Capitol Center 1902

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Capitol Center 1902
Physical Description:
29p. : elevations, plans, sections.
Language:
English
Creator:
Black, James B.
Publisher:
James B. Black
College of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
AFA Historic Preservation document 268

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00004579:00001

Full Text









CAPITOL


CENTER


1902


james b black
march 1979

















TABLE OF CONTENTS
Project Concept and Introduction 1
Design Philosophy 3
Orientation and Energy Information Center 6
Museum-Exhibition 9
Auditorium 12
Restaurant 17
Preliminary Building Square Footages 22
Structural Considerations 24
Structural Conclusions 27
Conclusion 29





PROJECT CONCEPT
and INTRODUCTION
Capitol Center 1902 shall be a facility for all people
to come to in order to find out about the government
and the state of Florida. The major activities that
will be provided for in this adaptive use are an orien-
tation center.,to the Capitol Complex, two different types
of museum-exhibition spaces, a quality .dining facility,
and an auditorium that will be associated with both the
orientation center and museum. These activities are
intended to improve conditions in the Capitol Complex
for state employees and visitors. This program shall
compliment the continued development of the adjacent
commercial areas that serve the Capitol Complex.

By programming functions into the building that the aver-
age person could engage in, the building could be con-
sidered as serving its highest and best philosophical
use. It would be serving the people directly rather
than through the governmental officials. The building
would serve the Tallahassee community as well as the
increasing number of visitors and tourists.

The exterior of the Historic State Capitol shall be re-
stored to its 1902 condition. Most people will exper-
ience the building from the two major circulation
arteries or from published photographs, as in news media






reports. The exterior pedestrian procession to the Capitol
Complex is a definite series of events. People going to
the site will experience the exterior spatial relation-
ships, details, and scale in comparison and contrast to
the newer capitol buildings. The old capitol shall not
be the major entrance to the new capitol buildings,-but
people will come to the old capitol to be oriented. The
old building should be a functioning monument to Florida's
past. Development of these qualities and relationships
will give prominence to the Capitol Center 1902.

The primary concern for site development shall be pedes-
trian circulation, with emphasis on the Historic Capitol.
Ceremonial and emergency vehicular access shall be devel-
oped to the plaza, between the Capitol Complex Tower
and the Capitol Center 1902. Vehicular service access
will be necessary for both the north and south ends of
the Historic Capitol. An improved paved surface will be
required in order to achieve these requirements. For
optimum safety emergency vehicles should not be obstruct-
ed from complete access to the entire Capitol Complex site.
Bus parking and a visitor drop off lane shall be provided
to the east of the Senate office building, on the west
side of Monroe Street. The Historic Walk along the






eastern edge of the site shall be retained under their
canopy of the existing water oaks. Planting of oak
saplings should be initiated for the future. Florida's
D.O.T. shall plan and perform the alteration of Monroe
Street by moving the street and its intersection with
Apalachee Parkway, to the east. This move shall compli-
ment the proposed site considerations.

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY
As an academic exercise it is important for the designer's
philosophy about the 1902 Historic State Capitol in its
completed environment to be addressed. The Capitol Center
1902 shall be a symbol of government and the growth that
has occurred in Florida. It is the symbol of success and
identity with the past. Having the Historic Capitol
and the new building so closely related emphasises just
how far Florida has progressed. The architectural quality
of both buildings should not be an issue. The built
environment must be dealt with to its greatest potential.
Discussion of architectural quality should be left to
the historians.

Many people would choose to identify Florida with the
new Capitol Complex, and the contemporary, progressive
nature that it represents. Other people would prefer
to identify with the Historic Capitol. However the old





capitol building can no longer accommodate the many
requirements associated with Florida's growing govern-
mental process. It would seem proper to reserve func-
tions for the Historic Capitol that would allow the
people of Florida and all visitors to experience this
vestige of the past.

The State has chosen to keep and preserve the old capitol
building. It should be preserved in such a way as its
impact and integrity shall endure for the life of the
structure. To put a state agency in the building would
leave open the possibility that a policy change could
result in damage to the building and its proper preser-
vation. As an independent operation with internal con-
trols and a program that in itself deals with preserving
art objects, perhaps the old capitol will maintain its
impact.

