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Unearthing St. Augustine’s Colonial Heritage: An Interactive Digital Collection for the Nation’s Oldest City (NEH Grant ...
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Title: Unearthing St. Augustine’s Colonial Heritage: An Interactive Digital Collection for the Nation’s Oldest City (NEH Grant Proposal 2011)
Physical Description: Grant Proposal
Creator: Caswell, Thomas Reed
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2011
 Notes
Abstract: In preparation for St. Augustine¡¦s 450th anniversary of its founding in 2015, the University of Florida (UF) Libraries requests $321,653 (with $196,821 in contributed cost share) to build an online collection of key resources related to research on colonial St. Augustine, Florida. Along with the UF Libraries, Unearthing St. Augustine partners are the two City of St. Augustine departments (Heritage Tourism and Archaeology Program), historic Government House in St. Augustine managed by UF, and St. Augustine Historical Society. This two-year project will produce two major outcomes: 1) UF and its partners will establish for the first time a computer digitization lab at Government House which will be used create and disseminate an interactive digital collection consisting of 11,000 maps, drawings, photographs and documents and associated metadata that will be available freely online; 2) project staff will spatially enhance digitized paper maps and images through a process called geo-referencing and create original programming to produce a user-friendly, Google map-based interface, and release it as open source technology. These products will allow for downloading and manipulating primary source material thus creating a means for increasing interactivity and enhancing broader public access. Along with searching and browsing functions (including full text searching) the project will develop a map-based interface built upon geographic metadata. Users will be able to search for textual information, structural elements and geographic locations on maps and images. Users also will be able to view the creation, alteration or destruction of structures and sites within specific timeframes. For the first time, this project brings the study of St. Augustine's past into the modern research environment. An Advisory Board comprised of noted archaeologists, historic preservationists, and historians with expertise in the colonial history of St. Augustine and Florida will provide expert guidance on building the digital collection and designing the user interface. Unearthing St. Augustine collection objects will cover a broad range of subjects including Florida and U.S. history, Spanish colonies, Native Americans, slavery, exploration, architecture and urban planning, social and economic development, missionary work, military defenses and warfare. The collection will satisfy the needs of a wide variety of researchers including historians, archaeologists, architects, and historic preservationists. The 11,000 digital objects, which date from the 16th century to the present, are in the public domain or partner repositories and have reproduction rights. Selected materials will include: Government House - 1,200 maps and overlays of the city, architectural drawings of historic structures, and related government documents. St. Augustine Historical Society - 2,500 Spanish documents, transcriptions and English language translations. City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program records, photographs and site summaries for 100 excavations conducted over the past 20 years. Herschel Shepard Collection at UF - 800 drawings, photos and documents related to Shepard¡¦s restoration and reconstruction of the city¡¦s colonial buildings. Unearthing St. Augustine will be promoted broadly to local, national and international scholars, teachers and the general public. To increase discovery and access, UF will contribute objects and metadata to digital repositories and other online collections including: Trove, NINES, 18thConnect, WorldCat, OAIster, and other aggregators.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00004298:00001

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Abstract th anniversary of its founding in 2015, the University of Florida (UF) Libraries requests $ 321,653 (with $ 196,821 in contributed cost share) to build an online collection of key resources related to research on colonial St. Augustine, Florida. Along with the UF Libraries, Unearthing St. Augustine partners are the two City of St. Augustine departments (Heritage Tourism and Archaeology Program), historic Government House in St. Augustine managed by UF, and St. Augustine Historical Society. This two year project will produce two major outcomes: 1) UF and its partners will establish for the first time a co mputer digitization lab at Government House which will be used create and disseminate an interactive digital collection consisting of 11,000 maps, drawings, photographs and documents and associated metadata that will be available freely online; 2) project staff will spatially enhance digitized paper maps and images through a process called geo referencing and create original programming to produce a user friendly, Google map based interface, and release it as open source technology. These products will allo w for downloading and manipulating primary source material thus creating a means for increasing interactivity and enhancing broader public access. Along with searching and browsing functions including full text searching the project will develop a map ba sed interface built upon geographic metadata. Users will be able to search for textual information, structural elements and geographic locations on maps and images. Users also will be able to view the creation, alteration or destruction of structures and s ites within specific time frames the modern research environment. An Advisory Board comprised of noted archaeologists, historic preservationists, and historians with expertise in the colonial history of St. Augustine and Florida will provide expert guidance on building the digital collection and designing the user interface. Unearthing St. Augustine collection o bjects will cover a broad range of subjects including Florida and U.S. history, Spanish colonies, Native Americans, slavery, exploration, architecture and urban planning, social and economic development, missionary work, military defenses and warfare. The collection will satisfy the needs of a wide variety of researchers including historians, archaeologists, architects, and historic preservationists. The 11,000 digital objects, which date from the 16th century to the present, are in the public domain or partner repositories and have reproduction rights. Selected material s will include: Government House 1,200 maps and overlays of the city, architectural drawings of historic structures, and related government documents. St. Augustine Historical Society 2,500 Spanish documents, transcriptions and English language transla tions. City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program records, photographs and site summaries for 100 excavations conducted over the past 20 years. Herschel Shepard Collection at UF 800 drawings, photos and documents related to Unearthing St. Augustine will be promoted broadly to local, national and international scholars, teachers and the general public. To increase discovery and access, UF will contribute objects and metadata to di gital repositories and other online collections including: Trove, NINES, 18thConnect, WorldCat, OAIster, and other aggregators.

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University of Florida Table of Contents 1 I. 1 4 II. 7 III. Methodology and 7 .... 7 .... 1 2 1 3 IV. 1 4 V. 1 5 1 5 1 7 19 VI. Disseminat 20 History of Grants List of Participants Budget APPENDICES A. Gantt Chart 1 B. Work Plan Activities and Digitization Estimates 3 C. Advisory Board Members Vitae 4 D. UF Faculty and Staff Vitae 16 E. NEH Grant Funded Position Descriptions ........................ 32 F. Letters of Commitment and Support 36 G. Selected Scholarship References and Resources 49 H. Inventory of Government House Archives 54 I. Government House Flat Files 5 5 J. St. Augustine Historical Society Resources 5 8 K. City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program Resources 59 L. Archaeology Program Pablo Sabate Site Presentation 61 M. Herschel Shepard Collection (UF) Selected St. Augustine Projects N. Draft Collection Pages; UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features

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The University of Florida (UF) Libraries requests $ 321,653 ( with $ 196,821 in contributed cost share) from the National Endowment for the Humaniti es to build an interactive online collection of key resources related to colonial St. Augustine, Florida. Along with the UF Libraries, Unearthing St. Augustine partners are the two City of St. Augustine d epartment s ( Heritage Tourism and Archaeology Program ) historic Government House in St. Augustine managed by UF and St. Augustine Historical Society. Since the 1970s, research in St. Augustine has elicited attention from scholars in history, archaeology, and historic preservation throughout Florida and the United States. Efforts to protect and promote its historical importance have been ongoing since early in the 20th century. This two year project will produce two major outcomes: 1) UF and its partners will establish for the first time a computer digitizat ion lab at Government House which will be used create and disseminate an interactive dig ital collection consisting of 11 ,000 maps, drawings, photographs and documents and associated metadata that will be available freely online; 2) project staff will spati ally enhance digitized paper maps and images through a process called geo referencing and create original programming to produce a user friendly Google map based interface, and release it as open source technology. These products also will allow for downl oading and manipulating primary source material thus creating a means for increasing interactivity and enhancing broader public access concerns raised by panelists about insufficient resources regarding Native American and African American populations, and clarification of geo referencing (the process of spatially enhancing digitized maps and ima ges with geographic coordinates ) Further, this proposal, with a reduce d budget, includes a new digital lab component to be established in St. Augustine, situated 64 (DLC) is located. I. Significance and Impact Unearthing St. Augustine continues 40 years of commitment to scholarship by UF and its project partners in colonial St. Augustine. Established in 1565, St. Augustine has long identified itself ry and its remarkable survival as a small community that has maintained its original coloni al grid of streets and blocks. Its story is one of diversity and a window into the lives of Native Americans, colonists, slaves and free people of color as they adap ted to a region constantly caught in the military conflicts of expanding empires and national states. As such, St. Augustine has been a research mecca for archaeologists, historians, and other scholars seeking to understand the complex legacies of the Span ish borderlands and the American Southeast. For half a century, the city has also been a focal point of work in historic preservation. As Florida moves towards its 500 th anniversary (2013) and St. Augustine looks ahead to the celebration of the 450 th anniv ersary of its fo unding (2015), researchers need: 1) access to primary resources regardless of holding repository ; and 2) ability to download and manipulate digital content T his project finally brings the study of past into a modern resear ch environment. To meet contemporary research needs, this project will deliver resources using technology customized for use in history, archaeology, and historic preservation. Guided by a n Advisory Board of expert scholars and researcher s (see letters o f commitment and support Appendix F) Unearthing St. Augustine will draw from unique and rare materials that are difficult to access and manipulate in original form. The project will focus on collections from the C ity of St. Augustine, the St. Augustine H istorical Society, and the UF Libraries that are indispensable

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University of Florida 2 resources. With the exception of a few online resources there is currently no easy way to gain access to the diverse information that exists in these repositories. It will open access to archi val materials of Government House which have been closed since 1997 when the City of St. Augustine terminated its stewardship of the archive Since 2010, UF has incurred the oversight of this property and its contents. Additionally, Unearthing St. Augusti ne will enable project partners to add content to their existing web sites and contribute to a collective digital collection. Selected m aterial s (see Selection and Imaging Section, pg 7 ) will be drawn from four distinct collections: 1) Government House fl at files of maps and drawings (currently inaccessible) 2) St. Augustine Historical Society transcribed and translated texts (available only by appointment) 3) City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program records and photographs (only open to City of St. Aug ustine employees) and 4) architectural records from the Herschel Shepard Collection at UF (paged collection in Special Collections) From Government House project staff will inventory and digitize approximately 1,200 large format maps and overlays of t he city, architectural drawings of historic structures, and related government documents (to be selected from items listed in Inventory, Appendix H) This collection was developed by archaeologists and historians during the long tenure of the state agency known originally as the St. Augustine Historical Restoration an d Preservation Commission (1959 1967) and subsequently as the Historic St. Augustine Preser vation Board (HSAPB) (1968 1997). The files were originally collected to provide historical inform ation to guide HSAPB administrators in the purchase and development of the colonial properties. Since the closure of this state agency in 1997, and in the absence of a librarian or archivist, these resources have for many years been closed to researchers. As the majority of the Government House files are primary source materials, digitization of these materials will bring universal access to 11,000 pages of data and images that heretofore have been accessible only to persons officially working in Government House. Researchers who are granted access by appointment with the PI who volunteers on the weekends, are confronted with vast amounts of oversized materials in some 37 flat file drawers (see Appendix I Fig. 1) with lit tle or no cataloging beyond 3x5 in dex cards and minimal descriptions on drawer labels. Many flat files that have been used over the years are located on tops of file cabinets or rolled up and stuck in Appendix I Fig.2). The delicate nature of half of these materials due to age or physical format (e.g., blueprints or original architectural drawings on vellum) makes the need for digitization critical. From the St. Augustine Historical Society the pro ject will digitize 2,500 Spanish documents, as well a s English language translations (see Appendix J) This will address frequent request s from K 12 teachers and researchers working on colonial America for access to key documents in translation. The transl ations, stored as typescripts, represent the work of Edward Lawson and other scholars in the 1940s and 50s. Besides documents relevant to the founding and development of St. Augustine, these files also include translations of: Spanish printed sources about Juan Ponce de Leon and Pedro Menndez de Avils; extensive selections in English translation of from the expeditions of Juan Pardo; memorials by clergy on conditions in the Spanish missions ; investigations into the governorship of Diego de Rebolledo during the Timucuan revolt; reports on the 1702 siege of St. Augustine by James Moore and the 1740 si ege of James Oglethorpe; texts on town planning and royal ordinances; documents pertaining to the building of the Castillo de San Marcos; and others dealing with details of life in town at different times. These materials will be supplemented by an additio nal 1,500 documents from the collections of the Historical Society and the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, UF. Unpublished research reports and

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University of Florida 3 archeological data includes the colonial history of Native American and mission communities and documents related t o Grac ia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose, a free black settlement. A third major contribution to the project comes from the City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program It focuses on materials from excavations conducted over the past 20 years by ci ty archaeologist, Carl Halbirt. European origins since 1565, but a rich and varied Native American heritage that has been in existence for thousands of years. Project staff will select and dev elop sets of documents and images from 100 major excavations, documenting in ground features, such as building foundations, roads and bridges, defense lines, wells, tr ash dumps, animal burials, etc. Fifty of these sites have been recommended by Halbirt (se e Appendix K ) and the remaining 50 will be selected in consultation with the project advisory board from a f ield of more than 500 projects. Each of the 100 selected sites will be represented online by a summary of its history and documented by maps and dig it al images from the excavations (approximately 20 images per site) Site summaries will be modeled upon several currently online but will expand and broaden the coverage given to each excavation (For examples of the City information and images see Appendix L ). Resources from the City Archaeology P rogram will provide comparative data for archaeologists working at other colonial and urban sites, will facilitate the teaching of archaeology, and will supplement the virtual archive of Spa nish colonial artifacts which has been created by the Florida Museum of Natural History From the previously private unprocessed historic preservation collection of Herschel Shepard project staff will d igitize records and drawings of major preservation and restor ation work of St. Augustine The Shepard Collection, which was donated to UF in 2010, documents Shepard's expertise in Florida's historic architecture and his many contributions to preservation a past, including restoration and reconstruction of such historically significant sites as the Second Seminole War era Fort Foster and the Spanish mission site of San Luis de Apalachee. The total collection of original drawings, documents and photographs includes the colonial buildings of St. Augustine. Shepard has worked in architectural restoration and reconstruction of St. Augustine buil dings since 1970, and 25 historic structures are documented thoroughly with drawings, research notes, and photographs (See Appendix M ) These buildings include the Ximnez Fatio House, de Mesa Snchez House, Tovar House, Government House, Castillo de San M arcos and Fort Matanzas This project will digitize approximately 800 drawings, photos and documents from the Shepard Collection. Finally, Unearthing St. Augustine will incorporate digital objects and resources created by UF and other institutions inclu ding but not limited to: The Spanish Land Grants (Florida State Archives) Mission San Luis Florida History Online (University of North Florida) Index to the East Florida Papers (University of Florida) Spanish Colonial St. Augustine: A Resource for Teachers (NEH/Florida Human ities Council) Colonial People of Pensacola (University of West Florida) Castillo de San Marcos (1672) Fort Mose: Historical Overview Fort Matanzas (1742) Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine (1797) Fort Caroline (1564) Mission Nombre de Dios (1565)

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University of Florida 4 The Significance of Colonial St. Augustine as a Research Focus Since the 1970s, research in St. Augustine has elicited attention from scholars in history, archaeology, and historic preservation throughout the US Efforts to protect and promote its historical importance have been ongoing since early in the 20 th century. 1 UF traditionally has played a major role in this research, through its 1) Historical A rchaeology program under the direction of Dr. Kathleen Deagan and the Florida Museum of Natural History; 2) Historic Preservation program, offered by the UF Co llege of Design, Construction and Planning; and 3) efforts to collect primary source material on the colonial era, as archived at the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History. These enduring connections between UF and St. Augustine now include a new role as U F assumes, through legislative action, a trusteeship over state owned historic properties including Government House in St. Augustine. UF seeks to support preserv ation, archaeology, cultural resource management, cultural tourism, and museum 2 This project will address current research interests in colonial St. Augustine, especially the role it played in early America and the Spanish borderlands. Th e city remains one of the best documented examples of a Spanish colonial frontier settlement. The town plan, established at the end of the 16 th century (1586 1597), is registered as a National Historic Landmark. 3 The e Castillo de San Marcos, date to the 17 th century and the core structure still bears the basic colonial form it achieved in the 1750s. Other surviving colonial buildings number about 36 structures and date from the 18 th or early 19 th centuries 4 and are an important record of houses from this time period. St. Augustine also is one of the only former colonial cities of Spanish America with an intact local government archive (the East Florida Papers, Library of Congress) and its Plaza de las Armas boasts the only known original monument to the Spanish liberalized constitution of 1812. More than 40 years of archaeological residences, nearby Native American and mission commu nities, and a free black fort and settlement (Fort Mose) Locked away in Government House are more than 26,000 p roject reports slides, photos and well documented manuscripts (see Inventory, Appendix M ) authored by Historic St. Augustine Preservation Boa rd research staff and archaeologists, a sample of whose work illuminates St. a These documents and reports have been Un published project report on file, Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board: Earliest free African 1 ( http://www.colonialstaugustine.org/11.html ) 2 For information on the role as trustee, see Section 267.1735, Fla. Stat., Access: http://www.flsenate.gov/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=Ch0267/SEC1735.H TM http://www.facilities.ufl.e du/staugustine/index.htm 3 See http://www.nps.gov/history/nhl/designations/Lists/FL01.pdf 4 See Adams (above); also Nolan, David, The Houses of St. Augustine (Sarasota, Fla.: Pineap ple Press, 1995) p. 12 14. and Manucy, Albert C. The Houses of St. Augustine; Notes on the Architecture from 1565 to 1821 (St. Augustine: St. Augustine Historical Society, 1962) p. 13.

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University of Florida 5 Among the published studies which quote from mater i als found within the Government House archives are such benchmark works in Florida history, archaeology, and architecture as: Albert Manucy, The Houses of St. Augustine: notes on the architecture from 1565 to 1821 (1962) still the standard reference work for local colonial architectural traditions. Michael V. Gannon The Cross in the Sand, The Early Catholic Church in Florida, 1513 1870 (1965) a seminal work prompting mission related histor ical and archaeological inquiry. Eugene Lyon, The Enterprise of Fl orida, Pedro Menndez de Avils and the Spanish Conquest of 1565 1568 (1976) the key biography of the founder of the town. Luis R. Arana and Albert Manucy The Building of the Castillo de San Marcos (1977) in both English and Spanish, which has been in c ontinuous print since its first publication. Kathleen D eagan, Spanish St. Augustine, the Archaeology of a Colonial Creole Community (1983) a most influential work comparing Spanish and British colonial sites. Kathleen Deagan and Darcy MacMahon Fort Mose Freedom (1995) the book created to accompany the national touring exhibit, now a perennial favorite among general readers. Jane L. Landers Black Society in Spanish Florida (1999) the pioneering scholarly study of t he lives of free people of color in the Spanish borderlands. T he Historic St. Augustine Research Institute a collaborative project of Flagler College and UF supported by the St. Augustine Foundation, lists over 25 theses and dissertations on colonial St. Augustine in the field of archaeology alone ( http://www.flagler.edu/hsari/thesis.html ). Notable contributions in history and historic preservation include : Sherry Johnson, The Spanish St. Augustine Co mmunity, 1784 1795: A Reevaluation (1989) Susan R. Parker, The Second Century of Settlement in Spanish St. Augustine, 1670 1763 (1999) Nick Linville Cultural assimilation in frontier Florida: the life of Joseph M. Hernandez, 1788 1857 (2004) Roger C. Smit h, The faade of unity: British East Florida's war for dependence (2008) Joseph Shaughnessy, Crises of Authenticity in Saint Augustine's Early Preservation History, 1840 1955 (2009) Elizabeth Jo Cham bless, The Artillery Lane Site Archaeological Analysis fr om Late First Spanish Period St. Augustine (2005) New research titles also cont inue to appear with regularity. Since 2000, colonial St. Augustine has garnered attention from new studies in history, architecture, biography, and archaeology: Jane G. Lander s (editor), Colonial plantations and economy in Florida (2000) Robert L. Kapitzke, Religion, Power, and Politics in Colonial St. Augustine (2001) Paul E. Hoffman, Florida's frontiers (2002) Elsbeth K. Gordon, Florida's colonial architectural heritage (2002 ) Daniel L. Schafer, Anna Madgigine Jai Kingsley, African Princess, Florida Slave, Plantation Slave Owner (2003) James G. Cusick, The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida (2003) William R. Adams, St. Augustin e & St. Johns County: A Historical Guide (2005) Patricia C. Griffin (editor), The Odyssey of an African Slave by Sitiki (2009) Jane G. Landers, Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions (2010) Articles and conference symposia continue to be regular featu res of the Florida Historical Quarterly and in El Escribano, the journal of the St. Augustine Historical Society. Since 2000, the Quarterly has published 15 articles on colonial Florida, four specifically on St. Augustine. El

