Rotary Park @ Leitner Creek : efficient design with nature in mind

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Material Information

Title:
Rotary Park @ Leitner Creek : efficient design with nature in mind
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Wheeler, James Harrell Jr.
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
Rotary Park aims to provide small communities with little money the opportunity to build and manage needed suburban green spaces while preserving the native landscapes. As human impact spreads inland, much of Florida’s natural interior has been replaced by unsustainable and inefficient suburban development. To combat this, a new style of park design must weigh program needs with preservation goals. These neighborhood parks can be funded and constructed with minimal input and volunteer labor to strengthen bonds in the community and with the environment. Rotary Park uses existing resources readily available on site to create site elements and integrate art into the landscape. Management guidelines are specific to site ecology and work with nature, rather than against it. Lowering human inputs and creating a more efficient environment for the future.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00004224:00001


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Full Text










Rotary Park @ Leitner Cree T'
Efficient Design with Nature in Mind







Acknowledgements


Prepared by:

James Harrell Wheeler Jr.
jhwheeleru@ufl.edu


Prepared for:

UF Dept. of Landscape Architecture
City of Bonita Springs, Florida
Rotray Club International Bonita Springs Charter

Special Thanks to:

My immediate and extended family that has sup-
ported me and unknowingly guided me towards a
life of landscapes and gardens.

To my talented peers and friends who have inspired
me and taught me more than what I paid for in
school.


4/20/2011








*-2


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Contents


i. Introduction
P project G enesis ...........................................
P project A abstract ..........................................5
Statem ent of Intent ......................................
S, City O verview ......................................... 7-
Goals and Objectives ..................................
v : .', .
2. Observations
Developmental Impacts .............................12
Wl after Conservation ........................ ...
:.Habitat Conservation .......... .. ..
Flourishing Abandonment

3.Research and Discovery .
Topical Investigations ..
Influential Designs.. .
Informing Places .. ...
-Case Studies .


-
4. Analysis and Synthesis
Landuse Alaps
Housing, Traffic and Density M lps o-
Wiatershed/Elevation AlapA '
Open Space Proposals /............
Site Adjacency M aps ....................... .
Site Inventory and Existing Systemsf

5. Design Development
Program Dev. ............ ...................
S Conceptual D ev. ............................... ..... 4-
Illustrative Plan and Details ............... ..
W 'jL^ *. .
6. Planting Specifications
Planting Plan .~C .......I....
''Plant Lists '


P ha sing ............... .............
Further Suggestions 7 7


8. Conclusions
Sum m ar) ............................ ................. 66 ,
Bibliography .............................. ........... ....... ', 6.-,t


As'design is specific to site, the process of development is specifc to the designed. Immeision into the pioject'begils w ith inquiry ot
""the client and city history. Next, unbiased observations and desires foi the community and environment are derived from geographi-
cal and social observations existing in the aiea. Research, analysis, snythesis and design follow in the traditional. fas~io6. W.hle lastly,
I look into phasing and implementation of project consti action. .- .'.

3 A Senior Thesis by James H Whee


ler







Genesis of Rotary Park





', ":.. .'.I. -y '.
.. .. .z. .

Upon recommendation, I made a contact about a neighborhood park theorized by a group of Bonita
Springs Rotary Members. The basis of this park was to provide leisure space and passive recreation for
neighborhoods surrounding a 15 acre disturbed parcel. The site is owned by The City of Bonita Springs
and upon acceptance from commissioners, would be a Rotary organized venture working with local citi-
zens relying on volunteer and member labor with Rotarian organized funding.

Rotary Club International is a service base organization that encourages high ethical standards for profes-
sionals and promotes humanitarian services within their community and the world.


Is it the truth?
Is it fair to all concerned?
Will it build good will and better friendships?
Will it be beneficial to all concerned?


'Service above self'


Rotary suggested program includes: Exercise circuit, children playground, and nature trails. Most of
the gravity was given to providing open space, play and interaction for the lower income, higher density
neighborhoods north of the proposed site.


4 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Project Abstract



Rotary Park aims to provide small communities with little money the opportunity
to build and manage needed suburban green spaces while preserving the native
landscapes. As human impact spreads inland, much of Florida's natural interior has
been replaced by unsustainable and inefficient suburban development. To combat
this, a new style of park design must weigh program needs with preservation goals.
These neighborhood parks can be funded and constructed with minimal input and
volunteer labor to strengthen bonds in the community and with the environment.

Rotary Park uses existing resources readily available on site to create site elements
and integrate art into the landscape. Management guidelines are specific to site
ecology and work with nature, rather than against it. Lowering human inputs and
creating a more efficient environment for the future.








5 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Statement of Intent


My intent for Rotary Park @ Leitner Creek is
to showcase the idea of low input, efficiently
operating landscapes that work with nature to
provide beauty and programmed use for the
surrounding neighborhood.











6 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






City Overview


Much has changed since the Florida
Frontiersman forged their way into a
land full of untapped resources, exces-
sive water problems and wild animals.

Similar to the rest of Florida, tropical
agriculture and seafood were common.
In time, tourism and freeways brought
the world to the land we know today.

Bonita Springs was founded in 1881 as
land speculators and pioneers ventured
into the region upon Florida's manifest
destiny. Exploring the Caloosahatchee
River and the southern tip of the Estero
Bay, up Survey Creek, later coined the
Imperial River.

Incorporated in 1998, it lies 15 miles
south of Ft. Myers on the Lee County
line. Naples lies 12 miles south of Bonita
in Collier County.






a-----


7 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






City Overview


City Demographics 2000 Census


Population and Growth
Estimated 42,268 (July 2007)
192% population change since 1990
Median age 46.7


Race Estimates
Black 2.5%
Hispanic 31%
White 66.5%

Dwelling/Occupation
Avg. Household size
Households: Family
Household: Non-Fam.
Household: W/ Child
Household: No Chil
White Collar Occup.
Blue Collar Occup.

Income
Median Household
Average Household


nita

.T"CY


2.47
68%
31%
20%
80%
74%
26%


$59,086
$88,4-4


Informing Spaces and Parks
( Rotary Neighborhood Park
8 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






City Overview


Bonita Springs is in a
position many small south
Florida municipalities
wish they could be in. The
city is afforded a con-
densed quite downtown
sector on a secondary
arterial road, an intriguing
history, minimal sprawl,
bordered by the peaceful
gulf and interior wetland
scrub, and most of all a
passionate community
with small town values.
Golf course communities
and easy beach access are
constant draws for tourists
and migrating residents
from all over the world.







a---


I I


r~i


9 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Goals and Objectives

1. Generate the most use by focusing on easy access and relevant program for the Rosemary Community.
-Meet and exceed all vacancies in surrounding open space matrix
-Community advocacy and volunteers foster awareness and ownership
-Maximize safe access locations in conjunction with CPTED principles
-Improve eye lines and view sheds

2. Improve ecology
-Let the site guide the design. Allowing select current successions to continue.
-Low impact construction
-Native/naturalized planting design via habitat type

3. Provide low maintenance design leading to a self-sustaining dynamic
-Preferably none or temporary irrigation with drought tolerant plantings
-Accessible and screened maintenance area with compost/propagation areas
-Low impact materials with longevity or on-site replacements
-Management plan with foresight

4. Design with low cost construction
-Community support and relationship building with local suppliers
-Materials from local sources
-Utilize existing resources

5. Integrate details and art tastefully to strengthen sense of place and provide an outlet for artists
-Design with existing resources aka leftovers
-Draw from surrounding aesthetic
-Incorporate interpretive signage for educational and artful experiences



10 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler
















Observations


. W7!?p






Observations

Developmental Impact


Natural Inputs
-Rainfall
-Occasional fire
-Pollinating species
-Nutrient sink (organic matter)


Human Inputs
-Labor ($)
-Capital (investment and planning)
-Materials (as expensive as you'd like)
-Electricity (drain of existing infrastructure)
-Irrigation system
-Invasive species
-Inefficient and toxic weekly maintenance plans
-Reoccurring repair costs


12 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Observations

Water Conservation


Water Shortage Areas
(Prepared 4/30/07)
! \., 7 --- ,\


Water will be the natural resource of the 21st cen-
tury.

Lee County, Fl approximates 60% of potable wa-
ter is used for lawn and agricultural irrigation.

Retention reservoirs, deeper aquifer drilling and
filtered surficial systems are current methods for
fresh water.

BSU built $38 million reverse osmosis filter sys-
tem to pump brackish water for public use.


13 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a





Observations
Habitat Conservation


Providing habitat for feature and threatened species




14


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Observations
Flourishing Abandonment












Weedy rudderals strive in abandoned and forgotten lots.


15 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a

















Research and Discovery


I






Research and Discovery


Areas of Investigation

-Much of the existing open space in Bonita Springs is geared towards water activities and tourism.
Very little emphasis is put on neighborhood and community parks.

-20/20 Conservation Program
http://www.conservation202o.org

-Dog Park guidelines and precedences
Dog Park Standards & Manuals by Susyn Stecchi
DC Dep. of Rec. Dog Park Standards

-Native ecosystem types and functions
RegionalConservation.org
Coccoloboa Chapter of Florida Native Plant Society

-Playground types
ProgressiveEarlyChildrenEducation@blogspot.com
PlayScapes.blogspot.com
USA Today article 'Natural playgrounds are growing into a national trend'

-Existing vernacular

-Architecture styles in civic and private communities



17 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Research and Discovery



Influential Projects
Crosby Arboretum, Picayune, MS The Crosby Arboretum at the Univeristy of Mississip-
pi serves as a natural education experience for the region. Specific design and maintenance
guidelines were made to introduce the user to different ecosystems found on this 700 acre
site. The mission is to preserve,protect and display native species through cultural, scientific
and recreational programs.


Crosby Arboretum

Byxbee Park, Palo Alto, CA Located in the greater suburban San Francisco area, Byxbee
Park was designed by George Hargreaves as a brownfield reclamation project. This project
illustrates a depth and emotions that sculptures in the landscape can posses. Environmental
and industrial systems are brought together to create a sublime environment set in a serene
landscape.

Byxbee Park
Discovery Park, Seattle, WA This 534 acre site includes a larger scale of planning than Ro-
tary Park, but it serves as a guide to management practices on a semi-natural site. Pathways
and trails take the user to a variety of ecosystems that serve as education




Influential Practitioners Discovery Park

-J.B. Jackson -Ian McHarg -Gilles Clement -Jens Jensen -Michael Hough -Piet Oudolf


18 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Informing Open Spaces:
Downtown Bonita Springs


Island Park q


Wonder Gardens
9


High Value
'Derelict Prop-
erty. Mixed
Use Preferable




Survey Cafe


D Area Investigated


IFMt. C t Community
Center
and Historic
Banyan Tree



Depot Park Riverside Park

The central downtown sector has benefited most from city capital improvements. Riverside Park acts a nucleus controlling
activities on both sides of Old US 41. Island Park and Depot Park are in the process of renewal and act as a corridor along the rail
path. Currently they are used as dog walks, passive strolling and overflow parking for community events.

The former Bamboo Village site, outlined in pink, is being shopped by the city for investors due to its value and centrality.

Everglades Wonder Gardens, outlined in yellow, opened in 1936 and houses a diversity of wildlife and provides tours on site. A
great example of early Florida conservation for tourists. Home to Florida panthers, otters and alligators. It serves as education
for the community.



19 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheel


er






Informing Open Spaces:
Riverside Park



Type: Downtown Community Park
Size: 5.5 acres (2.3 ha) Entry Signage and Art Lilies Hotel and Fountain Canoe Launch and Riverside
Stakeholder: City of Bonita Springs
Contributing Factors for Research: Center of civic activity of city. Located 3/4 mile from Rotary Park.
Brief Description of Place: Open aired lawn located in the heart of historic Bonita. Traditional design style with
native shade trees and tropical planting beds. Amphitheater band shell surrounded by parking and commercial retail
(bicycle shop and art studio).
Natural Habitat Type: Scrub pine flatwoods with second order stream. Formerly a disturbed rudderal field.
Predominant Program/Amenities: Band shell, picnic/pavilions, outdoor art, holiday gatherings, fishing dock and
canoe launch, historic cottages converted to art studios and hotel.
Site Elements: Benches, drinking fountains, focal water feature, picnic tables, paving (see page x)
Lighting: Adequate in three scales
Parking: 120+
Maintenance: Sub-contracted by city
Accessibility: Location lends well to pedestrian and bicycles with easy vehicular access.
Summary and Criticisms: Traditional open lawns and walkable pathways. Community gathering place and meet up
area. No play options for children.










