were sub jected as a rule. A sort of chief slave-driver, the book-keeper was in some way a slave himself. He had an inferior status, a poor salary, and (as he had heard) unlimited labour. But Rutherford's spirits were unruffled by all this, for he was here to learn, and schooling, he realised, meant discipline. He had seen Burbridge eyeing his clothes with a be wildered air; they were certainly much superior to those worn by the ordinary book-keeper or overseer. Burbridge himself was very poorly clad and seemed to think that any book-keeper who got himself up as though he were a person of means was either mad or looking for trouble. He was clearly puzzled as to how to place the newcomer. Young Rutherford pursued his way in the direc tion indicated and soon came to the steps of the overseer's house. Three or four savage dogs rushed out the instant they perceived him, barking and showing their teeth at him; then a black boy quick ly descended the steps and ran up with the ques-tion: "What massa want?" "Mr. Ashman; is he in?" "Yes, massa; massa come in?" Massa would; he leaped off his horse and followed the boy to the verandah, where he was bidden to wait. A moment afterwards a stern-looking man of about forty-five years of age emerged from the in terior of the house jacketless, his soiled corduroy trousers thrust into the tops of knee-boots, a day's growth of beard on his chin, and an inquisitorial, imperious look in his eyes. "Yes, sir, you want me? Will you come in? Your name is-?" "I am Rutherford, Mr. Ashman, the new bookkeeper." Mr. Ashman figuratively stopped dead in his tracks; his manner of welcoming host giving Place instantly to that of a plantation boss who was accustomed to being a despot. "Oh! Why are you so late this "I must apologise; I couldn't get away earlier." "What ship you came by? I didn't know one was expected yesterday or to-day." "I came a week ago." "Then why in hell didn't you report at once?" "Because I was not to turn in before to-day; that was arranged when I left England. We made a quicker voyage than we had anticipated, and when I got to Montego Bay I found I had a week on my hands. I brought a letter of introduction to Mr. M'Intyre, the rector. I stayed with him." "Letter of introduction, eh? The rector, eh? Well, you are a stranger with a lot to learn. But book-keepers don't go about this country with 'letters of introduction, and many a man has lost his job for being an' hour late. And jobs are not easily picked up here, let me tell you." '.'Perhaps not; do youmean that I am to lose my job before I have even found it?" "Damn my soul!" shouted the overseer, genuinely astonished, "is this the way you are going to be gin ?" "I expected a different sort of greeting," said Rutherford quietly, but with a glint of anger in his eye: he was striving to keep his temper under control. "I am a book-keeper, yes; but I might be treated courteously. I have just arrived and Yuu keep me standing on your verandah as if I were a nigger slave." "Perhaps, retorted Mr. Ashman, "yOU would like to ride up to the Great House and be received in Mrs. Palmer's drawing room? Now look hers, don't commence by playing the fool or you won't last on Rosehall, I can tell you. If it wasn't that you were engaged in England you would be going aut of this estate now in double quick time! You seem to be quite a high and mighty gentleman. but you have a lot to learn and you'd better se .. about learning it damn quick. Sam!" "Yes, massa!" The boy made his appearance suddenly; he had been listening to the colloquy behind the door. "Take this backra to the book-keeper's quarters and show him his room. When you have been there and have had something to eat," he continued, addressing Rutherford, "Sam will take you to Bur bridge, who is your senior, and who will tell you what you have to do to-day-and to-night. And remember in future that the overseer of an estate in Jamaica is used to being respectfully spoken to by his bookrkE\epers, and when you address me don't forget to say 'sir.' English airs and graces won't do here!" Ashman turned on his heel and went inside; Rutherford silently walked down the steps, mounted his horse, and followed Sam, who ran in front to wards the sugar works, some half a mile away. Quite evidently, thought Robert, a book-keeper did not count for much here; well, he had been given a very clear hint of that by the Rev. Mr. M'Intyre and his family. His father had not known of these conditions, or of a surety he had never suggested this job to him. Yet it would be worth his while to stick it through. After all, he would not be a book-keeper for more than a couple of years, if as long. At twenty-five years of age one usually sees the world through the brightest of tinted glasses, es pecially if one is healthy, well-connected and not ill-endowed with means. In the island of Barbados was a sugar estate, one of the largest there, which belonged to Robert Rutherford's father. The older man had never himself been to the West Indies, the property had been left to him by an old uncle who had lived nearly all his life in Barbados and had had no legitimate children. Mr. Rutherford never contemplated the possibility of his going to look after the estate himself; that was a task, he said, for a younger man, and Robert, his heir, was naturally and almost inevitably that man. But Robert knew nothing about planting or estate man agement; he was still young, he should acquire some experience in those arts. To send him out to Bar bados at ouce would, MI'. Rutherford conceived, be a great mistake. In the first place there was still in charge of it an attorney who, so far as could be gathered, was tolerably honest; he could continue to perform the necessary work of supervision for some time. But if Robert went out to him to learn the business, the fact that he was his father's son and the heir to the property might prevent the at. torney" from putting the boy through the mill, while overseers, book-keepers and the rest, would naturally look up to the young man, flatter him and endeavour to spoil him; thus, with the best will in' the world, Robert might learn very little. Mr. Rutherford knew that his son was made of good stuff, but he did not want him to be exposed to sycophancy and coddling when he should be acquir ing useful knowledge and experience by practical work. So it occurred to him that Robert should go to some other West Indian colony to acquire the knowledge he would need for the management of a sugar plantation, whether he should afterwards de cide to reside on his own in Barbados permanently or to visit it at frequent intervals. This view was placed before the younger Ruther ford, and he fell in with it immediately. Robert was fond of his father, liked to please him, and thought it would be excellent fun if he, a future West Indian proprietor, should begin planter life in the humble office of that was what, he was told, it was best to do. Of the duties of a book-keeper neither he nor his father had the slight est conception; but when a firm of West Indian sugar brokers in London, who had been approached

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) 1929 PLA N T E R S' PUNCH 3 A PICTURE OF ROSEHALL PAINTED IN 1825. HERE ARE LAID 1I10ST OF THE SCENES IN THE NOVEL, THE WITCH OF ROSEHALI. by the elder Rutherford in the matter, informed the latter that they could secure for Robert a posi tion on the Rosehall estate in Jamaica, the trans action was settled at once, although the post was worth only fifty pounds a year, with board and lodging. Robert Rutherford had all the money he was likely to need in Jamaica; the salary was of no consideration. But this was to be kept private, for the boy must win his spurs like any other young fellow. Mr. Rutherford was quite enthusiastic about this. He himself had never been called upon to begin on the lower rungs of the ladder, he had -never worked hard in all his life. But he had a great admiration for tlrose men who had carved out their own fortune, and he wanted Robert, in a manner of speaking, to stand in the ranks of such .self-made heroes. The Rev. John M'Intyre, rector of St. James' Church in the town of Montego Bay, had known Mr. Rutherford years before at Oxford. To him was sent by Robert a letter telling of the Rutherford plans and enjoining secrecy, for the reasons given above. Mr. M'Intyre, knowing the local situation, did not at all approve of these plans, but said notaing. He liked the young man at once and, learn ing that he was not expected at Rosehall for a week, invited him to remain a week at the rectory, at the same time advising him not to make his arrival known to the Rosehall people before the day he was expected. He would not have thus invited an .()rdinary book-keeper; such a one could have no social status. And had Robert, the son of his old friend, been dependent on this job for a living and a future M.r. M'Intyre would have counselled him to push on to Rosehall on the very day of his ar rival, being aware that a book-keeper must not claim any leisure save that allowed to him by his employer. But he did not imagine that Robert would remain lon g at Rosehall, or in Jamaica; and he hoped that even if the boy chose to stay in the colony it would not be as a member of th'J Rosehall staff. That was the one estate of all others that he would have warned his old friend against had his opinion been asked in advance. As it was, he thought it wisest to say nothing; Robert must decide for himself now that he had come out to the colony. He was a man and must work out his own salvation. Robert Rutherford, twenty-five years of age, tall" stronglybuilt, with laughing grey eyes, a kindly, humorous mouth, straight nOSe and curly brown hair, was a handsome young man, even a distin guished looking one. He was a graduate of his father's university, an athlete; not brilliant as a .. cholar, though he had taken his degree, he yet had done some reading and had travelled for a year in France and Italy after his graduation. The voyage out to Jamaica had tanned his hands and face but glightly; the clothes which he wore, and which he had been told would be required in his job, were tailor-made and of excellent quality; he looked ex ceedingly well in them and was fully aware of that. His hat was a good felt with wide brim, and he wore it with an air; his knee-boots were of the best leather. The grey horse that he rode was his own, he had bought it at a good price some days before. In spite of his curt and even rude greeting by the overseer this forenoon, therefore, he was feeling satisfied with the world and .not dissatisfied with himself; he could not pretend that he appre ciated the atmosphere of Rosehall, but on the other hand he was conscious of a sense of adventure, an anticipation of interesting and strange experi ences, and he never doubted that he would be equal to any situation that might arise. Robert did not consciously realise that had he been an ordinary, poor fellow endeavouring to make his way in the world his feeling would pro bably have been very different; that instead of his present composure he would have been dreadfully depressed. He did not admit to himself (though the thought must have been somewhere at the back of his mind) that if the worse came anywhere near to the worst he could always shake the dust of this estate off his feet and fare forth to hunt for pastures new. What he did think was that, in spite of the apparent churlishness of people on his planta tion, he would do his work cheerfully and to the best of his ability (which he felt was of a commend ably high standard) and thus would please both the old man and himself. His mother (dead now these last five years) had always striven to pl,ease her husband and had always impressed upon her son the virtue of doing so too. Mr. Rutherford had in spired both wife and son with a real and abiding affection for him, and he amply deserved it. Robert knew that if he quitted Jamaica altogether and frankly told his father that life in the West Indies was impossible, the older man would feel that his boy had honestly tried his utmost and was not to be blamed. Therefore he was determined to do his ut most. CHAPTER TWO ROBER
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, 4 PLANT E RS' PUNCH 1929 cMISS JAMAICA By Sub Inspect o r Harv ey C larke I I '"' 1'7> (Jto b!l Olea,'!! and Elliott MISS EDNA DAVIS BEFORE I begin I desire to convince one and all that I am entirely serious and in earnest, and that I am not laughing. It is too serious a subject to laugh at. Being utterly incapable of writing down anything about women-or girls rather,-like all writers on this elusive, intangible subject I must endeavour to appear, myself, intangible and elusive. If, then you cannot grasp the clear meaning of any part of this-or all of it-put it down to my intangibility. Wonderful world! Wonderful subject! Any man who in writing about woman deliberately sets out to catalogue their virtues and their vices with a baldness only equalled by rural correspondents to local papers, is merely asking to be told a few home truths about his miserable person and character. Therefore, gentle reader, I will hie me to my sub ject with required vagueness and, or, for the truth, naturally. The Jamaican girl is fascinating. There, you immediately exclaim, there you go doing just what you said you despised-summarising. Not so. Fascination is a quality sufficiently elusive and slippery to set down without any hedging. The particular fascination peculiar to Jamaica and the Jamaica creole-by which I mean anyone born in the islandis one made up of such components as languor, sudden sparkle, as sudden stillness, a caress given unexpectedly, sulkiness-for even this has its own draw-quick temper as quickly quiet, and silence. 1 have to admit it, but unless she has grown to know you very well or is one of the exceptions, the Jamaica girl has not an easy flow of conversation. But even in that you get a very singular type of fascination which appeals to the inborn vanity of man, who loves to unburden himself of his woes, fears, hopes, desires and conquests to some sympathetic girl-and the Jamaica girl is an excellent listener. Silence, even if it conceals but little (and here r do not by any means infer that the silence of the Jamaican girl means a void within), silence carries with it a challenge to probe-to endeavour to find out what lies underneath that silence. Silence, r grant, can be a fearsome thing carried to embarrasment and uneasiness, but silence judiciously used as it is by girls out here can stir men and, as every woman's urge is, challenge him. Perhaps, being very young, I err terribly and irrevocably, but r state boldly as I said I was not going to-that coupled with silence a man loves an occasional flickering jet of gossip, and here r am quite decided to start afresh, rashly, with a new paragraph. GOSSIP! It always behoves a man writer to use, with discretion, exclamation marks. I use one here. I use it without apology and I use it merely for a means of sensation. After all, sensation is life, and where, oh! where in the name of the Seven Parables of Woman, would life be without gossip? Life in Jamaica is necessarily narrow and insular, but however large a community, however broadminded a nation or sect, where is the one to be found whose women do not (just very, very occasionally) indulge in an exchange of views regarding their own or someone else's neighbours? In this a woman-I very nearly said "through practice"-is cleverer than a man, more subtle, more intangible. The Jarpaican girl really has few exP7,oto /)Jj Ol earJj anri PJllil)tt 1I1ISS HELENE lIIYERS citements and fewer pleasures. Her English or American cousins have a larger scope of amusements, mtertainmants and general "pass-the-times" com pared with the Jamaican girl. So scandal as spoken out here is naturally of vital interest to girls budding out into life-to a life in which A knows to a sixpence how much B earns a year, and when that affair ended between Mrs. B and old X, and how Photo by Valdes' Studio 1I1ISS PAlIIEJJA GRIFFITH, O'SE OF JAlIIATCA'S YOUNGER LEADING SPORTSWOlllEN l)/1fJto by Clea/ry (In(t Elliott lIIISS DOROTHY WORTLFjY long Miss B has been wearing "that rather terrible little cll!lche hat she got cheap at Johnson and Johnson's sale last June". Let him who is without sin chuck the first jolly old pebble. Personally I dislike stones. The Jamaican girl is too good a hand to fling stones about. She lol)s a bread crumb perfectly deliciously, and I take off-haven't got one, but if r had-I'd take off my hat to her. WE all were, more or less I suppose, in a natural state in the Beginning. The Jamaican girl is natural even to primitiveness at times. Secretly, men like that, although they are attracted at times by artificiality carried to a pitch bordering on the absurd. But this palls. So does nature unadulterated. The Creole, however, can pour tea with the best, dine with the highest in the land, conversing in correct if rather stilted English, attend a garden party where "form" is everything, then go home and indulge in a wordy battle in the native vernacular with a fat, perspiring, black cook. She-the creole, not the cook-carries a slight air of boredom which .. eallY languor brought about by our steamy hot climatic conditions. In that state she is given :to moody fits lasting according to company or cir cumstances. She delights in that fiutter of bustling and emotion which the presence of someone new brings into her life. New faces, and the longing to know what they think of her, of her ways, her doings, her figure, her face, her all, makes her shake off languor at meeting with a stranger, and, although remaining natural, bestir herself to please. Upon getting to know them well she is apt to sink back into that languid state when a tiny streak of selfishness will generally make itself felt. The Jamaican girl is generally rather selfish. This, perhaps, is brought about by the over indulgence of proud and notoriously kind parents. The Jamaican father and mother have rather more of the Southern method of bringing up children than the sterner variety found abroad in cold climates. r refuse to believe that climate and the conditions created by atmosphere have nothing to do with character, or, for that matter, figur.e and general physical bearing. It has. The offspring of Jamaican parents are brought up slightly spoilt, if very adorable, and one of those most to blame in this is the kindly old black "Nana" to be found with almost every Jamaican family. Nana, a good natured, large personage, marvellous in knowledge of children, yet, as a rule, inclined to pet and "let off" through her over-kindness, is often the "fetch and carry" for everyone, especially the children. The baby girls, and boys, etc., suffer for this, the girls perhaps to a greater extent owing to the fact that girls are never spanked, or never very hard! Girls out here invariably come out into Society with an image of Nana fetching their Slippers, running for little trinkets quite unnecessary, bringing little presents daily. This, coupled with the fact that in most cases the Jamaican girl takes her place in society at an age when her English cousin is doing French in the schoolroom, is apt to make her desire to carryon the policy of being fetched and carried for. DoubUess I have enlarged on this at too great length. We will leave it and. turn to far pleasanter aspects.

