Flint Hall adaptive use, program & specifications

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Material Information

Title:
Flint Hall adaptive use, program & specifications
Physical Description:
113p.
Language:
English
Creator:
Fraga, Robert
Publisher:
Robert Fraga
College of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
AFA Historic Preservation document 168

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00004637:00001

Full Text










FLINT HALL
ADAPTIVE USE
PROGRAM AND
SPECIFICATIONS

























INDEX


Introduction

Historic Information

General Description

Adaptive Use, Feasibility Statement

Programmed Space

Functional Diagrams

Design Criteria and Concept

Code Usage and Restrictions

Flint Hall, Outline Specifications















INTRODUCTIONN_













The following project is a proposed adoptive use

of Flint Hall, a building of historical and architectural

significance to the University of Florida. This project

consists of two parts: first, a programatic proposal

designed to determine the needs and spatial requirements

and relationships of the functions proposed for the adap-

tive use project; and second, a design solution and

detail specifications for such a proposal.

Other than being an academic exercise, the princi-

pal purpose of this project is to show the potential that

exists in doing an adaptive use project of Flint Hall, a

building whose structure and spatial qualities are ideal

for such a project. Since the Office of Planning and

Analysis of the University of Florida has no definitive

plans for the future of Flint Hall and since at the present

time the University of Florida has fulfilled all of its

spatial needs, for the sake of the academic exercise, a

need has been assumed to house the Department of History

and general classrooms and assembly functions in Flint

Hall. The reasons why these functions have been selected

for the proposed adaptive use project are due to the com-

patibility that exists between Flint Hall's physical

facilities and the spatial requirements of these functions.















HISTORIC
INFORMATION N





























INTRODUCTION


The following section deals with historic data

pertaining to Flint Hall, its setting and its architecture.

This section consists of a series of articles and photo-

graphs which are presented here in hope that they will

contribute to the understanding of the history and the

historic significance of Flint Hall.












HISTORICAL NOTE


The University of Florida is a combined state

University and land-grant college located in the northern

center of the State. While its beginnings go back to

the days previous to Florida's admission to the Union in

1845, its first college--the College of Arts and Sciences--

did not open until 1853. A few years later the passage

of the Morrill Act provided lands for state institutions

of higher learning which would promote agriculture,

mechanical arts and military science, resulting in the

beginnings of the College of Agriculture, the College of

Engineering, and the Agricultural Experiment Station.

By 1905 there were a half-dozen state-supported

institutions of higher learning in Florida, located in

various parts of the State and struggling for existence.

At that time the Florida Legislature took a step unpre-

cedented in the history of education in any state by passing

the Buckman Act, which abolished the six State Colleges

and provided for the establishment of two new institutions,

of which the University of Florida was one. It was es-

tablished for men, at Gainesville and placed under the

direction of the Board of Control, a body created by the

Buckman Act. The seven members of the board represented

the seven geographical sections of the state, and served































without compensation, except for travel and incidental

expense incurred in the performance of duty. In 1947,

the University was made coeducational. The nine-member

Board of Regents replaced the Board of Control in 1965.*


*University of Florida Undergraduate Catalog.












FLINT HALL


In 1906 all of the science classes and laboratories

were located in Thomas and Buckman Halls, but it was

quickly apparent that a separate building was needed to

meet the needs of students and faculty. The Florida legis-

lature appropriated $68,000 for a science building in 1909,

and the Board of Control directed William A. Edwards to

draw up plans. J. J. Cain was the contractor and construc-

tion began in September 1909 on a site that had been

designated on the 1905 campus plan. The building was

completed in April 1910, and it was described at the time

as one of the finest buildings of its kind in the Southeast.

The Departments of Botany, Horticulture, Chemistry, Physics,

Zoology, and Bacteriology were located in Science Hall,

as it was then known. In 1910 the University Museum was

moved to the second floor of Flint from Thomas Hall.

Renamed the Florida State Museum in 1914, it remained in

Flint Hall until the Museum was moved to the Seagle Building

during the 1930s.

Many distinguished scientists taught and carried

on their experiments in Flint Hall, and the results of

their research have had a major impact on the economic

and scientific development of the state and nation. One

of these scientists was Dr. Edward R. Flint, and Science











BIOGRAPHY OF WILLIAM A. EDWARDS
(12/8/1866-3/30/1939), ATLANTA, GA. (A.I.A.)


Born and educated at Darlington, S.C., he entered

the State University was was later graduated with the

first class of Mechanical Engineering taught in the

school. A few years after Mr. Edwards joined the office

of C. C. Wilson, Architect, at Columbia, S.C., and for ten

years continued work there as a draftsman, subsequently

began practice under the firm name of Edwards & Walter.

In 1908 he moved to Atlanta, and after maintaining an

independent office until 1912, joined William J. Sayward

in organizing the firm of Edwards & Sayward, of which he

remained a member for more than twenty-five years.

During his long professional career Mr. Edwards'

work included a wide range and variety of buildings,

churches, court houses, some commercial structures, and

considerable collegiate work. Among the latter were build-

ings at the Florida A & M College at Tallahassee, Adminis-

tration Building, Library and dormitories between 1913 and

1924; at Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia,

Academic Hall and faculty residences, 1926-27; University

of Florida, Gainesville, the Administration Building, Lib-

rary, Science Hall, Law Building, etc., between 1913 and

1925; also buildings at the Florida State College for Women

at Tallahassee; the Florida School for the Deaf, St.











Augustine; Georgia State Woman's College at Valdosta, from

1921 to 1939; Winthrop College, Rock Hill, N.C., and the

Law Building at the University of South Carolina.

In addition the firm designed the Union National

Bank Building at Columbia, S.C., in 1913; the Exchange

Bank and Office Building at Tallahassee, Florida, in 1927,

and the following public buildings: Unitarian Church at

Atlanta, 1914; County Court House at York, S.C., 1914;

Methodist Church at Clarksville, Tennessee, 1916; Baptist

Church at Easley, S.C., 1920; First Presbyterian Church,

York, South Carolina, 1923; Masonic Temple at Decatur, Ga.,

1926; U.S. Post Office and Court House, Columbus, Ga.,

1932; Candler Hotel, Decatur, Ga., 1927; Hotel Thomas,

Gainesville, Florida, 1925; Fannin County Court House,

Blue Ridge, Ga., 1936; Teachers' College at Georgia State

College, 1938, and Keshaw County Court House, Camden, S.C.