20 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Informing Open Spaces:
Bonita Community Recreation Center


0Rail
Corridor


7 Area Investigated


0o*
Recreation Center
(Skate, Basketball,
Volleyball, Fitness)

Bonita Springs
Middle School --


Lee County
La Library An-
nex


5 Bonita
Community
Pool


Bonita Springs Recreation Park and Center center for active rec and sports for the community. Little League baseball and soft-
ball are main attractants. Fishing competitions and taste of town events often take place here. Detailed description on following
page.





21 A Senior Thesis by James H Wl


wheeler






Informing Open Spaces:
Bonita Community Recreation Center



Type: Community Park and Recreation Field -
Size: 42 acres (17 ha)
Stakeholder: City of Bonita Springs Recreation center entry and signage Baseball fields from the parking lot
Contributing Factors for Research: Located 1 mile from Rotary site. Center of active recreation for Bonita Springs.
Brief Description of Place: Open fields and parking dominate the environment. Recreation and ball fields see most
use for baseball and soccer. Offers quite, free form leisure in back near retention pond. Rec facility offers fitness, basket-
ball, indoor soccer etc.
Natural Habitat Type: Historically pine/palmetto scrub and prairie.
Predominant Program/Amenities: Tennis, skateboard plaza, disc golf, four baseball/softball fields, batting cages,
children's play area. Large field double as event space for taste of the town events and fairs.
Site Elements: Benches, drinking fountains, concession stand for baseball.
Lighting: Acceptable with only two scales
Parking: More than adequate 250+.
Maintenance: ?
Accessibility: Mostly by car. Pedestrian and cyclic access is very common due to resident adjacency.
Summary and Criticisms: Lacks overall organization with piece meal construction over time.
Picnic capabilities are lacking. Overall successful due to location and variety of uses.








Playground area

22 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Informing Open Spaces:
Bonita Nature Place


Bonita Nature Place
Type: Donated preservation and educational area
Stakeholder: City of Bonita Springs 0 Area Investigated
Contributing Factors for Research: Located 1.5 miles from Rotary site. Habitat preserva-
tion for wildlife and education for community.
Brief Description of Place: In its first year of development, open Sundays only. Stakehold-
ers are in the process of converting old residence into educational and demonstration zones.
Natural Habitat Type: Sand hill scrub sloping down into hardwood floodplain forest with
alluvial stream.
Predominant Program/Amenities: Education facility, gopher habitat areas, bat house, bee
keep, and nature trails.
Lighting: None outside of built features
Parking: 20-30 spaces
Maintenance: ?
Accessibility: Mostly by car but accessible by foot and bicycle. Open Sunday only.
Summary and Criticism: A great learning environment for those interested in natural
sciences. Located off the beaten path and being relatively new, few residents are aware and
general funding is lacking.









23 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Case Studies:
Estero Community Center and Park, Estero Fl.

Type: Regional Park with Active Rec. Center
Size: 55 acres (22.3 ha)
Stakeholder: Lee County Parks and Recreation
Contributing Factors for Research: High use suburban park that displays suc-
cessful play areas for children and active recreation for adults. A 1.2 acre fenced in
dog run.
Brief Description of Place: Entire park includes a 40,000 sq ft. rec center and
large fields for team sports and fitness. Eastern side is 7 acres of passive amenities
designed in 2006 with prefab play equipment and dog park. Walking paths mean- .
0Estero Community Center Aeria
der and connect through the site.
Natural Habitat Type: Light pine canopy, mostly dry prairie with retention ponds.
Predominant Program/Amenities: (Eastern side) Two child's play zones raised and mulched, fenced in dog run
(zones for small and large dogs), Picnic pavilions, and walking trails.
Site Elements: Benches, drinking fountains, grills, cap rock outcrops, bicycle racks, six-stall rest room facility.
Lighting: Adequate in four scales
Parking: Several linear zones 250+.
Maintenance: County Parks and Rec
Accessibility: Mostly by car, walking and cycle accessibilities exist with little use due to location.
Summary and Criticisms: Scale a bit large at times and open expanses need organization. High use denotes success on
eastern side. Dog run a big hit for area with movable seating and wash basin.








S24 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Case Studies:
Naples Preserve, Naples Fl.

Type: City operated preserve and education
Size: 8.8 acres (3.5 ha)
Stakeholder: City of Naples
Contributing Factors for Research: Similar scale and habitat type. Entire site allocated to preserving flat-
woods scrub ecosystem.
Brief Description of Place: Moderate canopy over raised boardwalk near heavy trafficked corridor. Out-
door education space in semi-urban setting
Natural Habitat Type: Pine/scrub flatwoods with coastal scrub zones.
Predominant Program/Amenities: Eco-center converted from 196o's modern south Florida architecture. A
.4 mile sign guided ecosystem tour limiting to boardwalk.
Site Elements: A central pavilion with signage and literature. Several seating areas spaced on boardwalk for
reflection and rest.
Lighting: One scale only near parking and building.
Parking: 25+
Maintenance: Volunteer based with city referendum.
Accessibility: Mainly vehicular but being integrated into developing pedestrian/bicycle system.
Summary and Criticisms: Excellent brochure with ecology speaker events and locations. Well buffered
from road. Only criticism is lack of connectivity.











25 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Case Studies:
MitchellJ. Pierce Park, Palo Alto, CA

Type: Regional park active recreation
Size: 22 acres (8.9 ha)
Stakeholder: City of Palo Alto
Contributing Factors for Research: A popular city park with a variety of uses. 50+ years of use as a tradi-
tionally designed multi-use park. A successful fenced in dog park recently implemented.
Brief Description of Place: Great lawn centers active use zone for play, tennis, dog walk, picnic and rest
rooms. Located adjacent to middle and elementary schools, library, and community center.
Predominant Program/Amenities: Lawn games, tennis, dog area, horseshoes, art installation.
Site Elements: Group tables, swings, drinking fountains, public rest rooms, pay phones, bbq grills.
Parking: 60-70 in urban setting
Accessibility: Good vehicular access with many bike and pedestrian entries as well as public transportation.



Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School Fairmeadow Elementar School

Exere=se S m1
Mitchell Park
1Picnic Reservations d









Middlefield Roadoms




26 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler











Analysis and Synthesis


S-'Zwol









Analysis and Synthesis


Land Use and Public Places



Legend
r Bonita Springs City LiUmits
Arterial Roads
MajorRoads
Social and Public Spaces
CHURCHES
CLUBS, LODGES, AND UNION HALLS -
CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS -. '
OTHER MUNICIPAL
OUTDOOR RECREATIONAL t
PRIVATE SCHOOLS
i PUBLIC SCHOOLS .f
TOURISTATTRACTIONS '
Bonita Springs Land Use Type /
COMMERCIAL ANO, SERVICES .
RETAIL SALES AND SERVICES
INDUSTRIAL '
CULTURAL AND ENTERTAINMENT
FIXED SINGLE FAMILY UNITS
FIXED SINGLE FAMILY UNITS > 5 DWL UNITS/ACR- .
RESIDENTIAL MOBILE HOME UNITS-ALL -- .
RESIDENTIAL, HIGH DENSITY -
RESIDENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
ELECTRICAL POWER FACILITIES .... -
SEWAGE TREATMENT
FRESHWATER MARSHES
RESERVOIRS
LAKES -,
STREAMS & WATERWAYS
MANGROVE SWAMPS
FALLOW CROP LAND -- -
CROPLAND AND PASTURELAND
GOLF COURSES
FOREST










28


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Analysis and Synthesis
Land Use Summary


Bonita Springs Land Use Type


Retail and Commercial lies along the main roads US 41 and Bonita Beach Rd. while residential holds the highest density along the
Imperial River radiating from historic downtown along Old US 41. The city of Bonita Springs has developed a respectable downtown
open space surrounding Riverside Park. Active fields and indoor recreation is used heavily just north of the downtown zone at the Bo-
nita Recreation Center. Non-estate residences lack community open spaces nearest their homes for less crowded and passive recreation.


29 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Analysis and Synthesis

Housing and Traffic Maps


Circulation Analysis


New homeowners are the key eco-
nomic boosters for the city of Boni-
ta springs as well as the SWFL area.
As vacancies and foreclosures need
filling. Bonita Springs can capital-
ize on its the small community feel,
lower tax zone and smooth traffic
toward Ft. Myers and Naples by
creating livable communities with
efficient access to gathering and
green spaces.

These spaces should give nearby
residents opportunities to enjoy
morning or evening walks, wildlife
viewing and play. Leading to happy
and healthy families.

By locating zones of need and
land use potentials within existing
neighborhoods. Parks can begin to
take shape.


-- INTERSTATE HIGHWAY
S,-- MAIN HIGHWAY
--- REGIONAL CORRIDOR
--... NEIGHBORHOOD ARTERIAL
) ROTARY PROPOSED SITE


Residential Home Values


Legend
Homestd Value
AVHMSTD
SSO 000000 39990o.000000
S $39990 000001 97250 000000
-~ S S9u2 0 .0o0 160950,000000
S ti5u IX"X'1 300000.000000
S.IC.OO ,XW I 5910770,000000
S,:.-Ti -Fi: T-TESWITH
IE *:lli E AMENITIES


30 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Analysis and Synthesis

Existing Open Space and Population Density


Neighborhoods lacking
open space conqireoa-
tu-n


Wetland and ground-
water protection area
DR/GR


1 Dot = 1.2 POPDENS
EXISTING PUBLIC
OPEN SPACE
PROPOSED ROTARY
PARK
G-TED ESTATES WITH
E CLUSIVE AMENITIES


*Areas highlighted in orange note need of public open green space when related to population densities and
existing open space.


31 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a






Analysis and Synthesis
Watershed


Zones outlining
current needs


The digital elevation model shows the preceding zones of need in relation to the natural watershed. Zones
of higher density without open green space lie within stream and watershed corridors. This provides a
wealth of opportunities to filtration and cleansing of water as well as interaction and education for users.


32 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Analysis and Synthesis

Open Space Proposals


Strike Ln/ Bonita Golf Estates
/ Convert derelict golf course
into natural style course with wet-
land filtration and walking nature
paths


Education Park

*Athletic Fields

Water Rec Park

Civic Park

Proposed Rotary Park


Rosemary/Matheson
.... To be the project example
of low budget, low input,
sustainable


_I




Dean St./Bonita Elementary
Nature playground incorporated
in to existing Oak Creek preserve
and school. Nature education op-
portunities for school.


As the city grows, conservation and open space activities must be allocated for neighborhood parks. Parks
should be designed around existing sense of place, specific neighborhood user groups, on-site resources, and
natural water regimes. Program should continually find a balance human and natural systems

Rotary Park
Efficient Design with Nature in Mind 33 A Senior Thesis by Jan


ies H Wheeler







Analysis and Synthesis

Site Specific Context


a Area Investigated


OPEN SPACE
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
MOBILE HOMES
MULTI FAMILY HOMES
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
SCHOOL BUS STOP

COUNTY TRANSIT STOP

ROTARY PARK


34 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Analysis and Synthesis

Adjacent Site Circulation






---.. e .Site Boundaries


~Access Points


.. 4T..i
-'-Access from the north is
W ." prone to higher density of
use from pedestrians and
bicycles. Most being lower
OF class status.
i--F- 71- 1-T





-Access from the south will
receivee higher vehicular en-
** b : tries from middle to upper
t- -class users.

0 -Approximately 900 hous-
-- .- ing units within 1/2 mile
1 7'261 i -J distance to park entry.


0 005 01 02 03 04 Nt


35 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Analysis and Synthesis

Site History


1968


1985


2006


These historic aerials show the properties past transformations. The first notes the original land prior to develop-
ment. The second image displays the former mobile home park on site. While the east half of the site has been heav-
ily disturbed, the western area has been left undeveloped and only slightly disturbed as a thoroughfare for pedestri-
ans. This western parcel has high suitability for habitat preservation. No residences have been on site since a clean up
in 2005. Small campsites remain as vagrancies and gang related groups. The majority of use comes from pedestrians
or bicycles connecting Terry St. and Rosemary St neighborhood.