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1929 PLA N T E R S' PUNCH Miss United States Little Miss England lInss lIlAJORIE CUSHlIlAN lInss BARBARA STUBBS Yiss lUn,jorie Cushnlan's l)Cople hail from New England. and she received part of her education in England. So ber short life up to now has been spent in America, Englan(l and Jamaica, and "we nre sure bas been liked in nil three countries. She is typically Alnericnn in choTm and brightness This picture was specially taken for Planters' Punch through the charming courtesy of Lady Stubbs. It shows the Governor's daughter in a reflective mooel. On looking at t h e broad intelligent forehead of lin Barbara Stubb. PHYSICALLY I bow to the perfections of our girls. There' are very few with unshapely figures, and those who do not reach the 100% class gen erally manage to dress effectively, so as to hide de fects and bring out pleasing features. Although lacking in tbe warm colouring whic h makes girls in cooler climates so very attractive, the young Jamaican is clever with her cosmetics, and who, who in these steamy, hot surroundings, dare decry her for this? With eyes that are generally her best facial feature, hair and eye-lashes that are luxuriant and curly, and an inborn knowledge of the very best way to dress, the creole is pleasing to look upon. The knowledge of dress is peculiar perhaps, in that the Jamaica girl is never gaudy or overdressed, as tropical surroundings might b e supposed to cause, but taste is expressed from her neat little hat to her expensively demure shoes and stockings. Shoes and stockings mean so very much. The Jamaican realises this; from the shop girl to the daughter of IN the preceding sketch a very young man expresses his view of Miss Jamaica. In the sweet and pleasant things he says he puts a drop of acid now and then, perhaps to improve the flavour. He is looking at the girls through the eyes of youth; but that will probably make what he says all the more interesting to them and to other young men. And, maybe, to older people. An expression of our own opinion on one or t wo of the characteristics of the modern young lady may not be out of place. For instance, Mr. Harvey Clarke says that the Jamaica girl is inclined to be selfish, b u t is not selfishness, or what is considered to be such by others, a trait of girls in general in these days? The o l d ideal, expressed in such books as "Little Women" and "Little Women Married," was t h e selfless girl always thinking for others, a lways working for others; she looked after her younger b r others and sisters with such an unwearying soli c i tude that they must secretly have hated her and wished her dead; she adored father, was devoted to mother, and was so gentle in dealing with her husband that he must have got tired of her a'fter the first six months of married life. She aimed to be, she was represented to be, a most lovable creature, a sort of angel in the house. But she suffered from anaemia or the "green sickness," and now and then, if we remember our reading rightly, she died a beautiful death to the sound of s l ow Singing and was translated forthwith to heaven, where she may one t hnt s lle has a future that will not be un(listinguisbe(l the highest, their feet are above repro.l.ch. Whilst on the subject of feet, walking comes into one's mind as a corollary to those limbs. A walk that is ugly is a thing of sin. Pretty walking is an island peculiarity that starts with market women, bearing baskets on their heads, swinging gloriously along, and proceeds upwards to Miss Jamaica daintily making a few purchases along King Street. It is an art that cannot be acquired. In the line of sport, the girls of this island, where sport is a very exacting and powerful god, are gradually coming into their own. Tennis is fa vourite, with riding, golf, swimming and hockey following. We have some "white hopes" in the tennis line who have been favourably commented on by Visiting players, and who lose none of their charm or daintiness on the hot, hard courts. Tennis is a game of skill which offers to wome n an opportunity to be graceful, and many Jamaican girls are a sheer delight to watch striking the white ball. have been more welcome than she could possibly have been on earth. In these more riotous times we think of her as "goody-goody." Representatives of her type hardly exist today. Such was the o l d ideal, but how many girls measured up to it? That some approximated to it is doubtless true; where there is an ideal there will be an effort to embody it in actual conduct. Yet the younger generation must a lways have been possessed by the very natural impulse to express themselves freely, to act according to their own ideas, to demand of life more than it could give them; in a wora, they all had the same urge to selfishness which the modern gir1tlXPeri.ences and expresses. It was curbed, undoubtedly; it is curbed somewhat now by all really nice girls. But it is nothing more than a very human impulse, it is also the expression of a point of view. The fact is that youth does not see life as its elders do The young think that their elders are wrong. And sometimes their elders are wrong. Perfect wisdom is not necessarily associated with gray hairs. The point always is: how far does selfishness go? There is a limit for everyone. The modern miss has to find that limit for herself; when she goes beyond it she is not merely ordinarily selfish-which can easily be forgiven-she is hard and callous, headstrong, foolish. That means trouble for her and for those who have to 10 with her; of such we say I have no objection to a game skilfully and gracefully played by girls, but when certain "1880's" girlishly give themselves up to the "abandon" of the age, cum short skirts and cum no sleeves, then, preferably, let Miss 1928 look on from the verandah rather than bring tears of laughter to the eyes of onlookers by the obvioliS contrast if she engages in games with elder players. It is not fair to the older players and savours too much of a desire to bene fit by comparison. Finally, and in conclusion, I will add that Jamaica is a land where oranges grow. On the orange tree is found orange blossom. Orange blossom is used in weddings and ... well, the average Jamaican girl is much too good for the average Jamaican man. But she seems to bear her burden with fortitude and remarkable courage, marrying him and making an excellent wife and mother despite her numerous and ardent critics. All Jamaican men should agree with this view. that they must li e on the beds they have made for themselves. People, however, feel, even if they do not consciously think, that if the beds they have made for themselves are uncomfortable, it is the business and duty of others to find better beds for them. The individual everywhere regards himself or herself as the salt of the earth, and is grieved and indignant that no one else does. But on the whole the beds we make are not so bad, and we reconcile ourselves to lying on them, and usually grow so accustomed to them that a change might actually be uncomfortable. To put the matter differently, the nice girl does not carry selfishness very far. It may be just enough to give a piquant flavour to her actions. A little sauce improves our food. It is when we pour in too much sauce that we spoil the platter. Perhaps the girls realise that it is in the period of their pulchritude that they have their best time. Then they are praised, sought after, courted, and the men (and not merely the young men either) go about saying, "love me and the world is mine." Comes a time when responsibilities increase. looks fade, court is paid to another generation, and no one considers the matron as at all an adequate substitute for the world. Even if a girl does not give a conscious thought to such a future, she may have an instinctive realisation of it. Hence, in the day of her beauty and power she shows selfishness. It is a passing phase mainly.

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,', PLA N TE R S' PUNCH Some others if Jamaica And Their Little Ones MRS. PLAICE (FORMERLY MISS FAY WESTMORLAND) WITH DICKIE AND NANCY MRS. J H. PHILLIPPS (FORl\IERLY MISS NANCY NEW) WITH HER LITTLE GmL, JANJ!]TTE MRS. G. J. deCORDOVA (FORMERLY lUISS DOROTHY BRANDON) WITH HER LITTLE GmL, PAULA MRS. KENNETH COCKING (FORMERLY MISS HELEN MILLINER) WITH HER LITTLE BOY, KENNETH 1929t \

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1929 P LA N T E R S' PUNCH 7 fl) CUBA AND JAMAICA @ THE crowd waited, expectant, in the square. Close packed it stood; the promenading there had been for some two hours hitherto was over; there was now but little room for movement; noon the New Year would dawn, and it was to celebrate this event that Santiago de Cuba had sent forth thousands of its people on this New Year's Eve. To the left of the square, as one looked straight in front from a balcony of the Casa Grande Hotel, rose the twin towers of the Cathedral, the largest religious edifice in Cuba. The spacious, elevated pavement surrounding the Cathedral was thronged, like the square below, with eager, chattering people; the verandahs of the neighbouring buildings -crammed to capacity; the lights from the electric lamps in the park, in the hotels, in the buildings about, illuminated a scene of variegated colours. For this was a fiesta, this was an occasion of re. joicing, and the folk of all classes had come tenth arrayed in their finest to salute the New Year with every demonstration of joy. There was a sound of martial music. Presently a band emerged into view, marching with quick step, and behind the bandsmen came a company of the Rural Guards. Followed another band, and after them a company of soldiers. Someone said that the Governor of the Province had already arrived and was somewhere below; and the other notables of the city were with him. The highest and the lowest were awake that night and assembled to bring the New Year in. The bands and the guards and soldiers tra versed the four streets of the square, and the blare ()f trumpets and the throb of drums were almost lost in the hum that arose from ten thousand voices. "They halted, the music ceased, a sort of silence fell, for everyone now spoke with muted voice: the mo ment was nearly come. Every eye was fixed upon a flagstaff rising above the municipal buildings that stood opposite to the Cathedral. Midnight hovered in the air. A call from a bugle broke out, a long, piercing call. It was answered by a rattle of drums. The sound rolled out, the notes of the bugle shrilled higher, a great bell began to clang forth the strokes which divided one year from another, announcing the death of the Old Year and proclaiming the birth of the New. Then slowly, slowly, there floated up ,yards the national banne r of Cuba, the red, white and blue with the silver star, which is the cognisance of the Republic. All new, and of glistening silk, it strea med in the light, and as it floated over the heads of the vast gathering it was hailed with a deep full-throated cheer. And now a tremendous clangour pealed from the Cathedral steeples, and the bands below crashed out a triumphant tune, and all the -city was filled with a tumultuous uproar. Bells and instruments and human voices vied in a wild wel coming of a New Year, in a mad, joyous greeting to another brief era of man's life. In the streets, in the square, men embraced each other, girls kissed ()ne another on both cheeks, hands were fervently clasped, hats raised and thrown into the air in a llassion of emotion, and still the Cathedral bells clanged and clashed and the drums rolled, and the blare of the trumpets continued. Then it was over, suddenly. As at a Signal, the 'noises were hushed. The New Year had dawned, the ceremony was completed here, as in every other city of Cuba, where, also, the flag of Cuba had been raised and the bells of churches had welcomed in the year. The crowd began to disperse. For hours thousands of it had strolled about below, seemingly tireless. In blues and pinks and reds, in white and green and every intervening hue, the girls had moved around on the paved walks of the Park with the glare of the electri c light setting into brilliant relief their sinuous forms and pleasing faces; and now they would go home, or repair to some .vla ce of entertainment, where they would finiSh the night's festivities. In a little while the plaza was all de serted, the leafy trees and the lamps looked down upon a silent square; but from both the hotels that faced the Park came sounds of revelry and dancing. In these places the society of Santiago was gathered to dance the rest of the night away, to feast upon choice viands, to consume champagne, to jest and make love and not to depart until the sun should rise and the day come sweeping in from behind the hills. And in scores of other places to-night there would be feasting and rejOicing also. For this was the New Year, and the Cubans were giving themselves Qver to all of its joys and its delights. I thought how differently we welcomed in the New Year in the neighbouring island of Jamaica. The difference is perhaps characteristic of the Spanish and the British civilisations and customs. Both of course have public festivities, yet in Spanish American countries there is far more communal en joyment, the several classes mingle much more in the open-air life of towns and cities. When a King By HERBERT G. DE LISSER C.M.G \ is crowned or some great national event like th'3 termination of a successful war is celebrated, all orders of the population will come together for an hour or two in a British West Indian city to rejoice over the event; but the promenading together which we so constantly see in Spanish America, the taking of ordinary public pleasures in common, is rare indeed in the British West Indies. On this New Year's Eve, I thought, there will be no congregating of a miscellaneous crowd in any town of Jamaica for the bringing in of the New Year, though Cuba's hotel parties will be paralleled in the balls given at the Myrtle Bank, Bournemouth Bath and elsewhere. I could see Myrtie Bank and Bournemouth in King ston, the Casa Blanca in Montego Bay, and other resorts also; I could picture the bright crowds of dancers thronging them, the gay mUSiC, the suppers made merry with laughter and wine. I could see the island's picture theatres filled with applauding throngs, could hear the sound of bursting rockets as the Old Year died and the new Year came to birth. But nothing like this scene in the plaza of Santiago de Cuba could be imagined, for nothing like it would be found in Jamaica. What we should find in the British city but a short distance away, were the Protestant churches filled with r everent people at prayer, for in Jamaica the last hours of New Year's Eve are still regarded religiously. The night of New Year's Eve is a solemn occasion for tens of thousands who love to begin the New Year, not with cheers and feasting, but on their knees and with supplications on their lips. THE next day I left Santiago for Havana. It was eighteen years since I had travelled through the island, and in that interval many changes had taken place. Santiago itself had altered, in that its shops were larger, many fine and spacious buildings had been erected, its population had grown and its streets had improved. To the eye of the complete stranger it might seem that the streets of this city could never have been worffil than they are to-day; but once they were infinitely worse, were indescribable; and even though some of them now exhibit yawning holes and seem never to be repaired, they are better than the cesspools through which one had to walk or drive in the days gone by. Santiago is the second port of Cuba, a port of considerable importance. Its people complain that money is taken out of the province to beautify and enrich Havana, hence Santiago's neglect. It may be so; but Santiago is certain to be improved, however slowly ; it is the capital of the province of Oriente which is four times the size of Jamaica. is the greatest sugar producing division of Cuba to-day; the iron and manganese mines are situated there also; it can grow coffee, and there the famous Baccardi rum is made. It is potentially rich, and much money is made there even now. True, the people talk of their poverty, but its many bright shops, its cafes, its consumption of cham pagne, the beautiful houses in the Vista Alegre, its fashionable residential quarter, do not convey an impreSSion of poverty. What the city itself does suggest is that, in spite of Cuba's connection with the United States these last thirty years, Santiago is still in all essentials Spanish-American, a city whose inner life has not changed. The narrow streets have not been widened; the sexes are still separated by barred windows and doors, and through these bars one sees courtships conducted under the eyes of every passer-by. In little shops literature of the utmost obscenity is openly sold, though emigrants and tourists are solemnly warped not to bring in such literature to corrupt the Cuban morals. Suc h corruption would be quite impossible, since Cuban morals have long since needed no assistance in degeneration; the flagrant contradiction between precept and p.racti ce, however, between the law and the quite open vend ing of what the law condemns, is characteristic: if all the excellent laws passed in Snanish-American countries were observed, the people would be angels. Santiago has the laws, but remains true to the traditions of Spanish-American acceptance withQut execution. It is not quite the same to-day in Havana, but Havana is over five hundred miles from Santiago. That enables Santiago to remain more Cuban than Havana, though Havana is also Cuban. THE journey by train from one city to the other occupies about twenty-five hours; and unless you travel by steamer there is no other convenient way of getting from one to the other save by rail. They are building now the great highway through the island which is to enable motor cars and other vehicles to pass freely from east to west. They have been talking about this road for over twenty years; it is something that they have commenced it at last. When one is about fifty or sixty miles from Havana one catches a glimpse of it from the win dows of the train; you can go from Havana to Matanzas by this road even now; some part of it has actually been accomplished. When it will reach Santiago depends, I suppose, on the finances or on the administration of the finances, for the loan for the highway has been sanctioned. It depends also on the energy of the Cuban Public Works Depart ment. But, given time, it will be buiJ.t, and then the motorist will have his opportunity of seeing Cuba by some other means of conveyance than the railway. Meantime I do not find the train journey uncomfortable, and the scene, as one makes the journey, is full of interest, if one remembers what it was some eighteen years ago. The countryside of Cuba has been remarkably transformed. The dominant note of the scenery was once struck by the forests of royal palms one saw on every side; by millions of the slender, stately trees with their tapering white boles and towering crowns of green and waving fronds. There were other palms also, for Cuba was a land of palms, they grew every where, graceful even if, in their multitude some what monotonous. But the multitude has ed. There are still palms, but in some districts these hav actually had to be preserved. They flourished on fertile soil, and the day came when a great demand went up for Cuban sugar. So the axe was laid to the roots of the trees, the palms fell down and the luscious cane was planted in their stead, and now, for miles and miles, and yet more miles, scores, hundreds of miles, and as far as the eye can reach, one sees cane and yet more cane, a vast, spreading carpet of it, light green and roIling away from side to side across the whole breadth of Cuba. Lt is when one sees this country given over to the cane farms, and beholds factory after factory, town succeeding to town, that one realises what sugar means to Cuba. There is hardly anything else that matters. You come to a station which, eighteen or twenty years before, you 11emember to have been but a little settlement inhabited by a few listless people, a beggar or two, with a couple of shabby shops-a mere stopping place upon the way. Only the name has remained unaltered. Everything else is changed beyond recognition. It is now a town lighted with electricity; its streets, the principal ones paved, run to some distance at right angles to one another. There is a plaza not far off with parterres of flowers and of palms, there is ;, band stand where music is played once or twice a week, there are benches where the idle or the weary may rest. Many houses, built in the rural style, are observable, red-tiled single storey buildings, coloured blue or pink, and with wide verandahs in front of them. A church or two dominates the scene, and some public edifices; the shops seem well stocked, and before the little cafes are seated men sipping drinks and doubtless discussing politiCS and wo men. Forming the background of this scene are the great stretches of cane, the giant factories with their lofty chimneys, and the rows of royal palms which are now maintained for ornamental purposes. And this picture is repeated again and again along the way from Santiago to Havana. All Cuba has grown. The population now is a million more than it was in 1909. It was perhaps the richest spot of its size in 1919 and the year after, when all the world wanted sugar and the priCe of that commodity rose as high as a hundred pounds per ton. They speak of that time as the day of the "dance of the millions"; men made great fortunes overnight and flung them away carelessly; it seemed as if the good fortune that had come to Cuba could never end. It ended dramatically. It ended with a crash. The financial princes of one day found them selves beggars the next; sugar had sunk so low in price that ruin stared thousands in the face. Many committed suicide. Some went mad. And since then Cuba has been fighting and struggling to stabilise sugar prices, to prevent herself from producing sugar at a loss or at but little profit. But the crisis is past, though Cuba still considers herself desperately poor; the worst is over, for the factories still grind sugar and the people do not starve. Meanwhile the towns remain, lighted with the electricity generated for the manufacture of sugar, and the improvements effected persist. The cane flourishes, the royal palms no longer grow in their myriads. Except for the tobacco fields, the fields of hennequen, the coffee in the mountains of Santiago, the cattle pastures, Cuba is one great sugar country, the largest in the world. From this industry comes the livelihood of the peas ant who inhabits a shack in some village a hundred miles away; upon this industry also is founded the magnificence of the pleasure city of the Caribbean islands, Havana the beautiful. A journey through Jamaica, such as I had made shortly before going over to the republic, re veals also the striking development which has taken place during the last few years. But in Jamaica one sees, not so much the long green leaves of the cane as the great split fronds of the fragile banana. A