Mr. Edwards' work also included several High Schools

built in Georgia, Florida and South Carolina, together

with stores, restaurants, banks, theatres, auditoriums,

recreational and park buildings and residences. In 1933

the firm was commissioned to plan a large housing project

at the University of Atlanta, one of the first of such

projects sponsored by the Federal Government.

Prominently known in Atlanta throughout his long

career, he had been a member of the local Chapter of the































A.I.A. since 1913, and at the time of his death maintained

an office in the Marietta Street Office Building.

-Detailed information from the office of Edwards

& Sayward, 1940.*


*Peabody Maintenance Report, Dean Knott.








ST -7E OF F L i, .L, ,
F ,Li.' r ,lI. C. .',-.E Sc,11 NO ...
and Rfcoras Maniagc emen
DS HSP 3G 6 75 Site Name Flint Hall

Address on University Avenue, Unv. of
Florida Campus
ARCHITECTURAL SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT o

ARCHITECT William A. Edwards (between 1909 and 1912) 872

BUILDER 874--

STYLE AND/OR MODE Collegiate Gothic 961-

PLAN TYPE Classroom building with central hall, rectangular 6,t3-

EXTERIOR FARIC(S) brick and terra cotta 854
EXTERIOR FABRICS) 85--

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM(S) loadbearing brick and wood frame 856 =

FEATURE OF STRUCTURE (942):

FOUNDATIONbattered brick wall942
FOUNDATION: 942==
hip
ROOF TYPE: 942==

SECONDARY ROOF STRICTURE(S): gable ends to hip roof
SECCJ3. rdDA RY R:COOF S[R F IJ CTUIJREt(S}:


6/6 sash with 6 pane transom
W I NJ D OW TY Y P E

MATERIALS (882):

CH MNEY:_ square .brick- -- .. -

ROOF SURFACING: tile

INTiERIOR WLLS: plaster on masonry or plaster on lath--

ORNAMENT INTERIOR: none

ORNAMENT EXTERIOR: brick vousoirs and terra cotta trim

QUANTITATIVE DATA (950 960):

NO. OF STOREYS 3

NO. OF CHIMNEYS 1

OTHER (SPECIFY)


942-

942=


382 -=_







882=-
g829'=


950==

952---

. 954--

9:;"6- -








OTHER NOTABLE FEATURES OF BUILDING (FREE TEXT) (865):

ROOF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM: wood

865 -=

MAIN ENTRANCE: Entrance now on the east end; the original on the north side
--facing University Avenue has been- tlled in by windows, as
was done to another original entrance at the west end. 865-=

WINDOW PLACEMENT: Regular spacings with south facade windows in pairs.

865==

WINDOWSURROUNDS AND DECORATION Brick vousoirs and terra cotta sills;
Gable windows are framed -and- paneled--in terra cotta.
865==

PORCHES, VERANDAS, GALLERIES AND BALCONIES: none

865==

EXTERIOR ORNAMENT AND COLOR: red brick; cream color terra cotta *
Terra cotta gable cornice and crennelated parapet.-
865==

INTERIOR COMMENTS: Original stairs on north center and west end have
been removed; space now used for classrooms.


___ 65==

OTHER (SPECIFY):

865==

MAJOR ALTERATIONS (FREE TEXT) south side exit and stairwell added, cut into
original brick wall; date of this- (?)- probably coincides with the sealing
of the original north and _west entrances.

Ceilings were lowered with acoustical tile. 857==

OUTBUILDINGS (FEATURES OF SITE) none



876==

SURROUNDINGS (CLASSIFICATION) 864-=

RELATIONSHIP TO SURROUNDINGS (FREE TEXT) north- University Avenue_ east-_
Library West; south- parking lot and Chemistry building; west- Building I.


859 9





STATE OF FLORIDA Site No.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE Site Name Flint Hall
visionn of Archives. History
and Records Management University of Flnrida Campll.s
-HSP3EE &-76

Present & Original Physical Appearance (use continuation sheet if necessary) (935==):


Condition of Flint Hall

A. Alterations:

1) Original main entrance doorway and stairs (central bay,east
facade) removed, blocked, and floored in.

2) Original west end stairway and exit removed, blocked, and
floored in.

3) New south side concrete stairway installed; doorway knocked
into exterior brick

B. Exterior Condition 1977:

1) Condition of Brick

a) American Bond- 1 course of headers 4 courses of stretchers
and stretchers
b) brick cracks on exterior

2) Condition of Terra Cotta

a) gable trim chipped and cracked

b) greenish stains on window sills

3) Downspouts and gutters in good condition

4) Windows

a) paint shipping on sash, muntins, and lullions.

b) south facade- broken window panes

C. Interior Condition 1977- Shabbyl but. adequate.

1) No architectural detail

2) paint chipping

D. Use- always a classroom building

1) At present: Basement- Graduate Design Studios

1/rst floor- "

2/nd floor- Urban and Regional Planning;
Design Department Offices








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FLINT HALL
GENERAL
DESCRIPTION








GENERAL DESCRIPTION


Flint Hall is located in the University of Florida

Campus, between Newell Drive and Buckman Drive, The north

side of the building faces University Avenue. This building

has been assigned the number eight (8) in the University of

Florida building register.

Flint Hall was built in 1909 by the firm of Edward and

Walter, an architectural firm that operated from Alanta, Georgia.

The building is located on a flat terrain that is land-

scaped with several types of large pine and oak trees as

well as various types of low shrubs. The building is flanked

on the north by a landscaped area that separates the build-

ing from University Avenuei on the south, by another lands-

caped area which separates it from the main parking facility;

on the east, Flint Hall is flanked by Newell Drive, and on

the West by Anderson Hall. Automotive access to the building

occurrs on the east by Newell Drive and on the south by the

main parking facility that serves the building. Sidewalks

surrounding the structure on all sides provide for pedestrian

access. Entrances to the building occurr on the east and south

side of the structure.

Flint Hall was built in the Gothic Revival Style. It

has a rectangular plan with a central corridor which is flanked

by classrooms on either side. The building is a three stoiy

structure composed of exterior and interior brick load bear-






























ing walls with a wood frame supporting a clay tile roof.

The facades are composed of brick highlighter with

stonework. There are rows of double hung wood windows

on each floor.










BUILDING SITE


GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Flint Hall is located on a flat site in the University

of Florida Campus, between Newell Dr. and Buckman Dr. The

north facade of the building faces University Avenue.

SOILS.

Flint Hall is located in a area where the soil is of a

sandy composition. The Water and Sewer Development Plan for

Alachua County describes the soils of this area in the

following manner:

Hernando Jonesville Association. Broad sandy ridges and

slightly acid yellowish sands; interpersed with small areas

of similar soils.