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University of Florida 6 Escribano has published two sp ecial issue volumes on the British period (2000 and 2001), one marking the anniversary of the 1702 siege in St. Augustine, and another on the Castillo (2004). 5 U pcoming anniversaries in Florida and St. Augustine history between 2012 and 2021 will inspire new publications. A strategic plan produced by UF for recommended management of state historic properties in St. Augustine will be another catalyst for increased demands for research materials ( http://www.facilities.ufl.edu/staugustine/index.htm ). In addition, the City Archaeology P rogram and numerous community redevelopment projects conducted in and around St. Augustine every year rely on basic maps and resources for project reporting S ince 2004, the city has been the site of annual summer workshops for K 12 teachers : Between Columbus and Jamestown : Spanish St. Augustine F unded first under the NEH We the People initiative and now through the Florida Humanities Council (FHC) UF curators and partner institutions conduct these worksho ps and provide free educational materials for teachers to use in the classroom via the Spanish Colonial St. Augustine site. Over 1,000 teachers from across the nation will have participated in the program. Besides academic scholarship, the colonial era also is the subject of scholarly texts and historical novels fo City ; Tristan Boyer Binns St. Augustine ; The S ettling of St. Augustine ; Matthew C. Cannavale and Florida, 1513 1821 First Thanksgiving and Saving Home The universe of interested St. Augustine audiences is difficult to quantify because of the multi Beyond the scholastic community including 0,000 students and associated faculty, St. Augustine remains an epicenter for cultural heritage tourism (over two million visitors annually) and historic education. While the needs of such a diverse user community are beyond anything but a full scale dedic ated archive s and library Unearthing St. Augustine fulfills frequently made requests from historic preservationists, archeologists and historians working on St. Augustine, in particular for access to English language versions of key historical documents, access to maps, and to basic data from archaeology and historic preservation activities. A current dig by a UF archaeologist Kathy Deagan and her St. Augustine field students uncovered due to the analysis of recentl y discovered archival material 6 This interactive digital collection will be a primary resource for scholars, students and historical tourists in colonial and urban history, geography, historic cartography, cultural heritage and museum studies. For the fir st time, this project will unify disparate resources, both electronic and paper based, held in multiple repositories and largely inaccessible. More importantly, users will be able to freely download and manipulate digital resources and contribute to this i nteractive digital collection. It should be noted that digital access by users of the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) has been growing exponentially each year. UFDC contains over 100 unique digital collections, 266,755 items totaling mor e than six million pages. During the month of June 2011, collections in UFDC received over two million item views. 5 Schafer, Daniel L., ida Indigo Plantation, El Escribano The St. Augustine Journal of History, 2000; Schafer, Daniel L., 1784, El Escribano, The St. Augustine Journal of History, 2001; Waterbury, Jean Parker, Firestorm and Ashes: the Siege o f 1702, El Escribano, The St. Augustine Journal of History, 2002. 6 Lane, Marcia, Long lost church found, The St. Augustine Record, June 3, 2011

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University of Florida 7 II. History, Scope and Duration Unearthing St. Augustine builds on technology and system architecture developed at UF since 1997. In 2009 UF Libraries completed a pilot project funded internally which established a digital collection of vertical file materials from Government House The bulk of the initial Historic St. Augustine di gital collection is comprised of 8.5 x 11 block and lot materials (approx. 3,000 items ). Large, flat file materials ( i.e., over the size of an 11x17 flatbed scanner) were excluded from the project due to limited funds and the need for personnel to operate a large format camera. The resulting digital collection provides a simple interface which is freely accessible and keyword searchable, but a more structured search and display system requires development to take advantage of these highly graphic, unique pr imary resources. digital collection innovations a s part of the From the Air: The Photographic Record of Florida's Lands project (2002 2010 ), $ 263,884 funded by Library Services & Technology Act, UF developed technology, proced ures, expertise and infrastructure required to digitize and make available 160 ,000 historic Florida aerial photos and associated geo referenced data which are globally accessible in the Flo rida Aerial Photography .. Early development of system architecture required to link maps with metadata occurred in a 2003 project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services entitled, Ephemeral Cities: A Model for Developing an Historic Digital Atlas Based on Three Florida Cities $ 184,609. Editing tools for digitization and metadata that will be used for Unearthing St. Augustine initially were developed as part of the Digital Library of the Caribbean a Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information Access ( TICFIA) $ 110,671, project from 2005 to the present. UFDC currently allows authenticate d users to edit object metadata online. Although project staff will be creating detailed metadata for all digital objects during project imaging stage the project partners and advisors will be provided with myUFDC accounts to review and edit metadata online. Following project completion, this feature will allow any authenticated users to continue contributing descriptive information and establish relationships between digital objects. (see Appendix N ) Products resulting from project implementation from 2012 through 2014 include: 1. 11,000 digital objects (slides, research reports, field notes, architectural sketches, photos) 2. Trained personnel from partnering institutions in St. Augustine to produce di gital files on site 3. The first digital lab established in Government House, St. Augustine, devoted to digitization and preservation of archival collections 4. Google map based user friendly interface to access primary source materials from four disparate colle ctions, and to provide the options for downloading and manipulating resources 5. Online digital video tutorial for users of digitized primary source material describing research methods for utilizing these collections III. Methodology and Standards Unearthing St Augustine co nsists of two major components: 1) UF and its partners, with oversight from an Advisory Board (see Section V ) will select and digitize approximately 11 ,000 objects, and 2) UF will create open source programming and develop system functionali ty that will significantly change the way in which researchers and expert users such as archaeologists and preservationists discover, interact with, and make use of these digital objects. 1. Selection and Imaging Overview Selection C riteria prior to Pro ject : The resources selected for this project, as identified above in Section I, form a basic corpus of materials and were selected based on several criteria :

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University of Florida 8 1. Given the sheer size of resources, the UF and its partners have made preliminary selections of pr imary research materials that have traditionally been consulted by researchers prior to beginning any project in St. Augustine history, historic preservation, or archaeology. Qualifying criteria will include: 1) researcher interest and demand, 2) uniquenes s or rarity of the materials, and 3) the ability of the materials to fill in 2. Selection will be restricted to materials either in the public domai n or legally owned by project partn ers Therefore, the focus of selection will be revealing basic tools of research that have not been reproduced previously in any fashion. 3. In addition to the 8,000 objects described in Section I, the Unearthing St. Augustine collection will include approxim ately 3,000 items in existing digital collections: Government House block and lot collection (see Section II above), Colonial St. Augu stine: A Resource for Teachers Florida Map Collection Sanborn Fire Insurance Company Maps of Florida and Aerial Photography: Florida Selectors: UF and its partners have established an Advisory Board to review the corpus of materials that have been identified and to further refine the selection process Th e Advisory Board is comprised of archaeologists, historic preservationists, and historians who have expertise in the colonial history of St. Augustine and Florida The Board will recommend items for inclusion in the project and identify gaps in content tha t need to be fill ed by additional selection. Current membership of the Advisory Board consists of: Dana Ste. Claire (Director, Department of Heritage Tourism, St. Augustine) Susan R. Parker (Executive Director, St. Augustine Historical Society) Carl Halbir t (City Archaeologist, City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program) Roy E. Graham ( Beinecke Reeves Distinguished Professor UF College of Design Construction and Planning ) Glenn G. Willumson (Director, Museum Studies Program, UF College of Fine Arts ) Hersche l E. Shep ard (FAIA Emeritus, Architect) Selection Process: At the start of the project, the Advisory Board will meet with the UF Collection Curators (Tom Caswell, Jim Cusick and John Nemmers) and the p roject manager (to be hired with grant funds) in St. A ugustine to discuss and review the selection process. Board members will be responsible for selecting 1,500 additional documents from the collections of the St. Augustine Historical Society and the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History at UF to supplement the objects selected prior to the project start. For example, the Historical Society has approximately 1,500 typescripts of documents from British colonial records that could be included with permission from the Public Record Office/National Archives in Lo ndon. The Board will provide guidance in selecting these documents, and the Collection Curators will ensure that there are no legal or privacy issues associated with selected items. The Board also will advise city archaeologist Halbirt, in selecting 50 of the 100 archaeological sites include d in the project ( see Appendix K ) They will provide selection guidance throughout the duration of the project by email, telephone or in person. Project staff and the Advisory Board will agree on communication and evalu ation procedures at project start Imaging Overview : The majority of digitization/metadata creation will occur in St. Augustine at the Government House digitization lab by the project manager and partners. E xisting digital objects will be provided by both UF and its partners. T ext capturing activities will be completed at UF by th e Digital Library Center (DLC).

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University of Florida 9 Pre Imaging Activities : The project staff and Advisory Board will coordinate the transport of original objects from partner repositories to the G overnment House dig itization lab for imaging. The UF conservator and c urators will train the p roject manager (TBD funded by NEH at $8 0,175 ) to properly handle original objects. I tems selected for this project will be in good physical condition; therefore, no detailed conservation work will be required. Upon arrival at the digitization lab, the p roject manager will examine and apply treatment to facilitate the imaging process. Items will be relaxed or flattened as needed, corners will be unfolded, and tears interfering with handling will be mended. Multiple items attached together will be separated when possible. T he c onservator will be available for consultation throughout the imaging process. The p roject manager will be responsible for tracking the locatio n of all original objects while at the digitization lab Metadata : Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) metadata will be create d by the onsite project manager and imported in to t he DLC Tracking Database, and enhanced both automatically and manually as objects move through the imaging workflow. The DLC Tracking Database assigns a unique Bibliographic Identifier (BibID) to each object processed, and that BibID will be used to track the item ( see UF Metadata Information ) The METS files will include technical and structural data about each image, as well as descriptive and administrative information. Any p re existing metadata (e.g., from catalog records) will be imported into the DLC Tracking Database at the start of imaging. Scanning : At the new Government House digitization lab, t he project manager will be respons ible for scanning objects and training/s upervising partners to scan their own collection materials Hours of operation for the digital lab will be four days per week, with the project manager traveling to Gainesville, biweekly, to deliver portable external hard d rives (containing digital files a nd metadata), and fragile archival material for special handling by UF conservator and DLC personnel at UF. DLC personnel will provide initial training and supervision for the project staff in the image capture and enhancement process. All objects will be digitized to meet scanned using a Copibook (loaned by DLC and shipped to Government House at no cost ) or a flatbed scanner (Microtek 9800 XL N EH funded $1,200 ) and computer workstation with two monitors (NEH funded $ 996 ) ( at a minimum of 300 dpi, 8 bit grayscale or 24 bit color ) Maps, architectural drawings and other large format materials will be brought to UF DLC and imaged at a minimum of 3 00 dpi using a Super 8K HS digital camera owned by the DLC DLC staff including scanning technician (TBD, funded by NEH ($ 16,870 ) will perform initial review of all digital objects, adjusting image s as necessary. Advanced image enhancement will include adj ustment of levels, skew, color and contrast. Images will be captured as uncompressed TIF F files (ITU T.6) at 100% scale All project imaging will be calibrated regularly to maintain color fidelity and optimum image results. Images will be captured on an 8 terabyte storage area network (SAN) connected via network cabling to computer workstations running Microsoft Windows XP or higher and Adobe Photoshop CS 4 or higher. For slides, a Nikon Super CoolScan 5000 ED Film Scanner ($1,200) and Nikon SF 210 Auto Sli de Feeder ($413) will allow users to scan batches of up to 50 slides. Other electronic supplies include two CyberPower Surge Protected Outlets ($280). Minimum furniture requi r ements include two adjustable computer tables, 74" X 30", ( $1,900); and two compu ter chairs ( $600).

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University of Florida 10 All DLC imaging will be completed in accordance with established professional standards. Imaging methods will depend on object characteristics, and follow principals and guidelines established in Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives by Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieger and Cornell University's Digital Imaging Tutori al I maging (i.e., scanning, text, metadata) will be based on specifications previously established by UF and its partners for PALMM ( http://fclaweb.fcla.edu/node/590/ ). These specifications are optimized f or data exchange for harvesting by other digital libraries such as the U.S. National Science National Science Digital Library the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library National Leadership Grant collection and OAIster at the University of Michigan. Quality Control & Derivate Creation : After imaging and image enhancement, all aspects of image control and digital package creation will be controlled by the UF Digital Collections ( UFDC ) Toolkit, an integrated software package that controls derivative image formation, quality control review at the packa ge level, and deployment to UFDC server s The scan t echnic ian will derive JPG, JPG2000 and JPG thumbnail images. JPG2000 files with zoom features will be used in the display of large format maps and drawings online. A Quality Control tool will display thumbnails of each image in sequential order for staff review. Errors will be noted and returned to the imaging unit for re will contain basic structural and administrative metadata, as well as any pre existing descriptive metadata imported at the start of the pr ocess. Digital Package & Text Processing : After quality control, the digital package moves to text conversion, mark up, and ME TS file validation. DLC s taff will ensure that all package level metadata conforms to the national METS, to local extension sche mas, to UFDC requirements and for long term digital preservation in the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) below ). S taff will implement Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing to produce searchable text from digital images. T he DLC currently uses Prime Recognition's PrimeOCR software, which bundles six OCR engines from multiple vendors. PrimeOCR is governed by a voting engine that typically yields 99% accuracy. It includes automatic image z oning, and can process English, Spani sh, and French The project manager will work with the text processing unit to proof all OCR produced text. With the exception of maps, photos, handwritten documents and items lacking significant text, all objects will go through OCR processing. The proje ct manager and Collection Curators will create descriptive metadata for objects lacking OCR text. M etadata can be created during imaging, and project staff and partners will be able to create or revise metadata after the objects are available online (see O nline Metadata Editing below). With final package approval, staff will use the UFDC Toolkit to transfer the package to the UFDC server for public access and metadata harvesting, send the package to the FDA for preservation archiving, and save it to tape ba ckup for local archival storage. Post Imaging Conservator Review and Storage : After imaging original materials will be regrouped and reattached if necessary, fold ed and/or boxed and prepared for return to the appropriate repository and partners will con firm receipt. All partner repositories store original objects in proper environmental conditions to ensure long term stability. All Government House archival materials will become freely available to researchers through the UF Libraries UF Libraries will be planning/developing methods for relocation of fragile materials requiring climate control and stabilization by project end. Digital Preservation and Digital Content Sustainability : In practice consistent for all UF digital projects, redundant d igital a rchives are maintained in perpetuity. Currently the two primary archives are maintained by the UF Libraries and the Florida Digital Archive. UF

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University of Florida 11 maintains an internal ready access archive of all files in the DLC. Files are saved to a tape archiving system a nd tapes are retained in environmentally controlled storage. Information about tapes and their contents are logged in the UFDC Database and the DLC Tracking Database, with MD5 checksum numbers and file format and version information, in association with ad ministrative and bibliographic metadata. The Databases queue disks and files for inspection every three years and migration every ten years or upon format obsolescence. The Florida Digital Archiv e (FDA) is administered by UF and is a digital preservation partner with the UF Libraries. The FDA was initially funded in part by a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and is now supported through the State University Librarie s of F lorida. Physically, all digital information is stored in off line systems under FDA administration NorthEast Regional Data Center on IBM Magstar 3590 extended length cartridges (i.e., magnetic tape). Cartridges are inspected routinely, refreshed as necessary, and periodically migrated to replacement media. All electronic data is stored with MD5 checksum for verification of data integrity. Metadata is maintained in METS compliant data structures. Bibliographic metadata, including cataloging, is also retained in FDA maintained and archived bibliographic systems. The software programmed to support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archival Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migration on request. The process of forwarding original uncompressed TIFF images to the a. Deployment : Project staff will create a project portal page including all project documentation and resources. A p roject p rogrammer (TBD funded by NEH $125 ,078 ) will be responsible for developin g the UFDC System A rchitecture described below. Discover y of the digital collection will occur in several ways: 1) A project homepage made available as part of UFDC; 2) MARC records with linked 856 fields in online catalogs of UF, WorldCat, etc.; 3) Encoded Archival Descri ption (EAD) finding aids available on partner homepages and contributed to Archives Florida a statewide union database of EAD finding aids; 4) OAI compliant metadata harvested by digital repositories; and 5) co mplete electronic packages contributed to other online collections. Discoverability of the digital objects will be enhanced by a variety of search and browse options. The primary interface will be map base d, which is described in the System Architecture section below Researchers also will be able to conduct keyword and subject searches of all of the collections simultaneously from the main project page. Alternatively, they will search each collection individually or combine two or more collections in the ir search scope. In addition, all digital objects will be discoverable via the UFDC home page, so researchers can search them in combination with all the other digitized materials held by UF and its partner institutions. Researchers also will be able to b rowse indexes to all of the resources included in the project. The project homepage will include a directory to the 100 archaeological investigation sites contributed by the St. Augustine Archaeology Program For each site, the project will include a site map or profile plan, a summary of site history and archaeological investigations, and links to all digital images related to the excavations. D igital objects will include up to 20 photographs for each site, with full descriptions, demonstrating results of the site investigations. These digital images were created previously during site excavations and will be contributed by the City Archaeologist The project staff and Advisory Board will create the site summaries, based on extant field notes and research m aterials. Appendix K demonstrates the quantity of information and images available for each site.

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University of Florida 12 In addition to the metadata created and maintained in UFDC, the Collection Curators will create descriptions for the collections in the form of MARC catalog records and EAD finding aids. All objects from the Herschel Shepard Collection, for example, will have links to an EAD finding aid describing that collection, while the EAD finding aid and MARC record will have links to the UFDC collection page and individ ual objects. Likewise, an EAD inventory will describe and provide links to the digital objects for the 1,200 architectural drawings, historical maps, and government documents from Government House. Ethical, Rights and Privacy Provisions : Selection will be restricted to those materials either in the public domain or legally owned by project partners. P roject pages will include a rights and privacy statement, and means for individuals to request offending digital objects be removed. 2. System Architecture The Unearthing St. Augustine collection will be delivered electronically using UF Digital Collections (UFDC) system architecture. UFDC operates on an engine named SobekCM open source software being developed at UF. SobekCM currently works in conjunction with the open source Greenstone digital library system, but the UFDC architecture allows for platform independence and easy migration to othe r digital library management systems. SobekCM also allows for online object submittal and editing of metadata Functionality and Interface : The project p rogrammer will develop software and enhance the current UFDC system to provide advanced features and functionality. Throughout system architecture development the Advisory Board will review and provide feedback in an iterative process, ensuring the user interface is designed based on needs of users. The p rogrammer will develop the system using a variety o f existing technologies including SobekCM, the Google Maps API, JPG2000, Javascript and Flash. Both during and following imaging, the project staff and Advisory Board will create descriptive and structural metadata to enable advanced interface functionalit y. The p rogrammer will create an interactive map interface and workspace allowing users to control how they interact with digital objects and related data. At its simplest, the map interface will allow users to discover and access resources by clicking o n map locations. Users will have the ability to reveal/hide sites on the map associated with particular collections (e.g., excavation sites of the city archaeologist or buildings renovated/reconstructed by Herschel Shepard). The interactive map will be sim ilar to the user friendly Google Map interface and will include functionality and features that users expect today: zoom, pan, image rotation, user contributed comments, and the ability to print, save and link. Additionally, t he p rogrammer will focus on d eveloping these advanced func tionalities : Revealing/hiding particular structures, roads or other features. Creating markers, lines, and simple shapes on images. Enabling searching for information and/or elements on images. Displaying latitude and longitude coordinates for spatially enhanced digital maps and images. Overlaying spatially enhanced digital maps and images with each other through user controlled map and image transparency. Saving and share images or sets of images that have been manipulated. Ge o Referencing: In order for the map interface to overlay newly digitized maps and images with existing geographical data, the newly digitized files must be assigned geographic coordinates. Geographic coordinates are assigned to digitized files using GIS s oftware. The Geo referencing process (spatial enhancement) is accomplished by finding a series of locations