The interior of the Historic Capitol shall not be considered
for complete restoration. A large requirement should not
be placed on the controlling bodies to maintain a very
detailed, expensive and unflexible building. Past exper-
ience has shown that the condition will not be maintained.
If flexibility can be designed into the building then
there will be less opportunity for a dissatisfied official





to demand this old outdated and useless eyesore be torn
down. The East-West axis through the rotunda shall be
the only element that is restored. This shall be the
major entrance and vertical circulation for the Capitol
Center 1902.


This architect intends to develop the Historic State
Capitol into a building that will continue to have a
strong historical impact and still function in a variety
of ways and with a great deal of flexibility for the
future.





ORIENTATION AND ENERGY
INFORMATION CENTER
This facility shall be the distribution point for infor-
mation on all elements of the State Capitol Complex.
Information shall be distributed concerning the func-
tions of government in Florida and where a particular
agency or office is located. There will be maps and
models that will locate all state buildings and delineate
relationships between them.

There will be exhibitions of various energy conservation n
techniques and principles. Literature will be distributed
on this matter from this area. Florida has a great deal
of potential to develop solar energy as an alternate
energy source and the 1902 capitol building is in itself
an energy efficient building. This would make it the
perfect distribution point for energy information. Basic
concepts would be addressed and general information and.
resources could be delineated for the layman. Inevitably
there will be a state energy agency and this facility
could serve to distribute general information with specific
referal to the agency when necessary.

There will be four major activities or concerns that will
demand space in the orientation center. These are an
exhibition-display space, offices, a conference space,
and a tele-communications terminal area.





Visual and graphic delineation of the Capitol Complex
shall take place in the exhibition-display space. Maps,
models, and slide shows should fulfill this requirement.
A counter shall be used to distribute information liter-
ature and control access to the space.
Offices will be necessary for personnel. Storage of
literature and display furniture shall also occur within
the offices,
A conference room for fifteen to twentyfive people shall
be located in this area. This would be a public space
but with limited access. Small demonstrations, lectures,
and meetings would take place here.
The telecommunications space will be a public space but
with limited access. There will provisions for computer
terminal hookups as well as a telephone and PBX communica-
tions system hookups. This space will grow in importance
as more emphasis is placed on computer communications
and its impact on the average person.


The auditorium shall serve the orientatbn center by pro-
viding space to show movies, slide shows,lectures, and
demonstrations. The orientation center should be closely
related to the auditorium. All visitors should have easy
access to this facility. This would necessitate a location
on the main entry level.





The Capitol Center 1902 is well suited as an orientation
center. The Capitol Complex is located on two major
arteries of the capitol city. As an architectural and
visual focal point of state government this building
commands the attention of most visitors and would
best serve those people.





MUSEUM-EXHIBITION


The Historic State Capitol building is intended to be a
place for visitors to the Capitol Complex. The museum-
exhibition spaces are to further inform the visitor by
providing an experience with Florida's culture, past and
present. Florida's governmental history shall be present-
ed in exhibition form. These two exhibitions would work
best as separate organizations. This would allow differn-
tiation not only in review but also in service.

The Florida governmental history exhibition shall include
models of buildings, maps, drawings, paintings, sculpture,
and artifacts, This would basically be a permanent exhibi-
tion with only changes as new material is developed.
Changes could be made by introducing material from private
for short periods of time. Due to the permanent nature
of the exhibition, large storage or preparation spaces
will not be necessary. If enough material is gathered
over a period of time to take up the entire museum, such
action should be considered. Security should be carefully
planned for,both during hours of operation and when closed.

The museum of Florida art shall be a rotating exhibition.
Objects with a common concept or philosophy would be
located here and presented at one time. Provisions should
be made for all types of art objects and both large and





small exhibition spaces. Circulation should be developed
to allow sections of the exhibition to be bypassed while
changes are made. There should always be some ojects
open to the public because of the large number of con-
stant visitors to the Capitol Complex.


This type of rotating exhibition would require rather
large preparation and storage spaces. The preparation
spaces for this type of museum could take up between one
half to two thirds of the total museum-exhibition space.
The support functions can be broken down into two catagor-
ies. An office and storage space should be included at
each of the two exhibition areas and a large shop-storage
facility, with an office would be necessary. The shop
should be located near a major service delivery level and
well isolated from the main functions of the buildingdue
to noise and odors. It will be necessary to store and
prepare the largest part of an exhibition prior to re-
moving the existing one. This procedure will reduce the
amount of time needed to totally change an exhibition.
The storage spaces and offices at each of the exhibition
areas would be needed to house staff materials and small
elements of the exhibition .


