• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Main
 Slides
 The Harrison Bros. Color Card
 Bibliography
 Clyde the Comet
 Maintenance Problems
 Core II: House for a Suburb of...






Preservation technologies 2 research project
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00004313/00001
 Material Information
Title: Preservation technologies 2 research project
Physical Description: Pt. 1, 12p. Pt. 2, 20 sls. Pt. 3, 5 ill.
Language: English
Creator: Golden, James William
Publisher: James William Golden
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: nd
 Notes
General Note: AFA Historic Preservation document 93
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00004313:00001

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Slides
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The Harrison Bros. Color Card
        Page 33
    Bibliography
        Page 34
    Clyde the Comet
        Page 35
    Maintenance Problems
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Core II: House for a Suburb of Tokyo
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
Full Text


PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGIES II
RESEARCH PROJECT



























A^^












EXTERIOR COLOR:


When painting the exterior of a house,there is more
to it than just picking out your favorite color and brushing
it on. Although this is what the average homeowner does, he
is more influenced by fashion and current trends than he may
realize. What have people done to paint their homes over the
last century? The following information should help to est-
ablish some trends
The house painting styles of mid part of the 19th.
century were divided into two basic camps, the whites and the
coloreds. (sounds political doesn't it?) The following ex-
cerpt from the 1873 publication Cottage Residences by A. J.
Downing will explain some of the difference of opinion.
The color of buildings may very properly be made to
increase their expression of truthfulness. Thus a
barn or stable being regarded entirely in a useful
point of view, may have a quiet, unobtrusive tone of
color, while a cottage or villa should be of a cheer-
ful, mellow hue harmonizing with the verdure of the
the country. A mansion may very properly have a
graver color than a cottage, to be in unison with
its greater dignity and extent. There is one color,
however frequently employed by house painters, which
we feel bound to protest against most heartily, as
entirely unsuitable, and in bad taste. This is white,
which is so universally applied to our wooden houses
of every size and description. The glaring nature of
this color, when seen in contrast with the soft green
of foliage, renders it extremely unpleasant to an eye
attuned to harmony of coloring, and nothing but its
very great prevalence in the United States could ren-
der even some men of some taste so heedless of its bad
effect. No painter of landscapes, that has possed a












name was ever guilty of displaying in his pictures a
glaring white house, but, on the contrary, the buildings
introduced by the great masters have a uniformly-a mel-
low softened shade of color, in exquisite keeping with
the surrounding objects."
The following slides of Victorian color schemes show
the the prevalent tastes of the times. The modification of the
traditional white clapboard house is particularly interesting.
The color charts show the rather drab range of colors that were
preferred. The brought colors were used only sparingly as accent
colors.
The Georgeion/Colonial revival period of the turn of
the century brought back the popularity of the color white. It
once again became the prevalent color in residential architect-
ure. The Columbian Exibition had a great deal to do with this
change in the popular taste. The influence of the Exibition
is still being felt to some extent today.
The Following series of slides shows some stages that
the exterior decoration of a Victorian house might have gone
through in the past century.



The next series of slides show some of the contemporary paint
schemes of today on some old San Francisco dwellings.

The following excerpts from Painted Ladies explains some of the
color theory of the past as well as the present.







* Some of the slides used at the time of the presentation came
from the University Slide Library and my own private collection
and thus are unavailable at this time.






