Club Morocco : an adaptive use / compatible design

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Material Information

Title:
Club Morocco : an adaptive use / compatible design
Physical Description:
15p. : elevations, perspectives, plans, sections.
Language:
English
Creator:
Klingberg, Barbara A.
Publisher:
Barbara A. Klingberg
College of Architecture, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
AFA Historic Preservation document 797

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00004574:00001


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CLUB


MOROCCO


An Adaptive Use/

Compatible Desij


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Program Selection

The distinctive character of the Morocco Temple, designed for the

Jacksonville Shriners by Henry J. Klutho in 1912, becomes a controlling

factor even at the beginning of the design process for an adaptive use.

A suitable program would have to be selected that would capitalize on the

strong visual elements and the identity through association that has

developed over the life of the building. The Egyptian Revival style, a

natural choice for a fraternal organization with its roots in Egypt, is

however historically associated with prisons and funerary monuments. Most

buildings in the style are regarded as design curiousities. With an

appropriate new use, the Egyptian motif would go a long way to identify

the complex as a special place. The new use would have to be of a nature

to merit such a designation. The feeling of exclusivity that the building

has inherited from its owners could also be capitalized on, perhaps with a

restrictive program which at the same time allows a controlled public use

of the building which has become a significant public landmark downtown.

There is a great opportunity for a positive public reaction to a program

that allows participation in the preservation and use of a structure that

has hitherto been restricted to a group.

The strong imagery in the name 'Morocco Temple' could also be a factor

in the choice of a program. The rTemple' as a place for spiritual recondi-

tioning, a place for renewal, could be carried over to the new program to

reinforce its identity. It is this image of the Temple that I have chosen

to extend and combine with the current trends toward total health and

fitness resulting in the development of a program for an exclusive holistic

health center- The Club Morocco.






Program

Club Morocco, an exclusive membership health center, would provide a

downtown retreat for the fitness conscious businessperson and a spacious

facility for the downtown apartment and condominium dweller as well as a

gourmet dining experience for the public. Members' facilities would include

separate fully equipped spas for men and women, swimming pool, racquetball

courts, exercise room and weight room. The facility would be staffed with

trained counselors coaches and therapists.

The need for stress release among today's active adult is recognized

as a major health concern. To this effect, a special feature of the club

would be the meditation center, providing group and individual areas for

the practice of yoga or meditation or other stress reducing techniques

under the guidance of counselors. In addition, many areas, indoors and out,

would be set aside for small relaxation seating clusters.

An holistic attitude for health and fitness identifies diet and habit

control as critical for the maintainance of good health. Programs and

counseling to support personal habit control would be provided for with

private counseling as well as group sessions and lectures. A dietician

would advise members and supervise a health food store and juice bar with

an joining members-only cafe.

The Morocco Temple would be adapted for use as a large restaurant

specializing in the preparation of properly cooked healthful dishes. The

dining area would utilize the auditorium and the balcony connected with a

series of levels and stairs. Kitchen facilities would occupy the ground

floor. The auditorium would retain most of its original decoration, with

the ceiling reexposed and the stage closed off behind a scene curtain. The

windows would be reopened at the upper level on both sides and the lower

2






south windows would allow view onto the terrace. The stair hall would

remain unchanged.



Square Footage

CLUB MOROCCO

Lobby The members' entry opens onto a three- 2240sf
story lobby spacewith seating and
reception desk. Behind a vertical
screening wall blocking view into the
private areas, an open stair and elev-
ator provide access to upper level
offices and exercise areas. The pri-
vate portion of the lobby features
an overlook onto the central court-
yard.

Offices Offices for membership counseling and 4600sf
massage therapy are located on the
first floor. On the second and third
floors are business offices and mem-
bers' bank, counseling therapy and
small conference areas. The space
includes waiting areas and restrooms
for staff.

Spas Two separate facilities for men and 9860sf
women each include locker and dress-
ing rooms, toilets and showers, sauna,
steam room, hot tub and cold plunge,
and massage room. Tile, polished
wood, glass and an abundance of plants
add to the feeling of luxury in the
spas.

Pool The two story tiled swimming pool 4220sf
space is lit from the upper level
with glass blosk. On the south, beneath
shade-providing walkways, windows and
french doors open out onto the central
courtyard. The 30'x75' pool has five
lanes and a 9 meter diving board.
Square footage for pumps and pool
equipment are included in mechanical.






Weight Room


Exercise Room/
Lecture Hall









Racquetball Courts




Meditation Center


The weight room is a large one story
space opposite the pool on the ground
floor. A full range of Nautilus equip-
ment, bicycles and other exercise
machines as well as free weights are
provided. There is a members' desk
and video unit with exercise tapes.
The room is carpetted throughout;
mirrors are selectively placed.