A great deal of attention must be given to circulation.
The main exhibition spaces should be accessible from the
central rotunda stairs. There should be handicap access





to all museum-exhibition levels. The preparation and
storage areas should have access to not only the service-
delivery level but also to the central rotunda stairs
and elevator. It should be acknowledged that deliveries
of exhibition materials could -be very difficult. The
building does not lend itself to easy access at any point.
This matter shall have to be resolved as the best of all
the alternatives.



The museum preparation space shall require each of the
following spaces.
Office-storage: to store small objects that require special
attention or security; office space for staff.

Specialty shop: separated form the open construction shop;
finishing shop or space for visiting curator.*

Tool storage: hand tool and moveable machinery storage;
required for security and maintenance.

Material storage storage for materials for new exhibition
stands, displays and stage props; storage of old displays.

Shopsfor the fabrication of displays and props; exhibitions
would be unpacked and prepared for display.

Director's office: for business operations of museum-
exhbition; office also required for assistant; offices
may be located on other than preparation level.





AUDITORIUM


This facility would be directly associated with the
orientation center and the museum, for most of its
scheduled activities. There would be the necessity
to make provisions for activities to take place that
are not directly associated with the Capitol Center's
everyday functioning. Activities would have to be non-
profit in order to maintain state policy on use of state
buildings. Availability would be on a first come, first
serve basis. It would be the building manager's
responsibility to respond to the various concerns.

Hourly presentations would be the major function of the
auditorium. Movies, slide shows, lectures, and demonstra-
tions would be presented on an hourly rotating basis.
This would allow several different areas of information
to be addressed within a very short period of time.
Depending on the length of the presentations, there should
be between eight and twenty presentations per day. Guest
lectures could be added at any time and off hour activ-
ities might include specialized lectures and demonstra-
tions for and by, public or civic organizations.


activities





activities


technical
requirements


access


This diversity of functions, in terms of film and the-
atrical activities, will require a great deal of flex-
ibility in terms of lighting, accoustics, audio amplifica-
tion systems, stage construction, support and circulation.
The HVAC system design must be comparable with all of
these requirements, primarily in terms of noise control
and comfort flexibility.


Seating should be provided for between 150-200 people.
There should be a minimum of four handicapped positions
with optimum visual and accoustical qualities. Due to
the large number of people associated with using this


Small scale musical or drama performances could be
arranged for the space. Any of these theatrical
activities would have to be quite small. There is not
a great deal of space available to develop a full scale
theatrical facility. The other activities must take
priority. A small group could perform in the space,
but the often required production equipment might not
be provided to the degree, necessary to constitute a
quality facility. There will be a permanent stage with
the associated wings and storage space.





space and the importance of its relationship with the
other activities, the auditorium should be located on
the primary circulation element. This would require
that the major entrance AND exit should be on the
first level and in the restored rotunda space. This
location will permit good emergency egress, as well as
increasing security for the other activity areas.
Having the other major functions on the other levels
will allow them to be closed off and still allow the
auditorium to be used.


ancilliary
spaces


projection booth
This space must be located to provide optimum conditions
for movie and slide projection to a screen at the front
of the space. Multiple projections should be considered
and generous allowances must be given for equipment op-
eration and potential future uses. The operations of
this projection booth must not interfere with the over-
all accoustics of the space. This is in terms of both
distracting background noise and disrupted sound trans-
mission qualities. Light controls could also be placed
in this space. Considerations must be made for the light
panel transformers, reostats and the associated heat





and noise. These major controls might be best located
in the stage area, with preliminary relay controls to
the projection booth only. Audio-amplification controls
and monitors could work within this space, but this again
would require additional considerations for noise control.


film.equipment storage
For ease in transportation of equipment and media,
this room must be located on the same level as the
projection booth. In addition to the projectors and
film, projection lights and audio equipment would be
stored in this space. Equipment would be maintained in
this space and media could be processed and maintained
to some degree. A major concern, in terms of location
should be for security of the equipment.


preparation spaces
Two spaces would be required at stage level to fulfill
several requirements. The spaces would be to adapt to
use as dressing rooms and/or as lecture preparation
spaces. As preparation spaces, a guest lecturer could
prepare his material in these private rooms. Small
theatrical casts could change or rest in these spaces.
By having these preparation spaces at stage level, a






private stage entrance should be developed. There
should also be access to a toilet facility.