COTTAGE ItESmDENCES.


remarks, but that they are strictly true every fine cAlorist will
admit.
As it is difficult to convey in words a proper idea of delicate
shades of color, and as we think the subject one of very
great importance in domestic architecture, we have given
specimens on the opposite page of six six shades of color highly
suitable for the exterior of cottages and villas. A, B, and C,
are shades of grey, and D, E, F, of drab or fawn color ; which
will be found pleasing and harmonious in any situation in the
country Stuccoed or cemented buildings should be marked
off in courses, and tinted to resemble some mellow stone;
Bath, Portland stone, or any other of the light free-stone
shades, are generally most agreeable.
A person of correct architectural taste will carry his feeling
of artistical propriety into the interior of his house, and confer
on each apartment, by expression of purpose, a kind of indivi-
duality. Thus, in a complete cottage-villa, the hall will be
grave and simple in character, a few plain seats its principal
furniture; the library sober and dignified, or bookish and
learned in its air; the dining-room cheerful, with a hospitable
sideboard and table ; the drawing-room lively or brilliant,
adorned with pictures or other objects of art, and evincing
more elegance and gaiety of tone in its colors and furniture.
The bedrooms would be simple, or only pretty, with abun.
dant ventilation, and ceilings of full height, and not low or
contracted.
We have thus sketched the ground-work upon which archi-
tecture rests, fitness and expression of purpose, but architecture
which goes no further is only a useful, not a fine art. It is
only building. The true artist breathes a life and soul, which





















-I


6


1.




































































































































































































* -*













T, f r

~AFj 1r
4I~r fITl















F-i

'V 4I






































































































'c.~. ~




4


q











.. noted for their baroque embellishments and
.,I'Udws. (The house at 1347 McAllister, seen
c 45. is one of these three.)
'halianate architecture uses forms and adorn-
derived from 15th- and 16th-century Italian pal-
rchitecture. Most Italianates have a straight
Sil look, with tall narrow doors and windows
Setter to fit into those 25-foot lots!), elaborate
.*/ed pediments, and Corinthian columns on the
'.he". Flat roof lines are sometimes concealed by
.,raitive false fronts. At first, many Italianates were
STed to look like stone.
Stick style might also be called Strip style, be-.
:,e it is named for the use of wooden sticks or strips
,utiline the square bay windows, doors, and frame-
Ak of the house. On a Stick house, the wood is
mnIly treated like wood. The house is tall and nar-
but built with a lighter frame than the Italianate
reinforced by nailed-on sides .This siding is then
:c;ited with paint, defining the outlines of the house.\
fhe addition of gingerbread millwork on the facade
'culted in a new style: Stick/Eastlake. (See the Mish
House, 1153 Oak Street, on page 54.)
Poor Charles Eastlake! In his treatise, Hints on
Household Taste, he called for simple, tall, slender,
graceful furniture, with every piece performing a func-
i!on. San Franciscans did exactly the opposite with
their houses-piling gingerbread on top of treacle,
flowery forms on top of fruit salad-and named the
resulting hybrid after him. The Eastlake style was
popular because it could easily be copied by any car-
penter who could order from a catalogue or follow a
mail-order pattern. Such a straight, easily built frame
house could then be made special with the addition of
machine-carved trappings. Several thousand such
homes were built at low cost under long-term financ-
ing, with the blessings of the Real Estate Association
of San Francisco.
In 1877, American Architect magazine defined
the Queen Anne style as "any eccentricity in general
design that one can suppose would have occurred to
designers 150-200 years ago." In San Francisco, it
means a house with a steep gabled roof, shingled
walls or panels for added texture, a rounded turret
corner tower or two, and a front porch usually inside
the main structural frame. (The house at 1348 South
Van Ness, on page 73, is an excellent example.)
Queen Anne row houses still have a sharp gabled roof
and a curve to the porch line, but they don't have
"witches' hats." Gradually, an intricate design combi-
nation of Italianate, Stick, Eastlake, and Queen Anne
forms became known as San Francisco style.
Photographing the Painted Ladies in constantly
changing, highly contrasting light and shadow brought
home the truth that San Francisco's bay-window Stick
style represents, as Henry Kirker put it in California's
Architectural Frontier, "A rare example of architec-


tural transformation as the result of regional environ-
mental conditions: The character of Stick architecture
depends upon shadows thrown across the surface by
projecting structural members. San Francisco, with its
continually attenuating fog and sunshine, is a city of
strong contrast; the light is flooding and the shadows
deep . it was the distinction of the San Francisco
rowhouse, to which this style is most frequently ap-
plied, that no structural member was denied the priv-
ilege of projection . a genuinely regional juxtaposi-
tion that gave the California frontier its only
significant urban architecture."