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8 PLAN T E R S' PUNCH 1929 THE PRESIDENT'S PALACE IN HAVANA. ]<'ACl:-
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o t e n e I S e I s d e I s II e If e e r e e n lS 'e ;s Is y Is IS It LS s. e ts y ir it n ld t y it. IP ld ld ir 19 ty Ie )P of n, It. tle 'a, 1st li11-191::9 ways upon Cuba and there is the economic pressure in homes that are not affluent. So now when one enters a Cuban shop or store one will find many girls behind the counters, and they are brisk, in telligent businesslike; good-looking, too, which is not a disability. Their mothers must have suffered many a misgiving when first it was proposed that these nil'ias should go out to work. The fathers must have wondered if honour could be preserved in the unsheltered life of business. But whatever the doubts and fears, it has come about that many Cuban .girls do work, and if some do so now, more will later on. The iron bars before the doors and windows to keep away the young men without seri ous and moral intentions, have been bent if not brok en. The apertures are wider, there is a sug gestion of greater freedom. By nine o'clock the city's life is in full swing, and the spectacle it presents is animated. Havana contains some five hundred and fifty thousand souls, is tbe first seaport of the republic and one of the world' s greatest tourist resorts. It needs must be a busy centre, especially in the tourist season; then it is at its brightest and we see the glittering sur face of it and are free to wonder about what goes on beneath that surface. The stranger moving round and about, glances int o department stores, where everything is sold, or into small establishments specialising in scents, face powders and the rest., He enters hotel cafes and drinks Baccardi cocktails, Martini cocktails, whisl(y and soda and the like. There are two cheap things in Havana: the cocktails and the taxis. A taxi will take one or two people tc any distance within the city'S limits for twenty cents, and to the at Oriental Park, about seven miles away from the city's centre, it w ill take one or two per sons and bring them back (waiting for two or three hour s) for three dollars or at most three dollars and a half. For thirty cents you can get a delicious cocktail. Except in some special places, indeed, drink is not very expensive in Cuba. From about nopn lunching begins. The Cuban has his siesta of an hour or two, when he goes home to lunch, his family taking the meal. with him. The stranger eats at his hotel or at some restaurant. Here he may meet a few Cubans come into the city from outside, but the people he sees mainly are foreigners like himself, bent upon having what they consider a hectic time. His lunch may cost him anything. But as a matter of fact, at one of the best hotels, a man may lunch quite well for a couple of dollars or less, and two people may do themselves very well indeed for five dollars, with cocktails in cluded. It depends upon the size of one's appetite perhaps, but the average man is not a glutton. There aJ'e decent placefl, too, C11inese restaurants Jand Cuban eating places, where your lunch may not cost you more than a dollar, and less if you wish. But one goes to a place like the Inglaterra or Plaza, or the Sevilla Biltmore, which is' called the hotel of millionair es. One can lunch well at any of these places for a coup le of dollars, and dinner need not cost one much more. The food is Spanish, or Cuban. The cooking is Spanish. Spain conquered the New World, and where she has been she has left an indeliNe im pression of her culinary art and tastes. Thus the foundation of the Jamaica cooking is Spanish, though the Spaniards were all driven out of this islan. d over two hundred years ago; in Cuba, where tens of thousands of Spaniards are, and where the natives are Spanish in descent and in manners, you have the rich gravies, the special mixtures, the flavouring of garliC, which the Spaniards love. And it is good stuff and worthy to be eaten; I hold thrt the Spanish pease and vegetable soups cannot be beaten any where, and the Cuban moorish crab, of which ot;lly .the huge claws will repay attention, are a delicacy which one longs fPl' when out of Cuba. Of course, in the hotels are restaurants where you may have dishes done in the American or European style. But it is not at all a bad idea to eat in Cuba as the Cubans do. THE stranger in Cuba Visits the places men tioned in the guidebooks as of outstanding in terest; he goes through the old fortresses, wanders about old convents, drives around the city by night and day viewing monuments and things of that kind. But for his amusement there are special pleasures provided, and foremost among these are the races and the Casino. Gambling, open, intense, fiercely exciting, is the reason of the Casino's existence. The minimum stake here is a dollar; the maximum is anything you may like to make it. The Casino of Havana is sit uated in the gardens of Marianao, a spacious building of white, a glittering building of light, with a playing fountain in front of it, a group of statuary, and with dining rooms where you may, special evenings, have at five dollars a head. This indeed seems to be the set price for all special functions during the tourist season in Havana. The Ziegfield Follies come down to Havana to give a few nights' performances. The best seats are all at five dollars each. The artists of Cuba give their annual ball. The admission is five dollars each. The Casino allows you to have dinner within its precincts. The charge is five dollars. Wine is extra. That may amount to whatever you please. PLAN T E R S' PUNC.H 9 OHISPO STREET. HAVANA, ONE OF TlIE CITY'S SI{QJlPIXG THOROUGlIFARES. TlIE RUILDINGS ARE NO TR.Ut S RUX THERE AXD IT 18 A ONE-\\1AlI"'STREET FOR MOTOR C.>\RS And dances are given at the Casino, and some times you are invited to hear a celebrated singer there. But these things are but side shows and accidentals. The great event of the night, and of every night, for about four months of the year; is the gambling. The gambling room is not very large. But in it are all sorts of devices for inducing the visitor to try his lUCK, to see if he can win against a system which, in the long run, no man on earth has ever been able to beat. You may win at first. In about ten minutes one night I had won twenty dollars at a game which consisted in turning a circular cage in which there were three dice. If you staked on, say, the number four and it came up once, you were paid a dollar on your dollar; if it came up twice--and as there were three dice in the cage, it sometimes did-you were paid two dollars on your one, and if came up three times, as it also sometimes did, you were paid three dollars. So you can win-for a time. The thing to do is to stop when you are winning. The better thing, perhaps, to do is not to begin at alL THE white-painted room, brilliantly illuminated, is crowded with people, some playing, others watching the games intently. There are roulette tables, with the white and the red holes and the spinning wheels, there are the dice cages I have spo of, there are mechanical whist and poker tables, there is a game which you play by pressing electric bulbs and causing lights to so shine that you may lose your money-and curse your luck. The atmos phere of the place is close, for there is much smok ing. It is tense, for, in spite of the effort of every one to appear calm and unconcerned (a very suc cessful effort on the whole) one senses the tingling nerves and the tension of expectation. One feels this tingling. The very feet seem to tremble and grow cold as the wheel spins round or the dice rattle against the sides of the little cage; as piles of money are handed to some successful player, or the man in charge sweeps off from the table what many have lost in a few moments or so. I watch ," the faces of the attendants. They" are grave, they are stolid masks' ; if one attendant makes a remark to another it is in quiet, monotonous tone: only once did I see one of these men smile. They at'e silent as they rake in the bank's winnings and i!q'lially si lent as they hand you over what you may have won. They calculate rapidly an:! with wonderful acciltacy. How they do it, so swiftly, so surely, is a marvel "to the uninftiated. Have you won a thousand dol lars? They pay with not a twitch of the facial muscles; it is nothing to them. Have you lost that amount? The absence of emotion is the same. If you want explanation they will give it to you; their business is to induce you to play. But, like the machines they tend, they too se.em to be nothing but machines. I believe that they work no more than four months a year and are handsomely paid. If anyone attempted to work a whole year at a time at such a job, I truly believe he ',Vould go mad. Clothed in black jackets, with white sliirts and black bow ties, clothed in black like clergymen, with their expressionless faces, their grave courtesy, these men do actually look like clergymen. I don't suppose they ever gamble themselves. They know too much and have seen too much. It is not skill at the Casino, it is not even chance that decides in the long run, it is playing against a system which makes it certain that if you play long enough you must lose, and often you lose from the very begin ning. Yet you may win now and then: many do. And when you have won and your luc k begins to turn, the wise act is to walk away; but how many have the wisdom and the courage to do that? YOll are a stranger; no one here knows you, will evel' meet you again, or cares half a dollar about YOIl. And yet each and everyone is conscious of the gaze of the others and does not wish to be thought of as mean or cowardly-which in itself is cowardly. So you continue to play until all that you have won is gone, and you still continue to play in the hope that you will win it back. And as you lose your own money you are not so jaunty or loquacious as before--though there is as a rule, at best, but little