RESTAURANT


The restaurant would be a quality dining facility for
the Capitol Complex. The prestige of being located in
the Historic Capitol should be reflected in the restaurant.
The facility would serve as a lunch and dinner restaurant
with a full compliment of waiter services. If possible
areas should be designated for formal and casual attire.
Provisions should be made so that one section of the
restaurant could be reserved for small, private parties
while at least one other section could still be open to
the public. The total restaurant capacity should be for
between 150-and 200 people.

At a preliminary design level it can be seen that due
to the sizes of the north and south wings, the restau-
rant will have to be split into at least two sections.
This would imply either a two level restaurant within one
wing or two sections split by the rotunda. This split
in the restaurant could work to the advantage of its
organizational differentiation. Both alternatives will
require the inclusion of support facilities, to each of
the sections.


Development of support facilities to handle the restau-
rant seating will require careful consideration. Food
preparation can take up to one third of the total restau-





rant area. Restaurant management, food preparation, storage,
and public toilets will all have specific program and
circulation requirements. The rotunda must be retained
as a major circulation element thereby eliminating or
at least limiting that space from inclusion in the restau-
rant. Considerations must be given for handicap require-
ments at each restaurant level.

A lounge and bar would have to be included in one of the
sections of the restaurant. Due to the proximity of this
facility to so many governmental offices, the lounge
should only be open during the evening hours. Location
and relationships must be considered to orient the use
of the lounge and bar as a waiting area before formal
dining. Independent operation as a bar should not be
considered. Having the one lounge as an element of only
one of the sections, would permit greater control of its
use. A lounge should be considered due to its increasing
acceptance as a social activity. The lounge and bar
should be located near the food preparation service area.
There are requirements for access to service areas at all
times. As drinks maybe ordered with dinner, allocations
should be made for waiter service from the bar.





food preparation


Food preparation facilities for 200 people will require
a great deal of space. Much of this area is used for
other than specific food preparation. There are six
major concerns adn processes that must be considered
for total kitchen operations. These are: service access,
storage, specific food perparation, general preparation,
washup, and waiter service.area.

Service access must be so located as to allow delivery
of goods and removal of refuse on a daily basis. A freight
elevator will be required if the kitchen is on any level
other than the service-delivery level. Garbage should
be compacted and provisions made for sanitary storage
until removal. A trash chute may be necessary for trash
collection from all floor levels. The kitchen may be
service through this element.

Food storage shall fall into four catagoriess dry, frozen,
cold, and undercounter. Undercounter storage is the only
type that will not require at least 100 sq.ft.per room.
Dry storage space may vary based on the amount of possible
dry storage space at the service-delivery level. The
deep freeze and cold storage rooms should be located next
to each other to make use of common insulated walls and
refrigeration supply lines. The deep freeze room may
prove more efficient if a vestibule is used that is kept
slightly colder than cold storage and warmer than the deep





freeze. Undercounter storage shall be those areas
required for food and utensil storage, either incorpor-
ated within specific. units or built into the space. All
storage areas must have access to service and deliveries
as well as direct access to food preparation areas.

Specific food preparation areas and equipment are those
concerns directly associated with preparation of meats,
fish, poultry, vegetables,and salads. Equipment is avail-
able to serve these functions and the manufacturer's
specifications would be necessary.

General preparation space would be required as counter-
top storage and countertop work space. Food that has
been specifically prepared and waiting to be served would
be stored here. (ie. bain marie) Counter space would
be necessary to place prepared dishes before serving.

Washup requirements involve both equipment and built space.
Mechanical equipment provisions must be made for a dish-
washing machine, glasswasher, and drying and storage space.
Several pot washing sinks with drying racks must be in-
cluded. Noise will be a big problem and it must be con-
trolled. Some form of preliminary garbage collection
and/or compaction will occur here.

Waiter service areas will be necessary for storage of





place settings, condiments, and specialty items. This
space shall be used for filling out checks and receiving
payment for checks.

restaurant management
and support facilities
Restaurant management and support facilities will have
specific requirements but a degree of flexibility in
location is possible. A management office will be re-
quired at every level or division of the restaurant.
This office will be used as a chef's office and for
bookkeeping. If service-delivery is located on a dif-
ferent floor from the restaurant, then an office may be
considered at that level for bookkeeping and receiving.