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University of Florida 13 in the newly digitized map and image files, called file coordinates, and then finding the the same location on the ground. Sources for geographic coordinates include coordinates obtained from Global Positioning Systems (GPS), existing geographically referenced images such as those at Florida Department data site, as well as existing GIS data at the Florida Geographic Data Library, FGDL.org. Using the series of digital file coordinates and the corresponding geographic coordinates, the GIS software mathematically transforms the digitized file coordinates to produce a new spatially enhanced digital image file containing coordinates that are now in the correct geographic location. Data geographically or spatially enhanced with a common coordinate system shared by all file layers allows locational and tempor al studies to be conducted, revealing new discoveries. The UF GIS Coordinator will train project staff to use GIS software to geo referenced digitized materials. Additionally project staff will be trained to use GIS software to create new GIS data files that represent specific sites and structures visible on the geo referenced materials. Geo Coding: Geo Coding, commonly referred to as address matching is the process of adding a single geographic coordinate to a particular text reference, or a descriptive picture of a location. Geo Coding is most commonly encountered when using Google Maps to search for the location of an address and then placing a dot on a map at that location, or using a single geographic location when using Google to display a digital camera picture of that location. Geo Coding also is what 911 emergency services use to locate a particular address. In Libraries, adding geo coding to metadata for a particular text reference or digitized picture links digital collection objects to speci fic locations on geo referenced maps and images. The project manager, partner personnel, and curators will be trained in geo coding metadata to connect digital objects with corresponding geographical locations. Geo coded metadata will include elements su ch as place names, physical addresses, and construction and destruction dates. In anticipation of this system enhancement, UF staff created geo coded metadata for items in the Government House block and lot files that were previously digitized as part of a 2009 grant project by adding geographic coordinates to the metadata. Once the digital objects have been described with chronological and geo coded metadata the programmer will develop a Flash application that allows users to view the creation, alteratio n or destruction of structures and sites at particular locations during specific time periods. The p rogrammer also will create an alternative view that does not rely on Flash technology, to ensure the widest possible audience. UF currently is developing a contribution system allowing for online input provided by authenticate d and anonymous users, and the p rogrammer will incorporate this technology into the interactive digital collection An editorial system will accept contributions automatically from appr oved users, and place all other contributions in an editorial system where contributions will be vetted and, once approved, will then be added to the existing metadata. (see Appendix K) 3. Project Sustainability and Future Support/Development Revealing t he research rich collections of UF, the DLC has digitized and mounted over six million items since its inception in 1997. UF's existing open access servers have the necessary memory and storage to support and deliver all of the digital images and metadata created during the project. As the project continues to grow beyond the grant period, DLC can easily scale if needed because UF has a commodity storage and hosting design, supported through

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University of Florida 14 the Open Systems Group. UF and its partners are committed to provi ding universal online access to these unique historical resources, and this project will encourage people to explore the earliest days of one of the oldest cities in North America. This project offers exciting new opportunities for both the partner insti tutions and for researchers and expert users far beyond the duration of the grant. UF is committed to investigating new methods allowing users to control how they interact with digital resources. Following project completion users will be able to enhance discoverability and comprehension of the resources by contributing metadata for objects online, defining relationships between resources, and manipulating images online. UF and partners will be able to expand the project by digitizing additional colonial S t. Augustine objects. UF has the technology infrastructure and programming expertise to ensure the long term sustainability of the interactive digital collection. Additionally, source software, the programming developed for this project will be available for use in other projects created by UF or others. IV. Work Plan (July 1, 2012 June 30, 2014) Unearthing St. Augustine will involve the selection and digitization of archival materials and the creation of syste m architecture and functionality to a resulting, open source digital collection A Gantt Chart provides an overview of the project schedule and is available in Appendix A. Work plan activities and digitization estimates are illustrated in Appendix B Quar ter 1 (July Sep 2012): Advisory Board (Advisors) meets first time in St. Aug ustine with PI, UF curators, and partners, and establishes selection guidelines to be used throughout the project. Advisors begin selecting 1,500 items from St. Augustine Historic al Society and P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History collections. Advisors and curators will consult with UF conservator (Freund) to assess archival materials to be digitized. The conservator is retained for consultation throughout the project Equipment a nd so ftware are ordered/ received, then transported, set up and tested at the new digitization lab in St. Augustine at Government House (Caswell; Renner; IT staff) Candidates for project staff ( project manager TBD; and p rogrammer, TBD) are recruited, inter viewed, and hired by September 30, 2012 (Caswell; Cusick; Nemmers; Renner). Quarter 2 ( October December 2012): Advisors meet with UF c urators and project manager in St. Augustine. Advisors will 1) review selections made by UF curators 2 ) advise the City A rchaeologist Halbirt, in selecting 50 of the 100 arch aeological sites included, and 3 ) provide initial list of requirements for UFDC user interface. Training ( scanning) for project staff and partners (with Renner and IT staff) Training and supervision for geo coding metadata, creation of templates, and geo referencing of data files by UF GIS coordinator (Aufmuth) Begin scanning materials and creation of metadata files at Government House digiti zation lab (1,500 files target) Transport d ata files to UF b iweekly throughout the project using portable external drives Examine d ata files for quality control (QC) and deri vative files are produced (DLC) Optical Character Recognition (OCR) performed on data files, uploaded to servers, and archived in Florida Dig i tal Archive (completed by DLC) Programmer begins developing system architecture Quarter 3 ( January March 2013 ) through Quarter 8 (April June 2014) Create protocols for user testing of system architecture (Quarter 3 only)

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University of Florida 15 Advisors meet with UF curators and project manager in St. Augustine to continue selection and project assessment/guidance. Continue geo coding metadata and geo referencing of digitized files Scan materials/ create metadata at Government House digitization lab (1,800 files target each quarte r ) Transport d ata files to UF biweekly throughout the project using portable external drives Examine d ata files for quality control (QC) and derivative files are produced (DLC) Perform Optical Character Recognition (OCR) on data files, uploaded to servers, and archived in Florida Digital Archive (completed by DLC) Programmer continues developing and refining system architecture Quarter 5 (July September 2013) and during Quarter 7 (January March 2014) Conduct focus groups with Advisory Board and campus facu lty/students (two each quarter) and usability studies for user interface and system architecture Programmer responds to focus group feedback by modifying user interface and system architecture as needed to reach desired result for users Quarter 7 (January March 2014) UF curators and history librarian begin developing electronic resource guides and video tutorial for using primary source materials revealed through the online digital collection Quarter 8 (April June 2014) UF curators and history librarian complete electronic resource guides and video tutorial, and perform usability testing with UF faculty/students. Guides and tutorial undergo modifications and are linked within the online digital collection UF curators and public information officer dissem inate availability of new online digital collection through media campaign (newsletters, listservs, newsreleases, targeted emails social networking sites, blogs ) Project PI and Co PI presents Unearthing St. Augustine at two national conferences and one st ate conference (e.g. Art Libraries Society of North America (May), Society of American Archivists (August), Florida Humanities Council (June) UF curators will publish at least two articles describing the project and its results. V. Staff Faculty and Adv isory Board This section describes the 1) Advisory Board members who will provide guidance in selecting materials to be digitized and in designing th e digital collection interface; 2) UF Libraries staff documented c ost sharing efforts for three collection curators and staff from the Digital Library Center, Information Technology, Preservation, and GIS Spatial Information Services ; and 3) NEH grant funded project staff including a full time programmer to develop the system architecture and user interface, a full time program manager to oversee digitization activities, and a part time scan technician. Rsums for relevant staff and advisors, and position descriptions for project staff to be hired, are provided in Appendi ces C, D, and E 1. Advisory Board Mem bers An Advisory Board will contribute, at no cost to the project, expert guidance on building the digital collection and designing the user interface The Advisory Board will be comprised of archaeologists, historic preservationists, and historians who ha ve expertise in the colonial history of St. Augustine and Florida. Project role: 1) to provide guidance in selecting collection content, and 2) to provide expert user perspectives about interface features necessary to improve scholarly access and work. Advisors will be responsible for selecting documents from the collections of the St. Augustine Historical Society and the P.K.

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University of Florida 16 Yonge Library of Florida History. Advisors will assist the St. Augustine city archaeologist in selecti ng 50 of 100 archaeological sites included in the project (Appendix K ). Advisors will guide the selection process throughout the duration of the project by email, telephone or in person. Advisors also will periodically evaluate the user interface during de velopment and provide feedback. Roy Eugene Graham Fellow American Institute of Architects ( FAIA ) (MAH University of Virginia, BS Architectural Engineering LSU, PhD studies Courtauld Institute, London) is the Beinecke Reeves Distinguished Professor and th e Director of the UF College of Design, Construction and Planning Historic Preservation Programs and the Center for World Heritage Research and Stewardship He directed similar programs at the University of Texas and the University of Virginia and founded the Urban Conservation Program at the Catholic University of America. For a decade he was Resident Architect and VP of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation where he directed the departments of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Planning, Research, and C onservation. He was Director of the State Historic Preservation Board of Texas, served on the Virginia Landmarks Commission and is Chairman Emeritus of the National Center for Preservation Technology. He has written numerous books on conservation and archi tectural history and is a frequent consultant to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre in Paris and the International Centre for Conservation and Restoration in Rome (ICCROM). Graham is a Fellow in the International Council for Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). Cur rent research includes contextual architectural and social history for the Castillo de San Marcos and the Spanish Defense Strategy of 1588, and the English colonial history of St. Augustine and is developing a consortium for historic preservation education for SECAC. Project role: Advisory Board. Carl D. Halbirt (MPA, University of North Florida, MA Northern Arizona University, BA University of Arizona) is city a rchaeologist for St. Augustine a position held since 1990. He directs the City's Archaeology Pr ogram as specified in the Archaeological Preservation Ordinance by conducting archaeological investigations at properties slated for development, analyzing all artifacts collected, and preparing project reports. These endeavors have been facilitated by the implementation of a volunteer program that trains community residents in data recovery and analysis. Halbirt is a member of the Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA) and has served as president and board member of the St. Augustine Historical Soci ety. He is a research associate with the Historic St. Augustine Research Institute and the St. Augustine Historical Society. He has received various citations included the Ripley P. Bullen Award in 2008 and presented the Julian Prescott Memorial Lectureshi p to the Florida Historical Society in 2010. Project role: Advisory Board. Susan Richbourg Parker ( Ph.D., MA in colonial history, UF ; BA in Sp anish, Florida State University) is executive director of the St. Augustine Historical Society and adjunct profes sor in historic preservation at UF She has taught graduate and undergraduate courses at UF University of South Florida and University of North Florida in Florida history, Spanish Borderlands, U.S. survey courses, historic preservation. She is a Research Associate with the UF Flagler College Historic St. Augustine Research Institute. Her work appears in several books published by University of Florida Press and historical journals. Her research focuses on the social history of the early southeast with part icular focus on material culture and social relations among the three races that inhabited the region, using information from original Spanish documents written in the 15 th through the 18 th centuries. Project role: Advisory Board. Herschel E. Shepard FAI A (BA, 1953, and MFA in Architecture, 1956, Princeton University) is a retired architect and professor emeritus in the UF School of Architecture. A substantial amount of his practice has been in historic preservation and includes the restoration of the His toric 1902

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University of Florida 17 Florida Capitol. In St. Augustine he has served as architect or consultant for the de Mesa Sanchez House, Avero House, Ximenez Fatio House, Gonzalez House, Government House, Old St. Augustine Village, and St. Augustine 1580. He has also served on the Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board and the City of St. Augustine Historic Preservation Commission. Current work includes architectural consultant for the reconstruction of Mission San Luis, Tallahassee, and independen t research related to Native American copper breastplates from Mount Royal, Florida. Project role: Advisory Board. Dana Ste. Claire is d Historic Preservation and Executive Director of the St. Augustine 450 th Commemoration Commission. He is the former National Director of Museums for Historic Tours of America, Inc. where he designed and developed museums, historic attractions, history themed destinations, themed retail stores and inte rpretive programs across the country. He consults as a heritage tourism specialist inte rnationally. Ste.Claire holds BA and MA degrees from the University of South Florida in archaeology and cultural resource management and is a former museum director and college instructor. Ste.Claire is immediate past Chair of the St. Johns County T ourist Development Council and the City of St. Augustine Historic A rchitectural Review Board He is a member of the Florida Folklife Council, appointed by the Secretary of Stat e, and is a former member of several state and national boards, including the Florida Historic Preservation Advisory Board, the Florida Heritage Tourism Council, and the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation. Ste.Claire is a former feature columnist wi th the Orlando Sentinel (1989 1999), a PBS television host ( Florida Crackerbarrel ), and has authored three books, including Cracker: The Cracker Culture in Florida History and Borders of Paradise (both University Press of Florida publications). Project role: Advisory Board. Glenn Willumson is an associate professor of art history and the director of the graduate program in museology at UF He served as curator at the Getty Research Center before moving to Pennsylvania where he was senior curator at the Palme r Museum of Art. In addition to his publications Willumson has organized exhibitions on American daguerreotypes, the artists of the Stieglitz circle, the Pincus collection of contemporary art, the video work of Bill Viola, and the photographs of Allan Seku la. He has held affiliate and visiting faculty positions at the University of California, Irvine, and at The Pennsylvania State University. His forthcoming book will be published by the University of California Press and is entitled Iron Muse: Picturing th e First Transcontinental Railroad Project role: Advisory Board. 2. UF Funded Positions ( Documented Cost Share) Thomas Caswell, Principal Investigator, associate university l ibrarian (.20 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $ 31,585 ): Master of Library and Information Sciences, University of South Florida; BA Art History, UF. For hitecture and Fine Arts Library Caswell provides reference and instructional assistance in art, architecture, and related disciplines and serves as subject specialist a nd collection manager in the areas of art, art history, historic preservation, and museum studies. He was PI for a project to digitize Government House vertical file material which forms the core of the UF Digital Col lection Historic St. Augustine Project role : Caswell will oversee evaluation and selection of materials; assist in the indexing and organizing of materials, including the provision of metadata to help i n searching and linking content ; create contextual narrative for historic preservation, museum studies and design related content; and help develop and review site functionality to make it useful for conducting research. James Cusick, Ph. D., Co Principal Investigator, c urator, P.K. Yong e Library of Florida History (.15 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $ 23,270 ) : MA and Ph.D. in Anthropology,

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University of Florida 18 UF. He serves as collection curator and bibliographer for Florida materials specializing in research on the Spanish colonial period; especiall y rehousing and curation of the map collection He is editor of Studies in Culture Contact and author of The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida Since 2004 he has served as lead scholar with the Florida Hum anities Council f or its summer teacher workshop Between Columbus and Jamestown : Spanish St. Augustine funded under the We the People initiative of NEH. He des igned the accompanying site: Spanis h Colonial St. Augustine: A Resource for Teachers Project role: Cusick will oversee evaluation and selection of materials; assist in indexing and organizing of materials, assist with metadata; create contextual narrative for archaeological and documentar y content; and assist with develop ment and review site functionality to make it useful for conducting research. Shelley Arlen, associate university l ibrarian, (.05 FTE cost share, year 2, totaling $3,564) has worked in multiple capacities, including libra ry management, in research libraries at the University of Oklahoma and UF for over 35 years. She is now U.S. and British History Librarian in the Humaniti es & Social Sciences Department Project role: Arlen will be responsible for creation of an online vid eo tutorial for users of digitized primary source material from the St. Augustine Digital Collection; she will participate in instruction sessions for UF students and the Joe Aufmuth GIS c oordinator (. 0 5 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $7,550 ) : MS Civil Engineering, specializing in Geomatics, UF For the past 20 years Aufmuth has concentrated on Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing. He serves as Head of UF Libraries Spatial Inform ation Services. He has managed numerous GIS projects to create photographs. Project role: Aufmuth will provide guidance and expertise to the Programmer in developing the geo referencing component of the system architecture. He will train project staff to input geo coded coordinates to metadata and create new GIS data for specific sites and structures on maps. Logan Clapp, IT Expert (.03 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $4,574 ): As an IT Expert in the UF Libraries Information Technology Department, he provides server, h ardware, and networking support. Project role: Clap p will provide guidance to the p roject p rogrammer in developing system architecture, and will provide general server and network ing support. John Freund c onservator (. 0 5 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $6,823 ) : As head of the Conservation Unit since 1988, he is responsible for repair and maintenance of circulating library collections and restora tion/ repair of Special Collections materials. He has built a full service conservation lab for modern and rare books, maps, manuscripts, photographs and objects. Project role : Freund will examine and apply treatment s to original objects He will relax or f latten items unfold corners, and mend tears interfering with handling and imaging He will separate m ultiple items. Freund will be available for consultation throughout the imaging process. Following imaging, he will review all originals and approve for r eturn to partner repositories. Winston Harris, chief software analyst and database a dministrator (.03 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $5,759 ) : a position he has held for 15 years. He holds a MS in Computer Science and has 25 years exp erience in s oftware development in libraries, medical, research, military and embedded systems. He has used a variety of software development methodologies which range from structured development and rapid application development to extreme programming. Harris has 15 years of experience as a database administrator using Microsof t SQL Server Project role: Harris will supervise the project p rogrammer in developing system architecture, and will provide programming support.

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University of Florida 19 John R. Nemmers descriptive and technical servi ces a rchivist (.20 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $ 30,771 ): Nemmers holds a Master of Library Science Florida State University. In this position since 2003, is responsible for arrangement and description activities, including processing archival collections, authoring EAD collection guides and MARC catalog records. He manages historical collections pertaining to Florida politics, landscape design, and environmental history and science. Project role: Nemmers will evaluate and select materials from the Herschel Shepard Collection; assist in indexing and organizing materials, including the provision of metadata; create context ual narrative; and develop/ review site functionality for conducting research. Nemmers will create MARC and EAD metadata. With t raining from the GIS Coordinator, Nemmers also will create geo coded met a data. Cynthia L. Peterson, architecture archives curator (.05 FTE cost share year 1 and 2 totaling $ 6,599 ) C ertified archivist, records consultant, and specialist in architectural recor ds preservation and management. She holds a Masters in Library and Informatio n Science from Simmons College with an Arc hives Management concentration. She has consulted throughout Florida with historical societies and private foundations to preserve a nd manage collections. Project role: Peterson will evaluate and select materi als ; develop/ review site functionality for conducting research; and promote the project to a diverse audience. Randall Renner, m anager for operations & digital p rojects (DLC) (.1 0 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $11,687 ): MFA in Creative Photography, UF. Before coming to the DLC in 2002, Renner taught college level courses on computer art, mixed media, black and white photography, training seminars on various computer appl ications, and worked as a photographer, photographing rare books, artwork, and 3 D models. Project role: Renner will supervise image capture and production units. He will hire, train, and supervise the p roject manager and s canning t echnician on new equipme nt and will provide technical expertise on functional operations, providing production support to ensure project success. Mark Sullivan, Digital Library Center/Systems Programmer (. 0 5 FTE cost share years 1 and 2, totaling $7, 623 ) : L ead developer respons ible for creating digital library tools and software: 1) SobekCM, the enterprise level open source digital library management system powers the UF Digital Collections; 2) Digital Libr ary of the Caribbean Toolkit, for metadata submission by 30 partners to d igitize and transfer files/ metadata to a centralized repo sitory for access and archiving; 3) DLC Toolkit, a specialized, enterprise, production scale version of the dLOC Toolkit adopted as the official digital production software by the Digital Initiatives Subcommittee of the State University Libraries of Florida; 4) myUFDC and myDLOC, online patron tools and a full suite of collection manager s partner tools, and administrative tools Project role: Sullivan will mentor and collaborate with p roject p rogramm er on project expansion and integration of new functionalities. Sullivan will assist in gathering user feedback, testing, and training to ensure technical strength and ease of use for all tools and technologies. Laurie Taylor, PhD, interim director, DLC ( 0 5 FTE cost share, years 1 and 2 totaling $ 6,985 ) Taylor holds a PhD in English and Digital Humanities from UF and has served on a review panel for the Digital Humanities Start up grants for NEH She is the technical director for the Digital Library of t he Caribbean technical director for the Florida Digital Newspaper Library and C o PI for America's Swamp: the Historical Everglades a project to digitize six archival collections. Project role : Taylor will provide management oversight for the digitizatio n portion of this project and monitors the workflow between digitization units, including tracking production schedules, facilitating communication and trouble shooting between units. I n conjunction with DLC staff, she will oversee archiving of the TIFF ma sters with the Florida Center for Library Automation. 3. NEH Grant Funded Positions

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University of Florida 20 Project M anager (TBD, 1 FTE NEH funded years 1 and 2 total request: $ 61,696 salary plus $ 1 8,479 fringe benefits ), Project Role : S ee Appendix E Project manager Positio n Description The p roject manager is imperative to facilitate communication among partners, organize activities and guarantee success. The person will coordinate interactions with partners; digitize materials and oversee production for the project; docum ent procedures; collaborate with the Collection Curators and Advisory Board to ensure creation of all digital materials, interfaces, and contextual supports. With training from the GIS Coordinator, this person also will have primary responsibility for crea tion of geo coded metadata. Project Programmer ( TBD, 1 FTE NEH funded, years 1 and 2 total request: $ 96,250 salary plus $ 28,828 fringe benefits ), Project Role : See Appendix E P roject Progra mmer Position Description. The p rogrammer will be responsible f or i mplementing and integrating new system functionality. In collaboration with the collection c urators Advisory Board members, and UF Digital Library Center and Informatio n Technologies (IT) staff, the p rogrammer will develop the necessary scripting/prog ramming as well as underlying map layers, databases and file structures, needed to allow users to interact with the digital collection Project Scan Technician (student worker) (TBD, .5 FTE NEH funded, years 1 and 2, total request: $ 16,443 salary plus $ 4 27 fringe benefits), Project Role : See Appendix E Project Scan Technician Position Description. The t echnician is necessary to complete digitization activities including scanning, post capture image correction, quality control and metadata creation The technician also will proof OCR text derivatives and create geo coded metadata. VI. Dissemination Unearthing St. Augustine will be promoted broadly to local, national and international scholars, teachers and the general public. The City of St. Augustine and the state of Florida anniversaries in 2013 and 2015 respectively will provide the most beneficial opportunities for promoting this project, its partners and its outcomes. UF and its partners will create and widely disseminate information about the proj ect and its resources. UF will publish project technical documentation and publicize system architecture and subsequently releas ed as open source programming. To increase discovery of and access to St. Augustine resources, UF will contribute digital object s and metadata to digital repositories and collections. UF digital collections are automatically disseminated via OAI and MARCXML feeds to multiple harvesters and repositories including: Trove, NINES, 18thConnect, WorldCat, OAIster, and other aggregators. UF Libraries public information office will provide professional promotional and marketing services to implement many of the publicity strategies. Collection man a gers and subject specialists at UF and partner St. Augustine institutions will promote the ne w resource to researchers and colleagues. Additional publicity will be conducted using: Press releases to media outlets and listservs, bot h general and subject specific Articles published in j ournals, newsletters, and blogs Presentati ons at conferences an d meetings Contributions of digital objects to social networking sites to encourage disco very The streng th of the dissemination plan is that Advisors will use their extensive network of international colleagues to disseminate information about and encoura ge future development of the interactive digital portal As leading experts in the archaeology, historic preservation and history of Florida and colonial America the A dvisors will effectively and authoritatively promote the project to a very broad audienc e. Their efforts, along with publicity efforts undertaken by UF and its partners, will ensure that the project receives the widest exposure.