DRAINAGE

Flint Hall is located on the St. John River Drainage

Basin. The soils around the building, which are composed of a

series of loose sand mixtures, drain well.

VEGETATION

Flint Hall is surrounded by various types of shrubs

and low growing trees. The major landscaped areas adjacent to

Flint Hall are found to the north and the south side of the

building. Here, there are large Long Leaf Pines ( pinus palus-

tre) and Live Oaks, ( quercus virginiana). These trees are

quite old, some of them over 200 years old, and they range




























in size from 50 to 75 feet tall for the pine trees and

40 to 65 feet for the Live Oaks.

The vegetation of the site is of the type that requires

no maintenance except for the grass which is mowed regularly.

* See Diagram.









UNIVERSITY AVENUE


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P- LONG LEAF PINE
0-LIVE OAK


SITE PLAN








STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


Foundation. 1"-5" brick foundation wall supported by

1"-3"x3"-0" continuous concrete footing. There are

approximately 3"-0" from grade to the top of the con-

crete footing. Architectural plans show no evidence of

steel reinforcement on the concrete footing. No specifi-

cation available as to concrete mixture or aggregate

of the concrete footing.

Visual Inspection revealed no apparent structural

damage to the building settlement or foundation

failure.


Diagrams







n --Brick Foundation Wall


Concrete Footing


Building Section



















BEARING SYSTEM


Load bearing wall, wood frame system. Exterior brick load bearing

walls rest directly on a brick foundation wall and support. the first and

second floor as well as the roof structure. The exterior load bearing wall

is approximately 1' 5" thick from the ground floor to the second floor where

it decreases in thickness to approximately 1' 0". This 1' 0" thick wall con-

tinues up to support the roof structure. The interior wood frame load bearing

wall system is composed of 2" x 6" stud walls.

There are some 6" tubular steel columms located on the ground floor of

the building; rooms 2, 16, 1A, 10A. These tubular columns seem to have car-

ried a concentrated load at one time, but their current structural function

is questionable.

*Visual .inspection revealed no apparent structural damage to

the building due to the failure of the bearing system. The

exterior load bearing walls are in good condition except for

some minor damages due to weathering. (See diagram.)






BEARING SYSTEM


Roof Structure


Second Floor


First Floor


Exterior
Load Bearing Wall


Ground Floor









FLOOR SYSTEMS


Ground Floor. 4" concrete floating slab on fill. Architect-

ural plans show no evidence of rigid insulation or steel

reinforcement on the concrete slab.

Visual Inspection revealed no structural damage.

(see diagram)


First Floor. Wood plank and beam floor system. 2x10 wood

floor joist 16" on the Center supporting a wood subfloor

and finish floor plank system. The floor joist run north-

south from exterior to interior load bearing wall. Archit-

ectual plans show no evidence of mechanical equipment

or insulation within the floor system.

Visual Inspection revealed no structural damagw.

(see diagram)


Second Floor. Wood plank and beam fllor system. 2x10 and

2x14 wood joist 16" on center supporting a wood sub-

floor and finish floor plank system. The floor joist

run north-south from exterior to interior load bearing

wall. Architectual plans show no evidence of mechanical

equipment or insulation within the floor system.

Visual Inspection revealed no structural damage.

(see diagram)









FLOOR SYSTEMS


Second Floor


First Roor


Ground Floor


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ROOF STRUCTURE


The roof system is a gable timber roof structure

of plank and rafter construction. The 2"x 8" wood rafters

extend continuously from the ridge to the exterior load bear-

ing wall and bear on a 4" by 6" wood plate. These rafters are

spaced at 16" on center and they are supported at the middle

of their span by a 6"x 10" beam which is carried by a timber

armature rising from the central interior load bearing walls.

A series of steel tie rods connecting each pair of

opposing rafters at their base, run the width of the building

and counteract the horizontal thrust created by the roof

structure.



Visual Inspection revealed no evidence of structural

damage due to the failure of the roof structure.

Structural members such as; roof joist and rafters

show no evidence of termite damage, rot or warpage.



































ROOF STRUCTURE


























DOOR SCHEDULE


2 panel

6 panel

2 panel

1 panel

5 panel

2 panel

1 panel


solid wood door with 6 pane glass top

solid wood door

solid wood door

solid wood door

solid wood door with glass panel top

double hinged solid wood door

hollow core metal door.











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DOOR SCHEDULE


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WINDOW SCHEDULE


1) 6 over 6 pane, wood duoble hung window

2) 6 over 6 pane, wood double hung, double window

3) 6 over 6 pane, wood double hung window with 6 pane top
pivoting panel

4) 6 over 6 pane, wood double hung with 6 pane top pivoting

panel




















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TYPICAL FIRST FLOOR WINDOWW
3-6 OVER 6 DOUBLE HUNG WOOD WINDOW
WITH PIVOTING 6 PANE PANEL TOP
4- DOUBLE WINDOW








TYPICAL BASEMENT -WINDOW
5-6 OVER 6 DOUBLE HUNG WOOD WINDOW
6- DOUBLE WINDOW

WINDOW SCHEDULE


TYPICAL SECOND FLOOR WINDOW
1- 6 OVER 6 DOUBLE HUNG WOOD WINDOW
WITH PIVOTING 6 PANE PANEL TOP
2- DOUBLE WINDOW


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BUILDING SURVEY.
EXTERIOR SURFACES.


INTRODUCTION.

The following is a visual survey of the exterior surfaces

of Flint Hall. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the

current physical conditions of the exterior surfaces of this

building and to identify and document any damage in these

surfaces due to erosion, decay,or weathering.

Due to the nature of this survey, it is impossible to

presicely assess the physical conditions that exist in the

various exterior surfaces of the building. This is mainly due

to the lack of accessibility to some of these building surfaces.

Consequently, the following survey will deal with those aspects

of the exterior surfaces of the building which are clearly vi-

sible and identifiable from the ground plane.

The following survey is organized in two parts. The first

part, consist of a general description of the physical conditions

of the exterior surfaces of Flint Hall. The second part of the

survey deals with the individual facade of the building and the

problems that occur in these facades.










BEIIDING SURVEY.

EXTERIOR SURFACES.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION.

The exterior surfaces of Flint Hall are composed of

a brick load bearing wall of the running bond type, ( 5 rows of

stretchers, 1 row of alternating headers and stretchers), a

series of rows of wood windows, mainly of the double hung type

and a clay tyle roof. Visual inspection revealed no major da-

mage to these surfaces.