Color in an Earlier Age
"For a long time, the public mind seemed powerless
to conceive of anything more sublime than the con-
ventional bay windowed house . just when the pres-
ent esthetic movement began, it would be hard to de-
termine; but it first manifested itself in a growing
aversion to gray paint. Cautiously at first, then more
and more boldly, houses appeared in browns, yellows,
greens and even reds-all sorts of unorthodox colors;
yet one was forced to admit that the town did look
better for it." (San Francisco Chronicle, June 19,
1887.)
The Gold Rush frame houses, many imported in
pieces from New England, were painted white and
fitted with green shutters. Soon some had peaked roofs
trimmed under the eaves with Gothic drippings and
millwork. Stained-glass windows and Oriental rugs
vied with an abundance of greenery to spark the som-
ber Victorian shades. But many houses were painted
not in white or gray hues but in two, three, or more
colors-the brightest colors available at the time. And
although the Victorians many San Franciscans re-
member were painted in pastels and earth tones-
light tones held up best over the years-architect John
Pelton and his colleagues rebelled against "leaden hues
draped in sable fringes," and painted their houses
green, yellow, peach, sage, Indian red, and vermilion.
Row houses were terra cotta, mustard, brown,
and olive-green. An architect of the time wrote: "A
successful painter (H. A. Downing) once said to use
. . the colors of "the ground or the colors of different
natural stones . we have also painted several build-
ings in the picturesque style, in the following colors:
body, maroon; trimmings, seal brown; sash, ash yel-
low; roof, dark brown; base, dark Indian red; doors
and vestibules in oak . [another] base, Pompeii
red; body, olive green; trimmings on body, bronze
green; underneath cornice, terra cotta; roof, Venetian
red and black; front doors, side doors and vestibules
in grain mahogany." (Picturesque California Homes,
1885)
Painters in the last half of the last century used
dil :- it colors to point out the different parts of the








house. Some homes looked as it y had been
painted in stripes: the ground flo wouldl d be one
color; the second story another; trii, another; roof,
another; and so on.
In 1878, an article in Modern Dwellings advised,
"Upon any portion of the house receding from the
facade, such as an alcoved balcony or recessed door-


v ,,, when deeply sunken, positive colors would be in
keeping . when an exterior is of neutral buff, the
sides of a deep window recess are painted a deep
ultramarine green; the trimmings of Indian red are
relieved by lines of black, and the coved ceiling is of
brilliant blues." -
Exterior Decoration, a Treatise on the Artistic


iiEli









live 11 0 I:.

41~


712-22 Steiner. One of the most photographed streets in San Francisco, this group
of Queen Anne row houses was built in 1894-95 by contractor Matthew Kavanaugh.








wouldn't hate them or think they're strange.
Bob Buckter said that the most resistance he
encountered was from architects "because they tradi-
like the trim to accent itself by means of
sh.,uows." Buckter and Canaletich faced their biggest
challenge in 1975 in the Mish House (page 54). The
architect involved wanted gray and maroon. But
C(analetich and Buckter insisted, "We choose the colors
or we don't do it." They came up with a dazzling but
tasteful combination of navy blue, pale yellow, gold,
silver, maroon, saddle brown, gold gilt, and light blue.
It is an important, imposing house on a heavily used
street, and Bob Buckter & Friends put everything they
had into it, spending twice as long as they had been
paid for, to make every detail perfect.
Today, one of the proudest possessions of over
200 homeowners in San Francisco-next to their
Painted Ladies-is the Bob Buckter & Friends sign,
embellished with a hand-painted miniature of the house
itself.
Canaletich is gratified that the Colorist Movement
has flourished as it has. "People have seen what can
be done with old houses, can see the craftsmanship
:nd wood ornamentation that could never be dupli-
cated today." Now, even people who have newer
stucco buildings are turning to paint to give their
!,mes new life.

