North Florida Community College : sustainable design for a rural campus

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North Florida Community College : sustainable design for a rural campus
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Ward, Keith
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College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
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Notes

General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

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North Florida Community College
Sustainable Design for A Rural Campus


Madison, Florida


A Senior Capstone Project


Keith Ward
Spring 20 I I


Faculty Advisor: Les Linscott

University of Florida: Department of Landscape Architecture


...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................












The University of Florida
College of Design, Construction, and Planning






North Florida Community College
Sustainable Design forA Rural Campus
Madison, Florida




An Undergraduate Thesis in
Landscape Architecture

By

Keith Ward


Faculty Advisor
Les Linscott

2011


Submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree Bachelor in Landscape Architecture






Table of Contents

Project Introduction
*Project Summary -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 4
*Site Location ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 5
*Mission Statement ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 6
*Site Description ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 7
*Context Description --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 8

Program, Goals, and User Analysis
*Program Development ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 10
*Goals and Objectives -------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------page 11
*User aAnalysis --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 12

Existing Conditions
*Unique Site Features -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 14
*Architecture Styles of the NFCC Campus ------- ----------------------------------------------------- page 15
*Building Inventory and Location ------- ------------------------------------------------------------- page 16
*Current Methods of Stormwater Management --------------------------------------------------------------------page 17

Context Analysis
*Landuse Map ----------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------page 19
*Regional Watershed, Topography, and Wetlands.------------------- -----------------------------------------------page 20
*Context, Watershed, and Drainage Patterns ------------------------------------------------------------------------page 21






Table of Contents

Site Analysis
FEMA Floodplain 2010. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 23
*Soil Types and Drainage Properties------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----- page 24
*Vegetation-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 25
*Soil Suitabilities------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 26
*Vehicular Circulation------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 27
*Pedestrian Circulation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 28

Site Synthesis
*Synthesis and Conclusion. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 30-31

Concept Development
*Concepts 1 and 2-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 33-34

Masterplan
Masterplan ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- pages 36-37
*Planview Enlargements----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 38-40
*Sections -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 41
*Stormwater Wetland ------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- pages 42-43
*Perspectives ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- pages 44-51

Case Studies
*Evergreen State College ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 53
*Sidwell Friends School (Middle SchoolRenovation and Addition) ---------- ---------------------- page 54
*Florida Aquarium Parking Lot and Queuing Garden ---- -------------------------------------------- page 55

References --------------------------------------------------pages 56-57


G,.












Project Introduction



Project Summary......... page 4
Project Location.......... page 5
Mission Statement.......... page 6
Site Description........... page 7
Context Description....... page 8






Project Introduction


Van Priest Auditorium over-looking one of several
existing lakes found on the property.


General Information:

Project Title:

*North Florida Community College:
Sustainable Design for a Rural Campus

Project Type:

*Institutional/Education Campus Renewal

Location:

-Madison, Florida


Project Summary:

The existing site of the North Florida Community College (NFCC)
campus is located in the rural town of Madison, Florida. It is a small
community college that was established in 1959 to serve the students of
Madison and the five nearby counties of Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette,
Taylor, and Suwannee. Attendance has grown dramatically in the past few
years from about 600 students to over 800 students. This is likely a factor
of the current recession but with the trend in community colleges starting
to offer four year degrees, the NFCC Campus will likely need to expand
to accommodate the future changes in education. This creates a need to
develop a masterplan to address and prevent the issues that will arise from
expansion and development as well as to try to correct issues that already
exist.

The NFCC campus is rich in natural and cultural resources with several
lakes and mixed hardwood and wetland forest found on site. It is a very
unique place to put a school but fails to use these resources to their full
advantage. The campus generally lacks a sense of place as the architecture
looks very generic and outdated. The original part of the main campus
was designed with some level of uniformity, connectivity, and open space
in mind, but as the campus expanded much of this concept was lost as the
newer buildings were fragmented by roads and parking lots. The build-
ings seem to be placed without a lot of thought as to alignments and the
outdoor spaces lack function and connectivity. There is no sense of arrival
to the campus as the entrances are not well defined. Stormwater is an issue
that needs to be dealt with due to the low lying nature of the site and the
existing environment creates an excellent opportunity for sustainable and
interpretive stormwater design.


Client:

*North Florida Community College





Project Introduction


Project Location


Project Location:
North Florida Community College
325 NW Turner Davis Drive
Madison, Florida 32340






Project Introduction


1 Statement


main goal of the project
se of place to the campus
ing the existing natural ar
>n site with regard to addr
:ment.


The main focus of the projc
best possible solutions for
expansion of the campus w
through pedestrian and veh
Stormwater management
determining these outcome
and topographical influence
ing context. .A careful exai
ing conditions will reveal oj
that provide ideas for imp
and attractive alternatives


while protecting and
id cultural resources
essing future growth


1 be to determine the
th management and
Yards to connectivity
circulation patterns.
dlay a crucial role in
to the hydrological
ie site and surround-
on of the sites exist-
nities and constraints
ting both functional
current problems at


impus is located on a
full advantage of it's
knowledge available
the evolving change
e the campus is in a
g interpretive design
educational tool to ex-
ity the importance of


stormwater. It may also be a L
door laboratory for the science<
to study. These solutions will
that addresses them in a sustain
reference and guidelines.


as an out-
urriculum
lasterplan
for future


I have chosen the NFCC campus as my capstone
project because I got to spend some time on the site
by working with the school at their satellite campus
Green Industries Institute during my internship. BeinL
in a rural setting was new to me and I began to see the
complexities and uniqueness that exists in these areas
especially with education facilities. I noticed the issueL
that existed on site and saw an opportunity for a mas
terplan that tries to resolve them. My interests in land
scape architecture are geared towards revitalization
and stormwater management and I see this campus a1
a very unique site that would accommodate these in.
terests.


Image. htt://www.southernenvironment.ore/about/ton 10 2009/iohns island/






Project Introduction


Site Description:

The site of the campus is approximately 165 acres in
size with four natural lakes wrapping around a large
portion of the main campus. A large open space con-
nects several buildings creating an inner campus. Twen-
ty acres of hardwood and wetland hammock with a lake
and a spring fed stream also exists on site. Within it is
the Ladell Brothers Outdoor Environmental Center with
over 1.5 miles of trails, a picnic area, and a boardwalk
crossing over marshland. The Environmental center is
part of The Great Birding Trail.

The campus has a large setback of almost 800 feet from
Highway. 90 with a long, winding road leading to the
administration buildings. There is a road network that
goes around the south and west perimeter with four sepa-
rate parking lots connected to it. On-Street parking with
45 and 90 degree spaces also occurs along portions of the
roadway. A total of five entrances to the campus exist.

The classroom buildings of the main campus area have
an institutional architectural style similar to an old K-12
school that is very outdated. They are generally one story
in height with outdoor breezeways. One of the buildings
is partially two stories in height due to the topography.

Inventory of the buildings of the main campus include
two administration buildings with one having an inter-
esting courtyard space in the center. There is an IT build-
ing, library, student center, five academic buildings, and
a gymnasium (recently remodeled). Spread away from
the inner campus is the Career and Technical Education
Center, a recently built Science Learning Center, and an
auditorium to hold school and local functions.


Scale: I"' 200"






Project Introduction


Context Description

The site of the school is located within a
valley surrounded by sloping terrain to
the east and west of the campus. A huge
stormwater retention pond exists just west of
the campus at the bottom of a large hill. A
major highway, U.S. Highway 90 runs along
the south entrance of the campus. This con-
nects a rural part of Madison on the east to
the downtown section of the City located to
the west. Private apartments offering stu-
dent housing are located southeast of the
campus while an older looking shopping
center with a grocery store as well as smaller
retail stores are located across the street to
the south of the campus.

Several fast-food restaurants and a southern
buffet style restaurant are also within this
district. To the west of the campus is a mix
of land uses from small sprawling business-
es to residential housing, apartments and
then the downtown corridor which has the
character of a small southern town laid out
in a grid pattern with on-street parking with
spaces having 45 degree angles. Directly
north of the hardwood hammock on campus
is the Public Safety Academy which trains
police and corrections officers as well as
firefighters. Mixed land uses continue with
much of it appearing to be agricultural land
and patches of woodland vegetation. Agri-
culture encompasses the surroundings of the
developed land and several natural water
bodies appear throughout the county.


0 850' 1700' 3400' 5100'
m m NFCC Campus WI
5cale: J" =J 700'
Ladell Brothers Outdoor Environmental Center

Urban, Downtown Area








Program,


Goals and Objectives,


and User Analysis


Program Development............page 10
Goals and Objectives............ .page 11


User Analysis.........................page 12






Program Development



5tormwater Management Plan
*Retention/Detention Ponds
*Wetlands/Filtration
*Outdoor Learning Spaces/Laboratory

Growth Management and Expansion Plan
*Academic Buildings
*Administration Buildings
*Sports and Recreation


Connectivity
*Pedestrian Circulation
*Vehicular Circulation and Parking
*Open Space

Campus Identity
*Gateways/entrances
*Architecture
*Landscaping






Goals and Oblectives



Manage stormwater through creative, sustainable, and interpretive practices.

*Identify the path and sources of stormwater runoff and design a functional and attractive system that integrates a combination of features such as rain
gardens, swales, bio-filtration, and habitat pools that cleans the water before it reaches the lakes and stream.

*Use native plant material within the stormwater system to clean the water through natural processes.

*Highlight as a design feature that educates students and the community about the importance of managing stormwater.
*Create a wetland that acts as a living outdoor laboratory for students to learn about biology, ecology, and chemistry.

Preserve and enhance existing natural resources on site.
*Place vegetative buffers of native plants around water bodies
*Prevent sedimentation and both point and non-point source pollution from reaching the water bodies and other delicate resources such as the hardwood
hammock by managing and cleaning stormwater before it reaches these resources.
*Locate appropriate areas of the lakes to open up the shoreline edge for users to gain up close access to the water.
*Analyze the current walking trail system within the Ladell Brothers Environmental Center and determine if the system could be better modified to pre
serve existing ecosystems or enhance the user experience within the hammock.

Improve and enhance pedestrian and vehicular circulation as well as connectivity throughout the campus.
*Use topography and natural features to create vistas and enhance the user experience for both pedestrians and vehicular travel throughout the site.
*Improve way-finding with uniform signage and open view-sheds with functional circulation patterns.
*Make vehicular circulation and parking more functional while adding a scenic element to it through landscape planting and road alignment that reveals
view-sheds of lakes and other landmark features.

Address future expansion and management.
*Identify land having the highest suitabilities for conservation, placement of infrastructure, and structures while offering unique situations for defining and
framing spaces.






User Analysis


User Groups:


*Students
18-25 Younger Generation
*26-40 and beyond. Workforce Development
*Athletes


*Faculty


*Administration personnel

*Maintenance personnel
*Building Maintenance
*Landscape Maintenance


*Visitors (All age groups)
*Individuals or small groups
*Large groups (Events at Art gallery, Auditorium,
or sports related


*Persons with disabilities


*Birdwatchers (Great Florida Birding Trail)

*Local residents for hiking or jogging


Scales of Concern:

*Surrounding Context

*Site of NFCC Campus

*Individual Areas of Campus


Stakeholders:


*North Florida Community College


*State of Florida


*Human Scale (Details)










Existing Conditions



Unique Site Features........................................... page 14
Architecture Styles of the NFCC Campus............ page 15
Building Inventory and Locations...................... page 16
Current Methods of Stormwater Management...... page 17






ExI5ting Condition5


Unique Site Features

S several unique features of the property enhance the :
visual experience and bring about a sense of place
to the campus. These range from large expanses of
green space filled with mature trees to the network ..
of lakes that form the framework for the layout of-"
the site. Some of the existing buildings such as the
Student Center pictured below take full advantage of
these spectacular viewsheds while others could ben-
efit more.


view oi iaKe Irom Denlllia mtuaent kenier


upen space winin inner campus.