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University of Florida History of Grants Although UF request s NEH funding to support the creation of the Unearthing St. Augustine digital collection the UF Libraries have secured funding from a variety of sources for related ological advances developed over the past 10 years are reflected in this proposal. UF has developed the capacity and expertise to deliver digital resources to users (two million users during the month of June 2011) and with NEH support will be able to take th e next step of producing a truly interactive and community based digital collection. Previous Support: Saving Carrre and Hastings' St. Augustine Architectural Treasures National Endowment s Program, 2010 2012, $99,124. [Note: UF Libraries is the subcontractor; Flagler College is serving as applicant for this collaborative project.] Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library: Disseminating and Preserving Records of Daily Life U.S. Department of E ducation Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information Access (TICFIA), 2009 2013, $19,719 National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), 2008 2011; $72,650 From the Air: The Photographic Record of Florida's Lands (Phase III) Library Services & Technology Act 2009 2010, $67,008 Historic St. Augustine: Block and Lot Files George A. Smathers Libraries Mini Grant (funded internally) 2008 2009, $5,000 Digital Librar y of the Caribbean: Crossing Borders U.S. Department of Education Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information Access (TICFIA), 2005 2009, $90,952 From the Air: The Photographic Record of Florida's Lands (Phase II) Library Services & Technology Act 2003 2004, $87,712 Ephemeral Cities: A Model for Developing an Historic Digital Atlas Based on Three Florida Cities Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2003 2006, $184,609 From the Air: The Photographic Record of Florida's Lands ( Phase I) Library Services & Technology Act 2002 2003, $109,164

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See online Budget Instructions (4-page PDF) Computational Details/Notes (notes) Year 1 (notes) Year 2 Project Total 07/01/201206/30/2013 07/01/201306/30/2014 1. Salaries & Wages TBA-Project Manager Fiscal year salary: $32,255 (yr1, 9 mth employee), $32,255 (yr2) 100% $26,441 100% $35,255 $61,696 TBA-Programmer(IT Expert) Fiscal year salary: $55,000 (yr1, 9 mth employee), $55,000 (yr2) 100% $41,250 100% $55,000 $96,250 TBA-Scan Technician Fiscal year salary: $9,396 (yr1, 9 mth employee), $9,396 (yr2) 100% $7,047 100% $9,396 $16,443 2. Fringe Benefits TBA-Project Manager 30.0% of funded portion of salary $7,902 $10,577 $18,479 TBA-Programmer(IT Expert) 30.0% of funded portion of salary $12,328 $16,500 $28,828 TBA-Scan Technician 2.6% of funded portion of salary $183 $244 $427 3. Consultant Fees $0 $0 $0 4. Travel 18 roundtrip drives from Gainesville to St. Augustine ($1,025); 19 nights of lodging ($2,375); 18 days of meals ($648) $4,048 $4,048 24 roundtrip drives from Gainesville to St. Augustine ($1,367); 24 nights of lodging ($3,000); 24 days of meals ($864) $5,231 $5,231 ARLIS/NA Conference; Registration ($325); Airfare($347); Hotel ($597) $1,269 $1,269 SAH Conference; Registration ($369); Airfare($312); Hotel ($599) $1,280 $1,280 FL Humanities Council Summer Seminar; Mileage ($57); Lodging($125); Meals ($36) $218 $218 5. Supplies & Materials Flat-bed Scanner $1,200 each 1 $1,200 $0 $1,200 Slide Scanner $1,200 each 1 $1,200 $0 $1,200 Bulk Slide Feeder $413 each 1 $413 $0 $413 Universal power supply $140 each 2 $280 $0 $280 Computer $800 each 1 $800 $0 $800 Monitor $98 each 2 $196 $0 $196 Computer table $950 each 2 $1,900 $0 $1,900 Chair $300 each 2 $600 $0 $600 6. Services $0 $0 $0 7. Other Costs $0 $0 $0 8. Total Direct Costs Per Year $105,788 $134,970 $240,758 9. Total Indirect Costs Per Year $35,545 $45,350 $80,895 Indirect Cost Calculation: a. Rate: 33.6% of direct cost per year. b. Federal Agency: DOH&HS c. Date of Agreement: 06 /18/10 10. Total Project Costs (Direct and Indirect costs for entire project) $321,653 11 Project Funding a. Requested from NEH Outright: $321,653 Matching Funds: $0 Total Requested from NEH: $321,653 b. Cost Sharing Applicant's Contributions: $196,821 Third Party Contributions: $0 Project Income: $0 Other Federal Agencies: $0 Total Cost Share: $196,821 12. Total Project Funding $518,474 Budget Form (rev. 06/2011) Applicant Institution: University of Florida Project Director: Tom Caswell Project Grant Period: 07/01/2012 06/30/2014

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Appendix A: Gantt Chart Project Timeline: Year 1 (2012/2013) Year 2 (2013/2014) Activities & Participants: Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Quarter 5 Quarter 6 Quarter 7 Quarter 8 Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 1. Advisory Board meets in St. Augustine to est. project guidelines (Caswell; Cusick; Nemmers) 2. Order/receive/set up & test equipment, software at Government House in St. Augustine (Caswell;Renner; IT) 3. Advertise/recruit for Project Staff (Caswell; Cusick; Nemmers; Renner; IT) 4. Hire/train Project Staff, Partners (Caswell; Renner; IT) 5. Advisory Board meetings in St. Augustine to assess & select materials (Board; Caswell; Cusick;Nemmers; Freund; Project Staff) 6. Staff & partner training/ supervision of g eorectification & creation of geolocation metadata (Aufmuth; Programmer) 7. Scan materials & create metadata at Government House digitization lab (Project Manager & Partner volunteers) 1500 files 3300 files 5100 files 6900 files 8400 files 10200 files 11000 files 8. Data files transported to 9. Data files examined for quality control and derivative files produced (Scan Technician; Renner) 10. to servers and archived into Florida Digital Archive (Scan

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Appendix A: Gantt Chart Technician; Taylor) 11. Develop & refine system architecture (Programmer) 12. Conduct focus groups & usability studies for user interface (Programmer; Board; Caswell; Nemmers) 13. Develop/distribute electronic resource guides & publicity (Caswell;Cusick;Nemmers; Peterson; Arlen) 14. Present work in progress at national conferences (Caswell) 15. Public release of finalized interface (Project Staff)

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Appendix B: Work Plan Activities and Digitization Estimates Appendix B : Work Plan Activities and Digitization Estimates This graphic illustrates workflow activities and relationships between the participants. UF Digital Library Center Digitization Estimates: Digitization from Analog: Quantity Type Equip ment Minutes/item Total hours 1200 Gov House: Maps, Large format Large format 150 3000 2500 St. Augustine Historical Society documents Copibook 5.45 227.27 1500 Selections by the advisory board: documents Copibook 5.45 136.36 800 Shepard Collec tion: Large format Large format 150.00 2000 Subtotal 6000 5363.64 Digital Ingest: Quantity Type Equipment 2000 Digital ingest of all files for 100 Archaeology Program excavations digital ingest 3000 Adding items from existing digital col lections myUFDC Subtotal 5000

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor & Director of the College Preservation Programs College of Design, Construction and Planning office: 356 ARCH e-mail: regraham@dcp.ufl.edu phone: (352) 392-4836 ext 233 Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA (MAH University of Virginia, BS Architectural Engineering LSU, PhD studies Courtauld Institute, London) is the Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor and the Director of the College of Design, Construction and Planning Historic Preservation Programs and the Center for World Heritage Research and Stewardship at the University of Florida. He directed similar programs at the University of Texas and the University of Virginia and founded the Urban Conservation Program at the Catholic University of America. For a decade he was Resident Architect and VP of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation where he directed the departments of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Planning, Research, and Conservation. He was Director of the State Historic Preservation Board of Texas, served on the Virginia Landmarks Commission and is Chairman Emeritus of the National Center for Preservation Technology. He has written numerous books on conservation and architectural history and is a frequent consultant to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre in Paris and the International Centre for Conservation and Restoration in Rome (ICCROM). Graham is a Fellow in the International Council for Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). Current research includes contextual architectural and social history for the Castillo de San Marcos and the Spanish Defense Strategy of 1588, and the English colonial history of St. Augustine and is developing a consortium for historic preservation education for SECAC. Education Master of Architectural History, University of Virginia Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering, Louisiana State University Post-Graduate Studies, University of Texas at Austin Post-Graduate Studies, Couthauld Institute of the University of London Positions Held (2003-present) Director, College Preservation Programs The College of Design, Construction and Planning The University of Florida (1998-2003) Director, Graduate Program in Urban Conservation The School of Architecture and Planning, The Catholic University of America (19971998) Distinguished Fulbright Scholar Taught at the Faculty of Architecture, The University of Ljubljana, Slovenia; Advisor to the Slovene Ministry of Culture on Cultural Policy; Project in developing Cultural Resource Management Strategy for Skofja Loka, Slovenia for the Council of Europe. Lectured in Croatia, Italy, Macedonia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Consultant to the restoration of the Basilica of St. Francis at Assisi.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae (1990-1999) Professor, The School of Architecture and Planning, The Catholic University of America (1988-1990) Adjunct Professor, Texas A&M School of Architecture Developed research and curriculum, established student internship program, lectured and consulted to Center for Preservation (1995-1998) Architect of the Capitol of Texas and Executive Director of the State Preservation Board (1982-1985) Director of the Historic Preservation Program, University of Virginia School of Architecture (1972-1982) Resident Architect, Vice President, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation ( 1968-1972) Associate Professor, University of Texas School of Architecture Created new graduate program in Historic Preservation. (1965-1967) Architectural Planner and Programmer, University of Virginia

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae CARL D. HALBIRT (City Archaeologist, St. Augustine, Florida) EDUCATION M.P.A. (Public Administration) University of North Florida, Jacksonville (2004) M. A. (Anthropology) University of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff (1985) B. A. (Anthropology) University of Arizona, Tucson 1974 AWARDS Jillian Prescott Memorial Lectureship Ripley P. Bullen Award ional and Avocational Award of Excellence City of St. Augustine Employee of the Year ( through his GRANTS City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program Website (2009): Presents the procedures used and discoveries made Every artifact tells a story: Windows Through Time: A Guide to the City of St. Augustine's Archeology Program: A portable display to the community 1993 St. Augustine Archaeological Inventory: An inventory of archaeological projects that has occurred in St. Augustine 1992 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE (since 1974) City Archaeologist: City of St. Augustine. Primary duties: To direct the City's Archaeology Program as specified for development; to analyze, curate, and conserve all artifacts collected; to prepare reports describing results of project investigations; to implement, train, and maintain a volunteer program to assist the City in archaeological data recovery and analysis; to provide support to City staff in matters concerning historic preservation and cultural resources management issues; to prepare annual budgets and mission statements; to inform the community of the City's Archaeology Program through lectures to civic organizations, brochures, and articles in local newsletters; to prepare grant applications that seek to support the research efforts or inform the community of the City's Archaeology Program; to present results of City investigations at professional conferences and journals; also developed a comparative modern collection of faunal remains to assist in the recognition of archaeofaunal assemblages and implemented an Occasional Series of archaeological monographs. April 1990 to present PUBLICATIONS ( Selection of published articles relevant to St. Augustine) La Ciudad de San Agustn: An eighteenth-Century European Fighting Presidio. Historical Archaeology 39(3):3348. 2004 Lessons from the Monson. St. Augustine Archaeological Association Newsletter 19 (3):16. 2002 El Escribano 39:2944. 2002 St. Augustine Archaeological Association Newsletter 17(4):15. 1999 Archaeology of the Santo Domingo Redoubt. St. Augustine Archaeological Association Newsletter 14(4):16. 1999 "...A Great Farmer and Gardener": Archaeological Evidence of Governor James Grant's Farm, St. Augustine, East Florida. The Florida Anthropologist 52(1-2):5771. 1997 Of Earth, Tabby, Brick, and Asphalt: The Archaeology of St. Augustine's Historic St. George Street. El Escribano 34:7097. 1993 The City of St. Augustine's Archaeology Program. The Florida Anthropologist 46(2):101104. 1993 The Archeology of the Cubo Line: St. Augustine's First Line of Defense. The Florida Anthropologist 46(2):105-127. 1993 Identifying and Locating the Hornabeque Line: An Eighteenth-Century Spanish Fortification in St.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Augustine. The Florida Anthropologist 46(2):128-136. 1993 The Stratigraphy of the Mose Line: St. Augustine's Last Line of Defense. The Florida Anthropologist 46(2):137-144 (with Bruce J. Paitek). CONFERENCES (Selection of papers relevant to St. Augustine) 2010 42 nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, Amelia Island, Florida. 2010 Refugees to Bootleggers and Everything In Between: A Microcosm of Urban Archaeology in Downtown St. Augustine. Poster presented at the 42 nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, Amelia Island, Florida (with Melissa H. Dezendorf) 2009 Beyond the Fountain of Youth: St. Augustine, Florida, prior to European Colonization. Paper presented at the 74 th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Atlanta, GA, April 22-26, 2009 (with Kathleen Deagan). 2008 Skittering Gators, a HackedPaper presented at Unearthing First America, La Florida by Land and Sea Conference Flagler College, St. Augustine, FL. 2008 Paper presented at the 60 th Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropological Society, Ybor City, Florida. 2007 mall Town Forum Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, St. Augustine, Florida. 2007 Timucuan Architecture and Village Layout in St. Augustine at the Time of the Menendez Encampment. Paper presented at the 59 th Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropology Society, Avon Park, Florida (with Antoinette B. Wallace, Nick McAuliffe, and Michael B. Tarleton). 2006 City. Poster presented at the 71 st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Juan, Puerto Rico. th Century Mission Community of Nuestra Seora del Rosario de la Punta. Paper presented at the 2005 SEAC conference, Columbia, South Carolina. 2005 th Century Agricultural Enterprise is St. Augustine, Florida. Paper presented at the 57 th Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropological Society, (with Melissa N. Hagen). 2005 Archaeological Investigations of a Multi-component Spanish Mission/British Hospital Site in St. Augustine, Florida. Paper presented at the 57 th Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropological Society, Gainesville (with Ray McGee, Antoinette B. Wallace, Mike Tarleton, and Nick McAuliffe). 2004 A Unique 19 th Century Trash Deposit from the Sanchez-Poujaud Site, St. Augustine, Florida. Paper presented at the 56 th Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropological Society, Fort Lauderdale (with Antoinette B. Wallace). 2003 th Century Cultural Landscape. Paper presented at the 55th Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropological Society, Tallahassee, Florida. 2002 Conflagration and Exchange: The Impact of the Carolina Colony on the Development of the 18 th century Presidio de San Agustin. Paper presented at the 28 th Annual Conference of the Archaeological Society of South Carolina, Columbia. 2002 Presidio de San Agustin: The Center of Spanish Power in La Florida during the 18 th century. Paper presented at the 35 th Annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, Mobile, Alabama. 2002 presented at the SHA 35 th conference for historical and underwater archaeology, Mobile, Alabama (with Andrea P. White). 2001 Colonial Defenses. Paper presented at the 53 rd Annual Conference of the Florida Anthropological Society, St. Augustine, Florida.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Susan Richbourg Parker Susan Richbourg Parker [Ph.D., M.A. in colonial history, University of Florida; B.A. in Spanish, Florida State University] is executive director of the Saint Augustine Historical Society and adjunct professor in historic preservation at the University of Florida. She has taught graduate and undergraduate courses at the University of Florida, University of South Florida and University of North Florida in Florida history, Spanish Borderlands, U.S. survey courses, historic preservation. She is a Research Associate with the UF -Flagler College Historic St. Augustine Research Institute. Her work appears in several books published by University of Florida Press and historical journals. Her research focuses on the social history of the early southeast with particular focus on material culture and social relations among the three races that inhabited the region, using information from original Spanish documents written in the 15 th through the 18 th centuries. EDUCATION: Ph. D. University of Florida Major field: Colonial United States; Minor field: Colonial Latin America Dissertation: The Second Century of Settlement in Spanish St. Augustine, 1670-1763 directed by Michael V. Gannon M. A. University of Florida (Major: History-Spanish Borderlands; Minor: Anthropology) B. A. Florida State University (Major: Spanish; Minor: History) EXPERIENCE Executive Director, St. Augustine Historical Society (2007-present). Regional Consultant for Historic Preservation (18 counties) Florida Division of Historical Resources (2002 2007). Scholarin -Residence, Florida Studies Program, University of South FloridaSt. Petersburg (Fall Semester 2006). Historian, Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, Florida Department of State (1987 1997). Adjunct professor, University of North Florida: Taught Florida history (AMH 3420), United States history survey (AMH 2020), Spanish Borderlands (AMH 3920); Florida Community College at Jacksonville (AMH 2020). ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICES: Editorial Board, Tampa Bay History, (2006 ) Editor, El Escribano (2005) Advisory Board, Florida Studies Center, University of South Florida (2001 ). Historic Resources Review Board for St. Johns County, (1999 2002), Chair (2000). Board of Trustees, St. Augustine Historical Society (1992 to 1998; 1999-2005), president (2000 and 2004). Board of Directors, Fort Mose Citizen's Support Organization (1997 2000). Historical Advisory Committee, Florida State Agricultural Museum (1996 -1998). Editor (1993), Journeys for the Junior Historian, published by the Florida Historical Society; Editorial Board (1990 -1991). Member (historical advisor) of Acquisitions Committee, St. Johns County Land Trust (1993 1996). HONORS AND AWARDS: Research grant, Historic St. Augustine Research Institute, University of FloridaFlagler College, 2005-2006. Research Associate, University of Florida-Flagler College Historic St. Augustine Research Institute (1999 ). Beveridge Grant for research in history of Western Hemisphere, awarded by American Historical Association (1997). LeRoy Collins Prize for best graduate essay, awarded by Florida Historical Society (1997). Speakers Bureau, Florida Humanities Council (1992).