The large clear carpetted multipurpose
room is primarily used for aerobic,
jazz, and other exercise classes. A
slightly raised stage on one end,
opposite the balcony, has a built-in
sound system. Storage areas for
folding chairs are located behind
mirrored doors. A glazed opening on
the rear wall provides a view of the
pool.

Seven regulation racquetball courts
on the second floor above the weight
room can be viewed from a gallery
on the floor above,

The meditation center, somewhat
separated from the rest of the club,
is located on the terrace south
of the Temple. It includes two large
group spaces, two smaller group spaces,
six individual cubicals, office, rest-
rooms and mat storage. Soft tones and
textures of wood, fabric and plants
help control the mood.


RETAIL


Health Food Store


The health food store, similar in
scope to a General Nutrition Center,
includes retail and a juice bar serving
snacks and sandwiches at a counter and
booths. The private cafe, with table
service, opens onto a small green court-
yard with fountain. The dietician's
office includes space for counseling.
Square footage for food preparation is
included in the existing square footage
on the ground floor of the Temple.


4220sf









3460sf










5600sf




3070sf


4600sf






Sport Shop


MECHANICAL


MOROCCO TEMPLE


Lobby


Dining Area


Kitchen


The sport shop adjacent to the health
food store sells equipment and cloth-
ing. The space includes retail area,
window display, dressing rooms and
office,

Receiving and garbage areas for the
retail stores are shared. There-are
separate storage areas.

A zoned hot and cold mixed air system
operates throughout the complex. The
mechanical room is located below the
spa adjacent to the pool and includes
the pool equipment. Access is via a
ramp north of the pool.


The restaurant utilizes existing
square footage in the Temple.

The original lobby provides access
to the restaurant on the second and
third floors. Coat check and ele-
vator are recessed into the body of
the auditorium so as not to inter-
fere with the original lobby. Rest-
rooms are located off the second
floor lobby,

The combined auditorium and balcony
provide seating for 300 persons, with
banquet facilities off the third floor
lobby and balcony. Waiter and busboy
service from the ground floor kitchen
is aided by several dumbwaiters. The
proscenium is closed off with a decor-
ated scene curtain in front of a par-
tition, allowing waiter circulation
behind the stage.

The kitchens for both the cafe and
restaurant are located on the ground
floor with additional storage in the
basement. Service is from the NE
corner of the Temple.


TOTAL RENOVATED SQUARE FOOTAGEs

TOTAL ADDITION SQUARE FOOTAGEs
x 1.2 Circulation Allowance
REVISED ADDITIONAL SQUARE FOOTAGEs


3170sf





960sf


4220sf


4900sf


9350sf










9600sf


23850sf

50220sf

60260sf






Design Considerations

The design and massing of the additional structure reflect major

horizontal (influence of the Prarie Style) and vertical details, the

strong rhythms of the pilaster spacing and the use of recessed center

portions of the facade within dominant corner blocks. The major horizontal

line at the second floor level extends around the complex as a terrace and

walkway element. The second floor is set back to reinforce the idea of

a building set upon a platform. Horizontal lines in the exterior stucco

complement this theme. The cornice, replaced on the Temple, is selectively

used as another defining horizontal element.

In plan, the massing of the block reflects the massing of the Temple.

Each elevation can be divided into three sections, a center recess with two

side blocks. Further tripartite breakdowns occur within each section. In

the center sections, the rhythm of the pilasters of the north and south

elevations are repeated, especially visible in the pool and racquetball

areas-and modified in a smaller scale on the first floor below the terrace.

On the west elevation, the addition defers to the Temple, especially

in its massing. The addition is perceived as a one story element with a

corner tower imitating the corner block of the Temple facade. The terrace

itself is set back some 20 feet forming a small plaza separated from the

sidewalk circulation by a change in elevation and a row of tall palms.

Although the club is exclusive, it is this west portion of the block which

involves the public through the restaurant and retail areas.

To give the private members' entry proper importance, to limit contact

with the public areas and to avoid visual conflict with the Temple facade,

the Club entry is located on the east. Though echoing the massing of the






Temple front, the design is a new statement providing a strong sence of

entry with an identity all its own.

The club is organized around a central courtyard continuing the theme

of a private temple complex. Circulation around and through the courtyard

and terraces links the different fitness areas. The ability to see the

various activities from the courtyard and circulation routes as well as

the ability to see into one space from another is a reflection of the

holistic attitude of the programming, the interdependancy of the different

areas of fitness concern.








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