36 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheele


r





Analysis and Synthesis
Existing Conditions


r ':.~w~
1"*


w .,..--


37 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a






Analysis and Synthesis

Inventory

-Located at 26' 20' N 81' 46'W

-USDA Zone ioA

-Hallandale Fine Soil
well drained, poor in nutrients


-Existing Site Resources
#1- io'xio'x8' CMU roofless structure
#3- 8'x6'x5' septic housing with cover slabs
#1- fenced in derelict pump house


#1- 2 cubic yards of concrete demo
#1- 10 cubic yards of fill dirt
#6- Concrete barriers


#27- Multiple nov hookups and water
#15- Concrete mobile home pads
#1- -6450 sq ft large concrete pads (90o'x7o')


-Native Plants


-Invasive Plants


38 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Analysis and Synthesis
Existing Systems and Circulation


For 8 years the site has served as a bypass for
both sides of the community. Zones of vagrancy,
graffiti, loitering, recreation and dumping have
been noted throughout. Despite the general dis-
concern for the property, wildlife flourishes com-
pared to traditionally managed parks.


Primary Circulation


-4 -_-


A
A


Zone of high-
est use and
compaction


Secondary Circulation
Areas of Homelessness
Abandoned Structure
Derelict Water Pump House


* Utility Lines Overhead
Septic Housing
,+ Dump and Fill Zones


S- S 20 60 100 N

39 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a







Analysis and Synthesis

Natural Habitat Types



Scrub habitat dominates the site. Scrub lands
are the most rapidly-declining ecosystem type in
Florida and should be protected accordingly.

Rotary Park is unique in that a feeder creek of-
fers habitat for aquatic species and mesic plants
within the scrub ecosystem. The gift of water also
attracts birds of many species. Blue Jays, Cardi-
nals, Red Shouldered Hawks, Ospreys, and Kites
spend active time here.


Nature trails should be planned to educate users
on both environments and transition zones


Hardwood
Canopy


Palm/Mesic
Hammock


Concentrate
Tortoise Hab

Open Scrub .--
Prairie .


Slash
Pine


20 60 100 N+T
MM::MEZM1 I |


4o A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


Upland
Scrub


Weedy
Invasives


.. .. .






Analysis and Synthesis

Site Synthesis Node of hi


Issues and Constraints

-Wildlife crossing from western
preserve to eastern habitat.
-Xeric habitat areas
-Poorly engineered creek edge
-Program goals of:
-No irrigation/fertilizer
-Preservation zone
-Low budget

Opportunities

-Existing wildlife viewing
-Existing needs in neighborhood
-Pedestrian connection between
neighborhoods
-Nature education
-Existing resources (leftovers)
-Adjacency to semi-urban commu-
nity within walking and bicycling
distance


Natural
400 Beauty


`7p Viewsheds


20 60 100 N t

LP Low Point


Tortoise
Habitat


41 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


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Design Development









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43 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


Concept Development


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Program Development

Initial recommendations made by the client include:


1. Children Playground 2. Exercise Circuit 3. Nature and Walking Trails


Florida's SCORP analysis for SWFL notes relative need in this order:


1.Picnicking 2. RVTrailer/Camping


3. Saltwater Activities


4. Swimming Pool 5. Football 6. Nature Study


Rotary Park Adjacent
Open Space Matrix


Sidewalk Entry
Sitting Areas
Pavilion
Grill/Picnic Area
Night Entry
Public Restrooms
Water Fountains
Art/Sculpture
Athletic Fields
Children Playground


Exercise Circuit w/ Equipment
Open Field Play -
Nature Trails
Environmental Education
Amphitheatre
Open Community Center
Boating/Kayak/Canoe
Fenced Dog Run


Final program to include: Children

study, art/sculpture, and dog park




^_____________4z


!'s play, picnic area, exercise circuit, nature


SA Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


.- -o
cu-li







Illustrative Plan











.


*. .- 41

", ,, i


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16


North Entry Gateway and Place marker
Children Play Area
Shelter and Picnic Use
Tot Lot
Parc Ventana Sculpture
Pine Row Nature Play and Harvesting
Exercise Circuit and Track
Prairie Trails and Play
Open Lawn and Mound
Concession/Restrooms/Equipment Storage (Shown with expansion)
Rotary Themed Seating Circle
Scrub Trail and Preservation 1
Art Wall '
South Entry Gate
Fenced Dog Run (Large/Small) ..
Preservation Lands


Area Totals:
-1.9 acres of open space lawn
-44% of 15.1 acres reserved as preservation
-3/4 miles of nature trails


h.


45 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


Triangulation while using
focal viewpoints
focal viewpoints






South Entry Details


Upland Scrub Trail



Council Ring


Ham mock Trail
1600 ft2 Park
Rest looms and
Concessions
Art Wall


Chickee Hut con-
structed by local
tribes


Bicycle Rack



Raised Flower
Planter


_ Aquatic Marsh
Edge






\,-Wo rk Station

Waste Collection


Cap rock Bollards


46 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


r ba E 7K- _7





South Entry Perspective
























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j2-


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Entry Bridge Details


Precast columns with recycled utility pipes on existing bridge


48 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Art Wall Perspective






aa.


49 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Central Open Space Details ,4 K..














Chickee hut can be con-
structed by native Micco-
sukee Tribe for cost or with
volunteer labor per engineer








Proposed seating type CMU block art wall provides play and creativity at a low cost





50 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Central Open Space Perspective





















a 51


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


-4t. 0 W7 I Ju
9 lb- M- : P







Open Lawn Detail and Section


INative scrub
buffer 1 1
6' path


Maximum I I I I
1 1 1 5:1islope on 1
6' path Mound hill 18' promenade Shade lawn Oak hammock 6' pine straw
Lookout path and fields path


*All paths are crushed shell and gravel paths compacted to ADA stan-
dards




52


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






Rotary Park North Overview


Children's Play


Exercise Circuit


Flagged entry
and sculpture


Upland Lupine a6
field wildflowers


53 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a






North Pine Prairie Perspective


0*
I


1~' ~

I -~


54 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






North Pine Prairie Details


Parc Ventana sculpture set with
footer











Alternate supports for trial install




a----


P



North Prairie Plan


ation


Existing Inspiration


55 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






North Entry Perspective


4L
Kj *
', Ir "".-'


56 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler






North Entry Details


Entry gate-
way and
flags pro-
vide nature
education


Upland Lupine and open
field wildflowers



a---


- -'


Installed hawk's nest


45


t






15

Solar Panels provide
night lighting


Children's natural
playground


57 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


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Planting


Specifications







Planting Plan


:









O Sand Live Oak
Q Sabal Palmetto
(_ Bald Cypress
o Slash Pine
o Rusty Lyonia
* Shiny Blueberry
a Prickly Pear Cactus
o Wax Myrtle
0 Saw Palmetto
0 Beautvberrv


Wiregrass
Muhley Grass
Hydric/Swale Mix
Gopher Apple
Daylily
Indian Blanket/Firewheel


Rusty Lyonia 17


~ITh)
mm


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2.
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/*^7 7'


Shiny Blueberry.


Many of the species presented are selected to
thrive under neglect if planted within their
natural habitat zone. All are found readily
at native plant nurseries or harvested on site.
Tree and shrub plantings are all native to the
site and should be planted in saturated soils
July-September. Relying on temporary ir-
rigation only if necessary. Grasses and edge
species need only 2-3 maintenance clearings
a year upon further research. Lawn mainte-
nance kept to monthly or bi-monthly mow-
ings.


Sunshine Mimosa


20 60 100 N
I2O


59 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


a







Planting List

Prairie Seed/ Liner Tray/ 1 Gallon List


Pine Prairie and Edge Mix *Non -Native
Andropogon sp. Bushy Bluestem, Golden brown showy inflorescense in To 5'. Self seeding
Broomsedge fall.
Aristida stricta Wiregrass
Ascelpias curassavica* Scarlett Milkweed Orange to red flowers on thin erect To 4'. Tolerant of wet and dry sandy soil w/o
stems. Monarch attr. supplemental water
Bidens sp. Spanish Bayonet Small year round white or yellow To 3'. Semi-showy, self seeding
flowers
Coreopsis sp. leavenworthii, Tickseed Yellow sunflower in mid spring To 2'. Mesic to moist depending on species
lanceolata
Chamaecrista nictitans Sensitive Pea Yellow pea flowers. Attr. for doves and To 3' on drier site. Scarification needed
quails.
Conoclinum coelestinum Blue Mistflower Pale blue clusters summer-fall. To 3' in moister regions
Butterfly attr.
Eragrostis spectabilis Purple Love Grass Purple-red grass flowers late summer 1-3' on dry site
to fall
Ipomopsis rubra Standing Cypress Red inflorescence and great wildlife 2-4 Tall
attractant
Liatris spicata Dense Blazing Star Purple tubular on stalks summer-fall 1-5' tall, plant in moister regions
Liatris gracilis Slender Blazing Star Purple tubular on stalks summer-fall Similar to dense liatris but on drier sites
Monarda punctata Spotted Beebalm White-purple lamiaceae flowers in Full sun on drier sites to 3'
summer-fall
Piloblephis rigida Pennyroyal Small fragrant flowers. Buttfly attr. To 24" Native to open pine sand soil fields. Drought
tolerant
Vernonia sp. Ironweed Perennial w/ purple aster flowers. To 3' for both species. Drier site for sp. angustifolia,
gigantea,angustifolia Butterfly attr. moister regions for gigantea





60 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Planting List

Open Lawn Mix


Lawn Mix *Non -Native
Perennial Rye* Rye grass Used as overseeding and perennial if Common grass spread in fall or incorporated into
possible. mixture.
Erigeron quercifolius Flea bane Showy white ray flowers with yellow centers To 2' in flowers. Moist to dry sites
Mimosa strigillosa Powderpuff Senstitive Pale pink flowers spring and fall. Nitrogen To 8". Spreading but not overpowering
GC fixing legume
Hydrocotyle sp. Dollarweed Flat peltate leaves. To 6". Suited for moist sand
Oxalis sp. Clover Small yellow flowers on clover leaves To 8". Small filler ground cover
Paspalum notatum* Bahia Argentine grass Common grass mix used to fill and cover Very drought tolerant and low maintenance. Seed
heads cut in summer
Phylla nodiflora Matchstick weed Ground cover with small 'matchstick' flowers Mounding to 10". Very drought tolerant
Richardia grandiflora* Mexican Clover Ground cover with small white tubular Mounding to 6". Drought tolerant with well-drained
flowers, butterfly attr, soils
Sisyrinchium atlanticum Blue eyed grass Pale blue flowers spring-summer. To 20". Prefers moister site but drought tolerant
Taraxacum officinale Dandelion Yellow flowers with airy white seed pods To 24" in flower. Flowers and seeds are well known
Trifolium refluxum* Buffalo Clover Pinkish, red blooms in springs. Nitrogen 4-10", Annual reseeder. Scarification needed.
fixing legume















61 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler











Phasing and Implementation












Phase I






Phase II





Phase III





Phase IV


Park phasing goals for longevity include re-engineering creek basins, timber har-
vesting for site upgrades and dog waste composting or digestor,


63 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


Phasing


- -_.


a


-Displaced fill and concrete creates a
landform mound
-Pathways, nature trails sculptures



-Install pine rows and shade trees
-Pavilions and seating
-Exercise circuit and 2nd phase
of sculptures


-Play structures implemented
according to capital
-Final round of planting completed.



-Central rest room, equipment, and
vending facility
-Fenced in dog park installed with
signage per spec.








Phasing







Human


Precedence set for projects
and new design typology for
pen space system. J


Continues to progress the
native ecosystem toward a
sustainable climax. Influenc-
ing further native design.


Phase IV ..* Phase
.****.. .*..".*..... ..

Creating a low input, /
efficiently managed /
open space that main-
tains at low human ]
costs.
Phase IIl .*'Pha

SIncreased wildlife Iraffic
by established native
plantings. Inducing
nature education. _


Funding and Management


'Clearing exotic
i nvasivs out
r and paving path
to restoration.

ase I
SEnriching space for gen-
I rations and increasing
citywide growth. ),
4

Phase IV Phase I


Sustained growth initial pnvate fund-
(use) yields expanded i ng accepts use
program and main- and spurs user and
tains park costs J / privale interests.
Phase 11 ... .*'Phase 11

Interest from commu- '
nity spurs parks growth.
Raising awareness and
donation capital.


64 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler


Ecological






Implementation and Management


Infrastructure Implementation

-As solar panel technology offers cheaper solutions.
The north portion of the site can exclude FPL utili-
ties. Solar energy can be installed in aesthetic fash-
ion to operate pedestrian lighting and water foun-
tains below grade.

-Alternatively, utility lines should run along eastern-
most walkway shielded by planting buffer.

