Everglades Outpost : a wildlife rescue

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Material Information

Title:
Everglades Outpost : a wildlife rescue
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Templeton, Logan
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
Founded in 1994, Everglades Outpost Wildlife Refuge and Rescue is a wildlife sanctuary located in Homestead, Florida that specializes in the rescue rehabilitation and relocation of both native and exotic wildlife. While not a zoo, the facility is open to the public and does provide educational opportunities for school and civic groups. Dependent upon a volunteer staff and monetary donations for its entire operation Everglades Outpost has evolved organically without a plan and to great extent under the philosophy that necessity is indeed the mother of invention. This presents an incredible opportunity to create a functional master plan that can be implemented over time and used as a tool in raising capital and grant applications. My project will be to create that plan by focusing on three distinct goals, Sustainability, Enhanced User Experience and Education.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00004172:00001


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lAKHOWLEDQGEHHTS

Wildlife habitat design i5 something I have been passionate about
for as lonq as I have been designing, I can trulq saq I've enjoyed
ever aspect of mq Capstone Project. Mq work on Capstone has
enabled me to incorporate mq passion with everything I've ',:.arrn..d
and experienced in this program over the past five L.-rs, would
like to thank the following people, who without their help, this
project would not have been possible: Mom and tPad, mq ad'i-c
Bob 6rist, the Universittl of Florida department of Landscape
Architecture faculty, mq classmates, tob Freer, Pesiree Pou and
everqbodL else at Everqlades Outpost, Chad tPouqlas and all qou
at Zoo Miami, and the rest of mq friends and family, '. I..:li. all
of Lour help and support, mq Capstone Project would not have been
what it was, Thank You,


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TA1DLE or COHTElTS


ylJJECT i Ir PUCTOON


CA5E 51ThIE5
CASE 5TIPY: Octaqcoi \''ilIlf,. 5ancuarq
CASE l5UPY: '.,-:h Wildlife 5aictuarq


nO/MS & C OJECfWVES


USL IR,/-.1 I iL 1F
fIq...'M."' 55
WILDLIFE CLA.FIFICA1flONS


,,Or-A IbLEMENT5


51t [ ,TfCrY & fANAL/'5
LOCArION & CCI iTrr
,L/ h ILUSE & ZCI ill Ii
rOPOrTHYm SOILS
EXIS1flN CONPIT1ON5


51E 5rHNE1I5

CC'I 'I. F [ Al 15


20


50


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MA51tR PLAN 46
LAELEt? MASWiPLAN
/I l ENCLOSURE MASTRPLAN


PIF1SN PMAIL5 & CHARACtiR 5KfCHE5 52
PARKING & ENfEY
MRESIENflTA, 5TAFF, & SERVICE AREA
P/'FT.f 1AY
iPRAZIN6 PAPPOCK
MEMORIAL
TAI.LHEAP & TROPICAL HARPWOt HAMMOCK
SNAKE HOUSE
PROOCP.AM SHHELER


MANAGEMENT RECOMENPATION5 64


WORK5 591W 70


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A DTRACT

Pounded in 1994, Everqlades Outpost Wil.ilife Refuge and Rescue is a
wildlife sanctuary located in Homestead, Florida that specializes in the
rescue rehabilitation and relocation of both native and exotic wildlife,
While not a zoo, the faciliNt is open to the public and does provide
educational opportunities for school and civic groups, Pependent upon a
volunteer staff and monetary donations for itf entire operation
Everqlades Outpost has evolved orqanicall without a plan and to qreat
extent under the philosophy that :i,\-\:.,3s-Is.j is indeed the mother of I
nver f i l, This presents an incredible opportunitN to create a functional
master plan that can be implemented over time and used as a tod in
raising capital and qrant applications, Mq prcjL,.,, will be to create that
plan bI focusing on three distinct goals, 5us"'.inltilit.1 lan,:, User
Experience and Education,


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PROJECT IHTRODUCTIOH

Volunteers watching a Florida Panther vanishing into the 5awqrass or a 7.ald aqle
beinq released into a blue Everqlades skq amongst anxious onlookers are the cover stories
associated with wildlife rehabilitation. While the rehabilitatio- and releasing of injured
native species into their natural habitat was the original intent of these centers,
es'x. aihi in South Florida with all of its unique circumstances, a \e:d has al so arisen for
the housing and care of exotic wildlife which cannot be released into the
wild,
Willow is a panther who was confiscated as a cub during a druq bust, Rockq, a n,;,.al
fiqer, was used bq an exotic dancer as part of her act, and ?u-:, a Crizzlq Bear, was
beinq kept as a pet in a Miami Peach back qard, Pesides having been removed from
their natural environments, domesticated in some manner, and more often than ,i',
phqsicalli altered to better serve their owners needs or safety concerns, these animals
cannot be taken in bq zoos or traditional animal attractions because of ethical restr.:.t i.:nS
placed upon them,
Founded in 1994 and leading the responsible movement towards rJl .a-I it:a. ,q and
releasing native species and providing exotic animals a safe and comfortable home is
Fverqlades Outpost Wildlife Refuqe and Rescue defined bq their seven point Mii,:i
Statement:

1. Rescue hurt, injured, or neglected exotic wildlife,
2. Provide medical treatment for sick, injured and abartiJed Florida wildlife
other exotic species,.
5, Rehabilitate and relocate Florida wildlife back into t'! ,ir natural environment,
4. Relocate permanently injured Florida wildlife in suitable sites,
5. Relocate exotic species in suitable sites,
6. Educate the general public about the conservation of wildlife,
7. Increase propagation of endangered and threatened wildlife,


Since its inception, Fverqlades Outpost has qrown orqanicallq and opportui st I-:ally.
There exists in this existing facility an incredible environmental and cultural rr;rort.i.iit as
well as a significant project in creating an implementable master plan using the prir,:pa.
of landscape architecture to update the physical plant and support their .'ri iiri state-
ment bq focusing on education, sustainability and an clian.:ed user experict i:.,


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PROJECT CASE STUDIES


Case 5tudu I: Octalon Wildlife Refuge
The information and images for this case studq A,re collected from an r,'1n
ste visit and interview with owner L-aurie Caron on January 16, 2011, Her
17 ears of experience provided qreat insight to understaridinq how a
program such as this can be successfully run and operated,

Case 5tudy 2: tusch Wildlife Sanctuary
The information and images for this case studcq A,-re cdlc:t.cd from an
onsite visit and interview on Januarq 17th, 2011, The interview was
conducted with Amq Kight, the Animal Care director, 5he has L~ce' with
Pusch Wildlife 5anctuarq for the past 6 years, Iit.r .,al cdc and work
experience with the anima ls provided qreat insight as to how to create a
vision and plan for a successful future for a project such as this,


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OCTAGOH WILDLIFE SiHCTUART


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51 r LOCATION A Il PUEC0PTION

0 41660 Horseshoe Road
Punfa forda FL, 59952
o The -ropertLt is located ii arpproximate l I0
acres with the sandcuarq .;.cr;ed on 7
o The sit:e and surr.,ndii;| laud uses are zoned.
for agriculture
o The -;.art of the sanctuary or;, to the u4-li: .
folloAws a .vll d,:: el".;,::. ,roqram that ,::jdt
visitors ariand the sit.. to all the enclosures
o The .i..3rantine area which takes up
approximately ,2 acres, is off limits to the
;1.lt; and on the back sid,: of the -ropertq
o There is a fairlq larqe man-made o:nd which
is enclosed to hold burros aind donkeys as
,: as various ducks and qeese
o The vegetation on site co.nisis of mostly
native trees such at Live Oaks and 5abal
Palmettos with a mid amount of around
cover and shrubs
0 Pue to the lack of s' in.is and ,. er
veqet.at ion the s it has a verq cr,.n feel to it


51FT Hi5fcOY Ji-l OPPlj FON.