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Arthur W. Thompson Prize for Florida History, awarded by Florida Historical Society for best article published in Florida Historical Quarterly (1991). PUBLICATIONS: The Oldest City, Sunday history column, St. Augustine Record, 1996 to present The St. Augustine Beach Hotel: a New Deal Project, El Escribano, 42 (2005): 84-98. 1603 Slaves Flee St. Augustine, El Escribano, 41 (2004): 18. Historic Resources of Canaveral National Seashore (Atlanta: Southeast Regional Office, 2003). Life in St. Augustine at the Turn of the Eighteenth Century, El Escribano, 39 (2002): 55-63. Cattle Trade in East Florida and Francis Fatio's Success Through Diversification in Colonial Plantations and Economy in Florida, Jane G. Landers, ed. (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2000). African Americans in Florida and the Caribbean, 1763 Today at www. millennium-exhibit.org, website for Jay I. Kislak Museum's exhibit, Myths and Dreams: Exploring the Cultural Legacies of Florida and the Caribbean( 1999 ). "The Endangered Bridge of Lions" (with E. L. Roy Hunt), Historic Preservation Forum (Summer 1997). "Second Spanish Period," in Michael Gannon, ed., The New History of Florida (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996). "Anglo-Spanish War, Siege of St. Augustine, Governor Francisco del Moral Snchez," entries in Alan Gallay, ed., Colonial Wars of North America, 1512-1763: An Encyclopedia in Military History of the United States Series (New York: Garland Publishing Co., 1996). "The Cattle Trade in Spanish East Florida, 1784-1821," in Joe Knetsch and Brenda Elliott, eds., Proceedings of the Florida Cattle Frontier Symposium (Kissimmee: Florida Cattlemen's Association, 1995) "Spanish St. Augustine's 'Urban' Indians," El Escribano, 30 (1993): 115. "Men Without God or King: Rural Planters of East Florida, 1784-1790," Florida Historical Quarterly, 69 (October 1990): 13555. "'I am Neither Your Subject nor Your Subordinate,'" El Escribano, 25 (1988): 43-60. "Canoes: Workaday Watercraft in Eighteenth-Century East Florida," El Escribano, 24 (1987): 53-62. The Sabate Plantation: The History and Archaeology of a Minorcan Farmstead with Stanley C. Bond, Jr., and Sue N. Smith, (St. Augustine: Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, 1990). St. Johns County Historical, Architectural and Archaeological Survey with Stanley C. Bond, Jr., (St. Augustine: Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, 1987). CONFERENCE PAPERS AND PUBLIC LECTURES St. Augustine in 1607 at La Huella de Espaa en la Unin Americana (The Vestige of Spain in the Americas,), University of Mlaga, Mlaga, Spain, May 8, 2008. St. Augustine in 1607 at Why St. Augustine? Symposium, St/ Augustine, February 23, 2008. Florida's Urban Indians': Two Centuries after Columbus at Florida Studies Program Lectures, University of South Florida-St. Petersburg, October 12, 2006. Colonial Florida Sacramental Artifacts at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts at University of Florida-Flagler College Historic St. Augustine Research Institute Spring Lectures Series, St. Augustine, March 22, 2006. NEH Landmarks of American History: Spanish St. Augustine, lecturer and lead scholar, Summer 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. The Men Without God or King' of Spanish East Florida, at American Historical Assoc. Annual Meeting, Washington, D. C., January 9, 2004. Iberian Regional Tradition in St. Augustine Architecture, at 300th Anniversary of 1702 Siege Symposium, St. Augustine, June 1, 2002. The First 250 Years of African Presence in Florida, at African-American Heritage Conference, Bartow, Florida, February 1, 2002. Spanish Florida Settlers and the new United States, at Plantation Symposium, Daytona Beach, March 24, 2001.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae HERSCHEL E. SHEPARD, FAIA EMERITUS PROFESSOR EMERITUS, UF SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Education Master of Fine Arts in Architecture, Princeton, 1956; B. A., Princeton, 1953. Professional Experience Herschel E. Shepard, FAlA Emeritus, Architect, I990-present (retired 1997). Shepard Associates, Architects & Planners Inc., 1978-90. Fisher & Shepard, Architects & Planners Inc., 1969-77. Herschel E. Shepard AlA, Architect, 1961-69. Representative Work Restoration of the Historic 1902 Florida State Capitol, Tallahassee (Architect). Florida Theater Restoration, Jacksonville (Architect). Reconstruction of Ft Foster, Hillsborough County (Architect). Mildred and Claude Pepper Archives, FSU (Architect). Partial Restoration of Ft. Clinch, Fernandina (Architect). Ximinez-Fatio House Restoration, St. Augustine (Architect). Spanish Point at the Oaks Restoration, Osprey (Architect). Quincy, Florida, Comprehensive Master Plan (Joint Venture). Cultural Survey, Tabuk Region, Saudi Arabia (Consultant). Reconstruction of Mission San Luis de Apalachee, Tallahassee (Consultant). Public and Professional Service Cit y of St. Augustine Task Force, Member, 2006 (transfers State properties to UP) City of St. Augustine Historic Preservation Advisory Committee, Member, 19 982001. State of Florida Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board, Trustee, 19921997. Florida Department of State, National Register Review Board, Member, 1986-92; Vice-Chairman, 1990-91; Chairman, 1991-92; Member, 20002002. Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, Director and Founder, 197879. National Trust for Historic Preservation, Advisor and Advisor Emeritus, 1976-present. Florida Department of State, Division of Archives, History and Records Management, Member, Advisory Board, 1975-78. Jacksonville Chapter, AlA; Member, I966-present; Secretary, 1966-67; State Director, 1967-68; Vice-President, 1969-70; President, 197071 Professional and Academic Honors (selected) State of Florida Senator Bob Williams Award, 2002. John Dyal Award, Jacksonville Chapter, AlA, 2000. Selected to Occupy the Bienecke-Reeves Distinguished Chair in Architectural Preservation, UF Department of Architecture, 1998-2001. Tallahassee Preservation Council Award for Historical Research, 1998. Carl Weinhardt Award, Florida Trust for Preservation, 1997. St Augustine Historical Society Award, 1992. Florida Trust for Preservation Awards, 1986, 1983, 1995. Jacksonville Historic Landmarks Commission Award, 1984. Fellowship, American Institute of Architects, 1979. Six Jacksonville Chapter AlA Awards, 1970-1984. Five Florida Association of AlA Awards, 1964-1983.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Henry Adams Fund Award of the AlA, 1956. High Honors, Princeton University, 1953. Teaching and Administrative Experience Director, UF Department of Architecture Preservation Institute: Nantucket (MA), 1994-1996. Chairman, Bienecke-Reeves Distinguished Chair in Architectural Preservation Selection Committee, 1994-1996. Professor, Department of Architecture, University of Florida, 1993-1996; retired in December, 1996. Distinguished Lecturer, Department of Architecture, University of Fl orida, 1988-1993. Associate Professor, College of Architecture, University of Florida, 1985-87.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Dana Ste.Claire Director Department of Heritage Tourism and Historic Preservation Executive Director St. Augustine 450 th Commemoration Commission City of St. Augustine Dana Ste.Claire is Director of the Department of Heritage Tourism and Historic Preservation with the City of St. Augustine. The Department manages historic programs, visitor experiences and facilities from the Visitor Information Center (VIC) and the Historic Downtown Parking Facility (HDPF) to historic properties and museums. It also oversees the Colonial Spanish interpretive programs. With 53 employees and over 500,000 square feet of physical plant, the department is the largest in the city. With heritage tourism as the largest industry in St. Augustine, the department essentially functions as the economic development agency for the City. Ste.Claire is also the Executive Director of the St. Augustine 450 th Commemoration Commission, formed in March 2009 by congressional act and executive authority by President Obama. The Commemoration is a three-year linear event beginning in 2013 with the 500 th anniversary of discovery of Florida by Juan Ponce de Leon and ending in 2015, the 450 th anniversary of the founding of St. Augustine in 1565 by Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles. Ste.Claire is former National Director of Museums for Historic Tours of America, Inc., where he designed and developed museums, historic attractions, themed destinations, themed retail stores and interpretive programs across the country from San Diego to Boston. He currently works as a heritage tourism specialist nationally for cities and organizations. Ste.Claire holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of South Florida in archaeology and cultural resource management with post-masters graduate work in anthropology and management. He is a former museum director, professional archaeologist, and college/university instructor. Ste.Claire is immediate past Chairs of the St. Johns County Tourist Development Council (TDC) and the Historic Architectural Review Board (HARB) for the City of St. Augustine. He is a past member of the Board of Directors of the St. Augustine Heritage Tourism Task Force, and recently sat on the Board of Trustees for the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation; he is a member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He is a member of t (1992 1999) and the State Heritage Tourism Council (1999 2003), and sat on the Visitor and Convention Bureau Board for several years. He is also a former board member of the Volusia County Historic Preservation Board and was a City Commissioner with the City of Lake Helen ng and Zoning Board and the Historic Preservation Advisory Board. Ste.Claire directed the 10-year restoration and development of Old St. Augustine Village Museum, a city block of historic houses, and has designed and developed museums in St. Augustine, Boston, San Diego, Washington D.C., Key West and Savannah, among other major heritage tourism destinations. He is a former feature columnist with the Orlando Sentinel, a PBS television host ( Florida Crackerbarrel ), and has

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae authored three books, including Cracker: The Cracker Culture in Florida History and Borders of Paradise (both University Press of Florida publications). His wife Carol is a psychologist with her private practice in St. Augustine and his two children, Casey (16) and Saneh (15) attend Nease and St. Augustine High Schools.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae GLENN G. WILLUMSON 9821 SW 55 th Road University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32608 School of Art and Art History 352 273 3072 P.O. Box 115801 gwillumson@arts.ufl.edu Gainesville, FL 32611 5801 352 392 0201, ext. 234 Employment 2001 Associate Professor of Art History and Director of Graduate Program in Museum Studies, University of Florida 1993 2001 Affiliate Associate Professor in the Department of Art History, The Pennsylvania State University 1992 2001 Curator, Palmer Museum of Art, The Pennsylvania State University 1990 Visiting Professor, Department of Art History, University of California, Irvine 1988 1992 Curator for the History of Photography and American Art, J. Paul Getty Research Institute 1987 Natio nal Writing Project Fellow 1982 1983 Assistant Curator, Nelson Art Gallery, University of California, Davis 1971 1981 Teacher, California Secondary Schools Lifetime Teaching Credential, State of California (1976) Education Doctor of Philosophy in Art History, University of California, Santa Barbara. 1988 Major Field : Modern art: emphasis in history of photography and American art Master of Arts in Art History, University of California, Davis. 1984. Thesis "Alfred A. Hart: Photographer of the Transcontinental Railroad." Bachelor of Arts in English, cum laude St. Mary's College, Moraga, California. 1971. Selected Publications Museum catalogue celebrating the opening of their new building, (in press), 2010. Framing the West Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2010. From Periphery to Center: Art Museum Education in the 21st Century edited by Patricia Villeneuve. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association, 2007.

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Appendix C: Advisory Board Members Vitae Contribution of Historic Preservation to the Quality of Life in Florida: Technical Report Tallahassee: Florida Department of State, 2006, section V, unpaginated (32 pages). chapter in Photographs, Objects, Histories edited by Elizabeth Edwards. London: Routledge Press, 2004, pp. 62-80. Selected Academic Awards and Honors Bill Lane Fellow, Stanford University, Fall 2008. Senior Research Fellow, Smithsonian Museum of American Art, 2007-2008. Beinecke Fellow, Yale University, 2007. Florida State Grant, Department of State, 2005-06. Part of an intercollegiate team that included the Colleges of Law, Recreation and Tourism, Architecture and Historic Preservation. National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute Fellow, 2005. National Endowment for the Humanities, Fellowships for University Teachers, 1998. Selected Lectures American Art Museum, April 9, 2010. The Western History Association, October 9, 2009. History Annual Conference, April 10-13, 2008. Association of Museums Conference, May 13-17, 2007. rence associated with the National Art Education Association and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, January 11-13, 2007. Selected Curatorial Projects Curator, History Past, History Present: The Daguerreotype Portrait in America January 2001. Palmer Museum of Art. The Crossing A Video Installation by Bill Viola September 1999. Palmer Museum of Art. Co -Curator, Dismal Science: Photo-Works by Allan Sekula, 1972-1996, January 1997. Palmer Museum of Art. Exhibition Co-Curated with Students Spring 2008.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Joseph L. Aufmuth Head Spatial Information Services Unit, GIS Coordinator Associate University Librarian Work Experience: GIS Coordinator, Associate University Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, FL, 2007 to Present. Responsible for the selection of GIS resources and the implementation of GIS services to meet in-library and remote user needs. Maintain high level of awareness and expertise regarding spatial and numeric data and its evolving applications. Provide GIS reference and consulting services to faculty and students in all disciplines in person and via the world-wide-web. Market GIS in the libraries and on campus. Work with the Electronic Reference Services Coordinator to develop training programs for library staff. Co llaborate with the Head of the Map and Imagery Library and the Bibliographic Instruction team to incorporate GIS into instructional sessions for all disciplines. Establish contact with faculty currently teaching GIS to determine service needs; identify software and data sets in use on campus; evaluate service needs of programs on campus without access to GIS software and/or hardware. Collaborate with the Head of the Map & Imagery Library and the staff of the Digital Library Center in planning digital library initiatives to provide remote access to and preservation of Map and Imagery Collections. Plan for, select, manage, and coordinate the use of GIS hardware and software. Design and develop WWW-based projects to enhance GIS and Remote Sensing services. GIS Coordinator, Assistant University Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, FL, 2003 to 2007. GIS Coordinator, Instructor Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, FL, 2000 to 2003. Research and Teaching Assistant (Geomatics), University of Florida, FL, 1995 to 2000. Provided Unix and Windows systems support for 4 IBM, 7 HP workstations and 12 Windows NT PCs. Developed and implemented GIS lab exercises and lectures for GIS class SUR3393. Assisted with remote sensing laboratories. Performed GIS and remote sensing tasks for Jacksonville Brownfield analysis, National GAP analysis, Everglades National Park SRF, and Hungarian Danube River land cover remote sensing research projects. Assisted with presentations of GIS short-courses in East Africa. University of Dar Es Salaam, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, Africa. GIS short course assistant instructor, University of Florida, 1997. Abra Minch Water Research Institute, Abra Minch, Ethiopia, Africa. GIS short course assistant instructor, University of Florida, 1999. Education: University of Florida Geomatics, Civil and Costal Engineering MS 2001 University of Illinois Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution BS 1984

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Grants: GIS Manager, Phase III, Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA)/State Library of Florida, From The Air: The photographic record of Florida's Lands PI, Carol McAuliffe. Responsible for $38,000 of a $91,000 grant to hire and supervise the GIS technicians who will rectify the paper and photomosaic indexes and link them to individual flight images; document the reliability of images for GIS applications; supervise the creation of appropriate geospatial metadata, assists in the development of online help sections for use and interpretation of the aerials; oversees the use of specialized photogrammetry software to create indexes for aerials where no index is available; and to install, configure, and program a new GIS server for spatial data display. GIS Manager: Phase II, Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA)/State Library of Florida, From The Air: The photographic record of Florida's Lands, $151,696, 2003-2004, GIS Budget $21,000. Continued to refine the Web based GIS database for displaying 80,000+ historical aerial photographs for Phase II. GIS Manager: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Ephemeral Cities, $184,609, 2003-2004, GIS Budget $15,000. Coordinated the rectification of historic Sanborn Insurance Rate Maps and collection of geographically referenced Sanborn feature points. GIS Manager: Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve, Historical Aerial Photograph Rectification, $15,000, 2003-2004. Supervised assignment of ground coordinates to historic aerial photographs and production of seamless historic images of the Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve. GIS Manager: Phase I, Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA)/State Library of Florida, From The Air: The photographic record of Florida's Lands, $151,696, 2002-2003, GIS Budget $21,000. Designed and implemented a Web based GIS database for displaying 40,000+ historical aerial photographs. Collaborated with Civil Engineering faculty on methods used to assign coordinates to aerial photographic indexes. Trained and supervised a team of 4 students who rectified photo indexes and assigned point coordinates to each of the individual aerial tiles. Created a Web based Internet map server interface for the display of historical aerial photographs of Florida. Worked with Library Systems Department staff and the Digital Library Center on Web site design and functionality of Internet map server tools. http://smathersnt13.uflib.ufl.edu/fta2/viewer.htm.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Thomas R. Caswell Title: Assistant Architecture & Fine Arts Librarian Rank: Associate University Librarian Work Experience: University of Florida Architecture and Fine Arts (AFA) Library University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, Florida Librarian, July 2001 present Serve as collection manager and faculty liaison for the areas of art, art history, museum studies, historic preservation, and related disciplines. Develop instructional guides and web pages for general and specialized audiences concerning the use of library databases and other materials. Coordinate and supervise activities of technical processing staff. Humanities and Social Sciences Services (H&SSS) Department University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, Florida Information Technology Coordinator, 1997-July 2001 Provided comprehensive reference and access services in the areas of the humanities, social sciences, and allied fields. Facilitated the on-going inspection, configuration, and maintenance (including software updates, security upgrades, hardware replacements, etc.) of all public and staff, networked computers within the department and its branch libraries. Provide consultation and technical expertise for collection management decisions in the acquisition and de-selection of electronic databases. Education: B.A., Art History University of Florida, 1989 M.A., Library and Information Science University of South Florida, 1997 Honors: Andrew Cahan Photography ARLIS/NA Conference Travel Award, 2008 GODORT/ALA David Rozkuszka Scholarship, 1997 Phi Kappa Phi, 1996 Phi Beta Kappa, 1989 Languages: Reading knowledge of Spanish and German Publications: Monographs/Book chapters: Guide to Reference Chicago: American Library Association, 2009-. (320 annotated entries and editor's guide) [Access: http://www.guidetoreference.org/BrowseSearch.aspx?mgid=85179 ] Guide to Reference Chicago: American Library Association, 2009-. (158 annotated entries and editor's guide) [Access: http://www.guidetoreference.org/BrowseSearch.aspx?mgid=85323 ]

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Caswell, T. R. and L. S. Freund. Scanning Services for Library Users: ARL SPEC Kit 288. Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries, c2005. Refereed articles: -1996," Government Information Quarterly (GIQ) 14 (1997): 363-371. Non-refereed articles: College and Research Libraries (C&RL) News 68, no. 7 (July/August 2007): 422-426. the online publication Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines. Ottawa: Art Libraries Society of North America, c2006. [Access: http://www.arlisna.org/resources/onlinepubs/informationcomp.pdf ] Papers, Speeches, Presentations: Invited Presentations: d exhibit to present Smathers Libraries' research and service in support of UF's graduate historic preservation programs. teaching and service projects in the St. Augustine area and on topics related to UF's St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan. th Annual Conference of the Art Libraries Society of North America, Atlanta, Georgia, April 26, 2007 Conference of the Southeast and Texas/Mexico Chapters of the Art Libraries Society of North America, New Orleans, LA, November 14, 2003 Grants: Funded Externally: Investigator, National Endowment for the Humanities' Save America's Treasures grant, "Saving St. Augustine's Architectural Treasures," $41,181; October 1, 2009-September 30, 2011. (Project team: J. Nemmers P.I.; T. Caswell, J. Freund, M. Mariner, R. Renner) Funded Internally: Principal Investigator, UF Libraries' 2008/2009 Mini-September 30, 2009. Professional Organizations: Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), 2002American Library Association (ALA), 1996Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Arts Section, 2001National Trust for Historic Preservation, 2007Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, 2007St. Augustine Historical Society, 2007