-Wifi routers running off charged battery can ac-
commodate outdoor study.



Program Management


Habitat Management and Materials

-Prairie and open lawn mowing to be scheduled season-
ally upon further research.

-Timber harvesting maintained at intervals for a variety
of functions

-Field selected cap rock to be used in seating areas and
pathways as bollards

-Pine needle and cone bedding for tree protection in dog
area.

-Decomposed granite or similar native crushed shell and
stone will comprise the fenced in dog park. Depending
on field tests.


-Sculptures should be built for permanence but
with simple deconstruction in mind. This will allow
temporary installments exhibiting local art.






65


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler





Conclusions



While many of the design elements presented at
Rotary Park may embellish my goals and objectives.
Most of them personify the overall concept of a
more efficient and simply sustainable solution that
heightens both human use and ecological preserva-
tion.










66 A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler







Bibliography and Photography Credits



Contacts
Bonita Springs Historical Society
David Green FGCU Dept of Biology. Assistant at Bonita Nature place
Gary Price City Manager, Bonita Springs City Hall
Mike Liggins Director of Engineering at Bonita Springs Utilities, Inc. Rotary member

Books
Florida SCORP Analysis. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/planning/parkplans/SCORP-2000.pdf
Hough, Michael. 'Cities and Natural Processes' Routledge Books NY, NY 1995
Jackson, J.B. 'Landscapes' Edited by Ervin H. Zube. Univeristy of Massachusetts Press 1970
McHarg, Ian. 'The Essesntial Ian McHarg' Edited by Frederick Steiner. Island Press, Washington DC 2006
Richardson, Tim. 'Avant Gardeners'. Thames and Hudson, NY, NY. 2008

Websites
http://www.floridasnature.com/floridahabitats.htm
Project for People Spaces. http://www.pps.org
http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/news/displaynews.asp?NewsID=1o2&TargetlD=14
http://progressiveearlychildhoodeducation.blogspot.com/


Photo Credits
#1. pg 9. http://lifeinbonitasprings.com #12. pg 54. http://der
#2. pg 9. http://lifeinbonitasprings.com #13. pg 57. http://ww
#3. pg 12. http://www.floridasnature.com/floridahabitats.htm #14. pg 57. http://ww
#4. pg 12. http://www.lawnsprinklers.us/installing.htm #15. http://news.cnet
#5. pg 13. http://criticalmiami.com/archive/2oo7/o5 #16. pg 57. http://pro
#6. pg 14. http://wildobs.com/Mick iP65/tag/Hawks #17. pg 59. http://ww
#7. pg 18. http://www.flickr.com/photos/tinkerszone/2893361632/
#8. pg 18. http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/news/displaynews.asp?NewsID=10o2&TargetlD=14
#9. pg 26. http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/csd/news/details.asp?NewsID=114&TargetlD=14
#10. pg 50. http://joejude.ws/tiki.htm
#11. pg 50. http://www.landscapeforms.com




67


idro.cnre.vt.edu/forsite
w.flickr.com/photos/wolfread/3740027598/
w.jrcompton.com/photos/The_Birds.htm
.com/83o1-11128_3-20011178-54.html
gressiveearlychildhoodeducation.blogspot.com/
w.flickr.com/photos/21248205@No3/3712122776/


A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler




Full Text

PAGE 1

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler1 Rotary Park @ Leitner Creek E cient Design with Nature in Mind

PAGE 2

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler2 AcknowledgementsPrepared by: James Harrell Wheeler Jr. jhwheeler11@u .eduPrepared for: UF Dept. of Landscape Architecture City of Bonita Springs, Florida Rotray Club International Bonita Springs CharterSpecial Thanks to:My immediate and extended family that has supported me and unknowingly guided me towards a life of landscapes and gardens. To my talented peers and friends who h ave inspired me and taught me more than what I paid for in school. 4/20/2011

PAGE 3

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler3 ContentsAs design is speci c to site, the process of development is speci c to the designer. Immersion into the project begins with inquiry of the client and city history. Next, unbiased observations and desires for the community and environment are derived from geogra phical and social observations existing in the area. Research, analysis, snythesis and design follow in the traditional fashion. W hile lastly, I look into phasing and implementation of project construction. 1. Introduction Project Genesis Project Abstract Statement of Intent City Overview Goals and Objectives 2. Observations Developmental Impacts Water Conservation Habitat Conservation Flourishing Abandonment 3. Research and Discovery Topical Investigations In uential Designs Informing Places Case Studies ...........................................4 ..........................................5 ......................................6 .........................................7-9 ..................................10 ..............................12 ...................................13 .................................14 .........................15 ..............................17 ................................18 .................................19-23 ...........................24-26 4. Analysis and SynthesisLanduse Maps Housing, Tra c and Density Maps Watershed/Elevation Map Open Space Proposals Site Adjacency Maps Site Inventory and Existing Systems5. Design DevelopmentProgram Dev. Conceptual Dev. Illustrative Plan and Details 6. Planting Speci cations Planting Plan Plant Lists7. Phasing and ImplementationPhasing Further Suggestions8. Conclusions Summary Bibliography ........................................28-29 ...........30-31 ............................32 ...................................33 ................................34-35 .......36-41 .............................................43 .........................................44 ...................45-57 ................................................59 .................................................60-61 .....................................................63-64 ...................................65 .....................................................66 .............................................67

PAGE 4

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler4 Upon recommendation, I made a contact about a neighborhood park theorized by a group of Bonita Springs Rotary Members. The basis of this park was to provide leisure space and passive recreation for neighborhoods surrounding a 15 acre disturbed parcel. The site is owned by The City of Bonita Springs and upon acceptance from commissioners, would be a Rotary organized venture working with local citizens relying on volunteer and member labor with Rotarian organized funding. Rotary Club International is a service base organization that encourages high ethical standards for professionals and promotes humanitarian services within their community and the world. Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build good will and better friendships? Will it be bene cial to all concerned? ‘Service above self’ Rotary suggested program includes: Exercise circuit, childrens playground, and nature trails. Most of the gravity was given to providing open space, play and interaction for the lower income, higher density neighborhoods north of the proposed site. f B i t Genesis of Rotary Park

PAGE 5

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler5Project AbstractRotary Park aims to provide small communities with little money the opportunity to build and manage needed suburban green spaces while preserving the native landscapes. As human impact spreads inland, much of Florida’s natural interior has been replaced by unsustainable and ine cient suburban development. To combat this, a new style of park design must weigh program needs with preservation goals. These neighborhood parks can be funded and constructed with minimal input and volunteer labor to strengthen bonds in the community and with the environment. Rotary Park uses existing resources readily available on site to create site elements and integrate art into the landscape. Management guidelines are speci c to site ecology and work with nature, rather than against it. Lowering human inputs and creating a more e cient environment for the future.

PAGE 6

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler6Statement of IntentMy intent for Rotary Park @ Leitner Creek is to showcase the idea of low input, e ciently operating landscapes that work with nature to provide beauty and programmed use for the surrounding neighborhood.

PAGE 7

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler7 Much has changed since the Florida Frontiersman forged their way into a land full of untapped resources, excessive water problems and wild animals. Similar to the rest of Florida, tropical agriculture and seafood were common. In time, tourism and freeways brought the world to the land we know today. Bonita Springs was founded in 1881 as land speculators and pioneers ventured into the region upon Florida’s manifest destiny. Exploring the Caloosahatchee River and the southern tip of the Estero Bay, up Survey Creek, later coined the Imperial River. Incorporated in 1998, it lies 15 miles south of Ft. Myers on the Lee County line. Naples lies 12 miles south of Bonita in Collier County.City Overview

PAGE 8

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler8City Demographics 2000 CensusPopulation and Growth Estimated 42,268 (July 2007) 192% population change since 1990 Median age 46.7 Race Estimates Black 2.5% Hispanic 31% White 66.5% Dwelling/Occupation Avg. Household size 2.47 Households: Family 68% Household: Non-Fam. 31% Household: W/ Child 20% Household: No Chil 80% White Collar Occup. 74% Blue Collar Occup. 26% Income Median Household $59,086 Average Household $88,474 Informing Spaces and Parks Rotary Neighborhood ParkCity Overview

PAGE 9

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler9 Bonita Springs is in a position many small south Florida municipalities wish they could be in. The city is afforded a condensed quite downtown sector on a secondary arterial road, an intriguing history, minimal sprawl, bordered by the peaceful gulf and interior wetland scrub, and most of all a passionate community with small town values. Golf course communities and easy beach access are constant draws for tourists and migrating residents from all over the world. City Overview 1 2

PAGE 10

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler10 1. Generate the most use by focusing on easy access and relevant program for the Rosemary Community. -Meet and exceed all vacancies in surrounding open space matrix -Community advocacy and volunteers foster awareness and ownership -Maximize safe access locations in conjunction with CPTED principles -Improve eye lines and view sheds 2. Improve ecology -Let the site guide the design. Allowing select current successions to continue. -Low impact construction -Native/naturalized planting design via habitat type 3. Provide low maintenance design leading to a self-sustaining dynamic -Preferably none or temporary irrigation with drought tolerant plantings -Accessible and screened maintenance area with compost/propagation areas -Low impact materials with longevity or on-site replacements -Management plan with foresight 4. Design with low cost construction -Community support and relationship building with local suppliers -Materials from local sources -Utilize existing resources 5. Integrate details and art tastefully to strengthen sense of place and provide an outlet for artists -Design with existing resources aka leftovers -Draw from surrounding aesthetic -Incorporate interpretive signage for educational and artful experiencesGoals and Objectives

PAGE 11

A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler11 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S Se Se S S S S S S S S Se Se S S S S S S S S Se Se Se Se Se Se S Se e S Se S S S Se Se Se Se Se e e Se S Se S Se Se e S Se e S Se Se e e e Se Se Se S Se Se S Se e e e e e e e S S Se Se S Se e e e Se S e e e S Se e e e e e e Se e Se e e S S e S S S S S Se e e Se Se S Se Se e e e Se S S e e S S Se e e S S Se Se e Se Se S S Se S S S S S S S S Se S e e S S Se S S Se S Se Se Se e Se e Se e e S S e S S S S Se e e e Se e S S e S S S e S S S e i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ni ni i i i i n i ni ni n n i ni ni n n n n ni n n n n ni ni i n n n n n ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni 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m m am am am a a am am am am am am m m m m m m am a am a am a m m am am m am am am am a a am am am m m am m m am a a am m m m m m m m am m am am m am am am am m am m am am m m a a am am m am m am am m am m m m m a a a am a am m m am m m m a a a a m m m m m m m a am m m m m m am m m m m m am am a m m m m am am m m a a a m m m m m a a a a m m m m m m m m m m am m am m m m am m a m m m m m e e e e e e e e es es s es es es es e e e e e es es es e e e e e e e e e e e e es e es e e e e e es e e e e s e e s e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e s e e e es es s e e e e e e e e e e s e s e e e e e e e e H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W he he h he he he he he he he he he he he h h h e he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he h h he h h he he he h he he he h h h h h h h h h h h h he he he he h h h he h he he h he he he he he he he he he he h h h he h h he he he he h he h he he he h h he he he he h he h he he he he he h he he he h he he he he he he he he he he he e he he h e h he h h he h h h h he he e he h h h h h he he h h e e e h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h he h h h he e he he h h e h h h h h h h h h h h h h h e e h h he h h e h h h e e e el el el l el el el el el el l el el el l el el el e el el el el el el el l l el el e e el el el l el el el el el l el el l el el el el el el el el l el el el el l l el e e e e e e l el el e e e e e el e e e e e e e e el e e e l l e e e e e e e e e e e el l e e el e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e el e e el e e e e e e e el l l e l e e e e e e l e e e e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e er er er er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er e e e r er er er e e e er e er er e e er er e e e e e e e e e e r e e e e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Observations

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler12 Natural Inputs-Rainfall -Occasional re -Pollinating species -Nutrient sink (organic matter)Human Inputs-Labor ($) -Capital (investment and planning) -Materials (as expensive as you’d like) -Electricity (drain of existing infrastructure) -Irrigation system -Invasive species -Ine cient and toxic weekly maintenance plans -Reoccurring repair costsObservationsDevelopmental Impact 3 4

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler13 Water will be the natural resource of the 21st century. Lee County, Fl approximates 60% of potable water is used for lawn and agricultural irrigation. Retention reservoirs, deeper aquifer drilling and ltered sur cial systems are current methods for fresh water. BSU built $38 million reverse osmosis lter system to pump brackish water for public use.ObservationsWater Conservation5