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]U PLA NT E R S' PUNCH 1929 ROURNEMOUTH BATH, 'l'I1E POPULAR BATHING RESORT OF Ta:SGSTO:S A:SO ST. IT IS BEAUTIFUL FOR SITUATION, AND ONE OF THE BEST BATHIXC. PLACES OF ITS KIND TO HE J;'OU:SD A:SYWHERE chatter in the Casino. You are silent now, with every nerve stretched to its utmost. At last, after winning, and losing, and realising that you have lost and will continue to lose, you ce:lse. You take a grip upon yourself. At least you have shown that you are not a coward. All may be lost except hon our, though it is difficult to see where the honour comes in. I saw a young Cuban lose a hundred pounds in less than ten minutes one night, and he had lost a hundred po 'unds immediately before at another table. I saw two Cuban girls (of one of the best }ap1ilies, I was told) lose hundreds of dollars. But they seemed not to know the value of money; I am sure their indifference was genuine. The strangers .come and go; some come to lose so much and will not play further than the limit they set themselves; a few (young married couples on their honeymoon) :will do nothing but look on. They are very much in love. They need no stimulus to excitement. And they have just made all sorts of good resolutions as to the life they intend to lead. Those resolutions 'have an immediate vlllue in the Casino. It is one of the principal attractions of Havana. Xou see it afar off, a blaze of white light, a great .illumination against the background of the Cuban '.night. But the stakes are too high, the atmosphere -too feverish, however much of a disguise there may .be to it. I weary of it after a while. And I think that many will agree with me when I say that after a hectic week in Havana one can long for something else, 'One longs for quiet travelling in the country, ,quieter sea bathing than you will find at the Playa, the sumptuous bathing place in Marianao, less of tourist life and more of the real life of the country land people. That is why, after a couple of weeks ;in Havana, men and women come down to Jamaica and surprise their friends (who have not had ex perience of the contrast) by expressing a prefer 'ence fOT their new surroundings. THE pressure of American official opinion arid regard for the which Havana shall "hold in the world have induced recent Presidents of Cuba: to the attempt to rid the city of its old reputation for open 'sexual vice. So now the thea tres "for men only" give but tame performances as compared with those they presented twenty years ago, 'and there is no recognised "red light district." 'Or rather there is a red light district, but it is so :dull, so drab, so common, so devoid of' all spectac ular attraction, that ordinary respectability is bright iIi comparison.' The ;,('daughters .0f joy" once' seg 'regated in Ilhe San 'lsid(')r 'Street and: its' neighbourhood have been s cattered; no longer do they th rong here, sitting at the little wickets cut in the great do ors opening upon spacious courtyards and lure in the passer-by with winning smiles or more open in vitation. There are still a few women in the old street; you Eee them loitering in mean bar-rooms. Fat or scraggy, ill-dressed, their youth long past, their good looks gone, they are more objects of pity than of anything else. No red lights gleam here; even the white electric light glows but dimly. The city has been purified ... but has it been? For now you will find the ladies of the half world elsewhere; these poor creatures in San Isidor do not count. You will find the "ladies of the life" dining with their temporary male friends and pro tectors in expensive restaurants, Sipping cocktails in the cafes, driving along the Maleco!l, living in handsome apartments along the Prado and even in the Vedado. Vice has not been abolished; how can it be in a modern city"? It has been gilded, it has been to outward appearance refined, it has become more expensive than hitherto, for the price of all things has risen steadily in Havana. But it is there; as much of it as you wish. And it is not only native but foreign. Those two elderly men, with that pretty, dashing girl;. I imagine them to be her father and uncle. And how they seem to love her! It is a delight, this picture of undisguised affection-at first. But soon the expressions of affection become too frank, too demonstrative, too daring, and then they grow shocking and you know. The girl is from the States; the men also. Havana is a happy hunt ing ground for "good lookers" of this sort, when the tourist season is in full swing, and when the wine is in the truth is apt to come out in public caresses that 'can have one meaning only. So the Cuban Government refuses to recognise any longer that there is a class Which it must seg regate, just as though it were a British Govern ment. And now it is Kingston that has a red t district "(which is lighted white) and not Havana; yet there is no law in Jamaica compelling women of an age-old calling to herd together in any particular section. It is preference which sends them in King ston to a certain street or two; preference and a knowledge that the street itself is a means of pub licity for them. But the kind of girl you will meet in a Havana cafe or in the Grand Stand at the race course, or in the Casino, or promenading the Prado: that type is hardly to' be seen in Kingston. 'One or two: may travel down in 'the tourist season; one or two do. But'the atmosphere is not congenial to them. 'Phil're dmis not seem to be much gold in JamaIca for'the professional gold-digger. VISITQRS do not come to Jamaica so much for a hectic as for a nice time. It can be hectic enough here. Nightly dances at the hotels, the Clubs and at Bournemouth Bath; sea-bathing at the latter, and at Myrtle Bank, Titchfield, Montego Bay and the open sea-baths on the northern coast of the island; racing in the season; dinners; these will give to the lovers of excitement all the excitement they desire. There is another side to the life, a side from which even the stranger is not cut off in Jamaica as he is in Cuba. I have said that in Cuba one sees the people but never meets them: the gulf between is fixed But it is easy enough for nice people from abroad to meet the residents of Jamaica. In the small country hotels strangers feel immediately at home. They are introduced to the local folk, they form friendships, they correspond with those they leave behind them when they return to their homes. In the larger hotels they meet the residents of the neighbourhood at the dances, and it is sur prising how soon acquaintanceships are made, and no questionable acquaintanceships either. For in a small country like Jamaica the questionable people are well known. And because they are well known they are not "known." They do not frequent the places of entertainment patronised by the better orders. You can meet them, of course, if minded to do so; but you will not be troubled by them, you will not unwittingly be thrown among them, as may so easily happen in larger centres of population. And there is the present great advantage which Jamaica possesses over Cl,Iba: her thou'sands of miles of roads over whfcIi ihe automobile may speed. Most persons wish to see something of the country they visit; the city may be attractive, but by itself it is not enough. Hence the visitor to Jamaica takes a car and finds himself in the heart of the mountains, where the air is exhilarating and cool and the scenery wonderful, or travels by the shore roads, where he is ever in sight and sound of the green and purple and silver sea. He sees a kindly peasantry, and at least he understands their dialect Communication is possible. There is no shrinking from the scrutiny of the stranger, no reluctance to answer his question: he speaks English, and that is a bond between him and the humblest' peasant. So if Cuba has its attractions, and they are many and compelling, Jamaica has hers also, and these possess an appeal of their own. In Cuba the attractions are spectacular, vivid, sometimes garish. In Jamaica they are Simpler, deeper, more enduring. Perhaps that is why so many visitors return to Jamaica again and again. Yet r must add that I too have returned to Cuba. And I should b sbrry to think that I should never see it again.

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, -...., 1929 PLANTERS' PUNCH CC5he CJ)ancinB, Girl Q/ Old THE QI'l<::F.X OK "MAA)I" OF A "SET". IN HIrK RWHT HAND SHE CARRIES WHAT IS SUPPOSED TO BE A SCEPTRE YOUR dancing-girl is one of the earliest and oldest creations of civilised and semi-civilised com munities; she goes back to ancient Egypt, she per formed before the kings of Babylon and Assyria; she was probably well rewarded for her grace and skill, for we know that Salome asked Herod the King for the head of John the Baptist on a charger" as the price of her amateur but exquisite perform ance. And the King paid that price, though what a young girl could want with the head of a preacher I have never been able to find out. It is said that ber mother put her up to getting John's head be cause of some uncomplimentary things that John bad indiscreetly said about the lady. But Salome does not seem to have been the sort of girl to care much about obliging mamma. Anyhow, we know for certain that she danced, and we know that there CAnd of CIo-daY.' were dancing girls in the Greek and the Roman and the Persian and the Indian Empires. Wherever there have been men to look on, the women haVe danced, In Jamaica they dance d almost from the beginning of the English occupation, and they are at it still. Thanks be! Yet there bas been a hiatus, a wide space, be tween our dancers and our dancers: between the days when we had the "sets," and these later days when we have the "troupes," there is fixed a great gulf of time. Almost every Jamaica girl, of any class whatever, could always dance, of course, but these performed for the most part with their male partners, and not professionally, so to speak. The professional dancers of old were the "sets," bands of men and women, but mainly of women, who on special occasions got themselves up in all the finery of their era and went about the streets of our towns gyrating and leaping to the sound of music and the clapping of hands. This was in the days of slavery, and when Emancipation came the custom began to die out. The reason is that these "sets" were gen erally dressed by their mistresses, who took as much interest in their success as the dancers did themse lves, When there were no longer any mistresses there was no one who could afford the elaborate finery required for the proper appearance of the dancing ladies, so gradually the habit of danchlg in sets died out. It had quite disappeared about fifty years ago, and then there were no more pro fessional dancers, if even for but a few days of the year, in Jamaica. It had begun to be thought, too, before this, that professional dancing, dancing for money, ,dancing in public as a pleasing or amusing spectacle, dancing in sets, was not at all respectable. Your nice girl o{ the working classes would no longer do it; that sort of thing, it was felt, belonged to the old dark days of servitude when pride was at a dis count and religion had no force. There was no objec tion to regular mixed dancing, to quadrilles, lancers, waltzes, polkas and the like. But no more appearing as a band in the public streets or in any enclosure to which the public might be admitte4 to look on. after paying entrance money and no credit given. So the "sets" disappeared. And it is only within the last few years that the professional girl dancer has appeared again. But how different from those who went before! Save perhaps in the matter of complexion there is little or no Similarity. THERE used to be two principal "sets" in Jamai ca, the Blues and the Reds. The first wore blue and were usually the more popular, the second wore red and strove mightily to equal their rivals. How did these "sets" originate? No one knows positively; by someone it has been said that the Blues represented the Navy, when Jamaica was a great naval station, and that the Reds represented the Army; for in bygone days a large number of white troops used to be quartered in this island, in or near many of the towns, and their red coats lent a picturesque touch to the otherwise drab tropical human scene. Between the blue water boys and the red-coats there was always some jealousy, and this, it is maintained, was reflected in the rivalry between the "sets" that danced at Christmas-time everywhere in this country where mistresses could afford to equip their girls (or help to do so, for the girls themselves did something.towards making their appearance hideous). But there is at least one other theory as to the onglll of the "sets". It is that advanced by a writer over a hundred years ago, Matthew Gregory Lewis. He says that once upon a time on the Jamaica Station an Admiral of the Red was superseded by an Admiral of the Blue. In those days the Navy seems to have been divided into two colours, and where such a division exists there will naturally be somefeeling, some belief on the one part that it is superior to or different from the other .. The Admirals gave balls to the Brown Girls of Kingston, and, in consequence, the city was divided forever after into two parties, one taking the red as its cognisan ce, the other the blue. One also learns that the Reds represented the English and the Blues the Scotch; and it would seem that while one party in Jamaica welcomed the coming el the Admiral of the Red, or English, the other party re sented the taking away of the Admiral of the Blue who stood for Scotland, oatmeal and whisky, and a great love of feminine society. But if it was the brown ladies who first started this rivalry, how is it that the white ladies became so prominently identified with it? And what about the black ladies, who !}ometimes carried the war from of mere colours to one of finger nails and some 'admirable butting with the head? These last also did all the publ ic dancing and promenadin g in which the Blues scored many a victory over the Reds. Truly there : ./.' I." -" I I 'x l' :'1 ,.., \ A JAMAICA "SET" OF A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. THESE PROBABT.\." REPRESEXTED THE "BLUES"

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12 PLAN T E R S' PUNCH THE BUTTERFLY TROUPE, A BRIGHT BODY OF GIRLS )[ADE THEIR DEBUT Alii DAKCERS AT THE PALACE THEATRE OF KINGSTON is a mystery here. What indeed was the true origin of the Jamaica "sets"? It does not matter now; what we do know for certain is that the dancing of these "sets" became a regular feature of the Jamaica life until about half a century ago, and that some of the highest gentlemen in the land did not hesitate to contribute towards the expenses of the rival' bands. The girls often wore real jewellery, lent by their mistresses for the occasion. These mistresses, enthused by loyalties, perhaps also by rum, watched the pro cessions and sneered at those who were not of their faction. I speak, of course, of mistresses not in the first rank of society; these did not display their feelings so openly. But they had them. They too belonged to the Reds or the Blues, and experienced emotions of the highest virtue when popular opinion gave to their side the winning vote. EACH band had a Que en, and she was the most wonderfully attired of them all. I don't know whether she was intended to represent the Queen of Beauty and Grace, or Miss Jamaica, or what, but she and the rival Queen were certainly the most conspicuous females in their town or district for quite a few days, and eJ.ch had her attendant court. Her followers were dukes and duchesses, earls and countesses, lords and ladies! There was hardly a commoner among them. And as they paraded up and down the streets, night and day, they danced; they danced instead of walking, the sound of their music was heard in the land. And in truth it must have been something to see, in those byegone days, scores of dancers, all brightly and gaily clad, in every town, and sometimes in the villages and on the estates themselves, disporting themselves for days together. It may have been garish, barbarian, laugh able. But it meant real mel'riment, a break in the monotony of life. When the custom died out it was written that it should never be revived. But though in those old days no one pretended to exceptional virtue, though living was "freer" than it is even now and the conventions sat lightly on the people, it would have been thought indecorous, shame lessly immodest, for the dancers to have appeared but partly clothed or wearing tights. Suc h a spec tacle would have been shocking, could, in fact, have simply not occurred. The truth is, of course, that the style of dress for dancers and for others, in those days, was quite different from what it now is; in a hot climate it was the custom for ladies to wear an abundance of clothes, and long skirts with crinolines were regarde d as beautiful; and one wore heavy felt hats ornamented with flowing feathers, and one per spired greatly and endured much for the sake of fashion, and those who should have transgressed the prevailing fashion, and appeared as your danc ing-girl now does upon the stage, would have been condemned in scathing language as lacking in all sense of pl'Opriety as abandoned .creatures quite. No one, save perhaps a philosopher, would have seen that all this horror and disapproval was but the re sult of a belief that what existed was right and would not alter. For in the fields and even in the homes, the young women who danced in "sets" completely covered at Christmas-time, went about their with but one garment as a rule, and that exiguoul!!. But that, it was thought, was right enough where work was concerned. Work itself (probably) was so highly correct and virtuous. that it did not much matter in what sort of costume it was accomplished. so long as the costume facilitated expedition. It was different with play; there, in public, one had to think of what was then accepted as the standards of decorum. Those standards were fixed by tlH' dominant classes and no one dared to ignore them. THIS feeling lingered so long that when, some five-and-twenty or thirty years ago, Variety (Continued on Page 21.) "FRENCH" SET GIRLS: REFUGEES FROl\1 HAYTI, AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 19TH CENTURY, BROUGHT OVER THEIR SLAVES. THESE FORlIIED THEIR OWN "SETS" AND DRESSED QUITE DIFFERENTLY FROl\l THE NATIVES 1