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae James G. Cusick Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, Department of Special & Area Studies Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 32611-7005 (352) 273-2778 / jgcusick@ufl.edu / http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/index.html Work Experience University of Florida, George A. Smathers Library 1998 to Present Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History July 2007 to July 2008 Interim Chair, Special & Area Studies Collections Education B.S. in Journalism Northwestern 1981 M.A. in Anthropology UF 1989 Ph.D. in Anthropology UF 1993 Honors 2004 James J. Horgan Book Award, Florida Historical Society Languages English / Spanish (reading) Most Recent Books/Book Chapters Forthcoming ork for the Seminoles of La Chua, 1784in Seminoles, 1763-1858 edited by Steven Belko. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, 2010. 2003 The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville. Reissued 2006 by the University of Georgia Press, Athens. 2000 Colonial Plantations and Economy in Florida, edited by Jane G. Landers, pp. 168-87. University Press of Florida, Gainesville. Most Recent Conference Papers 2009 So uth History and Humanities Conference, Pensacola, Fla., Oct. 15-17.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae 2007 Southern Historical Association 73 rd Annual Meeting, Richmond, Va., Oct. 31 Nov. 3. iculties in this Quarter: The Life and Death of Captain Joseph Van Swearingen th Annual Meeting, Clearwater, Fla., May 24 26. Grants award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources. $11,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center, U.F. award from NEH for teacher workshops in Florida history and supporting web resources. $12,000 subcontract from NEH/Florida Humanities Council to the Digital Library Center, U.F. Funded, November 2003. East Florida Papers Calendar Project, grant awarded by the St. Augustine Foundation, Flagler College, to digitize the card calendar index to this Spanish colonial collection and to convert it into a searchable online database. Grant writer and project manager, $5000. Teaching Lead Humanities Council Landmarks of America program (July 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007); Florida Humanities Council program (July 2008, 2009). HIS 4944 Preserving History: An Internship in the Archives (3 credits), University of Florida. (2006-current) Professional Organizations and Service (Current) State of Florida Book Awards Judge, Youth Fiction, 2008-2010 Florida Historical Society Board of Directors, 2006-current; President Elect; Program Chair, Annual Meeting, Pensacola (2009); Reception, 2003; Member 1998-current; St. Augustine Historical Society Member, 1998-current, Research Associate. Historic St. Augustine Research Institute Member, Research Associate, 2002-present.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae John Freund Preservation Department Smathers Library P O Box 117007 Gainesville, Fl 32611 Telephone: (office) 352-273-2835 (cell) 352-316-1259 Email johfreu@uflib.ufl.edu EDUCATION University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. June 1975, BA, Journalism. San Francisco State, San Francisco, California. College of Design and Engineering. September, 1984, Certificate, Book Restoration and Binding. WORK EXPERIENCE Head, Conservation. University of Florida, Smathers Libraries. Gainesville, Florida 32611-7007 October 1988 to present. Circulation and Stack Manager/Reference. Jonsson Library of Government Documents, Stanford University, Palo Alto California. June 1983 to September 1988. Instructor, Basic Book Binding and Restoration. San Francisco State University San Francisco, California 1983-1984 INTERNSHIPS Sutro Library San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA. September March 1982-83 San Anselmo Theological Seminary, San Anselmo, CA. October December 1983 Presentations to organizations on book and paper preservation including. Micanopy Historical Society, Florida State Genealogical Association, Holy Land Map Project, Society of Florida Archivists and others. Workshops/ Meetings Attended: Conservation Of Photographs. Metropolitan Museum, New York, 1989

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Collection Conservation Treatment Berkeley, California 1991 Advanced Conservation Workshop. University of Iowa and Center for the Book. Iowa City, Iowa 1995 Deacidification Reconsidered National Archives Washington, DC March 2000 Climate Notebook Environmental Training Atlanta Georgia 2001 SOLINET Mold Workshop Richmond VA 2004 The Changing Book Transitions in Design, Production and Preservation University of Iowa July 2005 SOLINET Hurricane Preparedness Workshop June 2005 Collections consulted and / or worked with. Florida Orchid Society Archives, Jay Kislak Collection, Mathison Museum, Harn Musuem of Art, Florida Museum of Natural History, Majorie Kinnan Rawlings Society, Lighthouse Museum, Flagler College, State Department of Records, State of Florida, St. Augustine Historical Society, Micanopy Historical Society, Florida Historical Society, Zora Neale Hurston Museum, Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine Archives, Sisters of St. Joseph, St Augustine, Florida.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae John R. Nemmers Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist Associate University Librarian Work Experience: Un iversity of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, Special and Area Studies Collections From: August 2003 To: Present Title: Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist Arranges and describes archival and manuscript collections, and supervises ot her department personnel involved in the arrangement and description process. Creates and maintains procedures and tools for the processing of archives and manuscripts. Creates descriptive metadata for the department's archival collections, including EAD f inding aids and catalog records. Reviews finding aids and catalog records created by other department personnel. Serves as collection manager for the Architecture Archives, and is responsible for collection development, processing, fundraising and grants, outreach, and promotion activities for this collection. Responsible for archival collections in specific subject areas, including Florida politics, landscape design, and environmental history and science. Participates in research assistance, instruction an d outreach. Incorporates and interprets archival materials in exhibitions. Florida State University Claude Pepper Library, 636 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL From: August 1998 To: July 2003 Title: Project Archivist Responsible for the creation and maintenance of finding aid database for the Claude Pepper Collection. Supervised multi year digitization project to provide digital surrogates of materials in the Pepper Collection and full text search capabilities to patrons. Processed manuscript col lections, including additions to existing collections. Assisted in developing outside funding sources for projects of the Pepper Center and FSU Libraries Special Collections Department. Developed and created EAD versions of guides to collections. Supervise d preservation/access reformatting projects for audiovisual and photographic materials in the collection. Education: BA in History Florida State University Date: 1996 MS in Library Studies Florida State University Date: 1998 Specialist in Education Florida State University Date: 1998 Selected Publications: Refereed: (with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Florida Libraries 49 no. 2 (Fall 2006): 16 19. "Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib" (with

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen O'Brien and Paul Victor, Jr.). Journal of Web Librarianship v.1 no. 3 (2007): 47 66. Burt Altman). American Archivist 64 no. 1 (Spring/Summer 2001): 121 131. Non-refereed: Public Services in Special Collections (with Florence Turcotte). SPEC Kit 296 (Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries), 2 006. Best Practice Guidelines for the Implementation of EAD Version 2002 in Florida Institutions (available at: http://fclaweb.fcla.edu/Opening_Archives), March 2006. Florida's Political Past: A Guide to Manuscript Collections, Archival Records, and Other Primary Historical Documents of Florida's Politicians. An annotated bibliography (available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/political/flpols.htm), March 2005. Selected Grants: Program. To conserve and digitize historic architecture drawings of the Hotel Ponce de Leon in St. Augustine. Amount funded: $99,124. Funding dates: July 2010 J une 2012. Role: Project Director for UF. [Note: Flagler College is serving as lead applicant for this collaborative project.] Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Preservation and Access Education and Training Program. To deliver a series of workshops to archivists and librarians in Florida on a variety of archival topics. Amount funded: $34,849. Funding dates: December 2009 December 2010. Role: Principal Investigator. Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). Cost effective digitization of six archival collections relating to the Everglades. Amount funded: $145,477. Funding dates: January 2009 D ecember 2011. Role: Principal Investigator. Selected Exhibits: Sarasota Modern: The Sarasota School of Architecture Smathers Library Exhibit Gallery, University of Florida Smathers Libraries, November 2009 December 2009. John Ormsbee Simonds Remember ed: Visionary Landscape Architect, Planner, Educator, and Environmentalist (1913 2005) Smathers Library Exhibit Gallery, University of Florida Smathers Libraries, November 2005 February 2006. Selected Service: Society of Florida Archivists, President, 2009 2010

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Randall David Renner 1103 N.W. 4 th Street Apt. A Gainesville, Florida 32601 H. 352.316.3499 W. 352.846.0129 renner@ufl.edu Education 1994 1997 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Photograp hy. 1987 1990 Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida. Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Photography; cum laude Employment 10/2002 Present University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Digital Library Center. Imaging Coordinator, Compu ter Applications. Supervision of daily operations of the Digital Library scanning and large format digital planetary camera. 8/2001 10/2002 University of F lorida, Office of Academic Technology. Photography Department. Photographer Responsible for implementation and daily operation of digital imaging services for the campus wide photographic service bureau; including equipment specification, integration, qual ity control and pricing strategy. Additional responsibilities included photographing library special collections, artwork, 3 D models, and other subjects, both in a studio environment and on location. Other technical duties included black and white printin g and processing, and E 6 processing and mounting. 1/2001 8/2001 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Center for Instructional Technology and Training. Training Specialist Responsible for conducting training seminars of graphic software programs to faculty and staff. Development and revision of new graphic software training programs, and development of the Instructional Computing Activities Training Program. Specific seminar content included: Introduction to Digital Media, Web Site Devel opment, Introduction to Photoshop, Intermediate Photoshop, Graphics for the Web, Digital Video, Acrobat, FrontPage, PowerPoint, and The Effective Use of Laptops. 1999 2000 University of Florida, Department of Art and Art History. Adjunct Assistant Pr ofessor Responsible for instruction, evaluation, and curriculum development of the introductory digital arts class, Computer Art: Montage.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae 1998 2000 University of Florida Brain Institute Teaching Lab Resources. Audio Visual Specialist Management of multimedia and classroom support activities within the Brain Institute, including multimedia auditorium, conference rooms, audio/video building distribution and surgical research and training lab. Coordination of scheduling, setup and maintenance of all m ultimedia and teleconferencing equipment. Administrative and technical management of all teleconferencing and multimedia resources including computers, digital projectors, slide projectors, teleconferencing codecs, scalers, mixers, and amx controlled syst ems. Performed preventive and corrective maintenance. Provide operational instruction of resources to faculty and staff. 1994 1997 University of Florida, Biomedical Media Services, Photography/Graphics Departments. Photographer Responsibilities includ ed the design and creation of photographic and graphic media including images, text, charts, and graphs. The processing, printing and digital transfer of biomedical, scientific, and public relations subjects in both film based and digitally generated form ats for teaching, research, publication and display. 1994 1997 University of Florida, Department of Art Gainesville, Florida. Graduate Teaching Assistant / Instructor Fully responsible for instruction, evaluation and curriculum development of beginnin g photography courses in the Art department. Courses taught included Black and White Photography, Figure/Ground, and Image/Order/Idea. 1991 1993 U Mac International Language Academy, Nishi Koiwa, Tokyo, Japan. Program Coordinator / Instructor Develope d specialized English language curriculum, and provided English language instruction to Japanese students of all age groups in classroom and individualized settings. Edited foreign correspondence. 1988 1991 Florida State University, Department of Art Tallahassee, Florida. Color Darkroom Manager of a photographic studio, a 10 workstation color darkroom, and a Durst RCP 50 dry to dry processor.

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Mark Vincent Sullivan Digital Library Center UF Libraries, PO Box 117003 352.273.2900 marsull@uflib.ufl.edu Experience 2005 2009 Digital Library Center, UF Gainesville, FL Programmer and Systems Architect Designer, architect, devel oper, and programmer for suite of production tools for the UF Digital Library Center and partners, including all partners in the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) multiple simulta user workflows. These offer interfaces in English, Spanish, and French DLC Toolbox and dLOC Toolkit are Open Source and currently support over digitization by over two dozen institutions across the US and the Caribbean Designer, architect, developer, and programmer for all aspects of the SobekCM system which: Uses Asp.net to harness the abilities of the Greenstone Digital Library System, enterprise level full text indexing and searching through Lucene, and MS SQL database, and to integrate them into a robust and dynamic digital library and content management system Powers the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC), which have over 203,000 volumes with over 4 million pages of books, archival ma terials, maps and other large format items, photographs, audio and video, newspapers, objects, etc. UFDC also includes materials from over 24 languages, which required implementing intensive indexing optimization Designed customized supports based on user needs (multi lingual interface support, automatic customized interfaces for all partners), material type needs (zooming, objects in rotation), and internal user needs (usage statistics, search engine optimization for external engines to search the UFDC mat erials) Developed and maintain documentation on all tools 2004 2005 Digital Library Center, UF Gainesville, FL Systems Architect and Programmer, Ephemeral Cities Project Designed and implemented software and database for the Ephemeral Cities Project, a grant to create geographic interfaces to browse through maps, documents, museum objects, and photographs for three Florida cities from 1884 1903. Designed, created, and maintained workflow applications and databases in .NET, C#, MS SQL. Automated image manipulation and creation of metadata for image class items prior to web mounting. 2001 2004 Digital Library Center, UF Gainesville, FL Internet Server Manager and Database Developer

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Prepared and manage electronic collections of digitized images. De veloped automation techniques, programming in C# and Visual Basic. Designed databases and manage information workflows for current projects in both MS Access and MS SQL. Created user interfaces to access the databases and assist students entering data. 1999 2001 MCI Worldcom [MCIW] Tampa, FL Implementation Consultant processes, from design and pricing assistance to solving any technical issues and configuration of routers and PBX customer. revenue from $16M to $42M annually. Aided the customer and MCIW in troubleshooting of all service and technical issues. Partnered with PwC, as wel l as Home Shopping Network, to sell, price, and provide both off the shelf and custom data and voice solutions. 1997 1999 MCI Worldcom San Francisco, CA Global Service Consultant Worked on the Bank of America account team with responsibilities for dat a and voice network implementation Assisted with general project management and customer notifications processes 1994 1996 Preservation Dept., UF Libraries Gainesville, FL Administrat ive Assistant Aided in the preservation of brittle books Education 2004 2009 University of Florida Gainesville, FL Computer Engineering, BA Selected Publications & Presentations "Developing an Open Access, Multi Institutional, International Digital Library," in Resource Sharing & Information Networks ; by Brooke Wooldrige, Mark Sullivan, and Laurie Taylor, forthcoming 2009 "Digital Library of the Caribbean : a User centric Model for Technology Development in Collaborative Digitization Projects," Invi ted paper to a Special issue of OCLC Systems & Services: International Digital Library Perspectives ; by Marilyn Ochoa and Mark Sullivan, forthcoming 2009 Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Training; US Embassy in Haiti

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Laurie Taylor Interim Director, Digital Library Center University of Florida Libraries ADDRESS: Digital Library Center TEL: (352) 273-2900 Smathers Library FAX: (352) 846-3702 P.O. Box 117003 EMAIL: Laurien@ufl.edu University of Florida Gainesville, FL 3261170 03 EDUCATION: Ph.D. 2006 University of Florida (English/Digital Media) M.A. 2002 University of Florida (English/Digital Media) B.A. 1999 Jacksonville University (English) RECENT POSITIONS HELD 2008 Interim Director, Digital Library Center, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 2007 2008 Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 2006 2007 Associate Director, Flexible Learning, Division of Continuing Education, University of Florida 2000 2006 Instructor, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Florida PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Technical Director, Digital Library of the Caribbean & Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library Technical Director, Florida Digital Newspaper Library Editorial Board Member, International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations Member, Modern Language Association Member, American Library Association Member, Library & Information Technology Association GRANTS Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library (Department of Education; 2009-2014) Florida Aerial Photographs / From the Air: the Photographic Record of Florida's Lands, Phase III (Library Services and Technology Act, 2009-2010) America's Swamp: the Historical Everglades (National Historic Publications and Records Commissions, 2009-2011) PUBLICATIONS Selected Refereed Publications "Developing an Open Access, Multi-Institutional, International Digital Library," coauthored with Brooke Wooldrige and Mark Sullivan. Resource Sharing & Information

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Appendix D: UF Faculty and Staff Vitae Networks, 2009. "Snow White in the City: Teaching Fables, Nursery Rhymes, and Revisions in Graphic Novels," in Approaches to Teaching the Graphic Novel. Ed. Stephen E Tabachnick. New York: MLA, 2009. Playing the Past: Video Games, History, and Memory, co -edited with Zach Whalen. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2008. "Bioactive," in Gaming in Academic Libraries Casebook, co -authored with Sara Russell Gonzalez, Valrie Davis, Carrie Newsom, Chelsea Dinsmore, Cynthia Frey, and Kathryn Kennedy. Ed. Amy Harris and Scott Rice. ACRL, 2008. "Gaming Ethics, Rules, Etiquette and Learning." Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education. Ed. Richard E. Ferdig. Information Science Reference, 2008. "Making Nightmares into New Fairytales: Goth Comics as Children's Literature," in The Gothic in Children's Literature: Haunting the Borders. Eds. Anna Jackson, Karen Coats, and Roderick McGillis. New York: Routledge, 2008: 195-208. "Console Wars: Console and Computer Games," in The Player's Realm: Studies on the Culture of Video Games and Gaming. Eds. J. Patrick Williams and Jonas Heide Smith. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2007: 223-237. fr-FR "Cameras, Radios, and Butterflies: the Influence and Importance of Fan Networks for Game Studies." Fibreculture Journal 8 (2006). "Gaming's Non-Digital Predecessors," collaboratively written with Cathlena Martin, in The International Digital Media & Arts Association Journal 2.1 (Spring 2005): 25-29. "Practicing What We Teach: Collaborative Writing and Teaching Teachers to Blog," coauthored with Cathlena Martin, in Lore: an E-Journal for Teachers of Writing (Fall 2004): http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/lore/digressions/content.htm?dis12. "Open Source and Academia," co-authored with Brendan Riley, in Computers and Composition Online (Spring 2004): http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/tayloriley/intro.html. "When Seams Fall Apart: Video Game Space and the Player," in Game Studies: the International Journal of Computer Game Research 3.2 (Dec. 2003): http://www.gamestudies.org/0302/taylor/. SELECTED PRESENTATIONS "Using the Florida Digital Newspaper Library," poster session with Missy Clapp at the 2010 Florida Library Association Conference, Orlando, FL: April 8, 2010. "The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)" with Mark Sullivan and Matt Loving at the FSU Libraries, Tallahassee, FL: March 26, 2010. UF Digital Collections," ASERL ITDIIG Webinar: February 9, 2010. "Exhibit Opening: Efran Barradas Collection of Mexican and Cuban Film Posters: given by Ramn Figueroa. A few words on Digitization, Preservation, and Access," University of Florida Libraries, Gainesville, FL: January 22, 2010. "Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Summit: Technologies," presentation with Mark Sullivan and Brooke Wooldridge. Florida International University, Miami, FL: November 16, 2009. "The Basics of Digitizing Collections," with Lourdes Santamaria-Wheeler at the Society o f Florida Archivists Annual Meeting. Gainesville, FL: April 22, 2009. "Practical Steps Towards Your Local and/or Regional Digitalisation Project," at the Seminar for Libraries of the Dutch Caribbean Curaao, University of the Netherlands Antilles. Willemstad, Curaao: September 25-6, 2008.

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Appendix E: NEH Grant Funded Position Descriptions Appendix E NEH Grant Funded Position Descriptions Project Manager Position Description WORKING TITLE: Library Associate II; Digital Production (Scanning Supervisor) SUMMARY OF POSITION ROLE/RESPONSIBILITIES: Ingests born digital materials, conducts digital imaging including equipment maintenance and calibration, performs quality control, creates structural metadata, trains and supervises student assistants in all aspects of the work, and tracks materials throughout the digitization process. Prepares materials for digital imaging, ensures that imaged materials are successfully processed through metadata enrichment, loading, archiving, filling requirements for duplicate copies or other special needs for partners or as based on the project needs, and including documenting the progress on projects and completion status. With training from the GIS Coordinator, this person also will have primary responsibility for creation of geolocation metadata. EXAMPLES OF RESPONSIBILITIES: Liaisons with collection curators, project staff, partners and participants. Performs physical preparation and distribution of documents for imaging. Benchmarks source documents for appropriate digital resolution and color. Coordinates and maintains documentation of the receiving, preparation, tracking, and returning of materials that are imaged by the Digital Library Center. Trains and supervises a part-time student assistant scan technician (.5 FTE) in the proper use of imaging equipment, software, and DLC imaging procedures. Sets up and calibrates equipment to maintain image quality, including use of resolution and color targets, and calibration of monitors for color fidelity. Images source documents using a variety of flatbed scanners, high speed scanners, microfilm scanners and DSLR cameras. Coordinates tasks with Imaging Unit Head to maintain efficient workflow. Assesses and adjusts quality of digital products by methods set forth in re levant standards and guidelines. Performs image correction to correct scanning effects, to ensure the fidelity of the reproduction, and optimization for targeted use. Assesses color and tonal values and makes corrections as necessary. Assesses and corrects file names and image order. Determines appropriate color mode and bit depth of final files. Coordinates with the Quality Control unit in providing completed file packages, and rescans of rejected work. Performs or supervises metadata encoding (i.e., mark-up) for text documents and image to be served using METS other metadata standards. Loads and sends digital packages. Keeps current with standards, specifications, and best practices in digital imaging through training opportunities and directed professional reading. Once trained by the GIS Coordinator creates geolocation metadata. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor's degree and four years of related library experience; OR, post graduate degree and two years of related library experience; OR, any equivalent combination of experience, training and/or education.