o Octaqon Widllfe S.ani,:tu.ar has been in
operation for 55 ears
o Owned and Operated bq Lauri Caron whose
late husband along with his father, founded
Octaqon W life ..ani,:tu.aru
o It is a non-profit organization that generates
revenue for the cost of op.;rat ion from
donors, government grants, local bLsii. ::nses,

o The staff Jludes about 5 volunteers
rangqin from Veterinarians to mairt'n an ce
-;,rsonnel
o Last Near, Octaqon Wildlife received
approximatelq 20,000 visitors
o There are rouqhl4 150 .ermrn.i.nt residents
( it i-releasable animals) on site
o There is approximately 75 to 100 "-,unds
of animal feces and food waste that is
generated dal4
o The waste q.:,.:rated bh the sa5ictuarN is
collected in two dumpsters which are ::mpti..d
weekiq


Owner Laurl Caron walking the rounds


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Octaqon Wildlife 5anctuarq Site Map


A Peer and 6oat Pen
P Parking Lotb
C Pond
P Quarantine
F Permanent Pesidence


P Cold Food Storaqe a Haq %arn
6 entrance Area
H Volunteer Lodqe & Picnic Area
I Animal Enclosures
J Undeveloped Area


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o PCrrm.air, resid.cle which also i,..es all
med,.3a aid veterinary slI.rl ..iS ari. firearms
o Office trailer
o (lift sharp and admissions trailer
o Vdunteer lounqe with a picnic/ lunch area
l',:atcd outs id,:
o Maintenance and tod shed
o Walk in freezer
o Prq food and haq barn
o ,iirnmal enclosures
o Quarantine faoi,;:i iis
o 6iarbaqe and A,,a t3- collrt:rl


volunteer iounqe


,, II,.AL I0O5, ,5

o The -*najor iti of the animal enclosures were
constructed I1 to 50 ears aqo
o Theq do require annual mairtenanr:.e atrid
.:k,;ep but are up to code and have
withstood the harsh [florida .veAl cr irlidiig
5 different hurricanes
o The enclosures must meet the standards
local 'AC anid the stricter fnderallq
regulated U5LPA codes for crerali.ic\
o In the sanctuary' s $5 ears of or..,rat iO.n, no
animal has ."act'i loose due to riadl ...jues
of the enclosure


Materials and Constr.:tioil
o Al wood is -;ressure treated
o Al -;,st are set in concrete a minimum of 4'
deep
o 5creeninq sand is used for flooring in la z.
concrete
o The sand is packed 4' deep and for animals
such as bears, that like to diq, there is a
concrete base
o In these instances, the concrete base has
drainage holes to allow for water percoation
o (alvanized and rolled wire are use for siding
which qoes d?.. a minimum of 4'
o Tin ai.::; irt,; and s 1a.d3 cloths are attached
to the outside of the roof structure
o Poods are made out of concrete and are filled
to various heights d.teildini on the animal


1[lack I.: :.lT3-rd enclosure


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o Fach enclosure is equipped with its own
automatic watering system, similar to an
outdoor dog faucet
o /..il enclosures have a lock out or double entrq
so as to never have direct exposure to anqi
animal
o For animals that easily contract parasites,
concrete flooring with a drainage trough is
used which allows for east clean up and
bleaching
o Recycled telephone poles are used throughout,
mant of the enclosures
o The enclosures are set back 6' to 8' from
the pathway


/\ trier enjoying her enrlcmment ballI


o When possible, place pressure treated wood
on the outside of the enclosure's siding to
reduce wear caused bq the animals
o Enrichment items such as plastic aills, tires,
or anqthinq that encourages mental
stimulationand can withstand the animals'
strength are good accessories


ANIMAL ON 51T


fingers
Leopards
Cougars
Lions
mall cats
Pears
Wolf
Monkey
Paboon

Skunk


Kinkajou
Coatimundi
P inturrrI,;j
.urros
Ponkeqs
Parrots

Pucks
t Lt.ive birds
Iquanas


CONCLUSION

WHAT TOOK AAY FROM OCTfA6N
WILPLIfE SANCTUl'FY 'V'5 'i,- ENTAILw
APPROPRIATE ENCLOSURE tSl5 PPI A
WILPLIFE RESCLU A1 IrA- 1l .- Y;
F5PFCIALLY ONE rf fi HOLUS5 ': C/A 5
ANP 3? ARS Li, EVF6LAPUS C0U1POST,
THE THINN5 WE A5 I UJMA 15 PEEM
APPROPRIATE POR, -[T ANIMAL fO t
COMPOCRfAWL, COPTN HA5 LIflt TO 2O
'AWlrH THEIk /,CTUAIY NEEPS, PCr. ./APLE,
A 51MPLE I'0OP PECK l [1H AN 'LO0 W06
HOUSE PROVIPE5 A5 MUCH COMOCPT AS A
CONCREFi 51LUCTURE WiTH A `.LIL1f I PEN,
ABE51IC5 ARE MAPE FPOR HUMANS, Of THE
At lIM LS., WHN IP5lil II 1 ENCLOf.RtS,
If IS 'MPOANT TO LISTEN O THE AN IMALS,
EACH ONE 15 PIFPEfR.I Irf !P THEY WILL TlLL
YOU WHAT If IS THEY LI KE 1 I P PON'f LIrE,
LIS, NIN6 TO ANIP COFR-i 11 THE Al ILA P 5
WILL ENSLUFL THlY JPL I T-FPY Al IP HOUSE
IN A 5/rF ANP COMPC'i/rLEt
ENVIRONMENT,







DUSCH WILDLIFE SMHCTURMT


SI f. LOCATION ANIP P5CIPTION

o 2500 Jupiter Park Prive
Jur ter Fl, 55458
o The '.and the satnctuar is on is cA'nC and
l.T.ased from the Loxahatchee River tPistrict
for 110 a iI.a
o *e cause the prrr-F;rty is c n'L.d; bhy the state
it is ccremr,. from zoning restri:.ions
o The site: is located oi the same land as the
boxahatchee water treatment center
o o7ing on the same prrr;c-rty as lthe water
treatment- center allows for some unique
and :nrficial opportunities
o .-'u:h Wil.dlife sanctuary leases IS of the
150 acres from the Loxahatchee River
lsr.trict
o ~,.ugahlyq acres make u.:' the developed
portion of the 5.ar,:tary with the other 10
comprised of nature trails with existing and
prrop-ed larqe animal enclosures
o The main portion of the sanctuary folloAws a
circular -:.ath bring you by the enclosures and-
is very e(a31 to .3v-igate
o 0IthI-.ugh the sanctuary is surrmaid,:d by a
well d.:t',lo :d T n .,:.l:.al \\. it does not feel
that way
o The site. creates a .'i.lu:. sense of la:,: with
the use of natural vege..ationt and a common
design language throughout the s.al:lt.uary
o P.t.1 bI.ild igl,;s, signi, and pathways and .i:- t
enclosures relate to each other creating the
sense of ': in, in an "Old Florida" town
o The vegetation such as saw palmettos and
et4l .cr ferns are thick '-ut. not overgrown
giving users the f.:,.rliigt of walling through a
natural Klorida '.and-:ape


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trntor t it- .: ,'iicIit. tanctuarq


51TE Hi5SfCrY A L,) OPl Pr P rON5

o The Wildlife 5anctuarq was originally
founded in 19855 bqy avid Hitziq as a rehab
and education center
o Those two main tiriipl,:s have remained
-;resern throughout the site' s growth an

o In I14 The Peter tusch Familq Four.d.tii,
a .lo -rprofit cororabti i joined up with Hitziq
to create tusch Wildlife 5anctuarq
o The nmajrcrl.] of their revenue comes from
donations but theq also receive government
grants and host wildlife roqrams which also
generate a fair amount of moneq
o t i. have I4 full time and 4 part time staff
members with about 60 active volunteers
o There are rouqhly -400 ::rmai, nt animal
residents
o including their outreach -raram, lu-ch
receives about I 0,000 visitors annually.
o Because of the ir re'. A io, i w ith the
Loxahatc.::l ,, iver diisrict, tieiy are all?,,::d
to dump their animal waste directIy on site


-.- .,Jt Am~kflAf. kAlA ,h..- .fl. AMX ikt*1L1j.k L.AlA.- A ,ILn..ij.- .1l- A.1A1-.itL.h. ,.\kl -


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frail Map and fuide provided bq Busch Wildlife 5anctuarq

-i.t ov. X :
( e s t o I ..[a Anrr, Hospu. al .. ... .uoe
0 Hand up ten j a F' Aid Io duo public