Existing Conditions


Architecture styles of the NFCC Campus


There are multiple architecture
styles that exist on the campus.
Some uniformity and common ele-
ments exist in the older styles while
the more modem styles tend to have
less in common with the original
campus. The Science building and
the Van H. Priest Auditorium are the
newest additions to the campus.


Student Center


Academic Building Art Gallery


Science Building


Career and Technical
Education Center


Administration Building


Van H. Priest Auditorium






Existing Conditions


**4*' 14


0
NTS


13
29


Building Inventory

and Locations
NFCC CAMPUS MAP
1. Van H. Priest Auditorium
2. Administrative Services Building
3. Walter L. Bishop Administration Building
4. Marshall Hamilton Library
5. Technology Center
6. College Preparatory Education /Mathematics Classrooms
7. Business Education Building
8. General Classrooms Building
9. Student Center
10. Fine Arts Building
11. Hardee Center for the Arts
12. Colin P. Kelly Fitness Center
13. Career and Technical Education Center
14. Warehouse
15. Greenhouse
16. Testing Center
17. Maintenance Building
18. Warehouse
19. Sentinel Baseball Field
20. Frank Cantey Softball Field
23. Ladell Brothers Outdoor Environmental Center
29. Fitness Walking Trail
32. College Advancement / Artist Series
33. University Programs / Saint Leo University Offices
34. Morris G. Steen, Jr. Science Learning Center
35. Public Safety Academy
36. Government Relations Office


0:::~


ito I






Existing Conditions

Current Methods for Stormwater Management


Several methods of stormwater management occur
on the campus. These include retention ponds
surrounded by fences, concrete swales, and large
concrete spillways. A long, straight concrete swale
similar to the one featured in the picture to the right
runs directly through part of the main campus. These
produce unattractive elements that could be used
more creatively to enhance the visual quality of the


nage oasin niaaen oy -iaewalK ana poured concrete ret
wall to handle water detention during big rain events.


Concrete swale next to Art Building carries
water from parking lot toward lake.









Context Analysis



Landuse M ap................................................................ page 19
Regional Watershed, Topography, and Wetlands.........page 20
Context, Watershed, and Drainage Patterns.................page 21






Context Analysis


Landuse Map


Madison County is historically
known for its agriculture and
timber which can be seen today
surrounding a large portion of the
NFCC campus. Existing green
space currently borders the campus
with a cemetery on the east side of
the property and a community park
on the south side. The County Ag-
ricultural Extension Agency (Insti-
tutional Color) is located on the
southern edge of campus next to the
park and a public library borders
the southwest side of the property.

Several other land uses seen on the
map include commercial properties
that stretch along the major high-
way. Both large and small patches of
residential and multi-family can be
seen throughout the land-use map.


Legend
Single Family Residential
E Multi-Family Residential
Mixed-Use Residential,
Commercial,Institutional
E Commercial

H Institutional

I Vacant Mixed Uses
I Parks and Open Space
Agriculture, Timber, and
Grazing Classifications
* NFCC Property Boundary
m Major Road


0 850' 1700' 3400' 5100'
5cale: = J 700'






Context


Analysis


Regional Watershed, Topography, and Wetlands


Because stormwater
is such major issue
on the site the regional
watershed was examined
to clarify exactly where
it is located as well as
any drainage basins that
might affect the site.
This information helped
determine the area of
concern which is seen as
the purple bubble on the
map.

The map also describes
the elevation changes of
the area as well as where
wetlands are located.


Legend

watershed
r7 Basins
Topography
Elevation
-- 30-100 ft.
105-170 ft.
_- 175-240 ft.
- Major Roads
-- 1 Madison Parcels
Wetlands
... NFCC Property
Boundary
Water Flow From
High to Low
Area of Concern


0 1300' 2600' 5200'
I: I =?00' Feet 0
Scale: I" =2GO0'






Context


Analysis


Context Watershed and Drainage Patterns


T he watershed was exam-
ined at the context scale
to determine the flow of water
through the site.

There is a 110 foot elevation
changes in this area ranging
from 190 feet to 80 feet. The
red color indicate the low ar-
eas of the valleys and suggests
the paths that water moves
through them as well as likely
aquifer recharge areas, espe-
cially in the southwest comer.


0 750'
Scale: I"


1500' 3000
F FOOMMOMM Fe


= 1500'


' Legend
~- Major Roads
[.....1 Madison Parcels
Wetlands
C Basins
Topography
SElevation
-- 30-100 ft.
105-170 ft.
i 175-240 ft.
*NFCC Property Boundary

Major Drainage Areas
Direction of Water Flow
From Highest to Lowest
Elevation








et


m












Site Analysis




FEMA Floodplain 2010................................. page 23
Soil Types and Drainage Properties .............. page 24
Vegetation ..................................................... page 25
Soil Suitabilities............................................ page 26
Vehicular Circulation .................................... page 27
Pedestrian Circulation ................................... page 28


G.. G..






Site Anal 5sis

fEMA floodplain 20 1 0
"Legend

FEMA Floodplain 2010
Lakes
Madison City
Boundary
Property Parcels
S NFCC Property
Boundary


The 2010 FEMA Floodplain
map shows the floodplain
covering the same areas as
the wetlands on the water-
shed maps.

The floodplain can be seen
bordering a large portion of
the north and west sides of
the main campus area.


0 300' 600' 1200'
Scale: I" =GOO'






Analysis


5oil Type5 and Drainage Properties


Soils found on the site and
context were looked at
to help determine the drain-
age properties and slopes of
the area. This was necessary
to begin looking at locations
that would be most suitable
for future expansion and
growth management of the
campus.

Once the existing soils were
determined, a metric was cre-
ated using ARC GIS and the
USDA Soil Survey to create
suitability maps that show ar-
eas with the highest and low-
est suitabilities for both site-
structural development and
recreational development.

Site-structural development
is based on locating struc-
tures such as buildings, park-
ing lots, and road networks.
Recreational development
is based on locating trails,
sports fields, campgrounds,
and picnic areas.


0 400'
Scale: I "


800' 1600' 0


LEGEND
[i |Property Parcels
SMajor Roads
Proberty Boundary
Soils Descriptions
1 Albany Sand, 0-5 % Slopes, Some-
wat PoorFy Drained
Blanton Sand. 0-5 % Stopes,
Moderately Well Drained
31 Bonifay Fine Sand 0-5 % Stopes,
WeI Orainod
4- Fuquay Sand, 2-5 % Slopes, Wel
Drained
5 Lovett Sand, 5-8 % Slopes, Moderately
--_ Well Drained
6 Lucy Sand, 5-8 % Stopes, Wel Drained

7 Nankin Loamy Sand, 5-8 % Sopes, We//
Drained

S Ocilla Sand. 0-5 % Skopes, Somewhat
Poorly Drained
9 Orangeburg Loamy Sand, 2-5 %
Slopes,Well Drained, Prime Farmland
10 Pelham Sand, Nearly Level, Poorly
S Drained
l !, Plummer and Surrency Soils, Neary
Level, Depe$ssaSon, Very Poorly D(*wd
S2 Plummer Sand, Nearly Level, Pofto
Drained
13 Troupe Sand, 0-5 % Slopes, Some-
-- wa EXcessfvy Drained
14 Water


m


Site


.--lr






Analysis


Soil Suitabilities
The structural development suitability graphic shows that the majority
of the campus infrastructure and remaining land exists on land with
only moderate suitabilities. The Maintenance facility and only a small
part of the main campus were located in areas with high suitabilities.
The recreation suitability graphic shows that all of the existing sports
fields such as the baseball and softball field as well as the tennis courts
and open green space were located on soils with the highest suitabilities.

Recreational Development Suitability


Structural Development Suitability


Soils
Suitability
High
oderae
Luw


| Property Parcels 0


- Maor Roads
- Proberty Boundary


650' 1300'


Scale: I" = 300'


2600'

0


Site






Analysis


Vegetation


Several ecosystems as
well as mature trees
exist on the campus. A
twenty acre hardwood
and wetland hammock
divides the property.
This is seen on the map
as a colorful band stretch-
ing through the property
boundary. Within this
hammock is a variety
of ecosystems including
swamp forest, cypress,
mesic-xeric mixed pine
and oak, sandhill, and
several others.

Many mature trees can
also be found on the
main campus. Several
specimens of live oak
and laurel oak as well
as tulip poplars, cypress,
and sycamores create
a beautiful canopy and
much needed shade.


Legend
L[l Madison Property Parcels
Major Roads


- -


0 500' 1000' 2000'
Scale: I" = 000' feet


NFCC Property Boundary
Open Water


SAgriculture
Bay/Gum/Cypress Ecological
Complex
Xeric-Mesic Mixed Pine/Oak
Forest Ecological Complex
Mesic-Hydric Pine Forest
Composition Group
Swamp Forest Ecological Complex
Cypress Forest Compositional
Group
Mixed Evergreen/Cold-deciduous
Hardwood Forest
SSandhill Ecological Complex
Broad-leaved Evergreen and
Mixed Evergreen/Cold-deciduous
Water Lily or Floating Leaved
Vegetaion
SXeric-mesic Live Oak
Ecological Complex


O"-


Forb Emergent Marsh

Water Lily or Floating Leaved
Vegetaion


Urban/Residential


Site






5ite AnaIy515

Vehicular Circulation
Legend

Arterial Roads
m m Connector Roads
m Primary Vehicle Route
Parking Lot Circulation
m m Maintenance Roads
**** Parking Lots

Athletic Recreation, Parks, Green Space

Water
Hardwood/wetland Hammock
9 Pedestrian Circulation
Pedestrian Circulation Under Buildings

Entrances/Gateways







0 375' 750' 1500'
Scale: J" =750' feet 0


. I





Site Analsis55

Pedestrian Circulation
Legend
SAthletic Recreation, Parks,
.Green Space
Water
Hardwood/wetland Hammock
Pedestrian Circulation
Pedestrian Circulation Under
Buildings
Pedestrian Routes With Major
Connections
'Pedestrian Gathering Locations
Trailheads
Parking Lots








0 200' 400' 800'
Scale: J" =400' feet 7












5ite 5ynthesis5


Synthesis................. page 30
Conclusion ............. page 31






5ite 5ynthes5s5



Legend
Primary Road Bordering Campus
S-Secondary Access Roads
S-Primary Vehicle Route Through Campus
Primary Entrance/Gateway
Secondary Entrance/Gateway
SPedestrian Routes With Major Connections
SPlaces of Student Gathering

Place of Interest
SConservation Land
Trailhead
Lakes/Wetland/Conservation
Potential Green Space
Potential Water Feature
Good Views
rkoQ-Needs Buffering
-, oCommunity Park
Point of Connection to Park
O Parking Lot Used Only for Events
q I Fragmented From Main Campus
Fragments Area of High Potential
(i- Adjoining Property With High Potential
S16-25% Slopes
0 150' 300' 450' 16-25% Slopes
e 1 5 Feet
Scale: = J 50






5ite Synthesis


Conclusion


Through my analysis of the site and context I was able to determine that
the best location for expanding the campus exists within the existing
property boundary. The primary vehicle route through campus runs
along the edge of the property and already has some good alignments
as to views of the lakes and some large specimen trees. Expansion of
parking areas is an issue without locating them on adjacent properties
which are county owned and therefore may be easy to acquire.