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler14ObservationsHabitat Conservation Providing habitat for feature and threatened species6

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler15ObservationsFlourishing Abandonment Weedy rudderals strive in abandoned and forgotten lots.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler16 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S Se S S S Se S S S S S S S S S Se Se Se S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S Se S S S S S S S S Se Se Se S S Se S S S Se S Se S S S e S S S Se Se Se S Se S Se Se Se Se Se Se e e e S S S S Se Se Se Se Se S Se Se Se S Se Se Se e e e e e Se S Se e S S S Se S e e e e Se e e e e e e e S e e e e S S Se e e e e e e Se e e e Se e e e e e S S e Se S Se e S S S Se e Se S S Se e S S S e e e S Se e e e S S S S e S S S S Se S S S e S S Se Se S Se e e S S S S S Se e S S S S S e e S S e S S S S S e e e i ni n ni ni i n i ni ni ni i i i i i i n i i i i ni ni i i i i i i i i i i i ni i i i i i i i n n n n n i i ni n n n n i ni n n n ni n ni n n i ni i ni ni n n n ni n n ni ni ni n ni n n n n ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni n ni ni ni ni ni n n ni n ni ni n n ni ni ni n n n ni ni ni n n ni ni ni ni ni n ni ni ni ni ni i ni n n i i ni n n i i ni ni ni ni ni n n ni ni n n n n n n ni ni n n n n n n n n n i ni ni ni ni n n n n ni ni n i i i i n ni ni ni ni ni ni n ni n n ni n n ni n i i i i i i n ni n n n ni ni ni i i i i n n ni n n ni i n n n ni i or or or or or or or or or or o or o o o or or or o or or or or r or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or o r o or r r o o or or r r r r r o o o r r o o r r o o o o r or r r r o o o o r r r r or or or r r r o or o o or or r r r r r r r o or r r r r r o o o or or r r r r r r o o o o o r r r r r r or r o or o or or r r o o or or o or or or r r or o or r or r r r or o o r r r or o or or or o o o r r r r r r r or r r r o r r r r r r or or r r or o o or r r r or or o o o o o o o o T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T he h h he he he he h h he he he he he he he he he e he he he he he he he he he he h h h he he he he h he he h h he he he h h he he he he he h h he he he h he he h h he he he h h he h e he he he e he he he e he h he e he h he he h he h he h he he he e e e h he e e e e e he h he he e e he he h h h he e e e e h h h h h h h h he h h h h h h h h h h e e he e he he he h h he e e he e e e h h e e h he h he he he h e e h h h h h h h h h h e e h h e e s si si si i si i s si si si si si si s si si si i si i si s si si i si si si s si i si i i i si s i s s s i i si si i s si si si s i s s si si s s s si si si si si i s i s si s s s i si s s s si si si s i i s si si i i i s s s si i i s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s by by b by by by by by by by by b by y by b by b b by by b b by by y by by y by by by y by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by y by by y by y by by by by by by by by b b by by y y by by by by by by y by b y y by by by by by b by b b by y by y b b b b y y b b by y b b b b y b b b b b b b b b b b b b b y b b b b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b by b b b b b b b by by b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b b y y y y y b b b b b b b b y y y by by b b b b b y b b b by y y b y y by b y y y y y y y y y y y y J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J am am am am am am am am am am am am am am am am am am m am am am m am m am am m m am am am am am am am am am am am m m am am am am am am a am am am am m am am am am a am a a m m am am a a am am am m m m a a a am m am am a a am a am m a a a a a a a a a am m am a am am a am am a a a am am am am m a a a am m am am a a am am m m m m am am am m am am am m m m m m a a a am am am m am m m m m a a a a a m m m m m a a a m m m m m m m m m m m am a am a m m m m m m a am a m m m m m a a a a m m m m m m m a a a m m m m m m m m e e e es e es es s es es es e e e e e s es es e e e s e es es e e e e e es es e e e e e e s s e e e e e e e e es e e e s e e e e e e e e e es e e es es e s s e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W he h h h he he he he h h he he he he he he he he he he he he he he e he e h he h h h h h h h h h h he he he he he he he he he h h h h h h h he h h h h he h he he he he he he e he he h h he he he he he e h h he h h h h he he he he he he e he he h he he h he he he he e he he h h he he he he he he he he he he he he he he h he he he he he h h h h he h h h he he he he h he he he he he he h h h h he h h e he h e he h h he e e he e e h he h he e he e he he h h he h he h h he e he e he he e h he h h h h he e h h h h h h he he h e e h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h e h h h e h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h e e el el el el el el el l l el el el el el el e el el e e e el e e e e e e el el el l l el el l l e e e e e e e el el el e el e el el el e e el el l l l e e e e el e el el el el el l l e e e el el l el e e e e el el l el e e el e e e el l el el e e e el el l e l el e e e e el e e el e el e e e e e e e e e e l e e e e e e e e e el e e el e e e el el e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e l l e l e e e e er e e e e e e e e e e e er er er er er e e e e e e e e e er r er er er e e e e e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e r e e e e e e e e e er e er e e er e er e e er er e e e e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler17Research and Discovery Areas of Investigation-Much of the existing open space in Bonita Springs is geared towards water activities and tourism. Very little emphasis is put on neighborhood and community parks. -20/20 Conservation Program http://www.conservation2020.org -Dog Park guidelines and precedences Dog Park Standards & Manuals by Susyn Stecchi DC Dep. of Rec. Dog Park Standards -Native ecosystem types and functions RegionalConservation.org Coccoloboa Chapter of Florida Native Plant Society -Playground types ProgressiveEarlyChildrenEducation@blogspot.com PlayScapes.blogspot.com USA Today article ‘Natural playgrounds are growing into a national trend’ -Existing vernacular -Architecture styles in civic and private communities

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler18Research and DiscoveryCrosby Arboretum, Picayune, MS The Crosby Arboretum at the Univeristy of Mississippi serves as a natural education experience for the region. Speci c design and maintenance guidelines were made to introduce the user to di erent ecosystems found on this 700 acre site. The mission is to preserve,protect and display native species through cultural, sienti c and recreational programs. Byxbee Park, Palo Alto, CA Located in the greater suburban San Francisco area, Byxbee Park was designed by George Hargreaves as a brown eld reclamation project. This project illustrates a depth and emotions that sculptures in the landscape can posses. Environmental and industrial systems are brought together to create a sublime environment set in a serene landscape. Discovery Park, Seattle, WA This 534 acre site includes a larger scale of planning than Rotary Park, but it serves as a guide to management practices on a semi-natural site. Pathways and trails take the user to a variety of ecosystems that serve as education In uential Practitioners -J.B. Jackson -Ian McHarg -Gilles Clement -Jens Jensen -Michael Hough -Piet Oudolf In uential Projects Crosby Arboretum Byxbee Park Discovery Park7 8

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler19The central downtown sector has bene ted most from city capital improvements. Riverside Park acts a nucleus controlling activities on both sides of Old US 41. Island Park and Depot Park are in the process of renewal and act as a corridor along the rail path. Currently they are used as dog walks, passive strolling and over ow parking for community events. The former Bamboo Village site, outlined in pink, is being shopped by the city for investors due to its value and centrality. Everglades Wonder Gardens, outlined in yellow, opened in 1936 and houses a diversity of wildlife and provides tours on site. A great example of early Florida conservation for tourists. Home to Florida panthers, otters and alligators. It serves as educati on for the community. Island Park Depot ParkRiverside Park High Value Derelict Property. Mixed Use Preferable Community Center and Historic Banyan Tree Survey Cafe Wonder Gardens Area Investigated Informing Open Spaces: Downtown Bonita Springs

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler20 Entry Signage and ArtLilles Hotel and FountainCanoe Launch and RiversideType: Downtown Community Park Size: 5.5 acres (2.3 ha) Stakeholder: City of Bonita Springs Contributing Factors for Research: Center of civic activity of city. Located 3/4 mile from Rotary Park. Brief Description of Place: Open aired lawn located in the heart of historic Bonita. Traditional design style with native shade trees and tropical planting beds. Amphitheater band shell surrounded by parking and commercial retail (bicycle shop and art studio). Natural Habitat Type: Scrub pine atwoods with second order stream. Formerly a disturbed rudderal eld. Predominant Program/Amenities: Band shell, picnic/pavilions, outdoor art, holiday gatherings, shing dock and canoe launch, historic cottages converted to art studios and hotel. Site Elements: Benches, drinking fountains, focal water feature, picnic tables, paving (see page x) Lighting: Adequate in three scales Parking: 120+ Maintenance: Sub-contracted by city Accessibility: Location lends well to pedestrian and bicycles with easy vehicular access. Summary and Criticisms: Traditional open lawns and walkable pathways. Community gathering place and meet up area. No play options for children.Informing Open Spaces: Riverside Park

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler21 Bonita Springs Middle School Bonita Community Pool Lee County Library Annex Recreation Center (Skate, Basketball, Volleyball, Fitness) Rail Corridor Area InvestigatedBonita Springs Recreation Park and Center center for active rec and sports for the community. Little League baseball and softball are main attractants. Fishing competitions and taste of town events often take place here. Detailed description on followi ng page.Informing Open Spaces: Bonita Community Recreation Center

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler22 Type: Community Park and Recreation Field Size: 42 acres (17 ha) Stakeholder: City of Bonita Springs Contributing Factors for Research: Located 1 mile from Rotary site. Center of active recreation for Bonita Springs. Brief Description of Place: Open elds and parking dominate the environment. Recreation and ball elds see most use for baseball and soccer. O ers quite, free form leisure in back near retention pond. Rec facility o ers tness, basketball, indoor soccer etc. Natural Habitat Type: Historically pine/palmetto scrub and prairie. Predominant Program/Amenities: Tennis, skateboard plaza, disc golf, four baseball/softball elds, batting cages, children’s play area. Large eld double as event space for taste of the town events and fairs. Site Elements: Benches, drinking fountains, concession stand for baseball. Lighting: Acceptable with only two scales Parking: More than adequate 250+. Maintenance: ? Accessibility: Mostly by car. Pedestrian and cyclic access is very common due to resident adjacency. Summary and Criticisms: Lacks overall organization with piece meal construction over time. Picnic capabilities are lacking. Overall successful due to location and variety of uses. Recreation center entry and signageBaseball elds from the parking lot Playground areaInforming Open Spaces: Bonita Community Recreation Center

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler23Bonita Nature PlaceType: Donated preservation and educational area Stakeholder: City of Bonita Springs Contributing Factors for Research: Located 1.5 miles from Rotary site. Habitat preservation for wildlife and education for community. Brief Description of Place: In its rst year of development, open Sundays only. Stakeholders are in the process of converting old residence into educational and demonstration zones. Natural Habitat Type: Sand hill scrub sloping down into hardwood oodplain forest with alluvial stream. Predominant Program/Amenities: Education facility, gopher habitat areas, bat house, bee keep, and nature trails. Lighting: None outside of built features Parking: 20-30 spaces Maintenance: ? Accessibility: Mostly by car but accessible by foot and bicycle. Open Sunday only. Summary and Criticism: A great learning environment for those interested in natural sciences. Located o the beaten path and being relatively new, few residents are aware and general funding is lacking. Area Investigated Informing Open Spaces: Bonita Nature Place

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler24 Type: Regional Park with Active Rec. Center Size: 55 acres (22.3 ha) Stakeholder: Lee County Parks and Recreation Contributing Factors for Research: High use suburban park that displays successful play areas for children and active recreation for adults. A 1.2 acre fenced in dog run. Brief Description of Place: Entire park includes a 40,000 sq ft. rec center and large elds for team sports and tness. Eastern side is 7 acres of passive amenities designed in 2006 with prefab play equipment and dog park. Walking paths meander and connect through the site. Natural Habitat Type: Light pine canopy, mostly dry prairie with retention ponds. Predominant Program/Amenities: (Eastern side) Two child’s play zones raised and mulched, fenced in dog run (zones for small and large dogs), Picnic pavilions, and walking trails. Site Elements: Benches, drinking fountains, grills, cap rock outcrops, bicycle racks, six-stall rest room facility. Lighting: Adequate in four scales Parking: Several linear zones 250+. Maintenance: County Parks and Rec Accessibility: Mostly by car, walking and cycle accessibilities exist with little use due to location. Summary and Criticisms: Scale a bit large at times and open expanses need organization. High use denotes success on eastern side. Dog run a big hit for area with movable seating and wash basin. Case Studies: Estero Community Center and Park, Estero Fl.Estero Community Center Aerial