L go1...11.. W s< 5 6 Hask-s (wis & Falcon,
Skunks Racoons & OpCssums S
Aletile Uder di 65
CIFoc & GIONi S75
to tbobau. F;!ees & (Al"m e
Eagles S15
Wk .. Bcars & Punr,.' S200












... ng sa easc u
on patdwni. no clmbu4ng
Smok'r- Turti- f-Jn
apoisted sigs POO
No child ilil namncr-tce
R* cr~ber )vu ar m a u .nut
in the anana hireo
*En,... youl uan

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Snage showing site character fight cage w-th b rds of prey
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AI-.I,.LEN, CLOUES5


PACII.It,

o Hopl ital/ /" dm inistrat ion/ Kitchen
o iift 5h.p/ Classroom/ Maitanence si id
o Picnic area and ;.'a lli
o /mplnt Iirlrr
0o Snk.3 House/ ,'strooms
o Larqe Mammal F:Hab
o 5'mall Mammal F'::hab
o -liqht Caqes
o Larqe LPird Rehab
o Qaptor Rehab
o Water ird Rehab
o 5mall tird Rehab
o 5ongq Trd Rehab


TI' Ip r I ii hi] 3hh :ck':.) I,? hi if .-~u~k: I ~.j


o ioing alonli with >rch's cr.ansion and new
development most of the animal c .-,losures
have been rebuilt within the past few Lears
o /,AI enclosures meet the caqe regulations for
the PWC and the fd.:rallN rcqul.ab;d WP
and the USPA
o The facility is sil-j,:ed to the harsh Florida
weatr ir atd has survived several hurricanes
and tropical storms
o Manq of the enclosures were designed with
srezific facades and backgrounds to help
create a narrative throulo i..l the site
o The proposed enclosures on the nature walk
will be open resem bling a -;.add::l at a zoo

Materials and Cot, n.i,.:tii
o The existing enclosures use pressure treated

o New enclosures will be constructed with
composite wood
o There are three main tripes of flooring used
throughout the -nt .closures: Concrete at.d wood
for the smaller cages and natural materials
such as pin.: bark for the larger Ocnr, caqes
o The bird enclosures use a travel sub-- rate
for their flooring
o The old enclosures use galvanizedd or .olld
wire while the newer ones have made a
switch to vinql coatd wire
o The roofs over the enclosures are made from
wod',, and go alonq with the design scheme
o Cpani encosures such as the black '.::ar and
rescued bald eagles meet the minimum height
requirements as well as having an electric
fence to keep other animals from qettinq in
o The larqe mammal rehab is a lonq corr-d]or of
'.,C':dIn caqes with a concrete base, the
bottom is Cr'Cl with a drainage trough running
the ',:;rgth of the enclosures for easu cleaning


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At .IM./.5 ON 51TE


water bird enclosure with deck tacade


Panthers
lack Pears
Bobcats
Foxes
Otters
Peer
Skunks
Racoons
Opossums


Water Btirds
Pirds of Preq
Sonq tBirds
Cranes andJ Turke4s
/Ill l.aters
Cr:c.d ]es
Snakes
furdes


o The snake house is a sealed and locked
room with the display caqes visible from a
covered porch
o ,"il the enclosures are designed with a lock
out or double entry system to ensure there
is not unwanted exposure between a keeper
and the animal
o Manq of the enclosures use smaller qaqe
wire on the side closest to the public to
prevent people from giving the anima s food
and truinq to pet them
o Although the enclosures appeal to the eqe
and go alonq with the design theme, the
animals comfort and safetN is the first
priority) and all cages satisfy their needs


CONCUSSION

tBUSCH WVlI PL1 SANCTUJAIY HAS ,AN
INCV~rItLE VISION Al ir' Srt CIt',.FACT-,h
PROM THE MOMENT YOU \'LK i1. L PEUES
AS IP YOU A IN A SPECIK. PLACE. rl-IlOUH
T1HI51 5A. THE PO Si.r Or" CTr.A11il A
VW~L M.\YLOPEP PES', I THEM ANP
LAN4UA6E., Y 'MPLEM1 il M : THE FPOPPFR
VOCABULARY, YOU HAVE TO CPPrCPJI lirY
tO CREATi A \ER'FY UNIQUE SI rrI CI,',.FPACTf .
5ENSE OF PLACE, ANP TELL A 5fCY, -'OM
TH1IR Y'.,iKVAY 5I6NS TO THEIR
ENCLOSURES. THEY NB\ER 51TAY PROM THE
VI5ION i1-.r IVES flE 51rE SUCH A f.:[/-F
COHSIVENESS. THE ATTENTION TO 9E7 IL
ANP OVERALL 'M E CfD BUSCH WILPLlr'
54 ICTUR',Y 5 WHAT Ml.f:5 THE IKTERNCf
tEfMTEEN CREAfING A 600P PROJECT
ANP A tiREAf PROJECT.


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GOWLS 1ID ODJECTIVES


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5L.5-91I II.Y

* Preserve the Existing r ite
o ,-.oiJ:d harming or removing c.ii.irLj vegetation Ahi.;iI::r o,-I.:
o Petermine what is functional and beneficial to the site ao.lJ what i.:,:ds to be removed
0 '.A l.'i removing unui-lttal.: structures from Ei,?, recycle as manq materials as -;5ct: l-I

* Pesi,] a'd Constri'.: aisi
o Util ize sustainable constrt..:i, methods to cr-lure low impact .i the site
o Pesi,;igi for water runoff ard storm water ,'.ll:',, Itn
o Develop strategies for enerqq effci.e:,, recqcl ing, a\d waste mari.3;'m.::nt
"o i.ht 3\.anK riqgt -;l.3.:. des i,]l method
o Use sustainr.- materials such as composite .cord and pervious concrete in place of
tra.itikrial materials


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BUA.EPU7







ENHANCE UI5P EXPPRIFNCE


* esigqninq for the Animals
o Enclosures must meet the requirements set forth bq the LUS5A and FWC
o The animals' needs for safety and comfort are top priority
o Enclosures need to be able to house various species
o Appropriate placement of animals throughout the site

* Pesigqninq for Humans
o Create effective circulation for visitors, staff, and vehicles
o Provide facilities and amenities necessary for human comfort
o Create areas of interest and opportunity
o fell a storq throughout the site
o Allow for positive visual interaction with the animals
o Create experiences to evoke different aspects of the snes
o Use appropriate scale to make the site feel intimate but not overcrowded

* Pesigning for the Communitq
o Create a cultural connection to the surrounding areas
o Create an experience that establishes Everqlades Outpost as a d-'.:.in i ,n
o Maintain the site's identity through the area's history and culture


EPUCA11ON

* Provide facilities that promote education
* Use interpretation of natural ecoloqq throughout site to promote awarene-ss for ..:al
and international environmental issues
* Opportunities for interactive educational programs
* Educate through signage and other interactive means


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USER rHmALTSIS


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iU P /-1 l .1i O"F. r,'IEW

There are three main user grt.|', animals, 'i trs, and staff; each with a different level
of importance, The animals take pre:cd.:n .: over visitors and staff, It is for the animals
that this prj.,::. exits, t fir 'lc,:i must be met first in order for the -;roject to be
successfully Of the two human .:.r qra.ps, visitors and staff, each %resent different
:ds .vil i the ',.-itrs being of more importance than the staff, The goal ofany utiness
is to attract customers and bring in revenue; the project must be appeal ing ard generate
interest throughout the venue, That is not to sa5 the staff are of I1L.ll. importance, far
from it is their job to ,nli.,ure the comfort and safetqL of both the animals anld visitors,
Their lecd.; must be met in order to cisure a successful project


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HM&TH < WELFARE


PrYSICALNT r iAL
sonrmuL op


'PRO ATE


ANILM ANALY515 OVEVIEW
The IllJthd and welfare of the animals at Fverqlades Outpost is the highest pr,'it, to
keep in mind when redesigning the site, As stated, this prcj- .: exists for the animals it
houses, It is of the utmost importance to keep them safe and happy, /'idj from t. ic
obvious basic needs such as food, water, and a:..d.' space; each and ever animal
needs an outlet for mental and physical stimulation, This can take shape in varis- forms
of enrichment items such as loqs or plastic balls as A.,ll as interaction with visitors and
staff, Each enclosure will meet and surpass the minimum requirements set forth b it
United states Department of Agriculture ( U5PA) and the Florida Fish and 'vVidllhfe.
Conservation Commission ( FWC) and will be appropriately designed for the animals til ci
will potential l house,