Jazon Wonders of Blissful Painting has also be-
involved in using multicolors and graphics on
Succo. But his real love is giving new zest to Victo-
*i.M. He feels that colors can control people's emo-
'1,. can make houses cheerful, and bring joy to the
"cis. He uses clear, vivid colors and "brings a little
S'f the countryside into the city so it's not so gray
.' depressing."
In 1972, when he painted his first multicolor in
n orders the neighbors complained so bitterly that
Sful Painting had to tone it down with whites. To
'Pi'ensate for their double work, the owner let them
to, !vn'" on the house behind the first one; and
;';'nters went wild, using violet, lilac, and silver.
inders meets with his clients, does a sketch of
ihldmng, and suggests colors. Half the time, his
haie preconceived ideas, but Wonders can us-
n ,umade them to use more colors than they had
i'red One man who asked Wonders to paint the
",Il Victorian his grandfather had built in the
hil three colors in mind. Wonders countered
o 'thcir that "looked like neon" to the client,
Secmiie proud of the effect since strangers
,quiie about the house.
t'ti-n Painting did the Stick/Eastlake Flei-
1 .,,c 1451-53 McAllister, page 47) in dark
S nviv.ns with gold, as the owner had asked.
'i .k \is finished, the lady next door who'd
Scr n money for years to paint the house


asked him to do her house (1463-65 McAllister, page
47) in greens. The house, with its carefully detailed
cherubs (cheerfully given a third blue eye by Won-
ders), is now the female half of one of the most widely
admired and recognized male/female Stick/Eastlake
pairs of Victorians in the city.
Wonders has designed homes in Pismo Beach,
Healdsburg, and the Gold Country, but he most enjoys
working on undesirable properties or in declining
neighborhoods-because he can rejoice in the neigh-
borhood renovation. His work is so delectable that
M & M's, the candy manufacturer, used it for a tele-
vision commercial.

Foster Meagher of Color Control says: "It only
takes one good flower to make everyone want to fancy
up." After six years of serving as a color consultant for
small private homes, businesses, and government-
backed projects, Meagher is rightfully proud of the
effect his work has had on neighborhoods. "Gardening
tools appear, the street gets swept, windows are
cleaned. The people in the neighborhood don't change,
but now they have something to be proud of, to re-
spect, and none of the newly painted Victorians ever
gets graffiti or abuse after th,. are finished."
Meagher feels he has a different approach to
painting Victorians. He takes an architectural ap-
proach and makes the color perform as an entity. He
considers five elements in applying color:
Body color, or predominant tone;
Architectural color;
One or two "punch" colors;
A shadow value, to make unseemly or overly
large dull space recede;
A light color to bring something attractive to the
fore.
For example, in the Queen Anne at 1348 South
Van Ness (page 73), a doctor who wanted to raise
his patients' spirits asked Meagher to do something
playful, yet dignified. He used a brown tone for the
body, burnt umber on the base, yellow as the punch
color-it's the one we remember when we think of
the house-and a glossy white as the architectural
color. In other words, the building would remain
standing if only the white parts, the columns, and
corbels (brackets holding up the windows and roof)
were there.
Meagher specializes in color design. After study-
ing a house throughout the day and researching it
historically, he prepares an architectural drawing of
the building that specifies which paint hues and tints
to use. Then, he acts as a liaison between owner and
painter or contractor. Meagher's aim is to "applaud
with paint what the architects have done with wood
and plaster, and if necessary, to pick up where they
left off." Fr'- example, if an arch or stenciled frieze
has bee, or taken off, he'll put it back on and



































WWII













di














f0i






ol
04N



WES,


A-
Mir


ow


Joe
Ak



JI,
74
10 .14 ..........