WALLS.

There seems to be some slight water damage in the upper

parts of the building, where the brick wall meets the roof.

Also, the first two or three rows of brick which are closest to

the ground plane show evidence ofexcesive humidity, ( mosse

growing on the brick and decoloration of the brick ), which is

due to the poor drainage of the building. In some of the areas

where the building has been renovated, the quality of the work-

manship has been poor, specially in the brick jointery and there

are some areas where the mortar has been washed out by the rain.

A great part of the north and west facades, as well as some

areas of the south facade, are covered with espalier type trees,

( trees that grow parallel to the wall surface using the wall

for support and nourishment), although at the present time there

is no evidence of major damage to the wall as a result of the























growth of these trees, this condition may prove to be harm-

ful to the brick wall.

WINDOWS

Generally, the caulking in most of the windows is dry and

the paint is peeling. The windows in the second seem to be in

much better physical condition than those windows in the first

and ground floor.

For a more detailed study of the physical conditions of the

windows refer to the interior building survey.

ROOF

Visual inspection revealed no apparent damage to the roof

surface.











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West Elevation









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First Roor Plan


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Second Floor Plan


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FLINT HALL
ADAPTIVE USE
FEASIBILITY
STATEMENT
























INTRODUCTION


In doing an adaptive use project such as the one

proposed for Flint Hall, it is necessary to question the

feasibility of such a project in terms of benefit versus

cost. To evaluate this issue, it is important to consider

three factors: The historical significance of the building

to its local, regional or national context; the architec-

tural significance of the building in terms of its quality

of design, uniqueness and physical conditions; and, the

economic feasibility of the adaptive use project. The

following statements deal with the previously mentioned

factors in reference to Flint Hall.
















HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE


Flint Hall is historically significant to the

University of Florida since it is one of the few structures

that are left from the original campus plan. Along with

Anderson, Peabody and Floyd, Flint Hall is part of the

quadrangle that surrounds the Plaza of the Americas. Its

position at the northwest corner of this quadrangle is

critical to the symmetry of this important campus area.

Buildings such as Flint Hall have had a tremendous

impact on the development of the architecture of the

University of Florida. One clear example of such an impact

is the extensive use of brick veneer by contemporary

structures such as General Purpose Building A and the

Forestry Building.

Flint Hall is a fine example of the collegiate

work the firm of Edwards and Walters, whose works are of

regional importance to the southeastern sector of the

United States. Flint Hall has been nominated for the

National Register of Historic Places for its historical

and architectural significance.













ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE


As one of the earliest collegiate Gothic buildings

designed for the University of Florida, Flint Hall is

architecturally irreplaceable in terms of its design and

construction. It would be unfeasible and unlikely to design

a building such as Flint Hall today. Another aspect which

adds to the architectural significance of Flint Hall is the

fact that, unlike many of the other older buildings on

campus whose exteriors have been the victims of unsympathe-

tic additions, Flint Hall's exterior character remains

almost intact and free from alterations. Also, Flint

Hall is structurally sound, and its interior wood frame

construction as well as its spatial organization would make

an adaptive use project a relatively simple and inexpensive

task. Flint Hall's twenty-five-foot bay, ample interior

corridor and window area make it an ideal classroom or

office building. Its location west of Library West is

also ideal for such purpose.


ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY


The Ad Hoc Committee for the Preservation of

Campus Sites conducted a study on the economic feasibility

of remodeling Flint Hall. The result of this study indicates





























that compared with the cost of new classroom construction,

the cost of remodeling Flint Hall would be less expensive

(new construction: $38.50 sq. ft.; remodeling: $8.00 sq.

ft.; a ratio of 4 to 1). Also, the Ad Hoc Committee studied

the comparative energetic cost of air-conditioning Flint

Hall. The following is a copy of the report presented

by the Ad Hoc Committee to University of Florida President,

Robert Q. Marston.






DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


COLLEGE OF AnCHITrCTURF
201 Flint lall

May 24,.1977






Dr. Robert Q. Marston, President
University of Florida
226 Tigert Hall
Campus

Dear President Marston:

Several years ago, during a time of relatively cheap and abundant energy
supplies, a decision was made to begin design on a new classroom complex
(GPA) and to remove several old, turn of the century, classroom buildings.
At that time these old buildings were thought to be outdated, expensive to
air condition and modernize, and not in pace with the quality teaching
environment of the newer structures on the University campus.

Since that time, a new condition of expensive and diminishing energy supply
has descended upon us. Decisions that were valid at that time relative to
the existing information must now be reevaluated given the .new situation.
It now becomes obvious that the old structures, with their thick masonry walls,
high ceilings, operable windows, cross ventilation, and insulative attic
spaces, are the type of buildings that were designed to perform without air
conditioning and embody many of the elements of today's environmentally
responsive design techniques.

For your information, an analysis of the costs of new construction vs. remodel-
ing and the operating costs.of air conditioned buildings (which constitute
2/3 of all energy consumption on the U. F. campus) vs. mechanically ventilated
and hybrid ventilated/air conditioned buildings, has been prepared. Assisting
me in the preparing of this analysis were Associate Professor Ira Winarsky,
director of the Urban Systems Sector of our recent Carrying Capacity research
and Assistant Professor Gary Ridgdill, director of research on our recent
publication "Value of Energy Conservation in Buildings" sponsored by the
Florida Energy Committee. .

We have used, as a base for our energy consumption analysis, Flint Hall which
is now occupied by the College of Architecture. Flint Hall was chosen as we
have experienced two years of teaching in this structure with minimum air
conditioning, and we feel we have a real insight into the behavior of this
building over an adequate period of time. We have compared the performance of
a remodeled Flint Hall with other air" conditioned classroom buildings such as







101C AIA, LIN IVCISI IY Or FLOr Ii A, C;AINCSV i Li 321 11, 904--392-0205

T i" rC tLIUI L)l G CONS1 RUCI IONII1eNTIE IOF DESIGNeL. ANOS CAPE AtC IIIT ECTURE* URB AN AN) fU.GIONAL PLAr,


UNI VE RS I Y OF vI-- O I h AA














Dr. Robert Q. Marston, President
May 24, 1977
Page Two



Black IHall,'Matherly Hall, and proposed General Purpose Classroom Building A.

We hope the attached information will be helpful to you in your effort to provide
for.our campus,the best possible educational environment.

Sincerely,



Harry C. Merritt
Chairman, Graduate Design

HCM/bac

Enclosures:

1. Energy consumption for exhaust fan ventilation for Flint Hall.
2. Energy Consumption for limited air conditioning for Flint Hall and.
summation of aggregate costs for fan/AC hybrid system.
3. Energy consumption of typical, air conditioned, classroom buildings.
4. Remodeling cost of Flint Hall relative to construction costs of new
classroom space.
5. Summary.


cc: Mark T. Jaroszewicz, Dean
College of Architecture

Arnold F. Butt, Chairman
Department of Architecture

Prof.. Ira Winarsky

Prof. Gary Ridgdill

Prof. Blair Reeves


Prof. Earl Starnes












May 24, 1977


ENCLOSURE 1

ENERGY CONSUMPrTION FOR VENTILATING FANS FOR FLINT HALL

1. Data Assumption:

a. 15 air changes per hour (as recommended by ASHRAE for ventilative
cooling).

b. Aggregate cost of electricity per KWH = $ .032.

*c. Hours of operation of fan cooling or air conditioning system
= 1,500 hours.

d. Total wattage of fan cooling system (17 450'cfm units, 14 650
cfm units, 16 2000 cfm units) = 26,950 watts.

2. Estimated costs for operating fan ventilation system per year:

Cost of elec. Number of lours] Wattage of System
er KWH of operation 1000 Estimated Cost

$ .032 X 1,500 X 26,950/1000 = $1,293.60

3. Cost per sq. ft. of building to ventilate

1,293.60/29,950 (area of Flint) $ ,n44/sq. ft.

*Estimated average cooling hours per year


May


June


July


Aug


I I I I I


quarterr
Weeks


$-


Summer Qu
9 Week


irter
s 4


Sept.


Fal
6


Oct.


L QuartQ
.Jeeks 4


Total weeks of operation = 25, estimated 10 hours per day, 6 days per week
= 25 x 10 x 6 .= 1,500 hours


April


Spring.












May 24, 1977


ENCLOSURE 2


ENERGY CONSUMPTION FOR LIMITED AIR CONDITIONING OF FLINT HALL AND SUMMATION
OF AGGREGATE COSTS FOR FAN/AC HYBRID COOLING SYSTEM


1. Spaces to be air conditioned

a. 101 Flint lecture and exhibition
b. 201 Flint Graduate Design office files
c. 211 Flint URP office and files
Total


7.0 tons
1.5 tons
1.5 tons
10.0 tons


2. Assumed Data:

a. 15 air changes per hour (as recommended by ASHRAE for ventilative
cooling).

b. Aggregate cost of electricity per KWH .032.

c. Hours of operation of fan cooling or air conditioning system
= 1,500 hours.

d. Total wattage of fan cooling system (17 450 cfa units, 14 650
cfm units, 16 2000 cfm units) = 26,950 watts.

3. "Estimated costs for operating limited air conditioning for one year.

Cost of elec. Number of Hours Wattage of Syste t
per KWH X of operation x 1000 Estima

$ .032 X 1,500 X 35.16 = $1,688.00

4. Aggregate costs for hybrid fan/AC system

*Operating costs fan system 1,293.60 yr. ---
Operating costs AC system 1,688.00 yr. -


Total


2,981.60 yr.


ted Cost


Cost per sq. ft. for system

$3,000.00/29,250 sq. ft. = $ .10/SQ.FT./YEAR










May 24, 1977


ENCLOSURE 3


ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF TYPICAL AIR CONDITIONED CLASSROOM BUILDINGS


1. Data Assumption:

a. Aggregate cost of electricity per KWH = $ .032
b. Hours of operation of cooling system = 1,500 hours.

2. Estimated costs for operation of typical air conditioning systems per year.

Cost of elect [ Number of Hours x Wattage of system Estimated Cost
per KWH. .Lof operation J 1000
$ .032 X 1,500 X 26,950/1000 = $1,293.60

3. The following air conditioned classroom spaces were analyzed as per the
above formula with the following results.

a. Black Hall

Tons of AC 110
Sq. footage 25,530
Yearly cost of operation $18,564.00

Cost to operate per sq. ft.
$18,564.00/35,530 = $ .52/SQ.FT./YEAR

b. Matherly Hall

Tons of AC 160
Sq. footage 52,270
Yearly cost of operation $27,000.00

Cost to operate per sq. ft.
$27,000.00/52,270. = $ .52/SQ.FT./YEAR

c. GPA (proposed)

Tons of AC 450
Sq. footage 219,000
Yearly cost of operation $75,945.00

Costs to operate per sq. ft.
$75,945.00/219,000 = $ .35/SQ.rF./YEAR
































Enclosure 3 (continued)
Page Two



It is apparent that newer buildings such as CPA are more efficient in energy
consumption relative to cooling costs than older buildings; however, it should
be noted that the $.35/sq. ft. for cooling operating costs are 3-1/2 times
the cost for operating the hybrid fan/AC system proposed for Flint Hall. An
analysis of all of the air conditioned classroom space would show a ratio in
excess of 4 to 1 in operating costs over the proposed Flint Hall system.











May 24, 1977


ENCLOSURE 4

ESTIMATED REMODELING COSTS FLINT HALL


The following estimate was submitted by Holton Construction Company, Inc.-on
May 20, 1977. It is to be understood that the below amounts are estimates
only and do not constitute an exact calculation of all items.

Item #1


Hang new fire-rated, acoustic ceiling throughout second and third
floors (equal to J. H. H & T system).


24,442.00


Item #2


Remove existing floor tile, grout and sand subfloor, and install
1/8" vinyl tile.


29,330.00


Item #3


Remove all existing, ceiling hung flurosecent fixtures and replace
with 2-lamp, 1x4 flurosecent fixtures (162 fixtures ground floor,
184 fixtures main floor, 164 fixtures upper floor). Also
install 24, 1-lamp, 8' strip on each floor in hallway. Rework
service panels and receptacles.


70,882.00


Item #4


24,809.00


Repaint all interior walls, windows, and doors.


Item #5


Renovate all operable windows, inspect all sash cords and replace
.where necessary, and repair or replace all defective hardware.
All windows to operate freely upon completion.


17,476.00


Item #6


Trim all existing "Homasote" display panels with 1x2 hardwood
stock.


3,911.00


Item 117


Resurface all stair treads and landings with quarry tile.


3,300.00










Enclosure 4 (continued)
Page Two


Item #8

Install new wooden handrail over existing metal pipe system.

Item /#9

Hang "llomasote" panels on ground floor in manner similar to main
and upper floors.

Item#/ 10

Remove existing entry door and install new, aluminum frame, glass
doors and transom.