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I


or F4ciLT ES 0





A UHrV-uAP NC-
Al THE- STfl


CFORMT


w IMrESSION
4 GlCTI^f


6ISFMTICN


25
wWL0 ^^ Mi^1.i. ^^aA." ,.^


V ICP ANAL&Y-3 0.. L rVIUW

It is impossible to recreate the animals'
natural I.3k- [,t esp.::ia|ll in a project of
this size. As lonq as the animals' basic
":lds are met and theN are prcided
with an outlet for their ::r.\'rqqg, ie\.1 are
a.pp,. It is the visitors' perc.ptio, of
the site and enclosures that creates a
s,,r: of animal wellness, Their
-;,:rc.::;p ii of the site starts from l Jia
theq first walk ni, One of the stated
oj,:tii.:: of this project is to t.::II a storq
anr, prc id,: an opportunity to educate
v,,'iris and afford them the .pportunittI
to interact with the wildlife in a
comfortable safe setting The
interaction arnd part i: r:tion with the
animals is what creates a bond '"tI.v:
the visitors and the project anrd keeps
them rrtxested, I[ is the hope that
theq will, "fall in love" with the venue or
at the ver4 least, one of the animals and
want to ,r out, rin.",air.. that the4 can
make a difference for a specific animal
and h:Irl to impact its sr.:ies' survival
leaves the visitor with a sense of
sa.i,- faction which will make them
stakd id.:: :rs in the project r .iurinq its
future success.


NTRACTO






Pfl.V T\i C tM



















ACCEAST
ACCESS


^JCwtrtNT


\suPe


5f1P ANALY515 OVEIV EW
The job off the staff is to maintain the project and insure the animals and viit.rs are
comfortable and safe, However, to adequately do their job, the staff have ,'cd and
requirements that must be met, All of these requirements such as accessVl--ill
throughout the site, interaction with visitors and animals, having a place to relax and
break are of equal importance. T111e staff needs to be comfortable and qiven the roper
tools to do their job effectively, Not limiting the essentials required bq the staff will
guarantee the project is run to its fullest potential and providing for the comfort and
safety of both the animals and visitors,.


J


.M ENARC E


FWP







C. Pf E WI V'l.LPrl CL/--t ICATION5
Plorida Fish & Wildlife Conservatri i Commi-sion 6QA-6,004, 'tKm 6 C I

Class I Wildlife
Class I w idlfe are tili..:, that 'mose a significant danger to -;erI.:. 5uitantial e'.r l:.e and
sr-;. :ific cage requirements must be metPermits are required for ,:-u.lii. e iik-itiin or sale of Class
I wildlife, Anqone who possesses Class I vidlife must guarantee fi-aicial respon-.ilit,.1, Class I
w Idlife is ,:5:'rr i ilk d ; from -.,;rsonal possession ui.nl.:-s the animal was possessed on or before
Auqust I, 1980; or on or before 'aust 27, 2009 for cougars, panthers or cheetahs,

Fxistinq Class I wildlhf,:'. Tigers, Florida Panthers, Crocodiles, Sears, Vcoma.s reptiless

Class II W Idl
Class I wi dlife can also pose a dai ;r to people. substantial exper.:i.: and sr.:;ific cage
requirements must be met. Prrnmits are required for ;.ri:i e..llitii, sale or -;:rsonal possession
of Class II Aidlife,

xi-tinq Class II w dlJfe: ..lapanese Maa:.ac...:s, Zebra, Alliqators, fimberwolves, Pison

Class III Wildlhfe
A ,:',:rmit is required for personal possession, ..r..hiliti.i or sale of Class III wildlife, Class III
w dliFe are all speci.s not lifd as Class I or Class I; and not among those sr. ies that are
sr.;ificall lis.fted as not requiring a -rrnt. for ,.rsonal possession in rule 65A-6.0022, FAC.
There is no formal ist of Class III speiss, You must cl.k the lists of Class Cass II, and
sr:.lies not requiring a ,ermit to dtc'rmine if an animal in :.i.;-stion is a Class III species, Florida
residents 16 ears of aqe and older mat ap.rrl for p.:rmit to t.wss, *.. l,-it or sl Class III
w dl ie,

xistinq Class III wildlife: Opossums, Armadills Strown Lemur, Capu:hin MAr ..i .
Ostriches, Northern Tam.andi., 5ulcata Tortoises, Camel

flame birdss
Muscovq Pucks, Chinese deese, White fleese

Wildlife not Cla&sif ,.e aid not ,e.q.iirinq a Permit
Scarlet Macaws, 71ie and YcII'k-x Macaws, Red and Y.-ll'?.A' Macaws, White Cockatoos, Salmon
Crested Cockatoos, Amazon Parrot, Pomestic Piqs, frai Iquanas, Ramilts, Ponkeqs, Miniature
Ponies, t-d Foo Ti -r:,t, [I ox Turtles, Prairie P[oq


25
wWL0 S^ Mi^1.i.^^aA" ,S ^M






THE FOLLOWING AURE UENEP RUULE5 FPO THE 5fAN A P CA61N1 FEOUIRI.iLi 15 CPR
CAP11VE WILtLIPE A 5 FPORTHfl Y THFE WC, POF ACH At ,,IL.'L 6CUP THE Lr ',I.,,
MEEN COMPILED r0 Mf,.LL THE NEU5 OP THE GROUP, NOf 5PECFIrC Alt lhL5, TO (0 l I
FURTHER INFORMATION PLUEAE rPER TO THE FWC 5174 IPARP CAE FLOQUIREfil if5 PCR
CAPI1VU WILtLIFP,

Primates
/-II enclosures will meet original floor space and enclosure fencing requirements per spe i,::s, In
addition, each enclosure will have an access 4-,I7 device to provide physical st imulation or
manipulation compatible with the species., ach enclosure will be equipped with perching areas
and nest boxes that will accommodate all animal in the enclosure simultai.z..i-l., Each enclosure
will have climbing apparatuses,

L-arqe Carnivores
Al enclosures will meet original floor space and enclosure fencing requirements per spe,-i, In ad-
dition, each enclosure will have an access -I,-L device to provide phqsi,.-l st imulation or manipr;Jl.at,:,i
o.i[.- i-I, with the species. Such devices shall be non-injurious, and mq include but are not lim-
ited to boxes, -all-, bones, barrels, drums, rawhid,.j, pods, etc, Each enclosure shall have el-
evated platforms that shall accommodate all animals in the enclosure simultaneously, Each :a.,:
shall have a claw loq, unless the animals front claws have been removed, 'vvtlrl required the ,i"r-
closure shall have a pod that meets the minimum floor space,

mall Mammals
/11I enclosures will meet original floor space and enclosure fencing requirements per spe,.i,::s, In ad-
dition, each enclosure will have an access 5I lc device to provide physical stimulation or manip 1i.ait:'n
compatible with the species. Such devices shall be -i. iri-jurious, and mu include but are not lim-
ited to boxes, b'Lk, mirrors, climbing apparatuses, foracinq items, chewiiq i.1ms etc, Each en-
closure will have perching areas and nest boxes that will accommodate all animals in the enclosure,
When required, each enclosure will be equipped A ith an environment or devices that allows for
temperature regulation necessary to ensure the w,.ll -being of the srF,, s, For animals that re-
quire diqqing, enclosures will be deep enough to provide for digging

Crazing Animals
/11I enclosures will meet original floor space and enclosure fencing requirements per speci,::

Snakes, Lizards, a turtles
Each enclosure will provide and an environment or device that allow for temperature regulation nec-
essaru to ensure the well-beinq of the species., ach enclosure A ill provide a non-injurious
substrate, Arboreal species d :oll be provided ,,idtli a perch of sufficient height to allow for suc6A