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler25 Type: City operated preserve and education Size: 8.8 acres (3.5 ha) Stakeholder: City of Naples Contributing Factors for Research: Similar scale and habitat type. Entire site allocated to preserving atwoods scrub ecosystem. Brief Description of Place: Moderate canopy over raised boardwalk near heavy tra cked corridor. Outdoor education space in semi-urban setting Natural Habitat Type: Pine/scrub atwoods with coastal scrub zones. Predominant Program/Amenities: Eco-center converted from 1960’s modern south Florida architecture. A .4 mile sign guided ecosystem tour limiting to boardwalk. Site Elements: A central pavilion with signage and literature. Several seating areas spaced on boardwalk for re ection and rest. Lighting: One scale only near parking and building. Parking: 25+ Maintenance: Volunteer based with city referendum. Accessibility: Mainly vehicular but being integrated into developing pedestrian/bicycle system. Summary and Criticisms: Excellent brochure with ecology speaker events and locations. Well bu ered from road. Only criticism is lack of connectivity. Case Studies: Naples Preserve, Naples Fl.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler26 Type: Size: Stakeholder: Contributing Factors for Research: Brief Description of Place: Predominant Program/Amenities: Site Elements: Parking: Accessibility: Creek P P P KADATable Seats 8-10 Table Seats 8 Kiddie Table Table is Wheelchair Accessible Barbeque Drinking Fountain Restrooms Pay Phone ParkingLegend Game Table (non-reservable) ADA ADA ADA K K ADA ADA ADA K Table with Number45 Tiny Tot Play AreaWater Play AreaSpider DomeMulti-Use Bowl Play AreaHandball CourtsJuniorTennisTennis CourtsTennis Courts Dog Exercise AreaMitchell ParkPicnic Reservations (650) 463-4900Swings Redwood Group Area Tables (21-29) Pine Grove Group Area Tables (35-45) Arbor Group Area Tables (13-16) East Meadow Group Area Tables (1-6) East Meadow Individual Area Tables (7-12) Redwood Individual Area Tables (17-20) Middlefield RoadEast Meadow Drive Fairmeadow Elementary School Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School Mitchell Park Community Center Library x 6 x 10 x 4 x 5Fire Station12 11 10 9 8 7 4 3 2 1 5 6 16 15 14 13 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 35 36 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 Case Studies: Mitchell J. Pierce Park, Palo Alto, CA9

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler27 Analysis and Synthesis A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S e e e S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S Se S S Se S S S S S S S Se Se Se e e S S S Se Se S S S S S Se Se S S e S S S Se Se e S S S Se S Se Se Se S Se e e e S S S Se S Se Se Se Se e e S Se e e S Se S Se Se e e e e e Se S Se e e Se Se S Se e e S Se e e e Se e e S S S e e e e S S e e e e e S S S S Se e e e e Se e e e e e e e S S Se S S e e Se e S S e e S S Se e S S S S S e e S S S Se Se e e e S S S S Se S S Se S S S e Se S S S S S Se S e e e e S S S S S Se e S S S e e S S S e S S S S S e ni n n i i ni ni i i i i ni i i i i ni i i i i i i i i n i i i n i i n n i i ni ni n ni n n n n n n n n n n n ni i i ni ni n n n n n ni n n i i i ni ni ni n n n n ni i i i i i ni ni ni ni n ni ni n n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n n ni ni n n ni ni ni ni n n ni ni ni n ni n ni ni n n n ni n n n ni n n ni ni ni n n ni i i i ni i i ni n n n ni ni n n n n n ni n n n n n n n n n n i ni n n ni n n i ni n n i i ni ni n ni ni n ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni i i n n n i i i i n n n n i i i i i n n n n n n ni i i i i n n n n n n n n n i or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or r o o or or o or r r o or or or o r r r r r o o o o o o r or r r or or o r o or r r o o o o o o r r r r r r r r o o r or r r r r r r r r r r o o o or r r r r or r r r r r r o or o or r r r r r r or r o o or or or r r r r o o o or or o r r r r r r r or o r r r r o or o o r or or or or r r r r o or or or r r or or or or r r r r r o o o r or r r o r r or o o r r or r o o o o or or or r r r or or r r r or o r r r r o o o o o o T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T he he he he h he he h h he h h h he he he he he he he he e h he he he he he he he he he he he he he h h h he h he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he h h he he he h h h h he he he e he h he he h he e he he he h h he he h e e he he he e he e he he h e e he he he e e he e e h he e e e he h h he he e he h h he h h e he h he e h h h h h h h h e h h h h h h h e h h h h e e e he h h he h he e e h h e e e e he e e h e h h e h h h h e h h h h e s si s s si si si si si s si si i si si si si s s si s si si si si si i i si si si si si s s i si i s i i i i i i s si si si i i s s s i s s si s si s s s si si si si si si si s s s i si s i i si i i i s s s s i s i i s si i i i s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s by by b by by by by by by by by by by by by y by by by b by by by by by by by y y by by by by by by by by by by b by by by by by by by by by by by by by by y by by by b by by by by by b by by by y by by by by y y y by by b by by by y by by by by b by b by y y by b b by b y y y b b b b y y b b by b b b b b b y b b b b b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b b b b b by by by b b b b b y b b b b b b b b y by by b b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b y y b b b b y y b b b b by y b b b y b y y b y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J am am am am a am am am am am am am am am am am m m m am m am am am am am m m m m am am am am am a am am am am a a am am am m m m m am m am am am am a a a am am am m m m m a a a a am a m m m m am am a a a a am m am am m a a a a a am m a a a m am am am am am am am a a a m am m m m am a a am m m am m am am a a am a am am am am a am m m m m m m m m am a am am am am am am m m m am a a a a a am m m m a a a a a m m m m a a a m m m m m m m m m m a m m m m m m m m a a m m a a a a m m m m m m m m a m e e e e e e e e es s s s es s e e e es es e e e e e e es s e e es s e e e e e e e e es e e e e e e e e e e e e s e e s s e e e e e e e e e es e e e e e s e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e s e e e e e e H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W 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he he e e he e he h he h e he he h h h e e e he h h e e h h h h h he e h h h he he e h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h e h e e e h h h h h h h h h h h h h e e el el el el el el el el el el el el el l el e e e e el e el el l l el e e e e e el el el el l l el l e e e e e e e e e e el el el l l e e e e e el el l el el el el el l l e el l l e e e l e e e e l el e e l e e el l l l e el e e l e e e l el el el e l e e el l e e l el el l e e e e el l e e e e el el e e e e e el e e e e e e e e e e e l e e el e e e e e el e el e el l e el e e e e l e e e e e l e l e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e er er er er er er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e r e e e e e e e e e e e e e e r e er e e er e er e e e e e 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler28 OLD US 41INTST 75OLD US 41HWY US 41 HWY US 41BONITA BEACH ROAD W. TERRY STE. TERRY ST Rotary Park ProposalAnalysis and SynthesisLand Use and Public Places

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler29Analysis and SynthesisLand Use Summary y GATED ESTATES WITH EXCLUSIVE AMENITIESRetail and Commercial lies along the main roads US 41 and Bonita Beach Rd. while residential holds the highest density along t he Imperial River radiating from historic downtown along Old US 41. The city of Bonita Springs has developed a respectable downto wn open space surrounding Riverside Park. Active elds and indoor recreation is used heavily just north of the downtown zone at the Bonita Recreation Center. Non-estate residences lack community open spaces nearest their homes for less crowded and passive recr eation. Chamber of Commerce Arts League Public Soccer Fields Nature Place and Preservation Lands Oak Creek Preserve Downtown Riverside and Band Shell Sh Sh Sh Sh h el el el el el l l l l l Planned Kentucky Street Park Boat Launch/ Imperial River Park p Planned Windsor Park bl bl b b bl b bl Pu u u u bl bl b b b b b b F F Fi Fi Fi F F F F F F F F el el el l l l l d d d P P P P P Bonita Recreation Center, Pool and Fields Wetland and Groundwater Protection Area

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler30 Circulation AnalysisINTERSTATE HIGHWAY MAIN HIGHWAY REGIONAL CORRIDOR NEIGHBORHOOD ARTERIAL ROTARY PROPOSED SITE GATED ESTATES WITH EXCLUSIVE AMENITIES New homeowners are the key economic boosters for the city of Bonita springs as well as the SWFL area. As vacancies and foreclosures need lling. Bonita Springs can capitalize on its the small community feel, lower tax zone and smooth tra c toward Ft. Myers and Naples by creating livable communities with e cient access to gathering and green spaces. These spaces should give nearby residents opportunities to enjoy morning or evening walks, wildlife viewing and play. Leading to happy and healthy families. By locating zones of need and land use potentials within existing neighborhoods. Parks can begin to take shape.Analysis and SynthesisHousing and Tra c MapsResidential Home Values

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler31Analysis and SynthesisExisting Open Space and Population Density *Areas highlighted in orange note need of public open green space when related to population densities and existing open space. Neighborhoods lacking open space congregation Wetland and groundwater protection areaDR/GR GATED ESTATES WITH EXCLUSIVE AMENITIES

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler32 The digital elevation model shows the preceding zones of need in relation to the natural watershed. Zones of higher density without open green space lie within stream and watershed corridors. This provides a wealth of opportunities to ltration and cleansing of water as well as interaction and education for users. Analysis and SynthesisWatershed Zones outlining current needs Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z c c c c c c c c N

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler33Rotary Park y y y y E cient Design with Nature in Mind Strike Ln/ Bonita Golf Estates Convert derelict golf course into natural style course with wetland ltration and walking nature paths Rosemary/Matheson To be the project example of low budget, low input, sustainable As the city grows, conservation and open space activities must be allocated for neighborhood parks. Parks should be designed around existing sense of place, speci c neighborhood user groups, on-site resources, and natural water regimes. Program should continually nd a balance human and natural systems Education Park Athletic Fields Water Rec Park Civic Park Proposed Rotary Park Analysis and SynthesisOpen Space Proposals Dean St./Bonita Elementary Nature playground incorporated into existing Oak Creek preserve and school. Nature education opportunities for school.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler34 SCHOOL BUS STOP SINGLE FAMILY HOMES MULTI FAMILY HOMES MOBILE HOMES COUNTY TRANSIT STOP Area Investigated OPEN SPACE ROTARY PARK PUBLIC SCHOOLSAnalysis and SynthesisSite Speci c ContextN

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler35 Site Boundaries Access PointsAnalysis and SynthesisAdjacent Site Circulation-Access from the north is prone to higher density of use from pedestrians and bicycles. Most being lower class status. -Access from the south will receive higher vehicular entries from middle to upper class users. -Approximately 900 housing units within 1/2 mile distance to park entry.N E. Terry St Bonita Drive Rosemary DriveImperial Blvd.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler36 These historic aerials show the properties past transformations. The rst notes the original land prior to development. The second image displays the former mobile home park on site. While the east half of the site has been heavily disturbed, the western area has been left undeveloped and only slightly disturbed as a thoroughfare for pedestrians. This western parcel has high suitability for habitat preservation. No residences h ave been on site since a clean up in 2005. Small campsites remain as vagrancies and gang related groups. The majority of use comes from pedestrians or bicycles connecting Terry St. and Rosemary St neighborhood.196819852006Analysis and SynthesisSite History

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler37 2 5 8 1 1 2 3 3 4 4 5 6 6 7 7 8 9 9 10 10 Analysis and SynthesisExisting Conditions

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler38 – Located at 26` 20’ N 81`46’W – USDA Zone 10A – Hallandale Fine Soil well drained, poor in nutrients Analysis and SynthesisInventory#110’x10’x8’ CMU roo ess structure #38’x6’x5’ septic housing with cover slabs #1fenced in derelict pump house #12 cubic yards of concrete demo #110 cubic yards of ll dirt #6Concrete barriers #27Multiple 110v hookups and water #15Concrete mobile home pads #1~6450 sq ft large concret pads (90’x70’) – Native Plants– Invasive Plants –Existing Site Resources