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Planters' Punch A Jamaic a Magazin e (FOUND ED 1920) JAMAICA, 1929. T H INK FO R T H E MORROW. MR. F. G CULMER, an English writer who has devoted years of study to insurance questions, has written: "It is no little comfort to a young man to know that, should his life be cut short premature ly, his wife and children would not b e left penniless, .as in most circumstances the wives and children of most young men would be if there were no such thing as life insurance. Those who are able to impress this palpable truth upon the lives of all youths en tering manhood are doing a real national service." These words have inspired this journal to devote some special attention to life insurance. And as other forms of insurance are also of the very highest im portance, those too are dealt with on this page. Insurance is a safeguarding against death, ac cidents, fires, hurricanes and loss of all kinds; and the man who is not safeguarded by it is a man who runs a terrible risk day after day. It is a risk which, in many circumstances, is almost criminal. For it almost always involves other people: not only the \ininsw:ed individual suffers when death or fire or accident occurs, but others dependent upon him family employees, or creditors as the case may be. lt has be e n said that no man liveth unto him self or dieth unto himself. That is one reason for the various forms of insurance. SUPPOS E Y O U DIE THERE is none of us in Jamaica who has not heard of some family being left destitute, or at the very least in straitened circumstances, through the death of its breadwinner. Men die at any time. A man of forty or fifty, with perhaps a wife and four children, may pass away after a few weeks' illness. though a year before such a circumstance it would have been thought that he had twenty or thirty years more of life before him. In the great majority of instances a man here who can afford insurance is either an employee or the owner of a business which he has been stI'iving to 'put upon firm foundations, but which he knows will demand from him years of care and thought before i t can be considered as well established. His busi n ess may be a shop or a small banana plantation. ,Or he may be a professional man. But whether he be in business or in anyone of the professions, or a n employee, it is not usual in this country to find him so comfortably fixed that, without any life in surance, he can leave his family in a position to face the future without hardship and suffering until the children can begin to earn something for them .selves. Surely then that man owes it to his family, and to his own peace of mind, to provide for the former in the one way in which people of limited means can decently provide for their dependents. Let us suppose that (as happily is in many instances true) s u ch a man takes out a policy on his life when he is still you ng. He pays his premiums halfyearly or .Yearly, and the amount is small; for the younger you are when you take out a policy, the smaller is the premium. It is safe to say that the annual amount which a young man pays on a life policy of or even a ,000 would often be spent with out a thought on treating friends a little more, or on .additional entertainment, or on some expensive wear ing apparel: in a word on something which, when ,don e without, is not missed. That man marries, children are born: he may then think it wise to increase his insurance. And that is what he indubit .abl y should do if he can possibly afford it. For at the very least he knows that, with a life insurance policy, he cannot leave his family utterly unpro vided for in the case of early death. Not even if his busi n ess went to pieces at his death, and could not meet his liabilities, need his life insurance money be touched if it stands in the name of his wife. He bas made a certain provision, large or small as the -case may be, for those for whose support he is responsible, and the law of every country so recog nises and respects this act that it exempts from all "income tax the amount of a man's income which he 'Pays as premiums on his life insurance. The man who has one or more life insurance 'PoliCies goes about with a feeling of security. He may very properly want to do more than he has yet done by way of safeguarding his family's future, but at any rate he knows that he has done some thing, and that makes for peace of mind. And not only that: he is actually freer to spend money on the present enjoyment of himself and his family than if he had no life insurance. For with no life in S1.Irance he must. if he has any decent feeling at all, P L A NT E R S' PUNCH b e constantly urged by prudence and conscience to put away money, i\ir his or to seek fOT in vestments that. wiill 'yield them something when"pe is gone, But investment is there' as good as life' insurance? You take out a policy fol', say, It may be for life; it may be for twenty years-there are many kinds of poliCies. According to your age and the term of the policy, you pay or a year: we use approximate figures. How. could you invest this amount annually so as to be certain that, if you died five years after you commenced to do so, you would leave at least to your people? For this is the special advantage of life insurance: if you die im mediately after you have paid the first premium, the full amount for which you have insured n:!ust be handed over to your heirs. You may have paid or : death comes and the of insurance which you have taken out is without any question the property of those for whoI)l you intended it. It is this fact that makes life insurance the most popular form of providing for one's family. But it has other advantages also To mention but one. The insurance companies pay bonuses or dividends every year or every three years or every five years, according to the constitu tion of the company. You may consider these divi dends or bonuses as in.terest on your money, and as a rule they represent"extraordinarily' high rates of interest. When a man is informed by his insurance company that, on a sum of money which he has paid by instalments for three or five years, h e is now credited with a larger sum than he has had to pay in premiums for one or even two years, and when as time goes on this bonus keeps increasing-some' times it doubles itself within a comparatively short period-he begins to realise that he has made a very lucrative as well as a very sure investment. And if he decides to allow these bonuses to be added to the capital sum of his life insurance policy he may l eave at his death fifty per cent. more than h e was in sured for, and even one hundred per cent. more. This often happens. Life insurance is therefore not only a moral obligation to one's family, not only a safeguard of that family's future, but the easiest and one of the most profitable forms of investment that could possibl y be devised. THE C R Y OF FIRE. WHEN an alarm of fire is given the whole neigh bourhood rushes out to watch the flames The clanging of the fire engine b e ll summons all those who hear it to the place of the conflagration. The interest is intense. The general danger is immediate ly realised. And the question that comes to the mind of everyone who sees or hears of that fire is: "I wonder if poor Soand So was insured?" H it is learnt that he was not, the feeling for him may be one of sympathy, but such sympathy is invariabl y tempered by astonishment that so element ary a precaution against loss by fire should have been neglected. One knows that the person who has suffered such a loss has partly brought his fate upon himself, There was at his disposal a means of protecting himself; he coul d have insured his pro perty. If he is now homeless, that is not only his misfortune but seems to be very much his fault H he will not now be able to start in business again, it is felt and said that he could not be a far seeing businessman if he took no steps to insure his business. For no one can tell when a fire will break out. There is no foreseeing such a catastrophe. And no one can say what a fire will not do It may start in the next street. Bul the wind may blow the embers hundreds of yards away, and a whole block may be destroyed, or parts of two or three different blocks. And even if a fire n ever gets beyond the confines of the premises in which it occurs, it may destroy everything within those premises. When such a calamity occurs the man who has properly and honestly insured his house or his place of business, his furniture, his stock, or what not, can set about rebuilding and starting again with a fairly light heart. There is, of course, the inevitable inconvenience until everything is made right. That is one thing that cannot be provided against. But imagine the situation when he has no insurance or is very much underinsured. He feels then that he has lost everything he has been working for. His horne which was to shelter him and his during his lifetime, which was to be a horne for those for Whom he cares-that is now but a heap of charred wood and blackened stone and ashes. His business, to which he devoted so much care, has disappeared in smoke. He must now begin at the bottom once more, and be thankful for that chance. His hopes, his expectations of future comfort and prosperity, as well as his enjoyment of a present competence-all that too has vanished. Yet this could quite easily have been avoided, Insurance against fire means that a number of people pool their risks; as no one knows whose property may be destroyed, and as the loss of even the small est property may mean a very heavy burden for one individual to carry, hundreds and thousands of in dividuals agree to protect one another against what ever loss may occur. But the payment of each in dividual, while protecting him fully, is individually small. And his great, his overwhelming advantage 1 3 is that he is protected: that if he is the victim of a fire he cannot be a hea,VY sufferer' or pauperised, The honest man who insures his horne or his business, or his furniture, or anything against fire, does not hope that a fire will enable him to claim his insurance. But he knows that if there is a fire he is safeguarded; consequently he can go about his daily concerns without haunting and harassing anx iety. Fire insurance, in fact, is not merely a pro vision againat loss, it is a prevention of mental worry which not only hinders present happiness but sub tracts from the energy which one has to devote to one's business and other affairs. It is not only when the uninsured man sees flames rising here and there that the terrible fear grips his heart; the fear is there all the time, Always is there in his mind a sense of serious risk. It is wisest, from all points of view, to eliminate that risk. PAY, PAY, PAY! THE Jamaica n ewspapers are constantly reporting accidents to motor cars in these days. Now we read that outside the Palace Theatre a car caught fire or that o n his way to fulfil an appointment His Excellency the Governor's car collided with some other automobile, that a boy was run over on the Constant Spring Road, that a bicycle was dashed aside, that a woman had her leg broken, that a car was badly damaged through skidding, and so on and so forth: all in connection with motor cars or trucks. But the cases of accidents reported in the news papers are not a tenth of those that take place. Naturally, it is only the more serious accidents that get into the public prints, but the others all cost money, and someone has to pay that cost. The chief dread of the motorist is lest he should bump into some human being, either killing or in juring him or her. Unless this is due to criminal negligence on his part, to furious driving or gross carelessness, he has not to fear for his life or his liberty. But there are damages to pay. He may he called upon to compensate a man's family for the loss of its breadwinner, He may be called upon to sup port a man or woman for years, or to give 'in corn pensation for injuries received a sum of money that will cripple him for life if his car be not in sured. But if he is insured against what is called "third party risks," he has taken out on his car a policy that makes him free from personal financial liability should he unfortunately injure anyone. The ownership of a motor car is not then a sort of menace to him as it otherwise must be. As the likelihood of accidents increases with the increase of cars upon our streets and roads, this menace steadily grows g reater in the case of those who are not insured against it. The worst of it is that it is not only after prolonged use of a car that accident is likely; it may occur in the first week of ownership, in a jo urney of a hundred yards as well as in one of a hundred miles. That is why a larger and larger num ber of sensible people take out motor car insurance policies, But it is not only the injuring of other people that the motorist has to take into account. There is property damage also. If a man's truc k or car runs into another man's vehicle or bounces badly against a fence it 'will not suffice for him to say that he is sorry. His sorrow will not be regarded as an adequate redress by the sufferers. It is only just that he should make good the loss infli cted, and that might at any time run into a considerable figure. But if his car or truck is insured he does not worry about this. His insurance company takes care of it; that is what he pays his premiums for, that is what the company undertakes to do, and that is what the company does. There is also his own loss. Suppose his car skids and runs against an iron post or a bric k wall or a mountainside; or suppose it catches nre; or is stolen and either partly or wholly destroyed by the thief. Each of these contingencies means a loss and sometimes a heavy loss. But that loss need not be borne by the motor car owner. If he has taken the precaution to insure he can have an easy mind about accidents. Motor car insurance is becoming more general in Jamaica, not because people like to pay premiums, but because they do not want to be called upon to pay heavy damages, or to restore and repair their own cars at considerable personal expense. They prefer an annual insurance against grim possibilities (which may at any moment be transformed into actual nasty facts) to worry, annoyance, and an ex penditure not only heavy, but perhaps of so consid erable an amount as to Illake one little better than the financial slave of a person injured. There is a sound basis and reason for insurance against accid enfs, and while there are some who resolve to take risks it is noteworthy that these are most bitter in se l f blame when the risk becomes an actuality. When a judge's adverse decision falls like a bomb on the man who has refused or neglected to insure his motor vehicle, that man ):las no critic as scathing as him self. It is always easy to be wise aiter the event but such wisdom is terribly costly. Real is that which anticipates and provides against the event.

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14 I I PLAN T E R S' PUNCH THE MAYFAIR PROMENADERS A Body oj Jamaica Amateurs, Selected and Trained by Ermyn Ellis, Who Gave a Series oj Performances at the Ward Theatre i in April 1928 i "THE BEAUTY CHORUS" OF THE lIJAYFAIR PROMENADERS ; -.............. "ft':::.:':: ... .. .. ,. f 41 .. ....... t .: ..................... It: c..: : ................. .. : : ........... : II ,-of If .. ",. All:;!> ERlIIYN ELLIS, PRINCIPAL 0]< 'rUE lIIAYFAIR SCHOOL OF DANCING THE SLAVE GIRLS IN "THE DANCE OF THE SEVE N VEILS" OF WHICH MISS ER.IYN WAS THE SOLOIST I Pho t ographs b y Oleary a na b !1iott 'V tC""? I 1,/ C-.L )