J







src:^imen to ; ,rch or bask ..v. ilotA anq portion of its bodq or tall touching the floor, sides, or roof
on the enclosure, 'Ali (:' required the enclosure will have a -:;l meeting the minimum floor space
requirements,

Cro,: .:dilians
The enclosure wAlil be of sufficient size to -,:rmt. moving and turning both on a drq area and in a
pod of water, the water beinq of sufficient dpIl to -:-rmit. submersion,

irds
Por -t,:rchinq '--irds the enclosure will -rovide sufficient space to -:.:rmt'. ,rching without the tail
f.ra.l 'rs touching the floor and -:rovide for .a:.3d Je.arance with normal posturing, with a minimum
cage ,imi.., to allow full e. nr-ion of both wins, These measurements will be based on the
largest '"ird in the enclosure, For waterfowl each enclosure will meet original floor space and
water area -",:r sr..T i5s,


27






MANIPi5f OF AJ IIM' S
EVER6LAP5E OUTRPOS
January 16, 2011

QOuat it,{ Species ( Common t .3rm)
4 Muscovq 1. IS,5
2 fiqers
2 Opossums
2 Arm ill.3ll ( 'I 1,; ,-ianlded)
I ltrown femur
I Capuchin Monkeq
2 scarlet Macaws
I Plue and Yellow Macaws
5 Red and Yellow Macaws
2 li,? Cockatoos ( Umbr:.ll. Cockatoos)
2 Salmon-crested Cockatoos
5 Amazons Parrot
5 Japanese !Aisjii.:us
2 o lm.t. l Piqs
2 Ostriches
4 Cli i,_se 3 eese
5 White Ceese
2 Florida Panthers
5 Green Iquanas

I Northern famandua (anteater)
I Zebra
I Camel ( Promedarq)
2 Ponkebs
2 Miniature Ponies
2 Crocodiles (Nile)
4 Aliqators
2 'r 'l^ ,bl:r ,*i l's
8 5ulcata tortoise
4 Red Foot furtles
6 Box turtles
2 t.,1rs
I Pison
I Snakes and Lizards A


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FROGQonH ELEHMTS


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I, Al 11.A BN 'I 11 [lA.Nf5
o Larqe Carnivores
o frazers
o mall Mammals
o 5mall Primates
o Crocodilians
o 5'n.k:,s and Lizards
o Pirds


o :. ibiir.na %esid,::, I (owner)
o KYistirnq K'sidn:r.:: 2 (director of operations)
o d:,i .iKti,: : s i ,::,; 53 ( d-irector of mairt iali,:e)
o jirm.al Kitchen (,::d storage, walk-in freezer, food -;rep)
o Haq Btarn rainss and drq foods)
o Program Shelter
o !A.,l ::al (mcd.: 3..l surr7lic*s, m di:i..5:1s, first aid, firearms)
o Informarn...il (admissions, qifts, cold concessions)
o Maintenance ( c.luir~ment., vehicle storage)
o Hot Hou Hse ('.,::nm i.is rr.Al:.s)
o ,5?strooms
o 5taff I c,.;I,:

$, MEMCPli,

4+ GFLEZOM1
o Picnic area
o 3eatinq areas
o Inforrn.m.ini displays

5 5,FUSE ANP WR CYCLING

6. VPCf5 M \AM / iBf

7. COI"POSI A.11 PI:\r

8, WAWTP F TMN:I i.Ar ,..IAAEMNT

9. 5\USri\ PLEP MATERIAL


T.^MOI I, I .^. ". ,"'.. I .." 1






IO. PAJRKIN
II NTIRY
12, CIRCULATION
o Vehicular
o Service / 5taff
o Visitor


U
r=1 Bw I
EC9 ;I
II aI// 1a/ I ,^-* TItt-R U ) ^A T SW~~


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SITE INVETORT HID H1ALTSIS

Everqlades Outpost, located approximately two miles north of the main
entrance to Everclades National Park in Homestead Florida occupies
approximately three acres of a seven acre site, The existing veqetati,
on site was introduced with the exception of some larqe hPcus trees, The
surrounding land use is mainly agricultural with some low Jdjnitb residential,
The site was once part of the Freshwater Marl Prairie ecosystem which is
prevalent in the nearby area, The site is subject to harsh and frequent
chanqinq weather condition dominated bq sunshine and thunderstorms, The
area has also experienced devastating storms such as Hurricane ,Andrew
and Hurricane Wilma, The climate is hot and humid for most. of the qear,
Even in the winter months, it is not uncommon for the temperature to reach
the mid to hich 80's,


J







LAMP US~ ANP ZONIN6 CONCtXf


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v~//
--WIN


aO


ADOPTED 2015 AND 2025 LAND USE PLAN
FOR MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
ESTATE DENSITY (EDR) 1-2.5 DUIAC
%//////, ESTATE DENSITY Wl ONE DENSITY INCREASE (DO-1)
LOW DENSITY (LDR) 2.54 DUIAC
LOW DENSITY WI ONE DENSITY INCREASE (DI-1)
LOW-MEDIUM DENSITY (LMDR) 6-13 DUIAC
'////// LOW-MEDIUM DENSITY WI ONE DENSITY INCREASE (D0-1)
INDUSTRIAL AND OFFICE
S BUSINESS AND OFFICE
S INSTITUTIONS UTILITIES, AND COMMUNICATIONS
S AGRICULTURE
S ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
ENVIRONMENTALLY PROTECTED PARKS
* O0 EXISTING RAPID TRANSIT I FUTURE RAPID TRANSIT
*llemM 2015 URBAN DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARY


J


* Everqades Outpost is currentik zoned for APriculture







VOPOkA'WHY CONWXT


The overall topoqraphq of the site has a consistent elevation of 6 feet, There is one excavated area on
the site that will be used as a water feature, In addition there is one natural depression of approximately
two feet in qrade change, Finallq, although not part of the site, on the southern property line is a three
foot manmade berm that separates the site from an agricultural field,


501L CONTEXT


Name: Krome Vert (ravelt Loam
Prainaqe: Moderatelq well drained
Usaqe: Farmland of unique importance


Name: Card 5ound 5ilti Claq Loam-Rock Outcrop Complex
Prainaqe: Well drained
Usaqe: Not prime farmland


-Ranqinq from one to three feet under the soil is a bedrock known as Miami Oolite or Miami Limestone,
This bedrock is verq permeable and drains quite rap dlkq into the watershed,

57


0 200
100 A


00 200
100






EXI( ii. 511 CONrI"ONS
EverAlades O. trst is located on a 7.1 acre site with the facility occupqinq approximately 2.5 acres. Once part of the Freshwater
Marl Prairie ecosystem which is prevalent in the nearby area, the site has been altered to accommodate for agriculture, All of the
existing ..get.tir has been introduced, Much of it consists of native species the majority of which are Sabal Palm, Mahoganq and
Kumbo 1imbo. All of the existing '.. l:t.Ati with the exception of several large Picus trees that provide excellent canopy can be easily
r to.d throughout the site. The ants that survive best here are suited for tropical and subtropical weather as the location of
the site falls into hardiness zone Ob. The we .atlher that occurs here is frequently cnanginq and is dominated bq sunshine and
thunderstorms, The area has also experienced its share of devastating storms such as Hurricanes Andrew and Wilma, The climate
is hot and humid for most of the qear; even in winter, it is not uncommon for the temperature to reach the mid to hiqh 80's,





.-m W


Parking


Access Koad


J


Lanopq and enclosures


Main ntrtr

















SITE STHTESIS


59
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(MCU' of AF T -C PROV1O- 2 eLFFFe. PO-
r fV<> hi. 4. Co C. S



o^Vap UOOyW To -T--* *
R. &, S fALL [E I&." Wq l t SI -L.1 ESo -R 1E ~
SI Po ,." '.L A A, MOH .-PEL.ANt.-E,A" MATL p 'RDVI/,'E NATFF-L.
LA I RE.L CAVEZ cz EEtICR s- !;