Public toilets for men and women should be accessible
from all levels or divisions, with all handicap
requirements being met.

Security should be addressed by the designer as an issue
of organization. Control points should be developed to
avoid loss of revenue. All emergency egress, stairs,
elevators, and toilets should be so organized as to aid
in control of security,problems.





PRELIMINARY BUILDING
SQUARE FOOTAGES
orientation and energy
information center





museum-exhibition



museum-preparation








auditorium


Exhibition-display
Offices- 2@125 each
Conference
Tele-communication

Governmental History
Art
Offices-2@250 each
Staff office
Specialty shop
Tool Storage
Material storage
Shop
Director's office

Seating 165 people@10each
Projection booth
Film-equipment storage
Preparation 2@125 each


square feet
1200
250
280
130
1860
2700
4600
500
200
300
300
425
575
200

1650
125
225
250
2250_






restaurant


Dining area 200people@18 each
Lounge and bar 25people@10 each
Food preparation primary
secondary
Management offices 3'100 each


These building square footages only represent the basic
design requirements for each of the functions, as
developed by the designer.
Graphic Standards and Time Saver's Standards were used
as references.


square feet
3600
250
1000
450
300
4600
18510 total





STRUCTURAL CONSIDERATIONS


There have been several structural investigations
conducted on the Historic Capitol. There have been
just as many different conclusions as to the structural
soundness of various parts of the building, as well as
of the building as a whole. Some of the reports question
any use of the existing structure, while other reports
attest to the overall soundness of the building. Even
those professing the structural integrity of the build-
ing recommend only light office loads as the greatest
possible loads. This leaves little versatility for
future program changes.


The differing results have been justified and disputed
on the basis that certain engineers had no previous
experience with old structures, and were therefore,
unqualified to make an influential decision. These
engineers were usually professionals, commissioned by
politicians adamently opposed to any preservation of
the Historic Capitol. It is usually necessary that an
engineer have some experience in preservation technology
in order to make an accurate evaluation of all concerns.
Conversely, the engineers hired by pro-preservationists
might also reflect the bias of their employers. As a





means to an end, the preservation engineers could be
accused of serving their best interest. Their
best interests might reflect an immediate concern,
rather than the best interests of future use for
the Historic Capitol. This is not to say that the
engineers were influenced by their employers, and
this is only an academic discussion. A truly objective
evaluation is very difficult to ascertain.


One structural analysis of the building cites floor
elevation changes on the second floor, of up to seven
inches. Engineers report that in the 1923 addition
and rehabilitation, columns supporting the dome were
removed and the loadbearing trusses were transferred
to trusses supported by the old chimneys.


These chimneys have been blocked up at each floor and
may stand forever by themselves. However, they were
not designed to carry the loads now placed on them.
This goes back to the nature of the masonry units. The
masonry has been analyzed as being underfired and the
mortar is a low strength lime mortar. LMasonry work of
this type is made to carry only direct compressiv'e"'-
loads. In this capacity, the masonry walls should





carry their own weight, as well as their original
loads, for many more years. The additional truss
loads were not considered for the chimneys. Admittedly,
this masonry construction has stood the test of time.
In most cases the construction will continue to hold
loads without failure. The chances of failure and
the lack of objective evaluation should be considered,
with any future use, and rehabilitation.


The final report has apparently found that the capitol
structure is adequate for continued use and development.
Regardless of the various conclusions, there will always
be that reasonable doubt in this designer's mind, as to
whether the existing structure could be relied upon to
carry future loads that could potentially change a great
deal. The risk of a possible structural failure, and
resultant condemnation, seems reason enough to make
sure that the old structure will not jeopardize the
continued use of the building.





STRUCTURAL CONCLUSIONS


Due to intended programming and structural require-
ments, the entire interior of the building shall be
gutted, of walls, floors, roof, and additional struc-
ture. The existing brick footings and foundations shall
be reinforced with concrete, as protection. For the
south subbasement, the basement footings and foundations
will require underpinning and construction of concrete
walls to provide support for the south 1902 masonry
walls. The southern most wall has already undergone
this restructuring with the 1947 addition. This will
then be a continuation of that method. Footings will
have to be placed to support steel columns. A mechanical
equipment corridor will be constructed below the base-
ment level running north to south terminating,at the
subbasement mechanical equipment rooms.