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) 1929 PLAN T E R S' PUNCH 15 "DOUBLE DUMMY" The odd little adventure that befell a dhlillond-rnerchant"s rnessenger on a Journey between London and Paris. HTlte details are absolutely correct," writes the Author, "but for obvious reason s nantes have been 8uPllressed or My story opens in 1920, at which time I occupied a position as messenger to the oldestablished iirm of H. Vi'-and Sons, diamondmerchants of London it being my job to convey stones and other valuables to and from their clients and agents. When not thus occupied I was expected to make myself generally useful and help the office staff when ever assistance was required. The firm was prosper ous enough not t o worry about such things as econ omy and efficiency, and the whole place was over staffed. so that I reckoned I was on a soft thing. The casual way in which old "H.W." engaged me was typical of his methods. You would have thought that a hard-headed diamond-merchant would have demanded some very convincing references before he selected a fellow to take sole charge of little p3.ckets of precious stones worth many hundreds of pounds, but luckily for me-it wasn't so The only references I had in my p ocket when I presented myself at the offices in answer to an ad vertisement, were one signed by myoid headmaster, which said I was "punctual and persevering," and one from the Army, in which my Colonel testified that to the best of his belief I was sober and indns/ trious-and a marksman! The "boss," however, never even asked to see them; he just picked me out of the bunch of ap plicant s waiting and told me I'd suit. It seemed a rather slack procedure to me, but I soon jiscovered that old "H.W." was very cute, and as far a s I know h e never had a stone miscarry. In the course of business, certainly, he took the precautions that custom and etiquette demanded. In Hatton Garden he packed the "stuff" in an attache case and was guarded; in Whitechapel Road, at the little en/ e where the shabbiest of shabby Continent als congregate t o buy and s e ll precious stones, he carried immensely valuable gems in his vest pocket, bringing them forth on request for inspection just as if they were bits of glass. One June afternoon I had no packages to fetch or deliver and so Joe, the office-boy, had claimed my services-ostensibly to assist him in the addreSSing of envelopes, but actually to discuss football. I was just being let in on something really choice in the way of football secrets when the bell rang. Joe answered and, returning, jerked his thumb over hili s-houlder in the direction of the private office of o l d "H.W." himself, 'intimating that I was required to llresent myself thereat without delay. I found the "boss" in his den going over some papers and chatting to his secretary, Roseman. He looked up as I knocked at the door. "Ah! Good afternoon, Gibbs. Come in. How do you fancy a trip to Paris tomorrow?" "Very nice, sir," I said. "When do we start?" "Oh, I'm not coming with you, Gibbs! I'd like to; I could do with a holiday, but I've got to meet Van Riebeck in Aldgate tomorrow. Now, listen care fully. Here's a little business you must see through on your own, but it's quite simple. I want yon t o take this package to our agent in Paris, Monsieur Fourneau, who will give you a letter to bring back to me. You may have to stay in Paris for a day or two, but Fourneau will make you comfortable." I knew this well, for the kindly little Frenchman and I were quite old friends, and notwithstanding the difference in our positions he had always made it his busines s to treat me hospitably on each occasion that I had visited Paris on behalf of the firm. The went on: "Now, I want you to take great care, for the package contains some pretty valuable stones, .and I'd rather not lose them if I can help it." He chuckled, and then added: "But I don't Suppose you'll forget you've got it to carry." I happened at that moment to be watching Roseman, who was putting some files in order trying to look uninterested, but somehow I had an idea he was listening intently. Mind you, there wasn't the slightest reason why he sho.uldn't, for he was entire ly in the confidence of the "boss," but for that very reason it seemed queer that he s hould be so curious. 'Surely he had known all that there was to be known about the package before I entered the office? I told myself. Anyway, it was probably only my fancy. "There'll be no examination at the Custom Gibbs," continued Mr. W--; "I've had the packet sealed at the Embassy, so you've nothing to do but keep your eyes open and go straight to F ourneau. You must catc h the 10 a.m. train from Victoria and travel via Newhaven-Dieppe This is important. On no account go by any other route, as I have instruct ed Fourneau to meet you at St. Lazare Station in PariS, and you mustn't miss him. "Anything you don't quite understand? Right! Off you go, then. Here is the packet, and a slip to the cashier. Oh, by the way, you are to travel first-class on the outward journey. Good day, Gibbs." Back in the main office, I co llected some money from the cashier, put the packet in an attache-case, and bidding Joe a fond farewell, floated out of the office at exactly 4 p m. From the time I left the office until my train was due to depart" was a period of eighteen hours, and you wlll -pr'Obably be rather surprised to think that I should be entrusted with such a valuable package for so long a time in my own home. As already explained, however, the firm of W--and Sons were rathe:casual in their methods. Apart from the possible risk o[ trusting me, however, they had been business-like enough. I n order to avoid the inconvenience of the examina.tion at the ports, the package had been inspected, sealed, and ce,'tifi e d by the authorities in London, and a.ll I had to do in order t o pass the Customs was to prod uce the certificate which I carried in my pocket. Directly I got home I packed up a few things in my bag and sent it off to the station. Then I ate a pretty substantial dinner and went to bed-to dream not of diamond-thi eves, but of a certain snug little cafe in the Boulevard St. Michel. Half-way through the night I aWOke to find myself possessed of :L brain wave. I recalled Roseman's peculiar attitude of camou flaged attentiveness and, turnin g things ove,' in my mind, I came to the conclusion that though in all probability there was nothing in the wind so far as he was concerned, there could be no harm in taking a few precautions. I therefore jumped out of bed lit the gas, got busy with some paper and sealing wax, and soon had a passably good imitation 01' the sealed packet lying beside the original. Then I climbed between the sheets again and fell fast asleep. Next morning, with ample time to spare, I pre sented myself and half-a-crown to a porte, at Vic toria, whereupon he put the coin into his pocket and me into so l e possession of a first c lass compartment on the London-Newhaven-Dieppe-Paris train. Punc tually at 10 a.m. we were off, and at 11.30 a.m. we were transferring to the Southern Rail way steamer at Newhaven after a showing of passports and a very perfunctory examination for contraband. My private bag had been registered through to Paris, so I had nothing to worry about save the attache-case and my appetite, which latter a hea,'ty lunch in the boat saloon soon dismissed. This left only the case on my mind, and that didn't weigh very heavily, for at three o'clock I was waiting in a very cheerful frame of mind for the disembarka tion at Dieppe to commence. I had kept my eyes open for anything or any body suspicious, but the boat was half empty, and the only interesting person aboard was the young lady who was now standing on my right, absorbing what were evidently first impressions of Franceand she certainly wasn't at all suspicious-looking. She was, indeed, distinctly good-looking, and had at tracted attention from all the passengers, though she appeared to b e ignorant of the fact. To tell the truth., I experienced great difficulty in keeping my eyes off her, in spite of the fact that I was well aware that young men on business such as mine o ught not to allow their attention to stray in the direction of attractive young ladies. I deduced from several little signs that it was her first visit to. the country. One does not, if o n e has been there before, murmur in a tone of delighted antiCipation: "France-La Belle France!" on arriv ing at Dieppe, for n o o n e, however kindly disposed, can say that Dieppe is beautiful. Nor does one usu ally hang around gathering impressions once the boat is made fast, for it is generally recognized that t o do so is guaranteed to rouse the all-too-easily awakened suspicion s of the Customs officials and en sure the laggard's luggage getting a thorough over hauling. I saw the look of pleasant antiCipation die away on the young lady's piquant face, to be replaced by one of disappointment, and then I lost sight of her in the scrambl e to get across the gangway. I was practically the first person asho.r e, and a few minutes later was making myself comfortabl e in a first-class compartment secured for my sole use in the usual manner. From the window I could see the Customs examination proceeding with much hat raising and argument-politely persuasive at first, then politely vehement, but always polite. I had watched the scene many a time before, but it i s a spectacle of unfailing interest. The crowd had thinned considerabl y before I again caught sight of the pretty young lady. Appar ently, she was just getting another fondly cherished idea knocked on the head-an illusion co ncernin g the inexhaustible patience and courtesy of t h e French examining officers. A seaman had dumped her bag on the counter and, having received his unjust dues, had ungallantly left her to the mercies of the French official. "Vous n'avez rien a decla?'er, madamet''' de manded t h e officer "Pardon, monsieur-er-I'm sorry, but I cannot speak French," replied the young lady. A pair of heavily-braided shoulders shrugged. "'Ave yo u any tabac-cigarettes?" He did his best with the words, but :they seemed just as hopeless in English as in French.' The girl did not answer. "OuV?'ez-Open, madame!" said the official, brus quely, and proceeded to rummage through her per sonal belongings. Silks and crepes, D.lmy s.tockings and underwear, were tossed and tuinbled, unfolded altered." IHL caITIB3 IB3 and crumpled-all because she COUldn't speak French. To add to her distress the train gave unmistakable signs of impending departure. Officials were orderin g passengers for Paris to get aboard, but the stolid Customs man continued to "visit" the possessions of Madame, impervious alike to sweet smiles and kind words. She was rapidly getting hysterical, and looked so charmingly help less that, flinging prudence to the winds, I hopped out of my co.mpartment and went to. her assistance. "Can I help you?" I asked. The girl looked up into my face, her eyes brimming with tears, and almost threw herself into my arms. "Oh! please /" she said, gratefully. "I must catc h this train. Can you stop this man turning out my bag? Do help me to get out of this." Thereupon I spoke to the officer and pointed out why it was that Madame had behaved so suspicious ly-how utterly unsophisticated she was, and how handicapped by her complete lack of knowledge of the French tongue. I parried his reply that he had addressed Madame in English by explaining that the lady was Scottish, and therefore unused to hearing "good English." Ah! Braided Shoulders' stolidity vanished, and vo.lubility took its place. He had deceived himself, he told me; he had thought Madame's inability t o reply a matter of conscience. He expressed ten thousand regrets and, becoming practical, assisted me to replac e the contents of the bag. A few more words, a shove or two, a scramble and. a jingle of coins, and the young lady and I were seated together in the compartment that I had left. Thro ughou t this little ep isode I had kept a firm grip on my precious case, and now, as we settled down and the train slid gently out of Dieppe, I began to wonder if I had been wise to take the girl under iuy wing, so to 'speak. She looked so pretty and so trustful, however, that I reproached myself for hav ing harboured any suspicious thoughts about her. "Don't you speak any French 'at all?" I asked. "No! I'm afraid I'm very ignorant," she answer ed, smiling sweetly. She went on to thank me for my ( help, but I soo n stopped her. "It's very awkward, \ you not being able to speak French," I said. "Where are you gOing to when you get to Paris? Please don't think I'm inquisitive, but perhaps I can help you until you meet your friends?" "I should be very grateful if you would," she told me. "Indeed, I am very grateful for what you have done already. I have an address to. which I am to go. I'm an actress, 'you know. My name is Minnie Tyrell." Seeing I gave no indication of having heard the name before she hastened to add: "I've not been at it very l ong, so of course I'm no t famous yet." "I s p end a considerable portion of my time travel ling, so. I know very little about theatres," I told her. I felt convinced, however, that Miss Tyrell must indeed be a beginner, for the most timid girl that ever tripped it in the c h orus would have known how to handle the situation in the Custom House. At any rate, she would have made a fight for it. W e chatted quite gaily as the really fine scenery slid by and our acquaintance made great headway. Presently I risked another question. "Is it a theatrical engagement that you have in Paris?" I asked. "Why, yes!" she answered, unhesitatingly. "It is a great opportunity, I think." "Would yOU consider it impertinent of me if I were to ask yo u for the address of which you spoke just now?" "No, certainly not. Here it is. Tell me-is it a nice place?" I glanced at the card which she handed me. "011, yes, I know it;" I said, "very nice-very. Have you never been there before?" "No, the agency in London gave it to me." The address, I should explain, was in one of the nastiest quarters of Paris-a once fashionable street of large houses, nOw let out as common lodging houses and tenements. It was not exactly a place' of ill-fame, but one to be avoided if possible. Still, everything might be all right. Possibly it was; pro bably it wasn't. I had heard of young girls being sent abroad on the pretence of theatrical engage ments, only to find themselves stranded. It was pretty obvious that Miss Tyrell wasn't very worldly-wise. Still, the people at this address might be quite respectable, and there was no need to alarm her unnecessarily. I would find some ex cuse, I decided, to see her to the house and also keep an eye on her during my stay in Paris. I could easily hand the package over to Fourneau at St. Lazare, and then help the girl with her luggagethat is, if she woulil let me. I hoped she would for I was decidedly interested. Oh yes, you'll be all right there," I repeated, and was astonished and secretly gratified to note how (Continued on 'page 28).

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16 The Witch ofp..osehall an estate of them." (C(;mtinued trom Page 3) are not friendly it is very hard for both "I should very much like to be your friend, Burbridge" cried Robert heartily. "And I'll tell you at once that 1 am not exactly a pauper; 1 mean," he corrected himself hastily, out of regard for the other man's feelings, I have some means and so can afford to buy a horse and any other little thing 1 may need." "Good for you," commented Burbridge moodily. "I have nothing but my pay, like most book-keep ers, and that is never enough. I have to stick wherever I get employment, for if you leave two or three jobs the overseers and attorneys come to think you are no good, and then you're done for. You seem to be all right, so you don't need to worry so much." "You are English, of course?" questioned Robert. "Like yourself, yes; only, you are a gentleman." "Let us hope we are both gentlemen," said Robert, but he had already noticed Burbridge's broad accent; just as Burbridge had caught the tones .of Robert's cultured voice and observed his easy, 1l1dependent manner. "Can't afford to be a gentleman," said Burbridge with downright can dour ; "gentlemen book-keepers don't last long here. I'll get Psyche to look after your room till you get a housekeeper, Rutherford. Psyche is a good girl, but you will have to get your own. for she has a lot to do for me, besides doing her ordinary work in the trash house." "She's your servant?" But even as Robert asked the question he knew from something in Burbridge's attitude and from his praise of Psyche that the girl, whoever she was, was something more than a servant to his co lleague. His eyes lifted themselves automatically and again he spied opposite to him, hanging from a nail in the wall, that fluttering female garment. "She's my housekeeper and a very good girl. thiJ'lk I heal' her now." True enough, it was Psyche, a middle-sized, pleas ant lookIng damsel of about nineteen years of age, light chocolate in complexion, and therefore sambo, with bright black eyes and a merry smile. She wore a Sing l e robe that reached her to the knees, but it was not coarse osnaburg such as Robert haa seen on the women in the fields; it was of much better material and must, Robert concluded, have been purchased with Burbridge's money. Her head was tastefully covered with a large scarf looking like a chequer-board of bright and diverse colours; her feet were bare. She had nothing of a slouching, timid demeanour; on the contrary, she flashed Robert a merry glance, bade him good day, then, touching Burbridge lightly on the shoulder, asked what he wanted. "This is Mr. Rutherford, Psyche, the other bookkeeper," explained Burbridge. "He is going to live in the next room like 1Ilr. Fanburg did, and I want you to fix it up him till he gets somebody of his own to do it. It won't be too much for you?" "No," grinned Psyche, looking Robert over with an appraising and appreciative glance. "An' it won't be long." "That's so," agreed Robert. "I suppose tbey allow a servant, don't they?" "Yes, you are allowed a servant to do the neces sary things," said Burbridge, "but not for all the time. She will have other work to do." "An' dem all is tief," said Psyche decisivel y. "Dem all rob you, except you is their sweetheart. But you will get a sweetheart, massa, specially as you is such a pretty gentleman. There is Millie, me cousin; she just twenty and she have good ways and is pretty. You want to know her?" No, no, Psyche," laughed Robert with real en joyment. (The eagerness of Burbridge's lady to find for him a special helpmeet, and her unabashed [rankness about it, affected his sense of humour keenly.) "I think it would be much more proper for me to select my lady-love myself: don't you agree?" "Yes," agreed Psyche, "for, after a ll what I t'ink may suit you you migbtn't like; you' taste may be different. But Millie really a good looking girl and can work, an' she is a free girl, massa. I will bring her over to see you soon; dat will be no harm, for you needn't teck her if you don't like her. What you say?" "Just as you please," laughed Robert. "There can be no objection to the lady calling on me, if that is a custom of the country. And of course 1 shall like her, though that does not mean that 1 shall take her. And here is something for you, Psyche." He handed the girl a dollar, at the same time glancing at Burbridge to see how he woul d regard this gift. He noticed tha t it was by no means re sented by Burbridge. As for Psyche, s h e crowed with delight. Robert perceived that the advent of Millie was likely to be hastened. "I live here," said Psyche, pointing to Bur bridge's room, "an' Millie could live dere," and she pointed to Robert's room; "an' bote of us coul d keep dis place nice and convenient, and we coul d be happy an' virtuous." PUNCH Robert stared. Then remembered that virtuous must mean to" Psyche something quite different from what it signified to persons with a better knowledge of the English language, though not necessarily with a higher appreciation of the value of virtue. That Psyche was convinced that she was living a highly virtuous life hI! did not doubt for a moment. As for Burbridge, Robert realised that virtue meant nothing to him; he would have said that it could not possibl y have any part in the life of a book keeper-which was indeed the universal view. "That's all right, Psyche," cut in Burbridge, with real kindness and affection to girl. "You nee d not go back to toe trash house tlll you have fixed up Mr. room; but be long or I will be blamed. We'd better be gettmg along. now, Rutherford. You will see when your box es come; we aren't going far from here." "I wi' bring Millie,". was the last word from Psyche; then the two men mounted their horses and went cantering off. The sun was now high in the sky and beating fiercely down upon the countrys ide; the whole sce n e was lit up brilliantly by a hard yellow light, and the flashing blue of the sea to the north challenged the sapphire of the radiant overarching canopy that reached from the horizon. to beyond the hills to the south and spread away to east and west, forming, to eye, an immense inverted bowl painted flaming co l ou r. The sea-bre eze had waxed m strength. Here and there stood groups of slender coconut palms, towering skyward, their lon g waving wildly and clashing as they waved. LIke sen tinels on guard over the fields, huge cieba trees lifted giant branches into the air. The atmosphere was permeated with the smell of sugar in the and of new rum; from far and neal' came cnes of human voices and the lowing of cattle; overhead floated with scarcel y a movement, large black birds, the Crows, a species of vulture whic h were then the only scavengers of town and country. Burbridge was interested in all this not at all; he was thirty years of age and for eight of these years he had been a book keeper in Jamaica .. No .. thing was strange to him, nothing new, and little was pleasant. With Robert it was different; his reo action to these tropic scenes, to this exotic life, was keen; it intrigued and thrilled him; to hin{ this was a holiday and what went o n around him might have been staged for his amusement. He felt exhilarated as he rode by Burbridge's side; in spite of the heat h e enjoyed it all to the full. But even as he drew rein at the still-house, where the rum was made, there came to him a shock. He saw a stout black fellOW lift a whip and bring it sharply down on the shoulders of a girl who was stooping to lift a bundle. The girl howled and crou ched, but did not dare to move, for the whip hovered menacingly over her. Three or four other women in the vicill'jty trembled violently, bent over their tasks with, fever ish intensity: the moment was one of tensioj1. Then Robert remembered that he was a book-keeper, and, as such, the boss of the drivel' who seemed. to be about, in a spirit of brutal enjoyment, to stl'lke the girl again. "Stop that and go and attend to some other business!" he shouted to the man peremptor ily. The fellow started to give some explanation; he was evidently astonished. The girl turned ap pealingly to her unexpected protector. Burbridge said nothing. The driver hesitated. Yet he still held the whip above the young woman. Angered by his at titude Robert rode up to him and kicked the whip out of his hand, the man uttering an exclamation of pain as he did so. Then Robert and Burbridge passed into the still-house. "What was that brute lashing the girl for?" asked Robert. "Some neglect of duty, perhaps," replied Bur bridge; "but I guess he was really taking it out of her for a private reason; possibly she wouldn't have him a-nd he is showing her what she might expect for her rejection." "But these peop l e are not allowed to flog without express permission from white men, are they? I thought that in these days only the white men on the estate cou l d give a flogging order." "Practice and theory are sometimes different," answered Burbridge dryl y, "and if you prevented these drivers from using the whip altogether you would soon have every slave raising the deV'il. There's plenty of flogging on RosehalI, Rutherford, more perhaps than on any other estate." "Are the slaves here worse?" "They are pretty bad." "But a lady lives on the property. Mrs. Palm" I' herself lives here, and she is a young woman, I have heard. Doesn't she take a personal interest in things? What about her influence?" Burbridge looked at Robert with a curious smile. "You had better find out all that for yourself," he said. CHAPTER THREE EXPERIENCES IN twenty-four hours Robert Rutherford had learnt a great deal. As he sat on his horse the morn ing after he had entered upon his duties at Rosehall, watching a scene which he knew would 1929 develop in a fashion revolting to his feelings, he concluded that a mere description of the position.. a book-keeper, however detailed, could never have brought home to his mind' the nature of that em-ployment as his brief personal experience of it had done. Robert was a man in splendid condition; 'but even he already felt horrified at the tax put upon an unfortunate book-keeper during crop time on a sugar estate. Yesterday he had picked up the rudiments of his work and had discovered that he would not have a single book to keep (all that sort or thing being done by the overseer), but that he. expected, after a day in the field, or in the bOllmg: house watching the sugar made, to spend every other night in the still-house where was kept fermented spirit and in which it was poured into puncheons for shipment at a little port two or three miles away. Last night he had taken up his post of watchman in t h e still-house. There he had had to re main from about nine until foul' o'clock in the morning. He had seen the rum drawn out of the huge vats in which it was stored, had seen the puncheons filled and sealed by the workers, had seen to it that they were carefully loaded on to the waggons that were to convey them away, and even during the intervals when there was little or no thing to do he had hardly dared to close his eyes for a few minutes' s l eep. He had been warned against this; the slaves would steal at the slightest oppor tunity, he had been told, and he would be held re sponsible. He had observed, too, that the slaves, a half a dozen men, watched him furtively, evidently hoping for some lap se on his part. Once h e had pretended to fall asleep, and presently there was a movement on the part of two m e n towards a rum. vat: one of these men had a bucket in his hand. Robert stood up suddenly and the men melted into the shadows. How one book-keeper could perform a ni"ht of watching in this still-house three times a w:ek, and accomplish his ordinary work in the daytime, seemed to him a problem which he him self weuld hardly be able to so lve. Yet Burbridge appeared to manage it, sheer necessity compelling. On leavino the still-house with its reeking rum, Robert, fatigu;d though he was, hacl out of curiosity wandered over to the boiling house where the sugar was being made. All night the estate had been in feverish activity. It was customary during the taking off of the cro];) for a good deal of night work to be clone, and on this his first night as a bookkeeper at RosehalJ a night spell had been in full operation. At foul' o'clock in the morning there was as yet no glimmer of light, no sign of the dawn which would break later on; but the gloom wa,:; pierced and illumined by millions of b .ul'ning stars which,. in that c lear atmosphere and at that period of the year, shone out with a wonderful gulden brilliancy. By their aid, and with eyes accustomed to 'ehe surrounding darkness, he perceived the carts dragging their slow way. towards the boiling-house in which the machinery was situated; he' saw shadowy human forms moving about singly' or iJl. groups, heard the curt commands of headmen in of gangs, and the sharp crack of the whips w 'ith which they emphasised their orders. The men who were working then would retire shortly, and the day labourers would take theh' place. All night the toiling and the shouting had gone on. And at in tervals there broke out sharp peals of raucous. laughter. There' were 3111'111 women's voices in termingled with the harsher tones of the men, and. some of these men and women passed him carelessl y chewin g the cane they had cut for themsel ves, talking in a dialect he could not understand. He .. was to learn later that these peop l e were each entitled to a small daily ration of 'sugar and rum,. from which they drew some of the energy which. enabled them to prosecute the arduous duties demand ed of them. He was to learn also that, in spite' of all vigilance, they stol e far more than they were supposed to have and consumed immense quantities. of juicy ripe cane. When he entered it, the boiling house seemed like' a corner of Hades. A three-rO ller sugar mill was in operation, a mill with three huge steel cy linders 01" rollers into one end of which the cane was thrust, while 'out of the other end the extracted juice poured in a steady yellow stream through an iron gutter into large open receptacles, somewhat like great hollow globes cut in halves, which simmered: and bubbled over fires on a long brick :Cireplace raised about two feet from the l evel of the ground. The two mills on Rosehall were worked by wind' power and by steam; when the wind was slight reOrt was h a d to steam as on this night, and now the furnace was' going and the heat it generated' was infernal. The men and women wer e feeding the mill with, cane and the furnace w i t h f u el. The men were clothed, each, in a pail' of trousers only, t heir sweat ing black torsos and muscular arms glistening in the glare from the flames Men were feed ing the fires under the shallow cauldrons, 01' taches as they were called. and constantly the cry rose for "wood, morewood!" With ladles whose handles were several feet long the attendants sldmmed the boiling, pungentsweet li(]uor from one .tache to :ll1other,'and the-