.4








Is
14





.41
W'



















4.4



AM
"N











































































'9..
.1' -.

































7P





.... ....... . ... ... "N!t
ym.'














































ln




























































































































51 N.,














out















































Ml


. . . . .


MR.









'OP




























































*Wlo




















. . . . . . .





i MQO

-=- Muffill

















'NOWm
MAX, 2 "Mm" v
to
. . . ...... 21









































.... .. ..









'. Fi K


WINj
U'k

M ,i vn















4N P. a

































..........




'jg54 4~%



















Al.























RA
17





el,

40(
















ON. A








W A
Nis
I ps M-w- 'A
AF
ME
............................... . . . . . T o m m y -









. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............
IA ...............




I not
IN 0.




tog;



Q






WRY.






lot




CEO













Ak":






law,




J"x












W45



ti I t









, W4







IN





in




4





A
VV


K4,

't 4tp
T











'4

y,







11t
"1, 4


4 1

,44



tTi"







44
4A, 't,










4













41,





d,


v,


'At






41


4



















If ,


tj



























T,
























*- ifT^-


**"-"w-'
'^fe
. '^'?,-. *
* IJl^,1^'1''^'
^y..^'/,
*y^^



'?^^
*^ *^*?'.


om


-X P


V3


... ','.-,... ^ -'. !







MAI





In



-e. jl"' .
























........... ..........
...........
















































































?9k















I


















ii

I


I








A,! ~
N




0








V.
h~'vi~" ~/*
w ~. j~. A


I~ ~fl
I~dI ~






I~iIim. h
1 tll% ti.~
.IFlqI ~

I flb 'Ii




)I


j \V'.. 1 I ( ) LE


\ \ l,) 1 \I\ 'S. .









COLOR NUMBER


The Harrison Bros. Color Card


NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS
COLOR NAMES


MUNSELL NOTATION


Dark Green
Grayish Blue
Grayish Blue
Bluish Gray
Light Yellowish Green
Strong Yellowish Brown
Dark Orange Yellow
Dark Orange Yellow
Moderate Orange Yellow
Pale Orange Yellow
Grayish Reddish Brown
Grayish Brown
Grayish Brown
Light Grayish Brown
Moderate Olive Brown
Grayish Olive
Olive Gray
Light Olive Brown
Light Grayish Yellowish Brown
Moderate Reddish Brown
Grayish Red
Moderate Yellowish Pink
Dark Grayish Reddish Brown
Grayish Red
Strong Reddish Brown
Deep Reddish Orange
Moderate Reddish Orange
Dark Orange Yellow
Brilliant Yellow
Pale Greenish Yellow
Yellowish White
Deep Yellowish Green
Yellowish Gray
Yellowish White
Yellowish Gray
Yellowish Gray
Grayish Yellow
Pale Yellowish Pink
Light Neutral Gray
Light Bluish Green
Grayish Reddish Brown
Pinkish Gray


7.5 G 3/4
5 PB 4/2
2.5 PB 5/4
10 B 6/1
2.5 G 7/4
7.5 YR 5/6
8.5 YR 5.5/8
7.5 YR 6/8
7.5 YR 7/6
9 YR 7.5/4
10 R 3/2
7.5 YR 3/2
7.5 YR 4/2
7.5 YR 5/3
2.5 Y 3/2
5 Y 4/2
5 Y 4/1
2.5 Y 4.5/2
10 YR 6/2
7.5 R 3/6
5 R 5/4
7.5 R 7/4
7.5 R 2/2
7.5 R 5/2
10 R 3/10
7.5 R 4/12
1.5 YR 5/10
7.5 YR 6.3/10
5 Y 8/10
10 Y 8.5/4
5 Y 9/1
10 GY 4/8
10 Y 7.5/1
2.5 Y 8.5/2
8 YR 7/2
2.5 Y 8/2
3.5 Y 8/3
7.5 YR 8/2
N 8.0/
5 BG 7.3/4
7.5 R 3.5/2
10 R 7/1



























BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Downing,-A.J. Cottage Residences. ., 1873
Downing, \A.J. The Architecture of Country Houses, 1856

Vaux,C. Villas and Cottages, 1857

Philadelphia Athenium Exterior Decoration, 1976

Bear, Pomada, & Larsen Painted Ladies, 1978

Holly, H.H Modern Dwellings, 1878
















on Saturday February 3rd, 1979
Clyde the Comet
reached his 100,000th. mile







MAINTENANCE PROBLEMS


/o:, &o. 4 l /









MAINTENANCE PROBLEM: The Leaking Sundeck of Gull Harbor

Problem:
The 6th. floor sundeck of a reinforced concrete apartment
building does not drain properly. The sundeck retains
water which sometimes reaches a depth of two inches or
more after a storm. The standing water has seeped through
cracks in the waterproofing of the structure causing
damage in the room below the deck.

The maintenance staff of the apartment complex has tried
to correct the problem by painting the surface of the deck
with a latex base sealer of the type used on mobile homes.
This has met with little success.


N


SECTIcN








Probable Cause:
Inadequate slope for run-off
Improper or decaying waterproofing

An examination of the structure after a rainstorm showed
that the standing water is deepest at the mid-points
of the deck surface. A long rain will cause the deck to
be completely under water, while a light rain will only
cause puddling at the center of the deck. The pattern of
water retentation indicates that the primary cause of the
problem is improper sloping of the deck surface for run-
off. The problem is compounded by the deterioration of
the waterproof sealer under the deck's carpeting, which
is usually saturated by standing water. The stop-gap
measures taken by the maintenance staff have only post-
poned the problem.

Suggested Cure:
The first step to correcting the problems with the sundeck
is to rectify it's basic design fault; the lack of any
slope to the deck surface. A new lightweight concrete
topping bonded to the surface of the existing deck with a
slope of approximately 1" in 10', draining rainwater to
the exterior edge of the deck will handle the problem of
water retention. The new surface must be treated with a
sealer to prevent penetration by any moisture retained
by the carpeting on the deck.


*HjX(.n\-^''-'A"-1'**'-*(



















































Nll












.... .. .




U -


we


iA


F;




_-- A


IA' Z




!!llll"ll 'lllll


k t -


.ii t~'~-
4.1'
4$

3;'
s-p.
-t 4-


-, .a-


- r ..


r '"! I Vf F


-1


...A .


I /


P
a .-; ., -f.


t "


Ar


&
'

-


onow man a a de


iL




~r jv


4 !

5)


1


- 9-~
0~


'9


> I '


- 0


I.


N


.p. ~
-- .1


- .


.4 -. "
ag o. *



4,


eq. ~
* ) -
- N.. Z-.t-.-.ecs-.
- ~..A -s ~"m.;~ rk'


Vo


ii





























'9. --4-.
~~-ra bO~










04c
'4.
-4-
E -


4 .


r- 43rt&~2 4S~ ~&4
t~ t
1~.


-~ ,,, -~d~'~--.-'
-~
- - '~-~AE&.t~ ~

fit. 9 ...-. -, ~ I


/
~ ~ 4*~.
-a-c
2 'L,




.4-u

$~y4i. -' j--~~- ~ 4











Xc


p -- Jr..
4
-t

a


.L,
V- .* .- ^ :


w

- - 4 -- 1'~~


907 .i










MAINTENANCE PROBLEM: The Leaking Sundeck of Gull Harbor

Problem:
The 6th. floor sundeck of a reinforced concrete apartment
building does not drain properly. The sundeck retains
water which sometimes reaches a depth of two inches or
more after a storm. The standing water has seeped through
cracks in the waterproofing of the structure causing
damage in the room below the deck.

The maintenance staff of the apartment complex has tried
to correct the problem by painting the surface of the deck
with a latex base sealer of the type used on mobile homes.
This has met with little success.