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Appendix E: NEH Grant Funded Position Descriptions PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Experience in an academic library Experience in a fast-paced digitization production environment. Knowledge of Windows XP or higher computers and software. Knowledge of digital reprographic practices and techniques employed with archival and library materials, or knowledge of and experience with digital photographic processing techniques. Familiarity with DSLR cameras, and flatbed scanning techniques; and associated software. Ability to maintain high production levels, think creatively, learn quickly, and work independently. Ability to plan, organize and maintain documentation of imaging work using manual and automated databases. Ability to communicate effectively

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Appendix E: NEH Grant Funded Position Descriptions Project Programmer Position Description WORKING TITLE: Information Technology Expert SUMMARY OF POSITION ROLE/RESPONSIBILITIES: Perform duties related to the creation and support of software applications for the Digital Library Center and the University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC). Develop necessary scripting and programming, as well as databases and file structures, needed to allow users to interact with digital collections. Create an interactive map interface and workspace allowing users to control how they interact with digital objects and geospatial metadata. EXAMPLES OF RESPONSIBILITIES: Perform analysis and programming to develop, document, and maintain computer software programs. The primary emphasis will be on web and database systems which effectively deliver digital resources and facilitate the compilation of analytical data (collection profiles and management information). Design, implement and maintain all relational database components (tables, SQL stored procedures, etc.) necessary for effective data presentation and with respect to product tracking and system security. Develop applets and scripts using Java, Visual Basic, C# and scripting languages. Utilize mark-up languages (i.e. HTML, XML, and others) to build presentation pages for the display of digital resources (text, image, audio, motion, etc.) Provide quality control on data, metadata and indexing. Coordinate with IT experts and expert users to develop delivery interfaces. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: A high school diploma and four years of any combination of relevant experience, education and/or certification. The level of expertise and skill required to qualify for a position in this classification is generally attained through combinations of education and experience in the field. While such employees commonly have a bachelor's or higher degree, no particular academic degree is required. Appropriate college course work or technical training may substitute at an equivalent rate to the required experience. Demonstrated ability to function as part of a team. Demonstrated experience with SQL or other database query equivalent. Demonstrated experience with multiple programming languages. Preference given to experience with C#, Java and web scripting languages. Demonstrated knowledge of relational database models. Experience with Microsoft Windows systems and familiarity with Windows server operating systems (NT, 2000 Server, .NET) Demonstrated experience with mark-up languages (i.e., HTML, XML) Must be able to communicate effectively with co-workers and users. Frequent written (email) and verbal communication is required. Cooperation, innovation, and listening skills are essential. Must be able to effectively extract programming requirements from users. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Advanced graphic design skills and proficiency with graphic design software. Bachelor's or Master's degree in Computer Science Familiarity with Microsoft SQL Server and/or Internet Information Server Experience with Google Maps API, JPG2000, and Flash.

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Appendix E: NEH Grant Funded Position Descriptions Project Scan Technician Position Description WORKING TITLE: Scan Technician SUMMARY OF POSITION ROLE/RESPONSIBILITIES: Scanning technician for the Digital Library Center at the University of Florida. Duties will include digitizing various material types, post-capture processing using Adobe Photoshop, and quality control for metadata. Experience and comfortable working with PC-Based (Windows 2000 or XP) computer systems. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Experience and comfortable working with PC-Based (Windows XP or higher) computer systems. Working knowledge of image-editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop. Detail oriented and able to perform multi-tasks in a timely manner. Must be a team player. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Photographic experience a plus.

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College of Design, Construction and Planning 331 Architecture Building Office of the Dean PO Box 115701 Historic Preservation Program Gainesville, FL 32611-5701 352392-4836 352392-7266 Fax June 30, 2011 Thomas Caswell Associate University Librarian 201 FAA, POB 117017 Gainesville, FL 32611-7017 Dear Tom, The proposal you and your colleagues at the UF Libraries are submitting to the NEH is one of the most urgently needed and timely positioned initiatives I have been asked to endorse in over 25 years as an academician and research scholar. The establishment of a digitization lab at Government House and imaging of Spanish colonial records which include valuable source material on Native American and Black Culture will at long last open the door for research and investigation of this neglected aspect of our national heritage for students, faculty, and independent scholars as well as the general public. I learned just yesterday about a priority program Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has begun, the Archuleta, Senior Advisor to the Secretary of the Interior for Historic Preservation and Culture will travel to St. Augustine along with the Secretary in July to foster participation for this program. As you are aware, I am currently on Sabbatical in order to research the Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine for possible inclusion in the San Juan fortifications World Heritage Nomination. Having just visited five separate archives in Spain, I can attest to the fact that the maps, drawings, records, correspondence and other extremely valuable material related to the founding and development of Florida are deposited in scattered places from St. Augustine to Spain. There is much to be learned from the documents you propose making available for inspection. Some of the historical information you identify is not readily available at this time. I was appalled to find pages cut out of books and missing documents while researching in the Archive of the Indies, and cannot help but speculate what kind of pilfering has been done to our own historical record. In the case of St. Augustine and Spanish Florida (which includes the east coast of the US) these documents must be consolidated, made sustainable and available. To overlook this emergency would be unconscionable. The digitized materials you envision would be an essential part in my accomplishing my research as well as other gaps in the documentation of this National Historic Landmark site. Additional research would greatly improve the conservation of the historic fabric of the town and its fortifications. I would happily commit to be an advisor to the group conducting this task and would gladly help in the selection of materials to be digitized, making suggestions in developing the search parameters of the resulting database and identifying depositories of research materials. This proposal has my strongest possible endorsement. Sincerely, Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA, Fellow US/ICOMOS Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor, Director CENTER FOR WORLD HERITAGE RESEARCH AND STEWARDSHIP

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UF,Fi6Rf#A College 0{ Fine Arts Siclrool sf A.rt and Art Historl June 8, 201 I Tom Caswell Associate University Librarian 201 FAA P.O. Box 117017 Gainesville, FL 32611 -7 017 Dear Tom, It gives me great pleasure to support your application for a National Endowment for the Humanities Grant for your project to make the resources about colonial St. Augustine available to scholars, students, and the public. With the University of Florida's commitment to the city and the State's recent allocation of funds (one of only two new programs that were funded!), I know that graduate and undergraduate will make good use of the resources. When students in my graduate seminar worked on exhibitions at the Government House it was very difficult for them to find information about St. Augustine's history. Your project promises to allow researchers easy access to the critical materials that will allow future graduate students and scholars to reassess the history of America's oldest city. Serving on the president's committee on St. Augustine, I know that a variety of colleges and students at the university plan on making good use of the city for their studies. I look forward to the opportunity to participate in the selection of materials for digitization and to discussing the ways in which these materials might be made available to researchers through search parameters in the database. Your proposal is an extremely exciting one, and topical given the recent state commitment of funds for the Govemment House (one of only two programs to receive new state funding). I look forward to working with you and your library colleagues. Your proposal has my strongest endorsement. Resepectfully, l fl l frine Arts {l'(.} Lir"rr 1'158{}i {iainesuillc, Fl, 3:6 i 1-5.q0 i 332-39t-ilXll 3;:1-392-$4ii3 lrax !s-9a-1-!:. il-t.[$JJLl"f .d.u. 9&'*,-DW Idt".rn Willumson Hirector, Graduate Program in Museum Studies Prolessor of Art History The F{}ilttdntiotr for'I'lze Gntor NrrfiL;ru A.n l,.lrral {.}n;:rrturrilr lirsi iiutiorl

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____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Florida Museum of Natural History Museum Road Department of Natural History PO Box 117800 Gainesville, FL 32611 7800 Phone: (352) 392 1721 Fax: (352) 846 0287Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Institution July 7, 2011 Dr. James Cusick Curator, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History University of Florida Smathers Library Box 117007 University of Florida Gainesville FL 32610 Dear Jim: I am most pleased to write this letter in support of the University of Florida Libraries NEH proposal to digitize and make available materials related to St. Augustines colonial history. Digital access to primary materials is probably the single most important factor in stimulating new and diverse scholarship on St. Augustines colonial history. This is also a very timely project, in that the 450th anniversary of St. Augustines founding will occur in 2015, providing an opportunity to focus both public and scholarly attention on the role of Florida in our nations history. Many of the materials proposed for digitization are presently inaccessible to researchers owing both to their storage conditions and to the fact that many of those in St. Augustine repositories are uncatalogued. This project will bring them to the attention of scholars and students in history, archaeology and historic preservation, and make them available for use. The University Libraries have already demonstrated their commitment to providing accessible and sophisticated digital resources for a wide variety of users, and have been extremely successful in those efforts. The track record in this area is excellent, and this proposal has my strongest endorsement. Sincerely, Kathleen Deagan Distinguished Research Curator Lockwood Professor of Caribbean and Florida Archaeology

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Thomas Caswell Associate University Librarian 201 Fine Arts & Architecture Library PO Box 117017 University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611-7017 June 6, 2011 Dear Professor Caswell, I write to express my support for your excellent proposal to digitalize and create an electronic archive of the important, unique, and under-utilized, historical and archaeological materials that have been generated about colonial St. Augustine over the last decades. As a scholar of the Spanish Southeastern borderlands, the circum-Caribbean, and the larger Atlantic World, I have long recognized the international significance of St. Augustine, as well as its importance in our national history. I can attest to the unique nature of the city's historical documents, maps, and artifacts and firmly believe they constitute a national treasure that should be made more accessible to a wider public. These records and archaeological reports document much about the material culture, economy, and social and political organization of St. Augustine and its indigenous and African hinterlands. Having participated in public programming related to St. Augustine for over twenty years now, much of it funded by the National endowment for the Humanities and/or the Florida Humanities Council, I know the great interest St. Augustine and its unique history hold for educators and for the general public. St. Augustine offers important lessons about the multicultural and internationally complex nature of our early frontier history and about the evolution of race relations in this nation. This project, then, has national and international significance and importance to the humanities. I wish you all success with this very exciting project and look forward to working with you. Sincerely, Jane Landers Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of History Direc tor, "Ecclesiastical and Secular Sources for Slave Societies Project" Nashville, Tennessee 37235-1802 Tel: (615) 322-3403 Fax: (615) 343-6002 Email: jane.landers@vanderbilt.edu

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Appendix G: Selected Scholarship References and Resources Appendix G: Selected Scholarship References and Resources Books and Book Chapters Adams, William R. St. Augustine & St. Johns County: A Historical Guide (St. Augustine: Third Millennium Editions, 2005). Arana, Luis R. and Albert Manucy The Building of the Castillo de San Marcos (Eastern Na tional Park and Monument Assoc., 1977) Cusick James G. The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2003). Deagan, Kathleen. Sp anish St. Augustine, the Archaeology of a Colonial Creole Community (New York: Academic Press, 1983). Deagan, Kathleen, and Darcy MacMahon. of Freedom (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1995). Gannon, Michael V. The Cross in the Sand, The Early Catholic Church in Florida, 15131870 (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1965). Gordon Elsbeth K. Florida's colonial architectural heritage (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2002). Griffin, Pa tricia C. (editor), T he Odyssey of an African Slave by Sitiki (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2009). Hoffman, Paul E. Florida's Frontiers (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002). Kapitzke, Robert L. Religion, Power, and Politics in Colonial St. Augustine (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2001) Landers, Jane G. Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010) Landers, Jane G. Black Society in Spanish Florida (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1999). Landers Jane G. (editor), Colonial plantations and economy in Florida (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2000). Lyon, Eugene. The Enterprise of Florida, Pedro Menndez de Avils and the Spanish Conquest of 15651568 (Gainesville: University Presses of Florida, 1976). Manucy, Albert. The Houses of St. Augustine: Notes on the Architecture from 1565 to 1821 (St. Augustine Historical Society, 1962). Nolan, David, The Houses of St. Augustine (Sarasota, Fla.: Pineapple Press, 1995)

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Appendix G: Selected Scholarship References and Resources Schafer Daniel L. Anna Madgigine Jai Kingsley, African Princess, Florida Slave, Plantation Slave Owner (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2003). Theses and Dissertations Anderson, Jamie Waters Children as active agents: The archaeology of children in Spanish colonial St. Augustine. Masters thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. 2004. Beidelman, Katherine Ceramic means as indicators of socio-economic status in colonial St. Augustine. Masters Thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1976. Bonath, Shawn An evaluation of the mean ceramic date formulas as applied to South's majolica model. Masters thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1976. Bond, Stanley Tradition and change in first Spanish period 1565-1763 St. Augustine architecture : a search for colonial identity. Ph.D. dissertation, State University of New York. 1995 Boyer, Willett Nuestra senora del Rosario de la Punta : Life ways of an eighteenth century colonial Spanish refugee mission community. MA Thesis, University of Florida (Anthropology). St. Augustine, Florida. 2005. Chambless, Elizabeth Jo The Artillery Lane Site Archaeological Analysis from Late First Spanish Period St. Augustine Florida State University, Tallahassee. 2005. Chaney, Edward Survey and evaluation of archaeological resources in the Abbott Tract and North City, St. Augustine. Masters paper, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1988. Clauser, John Excavations at the Ximenez-Fatio house: backyard archaeology in St.Augustine. Masters thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1974. Cumbaa, Stephen Patterns of resource use and cross-cultural dietary change in the Spanish colonial period. Ph.d. dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1975. Cusick, James Ethnic groups and class in an emerging market economy: Spaniards and Minorcans in late colonial St. Augustine. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1993. Deagan, Kathleen Sex, status and role in the mestizaje of Spanish colonial Florida. Ph.D. dissertation, Gainesville, University of Florida. 1974. Gaske, Fred The Archaeology of a Territorial Period Boarding house in St. Augustine. Masters thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1982. Hoffman, Kathleen The development of a cultural identity in colonial America: The Spanish-American experience in La Florida. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1994. Johnson, Sherry. The Spanish St. Augustine Community, 1784-1795: A Reevaluation [Gainesville, Fla.]: University of Florida, 1989.

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Appendix G: Selected Scholarship References and Resources King, Julia An archaeological investigation of 17th century St. Augustine. Masters thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1981. Koch, Joan Mortuary behavior patterning in colonial St. Augustine. Master's thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1980. Linville, Nick. Cultural assimilation in frontier Florida: the life of Joseph M. Hernandez, 17881857, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 2004. MacMurrary, Carl The archaeology of a Mestizo household, SA16 23. Masters thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1985. Merritt, Donald Excavations at a coastal Eastern Timucua village in northeast Florida. Masters thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1977. Parker, Susan R. The Second Century of Settlement in Spanish St. Augustine, 16701763 University of Florida, Gainesville. 1999. Reitz, Elizabeth Spanish and British Subsistence Strategies at St. Augustine, Florida and Frederica, Georgia between 1565 and 1783. Ph.D dissertation, University of Florida. 1979. Shaughnessy Joseph. Crises of Authenticity in Saint Augustine's Early Preservation History, 18401955 University of Florida, Gainesville. 2009. Shephard, Stephen The Geronimo de Hita y Salazar Site: A Study of Criollo Culture in Colonial St. Augustine. Master's thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1976. Singleton, Teresa The Archaeology of a Pre-Eighteenth Century House Site in St. Augustine. Master's thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1977. Skowronek, Russell K. The Patterns of Eighteenth Century Frontier New Spain: The 1722 Flota and St. Augustine. Masters thesis, Florida State University. Tallahassee. 1982. Smith, Roger C. The faade of unity: British East Florida's war for dependence University of Florida, Gainesville. 2008. Stuhlman, Robin. Acculturation in the Spanish colonies: a comparison of sixteenth century St. Augustine and Puerto Real. Masters thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. 1995. Waters, Gifford Maintenance and change in 18th century mission Indian identity: a multi-ethnic contact situation. Ph.D. dissertation. University of Florida, Gainesville. 2005. White, Andrea Living on the periphery: a study of an eighteenth century Yamasee mission community in colonial St. Augustine. Masters thesis, The college of William and Mary, Virgini a. 2002. Williams, Maurice The Castillo de San Marcos: A cross cultural test of the determinants of artifact patterning. Masters thesis. Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1982.

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Appendix G: Selected Scholarship References and Resources Zierden, Martha The archaeology of a nineteenth century second Spanish period homesite in St. Augustine, Florida. Masters thesis, Florida State University, Tallahassee. 1981. Articles and Papers Note: Articles and conference symposia continue to be regular features of the Florida Historical Quarterly and in El Escribano, the journal of the St. Augustine Historical Society. Since 2000, the Quarterly has published 15 articles on colonial Florida, four of them specifically on St. Augustine. El Escribano has published special issue volumes including: Schafer, Daniel L., Gov Plantation, El Escribano The St. Augustine Journal of History, 2000. Schafer, Daniel L., 1784, El Escribano, The St. Augustine Journal of History, 2001. Waterbury, Jean Parker. Firestorm and Ashes: the Siege of 1702, El Escribano, The St. Augustine Journal of History, 2002. [The proceedings of a symposium commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Carolinian siege of the Castillo de San Marcos.] Texts and Novels for Children Binns, Tristan Boyer. St. Augustine (Chicago: Heinemann Library, 2001). Cannavale, Matthew C. and Robert Olwell. Florida, 15131821 (Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 2006). Cobblestone Magazine. ty (1995) Gioia, Robyn. (Pineapple Press, Inc., 2007). Lindquist, Judy. Saving Home (Florida Historical Society Press, 2008). Riehecky, Janet. The settling of St. Augustine (Milwaukee, Wisc: World Almanac Library, 2003). Selected Online Resources ( http://www.colonialstaugustine.org/11.html ). City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program, http://www.digstaug.org/

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Appendix G: Selected Scholarship References and Resources Florida Humanities Council Between Columbus and Jamestown: Spanish St. workshop series, http://www.flahum.org/index.cfm/do/Teachers.Seminars/Seminars.htm Historic St. Augustine, University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC), http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?s=hsa1 Historic St. Augustine Research Institute at Flagler College, http://www.flagler.edu/hsari/ Florida Museum of Natural History (University of Florida), Ancient City http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/staugustine/ Nuestra Seora del Rosario de la Punta City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program, http://www.digstaug.org/archives.cfm The Pablo Sabate Site City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program, http://www.digstaug.org/archives.cfm St. Augustine Department of Heritage Tourism (Government House), http://staugustinegovernment.com/your_government/PurposeofHT.cfm St. Augustine Historical Society, http://www.staugustinehistoricalsociety.org/ University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC), http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/ Sanborn Maps: http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?a=sanborn Aerial Photographs: http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?a=flap University of Florida, Spanish Colonial St. Augustine: A Resource for Teachers http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?s=teachers St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan http://www.facilities.ufl.edu/staugustine/index.htm Young Avenue Site City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program, http://www.digstaug.org/archives.cfm

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Appendix H: Inventory of the Government House Archives Appendix H: Inventory of the Government House archives (estimated): Media Physical Description Total # Items (estimate) Date range Creator Description Notes Paper Varying sizes (4" x 6" to 24" x 36"); Some in Binders; Some stapled; in file drawers and Bankers boxe s 13,000+ documents/reports 1950s 1990s HSAPB; others Historical research reports; archaeological field notes; historic interpretation notes; architectural sketches; drawings; archaeological field reports; all related to properties in the St. Augustine his toric district and surrounding areas Photos Color and B&W; Varying sizes Binders; photomounts; loose photos 3,000+ photos 1930s 1990s HSAPB Photographs related to properties in the St. Augustine historic district and surrounding are as Slides Color and B&W; Binders; hanging files; loose slides 10,000+ slides 1960s 1970s HSAPB Slides related to properties in the St. Augustine historic district and surrounding areas

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Appendix I: Government House Flat Files Appendix I: Government House Flat Files Containers: 37 flat file drawers (and approx. 100 loose, rolled items) Quantity: approx. 1,000 1,200 sheets Contents: Dates of documents: ca. 19201997 Archaeological surveys and project maps (see Fig.3 below) Architectural drawings (see Fig.4) Block and lot maps (see Fig.5) Government House (U.S. Postal Office) blueprints Historic map overlays (see Fig.6) Historic properties floor plans and elevations Plat maps Survey and planning maps Single-sided Approx. 24 Unbound Folded Fig.1: Flat file drawers at Government House, St. Augustine

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Appendix I: Government House Flat Files Fig.2: Rolled flat files at Government House Fig.3: Archaeological project map example Fig.4: Architectural drawing example

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Appendix I: Government House Flat Files Fig.5: Cropped image from historic block and lot map Fig.6: Historic map overlay example

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Appendix J: St. Augustine Historical Society Resources Appendix J : St. Augustine Historical Society Resources Quantity: approx. 2,500 documents Contents: Besides documents relevant to the founding and development of St. Augustine, these documents also include translations of: Spanish printed sources about Juan Ponce de Leon and Pedro Menndez de Avils; extensive selections in English translation of La Florida: Su Conquista y Colonizac clergy on conditions in the Spanish missions; investigations into the governorship of Diego de Rebolledo during the Timucuan revolt; reports on the 1702 siege of St. Augustine by James Moore and the 1740 siege of James Oglethorpe; texts on town planning and royal ordinances; documents pertaining to the building of the Castillo de San Marcos; and others dealing with details of life in town at different times. Spanish documents, as well as English language translations Date coverage: 1565-1763 Autograph and typed text Primarily Unbound Note: The Advisory Board will recommend an additional 1,500 documents from the collections of the Historical Society and the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History.