Item Ill

Remove existing built-in seating from room 101, and install 7-ton
air conditioning unit with approximately 60 feet of.duct.

Item #12

Remove all venetian blinds, clean, repair, and rehang.


Item #13


Install wall mounted exhaust fans as follows: 17 450 cfm units,
14 650 cfm units, 16 2000 cfm units, including all wiring and
switching.


7% Job Overhead
Subtotal
5% Office Overhead and Fee
Subtotal
1% Bond
Subtotal
Insurance
TOTAL


15,510.00

$ 203,938.00
14,275.00
' 218,213.00
10,910.00
229,123.00
2,290.00
231,413.00
1,200.00
$ 232,613.00


Remodeling costs per sq. ft.


$232,613.00/29,250 sq. ft. = $7.96 per sq. ft. or

Costs of new classroom space per sq. ft. (GPA)..................

Ratio of costs of new classroom space (GPA) to remodeled
classroom space ................................................


+ 8.00.SQ,FT.

38.50/SQ.FT.


-4 to 1


1,467.00


856.00


1,589.00


7,311.00


3,055.00

















May 24,.1977


ENCLOSURE 5

SUMMARY


1. COST OF REMODELING COIMPARED-TO COST OF NEW CLASSROOM CONSTRUCTION.

An attempt was made to identify the elements of remodeling in Flint
Hall to bring this building to a workable and comfortable building
and to bring the maintenance schedule into a posture similar to the
modern buildingsof our campus. The comparative costs are as follows:


Costs of new construction (GPA)
Cost of remodeling (est. Flint)

Ratio of new construction remodeled


$38.50/sq.ft.
8.00/sq.ft.

+ 4 to 1


2. COSTS OF OPERATION OF TYPICAL AIR CONDITIONED CLASSROOM SPACE COMPARED
TO HYBRID VENTILATED/AIR CONDITIONED SYSTEMS.


Average costs of air conditioned space
Cost of hybrid system (Flint Hall, see enclosure 2)

Ratio of air conditioned space to hybrid system


1 .44/sq.ft./yr.
.10/sq.ft./yr.

4 .to' .


It is obvious, in view of the above estimates, that the recycling of our
older structures into an environmentally acceptable mode, is financially
viable insofar as remodeling and operating costs are concerned.

It is to be understood that this analysis has considered classroom type space
only and not functions that demand a higher technology of climate control.
Remodeling of existing space to house such high technology functions-should
be considered as a separate issue and the ratios.offered in this report are
not applicable.































CONCLUSION


It is obvious that the preservation of Flint Hall

is a worthwhile project in terms of the architectural

and historical significance of this building as well as the

economic feasibility of such a project.















PROGRAMMED
SPACES EN












As it has been previously mentioned in the intro-

duction to this program, the selection of the History

Department and classroom functions as the proposed adaptive

use functions for Flint Hall was based on the compatibility

that exists between Flint Hall's physical facilities and

the spatial requirements of these functions.

In determining the programatic and spatial require-

ments of the History Department and its classroom space,

the Facilities Program for General Purpose Building A

prepared by the Division of Planning and Analysis was

used as a model. This programatic model was thoroughly

discussed with Dr. Funk, chairman of the History Depart-

ment of the University of Florida. Dr. Funk made several

recommendations as to the need for additional functions and

spaces to be incorporated into the programatic model.

Also, Dr. Funk provided a list of the current classroom

needs of the History Department and the various types of

classrooms required to fulfill these needs. It was

determined that the History Department would need three

types of classroom space. A large assembly type classroom

to accommodate from 100 to 150 students, a regular type

classroom to accommodate 45 students and a seminar type

classroom to accommodate from 15 to 20 students. The

spatial requirements for these various types of classrooms




















were determined by a formula provided by the Division of

Planning and Analysis based on the number of students per

classroom times an assignable area per student (see program).

The total number of classrooms needed by the History

Department was determined by computing the total number of

hours per week of classroom use for each type of class-

room and dividing this number by 45, the maximum number

of hours of classroom use in one week. The resulting

number is the minimum number of classrooms needed to

accommodate the History Department's needs at 100 percent

usage of the classroom space. Additional classroom spaces

are added to the minimum number figured in order to obtain

a reasonable percentage of classroom use.

For specific information concerning the History

Department's classroom needs see the section of the

program pertaining to this subject.































ADAPTIVE USE: FLINT HALL


Flint Hall Net Area:


19,002 sq. ft.


PROPOSED FUNCTIONS


History Department


Classroom Space (General Purpose)


4,710 sq. ft.

14,292 sq. ft.





















HISTORY DEPARTMENT
SPACE PROGRAM


Chairman's Office

Assist. Chairman's Office

Secretarial/Receptionist Office

Office Service Area

Mail Room

Undergradaute & Graduate
Coordinators Suite

Conference Room

Faculty Library

Faculty Offices

Graduate Assistants' Office

Teaching Aids Storage


No. Sq. Ft. Each NASF

1 --- 200

1 -- 185

1 -- 400

1 -- 150

1 -- 60


145

135


400

300

400

1,740

675

200


4,710


DEPARTMENT TOTAL:









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History Sheet No. 1


NAME OF SPACE: Chairman's Office

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 200 sq. ft.

USER: Department Chairman

PURPOSE: Use for interview, small departmental meetings
and to house department confidential material
as well as the department chairman's personal
property.

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: One desk, one chair, adjustable
book shelf, coffee table and two to four lounge-
type chairs

SPATIAL RELATION: Part of the administrative core which
consists of chairman's office, assistant chairman's
office, secretarial and reception area and office
service area, also should be close to conference
room


__









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History


NAME OF SPACE: Assistant Chairman's Office

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 185 sq. ft.

USER: Assistant Chairman of the Department


PURPOSE:


Sheet No. 2


Use for interview, small departmental meetings
and to house department confidential material
as well as department chairman's personal property


EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: One desk, one chair, adjustable
book shelf, two lounge-type chairs

SPATIAL RELATION: Part of the administrative core which
consists of chairman's office, assistant chairman's
office, secretarial and reception area and office
service area, also should be close to conference
room.









PROGRAMED SPACES
i


DEPARTMENT: History


Sheet No. 3


NAME OF SPACE: Secretarial/Receptionist Office

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 400 sq. ft.

USER: 'Secretaries, faculty, students


PURPOSE:


Will house department files and records, and
serve as entry to the administrative core. Will
house secretarial functions.


EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Two desks, two chairs, two
typewriters, three filing cabinets, seating for
six persons.