LtypoaUbflfl I I




(R) >rPOgMAiT AVACAODX &ROV'E SE*,M
MI Wt-e nhuno tx a,,



am OPPMTEIP.Tc 'T" FOFM E..XpPN ON | | -




ITIL.I.E.. E-XIS"i t P..E.R

FR&. AfeR.Jt, .-TURAG,.. _4PFF--S
-ToMEA A4tLACRDeh





To EvtR.A.A- 3


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COCEFT rLmH


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PIVELOP2P CONCEPT


I~d' ~.I
n~*4 *4,
*4 JA *4
-'--N ~
~- A.~j


FINAL. CCr I:.P


* ~ 4 e _____________ ___________
anwttwrL t~
l0ttt ~v*At4LL. 'flS'"4& wru>~t. a


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flMSTERFLAHf


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IRNCE
'1 : I- ? I C
R PFUSE & CYCblI'I

HI"


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v I lTor, F' I N 1


S6rr: HOI -


5APP ( ONF
KITCHEN .Y IWJ


'" -
i --- ----
- - -


,
-4"-... (, l'


lD
o n


EiHKL N


C -I p/A ON


25' 5(


, 100'
O'I


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1Pkl. i LIl-


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RP -.11 u -
I IlI-", .' ENP KIOO, -
& T F/1Hi Ii. PrOPrfm bLI: 25


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~NI~AN(L ~IHYK1~ K~lkjELl


vp It qp IRV
V9
mow-


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25' 50' I00'


IMAMMALE
- rtU5


--- ---I ....


UQ*
I .. -L-......-......-

-- -l--- _i !." --
- z"........_j_.WE. ....... _
L- - --_- -


29'


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DESIQI DETAILS &
CHARACTER SKETCHES


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!,, I l BNT Y I P : Ir i[


- -


S2 o' O 100
FAAa$5 md M JA dsM A. msM'A~d ms M~46M iw M A JsM i.Ai J






























The parking area serves three functions: Cistern Petail
I, As a visitor parking area
2. As a delivers area which I have separated from the visitor parking area, This area
ties into the Residential, 5taff & Service area &
5, As an area that accommodates bus parking,

fo minimize storm water runoff and take advantage of the site's predominant quickly draining soil
tipe, Krome Verq fravelq Loam, I have recommended permeable & sustainable surfaces for the
parking areas as well as for the pathways and roads throughout the entire site,

fake note of the cistern for the collection and reuse of roof top storm water runoff which I have
recommended to be implemented throughout the project, I have also implemented a compost
area and garden, This is onlq for the compost of organic material and the fecal material from
herbivores, The composting of fecal material from carnivores requires special c,..iirmint. ad
procedures which are not cost effective for a facility of this size, That waste will be c.:oll:cted
and removed separately, Finall, I've rc..:ommnd,,d the use of recycled or composite ....
materials in the construction of new buildings and structures whenever -;c:slc, ,






S.51NTIAL, 517 ,r, g RVI.lE /-FA


~A ^
/7^
\t


Cart path *|U ii buffer and perimeter fence


I have mairtaicd, the ':,oAtio of the three existing
residaies, Aso bq sh.diqir, the rcltiolslhip of
uses, I have :r.-porated into this area the 5taff
Lounqe, the Kitcl'ic & Hal barn ,?ui' d and the
...:di al & Ouaranbine l. din;

fo maintain privacy and seqreqation from the -;uhli.;
areas, the residential area is secured with a fence
and buffered with heavl planting as detailed in this
section, In order to allow connection to the rest of
the site I have created cart paths for accessibilitH
at certain control points,


Lizisting I
.3516 (KiLO


F'.l J4..K 'a~ .' .>,r.. f f .


r 2' BO' 100
Ai".^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


F4!






PAROf BPAY


Parrot ,1.1. 5 that area of rverqlades Outpost where the
\l- itr experience .iii, and ,:4. once you're out of qour car
or off the bus and through the etrq building,

The area was desit.:..i to be trulq rruili ;imi.:-.lrnl.:nal incorpo-
rating:
I. The "Animal of the [2aq" Exhibit expand on
2. A gathering/ meeting area expand on
5, A picnic area & expand on
4, PisplaI enclosures for Birds and Monkeqs


Existing Parrot Fnclosures


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PAZI I ki rPAPOCK NCLOSLPLR


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ILI

o S=I= ___ io
Enclosure %..tir'ri 5licwiri Lockout LVetsai


No matter the series, the theory behind the
-losure is basical l the same, safety for the
animal and the caretakerAchievinq the balance of
what is appropriate for the animal and what is
pertcLi','vd ar.'prriate anid humane b4 the visitor
has and will corninue to be the biggest clhallai]
in the design of these facilities,


(razinq Padd.::i, Petai


10' 2- 50o


- -A
27' 50' 100'


B' 10'


20'


'Z -
,, ,---'


1 I


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!






MEMORIAL


/ Proposed Memorial 5c .


The owner had becun coti.druction of a memorial to his
daughter -Aiiit.. a real plan, but was adamant about
the location, His idea had been to excavate an area
for the memorial and he had nd.;d bequn some of that
work, ML idea was to take advantage of the work
already done and incorporate a contemplative and
tranquil water feature to honor his daughter,








hMcrricrial N low -r[;


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2' WO 100'







T1AILHA g ,'lFPWOOP HAMMOCK


Hardwook Hammock section


Propros.;J 1 F.3i~ ic.i~J


I have proposedd the removal of the dormant Avocado
qrove and the es--l ilihmar of a Tropical Hard.,cd
Hammock ., iUli an irt.rrretive trail traillI:.3d This
presents a JnIt.3u, crr titY that algin.; itself with
the siit:. of the Everglades Out.post PAisvion
statement to rL:0 l u. -i- t1. A Il i ife and l i::ir- I' lal-ii,
through education and awareness,


L < r t i.; r- .T .3 t1 *'' ,. $:'''; -*r '."


wk&,UA 2 Al"A&W74,j&"I























- >' 1-e


Lxistinqg nake House


T] i. ii'c_:k,: \\\.u -: \ C H .i i nt. ',r. :urJrJ I .ri 'll.-"
it ..i r Ci, i rt fl i. l .i'.. I .l iCKi .J I.-. .3 d
non-'.,::x.T ,s rcr{5..,I It is purposely 'o:.:.-t d
next to the Program shelter as both of t ':se
major elements are syiicristqic in iliir draw, The
Aiak.2. House can act as a waiti.;/ ati ..ti.i area
prior to present.t.i,.r,' in the Pro,.ram 5l ,,::l r,
Addlitionallq, manq of the events that take place
in the Proqram Sh.lti-r ndvi. the use of snakes
and the close ;ri, mit.. of fIlI:e two elements
would minimize the moving of these animals










I- r .?-- flJ. -

-~Ua)


- -.o .,


60







rv'O6~kAM 5HE~VWi~'


Prc 'rrd Froqram shelter


Sxistingq Proram aIlI r


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_ii




While the entire project reinforces the mission of rescue, reh.il- I1t.on, and r.t:lo.:.i.i'o the pro-
qram shelter is the most important venue in the project in terms of terms of ..raHllq communi-...-.i.q
that message,
111e placement of this major element was crit i. it to me in mq conceptual plan process as it. r.:.3all
helped me to organize the entire site, All at once, the program shelter became the focal -;oin.,
anchor, terminus and a pivot point that I was looking for, I wanted to create an extra "wow"
factor for this element, so I established the actor r Pit" as its front porch,
Mq idea for the space is that much like "Parrot Baq", it is verq vert.il.c and in addit:;i. n to being
used for educational purposes, it could be used just as easily for par.i, fund raisers a,,d enter-
tainment,
In all of mq public structures I wanted to advocate an architectural stqle that one would ..t. bq
crossing the vernacular of Cracker, Camp & National Park that together told a storq a'd con-
veqed a feeling of comfort, and familiariNt while encouraqinq inter:. t.i., i and promoting cdJu,.tic'rn,


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11HAGmEllHT RECOMELHDrhTIOH5


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5.J-taiitiabHe design with regards to Everqlades O.tprst ,ri.l..;s mprovinq the e.istirn site to
increase energy effi.'.:.,, reduce the amount of waste leaving the site, use materials that are
ornq lasting a .nd coil,..a:* i.al li fr, ::-dl, desiq ...,iti the surr.in,.di.;r nature and culture in mind,
fai.:lita.3te for user education, and preserve a Ihalthi atmosphere for the animals, all while
maintaining an already successf-Fil project so that these improvements are economically ani.
realistcall, fic.3 -1,:, /' 11these elements come t'i,;th.:l- to ..elp form a more spe: .'-f: defiriton for
s. %Ltaiiale design,