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Appendix K : City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program Resources Appendix K : City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program Resources Quantity: approx. 2000 digital items Each archaeological site will have the following types of information and images: A summary of the site history and the archaeological research conducted there A site graphic or map Samples, cataloged and appropriately described, of up to 20 images showing results of excavations for that site For examples of the types of information and images available from the city Archaeology Program, see the site summaries for Nuestra Seora del Rosario de la Punta, the Pablo Sabate site, and the Young Avenue site available at the city archaeology website at http://www.digstaug.org/archives.cfm Representative Sites: This list is a subset of the more than 500 properties investigated by the City of St. Augustine, Florida, through its Archaeological Preservation Ordinance, under the purview of the City Archaeologist, a staff position in the Planning and Building Department. The following list is organized chronologically beginning with archaeological deposits from the late prehistoric/contact era occupation (i.e., 16 th century) and extending into the American Territorial Period (1821 to 1845). Although later archaeological deposits are just as significant and are more common, it is this 350 to 400 year window that generates the most interest by the public and the media. 1. 39 Magnolia Ave. Late Prehistoric/Contact Era structures and trash deposits. 2. Puente Site Late 16 th c. trash deposits and structures. 3. Art Association Late 16 th 4. 17 King Street Late 16 th c. to 18 th c. deposits, including chicken burials 5. Town Plaza Late 16 th to 19 th c. deposits (wells, houses, trash). 6. Trinity Parking Lot Late 16 th to 19 th c. deposits (wells, privies, trash). 7. Aviles Street Series of street deposits dating from early 1600s to present. 8. 287 St. George St. Early 17 th century deposits behind Convento (Indian). 9. CPS VI Early 17 th c. trash deposits possible feasting. 10. 46 Marine St. Early 17 th c. to mid19 th c. building and trash deposits. 11. 105 St. George St. Early to mid17 th c. building and trash deposits. 12. Casa de Hidalgo Mid 17 th c. trash deposits and house foundation. 13. Charlotte St. (South) Series of street deposits dating from mid 17 th c. to present. 14. St. George Street Series of street deposits dating from late 17 th c. to present. 15. 33 and 34 Spanish St. Late 17 th c. to late 19 th c. series of house deposits and trash. 16. 2 St. George St. Late 17 th c. deposits associated with building Castillo/siege. 17. 3 St. George St. Early to mid 18 th c. trash deposits and 1702 siege. 18. Ponce Circle Early 18 th to 19 th c. deposits siege, bay front, and seawall. 19. Monson Motor Lodge Early 18 th c to 19 th c. foundations, trash, privies, pens. 20. 60 Charlotte St. Early to mid 18 th c. trash deposits possible pig wallow. 21. Charlotte St. (North) Series of Street deposits dating from early 18 th c to present. 22. Charlotte St. (South) Early to mid 18 th c. deposits (foundations and pig wallow). 23. CPS VII Early to mid 18 th c. deposits (wells and pig wallow). 24. Castillo de San Marcos Mid 18 th c. terreplein surface (gun deck). 25. Orange St. 18 th to mid 19 th c. Cubo Line (defensive wall) 26. El Rosario 18 th c. defensive redoubt.

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Appendix K : City of St. Augustine Archaeology Program Resources 27. 63 Cordova Ave. 18 th c. Rosario Line and 19 th c. grove/gardening. 28. 131 Marine St. 18 th c. Native American mission community of La Punta (structure) 29. 159 Marine St. La Punta (structures and trash). 30. 161 Marine St. La Punta (structures and trash). 31. 179 Marine St. La Punta agricultural fields and 20 th c. dog burial. 32. 11 Tremerton La Punta council house (?) and church/British hospital site 33. 8 Tremerton La Punta trash deposits and smudge pit. 34. 82 Washington St. 18 th c. Native American mission community of Pocotalaca 35. Blanco St. Pocotalaca 36. 2 Magnolia Ave. 18 th c. mission community of Nombre de Dios. es-MX 37. 16 Magnolia Ave. Nombre de Dios. es-MX 38. Milton Ave. Nombre De Dios. 39. Coleman PUD British Period 40. 312 Charlotte St. British Period trash deposits (privies ?) to barracks 41. Kings Bakery British Period Barracks. 42. 71 Park Place Late 18 th to early 19 th c. urban plantationM. Hernandez. 43. 65 Cuna St. Late 18 th to early 19 th c. privy. 44. 5 St. George St. Early 19 th c. coquina stone well

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Refugees to Bootleggers and Everything In-Between: A Microcosm of Urban Archaeology in Downtown St. Augustine, Florida Melissa H. Dezendorf, Carl D. Halbirt Archaeology Division, City of St. Augustine, Florida Introduction References: Griffin, Patricia C. 1990. Mullet on the Beach: The Minorcans of Florida, 1768-1788. El Escribano 27: 104-192. St. Johns County Courthouse. 1931 Deed of Oscar and Estelle Canova. Deed 98, Page 571. St. Augustine, FL. Robert Hall to Melissa Dezendorf. Personal Communication, March 2009. 1801 Letter to Governor Enrique White, St. Augustine Florida from Bartolom Morales. East Florida Papers, Reel 67, Bundle 160D13, St. Augustine Historical Society, St. Augustine, Florida. St. Augustine Historical Society: 1784 Spanish Census of English Colony; 1786 Census of St. Augustine and its Perimeter; 1787 Census of Householders; 1793 Census of St. Augustine and North River; 1764 Juan Elixio de la Puente. San Agustin de Florida. Hand-drawn Map; 1800 Tax Assessors Inventory, MC 63, Box 7, File 15, Page 53; 1835 Benjamin Clements Map of St. Augustine, Florida. Hand-drawn Map; 1888 Sanborn Insurance Maps. Map of St. Augustine, Florida; 1898 Photograph of Spanish Street; 1899-1930 City Directories, St. Augustine, Florida. The Late 19th Century The Sabate Occupation (1777-1830s) The Late First Spanish Period (1672-1763) The Twentieth Century and Beyond district exists as the most enduring location of European origin in the United States, having been settled since 1572. A diverse array of archaeological resources, the result of 438 years of concentrated human occupation, reflects the comThis poster presents preliminary information from the Archaeology Pablo Sabate Site in 2009. It illustrates the complexity of archaeological deposits derived from continuous redevelopment. This project yielded an assortment of archaeological features and items dating from the late 1600s to the early 1900s, with some deposits Project Specifics Field procedures involved excavating both systematic and judgmental shovels pits, some of which were later expanded into test units. The Archaeology Division examined approximately 4% of the lot. Ceramics provided date ranges for exposed features. Excavations resulted in documenting remnants to four colonial-era structures; demolition of the last colonial structure occurred sometime after the Civil War. Initial historical documentation of property ownership in 1763, lists Manuel Jacinto. No information exists about his origin or occupation but the index to the1763 Puente Map Overlying the charred post was an oyster-shell foundation with embedded ceramics and iron nails. This structure dates back to the end of the First Spanish Period (ca. 1760) and most likely belonged to Jacinto. The earliest historic occupation is represented by the remnants of a postin -ground structure. One of the posts evidenced charring, which could be indicative of the English-led sieges that occurred during the early 18 th century. In 1777, Pablo Sabate and his family arrive on the property as likely a wood structure with a thatched roof. Of Minorcan origin, Sabate earned a living as a fisherman and farmer. By 1801, he had pursued other means of support, namely running a tavern. The Sabate family owned the property at the corner of Spanish and Cuna until the mid-1800s The structure, constructed in the late 1700s, was an L-shaped tabby building and consisted of two rooms, with a tabby floor and brick hearth recorded in Room One. The builders used broken bottles at the base of the oyster shell foundation a unique way to support the massive shell foundation as well as dispose of trash. Atop the foundation, traces of the tabby wall were still apparent. Numerous fragments from broken tumblers and goblets were recovered along the junction of the wall/ tabby floor. Coupled with the presence of coins, over 120 pipe fragments, iron cooking implements, and a marionette fragment in soil deposits dating to the 19 th century, a portion of this structure is posited to have functioned as a tavern. the house and property in 1931. Locals recount Dixie as a bootlegger during Prohibition; Dixie would later open a bar on nearby St. George Street. The house on the property was demolished shortly A city street paving project in the 1990s disturbed the upper soil levels of the lot and obliterated any deposits left from the demolition of the house. The St. Augustine Foundation purchased the vacant lot in 1978. In 2009, the Foundation contacted the Archaeology Division to test the lot prior to installing a formal garden. Conclusion Archaeological investigations at the Pablo Sabate Site illustrate the diversity of deposits that are typiThe 20 units excavated uncovered four historic structures: the earliest structure built of wattle-anddaub dated to the late 1600s based on an adjacent trash pit. Three of the structures were constructed on the same footprint, illustrating continuity in the use of space on Spanish lots. The use of ale bottles as construction materials showed an opportunistic approach for acquiring construction materials during the Second Spanish Period (1784-1821). Documenting the Sabate occupation was the primary objective throughout most of the investigation. Discovering that a portion of the building served as a tavern was unexpected; however it was not uncommon for the Spanish to use portions of their homes for commercial enterprises. During the Second Spanish Period, more than 25 taverns were documented in the colonial downtown district essentially a tavern per every block. The work undertaken is an excellent starting point for continued research into the material culture of a 19 th -century Minorcan household and tavern. and an accessory from a carriage lantern. This neighborhood evolved from a primarily Minorcan area to an African-American enclave after the Civil War. Records from the mid-1800s to the late 1800s are unclear as to who owned the property. A two-story frame vernacular dwelling built in 1885, served as a rental house for working-class families. This structure encompassed the majority of the existing lot; trash deposits associated with this occupation most likely exist outside of the sample area. City Directories from 1899-1930, list the occupations of the people living on the site: a porter, a tailor, a laborer, and a laundress. Remnants of a hearth along the wall of Room Two. Hundreds of 18th-century ale and wine bottles formed a portion of the foundation for this structure. A late First Spanish Period Foundation. An 1898 photograph of the neighborhood. The Canova house as it appeared shortly before demolition. The site at present. Detail showing structure from the 1888 Sanborn Map. 1764 Puente Map: Detail shows Mid First Spanish Period Late First Spanish Period Sabate Occupation Artifacts relating to tavern activities: a human molar, an etched glass tumbler rim, a Spanish half-real, four furniture tacks, and a marionette jaw fragment. The 1786 Mariano de la Rocque Map: Detail showing the location of the Sabate property.

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Appendix M: Herschel Shepard Collection (UF) Selected St. Augustine Projects Appendix M : Herschel Shepard Collection (UF) Selected St. Augustine Projects Quantity: approx. 800 drawings, photos and documents Contents: From the previously private unprocessed collection of Herschel Shepard, the project staff will digitize records and drawings of major preservation and restoration work of St. Augustine. The Shepard Collection, which was donated to UF in 2010, documents Shepard's expertise in Florida's historic architecture and his many contributions to preservation and restoration in the restoration of landmark buildings such as the 1902 Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee and reconstruction of such historically significant sites as the Second Seminole War era Fort Foster and the Spanish mission site of San Luis de Apalachee. The total collection includes hundreds works on the colonial buildings of St. Augustine. Shepard has worked in architectural restoration and reconstruction of St. Augustine buildings since 1970, and 25 historic structures are documented thoroughly with drawings, research notes, and photographs. Selected St. Augustine Projects: Ximinez-Fatio House restoration (1973) 1580 Fort reconstruction (1974) Avero House and Shrine (1974) Joaneda House restoration (1975) Acosta House reconstruction (1975) Sanchez-deMesa House (Old Spanish Inn) (1977) 1580 Fort and Village reconstruction (1977) Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas inspection and report (1978) Sanchez-deMesa House (Old Spanish Inn) (1978) Tovar House (1987) Oldest House (1987) Government House east wing restoration (1988) Segui-Smith House (1989) Cerveau and Parades-Dodge Houses (1993) Bridge of Lions (1998) O'Reilly House (2000) Oldest House restoration (2000) Rodriquez House (2000) Ortega House (2000) Arrivas House (2000) Powoud-Slater House (2000) Villa Longa House (2000) Anastasia Island (2005) Fountain of Youth (re: Menendez and Seloy) (2005) Historic house at 801 Someruelos Road (2006)

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Draft Collection Page in UF Digital Collections (UFDC) http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?a=flcity (all images and text are temporary and included in this mock-up for illustrative purposes)

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Draft Sub-Collection Pages in UF Digital Collections (UFDC) http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?a=citystaug (all images and text are temporary and included in this mock-up for illustrative purposes) http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?a=shepard (all images and text are temporary and included in this mock-up for illustrative purposes)

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Selected UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features: UFDC Map Interface Google Map interface to: Search by address Search by selecting a point on a map Search by selecting an area on a map The interface allows users to drag and drop pins for search refinement. The search results are then shown in order of the closest geographic match, and each set of mapped images can be seen as map overlays in support of optimal usability. Guide to Using the UFDC Map Interface 1. Selecting Map Search: User ap Search in the Aerials (this may also be set as the default search).

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features 2. Searching: To search by address, user enters an address and clicks Find Address. To search by area, the user clicks the area. To search by a point, the user selects point. 3. Seeing coordinates: To see the coordinates for an address, the user enters the address and then Show tab on the top right corner of the map.

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features 4. Viewing results list: The result set is map view by default. The maps show the general outline or bounding box of the aerial flights. The name of the matching flight appears on the right. 6. Viewing results list in other formats: Users can also view the results in any different format, such as the table view.

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features 7. Viewing specific results: When the user clicks on an individual flight, the Google map for that flight's tiles, including the previous search, is displayed. 8. Viewing specific results in context: Zooming out in this view allows the user to see the overall coverage of the flight.

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features myru-RU UFDC & myDLOC Patron Toolsru-RU UFDC allows users who log in to: ru-RU Send an item to a friend via email Save an item to your bookshelf and add user comments to the item (comments are not displayed to others on the item, but will show within your bookshelf) ru-RU Save a search, or browse to your favorite searches Share an item (via Facebook, Twitter, DIGG, StumbleUpon, Yahoo, Yahoo Buzz, Google Bookmarks, Browser favorites) ru-RU Manage your bookshelves and saved searches through the myUFDC home page ru-RU Print the page displayed, print all pages for the item, or select and print a range of pages Print Clicking the Print button simply prints collection and search pages. For items, users can choose to print: ru-RU Citation only ru-RU Thumbnails ru-RU Current page (prints page as displayed for zoomed views) ru-RU All pages ru-RU A range of pages ru-RU

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Share The Share button allows users to share the collection, item, and search using Facebook, Twitter, DIGG, StumbleUpon, Yahoo, Yahoo Buzz, Google Bookmarks, and Browser favorites. ru-RU Send The Send button allows users to send an email with the current collection, item, or search. The Send button is only active when users are logged in (users can log in using Gatorlink or myUFDC for those without Gatorlink accounts). ru-RU

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Save/Add The Save/Add button also requires users to log in. This button is either Save or Add depending on context: On search pages, the Save button allows users to save their searches. Users can access all of their saved searches from the main myUFDC page. On collection and item pages, the Add button allows users to Add collections to their personal homepages and can add items to bookshelves. ru-RU myUFDC Home myUFDC Home is the first page after users log in, and it links to the user's bookshelves, saved searches, and collections. ru-RU

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Bookshelves Users can add new bookshelves, manage existing bookshelves, and make bookshelves public. Public Bookshelf ru-RU

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Saved Searches ru-RU My Collections ru-RU

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features myUFDC & myDLOC Contributor Tools Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Software Toolkit To aid partners with digitization and content submission, dLOC has created a software Toolkit to streamline local workflows and facilitate the creation of submission packages conformant to dLOC's technical and metadata specifications. Screenshots of the dLOC Toolkit

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Self-submittal Tool: Guide to Submitting Materials Logging in : Go to the web address: dLOC: www.dloc.com UFDC: www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc Log in If you have a Gatorlink username (University of Florida), use Gatorlink username and password. If you do not have a Gatorlink username, click the "Register now" link to register. Within 48 hours, your account will be activated. Submitting your materials: To submit a new publication, click on start a new item. Read the terms and conditions of our user agreement. If you would still like to submit your item, click on continue. Enter information about your material in the appropriate field. You are automatically listed as the creator of the item, but you may change this and/or list additional authors by clicking on the plus sign to the right of the field. Any field with a plus sign to the right of the field may have multiple entries for that particular field. When you are done, click on the save button. Add files by clicking on the browse button to locate the file that corresponds to the information that you just entered on the previous screen. After selecting the appropriate file, click on the upload file button. The name of the file you chose to upload will appear under Attached Files. If you would like to add supplementary files for this title, browse and upload once more for each additional file. When you are done, click on the save button. Now you may review your material. If you submitted a PDF, it is immediately visible via our PDF viewer. Other types of files are available by download only; select file types are automatically processed for additional page views. To review the information about your material, click on the citation tab near the top of the page. If you would like to edit the information, click on the link to the right of the corresponding section heading, change the text, and click on the save button. Editing your preferences: To set your myDLOC/myUFDC preferences, first log in. Once logged in, set your preferences by clicking on the "Edit my preferences link" or the "My Preferences" ta b in myUFDC. To edit the information about your materials, follow these steps: Contact us ( ufdc@uflib.ufl.edu ) or follow these steps: Log in Click on "View all my submitted items" Click on the item you want to edit Click on the citation tab Click "edit this item" Edit the metadata for the item

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Online Metadata Editing Tool: Guide to editing metadata Log in Go to the web address: dLOC: www.dloc.com UFDC: www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc Log in If you have a Gatorlink username (University of Florida), use Gatorlink username and password. If you do not have a Gatorlink username, click the "Register now" link to register. Click on "View all my submitted items" Click on the item you want to edit Click on the citation tab Click "edit this item" Edit the metadata for the item. Support Materials dLOC toolkit: http://dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&m=littoolk Videos of the submission process: www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?a=ufirg&m=hitirsubmithelp Video of configuring a scanner and scanning, in English and Spanish: http://dloc.com/ufdc/?b=UF00095843

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features myUFDC & myDLOC Digital Collection Manager/Curator Tools When activated, the describe/tagging function allows any logged in user to add a des cription to an item. The description is added in a note field, and the username and date for the description are automatically added as well. myUFDC/myDLOC provides a description tag overview page where digital collection managers and administrators can view all of the added descriptive tags. Tagging Display for Patrons Description Tag Overview

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features myUFDC & myDLOC Administrator Tools myUFDC/myDLOC offers robust administrator tools for managing: Aggregations (collection groups, collections, subcollections, institutions, institutional divisions) Web skins / interfaces Wordmarks Users Projects Aggregations Any collection of items into a distinct searchable or browseable set is an item aggregation. This includes collections, subcollections, institutions, exhibits, etc. Each item aggregation has its own home page and the search types and browse types can be defined for that page. All items must be listed in at least one aggregation, but a single item can be cross-listed with as many collections as are applicable. This allows a single item to be in multiple subject-based collections (and collection groups and subcollections) as well as being listed in the correct institutional collection for the contributing partner. For this project, all of the Web skins / i nterfaces HTML interfaces provide a unique way to control the look and feel of each page served by this digital library. The interface controls the stylesheet used, as well as the header and footer. This allows the same digital collection to be branded by each of the partners involved. The following screenshots are the same collection, Florida Photographs, with different web skins in use.

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Appendix N: Draft Collection Pages and UF Digital Collections Functionalities & Features Wordmarks Wordmarks provide additional item level attribution for partners and funding agencies. Wordmark Example with Aerial Photographs of Flagler County Users Administrators can assign a number of permissions for different user levels, including the ability to submit items and the ability to edit collections as a collection manager or curator. Administra tors can also assign project templates to users. Projects Proje c ts hold default metadata templates for use in online submittal s The project level data is stored in a project level metadata file that can be edited using the standard full online metadata form. When a user begins to add a new digital resource for a defined project the project level data is loaded into the digital resource, before the user views the item in the online submittal form. The project level data usually includes the item aggregat ion information linked to the project, as well as common default data including wordmarks and funding statements