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler39 Zone of highest use and compaction Primary Circulation Secondary Circulation Areas of Homelessness Abandoned Structure Derelict Water Pump House Utility Lines Overhead Septic Housing Dump and Fill ZonesAnalysis and SynthesisExisting Systems and CirculationN 20 60100For 8 years the site has served as a bypass for both sides of the community. Zones of vagrancy, graf ti, loitering, recreation and dumping have been noted throughout. Despite the general disconcern for the property, wildlife ourishes compared to traditionally managed parks.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler40 Scrub habitat dominates the site. Scrub lands are the most rapidly-declining ecosystem type in Florida and should be protected accordingly. Rotary Park is unique in that a feeder creek offers habitat for aquatic species and mesic plants within the scrub ecosystem. The gift of water also attracts birds of many species. Blue Jays, Cardinals, Red Shouldered Hawks, Ospreys, and Kites spend active time here. Nature trails should be planned to educate users on both environments and transition zones Concentrated Tortoise Habitat Upland Scrub Weedy Invasives Hardwood Canopy Palm/Mesic Hammock Open Scrub Prairie Slash Pine Analysis and SynthesisNatural Habitat TypesN 20 60100

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler41 Strengthen buffer against unwanted corridors Existing 200 yard circular drive. Track and exercise Bridge with questionable structure Fill Dirt Node of greater community use adjacent to highway. Preservation Zone Pump house needs demolition Construction Entry Node of highest neighborhood use. Dense zone of children and adolescents Wild ower Upland Large demo area. Look for alternatives Open weedy lawn in need of shade ENTRY ENTRYP P LP LP LP Issues and Constraints-Wildlife crossing from western preserve to eastern habitat. -Xeric habitat areas -Poorly engineered creek edge -Program goals of: -No irrigation/fertilizer -Preservation zone -Low budget Opportunities-Existing wildlife viewing -Existing needs in neighborhood -Pedestrian connection between neighborhoods -Nature education -Existing resources (leftovers) -Adjacency to semi-urban community within walking and bicycling distance o on o on on on o o o o P P P P P Natural Beauty Viewsheds Low Point Tortoise Habitat N 20 60100Analysis and SynthesisSite Synthesis

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler42Design Development A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A Se e Se Se Se Se Se Se Se Se e e e e Se Se Se e S Se Se S Se e e S S Se Se Se Se Se Se e e e e Se S Se Se S e S S S Se S Se S S Se Se S S Se Se e S e S S Se Se S Se Se e e Se Se S S S S e Se e e e S Se S Se Se Se S S e e e e Se S Se Se S e e e Se Se Se Se Se e Se Se Se Se Se e S S Se Se Se e e e S S S S Se Se Se e Se S Se Se e S e S S S S S e S S Se S Se S e e S e S S ni ni ni ni n n n n ni n n ni n n n n ni ni ni n ni i i ni ni ni n ni ni ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni n ni ni ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni i i ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni ni n ni n i ni ni i i n ni ni ni ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni i i n i i n i ni ni n i i i ni ni ni n n ni n i i i n n n n n ni ni ni n n n n n n n n n ni i i i n ni n ni i i i i ni n ni n n n n n i i i i n n n n ni n i i i i i n n ni n i i i i i n n ni n n n i i i i n n n n n n n n n n n n i i n n i i n n n i i i n n i or o or or o or or or or o or or or r or or or or or or or or or o or o o or or or r o or r r r r r r r o or o o or r r or or or o r r r or r r o or or o or or r or or or r or or or r r or or r r r or o o or r r r r r or r or or or or or or o o or or o r r r r r r or r o or o or o o o o or o o r r r r r r r r or or o o or r o o o r r r o o o o o o o r r o o o o r r o o o r o o o o r r r o o o o o or o o o o o o or or o r o o o o T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T h h h h h h h h h h h h he h he h h he h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h he h h he h he h h h h h h h h h h he he h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h he h h he h h h he h he he he he he he h he h h h h he h e he he he he e e he he he e he he h he he he e he h h h e e he h h he h h e h h he h h e h he e e e e h h he e h h h he he he h h he h e h h h he he he h h he e h h h e h e e i si si si si i si si si si si si i si si si si si si si i si i si i i si si i s s i si i si s s i i si i i i i i si i i i si i si si s i i s si i si i s s s s s s si si s s si si i si s i s si si s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s by by by by by by by by by by by by b b y y by by by y by by y by by by b b by by b by by by y by by by by b by b b by by by y by by b b b b b b y by by b b b b b by b by b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b by by by b b b b b b b b b by y y by b b b b b b b b b y by b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b b b by y b b b b b b b y b b b b b b by b b by y b b b by y y y b y y y b b y y b b b y y y y y y b b y y b b b b y y by b b b y y b by by by by by by by by b by y b b b by y by by y y by by b b b by y y y by y by y y y b b y y b by y by by by b y J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J am am am am am am am am am am am am am am am am m m am am am am am am am am am am m am am am am am am am am am m m am am am am am am am a am m am am am am m am am am m a a a a a a a am am m m m m m am am am m m am am am am am m m m m am a am a a a a m m am m m m m am am m m m m a am m m m m m am m m m m m m m m m am a a a a am am am am m m m m m m am m m m m m a m m m am am am am am m am m m m am m m a m a a m m m m m m m m am am am m am m a m m m am m m m m a a m e e e e e es e es es es s es es es es e e e e e e e e e e e e es es s es e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e es e e e e e s s e e e e e e e e e e es es s e e e e e e s e e e e e e es es e e e e s s e e e e e e e e e s s s es s s e e es es es e e e e s s s s H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W he h he he he he he he he he h h h h h he he he he he he h he h he h h h h h he he h h he h he he he he he he he he he e he he h h h he he he he he he h h h he he h he he h h he he h he h h he he h h he e he h h he h he h he he he he he he h h h he he e he he he h h h h he h h he e he h h h h h he h e e h h h h h h he e he he he h h h h h h h h h he h he h he h h e h he h he h he h h h e e e h h h h h h h h h h he h h h h h h h h h e h h h he he h h h he h h e h h h h h h h h h e h h h h h h e l el el el l el el l l l l l el el l l l el el el e l el el el l e el el e e el l el el el el e e el e el el l l l el e el e e e l el e e e l el el l e e el e el l el e el el el l e el el el el el el e e e e e e e e e e el e e el el e el el el e e e e el e e l el l el e el e e e e e e el el e e e e el l e el e el e l el e e e e l e e e e e er er er er er er r e er er er er e e er er e e e r e e e er er e er e e e e e e er e e e e e e e e e r er 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler43Concept Development

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler44 Initial recommendations made by the client include: 1. Childrens Playground 2. Exercise Circuit 3. Nature and Walking Trails Florida’s SCORP analysis for SWFL notes relative need in this order: 1.Picnicking 2. RV Trailer/Camping 3. Saltwater Activities 4. Swimming Pool 5. Football 6. Nature StudyProgram Development Rotary Park Adjacent Open Space MatrixFinal program to include: Children’s play, picnic area, exercise circuit, nature study, art/sculpture, and dog park

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler45Illustrative Plan 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 161 5 9 2 6 10 13 3 7 11 14 4 8 12 15 16North Entry Gateway and Place marker Childrens Play Area Tot Lot Shelter and Picnic Use Parc Ventana Sculpture Pine Row Nature Play and Harvesting Exercise Circuit and Track Prairie Trails and Play Open Lawn and Mound Concession/Restrooms/Equipment Storage (Shown with expansion) Rotary Themed Seating Circle Scrub Trail and Preservation Art Wall South Entry Gate Fenced Dog Run (Large/Small) Preservation Lands 12Triangulation while using focal viewpoints Area Totals: -1.9 acres of open space lawn -44% of 15.1 acres reserved as preservation -3/4 miles of nature trailsN 20 60100

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler46 South Entry Details Upland Scrub Trail Bicycle Rack Cap rock Bollards Chickee Hut constructed by local tribes Council Ring Raised Flower Planter 1600 ft2 Park Rest rooms and Concessions Hammock Trail Aquatic Marsh Edge Work Station Waste Collection Art Wall N 20 4070

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler47 South Entry Perspective

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler48 Entry Bridge DetailsPrecast columns with recycled utility pipes on existing bridge

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler49 Art Wall Perspective

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler50 Central Open Space Details CMU block art wall provides play and creativity at a low cost Chickee hut can be constructed by native Miccosukee Tribe for cost or with volunteer labor per engineer Proposed seating type 10 11

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler51Central Open Space Perspective

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler52 Open Lawn Detail and Section 6’ path6’ path 18’ promenade path Mound Lookout Shade lawn Oak hammock and elds 6’ pine straw path Maximum 5:1 slope on hill Native scrub bu er*All paths are crushed shell and gravel paths compacted to ADA standards

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler53Rotary Park North Overview Upland Lupine and open eld wild owers Pine Rooms Tot Lot Children’s PlayExercise Circuit Flagged entry and sculpture Focal Swing and Bench Pine Prairie12

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler54 North Pine Prairie Perspective

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler55 North Pine Prairie Details North Prairie Plan ExistingInspiration Parc Ventana sculpture set with footer Alternate supports for trial installation

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler56 North Entry Perspective

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler57 North Entry Details Entry gateway and ags provide nature education Upland Lupine and open eld wild owers Installed hawk’s nest Solar Panels provide night lighting Children’s natural playground N 13 14 15 16

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler58 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S Se S S S Se S S S S S S S Se Se S S S Se Se S S S S S S S S S S Se S Se Se Se S S Se S S Se Se S e Se S S Se Se Se Se Se e S e e Se Se Se Se Se Se e Se S S Se e Se Se S Se Se e e S e e e e e e Se S e e e e S e e e e e S S Se e e e e Se e e e e e e S S Se e S e S S S e e S Se Se S Se Se Se e S S S S e e e S Se e e e S S S Se S S S S S Se S S S e Se Se S S Se Se Se e e S S Se S e e S S S e S Se e e S S S S Se S e e e e S S S S Se e i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ni i i ni ni i i i i i i i ni ni i ni n ni n n n n n ni ni ni n n n n n ni n ni n n i ni ni ni ni ni n n n n ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni ni n n n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n ni ni ni ni n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n n ni n n n n n n ni n ni n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n ni i i i ni ni n ni ni n n n n n ni i ni n n n n n n n n n ni ni ni ni n n n i n ni n n i i i i i n n ni ni ni ni n ni n n n ni i ni n ni ni n ni n i n n i i i i ni ni ni n n ni ni i i i i n n ni n n ni i i n n n n n n ni i n i i i ni or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or r or or or or or or or r o or r or o r r r r r o o o o o r or r r or o or or or or r r o o o o o o r or r r r r r r r o o o r r r r r r r r r r r o o o or r r r r or r r r r r r o o or r r r r r r or o o or or r r r r r r o o or o or r r r r r r or or or r or o or o r r r or or o or or or or or or o r or o r r or or r r r r or or o o r r r r or o or or or o or o r r r r r r or r r r o o o o o or r r r r or or r r or o o o or r or r or o o o o o or o or r r r r r r or o o o or or r r o o o o T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T he he he he he h h he he h he he he he he he e he he he he he h he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he h h he he he he h he he he he he h he h h h he he h h he he h he h h h he he e h he he he he h he he h he he he he he h he e h h h he he e e he h h h h e h he e e h h h h h he h e h h h he h h h h h h h h h e e he he h he e he he h he e e e he e e e e e he e he h e he e h h e e e e h he h e h h h h h he h h h h h e h he s s si si si si si si si si si s s i i s s si si si s si si si si i i i i i si i s i i si si s s si i si si si s si s s si si s si s s si si si i si i i si s s si i si si s s i i i s s i s si i s s s s s i si si si i s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s by by b by by by by y y by by by by by by b b by by b b by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by by b by by y by by b b by by y by by y by y b by by by by by by by y by by b y by y by by by by b y by y b b y y y b b b b y b b b b b y b b b b by b by b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b b b b b b y by b b b b b b b by by b b b b b b b b by by b b b b y b b b b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b by b b b b b b b y y y y b b b b b b y b by by b b b b b b b y y y b y y y by b y y y b b b b b y b b b y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J am am am am a am am am am am am am am am am am m m am m am am am am m m m m am am am am a a am am am am am m m am m am m am am am am a a a am m m m m am a a a a a a m m m m am m a am a a m m m m am a a a am am m am a a a m am am am a am am a a am am am am m m am a am a a a am am am am a am am m am am am am am am am m am am a am m m m m m m a am a am am am m m m a a a a a a m am m m m a a m m m m m m am m am m am a m m m m m m m m m m am m m a a a a m m m m am m m m m a m m m m m m m m m am e e e e e es es s s s es s s e e e es e es es e e e e e s es e e e e es s s e e e e e e e e e es e e e e e e e e e e e e e e s s e e e e e e e e es es e es e es s e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e es e e e e H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W h h h h h he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he h he he h h he h h h he h he h h h he he he he he e e h h h h he h h h h he he he he he he he e h e he h h he h h he e he he he he he h h h e he e he he h he he he h h he he h h he he he he he he he he he h h he he h h he he he he he he he h he h h he he he h he he he he h h he he he h h he he h h e h he e h h h he e h he h h he he he e he he he h h h he he he he h he he h he he h e h h he e h h h h h e e h h h h h h e e he he he h h h he e h h h h h h h h h h h h h he h h h he e he h h h h h h h h h h h h h e h h h h h l e el e e el el el el l el l el l el el e e el e el el el el l el el l e e e e e e el el el e e e e el el e l el el el el e el e e e el el el el l el l e l l el el e e l el el e e e el el el el el l el l el el e el el l e e e l el el el e e e e el el e e el e e el e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e el e e el e el el e el e el e e e el e e e e e e e e e e e e e el e l e e l e e e l el e e l e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e er er er er er er er e e e e e e e e e e e er e e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e r e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er e e er e er er e e e e e e 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler59Planting Plan Sand Live Oak Sabal Palme o Bald Cypress Slash Pine Shiny Blueberry Rusty Lyonia Prickly Pear Cactus Wax Myrtle Saw Palme o Beautyberry Wiregrass Muhley Grass Hydric/Swale Mix Gopher Apple Daylily Indian Blanket/Firewheel N 20 60100Many of the species presented are selected to thrive under neglect if planted within their natural habitat zone. All are found readily at native plant nurseries or harvested on site. Tree and shrub plantings are all native to the site and should be planted in saturated soils July-September. Relying on temporary irrigation only if necessary. Grasses and edge species need only 2-3 maintenance clearings a year upon further research. Lawn maintenance kept to monthly or bi-monthly mowings.Rusty Lyonia Shiny Blueberry Sunshine Mimosa Gopher Apple Southern Slash Pine Prickly Pear17