With regards to Everqlades Ot.rpost there are several qoals arnd o tives that can be set up
to meet and support sustainable design, The following are specific qoals to improve susta,,.al-,it,.
on the existing site; Collect and use rainwater throughout the site, reuse animal waste rihsdead
of moving it offsite, and use sustain. ti.. and environmentally frieindl materials, 5p;.::ific qoals ike
these help to set up an approach to d,.alirn with sustainable d.: ,lopm,., Now that there are
spr.ific qoals we want to obtain for our site, it is necessary to elaborate and create okistives
to meet each qoal,

The a.. ailal-i lt4 of fresh water is the most 'mportant element to running a successful rrcpration at
Everqlades Outpost, Water is used in a variety of waqs on the site, its major uses ranqe from
an important aspect of certain animal enclosures, its use for cleaning animal cages ad .s, ilis,
drinking water for animals, irr;.ation for the site's 'aridscape, and its use in huildinqs for toilettes
and sinks, ,- Ina that fresh water is a I rri i td resource it is verq importantt that we use it as
efficiendtq as po-ilbl,:: All the water r'l ite is coming in from citN -;ipelin.::-5 atlid is not onlL costing
mor117. but dJpl cinq water resources which in 5outh Florida, are verq important A plan to
implement a rainwater 'oIlztion a nd storage system through a series of oldin.;1 tanks from roof
or;s w~ll Id11 to improve water eff'".i:il. thro;l i'.t the site, Purthermore to prevent storm
water runoff it is -.:,'.,mrn;rnded to exclusively use -;,rmeale materials for all parking areas,
pathways aind roads, /11 the animal enclosures and i". lldinrI..s should have roofs that can be used
to capture and c.j uarn,: I rainwater into a cll ,':.:kion sIstem, This maq take some alterations to the
ei-ti ig structures through the ins-.allatior of a butter system but wulid sigrificartlq help to
reduce the amount of storm water runoff on the site as well as providing the site with its own
water reducing the d.,pr;ri.,:.: of citr water, Other re.',mrn.::,d.t.iis to reduce water use would
be to use a closed filtration system in enclosures requiring water so as to not cor, airtlI.i be
rcpla':ing water, and drip systems for irri,..atio to reduce the water loss to .7',,.rporation,

When qou house lots of animals, qou have to deal with lots of animal feces, As of now, Everqlades
Outpost has no program to reuse its manure; it is collected in a se..a.;e system and moved off-
site, f ,is would be a qreat ortp:rh.iitrL to create a compost program to make fertilizer to dis-
trbi.bu: around the site,, This would not onlq cause a reduction in the cost of bukinq fertilizer, but
also reduce the cost for moving sewage off its,

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A more qroundbreakinq approach to reusinq animal wastes recently introduced iv the -a1-ilitil to
convert animal feces into usable enerqq known as bioqasc tic.i_, is produced bq\ the biol.;i:al
breakdown of organic matter such as manure, without the presence of oxqgen this qas is ti:n
turned into bio fuel, The downfall to this is that the tiay..- plant *..c.d; to create the fuel is
verq ec'oi-i, ... and would probably not be feasible for this proji. 1, tpe, However, it is
something to keep in mind and with the improvement in tecli,, dI.'' moving al i,:.a as fast as
theq are; it is something not to be overlooked,

The use of lonq lasting and sustainable materials can be verq beneficial for tl ii project in an
economic and environmentally waq, There are manq approaches to this and i.l q come in all
forms, Simple things that can be easily do,;,' are to use LI lights and putting electronics
such as computers and Iiqhts on a shutdown and s,:m,r timers so that t.l i,. are not left on
while people are not usinq them, More complex projects would be to improve in.uli.,i.k- in
buildings and use air conditioning systems that use less enerqq, For example, rt-: ,lis n.:d to
be in a c, i-tentL' temperature regulated environment, either beinq too hot or too cold is a
problem, The small reptile enclosures such as the snakes and 1izards are kept in a shed that
constantly needs to have air ca di0,ic iii.; or heat cqclinq to maintain a steady temperature,
Other things such as the use of composite wood for building animal str. :.ares, the use of
melaleuca or pine needle mulch for pathways, and pervious pavement for the parking lot all
have a more positive impact on the environment, are easq to do, and don't cost extravagant
amounts,

After the objectives have been put into practice it is important to re'i-ii. them to see if theq
did in fact meet the intended qoals, In regards to water rc, Lind.ni,, storm water runoff c.3a
be calculated with products such as the Marsh Multi-Maq flow meter, To see the
improvements in storm water management, calculations can be made before and after the
suggested improvements were implemented and then compared, From an economic s'.adr;oint.,
all one has to do is compare a water bill from before the improvements were made to after
the improvements were completed, There are two qood waqs to assess the progress *'naid
from the reuse of animal waste, measure the amounts of animal waste moved offsite before
and after, and from an economical standpoint, Ailmal waste is stored and t. ,.i moved off
site so it would be easq to calculate the reduction of animal waste in a qiven time,
Fconomicaliq qou can look at the amount of moneq beinq saved bq creating ..n.r own fertilizer
and the cost reduction in shipping off animal waste, The use of sustainable materials is a qoal
in itself and is harder to determine how much of the qoal is met, The best waq to approach
this is to ask the question "did the project use materials that are low impact on the earth,
lonq lasting, and safe for users?" If the answer is qes then it. can be said the qoal has '.-:i
met, It is important to remember that the qoals and objectives have to be reasonable and
capable of being executed, A qreat idea remains a qreat :,: if nobody is willing or able to
put it into action, The intent here is to recommend i,:,.. for sustainable development
that will lead to a successful and fea ItI project.


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Everqlades Outpost puts a huqe emphasis 5c educating its users about the ecological issues
surraundnq S5outh Florida and '..:rqlades National Park, whq should it step there? The project
site can be a qreat outlet to teach people through example how to be more sustainable in
everqdaq life, This important message of sustainabilitt can and should be reinforced in the shows
and tours :.ir oCu site bh illustrating the materials, systems, and 'arndcape materials used in
sustainable design with the overall qoal of creating a lasting c:ccl:gi.call.\ resfi-il'le project,

TROPicL. I- IVPWOOP HAMMOCK H5TAtLiHMENT

The eastern half of this site, the dormant ,: .-do qrove, presents a jniu rc;errei i.\t, that
aliens itself with the s::irit. of the Ever;lad,::s Cut ost Mission Statement to r.hIt-I.ilite wildlife
and their 'aiat iia through eiu,:'atlci and awareness, That .rrortiniiti.t lies in the establishment of
a Tropical Hardwood Hammock most of which have i.cei lost to &'.:.lrnpmt. but still occasionally
can be found in 5outh Plorida, This A.rtkl'-itliie eid.:.,ar, especially in its formative states, will
require a c',:.idrable amount of time and J,:.di,.ti'i,

A hardwood hammock is a ne stand of broad-leafed trees that grow Cu a natural rise of onl a
few in :.hes in elev.tiAi ? :au of their sl ight ..:l.at i- i, these hammocks rarely flood, Acids from
decaqinq latss di:- olve the Iimestone," around each tree island, creating a natural moat that
protects the hammock plants from fire, SIl .aed from the sun bq the tall trees, ferns and air
dlaits thrive in the moisture-'.ad.; air of these hammocks,

The dar.e shade created bq a mature hammock regulates the temperature n id,., .:pi g, them
several degrees cooler during the summer months, and sheltering the hammock interior from winter
winds, -[ ,:. sparse unil.drstorL, ,:-et sl uade of the c-anopi anid permeating moisture of a
hammock al so heIrlrp to insulate it from fire, In ver4 drN -,:riods however, hammocks become more
vulnerable to w Id fire, and a major burn can ,'omrletl.J destroN a hammock,

representative e [ ilra:
The tallst trees in hardwood hammocks, including the wild tamarind ( bsiloma '.Ai-il:iqua) and
qumbo limbo ( %ursera simaruba), rarely grow more than 5O feet in heiqhbt due to cold weather,
lightning, and strong winds, Mature hammocks form : ae calories, shading the internal environ-
ment from strong sunlight and maintaining a 'ii,.l i level of humidity. Ferns and mosses thrive along
the around with i this environment while bromel..lads and Ocr:l-hids, qrow along the trunks and
branches of the 'amrno,:-:'. trees,