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1929 thick substance incessantly formed bubbles which burst as incessantly, flinging upwards a thick spray. The voice of the big negro headman, or foreman, who was in charge of the boiling house that night, rapped out orders to the ladlers to "skim light!" There was a continuous movement. There was a perpetual babbling of voices. What these commands meant, and why there should be such a tumult, in all that glare of flame and terrible heat, Robert could not for the life of him comprehend. He re mained in the boiling house for but a few minutes, noticing that no white man was in charge just then. The black headman was evidently a trusted and a competent man. Not for an instant had he ceased his labours of supervision and harsh commanding because of the unexpected advent of the new book keeper. Robert was glad to escape into the open air once more, which was delightfully cool at this hour. He went straight to his quarters, flung wide the only window it possessed, a window made of wooden slats or blinds, which permitted curious persons to peer into the room unimpeded as soon as it was open. That there might be inquisitive eyes gazing upon him did not matter to him in the least just then; indeed, he never thought of it. Thoroughly exhausted he tossed off his clothes, threw himself on the indiffer ent bed, and fell sound asleep. He was out of his room at eight o'clock. Burbridge had been up at daybreak and among the fields, he had had no night duty and therefore was expected to be at his work when the slaves should begin to take up their tasks. But he spared a mo ment to ride up and say a few words to Robert when the latter emerged after a very hasty breakfast; he told Robert what he was to do until further orders. The latter, still feeling an interest in what went on about him, despite his fatigue,. had during the last hour been taking in the busy scene that was set out before his gaze. The cutting of the cane went merrily on, the loading of the carts, the unwearied shouting, just as he had seen and heard it yesterday. But now his more practised or more closely observant eyes noticed other things also. Under a great shade tree, a silk cotton, he saw little babies lying on heaps of trash or bits of spread cloth, with one or two women looking after them There must have been twenty of these urchins none of them more than two years old, most of them younger, and they lay on their backs and kicked their feet in the air, or rolled about, (:arefree with the irresponsible freedom of infancy. They were the children of women who were at work and who had brought them forth from their huts, ac cording to custom, to where they might suckle them when necessary. Meanwhile the little ones were placed ill the charge of a couple of women whose business it was to see that no harm came to them. There were some ,other children also, ranging in years from five to nine, and these were by no means idle. They ran about collecting bits of trash, which could be used in the furnace, and picking up cane leaves and other edible substances for the feed ing of the hogs and the cattle of the estate. This was the Piccaninny Gang, the gang of minors, very young, but nevertheless useful, and over them was put an elderly woman, armed with a switch, whose duty consisted in seeing that the piccaninnies did not fail to do something towards defraying the cost of their keep. But Robert's attention had been diverted from the antics of the children by some preparations which he saw being made not far away from where he was stationed. It was now nine o'clock; he was feeling somewhat fagged, and these preparations, the nature of which he fully understood, could not tend to an enlivenment of his spirits. Burbridge had hastily told him that morning that three of the slaves were to be punished for misdemeanours, and one of these was a woman the same girl he had saved from a whipping the day before. The slave driver had reported her case to Mr. Ashman, giving his side of the story, and Mr. Ashman had decided that the girl deserved punishment. Robert suspected that his in terference had had much to do with this decision; he was to be taught a lesson. This was, in fa c t, to be a sort of ceremonial punishment. There were some twenty persons assembled to witness it, clear ly the more obstinate of the bondspeople. Burbridge and Ashman were on the spot. Robert had not been summoned, but from where he was he could see what passed with a fair degree of distinctness. The three culprits, backs exposed, were awaiting their punishment. But there was, as it seemed to Robert a deliberate procrastination. Suddenly he glimpsed a figure on horseback approaching from the Great HOl1se and attended by another; the rid ing was rapid and in a very little while he perceived that the first rider was a woman, white, and at once he knew who it must be. "Mrs. Palmer," he thought, and felt certain that at least there would be some palliation of the sentence of the unfortunate trio who stood in such abject attitudes anticipating their torture. The girl might even be spared. A woman surely would have some sympathy with her. The riders arrived, and the first was respectfully greeted by Ashman and Burbridge. The slaves aro und simply grovelled at the sight of her. Her face could not be distinctly seen by Robert. but he observed that her figure was slight and girlish. her long riding habit sweeping down below her shoes, P LA N T E R S' PUNCH her feathered beaver placed jauntily on her head. Her right hand held a riding whip. She sat her horse perfectly. He guessed from their attitudes that the condemned Persons were beseeching her for mercy. He moved his horse a trifle nearer to the scene. No one paid any attention to him. He saw the lady nod to Ashman, who gave a signal. One of the men was seized and tied to a post, and a heavy whip rose and fell with a resounding whack on his skin. The wi'etch screamed out in fear as well as agony, a piercing scream that must have been heard a quarter of a mile away; but that had not the slightest effect upon the man who wielded the whip. Twenty times came down that terrible instrument; the full sentence was executed; and then came the other man's turn. Then it was the girl's. Robert, forgetting that he was only an employee on the estate, and that on his father's own property in Barbados a similar scene might at that very moment be taking place, dashed swiftly up to the group, though wit40ut quite knowing that he had done so or what he was going to say or do. He was given no opportunity to say or do anything. "Go back and watch those slaves load the waggon, Rutherford!" sternly commanded the overseer. "What do you mean by leaving them when you were not sent for?" The voice was arrogant, intolerably insolent, and, as Ashman ceased, Robert heard Mrs. Palmer say: "What is he doing here? He isn't needed." She did not even glance at him. Her gaze was fixed on the trembling, weeping young woman, and Robert Rutherford realized that he could not possibly aid the girl and might even make her predicament worse if he dared to say a word He noticed that the driver he had stopped from beating the girl the day before was the man in charge of the flogging This man flashed an impl,ldent, triumphant leer at him. He turned his horse and rode back, revolted, to his station. As he moved away he shuddered, for a long, terrible cry broke from the girl's lips and continued until her flogging ceased, though only eight lashes were administered to her. She was flogged to her knees. A wave of disgust swept through him. He was not squeamish; he lived in an age when labourers were treated harshly and callously; in England the men who worked in farm and field had a hard time of it: long hours, heavy labour, wretched remuneration; so that their position was sometimes contrasted with that of the West Indian slaves, to the advantage of the latter. And soldiers and sailors were unmercifully whipped for trivial offences; the use of the whip was believed to be indispensable if discipline was to be maintained. But he himself had never seen a human being flogged before, and a woman at that; and the circumstance that another woman, young, of good breeding, and presumably of ordinary humane feelings, should stand by and see such punishment inflicted startled and shocli:ed him. He knew that slavery was doomed. EmanCipation had already been decreed; in a few years there would not be a single slave in these islands, and the bondsmen, aware of it, were now muttering ominously and showing every inclination to disobey their masters and rise in their own behalf. He had noticed something of this spirit in the nearby town of Montego Bay; he had heard about it from the rector; but here on this estate of Rosehall the evil, reckless spirit of former days seemed to manifest itself; the danger that threatened was ignored; here he was back in the eighteenth century instead of being in the early nineteenth. And a woman the mistress of this estate. He had not seen the face of the mistress of Rosehall; only her figure. He had heard that she had looks to boast of, was beautiful; but he thought that her countenance must be hard, lined. cruel; that it must reflect a soul that delighted in suffering. Only a devil would willingly watch the agony of others as she had done, was the thought that ran in his mind. The punishment over, the group broke up, Mrs. Palmer, accompanied by the overseer and her negro attendant, riding off to some other part of the estate. She was evidently making an inspection. Burbridge went into the boiling house; Robert again gave his attention to the task immediately before him. He perceived that the slaves around went about their work with a sullen, mordant air, now and then exchanging a remark with one another in an undertone; he had a feeling that they were dangerous, deadly, though held in strict subjection. He believed he understood now what was meant by a smouldering human volcano. CHAPTER FOUR TWO WOMEN AN hour passed, and then he saw the mistress of the plantation returning. The sun was cruel now in the open, unsheltered landscape, although this was the cooler time of the year; but Mrs. Palmer did not seem to mind it. She rode easily, with Ashman at her side. She was coming in Robert's direction, but he kept his eyes fixed on the slaves who, aware of who was approaching, re their eff<)rts and began heaping cane into the waggons standing by the path. Not so had they toiled all that forenoon. The man on horseback, big and strong though he was, had for them nothing of the terror which the slim woman who was near ing them so evidently exercised. "Is this the new book-keeper?" The question was asked in a clear, musical; carrying voice, a voice which, though not lifted, could yet be heard some distance away, a voice of rich quality and of decisive, vibrant, exquisite tones. Robert lifted his head and stared in its di rection. It was as though an electric shock had passed through him. He found himself gazing into a pair of eyes which he thought the most wonderful he had ever seen. They were black and of a peculiar, penetrating brightness; they looked through you: gazing intently into them you became conscious of nothing else; they absorbed you. The brow above them, though partly hidden by the riding beaver, was broad and smooth, and smooth, glossy black hair covered the ears. The nose was slightly aquiline, suggesting strength of character, a disposition and a will and an ability to command; the mouth was small and full, the upper lip too full, the lower one a little blunt and hard. A fascinating mouth nevertheless, made for the luring of men; and under it was a rounded chin, well marked, definite, strong_ Her complexion was brilliant, her colouring indeed was part of the attractions of Annie Palmer and had not been affected by her rides in the sun of the West Indian tropics, probably because her horseback excursions were seldom taken in the bright sunlight. She sat upright on her horse; sit ting thus, she appeared to be a mere girl, though her age was in reality thirty-one. "Yes, he came in yesterday," Robert heard the overseer say in answer to her question. He was conscious that Annie Palmer was scrut inising him closely, studying him feature by feature as it were, sizing him up, calculating about him. She did so quite openly, in no way hesitating or abashed. She must have seen the impression her beauty made upon him, for she smiled a little smile of satisfaction and triumph, forgetting the book keeper and thinking only of the man_ Ashman noticed this by-play, and a dark expression gather ed on his brow. Ashman to-day was cleanly shaved, and anyone could see, in spite of his coarse mouth and insolent eyes, that he too was a handsome man. He was well-built, muscular, a masterful man and a quickly angry one. Anger showed now in his glance, in fists .clenched upon reins and whip. But Robert did not notice it. Mrs. Palmer did_ "Mr. Ashman," she remarked casually, "I will ride back to the house alone; you need not wait for me." "But you will go over to Palmyra this afternoon, won't you? There are some matters I should like you to see for yourself." "I am not sure I shall go to-day_" "But you said you would, Mrs. Palmer. We arranged it on Saturday. "And now I say I won't"-a note of imperiousness crept into her voice-"and that settles itYou can go over to Palmyra yourself after you have finished what you have to do here to-day. I will go another day. I'll not keep you now any longer." She moved her horse slightly, so as to put the overseer behind her. He said nothing more, but stared one longmoment at Robert. Not liking the man, and noticing the look, Robert returned the stare, and fancied that there was not only hate in it but also fear, distinctly fear. Yet why should an overseer be afraid of a mere book-keeper? That would be to reverse completely the established order of things. Mr. Ashman touched his hat and rode otI_ Mrs_ Palmer's face broke into a brilliant smile as, to the st.ll-prise of Robert, she put out her hand to shake his. "Welcome to Rosehall," she said gaily, "though I wish you had come at some other time when I was not obliged to superintend the punishment of rebellious slaves." '''Phanks,'' he replied; but, bewildered though he was, and fascinated, he could not help adding: "how rebellious?" "That is a long story, and I could not tell it to you here. You don't know the difficulties we are having now with our people. Unless we inspire them with a proper dread they may rise at any moment and cut our throats. You look incredulous! Wait until you have been here a month. I suppose you think me cruel?" "It is not for me, your employee, to think you cruel or to think anything disrespectful about you," said Robert humbly. "That would be impertinence." "Not in you!" Again he was surprised. They had just met, and, as mistress and book-keeper, their positions were such poles apart that it was very condescend ing for her even to take ordinary notice of him. The usual course would have been for her to flin!\' him orders, if she had any to give, through the medium of the overseer. Yet here was she talking to him pn friendly, on familiar terms, as an equal, as though they had kn-own each other for some time and were on much the same social footing. And she was smiling (ContimLed on Page 22)

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.p L A }{ T E R S' PUNCH 1$)29 Uhe Dream and the CBusiness THE ANCIENT Mexicans had as Qne Qf their puwerful dpities a Water GQd. To. this go.d human sacri tices were Qffered, and the grQund abuut its. altar was frequently drench ed with blo.o.d so. that the go.d might be pro.pitiated and the earth be drenched with rain. The fierce druughts fro.m which parts Qf Mexico. periudically suf fered had made water an element ever tn the thuughts and conscio.usness o.f a peo.ple depending upo.n agriculture, and who. frum experience knew what terrible privatiuns and numberless deaths o.ccurred when the heavens abo.ve were brass, the river beds but and to.rtuo.us lines 0.1' dry sand and bo.ulders, and the surrQunding vegetatio.n parched and withered and gead. Every trupical agricultu!'al c uun try has had QccasiQn to. realise what lack 0.1' water means, and even in an like Jamaica, who.se o.riginal pame is "The Land o.f Springs", there have been perio.ds Qf severe dry weather. There are districts which have had to. be neglected, 0.1' but partly cultivated, because the rainfall there is uncertain. Dry areas in a land 0.1' springs; suil 0.1' rich natural fertility develo.ped in patches unly because 0.1' insufficient muisture! That is waste, a tragedy; but the tragedy is steadily being transfurmed into. a gay co.medy uf living green fields and pro.ductive farms, fur since the water may nut al ways CQme fro.m abo.ve effo.rts are be ing made to. bring it up frum belo.w; the springs are nQt all un the surface, it is no.w knuwn; the rivers are nut all visible to. the casual eye. 'Water flQWS beluw the suil o.f Jamaic a. The dream has been to. utilise it fur the purpQse Qf creating wealth; the busi ness is to. make this dream a lucrative reality. Thus we have the dream and the Ibusiness. Amity Hall CQmpany 1'0.1' a quarter milliun sterling. But sumething e ls e had a lso. taken place. In spite 0.1' irrigatio.n wo.rks water still was scarce in Vere for the pro.perties purchasllQ: nuw water began to. the plentiful. How this has happened will be to.ld a liLtle later o.n. If Mr. Cecil Lindo. werc the favuurite 0.1' sume Jamaica water god he eQuid no.t have been better treated than he has been during the last cuu pIe 0.1' years in so. far as supplies of water are co.ncerned. Fo.rtune has in this respect favuured him immensely. Fo.rtune has the habit 0.1' favuuring men whuse co.urage amo.unts to. auda city and who., because of their co.urage and enterprise, and it they are still yo.ung enuugh to. carry o.n the struggl e perso.nally, acquire the means Qf launching o.ut bo.ldly upo.n large finan cial schemes. THIS dream was first dreamt by Mr. A. W. Farquharso.n, asso.ciat ed with who.m, amung uthers were Mr. E. A. dePass o.f Lo.ndo.n, and Mr. C E. deMercado.. The huge district uf Vere, cuntaining perhaps the richest suil in 1IIR. CECIL LINDO, JA1IlAICA'S CHIEF CAPTAIN OF INDUSTRY' NOT lo.ng ago. Mr. Cecil Lindo. pur chased CheITY Gardens estate in the parish 0.1' St. Catherine. It had been a cattle pro.perty maiuly, with so.me citrus fruit; it had excellent pas turage; the So.i1 was 0.1' guud quality'; but the o.ld sto.ry 0.1' insufficient 01' un dependable rainfall explained its gen erally unecunumical cunditio.n. Mr. Cecil Lindo. calculated that he wo.uld ubtain fro.m the St. Catherine IITigatiun Wo.rks abo.ut 200 c ubi c yards Qf water per huur 1'0.1' Cherry Gardens, and to. this he wuuld add 50 cubic yards 1'0.1' which he was already pay ing, and which co.uld be diverted fro.m his o.ther pro.perties in St. Catherine. But he was tuld, casually as it were, that in a little cavern un the estate there was water. Peo.ple had seen it; it was abo.ut ten feet belo.w the surface 0.1' the gro.und; it had never been util ised, fo.r there seemed no. means Qf utilising it; but it was quite guo.d water tho.ugh pro.bably stagnant. The talk of water to. Mr. Cecil Wndu, since he has beco.me interested in Jamaica agricultural develo.pment, is as the so.und o.f the trumpet to. the old war hurse. He lifteth up his head, he upen eth his nustrils, he crieth "Aha!" Hav ing heard uf this little po.ul 0.1' what-Jamaica, so.il no.t surpassed by any to. be fo.und in Cuba 0.1' in Haiti, lay arid under the sun. It was al mQst an abando.ned waste; it was calculated that the best land in Vere was no.t then wo.rth mo.re than abo.ut per' acre. So.me to.bacco. might be gro.wn, a little su gar, and in the pastures sheep and puultry might be reared. But it was all do.ne at so.me risk, the rains might fail fo.r two. Qr three years and might never be sufficient fQr even these minur and limited purpo.ses. So. Vere, after heart-breaking effurts had been made there in the earlier days uf the English settlement, and fo.rtunes had been lo.st, came to. be abanduned; and then it was that the dream o.f supplying the plains with water bruught up frum beluw and also. fro.m unfailing rivers many miles away was dreamt. The first reservo.ir was built at Raymund and was kno.wn as the Raymund Reservuir. This t failed. Wells were also. Sj,lnk Later o.n the irriga tio.n o.f the plains by means o.f water bro.ught fro.m the Milk River was decided Qn, the pumping o.f the undergro.und supplies having pro.ved unsatisfacto.ry and very expensive. Thus came the sugar estates o.f Vere into. existence. And after the gro.up o.f Far quharso.n, dePass and deMercado. had been at wQrk there as piQneers, lo.sing mo.ney o.ften, impro.ving the irrigatio.n wo.rks, fighting against adverse natural cQnditio.ns, but never ceasing to. struggle, there came to. Vere SQme fifteen years ago. Mr. Cecil Lindo. and his band Qf brQthers, and they (with two. 0.1' three single Qwners) divided Vere with the gro.up who. had at first started the wo.rk Qf develQpment Qn a co.nsiderable scale. Then in 1927 new develo.pments tQQk place. It was annQunced that Mr. Cecil Lindo. had purchased the Vere Estates Cumpany and the ever it was in the cavern un the prup erty, Mr. Lindo. had a ladder made to. thrust into. the hule, and do.wn this ladder he climbed until in the darkness he saw the g leam he had been to.ld that he wuuld see. As his eyes became ac custo.med to. the glo.um he perceived something else. It was an ee l, and he argued that eels do. no.t live in stagnant water. This must be a running stream, an undergro.und stream, and here it must have run fo.r years and perhaps fur centuries. But ho.w much water per ho.ur f1o.wed thruugh this cavern, and might it no.t give o.ut at any time? Experiment was needed, very delicate experiment, fo.r anything like blasting away the rucks might divert the stream to some luwer depth. He had a dynamo. placed in side the cavern, the PQwer fur which wuuld be sup plied by an engine situated un the surface so.me yards away frum the cavern's mo.uth. Pipes were WATER GUSHING FR01l1 ONE OF THE OLD RESTORED WELLS, WITH lIlB. A. MODERN LIGHT AQUEDUCT ON THE LINDO ESTATES. THE WATER IS PUlIfPED FROM A WELL CECIL LINDO WATCHING IT

PAGE 21

1929 carefully laid into the cavern and carefully the pumping began. The water rose and flowed into tbe open, a gush of liquid silver. Hour after hour it poured forth, and then day after day. The work continued. Four hundred cubic yards per hour was the supply, and more was possible. The quantity did not diminish, anD after six months of 1928, a time which is recorded as one of the driest spells in Ja maica (especially in that part of Jamaica in which Cherry Ga.rdens is situated) this underground stream continued to yield four hundred cubic yards of water per hour, and all that it has been necessary to do has been to construc t channels to utilise it for the irrigation of the fields below Here was good fortune plaCing itself at the dis posal of the individual. But the individual to perdeive it, to know what could be don e with it, was as ne cessary as the water itself. It flows by gravita tion. Two hundred acres on this side of Cherry Gardens are now irrigated by it, and excellent cane is growing there. But beyond these two hundred acre s the land rises and it would be expensive to lift the water on to this l a nd Across the main road, howev er, li es the other part of Cherry Gardens, hitherto devoted to pastures. A channe l c u t to the edge of the road, a tunnel constructed nnder the road and l eadi n g into the pasture land opposite, could lead the water to that land. The channel has been dug, the tunnel made, and on the other side of Cherry Ga.rdens cane will shortly flouri s h where only grass grew b efore. And since one strea m i s known to flow beneath the surface of Cherry Gar dens, other stream s may be there also. Water may be eco n om ically available by pumping. That test will be made, another big property may be de veloped in sug3r by this pumping of water. The sight of that ee l which indicated running water, was a n omen to the mind of the man who first saw it. WELLS had been sunk on Amity Hall and More l a nd s five-and-twenty-years ago. The men who sank them then believed there was water beneath th e so il and they were right. These wells were splendidly constructed; they are there today in excellent condition. But five-and-twenty-years, or even fifteen or ten years ago, pumping was a very expensive operation. It had to be done with coal, the coa l had to be brought from England or America to the very spot, and the apparatus was not fully perfected. Sometimes the flow of water was good, sometimes it would cease; and by some persons it was thought that the underground streams supplying the three great wells and more were but one river, and that when one well was yielding to capacity the other s would give but poor returns. The fault how ever was not in the supply of water underground jJ iAN T E R S' PUNC H but in the as yet inefficient means of raising the water. In these circumstances the owners of the estates could not depend upon the wells. They de cided to pump water from the Milk River, as has been said above, and they constructed the Raymond reservoir. But Jamaica is a country chiefly of lime stone formation and the water disappeared. No thing daunted, in spite of this disappointment they created the Vere Irrigation Works known as the Cockpit Scheme, with a capacity of five thousand cubic yards of water per hour, and the channels were made so that the flow could be increased, with additional pumping apparatus, to ten thousand cubic yards. This saved Vere. It was very expensive, some dependence upon rainfall there had to be, but in dry periods the canes could be watered and kept alive by irrigation, and when the rains fell the supply of moisture would lead to the obtaining of bumper crops. The idea was that so m e day ten thousand cubic yards of water per hour would be thrown upon the fields, but muc h capital would be required for the extension of the water works and of cultivation. The old companies, the Vere Estates and Amity Hall, could not supply this capital, and then it was that Mr. Cecil Lindo came upon the scen e with his o ffer to purchase the estates. HE perceived the possibilities; he knew that the dream was sound. He took over the properties in July of 1927. H e was aware that water pumping had now been carried to s uch a pitch of deve lop ment that there were engines, "refuse engines" they were called, which could b e worked with any sort of fuel-that on Cherry Gardens, for instan ce, is being operated with wood grown within a few yards of the engine house; and wood, trash and other combustibl e material were at hand on the fields of Vere. Costing nothing but a little labour to co llect and prepare for utilisation, this fuel is dirt cheap, and the engines of to-day are made precisely for this sort of stuff. So Mr. Lindo had the old wells overhauled and tested, and he put the pumps to work, and when in June of 1928, after six months of drought in Vere, the present writer stood beside one of these old wells, he saw the water gush ing out into co n c reted channels, and opposite he saw the fields of young bananas which, planted out but two or three months before, were at the moment healthy, vigorous, promising, a fortune created by the expenditure of a comparatively small amount of capital on machinery, ploughing and planting. For this particular stretch of land, and the ad joining areas that yet have to be dealt with, had not been cultivated for a hundred years. Perhaps they had never been cultivated since Jamaica was discovered. Thus the soil i s wonderful and the re turns will be immense. It was a mistake, however, J9 to believe, as was believed, that when Mr. Lindo purchased the Vere and Amity Hall estates he was about to grow less sugar than had hitherto been produced upon these properties. His plan was and is to produce both sugar and bananas; but he is pri marily a sugar man, and his output of s ugar for 1927-28 was something over 20,000 tons. On his pro perties in Vere alone, at the c lose of his last financial year, 11,200 tons of sugar w e r e produced and ex ported, and 164 000 gallons of rum. This was not the estimate; estimates are always made on a con servative basis. Thus the estimated crop for 1928-29 are 10 ,000 tons of sugar, 1 50,000 gallons of rum and 300,000 stems of bananas, but it i s confidently ex pected that the actual production will be much more. Last year's output of sugar and rum was the largest ever known in the history of Vere. Next year's may b e larger still. There is plenty of land for both sugar and bananas; the fruit produced here, o n extraordinary so il, and well irrigated will be of a quality which will command high prices, and the growing of both bananas and canes will enable the owner to undertake in the future a rotation of crops which is one of the best known means of rest ing and revivifying the ground. And all the while close attention is paid to the water question. The pumps on all the estates owned by Mr. Lindo in Vere (both those which he had before and those which he has acquired recently) yield about 5, 000 cubic yards of water per hour, tbe other necessary 5,000 cubi c yards being obtained from the Cockpit Irrigation Scheme. Duplicate machinery for the Cockpit Works has been ordered. This will enable pumping to continue without any intermission for eve n days a week; when one set of machinery is being overhauled the other set will come immediately into use; there will be no cessation of the flow from the Cockpit for an hour when this duplicate ma chinery i s erected. Additional wells are contemplated. These. will be sunk at conveni ent localities, meanwhile 10,000 cubic yards of water per hour are now being thrown on the farms, r endering them almost entirely in dependent of rain, and doubling the amount of water they previously received. MILES of light railway connect these banana farms and sugar factories with the port of Salt River which i s now being equipped as a first-ebss shipping port of its kind. The sugar of Vere is sh