SPATIAL RELATION: Part of the administrative core which
consists of chairman's office, assistant chairman's
office, secretarial and reception area and office
service area. Should provide for the main entrance
to administrative core and be accessible to
faculty and students. Adjacent to office work
area.









PROGRAMED SPACES



DEPARTMENT: History Sheet No. 4


NAME OF SPACE: Office Service Area

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 150 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty and secretaries

PURPOSE: Accommodate xerox and ditto machine, general
secretarial work space.

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Xerox and ditto machines,
table, adjustable shelving

SPATIAL RELATION: Part of the administrative core which
consists of chairman's office, assistant chairman's
office, secretarial and reception area and office
service area, also, should be close to secretarial
area.









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History Sheet No. 5


NAME OF SPACE: Mail Room

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 60 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty, secretaries, students

PURPOSE: Provide for faculty mailboxes

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Thirty mailboxes and one table

SPATIAL RELATION: Should have easy access to faculty and
administrative facilities









PROGRAMED SPACES



DEPARTMENT: History Sheet No. 6


NAME OF SPACE: Undergraduate and Graduate Coordinator's Suite

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 400 sq. ft.

USER: Undergraduate and graduate advisors, secretaries, students

PURPOSE: To house the offices of the undergraduate and graduate
advisors and a mutual secretary, interview students,
etc.

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Two desks, two chairs, several
lounge-type chairs, adjustable book shelf, secre-
tary's desk, chair, typewriter, filing cabinet

SPATIAL RELATION: Should be adjacent to the administrative
core if possible, should provide independent offices
for graduate and undergraduate advisors as well as
secretarial area









PROGRAMED SPACES
I


DEPARTMENT: History


Sheet No. 7


NAME OF SPACE: Conference Room

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 300 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty

PURPOSE: Departmental meetings, faculty meeting, occasional
teaching, etc.

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Conference table, seating for
ten to fifteen people, chalkboard, projector
screen

SPATIAL RELATION: Should have access to administrative
and faculty personal, should have access to
corridor








PROGRAMED


SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History.


Sheet No. 8


NAME OF SPACE: Faculty Library

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 400 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty

PURPOSE: Store faculty books and reference material (no
circulation)

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Adjustable book shelves, one
large table and seating for four
SPATIAL RELATION: Should be close to faculty offices









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History Sheet No. 9


NAME OF SPACE: Faculty Offices

NUMBER: 12

FLOOR AREA: 145 sq. ft. ea., 1,740 sq. ft. total

USER: Faculty


PURPOSE:


Work space for faculty, house personal and depart-
mental material, interview and small meetings


EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: One desk, one chair, seating
for one, adjustable book shelves

SPATIAL RELATION: Faculty offices should be close to each
other to encourage interaction. Should be close to
faculty library and administrative core.









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History


Sheet No. 10


NAME OF SPACE: Graduate Assistant Offices

NUMBER: 5

FLOOR AREA: 135 sq. ft. ea., 675 sq. ft. total

USER: Graduate assistants

PURPOSE: Work space for graduate assistant, house personal
and departmental materials, teaching preparation

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: One desk, one chair, microfilm
reader, adjustable book shelves

SPATIAL RELATION: Graduate assistants' offices should be
close to each other to encourage interaction, should
be close to faculty offices if possible.









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: History Sheet No. 11


NAME OF SPACE: Teaching and storage

NUMBER:

FLOOR AREA: 200 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty

PURPOSE: Storage of teaching and materials, audiovisual
maps, etc.

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Adjustable shelves

SPATIAL RELATION: Should be close to classrooms













HISTORY DEPARTMENT
CLASSROOM NEEDS


TYPES OF CLASSROOMS

100-150 Stations

45 Stations

15-20 Stations


Large assemblage

Regular classroom

Seminar


CLASSROOM SPACE NEEDS


Type

100-150

45

15-20


No. of Hours/Week

16

179

72


RECOMMENDED

Type

100-150

45

15-20


Min. at 100% Usage

1

4

2


No. of Classrooms


SPACE PROGRAM

Sq. ft. per station--Assemblage = 13.5 sq. ft./st.

Classroom = 15 sq. ft./st.

Seminar = 15 sq. ft./st.

































Sq. Ft. Ea.

1,350


675

300


TOTAL DEPARTMENT NEED:


Type

100-150


Number

1


15-20


NASF

1,350

4,725

1,200

7,275






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Comparative Histcory
Docto-ial Research


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McAZlscer
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M.icaulay

Wiler.skz
Staff
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Gutfeld

Su.rez
Brown

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Staff
Staff

Chang


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Davis

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FLINT HALL GROSS AND NET AREAS


Gross Area per Floor

8,064


Net Area per Floor

6,334


Number

3


Number

3


Total Gross Area

24,192


Total Net Area

19,002


ADAPTIVE-USE FUNCTIONS


SQUARE FOOTAGE


History Department

History Department Classroom Needs

Classroom Storage

Restroom Facilities (400 x 3F)

Mechanical Equipment

Elev.

TOTAL:


4,710

7,275

175

1,200

1,140

320

14,820


Net Square Footage 19,002

Adaptive-Use Square Req. 14,820

4,182

4,182 sq. ft. --Will serve to accommodate. Lobby space,
entrance, egress req. and added classroom
space.
































CLASSROOM REQ. FLINT HALL



1 100 st 1,350 1,350

7 45 st 675 4,725

5 15 st 225 1,125

7,200









PROGRAMED SPACES
I


DEPARTMENT: General Classroom Space


Sheet No. 1


NAME OF SPACE: Assembly Room

NUMBER: 1

FLOOR AREA: 1,350 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty and students

PURPOSE: Large lecture gatherings, presentation, etc.

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Table or instructional desk,
projection screen, fixed seating for 100 students,
chalkboard and map railings

SPATIAL RELATION: Access to student, pedestrial circulation
and traffic control should be main design con-
sideration









PROGRAMED SPACES
I


DEPARTMENT: General Classroom Space


Sheet No. 2


NAME OF SPACE: Classroom

NUMBER: 7

FLOOR AREA: 675 sq. ft. ea.; 4,725 sq. ft. total

USER: Faculty and students

PURPOSE: Lecture and discussion

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Table or instructional desk,
chalkboard, projection screen and map railings,
seating for 45 students

SPATIAL RELATION: Access to students, circulation and
traffic control is an important factor, also,
lighting and acoustics









PROGRAMED SPACES
I


DEPARTMENT: General Classroom Space


Sheet No. 3


NAME OF SPACE: Seminar

NUMBER: 4

FLOOR AREA: 300 sq. ft. each, 1,200 sq. ft. total

USER: Faculty and students

PURPOSE: Lecture, discussion and meetings

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Conference table, chalkboard,
projection screen, seating for 15 to 20 students,
map railings

SPATIAL RELATION: Access to students, circulation and
traffic control is an important factor, also,
lighting and acoustics









PROGRAMED SPACES


DEPARTMENT: General Classroom Space Sheet No. 4


NAME OF SPACE: Classroom Storage

NUMBER:

FLOOR AREA: 175 sq. ft.