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler60 Pine Prairie and Edge Mix *Non -Native Andropogon sp. Bushy Bluestem, Broomsedge Golden brown showy inflorescense in fall. To 5'. Self seeding Aristida stricta Wiregrass Ascelpias curassavica* Scarlett Milkweed Orange to red flowers on thin erect stems. Monarch attr. To 4'. Tolerant of wet and dry sandy soil w/o supplemental water Bidens sp. Spanish Bayonet Small year round white or yellow flowers To 3'. Semi-showy, self seeding Coreopsis sp. leavenworthii, lanceolata Tickseed Yellow sunflower in mid spring To 2'. Mesic to moist depending on species Chamaecrista nictitans Sensitive Pea Yellow pea flowers. Attr. for doves and quails. To 3' on drier site. Scarification needed Conoclinum coelestinum Blue Mistflower Pale blue clusters summer-fall. Butterfly attr. To 3' in moister regions Eragrostis spectabilis Purple Love Grass Purple-red grass flowers late summer to fall 1-3' on dry site Ipomopsis rubra Standing Cypress Red inflorescence and great wildlife attractant 2-4 Tall Liatris spicata Dense Blazing Star Purple tubular on stalks summer-fall 1-5' tall, plant in moister regions Liatris gracilis Slender Blazing Star Purple tubular on stalks summer-fall Similar to dense liatris but on drier sites Monarda punctata Spotted Beebalm White-purple lamiaceae flowers in summer-fall Full sun on drier sites to 3' Piloblephis rigida Pennyroyal Small fragrant flowers. Buttfly attr. To 24" Native to open pine sand soil fields. Drought tolerant Vernonia sp. gigantea,angustifolia Ironweed Perennial w/ purple aster flowers. Butterfly attr. To 3' for both species. Drier site for sp. angustifolia moister regions for gigantea Planting ListPrairie Seed/ Liner Tray/ 1 Gallon List

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler61Planting ListOpen Lawn Mix Lawn Mix *Non -Native Perennial Rye* Rye grass Used as overseeding and perennial if possible. Common grass spread in fall or incorporated into mixture. Erigeron quercifolius Flea bane Showy white ray flowers with yellow centers To 2' in flowers. Moist to dry sites Mimosa strigillosa Powderpuff Senstitive GC Pale pink flowers spring and fall. Nitrogen fixing legume To 8". Spreading but not overpowering Hydrocotyle sp. Dollarweed Flat peltate leaves. To 6". Suited for moist sand Oxalis sp. Clover Small yellow flowers on clover leaves To 8". Small filler ground cover Paspalum notatum* Bahia Argentine grass Common grass mix used to fill and cover Very drought tolerant and low maintenance. Seed heads cut in summer Phylla nodiflora Matchstick weed Ground cover with small 'matchstick' flowers Mounding to 10". Very drought tolerant Richardia grandiflora* Mexican Clover Ground cover with small white tubular flowers. butterfly attr, Mounding to 6". Drought tolerant with well-drained soils Sisyrinchium atlanticum Blue eyed grass Pale blue flowers spring-summer. To 20". Prefers moister site but drought tolerant Taraxacum officinale Dandelion Yellow flowers with airy white seed pods To 24" in flower. Flowers and seeds are well known Trifolium refluxum* Buffalo Clover Pinkish, red blooms in springs. Nitrogen fixing legume 4-10", Annual reseeder. Scarification needed.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler62 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S Se S S S Se S S S S S S S Se Se S S S Se Se S S S S S S S S S S Se S Se Se Se S S Se S S Se Se S e Se S S Se Se Se Se Se e S e e Se Se Se Se Se Se e Se S S Se e Se Se S Se Se e e S e e e e e e Se S e e e e S e e e e e S S Se e e e e Se e e e e e e S S Se e S e S S S e e S Se Se S Se Se Se e S S S S e e e S Se e e e S S S Se S S S S S Se S S S e Se Se S S Se Se Se e e S S Se S e e S S S e S Se e e S S S S Se S e e e e S S S S Se e i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ni i i ni ni i i i i i i i ni ni i ni n ni n n n n n ni ni ni n n n n n ni n ni n n i ni ni ni ni ni n n n n ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni ni n n n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n ni ni ni ni n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n n ni n n n n n n ni n ni n ni ni n ni ni ni ni n ni i i i ni ni n ni ni n n n n n ni i ni n n n n n n n n n ni ni ni ni n n n i n ni n n i i i i i n n ni ni ni ni n ni n n n ni i ni n ni ni n ni n i n n i i i i ni ni ni n n ni ni i i i i n n ni n n ni i i n n n n n n ni i n i i i ni or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or r or or or or or or or r o or r or o r r r r r o o o o o r or r r or o or or or or r r o o o o o o r or r r r r r r r o o o r r r r r r r r r r r o o o or r r r r or r r r r r r o o or r r r r r r or o o or or r r r r r r o o or o or r r r r r r or or or r or o or o r r r or or o or or or or or or o r or o r r or or r r r r or or o o r r r r or o or or or o or o r r r r r r or r r r o o o o o or r r r r or or r r or o o o or r or r or o o o o o or o or r r r r r r or o o o or or r r o o o o T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T he he he he he h h he he h he he he he he he e he he he he he h he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he he h h he he he he h he he he he he h he h h h he he h h he he h he h h h he he e h he he he he h he he h he he he he he h he e h h h he he e e he h h h h e h he e e h h h h h he h e h h h he h h h h h h h h h e e he he h he e he he h he e e e he e e e e e he e he h e he e h h e e e e h he h e h h h h h he h h h h h e h he s s si si si si si si si si si s s i i s s si si si s si si si si i i i i i si i s i i si si s s si i si si si s si s s si si s si s s si si si i si i i si s s si i si si s s i i i s s i s si i s s s s s i si si 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h h h e e he he he h h h he e h h h h h h h h h h h h h he h h h he e he h h h h h h h h h h h h h e h h h h h l e el e e el el el el l el l el l el el e e el e el el el el l el el l e e e e e e el el el e e e e el el e l el el el el e el e e e el el el el l el l e l l el el e e l el el e e e el el el el el l el l el el e el el l e e e l el el el e e e e el el e e el e e el e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e el e e el e el el e el e el e e e el e e e e e e e e e e e e e el e l e e l e e e l el e e l e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e er er er er er er er e e e e e e e e e e e er e e e e e er er e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e r e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er e e er e er er e e e e e e 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Phasing and Implementation

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler63 Phasing-Displaced ll and concrete creates a landform mound -Pathways, nature trails sculptures -Install pine rows and shade trees -Pavilions and seating -Exercise circuit and 2nd phase of sculptures -Play structures implemented according to capital -Final round of planting completed. -Central rest room, equipment, and vending facility -Fenced in dog park installed with signage per spec. Park phasing goals for longevity include re-engineering creek basins, timber harvesting for site upgrades and dog waste composting or digestor,Phase I Phase II Phase III Phase IV

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler64 Phasing A A A S S S S S S i i i i i i T T T T T T h h h h h h h i i i i i b b b b JHWh Human Funding and Management Ecological

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler65 Implementation and ManagementProgram Management-Sculptures should be built for permanence but with simple deconstruction in mind. This will allow temporary installments exhibiting local art.Infrastructure Implementation-As solar panel technology o ers cheaper solutions. The north portion of the site can exclude FPL utilities. Solar energy can be installed in aesthetic fashion to operate pedestrian lighting and water fountains below grade. -Alternatively, utility lines should run along easternmost walkway shielded by planting bu er. -Wi routers running o charged battery can accommodate outdoor study.Habitat Management and Materials-Prairie and open lawn mowing to be scheduled seasonally upon further research. -Timber harvesting maintained at intervals for a variety of functions -Field selected cap rock to be used in seating areas and pathways as bollards -Pine needle and cone bedding for tree protection in dog area. -Decomposed granite or similar native crushed shell and stone will comprise the fenced in dog park. Depending on eld tests.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler66Conclusions While many of the design elements presented at Rotary Park may embellish my goals and objectives. Most of them personify the overall concept of a more e cient and simply sustainable solution that heightens both human use and ecological preservation.

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A Senior Thesis by James H Wheeler67Bibliography and Photography Credits ContactsBonita Springs Historical Society David Green FGCU Dept of Biology. Assistant at Bonita Nature place Gary Price City Manager, Bonita Springs City Hall Mike Liggins Director of Engineering at Bonita Springs Utilities, Inc. Rotary memberBooksFlorida SCORP Analysis. http://www.dep.state. .us/parks/planning/parkplans/SCORP-2000.pdf Hough, Michael. ‘ Cities and Natural Processes ’ Routledge Books NY, NY 1995 Jackson, J.B. ‘ Landscapes ’ Edited by Ervin H. Zube. Univeristy of Massachusetts Press 1970 McHarg, Ian. ‘ The Essesntial Ian McHarg ’ Edited by Frederick Steiner. Island Press, Washington DC 2006 Richardson, Tim. ‘ Avant Gardeners ’. Thames and Hudson, NY, NY. 2008Websiteshttp://www. oridasnature.com/ orida_habitats.htm Project for People Spaces. http://www.pps.org http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/news/displaynews.asp?NewsID=102&TargetID=14 http://progressiveearlychildhoodeducation.blogspot.com/Photo Credits#1. pg 9. http://lifeinbonitasprings.com #2. pg 9. http://lifeinbonitasprings.com #3. pg 12. http://www. oridasnature.com/ orida_habitats.htm #4. pg 12. http://www.lawnsprinklers.us/installing.htm #5. pg 13. http://criticalmiami.com/archive/2007/05 #6. pg 14. http://wildobs.com/Mick iP65/tag/Hawks #7. pg 18. http://www. ickr.com/photos/tinkerszone/2893361632/ #8. pg 18. http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/news/displaynews.asp?NewsID=102&TargetID=14 #9. pg 26. http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/csd/news/details.asp?NewsID=114&TargetID=14 #10. pg 50. http://joejude.ws/tiki.htm #11. pg 50. http://www.landscapeforms.com #12. pg 54. http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/forsite #13. pg 57. http://www. ickr.com/photos/wolfread/3740 027598/ #14. pg 57. http://www.jrcompton.com/photos/The_Birds.htm #15. http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-20011178-54.html #16. pg 57. http://progressiveearlychildhoodeducation.blogspot.com/ #17. pg 59. http://www. ickr.com/photos/21248205@N03/3712122776/