The dome structure shall be replaced and reinforced with
a steel system and the loads shall be carried on columns
to the ground. A new structural steel system shall work
cooperatively with the existing masonry walls. The masonry
walls shall act as shear walls to stiffen the steel grid.
The steel system will then act as a means to brace the
masonry walls at each floor level. This combination





system shall reduce the required number of welded moment
connections and still reinforce the masonry walls. The
steel system will be a continuous tube column system
with a combination of open webb girders and wide
flange members. The webb girders shall allow increased
flexibility with the HVAC system. Open webb joists will
carry a three inch concrete deck. This system will
allow a great deal of flexibility in the future, as well
as permitting construction with minimal damage to the
1902 facade. The restructuring of the building will
allow an increased flexibility in the present and future
programming of the building.





CONCLUSION


This program statement was intended to present and
discuss the many pragmatic issues, as they contributed
to the development of a concept and finally a building.
These progmatic issues did not generate a solution.
There are many abstract issues that must be dealt with
before the pragmatic issues are resolved. To only
review the pragmatic issues would severely limit the
designer's ability to generate a progressive architec-
tural statement. It is often necessary to only deal
with a very general acknowledgement of the pragmatic
concerns, to avoid having the abstract architectural
issues from being stifled. The program has to be met
only within the organization of the concept. A good
concept will resolve the pragmatic issues with an
excellent architectural statement.

Such was the intent of this designer.


























CAPITOL CENTER 1902


A DESIGN ALTERNATIVE

























































SECTION FACING SOUTH THROUGH ROTUNDA
I |I 1s 10 |1o


CAPITOL CENTER 1902
J RESTAURANT MUSEUM EXHIBITION
> ORIENTATION CENTER AUDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE UofF
















































O a- 1J

0 1


BASEMENT LEVEL

I |2 Is tO 120

0a


SPECIALTY SHOP
MUSEUM OFFICE STORAGE
MAINTENANCE
RESTAURANT OfFICE SORAGE
MUSEUM STORAGE
IOOL STORAGE
MATERIAL STORAGE
SHOP
VENDING MACHINES
BUILDING DIRECTOR S OFIfCES
LECTURE PREP STORAGE
STAGE


CAPITOL CENTER 1902
ID RESTAURANT MUSEUM EXHIBITION
) ORIENTATION CENTER UDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Uof F








































































FIRST LEVEL

I 1? I I 1Io 120


CONFERENCE
2 EMPLOYEE LOUNGE
3 MAINTENANCE
4 DIRECTOR OFFICE
S ORIENTATION STORAGE
S ORIENTATION OFFICE
ORIENTATION ExHOIITION
ROTUNDA
9 AU NTORIUM
I0 1TL PREP- STORAGE
II STAGE


CAPITOL CENTER 1902
RESTAURANT MUSEUM EXHIBITION
0 ORIENTATION CENTER AUDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Uof F.

















------000-


0.o
o IF IT T


I


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(f -0


t ^ = c= =::


SECOND LEVEL
I 12 1 |0o 2o

--


I DININO
2 RESTAURANT OrrFFlC
3 M AINTENANCE
4 KITCHEN
5 ROTUNDA
S FLORIDA EXr NATION
7 MUSEUM OFICE-STORAGE


CAPITOL CENTER 1902
0 RESTAURANT MUSEUM EXHIBITION
ORIENTATION CENTER AUDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE U.of F.




















































I RIING
S EITAURANYT OFFrIC
3 MAINTENANCE
4 O000 PREPARATION
T H IR D L E V E L N .....E
6 ROTUNDA
o OUURNMENT E XIR11TION
LJs io 2a Io MUSEUM OFFICE
____q


CAPITOL CENTER 1902
4! RESTAURANT 0 MUSEUM EXHIBITION
0 ORIENTATION CENTER 4 AUDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE U.o F.





















































SECTION FACING EAST CAPITOL CENTER 1902
1 I s o o RE3TAURANT MUSCWNI EXHIUITION
ORIENTATION CENTER AUDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE U of F



























































CAPITOL CENTER 1902
RESTAURANT I MUSEUM EXHIBITION
ORIENTATION CENTER AUDITORIUM
JAMES B. BLACK MARCH 1979
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE U.of F.


















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