USER: Faculty

PURPOSE: Store classroom teaching aids, projectors, maps,
etc., and other general storage

EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS: Filing cabinets

SPATIAL RELATION: Close to classroom functions


















FUNCTIONAL
DIAGRAMS
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FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAMS


UDENTS


ADMINISTRATIVE


GRADUATE
FACULTY STUDENT
OFFICES OFFICES


CORE







FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP


DIAGRAMS


ADMINISTRATIVE


FUNCTIONS


FACULTY
FUNCTIONS


FACULTY 8 ADM.


GRADUATE 8
UNDERGRADUATE
SUTE














DESIGN
CRITERIA .
AND CONCEPT












DESIGN CRITERIA AND CONCEPT


In view of the information presented in this

program, it is clear that Flint Hall is an historically

significant building which is structurally and physically

sound. Taking these two factors into consideration as

well as other programatic and aesthetic considerations

and the economic feasibility of such an adaptive use

project, I have established the following concept with

regard to the proposed design solution for this project.


CONCEPT STATEMENT


To promote the preservation of Flint Hall, by tak-

ing advantage of its spatial and structural qualities to

adapt a new function into the building with the minimum

amount of destruction of its present exterior character.


DESIGN CRITERIA


In order to execute the previously stated concept,

I have established the following design criteria:

*As much as possible, to try to preserve
the exterior character of the building
in its present form

*Work with the existing structural system
of the building

*When possible, try to be historically
true to the building




































*Develop the building and its exterior
grounds so as to promote its preservation















CODE
_USAGE AND
RESTRI ACTIONS



























CODE


The following building codes will be applicable to

this exercise: The Southern Standard Building Code, the

Standard Plumbing Code and the Life Safety Code.

The following pages consist of a series of notes

taken from the Southern Standard Building Code pertaining

to the height and area restriction, fire protection, means

of egress and other code restrictions applicable to Flint

Hall.














NOTES


Sec. 406--Occupancy Classification

Group "C"--Schools


Sec. 606--Type of Construction

Type V Construction


Sec. 406.5--Height and Area Restrictions

Allowable Height--Type V--Two-story height limit

Allowable Area--Type V--12,000 sq. ft. 1st floor

12,000 sq. ft. 2nd floor


*Where basements or cellars are used as classroom or assembly
rooms they shall be counted as a story

**At least one hour fire resistive construction shall be used
throughout in all Group "C" (schools) two or more stories
in height.


Sec. 403.6--Area Increase for Sprinklers

The maximum allowable floor and attic area may be

increased by 100 percent for buildings over one

story in height if the building is provided with

automatic sprinklers.


Sec. 606.2--Fire District Sec. 301

No fire district applicable











CHAPTER VII--FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS


Sec. 701--Protection of Vertical Openings, Stairs and Elevators

Sec. 701--Elevators and vertical shaft--at least

two hour fire resistant


Sec. 702--Partitions

Sec. 702.2--Type V--In buildings three stories in

height, unless sprinklered, all permanent

partitions shall be no less than one hour

fire resistant construction.


Sec. 412--Mixed Occupancy and Separation Requirements

Minimum Requirements

Group E-2--Small Assembly--Two hour fire resistant

separation

Group C--School--Two hour fire resistant separation


Sec. 512--Assembly Occupancies

Sec. 512.4--Group E--Separation two hour fire

resistant minimum


CHAPTER XI--MEANS OF EGRESS REQUIREMENTS


Sec. 1103.2--Minimum Number of Exits

a) Minimum 2 independent exits per floor area

b) Group E-2 minimum of 2 exits

c)













Sec. 1104.3--Dead End Pockets of Hallways

Exits and exits access shall be so arranged that

no dead end pockets of hallway shall occur in

excess of 20 feet in depth.


Section 1105--Means of Egress Capacity Requirements

Sec. 1105.1--Occupant Content M.O.C.Fl.A./Person

Group "C"--Schools 20 sq. ft.

Group E--Assembly fixed seat 6 sq. ft.

Flint Net Area


Persons per Unit (22 in.) of Exit Width

Group C 100 Corridors

Group E 100 Corridors


60 Stairs

75 stairs


Sec. 1105

When exits from floors above and below converge

at an intermediate floor the capacity of the exit

from such intermediate floor shall not be less

than the sum of the width of the exits converging

on such intermediate floors.


Sec. 1106(F)

Fire window allowed in exit enclosure (fire


marshall).

















Sec. 1115.5--Handrails

Handrails are needed on both sides of the stairs


Sec. 1117--Doorways


Sec. 1118--Ramps


Sec. 1120--Exit to roof


CHAPTER XII--MINIMUM DESIGN LO


Sec. 1203.1(a)--Floor Loads


Occupancy

Assembly (fixed seating)

Offices

School (classrooms)


Min. Live Loads, Lbs./sq. ft

50 lbs./sq. ft.

50 lbs./sq. ft.

40 lbs./sq. ft.


CHAPTER XX--LIGHT, VENTILATION AND SANITATION


CHAPTER IX--SPRINKLER AND STANDPIPES


Sec. 902.3--Standpipes are required.















FLINT HALL
OUTLINE IN
SPECIFICATIONS













1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS


Purpose of Specification: This outline specification is

intended to supplement the drawings in supplying the infor-

mation to adequately describe the rehabilitation process and

as required for a preliminary estimate of cost. It is

not a complete and detailed set of specifications and the

estimator shall base his estimate on the beat normal

practice for a building of this type even when such require-

ments are not specifically stated.


General Conditions


A. The General Conditions for the Contract of Construction,

AIA, Document 201, latest edition, shall apply to the

work as applicable.

B. The Contractor shall carry insurance in adequate amounts

as follows: public liability, property damage, automobile

bodily injury and property damage, liability and work-

men's compensation.

C. All references to colors or materials used "as selected

by Architect" or otherwise recommended, shall be

submitted to, reviewed and approved by the University

of Florida before implementation.