The midstorq of the hiamrnm,:' is o:,Ui,::d bq smaller trees of the same species occurring in the
ca5rpi, as .ll as some smaller tree species such as cin iamal bark (Canella winterana) and
white st.r;r,:r ( uqenia axillaris),


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Beneath the midstorq lies the understory which includes saplings of some ca3ior:; sp:ias as
well as shrubs such as wild coffee ( Psqchotria undata) and white rndi.;l-'cTrr ( RandJ
aculeata), Other veqetabion ttpes include woodq shrubs and vines with grou\ :o.ve.:r -'ini
verq limited due to the lack of sunlilqh reaching the ground,

The outer edqe of the hammock is denselq wooded with vegetation requiring hiqh levels of
sunlight, This thick growth along the edges of the hammock maintains hiqh humidity levels and
cooper temperatures inside the hammock,

Species qrowinq alonq the edqes of hammocks include:
Bahama strongbark ( Bourreria radula)
saw palmetto ( 5erenoa repens)
fire bush ( Hamelia patens)
sweet acacia ( Acacia farnesiana)
Poisonwood ( Metopium toxiferum)
seven-qear apple ( 6Cenipa clusiifolia)

Representative Fauna:
ReF[il.s and /\mIl 1,iA
qreen tree froq (Hula cinerea)
everqlades racer (Coluber constrictor paludicola)
eastern indigo snake ( Prqmarchon codris coupen)
qreen anole ( Anol is car inensis)
Florida ribbon snake ( Thamnophis sauntus sack. n)

1Birds
barred owl ( 5trix varia)
cardinal ( Card final is cardinal is)
red-bellied woodpecker ( Melanerpes carol inus)

Mammals
marsh rabbit ( 5qlvilaqus palustris)
raccoon ( Procqon lotor)
cotton mouse ( Peromqscus gossqpinus)
opossum ( Pidelphis virginiana)


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Everlades Outpost is a qoinq concern and a ,.:Il conceived phasing plan will be crrt-zal to 'mple-
menting the plan hl I1c, maintaining continuous or-.ration, The -lan ihas been divided into five
di-tir:t. phases: Phase I Main Almal Pisplaq & Enlrt or (, ntrq & Memorial)
Phase II Major Elements
Phase III residential & 5taff
Phase IV Parking
Phase V Hardwood I Hamrri.:, I.: Restoration

Phase I Main /nlrnral Pr7ral. & Entru or ( EntrI & Memorial)
Virtually all of this area with the ex..:.imi of a tt..tiiori of the grazing paddock is not in use and
can be -lu. Aliio .i disr. t :ion of the existing operations and .A'iilrirt rcl.:n.tiori\ of animals, Once
er.-un, this area will create a "W !" first impression of Everqlades OAr-st a,-nd establish the
'. iioni of what the entire prr;..;rbLy will evolve to over time,

Phase I Major Elements
This area currendq houses the m.a3j'rritr of the larger animals which will be relocated into Phase I
leaving this area the loqical next phase for development, T. is area isludes the three major
elements of the project, the 5nake House, the Proqram shelter, and the Cator PU The waq this
area is diA:-i L d, each of these elements can be c .lorped and CF..'r ,ned Id. rs.ually as resources
become available,

Phase II sidt i.al & 5aff
This area currentdq houses the 5nake House, Monkeys and tBirds, The monkeys and Birds would
be r.:lo .:td into Phase ,I. The 5nake House cannot realistically be ,elo:.t\;d until a new '. llirq
is constructed altl'i.),1]h some rniriimal tcmporarti dirpjl. solutions could be ii,:,.r'orated into the
entr '-u.ilolidq in Phase ,I. Once the new 5nake House is constructed in Phase II fill scale
r..pra.dir, of this area can t-,4in with the addition of the Staff Lounqe, !,.\-,:al ?,l.-ir,] Kitchen,
and Haq '7am.

Phase IV Parkinq
During imp'cmuirt.t ioti of the first three -hases the parking area in addition to beiiiq used for
parking,; will also be used as a constn.r:tiotn staqing & d.::,li',,qr area and thus it makes little or no
sense to be ru..,4,:: .d c. int:i the m.air it. of the work in the first three .hases is completed.

Phase V Hardwood Hammock 'estort.ioi
'A i.le an importantt as:t of the -roject it is also the most passive and will require the removal
of the remnants of a dormant avocado qrove before anq serious restora.io effort can be in, The
passive ,crtri kt en to the overall -roject, the significant labor involved in r.ncmring the qrove and7r;
the conid.rable time it will take for reestablishment of this ecosystem r.zl.:;.ate it to the final
phase of the project.


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WORKS SITED

I. "lVomass Enerqq: Manure for Fuel," State Energq Conservation Office ( SCO), Renewable Enerqq, the
Infinte Power of fexas. Web. 29 Feb. 2010,
,

2. 3usch Wildlife Sanctuarq. January 17, 2011.

5., ouglas, Chad, Pirector of Maintenance, Zoo Miami.

4, "Everqlades Manaqement." National Park Service. Web, 25 Feb. 2010.
< http:/ / www.nps.qov/ ever/ parkmqmt/ index,htm>.

S, "Everqlades National Park Ecosistems: Hardwood Hammock ( U.S. National Park Service) ," U5,
National Park Service Experience Your America. Web, Mar, 2011,
,

6. "Everqlades National Park ( Paqe 4) ." Web, Mar. 2011,
< http:/ / www,shannontech.com/ ParkVision/ Fverglades/ Everqlades4,html>,

7, Everqlades Outpost, Web, 29 Feb. 2010. < http:/ / www,evergladeoutpost,orq>,

8, "Florida Museum of Natural Historq Ichthqoloqq Pepartment." Florida Museum of Natural Historq, Web, Mar,
2011, ,

9. Freer, 13ob, Owner and Operator, Fverqlades Outpost, Personal Interviews

10. FWC Home, Web, Nov. 2010, .

II1 Hanson, Flizabeth, Animal Attractions: Nature on t1i-[,l ,. in American Zoos, Princeton, NJ: Princeton LIP,
2002, Print.

12. Harris, Charles W., Nicholas f, Pines, and Kqle P, P1Brown, fime-saver Standards for L-id-.: :ape Architecture:
Pesiqn and Construction Pata, New York: Mc(raw-Hilll, 998. Print.

15, Klqht, Am,j Animal Care Pirector, Pusch Wildlife Sanctuarq,. Personal Interview

14. Mahaffi, Michael, "Pefininq 5ustainabilitq." 'V.:.-4ing.i State Universitq, Web, 25 Feb. 2010,
,

1,. "Measure and Monitor Stormwater Punoff." Government Product News and governments Procurement, 27
Sept. 2007, Web. 29 Feb. 2010.


6., Miami trade Zoninq Map.

17, Oc-taon Wildlife Sanctuary, Januar 16, 2011


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Ia. "Flitr 1versi5 Pioloqq FRdir W Mar, 2011,
,

19, Pdakowski, Kenneth J, Zoo esigqn: the Realty of 'A'illl Iusiais, [Ann Arbor]: Universitq of Michigan, 5chod of
Natural Resources, 1987, Print,

20, 5chmtt, Corad., Curator of Mammals, Zoo Miami

21. freacq, Meqan, "Animal 'vV:te Could Power foronto Zoo." Eco 6eek, 17 Nov. 2008, Web, 25 Feb. 2010,
< http:/ /wwwecogqeek,orq>,

22, Uhler, John W, "6edogq," Everqlades National Park Information Page, Web, 25 Feb. 2010.
< http:/ / wwweverqlades.national-park,com/ Infohtm >,

25, Williams, Paiiel Edward, Sustainable P.=,, Ecoloqq, /r,:lhii-L.,:.re, and Planningq, Hoboken: Wileq, 2007,
Print,


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