The baseball and softball fields are currently not being used but because
they exist they should remain where they are in the event that NFCC de-
cides to reinstate their sports program in the future. The Public Safety
Training Academy located to the north of campus is already fragmented
by the hardwood hammock forest as it should be. The Ladell Broth-
ers Outdoor Environmental Center located in the hardwood hammock
and already has some good trail systems and takes advantage of some
unique views. It utilizes good connections to the campus and should
only need minor modifications to maximize its function and connectiv-
ity.

When studying the floodplain and topography of the site and seeing the
45 foot elevation change on the east side of the campus, it is easy to
see why the site was developed the way it is. With this said there still
remains several opportunities to enhance and create connections to the
natural features and greenspace while making it a unique and produc-
tive learning environment as well.


Opportunities:

Offer views of natural areas and greenspace from all existing and
proposed buildings.

Connect the county park and cemetery as adjoining greenspace to
the campus.

Relocate the maintenance facility to a new location as the land it
currently sits on is prime for the campus expansion.

Relocate parking lot that is currently located in a prime location of
the main campus and create a strong entrance and axis that defines
that area.



Constraints:

Expansion of parking within the campus property boundary is very
unlikely without disrupting the natural resources and greenspace
areas or without expanding into the adjacent parcels.

Topography will create challenges as far as site development and
stormwater treatment is concerned.

Some of the newer buildings have been fragmented from the main
campus and it will likely be challenging to try to reconnect them.










Concept Development


Concept 1................page 33
Concept 2 ................. page 34






Conceptual Design





In this concept the maintenance fa-
cility was relocated to the northeast
comer of the property next to the Public
Safety Academy where it would be hid-
den by the hardwood hammock. The
parking area surrounding the science
building was removed and a complex of
buildings was created in the southwest
comer of campus below the cemetery.
Much of the road network remains the
same throughout this concept. Many
of the parking lots have been relocated
slightly with the exception of the one
that was at the center of the main cam-
pus. It has been moved south toward
the main entrance behind the lake.

Much of the main campus remains the
same with a few exceptions. A building
was placed where the parking lot was
removed and one of the administration
buildings extends over a narrow band
of water. The proposed buildings on
the eastern side shaped like H's have
courtyards within them to create spaces
unique to those buildings. The build-
ings also work to frame the existing
main campus. Greenspace connects the
campus and community park while be-
ing broken up by the buildings and road
to create unique areas of the campus.


Concept I






Conceptual Design





Part of the road network at the main
entrance to the campus was removed
in this concept to create less fragmenta-
tion of the greenspace at the entrance.
The Agriculture Extension Agency was
moved closer to the highway so that a
parking lot could be placed where it orig-
inally existed. The entrance road was
realigned to create a hierarchal sense of
arrival at the main campus with an iconic
building located at the end of it.

Greenspace connects the campus through
a more linear pattern in this concept than
the previous. Existing lakes and pro-
posed stormwater ponds break up the
greenspace instead of the buildings. The
maintenance facility is relocated to the
southeast comer of campus where the
science building was originally located.


Concept 2














Masterplan




M asterplan........................... page 36
Main Campus ..................... page 37
Planview Enlargements.........pages 38-40
Sections................................. page 41
Stormwater Wetland..............pages 42-43
Perspectives........................... pages 44-51






Masterplan


Public Safety Academy

Maintenance Facility


Existing Buildings


= Proposed Buildings

Outdoor Environmental Center


fc


*0
*-Iu


Community Park


0
0 *
**


0 600' 1200' 1800'
Feet
Scale: I =GOO


0


RIM





Masterlan
Main Campus Ivoti illi


o.7f





Masterplan


Plan View Enlargements


Inner Campus


The magenta colored buildings in the center create the main entrance to the inner campus. A vehicle dropoff circle is placed
in front of the buildings lined with sabal palm trees. A strong axis lined with flowering trees extends across the inner cam-
pus and ends as it reaches a building. The sidewalks create an organic figure 8 system that works its way throughout the campus
connecting everything while giving the most direct route as possible. The magenta buildings to the east frame the space of
the inner campus while pedestrians walk through the building and into a courtyard that connects to another section of campus.


0


'rC






Masterplan


Plan \



Eastern Side of Campus

This part of the plan illustrates the Social Sciences and Art
building complexes and there connection to the greenspace
and stormwater management system as well as the stormwater
wetland. Within the northernmost complex (Social Sciences) is a
swale that carries water into a wet/dry pond in the courtyard and
then further into the wetland. An amphitheater between the two
buildings offers an outdoor learning environment and a view of
the lake.
The southwestern complex (Art/Humanities) has a courtyard in
the center with a wet/dry stream running through it. Water from
the parking lot located to the south drains into the swale and flows
through the courtyard and into the wetland before it is cleaned by
vegetation before reaching the lake.


(iew Enlargements






Masterplan


Plan View Enlargements


I) Maintenance Facility


The maintenance facility was relocated to the north
of the property and a whole new complex was de-
signed with larger storage facilities and a larger of-
fice and break room. Green space was also provided
for the workers to relax in during breaks.


2) Technical Career and Workforce
Development Center

The light purple building is the existing science building. The parking lot that
surrounded it was removed to build a complex of buildings here. This location
is designated the Technical Career and Workforce Development Center because
it is fragmented from the main campus by the road. It will likely have several
evening classes taking place due to the difference in studies that will take place
here.





Sections


Cut-Fill Section of Social Sciences Buildings


Bio-Swale in Parking Lot


C Cut-Fill Section of Art and Humanities Buildings


|- - - - - - --





Stormwater


Wetland


Planview of 5tormwater Wetland


Marsh Zone

Hi Marsh Zone


* Micro Pool


. Inlet

Plunge Pool
Inlet


Gabion Wall


Wet Pond


Island





Stormwater Wetland

Sections


Zone Zone
A Section cut through deep wet pond and wetland


Wet Pond Lquatic
Shelf scale: I" =30'


B Small Pond With Bio-Swale Draining Into It.





Perspectives

Art and Humanitie5 Building5


Entrance to Courtyard and Stormwater Wetland is Through the Building





Pers5pectives


Art and Humanlties Building5


Courtyard has a Stream Running Through It When Large Volume of
Stormwater Runoff Exists





Per5rspectives


Main Entrance and Axis of the Inner Campus


Axis Between Proposed Buildings Connecting Vehicle Dropoff to
Inner Campus. Flowering Trees Line the Axis.


O


ft-





Per5s ectiveso


Main Entrance and Axi5 of the Inner Campu5


View From Within the Inner Campus. A Small Fountain with a Boulder in the
Center is Located Where The Axial Pathway Crosses the Sidewalk that
Meanders Through the Inner Campus Under the Canopy Trees.





Per5rspectives


Social Sciences Buildings


It


View of Amphitheater and Courtyard with Stormwater Detention Pond
Filled with Gravel and Muhly Grass


Sc *


0


MOWLn




Perspectives


Social Sciences Buildings


A


View From Within the Courtyard Looking at the Detention Pond in the Plaza
with Stormwater Stream Running Through It


0


>:. IV





Per5spectives


Social Sciences Buildings


View From the Plaza looking Out Over the Amphitheater and Lake
Into the Hardwood Hammock


1, i


0





Perspectives


Greenspace and Stormwater Wetland


View of Greenspace Looking Over Stormwater Wetland and Treatment Ponds
With the Lake and Hardwood Hammock in the Viewshed










Case studies



Evergreen State College Masterplan.............................page 53
Sidwell Friends School ................................................. page 54
Florida Aquarium Parking Lot And Queuing Garden...... page 55






Case Studies


Evergreen State College Masterplan

Location: Olympia, Washington

The campus is situated at the edge of the Puget Sound on 1033
acres with as much as 80% remaining as forest land. In 2008 a
masterplan was created for Evergreen State College as part of a com-
mitment and guide to developing a highly sustainable campus over a
15 year period. It aims to balance and reduce carbon use and waste
production. The plan addresses such topics as transportation modes
and patterns, energy production and use, ecosystem protection, con-
struction practices, food production, student life and housing, and .
wastestream management. The campus is to be used as a laboratory
for all aspects of sustainability ranging from stormwater manage-
ment to maintaining school spirit.

The plan aims to get students and faculty involved through hands
on learning by creating seven educational centers throughout cam--
pus that act as outdoor laboratories and classrooms. These include
a Stormwater Monitoring Center where management systems will
be exposed to allow interactive monitoring and measuring of water
flows and quality. A sustainable Design Resource Center, an Organ-
ic Farm Education Center, an Alternative Energy Education Center
and a Solid Waste and Renewable Fuels Education Center are also
planned.

Preserving the native ecosystems is one of the target goals of the
masterplan as well as focusing on connectivity within the campus
and to the community of Olympia. Revising the intra-campus road
network as well as paths and trails is a top priority. Trail heads are
located near transit stops to increase accessibility to outdoor class-
rooms.

The masterplan also addresses the use of native plants and rainwater
catchment devices for irrigation, storm and wastewater management
as well as food and waste composting. It also specifies using natural
fertilizers and cleaning products.






Case StucdlIes


Sidwell FrienC s School (Middle school
renovation and addition)

Location: Washington, DC

The school's fifty year old facility was renovated in 2007 to become
both an indoor and outdoor teaching laboratory to teach environ-
mental awareness to the students. The focus of the project is smart
water management. The design incorporates a central courtyard with
a rain garden, pond and constructed wetland that receives both storm-
water and wastewater.

The centerpiece of the design is a natural wastewater system with a
constructed wetland in the center. It produces high quality non-potable
water by utilizing the natural cleaning processes of the plants. Native
plant species of the Chesapeake Bay region were used in the design.
Much of this water is recycled back into the building for re-use or used
for irrigation. The wetland acts as a living laboratory for the students
of biology, ecology, and chemistry. The students measure and com-
pare nitrogen and phosphorous levels and also record wildlife sight-
ings such as birds, owls, and butterflies.

Stormwater management is achieved through a series of rain gardens,
swales, bio-filtration and habitat pools. There is also a green roof
where the students grow vegetables and monitor and compare runoff
with the conventional roof Cisterns are placed underground to store
water for irrigation. All of the site runoff is directed toward the rain
gardens which are planted with native meadow species.

The majority of the materials in the hardscape are recycled or re-
claimed. The lumber for the decks and boardwalk came from pilings
from the Baltimore Harbor. Sidewalks were made from reclaimed
flagstone and a dismantled railroad bridge provided stone for the steps
and walls. Concrete with recycled slag was used for walkways.


http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=2'






Case Studies



Florida Aquarium Parking Lot and
Queuing Garden

Location: Tampa, Florida

The Florida Aquarium partnered with the Southwest Florida
SWater Management District in 1993 to build an 11.25 acre
research and demonstration area to monitor stormwater runoff in
parking lots. The study compared low impact, alternative, sus-
tainable design practices to conventional methods. A w4 ,

Stormwater runoff from the Aquarium roof and parking lot was
directed into a "treatment train" for cleaning and filtering wa-
ter. This is chain is a series of bio-swales combined with smaller
basins that converge into larger ones, and then through a linear
progression of vegetated filtering zones. Permeable paving was
also a component of the demonstration area.
The new parking lot had to be one-third smaller in size than the ON POND
original to give way to a cruise ship terminal. This made the need --- -
to maximize the number of spaces critical to the design. Green
space within the design was increased by reducing the size of RunoffTaParin LotPon.d
each parking space by two feet. This extra space was used for
bio-swales planted with grasses. The front end of the cars were rkn ,t s" o N
then allowed hang over the grasses rather than pavement. PING

After monitoring 59 rain events over two years the research
showed that the sustainable practices substantially reduced runoff
volume and protected water quality. The basins that contained
pervious paving had the highest percent of removal of pollution /
loads and many removal rates for metals was greater than 75 per-
cent.






References


Contacts:
Garner, Patricia
Director of Green Industries Institute (Satellite campus of North Florida Community College). Monticello, Fl. (850) 973-1702. gamerp@nfcc.edu
Graduate of Landscape Architecture, University of Florida

Mulkey, Amelia
*Dean of Administrative Services (North Florida Community College). Madison, Fl. (850) 973-1604. mulkeya@nfcc.edu


Research References:

Case Studies:

Evergreen State College Masterplan, Olympia Washington
Sustainable Sites Initiative. http: //www.sustainablesites.org cases/show.php?id=20 11/3/2010
Florida Aquarium Parking Lot and Queuing Garden. Tampa, Florida.
Sustainable Sites Initiative. http://www.sustainablesites.org cases show.php?id 16 1/2/2011
Sidwell Friends School (Middle School renovation and addition), Washington, DC
Sustainable Sites Initiative. http://www.sustainablesites.org cases show.php?id 27 11/3/2010

Books:
Dober, P. Richard. "Campus Design ". John Wiley and Sons Inc. Canada. 1992
Dober, P. Richard. "Campus Landscape Function, Forms, Features John Wiley and Sons Inc. Canada. 2000






References


Websites and Documents Found on Web:

*Bio-Retention and Wet Pond Design. Mark Meyer, PE.
http://www.shawnature.org/documents/pdf/MSD%20Mark%20Meyers%20Bio%2ORetention%20Design%202.pdf
Florida Geographic Data Library (FGDL). www.fgdl.org/
Hansen, Gale (Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida) http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic all788330
Madison County Planning Office. http://www.madisoncountyfl.com/cd-planning.aspx
*Madison County Property Appraiser. http://www.madisonpa.com/
Minnesota Urban Small Sites BMP Manual. Constructed Wetlands: Stormwater Wetlands.
http://www.metrocouncil.org/environment/Water/BMP/CH3 STConstWLSw Wetland.pdf
North Florida Community College website. www.nfcc.edu
Sustainable Campus.org. http://www.sustainablecampus.org/
Sustainable Sites.org http://sustainablesites.org/
*The Neighborhood Model: Building Block for the Development Areas. Section 6: 11, Site Planning That Respects Terrain, Building on Slopes
http://www.albemarle.org/albemarle/upload images/forms center/departments/community development/forms/Neighborhood Model/Neighborhood
Model Design ApprochJor Principlell.pdf

Project Data:

GIS data: Topography, Soils, property boundaries, ecosystems, watershed.
Madison County Comprehensive Plan: 1991 (Outdated but has updated amendments going to 2009).
Site Photos (Personal collection)
Soil Survey; Madison County
Survey; AutoCad base: Shows 1 ft contours, existing water bodies, and building footprints.


U I




Full Text

PAGE 1

North Florida Community College Sustainable Design for A Rural Campus A S e n i o r C a p s t o n e P r o j e c t A Senior Capstone Project B y By K e i t h W a r d Keith Ward S p r i n g 2 0 1 1 Spring 2011Madison, FloridaUniversity of Florida: Department of Landscape Architecture F a c u l t y A d v i s o r : L e s L i n s c o t t Faculty Advisor: Les Linscott

PAGE 2

North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus No No No rt rt rt h h h Fl Fl Fl or or or id id id a a a Co Co Co mm mm mm un un un it it it y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Co Co Co ll ll ll eg eg eg g g g g g g g g g g g g e: e: e: S S S us us us ta ta ta in in in ab ab ab le le le D D D es es es ig ig ig g g g g g g g g g g g g g n n n Fo Fo Fo r r r A A A Ru Ru Ru ra ra ra l l l Ca Ca Ca mp mp mp p p p p p p p p p p p p p us us us North Florida Community College Sustainable Design for A Rural CampusMadison, FloridaAn Undergraduate Thesis in Landscape Architecture By Keith Ward Faculty Advisor Les Linscott 2011Submitted in partial ful llment of the degree Bachelor in Landscape ArchitectureThe University of Florida College of Design, Construction, and Planning

PAGE 3

1 1 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus P r o j e c t I n t r o d u c t i o n Project Introduction •Project Summary -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 4 •Site Location ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pag e 5 •Mission Statement -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 6 •Site Description -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pag e 7 •Context Description --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 8 P r o g r a m G o a l s a n d U s e r A n a l y s i s Program, Goals, and User Analysis •Program Development ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 10 •Goals and Objectives ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 11 •User aAnalysis ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 12 E x i s t i n g C o n d i t i o n s Existing Conditions •Unique Site Features --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 1 4 •Architecture Styles of the NFCC Campus ------------------------------------------------------------------------page 15 •Building Inventory and Location ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 16 •Current Methods of Stormwater Management --------------------------------------------------------------------page 17 C o n t e x t A n a l y s i s Context Analysis •Landuse Map -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 19 •Regional Watershed, Topography, and Wetlands.------------------------------------------------------------------page 20 •Context, Watershed, and Drainage Patterns ------------------------------------------------------------------------page 21 Table of Contents

PAGE 4

2 2 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus S i t e A n a l y s i s Site Analysis • FEMA Floodplain 2010. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 23 •Soil Types and Drainage Properties------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 24 •Vegetation-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 25 •Soil Suitabilities------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pag e 26 •Vehicular Circulation------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 2 7 •Pedestrian Circulation ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 2 8 S i t e S y n t h e s i s Site Synthesis •Synthesis and Conclusion. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 30 -31 C o n c e p t D e v e l o p m e n t Concept Development •Concepts 1 and 2-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 3 3-34 M a s t e r p l a n Masterplan • Masterplan -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page s 36-37 •Planview Enlargements-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 3840 •Sections ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pag e 41 •Stormwater Wetland ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 42 -43 •Perspectives ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page s 44-51 C a s e S t u d i e s Case Studies •Evergreen State College --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------page 53 •Sidwell Friends School (Middle SchoolRenovation and Addition) ------------------------------------------page 54 •Florida Aquarium Parking Lot and Queuing Garden ----------------------------------------------------------page 55 R e f e r e n c e s References ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------pages 56-57Table of Contents

PAGE 5

3 3 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus P r o j e c t I n t r o d u c t i o n Project IntroductionProject Summary............ page 4 Project Location............. page 5 Mission Statement.......... page 6 Site Description.............. page 7 Context Description....... page 8

PAGE 6

4 4 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus P r o j e c t S u m m a r y : Project Summary: T T he existing site of the North Florida Community College (NFCC) campus is located in the rural town of Madison, Florida. It is a small community college that was established in 1959 to serve the students of Madison and the ve nearby counties of Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Taylor, and Suwannee. Attendance has grown dramatically in the past few years from about 600 students to over 800 students. This is likely a factor of the current recession but with the trend in community colleges starting to offer four year degrees, the NFCC Campus will likely need to expand to accommodate the future changes in education. This creates a need to develop a masterplan to address and prevent the issues that will arise from expansion and development as well as to try to correct issues that already exist. The NFCC campus is rich in natural and cultural resources with several lakes and mixed hardwood and wetland forest found on site. It is a very unique place to put a school but fails to use these resources to their full advantage. The campus generally lacks a sense of place as the architecture looks very generic and outdated. The original part of the main campus was designed with some level of uniformity, connectivity, and open space in mind, but as the campus expanded much of this concept was lost as the newer buildings were fragmented by roads and parking lots. The buildings seem to be placed without a lot of thought as to alignments and the outdoor spaces lack function and connectivity. There is no sense of arrival to the campus as the entrances are not well de ned. Stormwater is an issue that needs to be dealt with due to the low lying nature of the site and the existing environment creates an excellent opportunity for sustainable and interpretive stormwater design. G e n e r a l I n f o r m a t i o n : General Information:Project Title:•North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design for a Rural CampusProject Type:•Institutional/Education Campus RenewalLocation:•Madison, FloridaClient:•North Florida Community CollegeVan Priest Auditorium over-looking one of several existing lakes found on the property.Project Introduction

PAGE 7

5 5 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Project Introduction P r o j e c t L o c a t i o n Project Location Project Location: North Florida Community College 325 NW Turner Davis Drive Madison, Florida 32340

PAGE 8

6 6 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Project Introduction T he main goal of the project is to bring about a sense of place to the campus while protecting and enhancing the existing natural and cultural resources found on site with regard to addressing future growth management. The main focus of the project will be to determine the best possible solutions for growth management and expansion of the campus with regards to connectivity through pedestrian and vehicular circulation patterns. Stormwater management will play a crucial role in determining these outcomes due to the hydrological and topographical in uences of the site and surrounding context. .A careful examination of the sites existing conditions will reveal opportunities and constraints that provide ideas for implementing both functional and attractive alternatives to the current problems at hand. It is my personal belief that the campus is located on a very unique site that does not take full advantage of it’s natural features. With the present knowledge available in stormwater management and the evolving change in policy and guidelines, I believe the campus is in a unique situation for implementing interpretive design strategies that can be used as an educational tool to explain to students and the community the importance of stormwater. It may also be a great resource as an outdoor laboratory for the sciences and other curriculum to study. These solutions will be put into a masterplan that addresses them in a sustainable manner for future reference and guidelines. I have chosen the NFCC campus as my capstone project because I got to spend some time on the site by working with the school at their satellite campus, Green Industries Institute during my internship. Being in a rural setting was new to me and I began to see the complexities and uniqueness that exists in these areas, especially with education facilities. I noticed the issues that existed on site and saw an opportunity for a masterplan that tries to resolve them. My interests in landscape architecture are geared towards revitalization and stormwater management and I see this campus as a very unique site that would accommodate these interests.Image. http://www.southernenvironment.org/about/top_10_2009/johns_island/ Mission Statement h he h h m m m m m m ai ai a a n n n go go go o o o o o o o a a al al a al al a a a o o o o o o f f f f f f f f f f f th th h th th t h e e e e e pr pr pr pr p p oj oj o oj j ec ec ec ec c e t t t t t is is is s t t t o br br b r in i n n n g g g g g g g ab b ab ou ou ou ou u t t t t a a a se se ns ns ns n e e e e e e of of of of p p p p p p p p p l l la a la l l la a ce ce ce ce e ce ce ce ce e c t t t o o o o o o th th th th h h h th e e e e e e e e ca ca c c a a m mp mp mp mp mp mp u us us us u w w w w w w w w w h hi hi h h h le le le e p p p p r r ro ro o te te te e e te e c c c ct ct ct ct in in in in in n n i g g g g g g g g g an a an an an an n a n n n an d d d d d d d d en en ha ha nc nc c nc nc in in in in in in n n n g g g g th th t th th h h t t h h e e e e e e e ex ex x ex ex ex x x x i is is is is s s s s ti ti t ti t i i i ng ng ng g g g n n n n n n n n n n n at at at t at at at t ur u ur u ur ur u u ur ur ur al al a l al al a a a a a a a n nd nd nd d d d n d c c c ul ul ul u u u tu ra ra a ra a l l l l l re e e re re e r e so so o o ur ur ur r ur r ce ce ce e ce s s s fo f fo un un un u un un d d d d d on on on n s s s s s s s i it it it it i it it e e e e wi i wi wi wi wi w wi wi wi th th h th t t t t t th th h r r r r eg eg eg eg eg ar ar a ar r d d d d d d to to to to to a a a a a dd dd dd d dd dd dd r r re re re re r ss ss ss ss s in in i in in n i g g g g fu fu fu u u f tu tu tu u u t re r re re e e e g g g g g g ro ro ro ro w wt wt wt w h h h h h ma m ma ma a na n ge ge e e e g me me m me m e m m e e nt nt nt nt t nt Th Th Th Th e e e ma ma ma ma in n n n n n n f f f f f f f oc oc oc c oc c us us us us u u s s o o o o o o o f f f f f f f f f f th th th h th th t t t th e e e e e pr pr r r pr oj oj oj o j ec ec ec e t t t t wi wi wi wi wi wi wi ll ll l ll l l l l ll l l ll ll b b b b b b e e e e to to t t o d d d d d d et et et et e e e e et t er er er er er er er er e er mi mi mi mi mi mi m i ne ne e ne n n n n ne t t t he h he he he he e b b be be be be be be b s s st t st st s st p p os o o os si si si s i bl bl bl bl b e e e e e e e so s o so so s lu lu u lu u ti ti ti ti t i on on on on on n on on s s s s fo fo fo o fo o f f fo fo o r r r r r r gr gr gr gr gr r g g ow ow ow w w o ow ow w h th th th m m m m m m m an an an an an an an an an an a n an a ag ag ag ag a a a a a ag g g a em em em em em m em en en en en n e e en t t t t t t an an an a an n d d d d d ex ex x ex ex ex e x p pa p pa a a a a pa a ns s s n io i io io n n n n n n o of of of of o o t t t he h he he e he c c c c c c am am am am am am am am m am m a pu pu pu pu pu pu pu s s s s wi wi w i wi wi wi w wi wi wi th th th th h t t th r r r r r r r r e eg eg eg g eg e eg e ar ar ar ar a a a ds ds d ds s ds t t t t t t o o o o o o o co co co o co co o n n nn nn nn n ec ec ec ec ec c ti ti i i vi v i ty t y th th th th t t ro ro ro o o u u u ug u u u g g h pe pe pe e e pe p e de d de de de de de de e s st st s s t ri ri i ri r an an an a an n a a a a a a a n n nd nd nd n nd nd n n v v v v eh eh eh eh eh eh h ic ic ic i c c c ic i ul ul ul l l u l l u u l u ar ar c c c c c c ir ir ir ir cu cu cu cu cu u u la la l a l la ti ti i on on on n n n n n p p p p p at a a at at at a a te rn s. s. s. s. St S St St St or or or o or m m mw mw mw mw m m m m m m at at a at er er r m m m m m m m an an an an an n a a ag ag ag ag ag a em em em em e e en en en en n t t t t wi i i wi wi w ll ll ll ll ll ll p p p p p p l la la a la a y y y a a a a cr cr cr r r u u u uc uc uc uc u u ia ia l l l ro ro ro o le le le i i i i i i i i i n n n n n n n n de de de de d de d de de d d e te te te te e e t rm rm m m m rm r rm m m in in n n g g g g g th th th th th t h t th t t t es es e es es e s e e e e e ou o ou ou u u tc t tc tc tc t om om om om m m m m es es d d d ue ue ue e ue e ue e e t o o th th th th e e e e hy hy dr r d ol ol ol ol ol ol og o og og og og o g og o ic ic al al l l an an an an d d d d d to to to to o to o to po po o o g g gr r r g r ap a ap h h h hi hi h i i hi h ca ca c ca l l l in in n in i ue ue ue e u e e n n nc c nc n n n es es s o o o f f f f f t th th h th t h e e e e si i s i i te te te te t te e e e a a a a a nd nd s ur ur ur r ur ur ur ur r ur r ro ro r r r ro ro ro un un n 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ta ta ge ge ge ge ge g ge e o o o o f f f f f it it it it t i ’ ’s ’s ’s n n na na a n na n n n n n tu t t ra ra ra a ra ra l l l l l l f f fe e e f f e at at at at ur ur es es W it it h h h t th t t e pr pr es e en e t t t t kn kn kn kn kn ow ow ow ow ow le le le le le le le le e e e dg dg d dg dg dg d g e e e e av av av a av ai i la l a l bl bl l e e e in in n in in in s to o o o o t rm r rm r rm rm wa wa wa wa wa w te te te e r r ma ma a na na a a n ge ge m me nt nt nt a a nd n d t t t t t t he he he he e e e vo vo o vo vo vo lv lv lv lv lv v lv in in n n in n in g g g ch c an an ge g in in in in p p p p ol ol l l l ol ol ol ol l l i ic ic ic c ic ic i y y y y y y an an a n a n n n n n n d d d d d d d gu gu gu gu id i id id el e in i n n es s I I b be b be li ev v v v v v v v v e e e e th th e e e e ca ca ca c mp m m mp mp p us u us s u s s i i s s in n a u un n n n u iq i i iq ue ue s s it i i i ua ua ti i t on on n f f f f o or o r i i i m m mp p m le l me m me me nt n in n n n g g g g in in in te te te te r rp rp rp re re re ti ti i ve ve ve ve e e ve v d d d d d d d d d d es es es e ig ig ig ig n n n n st st ra r r te gi i g es e t t ha ha ha ha a a ha t t ca ca c ca a a a n n n n be b be u u u u se s s s d d d as a a a n e ed ed ed d uc uc uc uc at at at a io io i na na a l l l to to to t t o t ol ol o l l l ol t t t t o o o ex ex ex ex e e pl p pl l p p p p p ai ai ai i n n to o o s s s tu tu tu tu u u u u u u d d de de de de d nt nt nt nt t t s s s s s s an a a a d th h h e e e co o mm m mm m m un u u un n n n i it y y y y th th th e e im im m m m po po o po po po o o r rt rt t rt r an a ce o f f st s t or or or or r mw mw w w mw mw mw mw a at at at at a at er er er r er er r r I I I I I t t t t t t ma ma ma ma ma ma y y y y y al al al l a al so so so so s so b b e e a a gr gr g e ea t re re re so so so o o o s o ur ur ur u u u u ur ce ce ce ce c a a a a s s s a an an n a an n n a o o o o ut ut ut ut t u t ut do d do do o do do d do o o or o or or r or r l l l l l l b ab ab ab b b b ab ab ab b or o or or o o r r at at at t t or or or or o or o or o o y y y y y f fo fo fo fo fo r r r r r th th h h th th th h e e e e e e e sc sc sc sc c s sc sc ie ie i e e nc nc c nc n c es es a a a a n nd d d o th t er er er r c c c ur ur ur r ur u r ri ri ri ri r r c c c cu cu c lu lu lu m m m m m m to to s s tu u tu u dy dy y dy d y T T T T T T T T T he e e h h he se e e se s se e s s s s s s s s ol ol o ol o o o o ut ut u t ut ut ut io io io o o io ns ns ns ns ns w w w w w w il l il il il i i l l be be b b b p p u ut i nt o o a a a a a m ma m ma ma a ma st st st st t s er e er r r er r e pl pl pl pl pl an a an n th th th th at t a a a a a dd dd d d d re re re e e e re r ss ss s s s ss ss ss s ss s es es es t t t he he he h he m m m m m m in in in in i i i a a a a a a a a a a s s s s u u us us us s us s t ta a a a a t in n in in in n in ab ab a a b b a a le le m m an n n e r r fo f fo fo o o f f f r r r fu fu fu fu f fu f fu fu tu tu u u u t re re e re re r r fe f f f e re re re nc nc nc nc c nc c e e e e e e e an an an an d d d d d d d d gu u u gu gu u id id i d d d el el l el l l e in in n in in es es s e I I I ha ha a a h a a ve ve e v v c ho ho h o ho se e se n n n th h th h th t t h e e e e e e e e e NF NF NF NF NF F N CC CC CC C C C C C c c c am am am am am a p pu pu u pu pu u s s s s s s as as as a a a a as s m m m m m m y y ca a ps s ps s ps to to o t to o o ne ne e e pr p p p pr p p p oj oj oj oj o ec ec ec ec ec c c c t t t t be be b ca us us us us us s e e e I I I I I I I I go go go go go go g g g g g t t t t t t t t to t to to t s s s s pe pe e p nd nd nd nd d s s s s s om om om om om m m m m e e e e e e t ti t i i ti i ti i me me me m m m o o n n th h e e si si si s si i i t te e e t e by by b by by by y b by b w w w w w w w or r r ki k ki ki ki ng g g ng ng ng w w w w w w it it i it t it h h h h h h th t th th h h t th th th h e e e e e e e e sc sc sc s c c c ho ho h ho ho h h h h h h o ol ol o o a a a a a a a a t t t th th th h th th ei i i r r r sa sa a sa a a te t te te te te te ll ll ll ll it it e e ca mp mp m p p u us us s u u Gr Gr G G G G G Gr ee e e n n n n In In In n I n du d du du d du d st t st ri ri es es e s I I I I I I I ns ns ns ns n n n s ti i ti ti ti t tu tu tu tu u te te te e t d d d d d d d d d d d d ur ur ur u ur r in n n in in n i g g g g g g g g g my my my my my my m my my m m y m i i i i i i i nt nt nt n n n er e r r ns ns n ns n n n hi hi p. p. B B B ei ng ng ng g g g ng g g g in in in n n a a a a a r r ur r ur ur r al a l al a a s s s s s et e t t e et e ti i t t ng g g g w w w w w w w a as as as a n n n n n n n e ew ew ew ew ew t t t t t o o o o o me me me e e m me m a a a a a a a a nd nd nd nd d nd n n I I I I I I I b b b b b b b b b b eg eg eg eg g eg g g e eg eg e eg a an an an a an an n n n a an a a t t t o o s se e th th e e e e co co co o o c mp mp mp m m m mp mp le le le le e xi i i xi xi x ti t ti t ti ti i es es es s es e s a a a a a a nd nd d nd n n n u u u u u ni ni ni ni n n qu qu qu u qu u en en en n e es es s s e s s s s s s th th th th th th th h h th a at at at a at a a e e e e e e xi xi xi i xi xi i st st st st st s s s s in in in in n t t t t he he he he h h h se se a a a a a re as as es e es e s e pe pe p pe p ci ci i c ci al al al a l a ly ly y ly ly y w w w w i it it it it t h h h h ed ed ed ed ed uc c u u uc uc at at at t t io io io n n fa fa fa fa fa fa f ci c ci ci ci ci li li li li i ti ti ti ti es es e es I I no no no no ti ti i ti i ce ce ce ce d d d th th h h th h th h h h e e e e is is s su es es th th th th th h at at at t at a at e e e e e e e x xi xi xi i x x x st st st t st s t t ed ed ed d ed o o o n n n si i i te te a a a a nd nd nd nd n s s s s s aw aw aw w aw a a a a n n n n n op o op p po po po po po rt rt rt r u un un it i y y fo o fo r r r r r r r a a a a a a a a a ma ma ss te t te te te te t te rp rp rp rp p p la la la la l l n n n n n th th th th h h h a at at a t t t ri i ri i i i es es e s s t t t t t o o o o o o re re re re so so o lv v v lv v l v e e e e th th th h th t h em em em em m e m My My My My M My My i i i i i i n nt nt n n er er er er es es es ts ts ts s ts s i i i i n n n la la la l a a nd nd d n n n sc c sc sc sc ap p ap p ap ap p e e e e e e e e e ar a ar ar ar ar ch ch ch h ch c ch c it it t it t t it e ec ec ec ec e e c c tu tu tu u tu tu t re re re re e re re a a a a re re e re r g g g g g ea ea ea a a re re re r re e e e d d d d d d to to to wa wa w wa w w w r rd d d d d rd d d s s s s s re re re re re vi vi vi vi ta ta ta ta li li li za za za z za za z za z ti i i i ti ti ti i on on on on on o o o on an an an n n d d d d d d d st st t t s st st o or or r o r r o mw mw mw mw mw w mw w w w at at a at a at a a a er r er e r m m m m m m an an an a a an a ag ag ag ag ag g g e em em m em e m m m en e en n n t t t t t t an an an n an n d d d I I se e s e se s e e e e e e e e e e th th h h th h th th th th is is s is s c c c c c am am am am m am m m m m am m p pu pu pu pu p p s s as as as as a s a a a a a ve v v e e ve e e ry r ry ry u u u i ni ni i n qu qu qu qu e e e si si si si te te te te te e t te te te t t t ha ha ha ha h a h a h t t t t t wo wo wo o o wo wo w wo o w w ul u ul ul l l l d d d d d d d d ac ac ac ac ac ac a ac co co co c c c co o c mm mm mm m m m m m m m od od od od od o o o o d at at a a at a e e e th th th h h h th th h h e es es es es es s s e e e e e e e e e e e in i i in n i in in i n n in t te te t t re re e e e r st st t s s s. s. s Imag Ima Imag mag a e. e. http htt http ttp ://w ://w //w ://w ww.s ww.s ww ww.s outh outh erne erne nvir nvir ir v v onme onme o nt.o nt.o nt.o rg/a rg/a rg/a g bout bout bout /top /top /top p 1 _10_ _10_ _10_ 2009 2009 2 20 2 /joh /joh oh oh i ns_i nsi ns_i ns_i slan slan slan slan d/ d/ M M M M M M M M M M M i i i s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s i i i i i o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o n n n S S S S S S S t t t t t t a a a a a t t t t t t e e e e e e e m m m m m m m e e e e e e e e e n n n n n n t t t t t t M M M M M M M M M M M i i i s s s s s s s s s s s s s s i i i i i o o o o o o o o o o o o o n n n S S S S S S t t t t t a a a a a t t t t t e e e e e e e m m m m m m e e e e e e e e n n n n n n t t t t t t

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7 7 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Project Introduction S i t e D e s c r i p t i o n : Site Description: T T he site of the campus is approximately 165 acres in size with four natural lakes wrapping around a large portion of the main campus. A large open space connects several buildings creating an inner campus. Twenty acres of hardwood and wetland hammock with a lake and a spring fed stream also exists on site. Within it is the Ladell Brothers Outdoor Environmental Center with over 1.5 miles of trails, a picnic area, and a boardwalk crossing over marshland. The Environmental center is part of The Great Birding Trail. The campus has a large setback of almost 800 feet from Highway. 90 with a long, winding road leading to the administration buildings. There is a road network that goes around the south and west perimeter with four separate parking lots connected to it. On-Street parking with 45 and 90 degree spaces also occurs along portions of the roadway. A total of ve entrances to the campus exist. The classroom buildings of the main campus area have an institutional architectural style similar to an old K-12 school that is very outdated. They are generally one story in height with outdoor breezeways. One of the buildings is partially two stories in height due to the topography. Inventory of the buildings of the main campus include two administration buildings with one having an interesting courtyard space in the center. There is an IT building, library, student center, ve academic buildings, and a gymnasium (recently remodeled). Spread away from the inner campus is the Career and Technical Education Center, a recently built Science Learning Center, and an auditorium to hold school and local functions.

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8 8 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Project Introduction C o n t e x t D e s c r i p t i o n Context Description T T he site of the school is located within a valley surrounded by sloping terrain to the east and west of the campus. A huge stormwater retention pond exists just west of the campus at the bottom of a large hill. A major highway, U.S. Highway 90 runs along the south entrance of the campus. This connects a rural part of Madison on the east to the downtown section of the City located to the west. Private apartments offering student housing are located southeast of the campus while an older looking shopping center with a grocery store as well as smaller retail stores are located across the street to the south of the campus. Several fast-food restaurants and a southern buffet style restaurant are also within this district. To the west of the campus is a mix of land uses from small sprawling businesses to residential housing, apartments and then the downtown corridor which has the character of a small southern town laid out in a grid pattern with on-street parking with spaces having 45 degree angles. Directly north of the hardwood hammock on campus is the Public Safety Academy which trains police and corrections of cers as well as re ghters. Mixed land uses continue with much of it appearing to be agricultural land and patches of woodland vegetation. Agriculture encompasses the surroundings of the developed land and several natural water bodies appear throughout the county. Ladell Brothers Outdoor Environmental Center Urban, Downtown Area NFCC Campus Scale: 1” =1700’ 0 3400’ 5100’ 850’ 1700’

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9 9 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus P r o g r a m G o a l s a n d O b j e c t i v e s Program, Goals and Objectives, a n d U s e r A n a l y s i s and User AnalysisProgram Development............page 10 Goals and Objectives............ .page 11 User Analysis..........................page 12

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10 10 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Program DevelopmentStormwater Management Plan •Retention/Detention Ponds •Wetlands/Filtration •Outdoor Learning Spaces/LaboratoryGrowth Management and Expansion Plan •Academic Buildings •Administration Buildings •Sports and Recreation Connectivity •Pedestrian Circulation •Vehicular Circulation and Parking •Open SpaceCampus Identity •Gateways/entrances •Architecture •Landscaping

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11 11 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Goals and ObjectivesManage stormwater through creative, sustainable, and interpretive practices. •Identify the path and sources of stormwater runoff and design a functional and attractive system that integrates a combinatio n of features such as rain gardens, swales, bio ltration, and habitat pools that cleans the water before it reaches the lakes and stream. •Use native plant material within the stormwater system to clean the water through natural processes. •Highlight as a design feature that educates students and the community about the importance of managing stormwater. •Create a wetland that acts as a living outdoor laboratory for students to learn about biology, ecology, and chemistry.Preserve and enhance existing natural resources on site. •Place vegetative buffers of native plants around water bodies •Prevent sedimentation and both point and non-point source pollution from reaching the water bodies and other delicate resourc es such as the hardwood hammock by managing and cleaning stormwater before it reaches these resources. •Locate appropriate areas of the lakes to open up the shoreline edge for users to gain up close access to the water. •Analyze the current walking trail system within the Ladell Brothers Environmental Center and determine if the system could be better modi ed to pre serve existing ecosystems or enhance the user experience within the hammock.Improve and enhance pedestrian and vehicular circulation as well as connectivity throughout the campus. •Use topography and natural features to create vistas and enhance the user experience for both pedestrians and vehicular trave l throughout the site. •Improve way nding with uniform signage and open view-sheds with functional circulation patterns. •Make vehicular circulation and parking more functional while adding a scenic element to it through landscape planting and roa d alignment that reveals view-sheds of lakes and other landmark features.Address future expansion and management. •Identify land having the highest suitabilities for conservation, placement of infrastructure, and structures while offering u nique situations for de ning and framing spaces.

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12 12 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus User Analysis U s e r G r o u p s : User Groups: •Students •18-25 Younger Generation •26-40 and beyond. Workforce Development •Athletes •Faculty •Administration personnel •Maintenance personnel •Building Maintenance •Landscape Maintenance •Visitors (All age groups) •Individuals or small groups •Large groups (Events at Art gallery, Auditorium, or sports related •Persons with disabilities •Birdwatchers (Great Florida Birding Trail) •Local residents for hiking or jogging S c a l e s o f C o n c e r n : Scales of Concern: •Surrounding Context •Site of NFCC Campus •Individual Areas of Campus •Human Scale (Details) S t a k e h o l d e r s : Stakeholders: •North Florida Community College •State of Florida

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13 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus 13 No No No rt rt rt h h h Fl Fl Fl or or or id id id a a a Co Co Co mm mm mm un un un it it it y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Co Co Co ll ll ll eg eg eg g g g g g g g g g g g g e: e: e: S S S us us us ta ta ta in in in ab ab ab le le le D D D es es es ig ig ig g g g g g g g g g g g g g n n n Fo Fo Fo r r r A A A Ru Ru Ru ra ra ra l l l Ca Ca Ca mp mp mp p p p p p p p p p p p p p p us us us E x i s t i n g C o n d i t i o n s Existing ConditionsUnique Site Features..............................................page 14 Architecture Styles of the NFCC Campus............ page 15 Building Inventory and Locations..........................page 16 Current Methods of Stormwater Management...... page 17

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14 S S everal unique features of the property enhance the visual experience and bring about a sense of place to the campus. These range from large expanses of green space lled with mature trees to the network of lakes that form the framework for the layout of the site. Some of the existing buildings such as the Student Center pictured below take full advantage of these spectacular viewsheds while others could bene t more. 14 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus 14 Existing Conditions U n i q u e S i t e F e a t u r e s Unique Site Features Open space within inner campus. View of lake from behind Student Center Open space at edge of inner campus

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15 15 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus A r c h i t e c t u r e S t y l e s o f t h e N F C C C a m p u s Architecture Styles of the NFCC Campus Art Gallery Academic Building Career and Technical Education Center Administration Building Student Center Science Building Van H. Priest AuditoriumExisting Conditions T T here are multiple architecture styles that exist on the campus. Some uniformity and common elements exist in the older styles while the more modern styles tend to have less in common with the original campus. The Science building and the Van H. Priest Auditorium are the newest additions to the campus.

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16 16 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Existing Conditions NTS

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17 S S everal methods of stormwater management occur on the campus. These include retention ponds surrounded by fences, concrete swales, and large concrete spillways. A long, straight concrete swale similar to the one featured in the picture to the right runs directly through part of the main campus. These produce unattractive elements that could be used more creatively to enhance the visual quality of the campus. 17 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Existing Conditions C u r r e n t M e t h o d s f o r S t o r m w a t e r M a n a g e m e n t Current Methods for Stormwater ManagementConcrete swale and spillway next to Science Building Concrete swale next to Art Building carries water from parking lot toward lake. Drainage basin hidden by Sidewalk and poured concrete retaining wall to handle water detention during big rain events. ClABildii

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18 18 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus C o n t e x t A n a l y s i s Context AnalysisLanduse Map...................................................................page 19 Regional Watershed, Topography, and Wetlands............page 20 Context, Watershed, and Drainage Patterns....................page 21

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19 19 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus LegendSingle Family Residential Multi-Family Residential Mixed-Use Residential, Commercial,Institutional Commercial Institutional Vacant Mixed Uses Parks and Open Space NFCC Property Boundary Major Road Agriculture, Timber, and Grazing Classi cations L a n d u s e M a p Landuse MapScale: 1” =1700’ 0 3400’ 5100’ 850’ 1700’ Context Analysis M M adison County is historically known for its agriculture and timber which can be seen today surroundihng a large portion of the NFCC campus. Existing green space currently borders the campus with a cemetery on the east side of the property and a community park on the south side. The County Agricultural Extension Agency (Institutional Color) is located on the southern edge of campus next to the park and a public library borders the southwest side of the property. Several other land uses seen on the map include commercial properties that stretch along the major highway. Both large and small patches of residential and multi-family can be seen throughout the land-use map.

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20 Scale: 1” =2600’ 0 1300’ 5200’2600’ 20 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus FeetContext Analysis NFCC Property Boundary Water Flow From High to Low Area of Concern Regional Watershed, Topography, and Wetlands B B ecause stormwater is such a major issue on the site the regional watershed was examined to clarify exactly where it is located as well as any drainage basins that might affect the site. This information helped determine the area of concern which is seen as the purple bubble on the map. The map also describes the elevation changes of the area as well as where wetlands are located.

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21Feet Scale: 1” =1500’ 0 750’ 3000’1500’ 21 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Context Watershed and Drainage Patterns Direction of Water Flow From Highest to Lowest ElevationMajor Drainage Areas NFCC Property Boundary T T he watershed was examined at the context scale to determine the ow of water through the site. There is a 110 foot elevation changes in this area ranging from 190 feet to 80 feet. The red color indicate the low areas of the valleys and suggests the paths that water moves through them as well as likely aquifer recharge areas, especially in the southwest corner.Context Analysis

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22 22 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus S i t e A n a l y s i s Site AnalysisFEMA Floodplain 2010.................................... page 23 Soil Types and Drainage Properties ................. page 24 Vegetation ........................................................ page 25 Soil Suitabilities............................................... page 26 Vehicular Circulation ....................................... page 27 Pedestrian Circulation ...................................... page 28

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23 Scale: 1” =600’ 0 300’ 1200’600’ FEMA Floodplain 2010LegendLakes Madison City Boundary Property Parcels NFCC Property Boundary FEMA Floodplain 2010 23 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site AnalysisThe 2010 FEMA Floodplain map shows the oodplain covering the same areas as the wetlands on the watershed maps. The oodplain can be seen bordering a large portion of the north and west sides of the main campus area.

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24 Scale: 1” =800’ 0 400’ 1600’800’ 24 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Analysis S S oils found on the site and context were looked at to help determine the drainage properties and slopes of the area. This was necessary to begin looking at locations that would be most suitable for future expansion and growth management of the campus. Once the existing soils were determined, a metric was created using ARC GIS and the USDA Soil Survey to create suitability maps that show areas with the highest and lowest suitabilities for both sitestructural development and recreational development. Site-structural development is based on locating structures such as buildings, parking lots, and road networks. Recreational development is based on locating trails, sports elds, campgrounds, and picnic areas. S o i l T y p e s a n d D r a i n a g e P r o p e r t i e s Soil Types and Drainage Properties

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25 Scale: 1” =1300’0 650’ 1300’ 2600’ 25 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Analysis R e c r e a t i o n a l D e v e l o p m e n t S u i t a b i l i t y Recreational Development Suitability S o i l S u i t a b i l i t i e s Soil Suitabilities S t r u c t u r a l D e v e l o p m e n t S u i t a b i l i t y Structural Development Suitability T T he structural development suitability graphic shows that the majority of the campus infrastructure and remaining land exists on land with only moderate suitabilities. The Maintenance facility and only a small part of the main campus were located in areas with high suitabilities. The recreation suitability graphic shows that all of the existing sports elds such as the baseball and softball eld as well as the tennis courts and open green space were located on soils with the highest suitabilities. P r o b e r t y B o u n d a r y Proberty Boundary

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26 Scale: 1” =1000’ feet 0 500’ 2000’1000’ S S everal ecosystems as well as mature trees exist on the campus. A twenty acre hardwood and wetland hammock divides the property. This is seen on the map as a colorful band stretching through the property boundary. Within this hammock is a variety of ecosystems including swamp forest, cypress, mesic-xeric mixed pine and oak, sandhill, and several others. Many mature trees can also be found on the main campus. Several specimens of live oak and laurel oak as well as tulip poplars, cypress, and sycamores create a beautiful canopy and much needed shade. 26 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Analysis V e g e t a t i o n Vegetation Open Water Agriculture Bay/Gum/Cypress Ecological Complex Xeric-Mesic Mixed Pine/Oak Forest Ecological Complex Mesic-Hydric Pine Forest Composition Group Swamp Forest Ecological Complex Cypress Forest Compositional Group Mixed Evergreen/Cold-deciduous Hardwood Forest Urban/ResidentialForb Emergent MarshSandhill Ecological Complex Water Lily or Floating Leaved Vegetaion Xeric-mesic Live Oak Ecological Complex Broad-leaved Evergreen and Mixed Evergreen/Cold-deciduous Water Lily or Floating Leaved Vegetaion Madison Property Parcels Major RoadsNFCC Property BoundaryLegend

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27 27 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Analysis V e h i c u l a r C i r c u l a t i o n Vehicular Circulation Scale: 1” =750’ feet0 375’ 750’ 1500’ Arterial Roads Connector Roads Primary Vehicle Route Parking Lot Circulation Maintenance Roads Parking Lots Athletic Recreation, Parks, Green Space Water Hardwood/wetland Hammock Pedestrian Circulation Entrances/Gateways Pedestrian Circulation Under BuildingsLegend

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28 28 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Analysis P e d e s t r i a n C i r c u l a t i o n Pedestrian CirculationPedestrian Gathering Locations Trailheads Scale: 1” =400’ feet0 200’ 400’ 800’ Parking Lots Athletic Recreation, Parks, Green Space Water Hardwood/wetland Hammock Pedestrian Circulation Pedestrian Circulation Under BuildingsLegend Pedestrian Routes With Major Connections P P

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29 29 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus S i t e S y n t h e s i s Site SynthesisSynthesis..................... page 30 Conclusion ................. page 31

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30 30 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Synthesis 0 300’ 450’ 150’ FeetScale: 1” =150’

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31Through my analysis of the site and context I was able to determine that the best location for expanding the campus exists within the existing property boundary. The primary vehicle route through campus runs along the edge of the property and already has some good alignments as to views of the lakes and some large specimen trees. Expansion of parking areas is an issue without locating them on adjacent properties which are county owned and therefore may be easy to acquire. The baseball and softball elds are currently not being used but because they exist they should remain where they are in the event that NFCC decides to reinstate their sports program in the future. The Public Safety Training Academy located to the north of campus is already fragmented by the hardwood hammock forest as it should be. The Ladell Brothers Outdoor Environmental Center located in the hardwood hammock and already has some good trail systems and takes advantage of some unique views. It utilizes good connections to the campus and should only need minor modi cations to maximize its function and connectivity. When studying the oodplain and topography of the site and seeing the 45 foot elevation change on the east side of the campus, it is easy to see why the site was developed the way it is. With this said there still remains several opportunities to enhance and create connections to the natural features and greenspace while making it a unique and productive learning environment as well. O p p o r t u n i t i e s : Opportunities:Offer views of natural areas and greenspace from all existing and proposed buildings. Connect the county park and cemetery as adjoining greenspace to the campus. Relocate the maintenance facility to a new location as the land it currently sits on is prime for the campus expansion. Relocate parking lot that is currently located in a prime location of the main campus and create a strong entrance and axis that de nes that area. C o n s t r a i n t s : Constraints:Expansion of parking within the campus property boundary is very unlikely without disrupting the natural resources and greenspace areas or without expanding into the adjacent parcels. Topography will create challenges as far as site development and stormwater treatment is concerned. Some of the newer buildings have been fragmented from the main campus and it will likely be challenging to try to reconnect them. 31 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Site Synthesis C o n c l u s i o n Conclusion

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32 32 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus C o n c e p t D e v e l o p m e n t Concept DevelopmentConcept 1...................page 33 Concept 2 ................. page 34

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33 33 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Conceptual Design C o n c e p t 1 Concept 1 I I n this concept the maintenance facility was relocated to the northeast corner of the property next to the Public Safety Academy where it would be hidden by the hardwood hammock. The parking area surrounding the science building was removed and a complex of buildings was created in the southwest corner of campus below the cemetery. Much of the road network remains the same throughout this concept. Many of the parking lots have been relocated slightly with the exception of the one that was at the center of the main campus. It has been moved south toward the main entrance behind the lake. Much of the main campus remains the same with a few exceptions. A building was placed where the parking lot was removed and one of the administration buildings extends over a narrow band of water. The proposed buildings on the eastern side shaped like H’s have courtyards within them to create spaces unique to those buildings. The buildings also work to frame the existing main campus. Greenspace connects the campus and community park while being broken up by the buildings and road to create unique areas of the campus.

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34 34 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus C o n c e p t 2 Concept 2Conceptual Design P P art of the road network at the main entrance to the campus was removed in this concept to create less fragmentation of the greenspace at the entrance. The Agriculture Extension Agency was moved closer to the highway so that a parking lot could be placed where it originally existed. The entrance road was realigned to create a hierarchal sense of arrival at the main campus with an iconic building located at the end of it. Greenspace connects the campus through a more linear pattern in this concept than the previous. Existing lakes and proposed stormwater ponds break up the greenspace instead of the buildings. The maintenance facility is relocated to the southeast corner of campus where the science building was originally located.

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35 35 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus M a s t e r p l a n MasterplanMasterplan..............................page 36 Main Campus ........................ page 37 Planview Enlargements...........pages 38-40 Sections...................................page 41 Stormwater Wetland................pages 42-43 Perspectives.............................pages 44-51

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36 36 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Masterplan 0 1200’ 1800’ 600’ FeetScale: 1” =600’ Maintenance Facility Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings Outdoor Environmental Center Public Safety Academy Community Park

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37 37 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Masterplan M a i n C a m p u s Main Campus 0 800’ 1200’ 400’ FeetScale: 1” =400’ H I J K LAuditorium Administration ST. Leo University Library Academic Support Arts and Humanities Student Center Gym Technical Career and Workforce Development Center History/Social Sciences Sciences Stormwater Wetland Existing Buildings Proposed BuildingsA B C D E F G H I JJK LA B C D E F G

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38 38 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Masterplan P l a n V i e w E n l a r g e m e n t s Plan View Enlargements T T he magenta colored buildings in the center create the main entrance to the inner campus. A vehicle dropoff circle is placed in front of the buildings lined with sabal palm trees. A strong axis lined with owering trees extends across the inner campus and ends as it reaches a building. The sidewalks create an organic gure 8 system that works its way throughout the campus connecting everything while giving the most direct route as possible. The magenta buildings to the east frame the space of the inner campus while pedestrians walk through the building and into a courtyard that connects to another section of campus. I n n e r C a m p u s Inner Campus

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39 39 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Masterplan P l a n V i e w E n l a r g e m e n t s Plan View Enlargements T T his part of the plan illustrates the Social Sciences and Art building complexes and there connection to the greenspace and stormwater management system as well as the stormwater wetland. Within the northernmost complex (Social Sciences) is a swale that carries water into a wet/dry pond in the courtyard and then further into the wetland. An amphitheater between the two buildings offers an outdoor learning environment and a view of the lake. The southwestern complex (Art/Humanities) has a courtyard in the center with a wet/dry stream running through it. Water from the parking lot located to the south drains into the swale and ows through the courtyard and into the wetland before it is cleaned by vegetation before reaching the lake. E a s t e r n S i d e o f C a m p u s Eastern Side of Campus

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40 40 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Masterplan P l a n V i e w E n l a r g e m e n t s Plan View Enlargements 1 2 1 ) M a i n t e n a n c e F a c i l i t y 1) Maintenance FacilityThe maintenance facility was relocated to the north of the property and a whole new complex was designed with larger storage facilities and a larger of ce and break room. Green space was also provided for the workers to relax in during breaks. 2 ) 2) T e c h n i c a l C a r e e r a n d W o r k f o r c e Technical Career and Workforce D e v e l o p m e n t C e n t e r Development CenterThe light purple building is the existing science building. The parking lot that surrounded it was removed to build a complex of buildings here. This location is designated the Technical Career and Workforce Development Center because it is fragmented from the main campus by the road. It will likely have several evening classes taking place due to the difference in studies that will take place here.

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41 41 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Sections ACut-Fill Section of Social Sciences BuildingsCCut-Fill Section of Art and Humanities BuildingsBB A CBio-Swale in Parking Lot

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42 Gabion Wall Hi Marsh Zone Marsh Zone Inlet Island Inlet Plunge Pool Micro Pool Wet Pond 42 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Stormwater Wetland P l a n v i e w o f S t o r m w a t e r W e t l a n d Planview of Stormwater Wetland

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43 Small Pond With Bio-Swale Draining Into It. Section cut through deep wet pond and wetland 43 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Stormwater Wetland S e c t i o n s Sections BBAA

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44 44 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesEntrance to Courtyard and Stormwater Wetland is Through the Building A r t a n d H u m a n i t i e s B u i l d i n g s Art and Humanities Buildings

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45 45 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Courtyard has a Stream Running Through It When Large Volume of Stormwater Runoff Exists Perspectives A r t a n d H u m a n i t i e s B u i l d i n g s Art and Humanities Buildings

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46 46 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesAxis Between Proposed Buildings Connecting Vehicle Dropoff to Inner Campus. Flowering Trees Line the Axis. M a i n E n t r a n c e a n d A x i s o f t h e I n n e r C a m p u s Main Entrance and Axis of the Inner Campus

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47 47 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesView From Within the Inner Campus. A Small Fountain with a Boulder in the Center is Located Where The Axial Pathway Crosses the Sidewalk that Meanders Through the Inner Campus Under the Canopy Trees. M a i n E n t r a n c e a n d A x i s o f t h e I n n e r C a m p u s Main Entrance and Axis of the Inner Campus

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48 48 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesView of Amphitheater and Courtyard with Stormwater Detention Pond Filled with Gravel and Muhly Grass S o c i a l S c i e n c e s B u i l d i n g s Social Sciences Buildings

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49 49 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesView From Within the Courtyard Looking at the Detention Pond in the Plaza with Stormwater Stream Running Through It S o c i a l S c i e n c e s B u i l d i n g s Social Sciences Buildings

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50 50 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesView From the Plaza looking Out Over the Amphitheater and Lake Into the Hardwood Hammock S o c i a l S c i e n c e s B u i l d i n g s Social Sciences Buildings

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51 51 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus PerspectivesView of Greenspace Looking Over Stormwater Wetland and Treatment Ponds With the Lake and Hardwood Hammock in the Viewshed G r e e n s p a c e a n d S t o r m w a t e r W e t l a n d Greenspace and Stormwater Wetland

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52 52 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus C a s e S t u d i e s Case StudiesEvergreen State College Masterplan................................page 53 Sidwell Friends School ....................................................page 54 Florida Aquarium Parking Lot And Queuing Garden...... page 55

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53 53 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Case Studies E v e r g r e e n S t a t e C o l l e g e M a s t e r p l a n Evergreen State College MasterplanLocation: Olympia, Washington T T he campus is situated at the edge of the Puget Sound on 1033 acres with as much as 80% remaining as forest land. In 2008 a masterplan was created for Evergreen State College as part of a commitment and guide to developing a highly sustainable campus over a 15 year period. It aims to balance and reduce carbon use and waste production. The plan addresses such topics as transportation modes and patterns, energy production and use, ecosystem protection, construction practices, food production, student life and housing, and wastestream management. The campus is to be used as a laboratory for all aspects of sustainability ranging from stormwater management to maintaining school spirit. The plan aims to get students and faculty involved through hands on learning by creating seven educational centers throughout campus that act as outdoor laboratories and classrooms. These include a Stormwater Monitoring Center where management systems will be exposed to allow interactive monitoring and measuring of water ows and quality. A sustainable Design Resource Center, an Organic Farm Education Center, an Alternative Energy Education Center and a Solid Waste and Renewable Fuels Education Center are also planned. Preserving the native ecosystems is one of the target goals of the masterplan as well as focusing on connectivity within the campus and to the community of Olympia. Revising the intra-campus road network as well as paths and trails is a top priority. Trail heads are located near transit stops to increase accessibility to outdoor classrooms. The masterplan also addresses the use of native plants and rainwater catchment devices for irrigation, storm and wastewater management as well as food and waste composting. It also speci es using natural fertilizers and cleaning products.http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=20 http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=20 http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=20

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54 54 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Case Studies S i d w e l l F r i e n d s S c h o o l Sidwell Friends School (Middle School renovation and addition)Location: Washington, DC T T he school’s fty year old facility was renovated in 2007 to become both an indoor and outdoor teaching laboratory to teach environmental awareness to the students. The focus of the project is smart water management. The design incorporates a central courtyard with a rain garden, pond and constructed wetland that receives both stormwater and wastewater. The centerpiece of the design is a natural wastewater system with a constructed wetland in the center. It produces high quality non-potable water by utilizing the natural cleaning processes of the plants. Native plant species of the Chesapeake Bay region were used in the design. Much of this water is recycled back into the building for re-use or used for irrigation. The wetland acts as a living laboratory for the students of biology, ecology, and chemistry. The students measure and compare nitrogen and phosphorous levels and also record wildlife sightings such as birds, owls, and butter ies. Stormwater management is achieved through a series of rain gardens, swales, bio ltration and habitat pools. There is also a green roof where the students grow vegetables and monitor and compare runoff with the conventional roof. Cisterns are placed underground to store water for irrigation. All of the site runoff is directed toward the rain gardens which are planted with native meadow species. The majority of the materials in the hardscape are recycled or reclaimed. The lumber for the decks and boardwalk came from pilings from the Baltimore Harbor. Sidewalks were made from reclaimed agstone and a dismantled railroad bridge provided stone for the steps and walls. Concrete with recycled slag was used for walkways. http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=27 http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=27 http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=27

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55 55 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus Case Studies http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=16 http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=16 http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/enlarge.php?id=16&image=2 F l o r i d a A q u a r i u m P a r k i n g L o t a n d Florida Aquarium Parking Lot and Q u e u i n g G a r d e n Queuing GardenLocation: Tampa, Florida T T he Florida Aquarium partnered with the Southwest Florida Water Management District in 1993 to build an 11.25 acre research and demonstration area to monitor stormwater runoff in parking lots. The study compared low impact, alternative, sustainable design practices to conventional methods. Stormwater runoff from the Aquarium roof and parking lot was directed into a “treatment train” for cleaning and ltering water. This is chain is a series of bio-swales combined with smaller basins that converge into larger ones, and then through a linear progression of vegetated ltering zones. Permeable paving was also a component of the demonstration area. The new parking lot had to be one-third smaller in size than the original to give way to a cruise ship terminal. This made the need to maximize the number of spaces critical to the design. Green space within the design was increased by reducing the size of each parking space by two feet. This extra space was used for bio-swales planted with grasses. The front end of the cars were then allowed hang over the grasses rather than pavement. After monitoring 59 rain events over two years the research showed that the sustainable practices substantially reduced runoff volume and protected water quality. The basins that contained pervious paving had the highest percent of removal of pollution loads and many removal rates for metals was greater than 75 percent.

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56 56 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus C o n t a c t s : Contacts:Garner, Patricia• Director of Green Industries Institute (Satellite campus of North Florida Community College). Monticello, Fl. (850) 973-170 2. garnerp@nfcc.edu Graduate of Landscape Architecture, University of FloridaMulkey, Amelia •Dean of Administrative Services (North Florida Community College). Madison, Fl. (850) 973-1604. mulkeya@nfcc.edu R e s e a r c h R e f e r e n c e s : Research References:Case Studies: • Evergreen State College Masterplan, Olympia Washington S ustainable Sites Initiative. http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=20 11/3/2010 • Florida Aquarium Parking Lot and Queuing Garden. Tampa, Florida. Sustainable Sites Initiative. http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=16 1/2/2011 • Sidwell Friends School (Middle School renovation and addition), Washington, DC S ustainable Sites Initiative. http://www.sustainablesites.org/cases/show.php?id=27 11/3/2010 Books: • Dober, P. Richard. “Campus Design” John Wiley and Sons Inc. Canada. 1992 • Dober, P. Richard. “Campus Landscape Function, Forms, Features” John Wiley and Sons Inc. Canada. 2000References

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57 57 North Florida Community College: Sustainable Design For A Rural Campus ReferencesWebsites and Documents Found on Web:•Bio-Retention and Wet Pond Design. Mark Meyer, PE. http://www.shawnature.org/documents/pdf/MSD%20Mark%20Meyers%20Bio%20Retention%20Design%202.pdf • Florida Geographic Data Library (FGDL). www.fgdl.org/ • Hansen, Gale (Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida) http://edis.ifas.u .edu/topic_a11788330 • Madison County Planning Of ce. http://www.madisoncounty .com/cd-planning.aspx •Madison County Property Appraiser. http://www.madisonpa.com/• Minnesota Urban Small Sites BMP Manual. Constructed Wetlands: Stormwater Wetlands. http://www.metrocouncil.org/environment/Water/BMP/CH3_STConstWLSwWetland.pdf • North Florida Community College website. www.nfcc.edu • Sustainable Campus.org. http://www.sustainablecampus.org/ • Sustainable Sites.org http://sustainablesites.org/•The Neighborhood Model: Building Block for the Development Areas. Section 6: 11, Site Planning That Respects Terrain, Buildin g on Slopes http://www.albemarle.org/albemarle/upload/images/forms_center/departments/community_development/forms/Neighborhood_Model/Neigh borhood_ Model_Design_Approch_for_ Principle11.pdfProject Data: • GIS data: Topography, Soils, property boundaries, ecosystems, watershed. • Madison County Comprehensive Plan: 1991 (Outdated but has updated amendments going to 2009). • Site Photos (Personal collection) • Soil Survey; Madison County • Survey; AutoCad base: Shows 1 ft contours, existing water bodies, and building footprints.