N -


2LCWh N


'SI? I ('~ .S,


LqAK* -'*X',-


0.








Probable Cause:
Inadequate slope for run-off
Improper or decaying waterproofing

An examination of the structure after a rainstorm showed
that the standing water is deepest at the mid-points
of the deck surface. A long rain will cause the deck to
be completely under water, while a light rain will only
cause puddling at the center of the deck. The pattern of
water retentation indicates that the primary cause of the
problem is improper sloping of the deck surface for run-
off. The problem is compounded by the deterioration of
the waterproof sealer under the deck's carpeting, which
is usually saturated by standing water. The stop-gap
measures taken by the maintenance staff have only post-
poned the problem.

Suggested Cure:
The first step to correcting the problems with the sundeck
is to rectify it's basic design fault; the lack of any
slope to the deck surface. A new lightweight concrete
topping bonded to the surface of the existing deck with a
slope of approximately 1" in 10', draining rainwater to
the exterior edge of the deck will handle the problem of
water retention. The new surface must be treated with a
sealer to prevent penetration by any moisture retained
by the carpeting on the deck.











MAINTENANCE PROBLEM: The Reappearing Crack


Problem:


A crack in a plaster wall above a folding door continues
to reopen after repeated patching.

Probable Causes:
A visual inspection of the wall shows that cracking is';
visible on both sides of the wall above the door. After
examining the construction of the house it is found that
this wall is load bearing, approximately seven of the
house',s roof trusses are bearing on a wood frame wall while
the remainder are bearing on the concrete tie beam.


W,/;:', IFK


47' &Tvi,
Lio-v ' i TI....


I I IL 9


3 V~4-W J;/~. "
















The crack appears to be caused by the normal settling
of the house, compounded by the seasonal expansion and
contraction of the roof trusses. The location of the
crack on the one wood frame portion of the bearing points
for the truss system indicates that the more elastic nature
of the wood construction as compared to concrete block
construction would make this portion of the wall more
susceptable to cracking than the block sections.

Suggested Cure:
Since the crack reappears in a few months after being
patched with a spackling compound, I would repair the
crack using a drywall seam tape and joint plaster. The
tape would spread the force that causes the crack over
a wider portion of the wall and thus lessen the chances
of the crack reappearing.


F A?
K)




_____________(


PC.', -^


i v-~\f fTA<










MAINTENANCE PROBLEM: The Reappearing Crack


Problem:
A crack in a plaster wall above a folding door continues
to reopen after repeated patching.

Probable Causes:
A visual inspection of the wall shows that cracking is,
visible on both sides of the wall above the door. After
examining the construction of the house it is found that
this wall is load bearing, approximately seven of the
house's roof trusses are bearing on a wood frame wall while
the remainder are bearing on the concrete tie beam.


Id'- Id


-L "' I .















The crack appears to be caused by the normal settling
of the house, compounded by the seasonal expansion and
contraction of the roof trusses. The location of the
crack on the one wood frame portion of the bearing points
for the truss system indicates that the more elastic nature
of the wood construction as compared to concrete block
construction would make this portion of the wall more
susceptable to cracking than the block sections.
Suggested Cure:
Since the crack reappears in a few months after being
patched with a spackling compound, I would repair the
crack using a drywall seam tape and joint plaster. The
tape would spread the force that causes the crack over
a wider portion of the wall and thus lessen the chances
of the crack reappearing.


2




I II


t1 1A'


-"A ,










CORE II:


HOUSE FOR A SUBURB OF TOKYO


~A. i~ ~































































































?~.




P I.


4.


IA


f-


-ri$J


I

























FLOOR 1


/































0


FLOOR 2



















































FLOOR 3


1 4..











































C,4%- WiRDW


5HUTIE.


eAkWAiN -WRT
ALUIA Q.IMN


i'ICAuC


DETAILS


-1-


W % ,


WuA- 5r:ecnvt x '3cA




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs