Welcome to the Riverwalk District on the north fork of the St. Lucie River

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Title:
Welcome to the Riverwalk District on the north fork of the St. Lucie River
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Sugg, Daniel McRae
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00004171:00001


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WELCOME TO THE

RIVERWALK DISTRICT
ON THE NORTH FORK OF THE ST. LUCIE RIVER
A LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE THESIS BY DANIEL MCRAE SUGG

















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT

















THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND PLANNING
DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


THE RIVERWALK DISTRICT


A LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE THESIS BY DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


FACULTY ADVISOR: LES LINSCOTT

APRIL 2011

















REVIEWED AND ACCEPTED BY THE FACULTY AS AN HONORS THESIS


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG

















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT













DEDICATION-
This project is dedicated to anyone who loves our great state of Florida and fights for the protection of our natural resources.




ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS-
There are many people responsible for shaping me into the person that I have become.

I would like to thank my dad, he inspired me to pursue this career through his guidance, knowledge, and support. I would also
like to thank my mom who's unconditional love and support has pushed me to strive for my best.

I would like to thank my grandparents for introducing me to the outdoors at an early age. This exposure sparked my passion for
our natural resources and ingrained the importance of its protection in my mind forever.

I thank my girlfriend for her love and support through this capstone process, I know it must be hard to deal with the late nights in
studio and the lack of quality time together. I greatly appreciate the encouraging words and patience through this project.

To my classmates and great friends in studio, thank you for making my experience at UF some of the best times of my life. I will
always remember these days and could not have asked for a better group of friends. All of you are amazing people and will do
great things.

I would like to thank my faculty advisor Les Linscott and the other faculty members that have influenced and guided me through
my career at UF: Glenn Acomb, Bob Grist, Tina Gurucharri, Kay Williams, Kevin Thompson, Terry Schnadelbach, Dave Barth,
Jeff Sugar, Chris Lathrop, Fred Halback, Bo Zhang, and Gail Hansen.

Thank you everyone for your support. God Bless


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG

















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT






TABLE OF CONTENTS:

CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................... 1

CHAPTER Two
BACKGROUND RESEARCH...................................................................................

CHAPTER THREE
CONTEXT ANALYSIS........................................................................................15

CHAPTER FOUR
SITE ANALYSIS..............................................................................................23

CHAPTER FIVE
CONCEPT.........................................................................................................31

CHAPTER SIX
THE M ASTER PLAN........................................................................................ 35

CHAPTER SEVEN
M IDPORT LAKE.............................................................................................. 37

CHAPTER EIGHT
O SPREY'S N EST PARK.....................................................................................49

CHAPTER NINE
THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL........................................................................ 55

CHAPTER TEN
THE PROMENADE........................................................................................... 59

CHAPTER ELEVEN
RIVERWALK PARK........................................................................................... 65

CHAPTER TWELVE
CONCLUSION................................................................................................... 75

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
REFERENCES....................................................................................................79




DANIEL McRAE SUGG

















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT


























INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER ONE -


DANIEL McRAE SUGG











ABSTRACT -
The Riverwalk District is a community park district that combines active and passive recreation with a more natural
experience. The main focus is on the Saint Lucie River Estuary and its recreational opportunities. The park district provides
community pride and unity by attracting people to the area and involving local businesses. The Riverwalk District is a mixture
of proposed and existing city parks that are all connected either by multi-use trails or boardwalk along the River's edge. Each
individual park offers the visitor a different experience. The Riverwalk District provides the public new access to River and protects
the access from being taken away in the future. The Riverwalk District also provides connections for the community through
greenways and blueways. The park district brings the St. Lucie River into the visitor's lives but, most importantly it showcases what
the St. Lucie River and Port St. Lucie have to offer.





MY INSPIRATION FOR THIS PROJECT -
I was born in Stuart, Florida, which is eight miles from this site. I have lived in the same house on the border of Port St.
Lucie and Jensen Beach, three miles from the site, until I moved to Gainesville for school. This area has played a vital role in my
development. I remember visiting Rivergate Park with my parents and grandparents when I was young, fishing and watching the
wildlife, especially the family of otters that used to live there. The boardwalk was shorter back then, but it provided such great
opportunities for people like my family. We didn't own a boat until I was older, so like most people the only way we were able to be
exposed to the St. Lucie River was on this boardwalk. Having this amenity so close to our house made this park feel as if it were an
extension of our own yard. To me the otters felt like they were my pet. They would always be at the River eating crabs and oysters,
playing and sleeping on fallen trees. As I grew older I noticed the otters started to disappear. I didn't know why, but later on in life I
learned what was happening.
The freshwater discharges from Lake Okeechobee are dumping millions and millions of polluted freshwater into our estuary.
This water is laden with polluted runoff from farms and surrounding areas. Not only is the freshwater flooding the brackish water
estuary (which was once considered one of the most bio diverse ecosystems in the nation), the freshwater is toxic. The result is
major fish kills, green sludge algae blooms, and flesh eating bacteria. At times bacteria levels are so high the City warns people of
the danger of going into the water. My otters and much more wildlife were driven away if not killed by this senseless act. Many
peoples' livelihoods depend on this River and they are put in jeopardy by these discharges.
I want people to have the same experience with the River as I did. I want to build this site so people are able to walk with
their family down by the River and witness the splendors that exist in their own backyard. I want the community to get close to
our native wildlife and learn firsthand what is happening and what will happen if these destructive acts are continued. The greater
exposure to the River's different activities and attractions will result in a larger family of "river keepers."
Previously there was a seven story hotel proposed for what I am calling the Riverwalk Park site. However, this site is much
more suited for a more natural experience. As stated previously in my proposal there is a more appropriate location for a hotel/retail
area on the main road with views of the River, Botanical Garden and park. With my completed master plan I will show my concept
to the City to give them another perspective for this area. I want to show them an option that will benefit the community and the
River, not just a developer.


My Grandparents, Sister and I on the
original Riverwalk Boardwalk


CHAPTER ONE


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





INTRODUCTION


Florida


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Port St.


PROJECT OVERVIEW-
The project site is located in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Port St.
Lucie is located about 45 miles north of West Palm Beach and 125
miles from Orlando. Port St. Lucie (A City for All Ages) is situated
between Stuart (The Sailfish Capital of the World) and Ft. Pierce (The
Sunrise City). Port St. Lucie is bifurcated by the St. Lucie River Estuary
and bordered by the Indian River Lagoon, two of the most bio-diverse
ecosystems in the nation. Port St. Lucie consists of 75.5 square miles of
land and 1.1 square miles of water. The city has an estimated popula-
tion of 160,000 people.


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THE MASTER PLAN SITE-
I have dubbed my Master Plan Site as the The Riverwalk District. The Riverwalk
District master plan site is located along the North Fork of the St. Lucie River Estuary.
The site is also located along Westmoreland Boulevard / Veterans Memorial Parkway
and Port St. Lucie Boulevard. The Riverwalk District consists of 180 acres. It is divided
into three main zones, the Northern anchor, the central area, and the Southern anchor.
The Northern anchor consists of 35 acres, the central area consists of 100 acres and the
Southern anchor consists of 45 acres. Within the site there are five existing city parks,
a mixed use development, and the city owned botanical gardens. There is an existing
boardwalk connecting two of the parks, Rivergate Park and Tom Hooper Park. There
is an estimated 7,000 residents within a 1 mile radius of the site. The median age of the
residents is 45. The new City Center development is 1.2 miles from the site. The City
Center is a 70 acre mixed use development aiming to become the "downtown" of Port
St. Lucie.


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'Lyngate Park


Veteran's Memorial
Mixed Use Development
Rivergate Park
Fom Hooper Park


"PSL Botanical Gardens


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT


CHAPTER ONE








OVERALL PROJECT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES-
GET PEOPLE OUTSIDE AND INTERACTING:
Create a destination for all ages to enjoy
Promote community unity through a space the local residents can be proud of
Integrate the park district with the surrounding context
HELP PROTECT THE ST. LUCIE RIVER ESTUARY:
Expose the environmental issues that are effecting the River, like the high
nutrient loads from stormwater runoff and the practice of inundating the river
with polluted freshwater from Lake Okeechobee
Educate the public on what they can do to help the River now and in the future.
PRESERVE AND PROTECT RIVER ACCESS FOR THE PUBLIC:
Promote more appropriate use of valuable waterfront properties for the benefit
of the public
Provide permanent access to the River's edge for the public


Get People Outside and Interacting


The River Needs Our Help


Educate and Enlighten


To GET PEOPLE OUTSIDE AND INTERACTING-
The main goal for this project at the community scale is to bring people together and
outside to enjoy what great resources Port St. Lucie has to offer. The project will also help
promote more sense of pride in the community. With pride more people will strive to keep the
area clean and protected. It will provide a safe place for people of all ages. Local businesses
can service the park with equipment rentals and food vendors. Shops and restaurants can
take advantage of the prime location near the park in a proposed lodging / commercial area.
Promoting a more active community lifestyle is important. I want to promote an active lifestyle
to encourage the community to explore the area together, interact with nature, which will boost
interest in the city and surrounding areas.


THE RIVER NEEDS OUR HELP-
This project will promote the use and protection of the St. Lucie River through
recreational activities that focus on the River and its quality as a vital resource for the city. This
project will showcase the River's scenic views from the boardwalk, the world class fishing,
and other outdoor recreation. The St. Lucie River is one of the few places where a visitor can
see alligators, kayak with manatees, witness bottlenose dolphins teaching their young how to
catch fish, and catch a rod bending bull shark all in the same location. I believe the experiences
witnessed at the park will promote more interest and pride in the River. By attracting interest
in the River, more people will be affected when it is polluted by freshwater discharges from
Lake Okeechobee. This will create more exposure to the destruction and a greater interest in
protecting the River. With greater exposure, people will help to stop the pollution.


PRESERVE AND PROTECT-
The site offers many opportunities for native habitat preservation. Although the site
was previously developed in some areas, it has since been demolished. From the limited prior
use of the area there are many stands of native trees and understory to be utilized. The site plan
will work around the existing native stands of vegetation and introduce more opportunities for
wildlife habitat. Great care and consideration will be used during the design phase near the
River's edge to ensure the least amount of environmental impact to the natural habitat. The
project will retain and reuse storm water onsite. My plan will use proper plantings and retention
areas to filter the stormwater runoff before entering the River.


EDUCATE AND ENLIGHTEN-
Another major goal for the project is to serve as an educational catalyst that sparks
an interest in learning about the natural resources available in the area. Opportunities for
interpretive signage along the trails and boardwalk can explain to the visitors about what they
are seeing and experiencing. Classes on environmental issues affecting the area can be held
onsite. There is an opportunity for a space for holding "sustainable technology" workshops (i.e.
rain barrel workshops where people can come and learn how to build their own rain barrels). In
conjunction with the newly built and city owned Port St. Lucie Botanical Gardens next door,
opportunities for plant sales and demonstrations on "Florida Friendly" plants and techniques are
possible.


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


INTRODUCTION


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT 6





























BACKGROUND RESEARCH
CHAPTER Two -




7


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG










PGA Learning Center


BACKGROUND-
Port St. Lucie became a city in 1961. In the 1950's Port St.
Lucie consisted of mostly uninhabited land, a fish camp and farms.
The original development was focused around the northern part of
the St. Lucie River. In 2005 Port St. Lucie was the nation's fastest
growing city. Today Port St. Lucie is still considered one of the
nation's fastest growing cities, increasing 85% in population from the
2000 to 2010 census. Today the population is an estimated 164,000
residents. The City offers the quintessential Florida lifestyle with its
proximity to the St. Lucie River, Indian River Lagoon, and beaches
on the Atlantic Ocean. The area boasts multiple golf courses and the
PGA Learning Center. Port St. Lucie is also home to the New York
Mets spring training camp and the St. Lucie Mets. Within the City
there are six public elementary schools, seven public K-8 schools, and
three public high schools. There are also four institutions of higher
education; Florida Atlantic University, Indian River State College,
Barry University, and Keiser University. The climate of Port St. Lucie
is subtropical, with temperatures in the high 80's to low 90's in the
summer and mid 70's during the winter. The average rainfall is about
53.5" per year, mostly accumulated during the summer months.


INDIAN RIVER
STATE COLLEGE


F6U
FLORIDA
ATLANTIC
UNIVERSITY


1966 Project Site Aerial


1980 Project Site Aerial


1992 Project Site Aerial


2005 Project Site Aerial


2010 Project Site Aerial


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


CHAPTER Two


,0


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BACKGROUND RESEARCH


Bridge Pla


2010 Aerial of the City Center Development


Strip Plaza Signs along the Roadside


Historic Photograph from the St. Lucie River Blue-green Algae Bloom from Polluted Runoff


Street Comer in the City Center Developn


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MARTIN CO. HEALTH OEPT 221-4090


Sign Posted to Warn the Public


CITY ISSUES-
The city of Port St. Lucie has fallen victim to the urban sprawl
trend that has plagued the state. The City never developed a downtown
area and became solely reliant on the automobile. Strip plazas and
parking lots line the roadways and hide the genius loci existing behind
the concrete and asphalt. It was turned into an anywhere USA city.
However, the City has appointed a Community Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) to help the revitalization and redevelopment of key areas within
the city. A mixed use development called the City Center has been
partially completed. The vision for the City Center is to become the
"downtown" of Port St. Lucie. It will have retail, office, and residential
spaces along with the City Civic Center. The Riverwalk District is on
I the western edge of the CRA area.





RIVER ISSUES-
ment The St. Lucie River Estuary was once considered the most
biologically diverse estuary in North America. Before 1898, the St.
Lucie River was a freshwater river that flowed into the Indian River
Lagoon. In 1898 the first permanent inlet connected to the River was
built and had an "unexpected" result. The St. Lucie River became an
estuary with the influx of saltwater in the main part of the River. The
north and south forks of the River still maintained mostly freshwater.
The River supported an amazing fishery and produced an abundance
of oysters, clams, and sea grasses. The River attracted many people to
the area for its sportfishing opportunities. Five different United States
Presidents vacationed in the area to experience the great fishing.
After World War II canals were built that connected the River to
Lake Okeechobee, and drained agricultural lands. These canals started
dumping polluted runoff and sludge into the River. As early as 1950
there was a River League formed to fight the damages being done by
the canals but, no progress was made. "The Martin County High school
class of 1970 deemed the River dead and held a ceremonial burial of
an outboard motor to memorialize the River's demise." In 1972 with
The Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act there was hope for
the future of the River. Despite all the environmental regulations and
rules the River still continued its decline. The St. Lucie River Initiative
and the Rivers Coalition have filed a lawsuit against the Army Corps
of Engineers. Litigation is currently pending. The public needs to be
educated about the plight of the St. Lucie River Estuary. The more
fighting for the River, the better chance it has of surviving.


DANIEL McRAE SUGG




CHAPTER Two

MA\S TS]E]R SS][TE P1L AN

CASE STUDY, INDIAN RIVERSIDE PARK -
Indian Riverside Park, Jensen Beach, Florida
Designed by: Glatting, Jackson, Kercher, Anglin
Park Features
63 acres, 12 mile waterfront
Frances Langford Dockside pavilion
3800 sq. ft.
2 story building
Banquet hall
Available to rent for events
Plantation Architecture
Wraparound porch with seating
Large overhangs
Holds 250 guests
4 outdoor pavilions with picnic tables and grills
Beach area
Kayak / Canoe Launch off of beach .,-.
34% mile paved walking path
780 ft. fishing pier with docking
Interactive play fountain
US Sailing Center
Maritime and Classic Boat Museum 'B
Multi-purpose open space
Butterfly Garden
Treasure Coast Children's Museum
The Mansion at Tuckahoe
On National Register of Historic Places
Available to rent for events
Newly restored
Holds 400 guests
Fire places
Multiple outdoor terraces
Located on Indian River Lagoon
Lagoon area
Captain Sewall's home
Future Attractions
Mt. Elizabeth Archeology Exhibit presented by SEFAS
Mt. Elizabeth is on National Register of Historic Places <
Mangrove Nature Trail System through Lagoon ^.- Oa i
Amphitheater and Stage


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




BACKGROUND RESEARCH


S


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


CASE STUDY, INDIAN RIVERSIDE PARK -
- How Indian Riverside Park relates to the Riverwalk District
A waterfront community park that has opportunities for water based activities
- Plantation style architecture
Large wraparound porches
2 story
- Cultural and Environmental education
Museums
Interpretive signage
Suitability for camps and groups to take field trips to or be based out of the main building
- Use of Pavilions
With picnic tables
Grills
- Multi-use Open space area
- Nature walk
To immerse guests into the ecosystem
- Fishing pier
Relates to boardwalk area of Riverwalk
Docking areas for guests visiting from the waterway
- Naturalized stormwater retention and filtration
Appropriately located and planted stormwater ponds
- Easy access to the River's edge
Beach type of area to get close to water


.




CHAPTER Two


CASE STUDY, RIVERBEND PARK -
- Riverbend Park, Jupiter, Florida
- On the Loxahatchee National Wild and Scenic River
- Park Features
Fishing
Picnic Pavilions
BBQ grills
Different sizes
Canoe / Kayak Rentals
Bike Rentals
Trails
Biking
Hiking
Walking
Paddling
Connects to other parks and eventually the Atlantic Ocean
Equestrian
Historic Seminole War battlefields


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





BACKGROUND RESEARCH


-.~ .:~


CASE STUDY, RIVERBEND PARK -
- How Riverbend Park relates to the Riverwalk District
- The Loxahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers area similar
- Passive public green open space
- Multi-use trails
Biking
Walking
Hiking
- Picnic Pavilions
Different sizes
equipped with BBQ grills
- Canoe and Kayak rentals
- Serves as hub for paddle trails on the Loxahatchee River
- Interpretive signage
- Fishing
- Birding
- Brings the visitors to the river's edge
- Educates the visitors about the amazing natural resources available
- Intrigues the visitor to keep coming back for more


DANIEL McRAE SUGG















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 14


























CONTEXT ANALYSIS
CHAPTER THREE -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER THREE


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SURROUNDING LAND USE MAP-
The surrounding landuse consists largely of single family
residential with commercial areas along Port St. Lucie
Boulevard and U.S. 1. Preserve and conservation areas line
the edge of the St. Lucie River.







LEGEND:
- CITY LIMITS
- CRA LIMITS
--- URBAN SERVICE BOUNDARY
TO BE DETERMINED (TBD)
[I] RESIDENTIAL (RLXRGC)
EI RESIDENTIAL (RMXRH)
W RESIDENTIALJOFFICE/INSTITUTIONAL (ROI)
W COMMERCIAL LIMITED (CL)(CG)
I COMMERCIAL SERVICE (CS)(CH)
I HEAVY, LIGHT/INDUSTRIAL (LI)(HI)
W INSTITUTIONAL (I)
LIII OPEN SPACE (OSR)
[- NEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (NCD)
W PRESERVATION (OSP)(OSC)
W UTILITIES (U)
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RIVERWALK DISTRICT




CONTEXT ANALYSIS


CiVIC CONTEXT-
This map shows the locations of the
civic context around the site. The Riverwalk
District is centrally located between three of
the major civic destinations in Port St. Lucie:
The City Center Development, City Hall
and the recently sold Club Med Sandpiper
Bay whcih is going under a $25 million
renovation.


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Master Plan Area
PSL Community Center
PSL City Hall
City Center
SClub Med
Hospitals
Schools


0 0.25 0.5 1 1.5 2
Miles


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DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


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GREENWAY CONNECTIONS-
This map shows the possible greenway
co sections to the surrounding neighborhoods and
C0 ly Center development.




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RIVERWALK DISTRICT


CHAPTER THREE




CONTEXT ANALYSIS


NATURAL CONTEXT-
Thc Ri\ ir\\ alk District has access to the St.
Lucic Ri\ cr. Indian River Lagoon, the St. Lucie
Inlcl. ind hec Atlantic Ocean.


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG





CHAPTER THREE


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A


I v .This map indicates the plant
communities represented in the surrounding
.., -" area. The red outline indicates the master
rt plan area. The plant communities found in
the Riverwalk District are highlighted in
yellow on the legend.

Legend
- Major Roads
Land Cover

Agriculture
S AQriculturWCoRfined Feeding Opeabion
Agrkiulture/GrfovesOmrnamental
Bar. sotMClearcut
Bay/KGuVCypres Ecologicl Complex
Coastal Strand
Cyp Dwarf Mangrove Eco~gical Complex
Forb Emergenl Marsh
Gramianocd Enmeigenl Marsh Cornpostional Group
Maidencane Marsh
SMsc-.Hydrt L'U OaW Sabal Palm Ecologcal Complex
Mesc-Hydrc Pinw Forest Composional Group
PasturerfrassiandiAgricullure
Recreation
Red Mangrove Foest
Red Mangrove Woodland
Saend PS n Forest
Saurated Mixed EveWreenCol-d4ocuous Shrubland
SawgrassMarsn
Sea QatE Dune Grassland
SSouth Florida Slash Pine Forest
Swarnp Forest Ecologc Coemplx
urbtan
SUrtan OpennOthers
UIatn ReSnenIal
[ Waler Lily or Floating LeaSed vegetation

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0 0.250.5 1 1.5 2 W *les S


MAJOR CIRCULATION MAP-
Thi mnap indicate, the major circulation routes
,tirrouinding ihe Ri\ ern alk District. The site is conveniently
l-camed near Por- St. Lucice Boulevard and U.S. 1 and just a
couple mile from Florida's Turnpike. There are three existing
irolleN ilop, located in ihe master plan area.

Legend

im Class 1 Roads
111111 Class 2 Roads
...... Class 3 Roads

Class 5 Roads
Transii Facilities
Transit Routes N
Master Plan Area

0 0.25 0.5 1 1.5 2-Mil,, S A f


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





CONTEXT ANALYSIS


CAPTAIN HAMMONDS HAMMOCK



GOAT ISLAND
* CITRUS HAMMOCK


RIVER PARK MARINA -


PB PRESERROPOSED B L UE\VAYS-
This map indicae, tihe proposed
blueways possible from ihe Ri er\\ alk
N STATEH (ENTRANCEI District. The blueways can ,er\ e a \rinel\ of
R Wi "''. watercraft. Motorboat,, aillo',-a. per,'innl
l .i Pwatercraft area all welcome to ra\el tlhee
waters, but the best wa\ ,-o c\plorc thii area
is by canoe or kayak. C(criain park, and
creeks are paddler accc,,hlc onIl. Alo.
paddling will provide more aicceNihilil\ to
the wildlife and offer more opporltinilieC for
wildlife viewing and fihing.


EXISTING PARKS-
Thin mzap indicaies the existing parks
alone tihe North Fork of the St. Lucie River.
The park, highlighted in red are in the
mater plan area. The parks highlighted in
\ ello\\ could he accee,,d by blueway from
ihe ma;,er plan area. ..^rt- ,^,.

k Linkage Map

PKMARI Exishing Park Possibly
tPARK MARIAJ Unked by Blueway

Existling Park in
Riverwalk Districi
Possible Neighborhood
Linkages

I Master Plan Area

Existing Park Locations I

0 0.250.5 1 1 2Miles S


LLPATIOKEE


















S Proposed Blueway Legend


Exisbng Parks -
IRIVER PARK MARINA


PRESERVE

f a Blueway Lengths -


I) C,21 ,) 1.


Existing Park Possibly
Linked by Blueway
Existing Park in
Riverwalk District
Exisling Park Locations

2.5 Miles
2.5 Miles
3.5 Miles
2.6 Miles
5.5 Miles


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


Oki"


r t,















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 22

























SITE ANALYSIS
CHAPTER FOUR -


DANIEL McRAE SUGG




CHAPTER FOUR


CRA FUTURE LAND USE MAP-
The existing land use plan has the area separated
by small commercial areas and residential land. hinder the
connectivity of the area and block off the public from certain
resources.


PROPOSED LAND USE MAP-
I have proposed to keep the commercial at the main
intersection and redevelop the existing strip plazas into
higher density mixed use areas. I proposed to change the
landuse to open space recreation to create a sinuous stretch
of parkland that will connect the active recreation park to the
more passive recreation areas and act as the main artery of
the District.


I
/


/ .



/


/'



(


Legend
Open Space Recreation
Preserve
Commercial


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


/.


I
4~L1)


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SITE ANALYSIS


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG





CHAPTER FOUR


S'-i ~


* A.


N

0 200400 800 1,200 1,600 W
*= = Feet s


SUITABILITY ANALYSIS-
The o\ emil ui-lability map is a collaboration
of ihe pre'\ IOu, 11inal i maps. This map combines
oII1. loporapli\. ,lope and landcover maps into
one lihil Indicac li ihe more suitable land for
dc\ elopmenl.










N

0 200400 800 1 200 1,600
Feet s


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




SITE ANALYSIS


As


I









,. 1%4 ~- -


,I: *


MANATEE


BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN


/ /-4
.. : .













*iF
i'h


WILDLIFE ANALYSIS-
Thi% map heo\\, \\ iIdlife \ ie\\ ing
oppolrlitin irlle in tlhe Ri\ er\alk Diltrict. There
;.-i ;- mIn`;-I 1\ O rl)nl' iiec lO c rrell al
and aqutiic \\ ildlifc. The Site ollier prime
habiltal for mi-inI popular lpeciCe like allantic
bolllenoce dolphins. \\ el Indian maniallees,
oiler-. oprie. i and bald ead-le.


AMERICAN ALLIGATOR


OSPREY


GREAT BLUE HERON


ROSEATTE SPOONBILL


Legend

} nViewing Opportunity

SViewshed Opportunity

Dolphin Movement


Manatee Movement


WHITE IBIS


WOODSTORK


00 Regular Alligator Sightings


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


I'


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1~
II
I





CHAPTER FOUR


/
iZ2~ *Ii Ii~U

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/
/


I,


EXISTING

PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT-
The e\i- ing pedestrian movement through
ihe Ri\ er\x alk Dkitricl i, mainly limited to a single
,ide\\x lk on tie \\etl ,ide ofVeteren's Memorial
Park\\i a\ nd tihe e\ilin.' Riverwalk Boardwalk.


-~ .- _


Legend


Fixed Buildings / Structures


Existing Public Parking


Existing Ponds / Lakes


Existing Pedestrian Movement


PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT-
N I proposed pedestrian movement adds up
lo an additional 3.3 mile of pathways and trails and
in addition I1.1 I mile of boardwalk.






Legend

SFixed Buildings / Structures


SExisting Public Parking

SExisting Ponds / Lakes


Existing Pedestrian Movement


/
/
(


Proposed Additional
Pedestrian Movement


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


,)




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.. .,'


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/~


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"-rfA Is




SITE ANALYSIS


POSSIBLE BLUEWAY CONNECTIONS UTILIZING THE ST. LUCIE RIVER


CONNECTIONS ANALYSIS-
This map shows direct connection possibilities Blueway oppor nities nect
to the Riverwalk District through greenways and to the rest oft -e
blueways. The greenway connections to the Northern d tla e
anchor utilize the open space around residential canal x.nv
.Utillizesana n 9pen
ways and existing conservation land. The greenways 7-loOa sce recre-on and
ac r open-space recrabon and
connecting to the Southern anchor utilize an abandoned Ighborhood connect
golf course. 4 .,





(Oppounity for Grenway Linkage)
...'..."......,,






.r.. Riverwalk District
o Master PlaConnection Arenalysis
mJ. Existing Open Space
2...l.m.'.. "..,F= ""WT ",*, (Opportunity for Greenway Linkage)
i~i '. T,. )'.,.Riverwalk District
............... il .A ,=!iv .r. ,, = M aster P lan A rea

North Fork of St. Lucie River
Jot"(Opportunities for Blueway Connections)
.o 14 li n VAPSL Botanical Gardens
M op e a arnd'-
e;.rh eVi Existing Roadway Connections

Site Nodes of Importance
E Major Nodes of Importance

POSSIBLE GREENWAY CONNECTIONS UTILIZING THE ABANDONED GOLF COURSE AND CANAL WAYS W e. -. -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 30

























CONCEPTS
- CHAPTER FIVE -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG





CHAPTER Six


SPECIFIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES-

FOR THE COMMUNITY AND SURROUNDING CONTEXT

PROVIDE A UNIFIED GATHERING SPACE
USE A CENTRALLY LOCATED SITE
LOCATE NEAR RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS
CREATE A BETTER LINK BETWEEN EXISTING PARKS
EASILY ACCESSIBLE FROM MAJOR ROADS
LOCATE NEAR MAJOR ROADS AND INTERSECTIONS
USE APPROPRIATE SIGNAGE FOR EASY NAVIGATION
IMPROVE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
PROPOSE NEW ROUTES TO LINK THE PREVIOUSLY BUILT CITY CENTER AND THE
RIVERWALK NORTH AND SOUTH DISTRICTS
INCREASE REVENUE
MORE EXPOSURE FOR EXISTING BUSINESSES
CREATE A BETTER LINK BETWEEN PARK AREAS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES
PROVIDE MORE PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE RIVER
MORE BOARDWALK ALONG THE RIVER'S EDGE
CANOE / KAYAK LAUNCHES
CREATE MORE AREAS FOR PUBLIC TO VIEW THE RIVER
EXPOSE THE PROBLEMS CAUSED BY OVER FERTILIZATION AND OTHER POLLUTION
THROUGH INTERPRETIVE SIGNAGE, DISPLAYS, CLASSES, AND DEMONSTRATIONS

IMPROVE CURB APPEAL OF THE MAIN EAST-WEST CORRIDOR IN CITY


SPECIFIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES-

FOR THE RIVERWALK DISTRICT

PROVIDE A CULTURAL EXPERIENCE
TEACH ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY
SHOW THE PROGRESSION OF THE CITY AND REGION
GET PEOPLE OUTSIDE AND INTERESTED IN OUR NATURAL RESOURCES
PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIFFERENT EXPERIENCES WITH THE RIVER AND
RELATED ECOSYSTEMS
MAKE A WALKABLE AREA WHERE PEOPLE FEEL SAFE
PROVIDE MULTI-USE TRAILS WITH MINIMAL CAR INTERACTION
WELL LIT PATHWAYS AND GATHERING AREAS
STRATEGIC PARKING AREAS THAT KEEP VEHICLES IN CERTAIN AREAS
BECOME A NODE OF INTEREST IN REGION
PROVIDE PUBLIC EASY ACCESS TO WORLD CLASS AMENITIES NOT FOUND IN
MANY OTHER PLACES
PROVIDE ENTERTAINMENT AREAS WITH RESTAURANTS, SHOPPING AND
AMPHITHEATER FOR OUTDOOR CONCERTS OR MEETINGS
TO BE A COMMUNITY SHOWCASE
PROVIDE SPACE FOR LOCALLY FUELED FESTIVALS
TO BE A DESTINATION FOR ALL AGES
PROVIDE ACTIVITIES AND AMENITIES THAT ATTRACT PEOPLE OF ALL AGES
To INCLUDE EXISTING BUSINESSES
PROVIDE EXISTING BUSINESSES WITH OPPORTUNITIES TO BE PART OF THE NEW
SPACES WITH NEW BUILDING PLANS AND MORE EXPOSURE TO POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS
VENDOR OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIFFERENT TYPES OF TOURS, RENTAL EQUIPMENT, FOOD
TO BE A DESTINATION FOR ALL TIMES OF THE DAY
PROVIDE ACTIVITIES THAT PEOPLE CAN ENJOY AT DIFFERENT TIMES OF THE
DAY, FROM A MORNING JOG TO MOVIE NIGHTS
BE ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE TO BOTH NATIVE FLORA AND FAUNA
LOCATE EXISTING PRESERVES AND OTHER STANDS OF NATIVE HABITAT THAT
WILL PRESERVED AND PROTECTED
WILL NOT BE ALL PATCHES OF SMALL FRAGMENTED HABITATS

TAKE INVENTORY OF SPECIES PRESENT AND THEIR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





THE MASTER PLAN


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CONCEPT ONE-
In Lhi, lirhI concept t he proposed community
hbuildin i in ihe center of tlie project. Green open
.pace i, on each ,ide connecting to existing parks.
The Riverwalk Park site would be more passive.


-' AC / ..LAL.. J.. i/ 4fAai
cAn jfar juP 4s.rae&2 sirck *CeaL6f SWee-
Cu-Efoul ta C?-HwtSj rzW*Er


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fim-TI src- n A~t ac
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uc. ine wr.ja t a m.hi.s-
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CONCEPT Two-
In ihie second concept I moved the
coimtinIl\ buIlding lo the Riverwalk Park site and
kept ihe cenial area a inuous natural green space
connecing lihe Norlliern anchor to the southern part
of ihe ceniial area. The Riverwalk Park site and
CM-lLing bolanical gardens will act as the Southern
anchor of the Riverwalk District in its entirety. The
community building and other program elements
\\ ill help pull the patrons from the central area and


ser- w^'s.w< Nollhern anchor.
.CAJC / I'Am c LALJjc.M p.winaqo5






S Aa L
Ftsscer ACS 14.j aL


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


teaowt-


^-Vtl>,>


10 e- plyCzfjtem
Dt5i-lAtjofsAW-





CHAPTER Six


PROPOSED PROGRAM-

FOR THE RIVERWALK DISTRICT
CULTURAL EXPERIENCE
INTERPRETIVE SIGNAGE
VISUAL
AUDIO
HISTORIC
NATIVE AMERICAN
CHICKEE HUT
CANOE EXAMPLES
WHAT ROLE THE RIVER PLAYED IN THEIR LIVES
EARLY SETTLERS
CRACKER ARCHITECTURE
WHAT ROLE THE RIVER PLAYED IN THEIR LIVES
HISTORIC TIMELINE OF AREA
SMALL CULTURE BASED MUSEUM
AREA APPROPRIATE ARCHITECTURE
ECOTOURISM BASED OPPORTUNITIES
TRAIL SYSTEM
MULTI-USE
BICYCLING
RUNNING / WALKING
SKATING
SPECIFIC USE
HIKING
WALKING
PADDLING
WILDLIFE VIEWING
ECO-TOURS
WALKING TOURS
SELF GUIDED TOURS
GUIDED TOURS
WATER TOURS
GUIDED BOAT TOURS
GUIDED CANOE / KAYAK TOURS
GUIDED FISHING TRIPS
REGIONAL Eco-CENTER
SERVE AS HUB FOR ECO-TOURISM IN THE AREA
MIXED-USE PROPERTY AREAS
CONVERT OLD STRIP PLAZAS AND COMBINE SOME EXISTING BUILDINGS
RESTAURANTS
OFFICE
RETAIL
RESIDENTIAL


'I


' J


COMMUNITY BUILDING AND EVENT SPACE


WIDE PATHWAYS


BOARDWALK


CANOE / KAYAK RENTALS


EXERCISE TRAIL


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


ECO-TOURS


h "-4




THE MASTER PLAN


BEACH ENTRY TO RIVER


INTERPRETIVE SIGNAGE


BIRDING AND EXCELLENT VIEWS


OUTDOOR FAMILY OUTINGS


NATIVE CHICKEE STYLE PAVILIONS


INFORMATIONAL KIOSKS


PUBLIC SHORE FISHING OPPORTUNITIES


PROPOSED PROGRAM IMAGES-


CANOEING / KAYAKING


BIKING AND MULTI-USE TRAILS


PROTECTING IMPORTANT ROOKERIES


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 36

























THE MASTER PLAN
CHAPTER Six -


DANIEL McRAE SUGG










r. .~i :. 411" / C


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II



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ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN-


I. ~ -~ ~Vw~ ~


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


CHAPTER Six


, .' .


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... -







































NIIDPORT L \lk Ri- RL- \TI(N AREA
OSPRi-L \VOODS P \RK
Till TIMI-LINI E\E R R'ISi TR UL
\'I TR \NSN M-MORI \L P \RK
TilI PRO1hII-N \D- NIIXl-. USl- DEVELOPMENT
RliVRC, \T\I P \RK


MASTER PLAN ELEMENTS- THE MASTER PLAN
1. LYNGATE PARK
Active recreation
Parking improvements
Additional basketball and tennis courts
2. GOPHER TORTOISE Disc GOLF COURSE
9 hole disc golf course with room for expansion
Bridge the Gap from active to passive recreation
Low impact recreation working in and around the existing vegetation
3. MIDPORT LAKE RECREATION AREA
Improved lake aesthetics / function
Picnic pavilions
Boardwalk along lake edge
Multi-use trails
Parking
4. OSPREY WOODS PARK
Green open space recreation
Picnic pavilions
Multi-use trails
Boardwalk through a mangrove forest and along the river's edge
50' tall observation tower
Parking
5. VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK
To remain untouched
Memorials for five branches of the military
Space for ceremonial events
6. THE PROMENADE MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT
Add dockage for access to and from the water
Kayak and canoe landing
Improve existing stormwater retention pond
7. RIVERGATE PARK
Boat ramps, Boardwalk and picnicking areas to remain untouched
Additional multi-use trail for connectivity to rest of the Riverwalk District
8. TOM HOOPER PARK
Additional multi-use trail for connectivity to rest of the Riverwalk District
9. PORT ST. LUCIE BOTANICAL GARDENS
Main part to remain untouched
Additional access from boardwalk extension and commercial area
Provide access to mangrove forest and river's edge
10. RIVERWALK PARK
Green open space recreation, picnicking, other passive recreation
Community building
Playground
Canoe / kayak hub
Public access to the river
11. THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL
Multiple workout stations
Shaded and winding to keep interest
Educational displays and kiosks about the history of the area


DANIEL McRAE SUGG












KEY Focus AREAS-
I elected to focus on five key areas in the
Riverwalk District. I developed detailed
plans and perspectives that communicate
what I propose for these key areas.


.'S

41
q .: ,d |D o


OZ- ~.Midport Lake (3.)

a 'a


I Osprey's Nest Park (4.) "

.. t H'I ,


Timeline Exercise Trail (11.)


h r sm,_ (6.). .-
The Promenade (6.) ...


.. ...

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.. .. .. ,

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?pow 4 %, t% -4 1 .t ..
!; .. ,<. ... ., 1. "*. .- .. ..-* .** .,^

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Si ". .,
<* A slift^.. .


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT


CHAPTER Six


I


,1'


L-




THE MASTER PLAN


Paved Path Calculations

Northern Anchor
Central Area
Southern Anchor
Roadside Sidewalks
Exercise Trail


Totals


Existing
1,327 ft.
3,436 ft.
0 ft.
15,108 sq. ft.
0 ft.

19,871 ft.
(3.7 miles)


Grand Total


Usable Public Open Space Calculations
Existing
Northern Anchor 5 acres
Central Area 2 acres
Southern Anchor 7 acres
Exercise Trail 0 acres


Totals


14 acres


Grand Total


Proposed
3,403 ft.
4,273 ft.
3,941 ft.
Oft.
5,787 ft.

17,404 ft.
(3.3 miles)

37, 275 ft.
(7 miles)


Proposed
14 acres
9 acres
5 acres
8 acres

36 acres

50 acres


EXISTING AND PROPOSED SITE DATA-
These tables represent the existing and proposed calculations of paved
pathways, usable public open space, preserve, and parking.


Parking Space Calculations

Northen Anchor
Lyngate Park
Midport Lake Area
Northern Anchor Totals:


Existing


Additional Proposed


75 2 H.C.
0
75 2 H.C.


Central Area
Osprey Woods Park 0
Veterans Memorial 38 3 H.C.
Mixed Use Area 77 4 H.C.
Rivergate Park 45 3 H.C. 27 B.T.
Tom Hooper Park 40 2 H.C.
Central Area Totals: 200 12 H.C. 27 B.T.


61- 2 H.C.
25 2 H.C.
86 4 H.C.



36 4 H.C.
0
0
0
0
36 4 H.C.


Preserve Calculations


Northern Anchor
Central Area
Southern Anchor


Grand Total


Southern Anchor
Botanical Gardens 135 5 H.C.
Riverwalk Park 0
Southern Anchor Totals: 135 5 H.C.


6 acres
56 acres
22 acres

84 acres


Totals: 410 17 H.C 27 B.T.


0
58 4 H.C. 3 B.T./Bus
58 4 H.C. 3 B.T./Bus

180 12 H.C. 3 B.T. / Bus


Grand Total: 590 29 H.C. 27 B.T. 3 B.T. / Bus


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 42






























MIDPORT LAKE
CHAPTER SEVEN -




43


DANIEL McRAE SUGG




CHAPTER SEVEN


EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR MIDPORT LAKE-
The Midport Lake area is an existing city park that consists of mostly
unimproved open space around the lake. The lake itself is about 1.8 acres and
is used frequently by a group of radio controlled sailboaters. There is not a
designated parking area so people drive all around the lake and park anywhere.
There is minimal aquatic vegetation and planting around the lake edge.







V.,'


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




MIDPORT LAKE


/
















MIDPORT LAKE PLAN-
This is the plan I propose for Midport Lake. The plan for
NI idport Lake offers the visitors excellent birding opportunities
around the lake and adjacent pine and oak hammocks. The lake offers
the public freshwater fishing from the shore, enabling the Riverwalk
Di,1nct to offer both freshwater fishing and saltwater fishing in one
park district. The edge of the lake will be pushed and pulled to form a
more organic shape. An added boardwalk along the southern edge of
hec lake with covered seating and benches will provide easier access
for all to the lakes edge. Other areas along the edge of the lake will
al,-, have added cypress trees and other aquatic vegetation to aid
in the cleaning of the water and provide a more natural experience
for the patrons. The main connecting trail of the Riverwalk District
connects Midport Lake to the existing Lyngate Park to the north and
inN proposed Osprey's Nest Park to the south.


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


A.




CHAPTER SEVEN


PICNIC PAVILION



BOARDWALK


LU"


BOARDWALK AREA-
The proposed boardwalk area is about 225 feet long. It acts as *
an oxbow off of the main path around the lake connecting back to the
path at both ends. The boardwalk sits about 2.5 feet on average above
the lake, depending on rainfall amounts. A childproof door allows
access through the railing for the launching and retrieval of radio-
controlled boats. There are covered seating areas and benches under
the canopy of cypress trees. The boardwalk also provides structure
for fish habitat.
MAIN CONNECTOR TRAIL

PARKING AREA-
The proposed parking area for Midport Lake consists of 27 .
parking spaces and 2 are handicapped accessible. There are 21 grass ,
parking spots and 4 paved spots.





PARKING














IC


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


-4


..,q %




MIDPORT LAKE


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT 48


























OSPREY'S NEST PARK
CHAPTER EIGHT -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER EIGHT


EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR OSPREY'S NEST PARK-
Currently the site for Osprey's Nest Park is a mixture of slash pine, sabal palm and oak hammock. The
site also borders a mangrove preserve. This site is a key element in the connectivity of the Riverwalk District.


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




OSPREY' S NEST PARK


OSPREY'S NEST PARK-
This i, ihe plan I propose for Osprey's Nest Park. Certain areas
o'f ihe eC\isNIin \\ oxods are thinned out to create a series of open space
room,. Connecting to Midport Lake to the North and Veterans Memorial
Park Ito he Somilh the multi-use main connecting trail meanders through
ihe \\ oods o each "room" and varies in width. There is an added parking
area \\ li cro\1\\ alk to the Timeline Exercise Trail. The parking area
coniLi of411 parking spots and 4 are handicap accessible. There are 31
i'ras, parking spots. Additional access to the River is provided through a
boardd\ ailk \\ ilih lielters and an observation tower. The observation tower
\\ ill pro\ idc an prey's eye view of the St. Lucie River and surrounding
comnlc. The boardwalk takes a visitor through the mangrove preserve
and out to ihc Ri\ er's edge. The location of the boardwalk on this section
of thc Ri\ cr mai\nnizes views of the area and provides patrons with
access tc areas Ihat were previously only accessible by boat. There is
also a canoe kia ak dock for paddlers to access the proposed observation
o\xelr and picnic areas.


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER EIGHT


PICNIC PAVILION


OPEN SPACE "RooM"


MANGROVE PRESERVE


po.-*


4
J td~~


BOARDWALK TO RIVER AND OBSERVATION TOWER


r


HARDWOOD PRESERVE


*


MAIN CONNECTOR TRAIL


w-


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-0


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


0




OSPREY's NEST PAxi




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PERSPECTIVE SHOWING WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE WALKING ON THE MAIN CONNECTOR TRAIL APPROACHING ONE OF THE OPEN SPACE ROOMS.
if "nb V6 <




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... T ... ...-,.-- -.4.




PERPETIE HOIN WATITWOUD E IK WLKNGONTH MIN ONECORTRILAPROCHNG NEOFTH-OENSPCEROMS


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 54


























THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL
CHAPTER NINE -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER NINE


EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL-
The area for the proposed time line exercise trail is currently an unused right of way that is on average 100
feet wide. There is plenty of shade trees existing onsite and small swales and depressions that collect stormwater
runoff.


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL


'. v ".' .',..' -, '
,1..." *: '. ::' ,-. .* ,* ... m:! .' .
..........................................................................................................
a ,' ql ,, ,
-,2. -, ,,,: ,o' ,' :.


THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL-
This is my proposed plan for the Timeline Exercise Trail. The
Trail offers the community a safe place to get outside and exercise.
The wide area is buffered from the street with existing shade trees
along with proposed additional trees and native shrubs and grasses.
The trail is about 1 mile long and offers a different workout station
every tenth of a mile. The trail also has interpretive signage near the
workout stations teaching the patrons history and interesting facts of
the area in a chronological format.


PERSPECTIVE SHOWING WHAT THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL WILL LOOK LIKE, WITH NATURAL SHADE AND WORKOUT STATIONS.


DANIEL McRAE SUGG


---- ---- -


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT 58


























THE PROMENADE
CHAPTER TEN -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER TEN


EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR THE PROMENADE-
The Promenade is an existing mixed-use development that has been relatively unsuccessful. One
restaurant is remaining and it is the one on the end that is exposed to the road. The development is focused on the
river but there is not any access to or from the water. There is also an adjacent city park, Rivergate Park, that is
heavily used by boaters and fisherman. The development is cutoff from its surrounding context and needs to be
opened up to aid in its revival.


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




THE PROMENADE


THE PROMENADE-
This is the plan I propose for The Promenade. I propose to add boat dockage directly in front of the restaurant and store fronts, giving access to the
development directly from the water. The docks will allow the patrons to get closer to the water. The dock will provide connections to and from the adjacent
Rivergate Park. The patrons of the park and River can dock their boats, grab a bite to eat or get some bait and tackle before a fishing trip. There is also a deep
water dock for larger boats that connects to the store front area by a boardwalk through the mangroves. I am also proposing small beach entries and parking for
canoes and kayaks. Also, there are added native grasses and cypress trees to the existing detention pond area for additional filtration and improved aesthetics.


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DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER TEN


DEEPWATER DOCK


DEEPWATER DOCK


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DANIEL McRAE SUGG















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 64


























RIVERWALK PARK
CHAPTER ELEVEN -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER ELEVEN


EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR THE RIVERWALK PARK SITE-
The Riverwalk Park site, which sits just south of the PSL botanical Gardens and shares the same
entrance road, currently consists of unimproved open space that is under utilized as a park space. Lately
there has been more use of the site by local fishermen. Currently there is not any designated parking or
order to the site which leads to people parking and driving all over the site. The site was previously a
residential project that failed in the late 80's and early 90's. Since then, there have been numerous proposals
for the site. The latest proposal was a hotel that was approved in 2006. The hotel contract fell through and
the city bought the property. The site boasts great fishing and birding opportunities. The site is adequately
shaded with existing pines, oaks and sabal palms. There is also a specimen ficus on the water's edge which
makes a great focal point. Additionally there is a small existing boat ramp and seawall.


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




RIVERWALK PARK


Riverwalk Boardwalk Community Building /
Extension Plaza Space


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RIVERWALK PARK PLAN-
This is my plan for the proposed Riverwalk Park which is the southernmost trailhead for the proposed Riverwalk District Boardwalk
extension. Riverwalk Park will use the existing entrance road for the PSL Botanical Gardens. The park will use part of the existing road with an
added drop off area for easy access to the proposed Westmoreland Building, Moonraker Plaza, and the North Fork Canoe and Kayak Hub. Parking
will remain in the front of the site near Westmoreland Boulevard. There are 65 parking spots, 4 handicap accessible, 49 are grass parking. There are
3 paved parking spots for busses or trailers. There is a play area for children in the center of the park. Picnic pavilions are offered throughout the
park. There are 4 horseshoe pits and 2 sand volleyball courts. The meandering pathways connect the patrons to each feature in the park and through
the preserve to the South.


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


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CHAPTER ELEVEN


1% PLAY AREA


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





RIVERWALK PARK


PERSPECTIVE SHOWING THE VIEW FROM THE WATER INTO RIVERWALK PARK


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG





CHAPTER ELEVEN


THE WESTMORELAND BUIDLING AND MOONRAKER PLAZA-
The Westmoreland Building and Moonraker Plaza welcome the patrons from the Riverwalk Boardwalk
extension and the patrons of Riverwalk Park with outdoor seating areas with natural shade and tables with
umbrellas. There is about 350 feet of direct riverfront access. The park offers world class fishing and birding
opportunities and spaces for meetings and events. The buidling and plaza were worked around existing trees and
vegetation to provide excellent views of the River and Botanical Gardens. The building and plaza space area are
also available to rent for special events or meetings. Inside the building there will be a display of the history of
the site and area. There will also be a St. Lucie River Watch Station Lab that will allow visitors to test the water
quality, salinity levels and health of the River. Displays and exhibits on how the public can help stop the pollution
of the River and practice more sustainable ways of living will also be on display.


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PERSPECTIVE LOOKING OUT TO THE RIVER FROM THE DROP OFF AREA


RIVERWALK DISTRICT


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THE NORTHFORK CANOE AND KAYAK HUB-
The North Fork Canoe and Kayak Hub area offers three different launch sites, the existing small boat ramp,
a dock area that steps down into the water, and a beach entry. There is deck space with seating under existing sabal
palms. Also, there is a canoe and kayak rental shop that offers equipment and concessions. The hub offers access to
the many miles of paddle trails throughout the North Fork of the St. Lucie River. The canoe / kayak hub will promote
a more eco-friendly and affordable way for the public to experience the St. Lucie River. The canoe / kayak hub area
can be used to host paddle only fishing tournaments and other paddle friendly gatherings.


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THE PLAY AREA-
The play area in the center of
the park is a Treasure Coast theme, with
pirate ships, Spanish galleons, manatees
and atlantic bottle nosed dolphins.
There is an area for toddlers and an
area for older children. The play area
is nestled between existing stands of
scrub oaks, pine trees, and sabal palms
for natural shade. The play area also
offers plenty of seating, with benches
and picnic tables around the perimeter.
The play area is surrounded by green
open space. The area around the play
equipment will be a soft surface colored
blue to aid in the imagination of the
kids. The concrete pathways will have
imprints of local wildlife tracks and
plant leaves to allow opportunities for
kids to learn about the local ecosystem
and take rubbings of the imprints.


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT


CHAPTER ELEVEN


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DANIEL MCRAE SUGG


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RIVERWALK DISTRICT 74


























CONCLUSION
- CHAPTER TWELVE -


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG




CHAPTER TWELVE


SUMMATION-
Overall the Riverwalk District is a destination for all ages that provides a place for the public to enjoy
the outdoors. The Riverwalk District provides connections for the community via greenways and blueways. It
provides public access to our natural resources that previously would not be available. The Riverwalk District
brings the St. Lucie River into the visitor's lives, but most importantly, it showcases what the St. Lucie River and
Port St. Lucie have to offer.


RIVERWALK DISTRICT




CONCLUSION


THANK YOU


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG















































































RIVERWALK DISTRICT 78


























REFERENCES
- CHAPTER THIRTEEN -


DANIEL McRAE SUGG





CHAPTER THIRTEEN


BIBLIOGRAPHY-


- WEBSITES AND WEB PUBLICATIONS
GIS MAPPING INFORMATION
WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM
WWW.FGDL.ORG
WWW.DOT.STATE.FL.US
LANDUSE INFORMATION
WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM
WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM/CRA/CRA INFORMATION PACKAGE.HTML
PSLGIS.CITYOFPSL.COM/IMAGES/MAPS/LANDUSE.PDF
SOIL MAP INFORMATION
WWW.FGDL.ORG
ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
WWW.RIVERSCOALITION.ORG
WWW.FLORIDAOCEAN.ORG
WWW.AUDUBONOFFLORIDA.ORG/PUBS OKEECHOBEEREPORT.HTML
WWW.SFWMD.GOV/PORTAL/PAGE/PORTAL/XREPOSITORY/SFWMD REPOSITORY PDF/STLUCIE.PDF
WEATHER INFORMATION
WWW.NOAA.GOV
WWW.WUNDERGROUND.COM
OTHER INFORMATION AND IMAGES
WWW.PSLBOTANICALGARDENS.ORG
WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM/CRA/CRA INFORMATION PACKAGE.HTML
WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM/PLANNING-ZONING/PDF/DESIGN STANDARDS.PDF
WWW.LNT.ORG
WWW.LOXAHATCHEERIVER.ORG/RIVER CENTER EDUCATION.PHP
WWW.STLUCIECO.GOV/PDFS/04 PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT.PDF
WWW.PPS.ORG/ARTICLES/STEPSTOCREATINGAGREATWATERFRONT/
WWW.JACKMARYETC.COM/PAD/PSLPARK.HTM
WWW.CANOEOUTFITTERSOFFLORIDA.COM/SHOWPAGE.ASP?PAGE=SUMMERCAMP
WWW.STLUCIECO.GOV/ERD/OXBOW/
WWW.ESC.MARTINSCHOOLS.ORG/
WWW.MARTIN.FL.US/WEB DOCS/PRD/WEB/DOCS/XX IRSP ALBUM I.PDF
WWW.STLUCIEHISTORICALSOCIETY.ORG/
HTTP://EXPLORER.ARCGIS.COM/?OPEN=409798E8AE304A4F9BC9A10CDOc5A694
HTTP://WWW.TCPALM.COM/NEWS/2011/APR/02/EVE-SAMPLES-CALLING-ALL-20--AND-30-SOMETHINGS-ST/
HTTP://PSLANGLERS.COM/DEFAULT.ASPX
HTTP://WWW.STLUCIECO.GOV/PDFS/02 RESEARCH OF OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS.PDF
HTTP://WWW.PBCGOV.COM/PARKS/LOCATIONS/RIVERBEND.HTM
HTTP://ARCHIVES.FLORIDASPORTSMAN.COM/CONTENT/ST-LUCIE-RIVER-GREEN-ALGAE-BLOOM-BACK
HTTP://WWW.RIVERSCOALITION.ORG/DOCS/WQ%20ANALYSIS%20REPORT.PDF


- BOOKS
ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
MYERS, RONALD L. AND JOHN J. EWEL. ECOSYSTEMS OF FLORIDA. UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA, 1990
WHITNEY, ELLIE AND D. BRUCE MEANS AND ANNE RUDLOE. PRICELESS FLORIDA. PINEAPPLE PRESS, 2010
OTHER INFORMATION
GRUNWALD, MICHAEL. THE SWAMP: THE EVERGLADES, FLORIDA, AND THE POLITICS OF PARADISE. SIMON &
SCHUSTER, 2007
HARRIS, CHARLES W. AND NICHOLAS T. DINES. TIME-SAVER STANDARDS 2ND EDITION. MCGRAW-HILL
PROFESSIONAL, 1997
WILLIAMS, ADA COATS. IMAGES OF AMERICA: FORT PIERCE. ARCADIA PUBLISHING, 2003

- DEPARTMENTS AND PEOPLE
CITY OF PORT SAINT LUCIE PLANNING AND ZONING DEPARTMENT
CITY OF PORT SAINT LUCIE GIS MAPPING DEPARTMENT
CHRIS COOPER AT THE PSL BOTANICAL GARDENS
RIVERS COALITION
ST. LUCIE PROPERTY APPRAISERS OFFICE
LOCAL RESIDENTS


RIVERWALK DISTRICT





REFERENCES


DANIEL MCRAE SUGG







Full Text

PAGE 1

WELCOME TO THERIVERWALK DISTRICTON THE NORTH FORK OF THE ST. LUCIE RIVERA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE THESIS BY DANIEL MCRAE SUGG O O N N T T H H E E N N O O R R T T H H F F O O R R K K O O F F T T H H E E S S T T L L U U C C I I E E R R I I V V E E R R A A LA LA N N D D SC SC AP AP E E A A R R CH CH IT IT EC EC TU TU R R E E UN UN D D E E R R G G R R R R R A A R R R D D UA UA TE TE TH TH ES ES IS IS BY BY D D AN AN IE IE L L M M C C R R AE AE R R R S S UG UG G G

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RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTHE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDACOLLEGE OF DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND PLANNINGDEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURETHE RIVERWALK DISTRICTA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE THESIS BY DANIEL MCRAE SUGGFACULTY ADVISOR: LES LINSCOTTAPRIL 2011 REVIEWED AND ACCEPTED BY THE FACULTY AS AN HONORS THESIS T R D T HE R IVE RW ALK D K IST R IC T A L AN D SCAP E A R CHITECTU R E U N D E R G R A R D UA TE T HESIS B Y D ANIE L M C R AE R S UGG T H E R I V E R W A L K D K I S T R I C T

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RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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DANIEL MCRAE SUGGDEDICATIONThis project is dedicated to anyone who loves our great state of Florida and “ghts for the protection of our natural resources. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThere are many people responsible for shaping me into the person that I have become. I would like to thank my dad, he inspired me to pursue this career through his guidance, knowledge, and support. I would also like to thank my mom whos unconditional love and support has pushed me to strive for my best. I would like to thank my grandparents for introducing me to the outdoors at an early age. This exposure sparked my passion for our natural resources and ingrained the importance of its protection in my mind forever. I thank my girlfriend for her love and support through this capstone process, I know it must be hard to deal with the late nigh ts in studio and the lack of quality time together. I greatly appreciate the encouraging words and patience through this project. To my classmates and great friends in studio, thank you for making my experience at UF some of the best times of my life. I wi ll always remember these days and could not have asked for a better group of friends. All of you are amazing people and will do great things. I would like to thank my faculty advisor Les Linscott and the other faculty members that have in”uenced and guided me through my career at UF: Glenn Acomb, Bob Grist, Tina Gurucharri, Kay Williams, Kevin Thompson, Terry Schnadelbach, Dave Barth, Jeff Sugar, Chris Lathrop, Fred Halback, Bo Zhang, and Gail Hansen. Thank you everyone for your support. God Bless

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RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTABLE OF CONTENTS:CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................1 CHAPTER TWO BACKGROUND RESEARCH...................................................................................7 CHAPTER THREE CONTEXT ANALYSIS.........................................................................................15 CHAPTER FOUR SITE ANALYSIS................................................................................................23 CHAPTER FIVE CONCEPT.........................................................................................................31 CHAPTER SIX THE MASTER PLAN..........................................................................................35 CHAPTER SEVEN MIDPORT LAKE...............................................................................................37 CHAPTER EIGHT OSPREYS NEST PARK......................................................................................49 CHAPTER NINE THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL.........................................................................55 CHAPTER TEN THE PROMENADE.............................................................................................59 CHAPTER ELEVEN RIVERWALK PARK............................................................................................65 CHAPTER TWELVE CONCLUSION....................................................................................................75 CHAPTER THIRTEEN REFERENCES....................................................................................................79

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RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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1 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGINTRODUCTION CHAPTER ONE H A P T E R N E

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2 RIVERWALK DISTRICT ABSTRACT The Riverwalk District is a community park district that combines active and passive recreation with a more natural experience. The main focus is on the Saint Lucie River Estuary and its recreational opportunities. The park district provides community pride and unity by attracting people to the area and involving local businesses. The Riverwalk District is a mixture of proposed and existing city parks that are all connected either by multi-use trails or boardwalk along the Rivers edge. Eac h individual park offers the visitor a different experience. The Riverwalk District provides the public new access to River and protects the access from being taken away in the future. The Riverwalk District also provides connections for the community through greenways and blueways. The park district brings the St. Lucie River into the visitors lives but, most importantly it showcas es what the St. Lucie River and Port St. Lucie have to offer. MY INSPIRATION FOR THIS PROJECT I was born in Stuart, Florida, which is eight miles from this site. I have lived in the same house on the border of Port St. Lucie and Jensen Beach, three miles from the site, until I moved to Gainesville for school. This area has played a vital role in my development. I remember visiting Rivergate Park with my parents and grandparents when I was young, “shing and watching the wildlife, especially the family of otters that used to live there. The boardwalk was shorter back then, but it provided such g reat opportunities for people like my family. We didnt own a boat until I was older, so like most people the only way we were able to be exposed to the St. Lucie River was on this boardwalk. Having this amenity so close to our house made this park feel as if it w ere an extension of our own yard. To me the otters felt like they were my pet. They would always be at the River eating crabs and oy sters, playing and sleeping on fallen trees. As I grew older I noticed the otters started to disappear. I didnt know why, but later on in life I learned what was happening. The freshwater discharges from Lake Okeechobee are dumping millions and millions of polluted freshwater into our estuary. This water is laden with polluted runoff from farms and surrounding areas. Not only is the freshwater ”ooding the brackish wat er estuary (which was once considered one of the most bio diverse ecosystems in the nation), the freshwater is toxic. The result is major “sh kills, green sludge algae blooms, and ”esh eating bacteria. At times bacteria levels are so high the City warns peop le of the danger of going into the water. My otters and much more wildlife were driven away if not killed by this senseless act. Ma ny peoples livelihoods depend on this River and they are put in jeopardy by these discharges. I want people to have the same experience with the River as I did. I want to build this site so people are able to walk with their family down by the River and witness the splendors that exist in their own backyard. I want the community to get close t o our native wildlife and learn “rsthand what is happening and what will happen if these destructive acts are continued. The grea ter exposure to the Rivers different activities and attractions will result in a larger family of river keepers.Ž Previously there was a seven story hotel proposed for what I am calling the Riverwalk Park site. However, this site is much more suited for a more natural experience. As stated previously in my proposal there is a more appropriate location for a hote l/retail area on the main road with views of the River, Botanical Garden and park. With my completed master plan I will show my concept to the City to give them another perspective for this area. I want to show them an option that will bene“t the community and t he River, not just a developer.CHAPTER ONE My Grandparents, Sister and I on the original Riverwalk Boardwalk

PAGE 11

3 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGINTRODUCTIONPROJECT OVERVIEWThe project site is located in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Port St. Lucie is located about 45 miles north of West Palm Beach and 125 miles from Orlando. Port St. Lucie (A City for All Ages) is situated between Stuart (The Sail“sh Capital of the World) and Ft. Pierce (The Sunrise City). Port St. Lucie is bifurcated by the St. Lucie River Estuary and bordered by the Indian River Lagoon, two of the most bio-diverse ecosystems in the nation. Port St. Lucie consists of 75.5 square miles of land and 1.1 square miles of water. The city has an estimated population of 160,000 people. 3 D O V E R V I E W s i te i s l ocate d i n Port St. Luc i e, F l or id a. Port St. o ut 45 miles north of West Palm Beach and 125 o Port St. Lucie (A City for All Ages) is situate d e Sail“sh Ca pi tal of the World ) and Ft. Pierce ( The S t. Luc i e i s bi furcate d by t h e St. Luc i e R i ver Estuar y e Indian River Lagoon, two of the most bio-diverse ation. Port St. Lucie consists of 75.5 s qu are miles o f milesofwaterThecityhasanestimatedpopula

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4 RIVERWALK DISTRICT THE MASTER PLAN SITE-I have dubbed my Master Plan Site as the The Riverwalk District. The Riverwalk District master plan site is located along the North Fork of the St. Lucie River Estuary. The site is also located along Westmoreland Boulevard / Veterans Memorial Parkway and Port St. Lucie Boulevard. The Riverwalk District consists of 180 acres. It is divided into three main zones, the Northern anchor, the central area, and the Southern anchor. The Northern anchor consists of 35 acres, the central area consists of 100 acres and the Southern anchor consists of 45 acres. Within the site there are “ve existing city parks, a mixed use development, and the city owned botanical gardens. There is an existing boardwalk connecting two of the parks, Rivergate Park and Tom Hooper Park. There is an estimated 7,000 residents within a 1 mile radius of the site. The median age of the residents is 45. The new City Center development is 1.2 miles from the site. The City Center is a 70 acre mixed use development aiming to become the downtownŽ of Port St. Lucie. e CHAPTER ONE

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5 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGINTRODUCTIONOVERALL PROJECT GOALS AND OBJECTIVESGET PEOPLE OUTSIDE AND INTERACTING: Create a destination for all ages to enjoy Promote community unity through a space the local residents can be proud of Integrate the park district with the surrounding contextHELP PROTECT THE ST. LUCIE RIVER ESTUARY: Expose the environmental issues that are effecting the River, like the high nutrient loads from stormwater runoff and the practice of inundating the river with polluted freshwater from Lake Okeechobee Educate the public on what they can do to help the River now and in the future.PRESERVE AND PROTECT RIVER ACCESS FOR THE PUBLIC: Promote more appropriate use of valuable waterfront properties for the bene“t of the public Provide permanent access to the Rivers edge for the publicTO GET PEOPLE OUTSIDE AND INTERACTINGThe main goal for this project at the community scale is to bring people together and outside to enjoy what great resources Port St. Lucie has to offer. The project will also help promote more sense of pride in the community. With pride more people will strive to keep the area clean and protected. It will provide a safe place for people of all ages. Local businesses can service the park with equipment rentals and food vendors. Shops and restaurants can take advantage of the prime location near the park in a proposed lodging / commercial area. Promoting a more active community lifestyle is important. I want to promote an active lifestyle to encourage the community to explore the area together, interact with nature, which will boost interest in the city and surrounding areas. THE RIVER NEEDS OUR HELPThis project will promote the use and protection of the St. Lucie River through recreational activities that focus on the River and its quality as a vital resource for the city. This project will showcase the Rivers scenic views from the boardwalk, the world class “shing, and other outdoor recreation. The St. Lucie River is one of the few places where a visitor can see alligators, kayak with manatees, witness bottlenose dolphins teaching their young how to catch “sh, and catch a rod bending bull shark all in the same location. I believe the experiences witnessed at the park will promote more interest and pride in the River. By attracting interest in the River, more people will be affected when it is polluted by freshwater discharges from Lake Okeechobee. This will create more exposure to the destruction and a greater interest in protecting the River. With greater exposure, people will help to stop the pollution.PRESERVE AND PROTECTThe site offers many opportunities for native habitat preservation. Although the site was previously developed in some areas, it has since been demolished. From the limited prior use of the area there are many stands of native trees and understory to be utilized. The site plan will work around the existing native stands of vegetation and introduce more opportunities for wildlife habitat. Great care and consideration will be used during the design phase near the Rivers edge to ensure the least amount of environmental impact to the natural habitat. The project will retain and reuse storm water onsite. My plan will use proper plantings and retention areas to “lter the stormwater runoff before entering the River. EDUCATE AND ENLIGHTENAnother major goal for the project is to serve as an educational catalyst that sparks an interest in learning about the natural resources available in the area. Opportunities for interpretive signage along the trails and boardwalk can explain to the visitors about what they are seeing and experiencing. Classes on environmental issues affecting the area can be held onsite. There is an opportunity for a space for holding sustainable technologyŽ workshops (i.e. rain barrel workshops where people can come and learn how to build their own rain barrels). In conjunction with the newly built and city owned Port St. Lucie Botanical Gardens next door, opportunities for plant sales and demonstrations on Florida FriendlyŽ plants and techniques are possible. Preserve and Protect Get People Outside and Interacting Educate and Enlighten The River Needs Our Help

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6 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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7 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGBACKGROUND RESEARCH CHAPTER TWO H A P T E R W O

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8 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER TWOBACKGROUNDPort St. Lucie became a city in 1961. In the 1950s Port St. Lucie consisted of mostly uninhabited land, a “sh camp and farms. The original development was focused around the northern part of the St. Lucie River. In 2005 Port St. Lucie was the nations fastest growing city. Today Port St. Lucie is still considered one of the nations fastest growing cities, increasing 85% in population from the 2000 to 2010 census. Today the population is an estimated 164,000 residents. The City offers the quintessential Florida lifestyle with its proximity to the St. Lucie River, Indian River Lagoon, and beaches on the Atlantic Ocean. The area boasts multiple golf courses and the PGA Learning Center. Port St. Lucie is also home to the New York Mets spring training camp and the St. Lucie Mets. Within the City there are six public elementary schools, seven public K-8 schools, and three public high schools. There are also four institutions of higher education; Florida Atlantic University, Indian River State College, Barry University, and Keiser University. The climate of Port St. Lucie is subtropical, with temperatures in the high 80s to low 90s in the summer and mid 70s during the winter. The average rainfall is about 53.5Ž per year, mostly accumulated during the summer months. 1966 Project Site Aerial 1980 Project Site Aerial 1992 Project Site Aerial 2005 Project Site Aerial 2010 Project Site Aerial o s tl y accumu l a t e d d d ur ur in in g g th th e s

PAGE 17

9 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGBACKGROUND RESEARCHCITY ISSUESThe city of Port St. Lucie has fallen victim to the urban sprawl trend that has plagued the state. The City never developed a downtown area and became solely reliant on the automobile. Strip plazas and parking lots line the roadways and hide the genius loci existing behind the concrete and asphalt. It was turned into an anywhere USA city. However, the City has appointed a Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) to help the revitalization and redevelopment of key areas within the city. A mixed use development called the City Center has been partially completed. The vision for the City Center is to become the downtownŽ of Port St. Lucie. It will have retail, of“ce, and residential spaces along with the City Civic Center. The Riverwalk District is on the western edge of the CRA area. RIVER ISSUESThe St. Lucie River Estuary was once considered the most biologically diverse estuary in North America. Before 1898, the St. Lucie River was a freshwater river that ”owed into the Indian River Lagoon. In 1898 the “rst permanent inlet connected to the River was built and had an unexpectedŽ result. The St. Lucie River became an estuary with the in”ux of saltwater in the main part of the River. The north and south forks of the River still maintained mostly freshwater. The River supported an amazing “shery and produced an abundance of oysters, clams, and sea grasses. The River attracted many people to the area for its sport“shing opportunities. Five different United States Presidents vacationed in the area to experience the great “shing. After World War II canals were built that connected the River to Lake Okeechobee, and drained agricultural lands. These canals started dumping polluted runoff and sludge into the River. As early as 1950 there was a River League formed to “ght the damages being done by the canals but, no progress was made. The Martin County High school class of 1970 deemed the River dead and held a ceremonial burial of an outboard motor to memorialize the Rivers demise.Ž In 1972 with The Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act there was hope for the future of the River. Despite all the environmental regulations and rules the River still continued its decline. The St. Lucie River Initiative and the Rivers Coalition have “led a lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers. Litigation is currently pending. The public needs to be educated about the plight of the St. Lucie River Estuary. The more “ghting for the River, the better chance it has of surviving. 2010 Aerial of the City Center DevelopmentStrip Plaza Signs along the RoadsideStreet Corner in the City Center Development Historic Photograph from the St. Lucie RiverBlue-green Algae Bloom from Polluted RunoffSign Posted to Warn the Public

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10 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CASE STUDY, INDIAN RIVERSIDE PARK Indian Riverside Park, Jensen Beach, Florida Designed by: Glatting, Jackson, Kercher, Anglin Park Features 63 acres, mile waterfront Frances Langford Dockside pavilion 3800 sq. ft. 2 story building Banquet hall Available to rent for events Plantation Architecture Wraparound porch with seating Large overhangs Holds 250 guests 4 outdoor pavilions with picnic tables and grills Beach area Kayak / Canoe Launch off of beach mile paved walking path 780 ft. “shing pier with docking Interactive play fountain US Sailing Center Maritime and Classic Boat Museum Multi-purpose open space Butter”y Garden Treasure Coast Childrens Museum The Mansion at Tuckahoe On National Register of Historic Places Available to rent for events Newly restored Holds 400 guests Fire places Multiple outdoor terraces Located on Indian River Lagoon Lagoon area Captain Sewalls home Future Attractions Mt. Elizabeth Archeology Exhibit presented by SEFAS Mt. Elizabeth is on National Register of Historic Places Mangrove Nature Trail System through Lagoon Amphitheater and Stage CHAPTER TWO

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11 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGCASE STUDY, INDIAN RIVERSIDE PARK How Indian Riverside Park relates to the Riverwalk District A waterfront community park that has opportunities for water based activities Plantation style architecture Large wraparound porches 2 story Cultural and Environmental education Museums Interpretive signage Suitability for camps and groups to take “eld trips to or be based out of the main building Use of Pavilions With picnic tables Grills Multi-use Open space area Nature walk To immerse guests into the ecosystem Fishing pier Relates to boardwalk area of Riverwalk Docking areas for guests visiting from the waterway Naturalized stormwater retention and “ltration Appropriately located and planted stormwater ponds Easy access to the Rivers edge Beach type of area to get close to water BACKGROUND RESEARCH

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12 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CASE STUDY, RIVERBEND PARK Riverbend Park, Jupiter, Florida On the Loxahatchee National Wild and Scenic River Park Features Fishing Picnic Pavilions BBQ grills Different sizes Canoe / Kayak Rentals Bike Rentals Trails Biking Hiking Walking Paddling Connects to other parks and eventually the Atlantic Ocean Equestrian Historic Seminole War battle“elds CHAPTER TWO

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13 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGBACKGROUND RESEARCH CASE STUDY, RIVERBEND PARK How Riverbend Park relates to the Riverwalk District The Loxahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers area similar Passive public green open space Multi-use trails Biking Walking Hiking Picnic Pavilions Different sizes equipped with BBQ grills Canoe and Kayak rentals Serves as hub for paddle trails on the Loxahatchee River Interpretive signage Fishing Birding Brings the visitors to the rivers edge Educates the visitors about the amazing natural resources available Intrigues the visitor to keep coming back for more

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14 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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15 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGCONTEXT ANALYSIS CHAPTER THREE H A P T E R H R E E

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16 RIVERWALK DISTRICT SURROUNDING LAND USE MAP-The surrounding landuse consists largely of single family residential with commercial areas along Port St. Lucie Boulevard and U.S. 1. Preserve and conservation areas line the edge of the St. Lucie River.CHAPTER THREE

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17 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG CIVIC CONTEXTThis map shows the locations of the civic context around the site. The Riverwalk District is centrally located between three of the major civic destinations in Port St. Lucie: The City Center Development, City Hall and the recently sold Club Med Sandpiper Bay whcih is going under a $25 million renovation.CONTEXT ANALYSIS

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18 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER THREE GREENWAY CONNECTIONSThis map shows the possible greenway connections to the surrounding neighborhoods and City Center development.

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19 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGCONTEXT ANALYSIS NATURAL CONTEXT-The Riverwalk District has access to the St. Lucie River, Indian River Lagoon, the St. Lucie Inlet, and the Atlantic Ocean. ST. LUCIE RIVERSITE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON ATLANTIC OCEAN ST. LUCIE INLET S S S S S IT E E E E

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20 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER THREE LAND COVER MAP-This map indicates the plant communities represented in the surrounding area. The red outline indicates the master plan area. The plant communities found in the Riverwalk District are highlighted in yellow on the legend. MAJOR CIRCULATION MAP-This map indicates the major circulation routes surrounding the Riverwalk District. The site is conveniently located near Port St. Lucie Boulevard and U.S. 1 and just a couple miles from Floridas Turnpike. There are three existing trolley stops located in the master plan area.

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21 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG EXISTING PARKSThis map indicates the existing parks along the North Fork of the St. Lucie River. The parks highlighted in red are in the master plan area. The parks highlighted in yellow could be accessed by blueway from the master plan area. xi xi st in g pa pa rk k rk s s e x L u ci ci e e R i ve r. L PROPOSED BLUEWAYSThis map indicates the proposed blueways possible from the Riverwalk District. The blueways can serve a variety of watercraft. Motorboats, sailboats, personal watercraft area all welcome to travel these waters, but the best way to explore this area is by canoe or kayak. Certain parks and creeks are paddler accessible only. Also, paddling will provide more accessibility to the wildlife and offer more opportunities for wildlife viewing and “shing. CONTEXT ANALYSIS

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22 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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23 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGSITE ANALYSIS CHAPTER FOUR H A P T E R R O U R R

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24 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER FOUR CRA FUTURE LAND USE MAP-The existing land use plan has the area separated by small commercial areas and residential land. hinder the connectivity of the area and block off the public from certain resources.PROPOSED LAND USE MAP-I have proposed to keep the commercial at the main intersection and redevelop the existing strip plazas into higher density mixed use areas. I proposed to change the landuse to open space recreation to create a sinuous stretch of parkland that will connect the active recreation park to the more passive recreation areas and act as the main artery of the District.

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25 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGSITE ANALYSIS SOIL ANALYSISThe soil analysis map represents the location of certain soil types within the Riverwalk District. The information gathered from the analysis indicates a mixture of sandy well drained areas and poorly drained soils in the lower elevation areas. TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSISThe topography of the Site ranges from below sea level to 13 feet above sea level. The lower elevations are represented in green and the higher elevatoins in brown.

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26 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER FOUR SLOPE ANALYSISThe slope analysis map indicates the severity of the slope within the Riverwalk District. SUITABILITY ANALYSISThe overall suitability map is a collaberation of the previous analysis maps. This map combines soil, topography, slope and landcover maps into one that indicates the more suitable land for development.

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27 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG SITE ANALYSIS WILDLIFE ANALYSISThis map shows wildlife viewing opportunities in the Riverwalk District. There area many opportunities to see terrestrial and aquatic wildlife. The Site offers prime habitat for many popular species like atlantic bottlenose dolphins, west Indian manatees, otters, osprey, and bald eagles. MANATEEAMERICAN ALLIGATOROSPREYWHITE IBISBOTTLENOSE DOLPHINGREAT BLUE HERONROSEATTE SPOONBILLWOODSTORK

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28 RIVERWALK DISTRICT VE RW AL K D K IST R I C T CHAPTER FOUR 28 EXISTING PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENTThe existing pedestrian movement through the Riverwalk District is mainly limited to a single sidewalk on the west side of Veterens Memorial Parkway and the existing Riverwalk Boardwalk.PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENTMy proposed pedestrian movement adds up to an additional 3.3 miles of pathways and trails and an additional 1.1 miles of boardwalk.

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29 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGSITE ANALYSIS CONNECTIONS ANALYSISThis map shows direct connection possibilities to the Riverwalk District through greenways and blueways. The greenway connections to the Northern anchor utilize the open space around residential canal ways and existing conservation land. The greenways connecting to the Southern anchor utilize an abandoned golf course. POSSIBLE BLUEWAY CONNECTIONS UTILIZING THE ST. LUCIE RIVER POSSIBLE GREENWAY CONNECTIONS UTILIZING THE ABANDONED GOLF COURSE AND CANAL WAYS

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30 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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31 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGCONCEPTS CHAPTER FIVE H A P T E R R I V E

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32 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER SIXSPECIFIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVESFOR THE COMMUNITY AND SURROUNDING CONTEXT PROVIDE A UNIFIED GATHERING SPACE USE A CENTRALLY LOCATED SITE LOCATE NEAR RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS CREATE A BETTER LINK BETWEEN EXISTING PARKS EASILY ACCESSIBLE FROM MAJOR ROADS LOCATE NEAR MAJOR ROADS AND INTERSECTIONS USE APPROPRIATE SIGNAGE FOR EASY NAVIGATION IMPROVE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PROPOSE NEW ROUTES TO LINK THE PREVIOUSLY BUILT CITY CENTER AND THE RIVERWALK NORTH AND SOUTH DISTRICTS INCREASE REVENUE MORE EXPOSURE FOR EXISTING BUSINESSES CREATE A BETTER LINK BETWEEN PARK AREAS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES PROVIDE MORE PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE RIVER MORE BOARDWALK ALONG THE RIVERS EDGE CANOE / KAYAK LAUNCHES CREATE MORE AREAS FOR PUBLIC TO VIEW THE RIVER EXPOSE THE PROBLEMS CAUSED BY OVER FERTILIZATION AND OTHER POLLUTION THROUGH INTERPRETIVE SIGNAGE, DISPLAYS, CLASSES, AND DEMONSTRATIONS IMPROVE CURB APPEAL OF THE MAIN EAST-WEST CORRIDOR IN CITYSPECIFIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVESFOR THE RIVERWALK DISTRICT PROVIDE A CULTURAL EXPERIENCE TEACH ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY SHOW THE PROGRESSION OF THE CITY AND REGION GET PEOPLE OUTSIDE AND INTERESTED IN OUR NATURAL RESOURCES PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIFFERENT EXPERIENCES WITH THE RIVER AND RELATED ECOSYSTEMS MAKE A WALKABLE AREA WHERE PEOPLE FEEL SAFE PROVIDE MULTI-USE TRAILS WITH MINIMAL CAR INTERACTION WELL LIT PATHWAYS AND GATHERING AREAS STRATEGIC PARKING AREAS THAT KEEP VEHICLES IN CERTAIN AREAS BECOME A NODE OF INTEREST IN REGION PROVIDE PUBLIC EASY ACCESS TO WORLD CLASS AMENITIES NOT FOUND IN MANY OTHER PLACES PROVIDE ENTERTAINMENT AREAS WITH RESTAURANTS, SHOPPING AND AMPHITHEATER FOR OUTDOOR CONCERTS OR MEETINGS TO BE A COMMUNITY SHOWCASE PROVIDE SPACE FOR LOCALLY FUELED FESTIVALS TO BE A DESTINATION FOR ALL AGES PROVIDE ACTIVITIES AND AMENITIES THAT ATTRACT PEOPLE OF ALL AGES TO INCLUDE EXISTING BUSINESSES PROVIDE EXISTING BUSINESSES WITH OPPORTUNITIES TO BE PART OF THE NEW SPACES WITH NEW BUILDING PLANS AND MORE EXPOSURE TO POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS VENDOR OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIFFERENT TYPES OF TOURS, RENTAL EQUIPMENT, FOOD TO BE A DESTINATION FOR ALL TIMES OF THE DAY PROVIDE ACTIVITIES THAT PEOPLE CAN ENJOY AT DIFFERENT TIMES OF THE DAY, FROM A MORNING JOG TO MOVIE NIGHTS BE ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE TO BOTH NATIVE FLORA AND FAUNA LOCATE EXISTING PRESERVES AND OTHER STANDS OF NATIVE HABITAT THAT WILL PRESERVED AND PROTECTED WILL NOT BE ALL PATCHES OF SMALL FRAGMENTED HABITATS TAKE INVENTORY OF SPECIES PRESENT AND THEIR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

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33 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTHE MASTER PLAN CONCEPT ONEIn this “rst concept the proposed community building is in the center of the project. Green open space is on each side connecting to existing parks. The Riverwalk Park site would be more passive. CONCEPT TWOIn the second concept I moved the community building to the Riverwalk Park site and kept the central area a sinuous natural green space connecting the Northern anchor to the southern part of the central area. The Riverwalk Park site and existing botanical gardens will act as the Southern anchor of the Riverwalk District in its entirety. The community building and other program elements will help pull the patrons from the central area and Northern anchor.

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34 RIVERWALK DISTRICT BOARDWALK COMMUNITY BUILDING AND EVENT SPACECANOE / KAYAK RENTALSWIDE PATHWAYSECO-TOURSEXERCISE TRAILPROPOSED PROGRAMFOR THE RIVERWALK DISTRICT CULTURAL EXPERIENCE INTERPRETIVE SIGNAGE VISUAL AUDIO HISTORIC NATIVE AMERICAN CHICKEE HUT CANOE EXAMPLES WHAT ROLE THE RIVER PLAYED IN THEIR LIVES EARLY SETTLERS CRACKER ARCHITECTURE WHAT ROLE THE RIVER PLAYED IN THEIR LIVES HISTORIC TIMELINE OF AREA SMALL CULTURE BASED MUSEUM AREA APPROPRIATE ARCHITECTURE ECOTOURISM BASED OPPORTUNITIES TRAIL SYSTEM MULTI-USE BICYCLING RUNNING / WALKING SKATING SPECIFIC USE HIKING WALKING PADDLING WILDLIFE VIEWING ECO-TOURS WALKING TOURS SELF GUIDED TOURS GUIDED TOURS WATER TOURS GUIDED BOAT TOURS GUIDED CANOE / KAYAK TOURS GUIDED FISHING TRIPS REGIONAL ECO-CENTER SERVE AS HUB FOR ECO-TOURISM IN THE AREA MIXED-USE PROPERTY AREAS CONVERT OLD STRIP PLAZAS AND COMBINE SOME EXISTING BUILDINGS RESTAURANTS OFFICE RETAIL RESIDENTIALCHAPTER SIX

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35 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG PROPOSED PROGRAM IMAGESBEACH ENTRY TO RIVERINTERPRETIVE SIGNAGEBIRDING AND EXCELLENT VIEWSOUTDOOR FAMILY OUTINGSPUBLIC SHORE FISHING OPPORTUNITIESINFORMATIONAL KIOSKSPADDLE TRAILS AND CANOE / KAYAK DOCKAGENATIVE CHICKEE STYLE PAVILIONSCANOEING / KAYAKINGBIKING AND MULTI-USE TRAILSPROTECTING IMPORTANT ROOKERIES THE MASTER PLAN

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36 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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37 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTHE MASTER PLAN CHAPTER SIX H A P T E R I X

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38 RIVERWALK DISTRICT ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN-CHAPTER SIX

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39 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG MASTER PLAN DIAGRAM-1. LYNGATE PARK 2. 9 HOLE DISC GOLF COURSE3. MIDPORT LAKE RECREATION AREA4. OSPREY WOODS PARK5. THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL6. VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK7. THE PROMENADE MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT8. RIVERGATE PARK9. TOM HOOPER PARK10. PSL BOTANICAL GARDENS11. RIVERWALK PARK MASTER PLAN ELEMENTS-1. LYNGATE PARK Active recreation Parking improvements Additional basketball and tennis courts2. GOPHER TORTOISE DISC GOLF COURSE 9 hole disc golf course with room for expansion Bridge the Gap from active to passive recreation Low impact recreation working in and around the existing vegetation3. MIDPORT LAKE RECREATION AREA Improved lake aesthetics / function Picnic pavilions Boardwalk along lake edge Multi-use trails Parking4. OSPREY WOODS PARK Green open space recreation Picnic pavilions Multi-use trails Boardwalk through a mangrove forest and along the rivers edge 50 tall observation tower Parking 5. VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK To remain untouched Memorials for “ve branches of the military Space for ceremonial events6. THE PROMENADE MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT Add dockage for access to and from the water Kayak and canoe landing Improve existing stormwater retention pond7. RIVERGATE PARK Boat ramps, Boardwalk and picnicking areas to remain untouched Additional multi-use trail for connectivity to rest of the Riverwalk District8. TOM HOOPER PARK Additional multi-use trail for connectivity to rest of the Riverwalk District9. PORT ST. LUCIE BOTANICAL GARDENS Main part to remain untouched Additional access from boardwalk extension and commercial area Provide access to mangrove forest and rivers edge10. RIVERWALK PARK Green open space recreation, picnicking, other passive recreation Community building Playground Canoe / kayak hub Public access to the river11. THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL Multiple workout stations Shaded and winding to keep interest Educational displays and kiosks about the history of the areaTHE MASTER PLAN

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40 RIVERWALK DISTRICT KEY FOCUS AREAS-I elected to focus on “ve key areas in the Riverwalk District. I developed detailed plans and perspectives that communicate what I propose for these key areas. CHAPTER SIX

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41 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTHE MASTER PLAN UsablePublicOpenSpaceCalculations ExistingProposed NorthernAnchor5acres14acres CentralArea2acres9acres SouthernAnchor7acres5acres ExerciseTrail0acres8acres Totals14acres36acres GrandTotal50acres ParkingSpaceCalculations ExistingAdditionalProposed NorthenAnchor LyngatePark752H.C.612H.C. MidportLakeArea0252H.C. NorthernAnchorTotals:752H.C.864H.C. CentralArea OspreyWoodsPark0364H.C. VeteransMemorial383H.C.0 MixedUseArea774H.C.0 RivergatePark453H.C.27B.T.0 TomHooperPark402H.C.0 p CentralAreaTotals:20012H.C.27B.T.364H.C. SouthernAnchor BotanicalGardens1355H.C.0 RiverwalkPark0584H.C.3B.T./Bus SouthernAnchorTotals:1355H.C.584H.C.3B.T./Bus Totals:41017H.C27B.T.18012H.C.3B.T./Bus GrandTotal: 59029H.C.27B.T.3B.T./Bus PavedPathCalculations ExistingProposed NorthernAnchor1,327ft.3,403ft. CentralArea3,436ft.4,273ft. SouthernAnchor0ft.3,941ft. RoadsideSidewalks15,108sq.ft.0ft. ExerciseTrail0ft.5,787ft. Totals19,871ft.17,404ft. (3.7miles)(3.3miles) GrandTotal37,275ft. (7miles) PreserveCalculations NorthernAnchor6acres CentralArea56acres SouthernAnchor22acres GrandTotal 84acres G ran d T o t a l 84 acres EXISTING AND PROPOSED SITE DATAThese tables represent the existing and proposed calculations of paved pathways, usable public open space, preserve, and parking.

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42 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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43 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGMIDPORT LAKE CHAPTER SEVEN H A P T E R E V E N

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44 RIVERWALK DISTRICT EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR MIDPORT LAKE-The Midport Lake area is an existing city park that consists of mostly unimproved open space around the lake. The lake itself is about 1.8 acres and is used frequently by a group of radio controlled sailboaters. There is not a designated parking area so people drive all around the lake and park anywhere. There is minimal aquatic vegetation and planting around the lake edge. CHAPTER SEVEN

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45 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG MIDPORT LAKE PLANThis is the plan I propose for Midport Lake. The plan for Midport Lake offers the visitors excellent birding opportunities around the lake and adjacent pine and oak hammocks. The lake offers the public freshwater “shing from the shore, enabling the Riverwalk District to offer both freshwater “shing and saltwater “shing in one park district. The edge of the lake will be pushed and pulled to form a more organic shape. An added boardwalk along the southern edge of the lake with covered seating and benches will provide easier access for all to the lakes edge. Other areas along the edge of the lake will also have added cypress trees and other aquatic vegetation to aid in the cleaning of the water and provide a more natural experience for the patrons. The main connecting trail of the Riverwalk District connects Midport Lake to the existing Lyngate Park to the north and my proposed Ospreys Nest Park to the south. MIDPORT LAKE

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46 RIVERWALK DISTRICT PARKING AREAThe proposed parking area for Midport Lake consists of 27 parking spaces and 2 are handicapped accessible. There are 21 grass parking spots and 4 paved spots. BOARDWALK AREAThe proposed boardwalk area is about 225 feet long. It acts as an oxbow off of the main path around the lake connecting back to the path at both ends. The boardwalk sits about 2.5 feet on average above the lake, depending on rainfall amounts. A childproof door allows access through the railing for the launching and retrieval of radiocontrolled boats. There are covered seating areas and benches under the canopy of cypress trees. The boardwalk also provides structure for “sh habitat. PICNIC PAVILION BOARDWALKMAIN CONNECTOR TRAIL PARKING CHAPTER SEVEN

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47 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG MIDPORT LAKE

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48 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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49 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGOSPREYS NEST PARK CHAPTER EIGHT H A P T E R I G H T

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50 RIVERWALK DISTRICT EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR OSPREYS NEST PARKCurrently the site for Ospreys Nest Park is a mixture of slash pine, sabal palm and oak hammock. The site also borders a mangrove preserve. This site is a key element in the connectivity of the Riverwalk District. CHAPTER EIGHT

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51 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG OSPREYS NEST PARK-This is the plan I propose for Ospreys Nest Park. Certain areas of the existing woods are thinned out to create a series of open space rooms. Connecting to Midport Lake to the North and Veterans Memorial Park to the South the multi-use main connecting trail meanders through the woods to each roomŽ and varies in width. There is an added parking area with crosswalk to the Timeline Exercise Trail. The parking area consists of 40 parking spots and 4 are handicap accessible. There are 31 grass parking spots. Additional access to the River is provided through a boardwalk with shelters and an observation tower. The observation tower will provide an ospreys eye view of the St. Lucie River and surrounding context. The boardwalk takes a visitor through the mangrove preserve and out to the Rivers edge. The location of the boardwalk on this section of the River maximizes views of the area and provides patrons with access to areas that were previously only accessible by boat. There is also a canoe / kayak dock for paddlers to access the proposed observation tower and picnic areas.OSPREYS NEST PARK

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52 RIVERWALK DISTRICT BOARDWALK TO RIVER AND OBSERVATION TOWER MAIN CONNECTOR TRAIL PICNIC PAVILION OPEN SPACE ROOMŽ HARDWOOD PRESERVE MANGROVE PRESERVE CHAPTER EIGHT

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53 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG PERSPECTIVE SHOWING WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE WALKING ON THE MAIN CONNECTOR TRAIL APPROACHING ONE OF THE OPEN SPACE ROOMS.OSPREYS NEST PARK

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54 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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55 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTHE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL CHAPTER NINE H A P T E R I N E

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56 RIVERWALK DISTRICT EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAILThe area for the proposed time line exercise trail is currently an unused right of way that is on average 100 feet wide. There is plenty of shade trees existing onsite and small swales and depressions that collect stormwater runoff. CHAPTER NINE E XISTIN G C O N D I TIONS F O R THE T IMELI N E E XE R CIS E T R AIL R R The area for the p ro po sed time line exercise trail is currentl y an unused ri g ht of w ay that is on aver ag e feet w id e. T h ere i s p l ent y of s h a d e trees ex i st i n g ons i te an d sma ll swa l es an d d epress i ons t h at co ll ect stormw a r u n off.

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57 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAILThis is my proposed plan for the Timeline Exercise Trail. The Trail offers the community a safe place to get outside and exercise. The wide area is buffered from the street with existing shade trees along with proposed additional trees and native shrubs and grasses. The trail is about 1 mile long and offers a different workout station every tenth of a mile. The trail also has interpretive signage near the workout stations teaching the patrons history and interesting facts of the area in a chronological format.THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAILPERSPECTIVE SHOWING WHAT THE TIMELINE EXERCISE TRAIL WILL LOOK LIKE, WITH NATURAL SHADE AND WORKOUT STATIONS.

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58 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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59 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGTHE PROMENADE CHAPTER TEN H A P T E R E N

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60 RIVERWALK DISTRICT EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR THE PROMENADEThe Promenade is an existing mixed-use development that has been relatively unsuccessful. One restaurant is remaining and it is the one on the end that is exposed to the road. The development is focused on the river but there is not any access to or from the water. There is also an adjacent city park, Rivergate Park, that is heavily used by boaters and “sherman. The development is cutoff from its surrounding context and needs to be opened up to aid in its revival.CHAPTER TEN

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61 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG THE PROMENADE-This is the plan I propose for The Promenade. I propose to add boat dockage directly in front of the restaurant and store fron ts, giving access to the development directly from the water. The docks will allow the patrons to get closer to the water. The dock will provide conne ctions to and from the adjacent Rivergate Park. The patrons of the park and River can dock their boats, grab a bite to eat or get some bait and tackle before a “shing trip. There is also a deep water dock for larger boats that connects to the store front area by a boardwalk through the mangroves. I am also proposing sm all beach entries and parking for canoes and kayaks. Also, there are added native grasses and cypress trees to the existing detention pond area for additional “ ltration and improved aesthetics.THE PROMENADE

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62 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER TENDEEPWATER DOCKDEEPWATER DOCKDEEPWATER DOCKBOARDWALK TO RIVERGATE PARKBOATRAMPSMANGROVE WALK CANOE / KAYAK BEACH

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63 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG THE PROMENADEPERSPECTIVE SHOWING THE DOCKAGE IN FRONT OF THE RESTAURANTS AND STORE FRONTS.

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64 RIVERWALK DISTRICT

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65 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGRIVERWALK PARK CHAPTER ELEVEN H A P T E R L E V E N

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66 RIVERWALK DISTRICT EXISTING CONDITIONS FOR THE RIVERWALK PARK SITEThe Riverwalk Park site, which sits just south of the PSL botanical Gardens and shares the same entrance road, currently consists of unimproved open space that is under utilized as a park space. Lately there has been more use of the site by local “shermen. Currently there is not any designated parking or order to the site which leads to people parking and driving all over the site. The site was previously a residential project that failed in the late 80s and early 90s. Since then, there have been numerous proposals for the site. The latest proposal was a hotel that was approved in 2006. The hotel contract fell through and the city bought the property. The site boasts great “shing and birding opportunities. The site is adequately shaded with existing pines, oaks and sabal palms. There is also a specimen “cus on the waters edge which makes a great focal point. Additionally there is a small existing boat ramp and seawall.CHAPTER ELEVEN

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67 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG RIVERWALK PARK PLANThis is my plan for the proposed Riverwalk Park which is the southernmost trailhead for the proposed Riverwalk District Boardw alk extension. Riverwalk Park will use the existing entrance road for the PSL Botanical Gardens. The park will use part of the ex isting road with an added drop off area for easy access to the proposed Westmoreland Building, Moonraker Plaza, and the North Fork Canoe and Kayak Hub. Parking will remain in the front of the site near Westmoreland Boulevard. There are 65 parking spots, 4 handicap accessible, 49 are gr ass parking. There are 3 paved parking spots for busses or trailers. There is a play area for children in the center of the park. Picnic pavilions a re offered throughout the park. There are 4 horseshoe pits and 2 sand volleyball courts. The meandering pathways connect the patrons to each feature in the park and through the preserve to the South.RIVERWALK PARK

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68 RIVERWALK DISTRICT PLAY AREAWESTMORELAND BUILDINGMOONRAKER PLAZACANOE / KAYAK HUB AREA BOARDWALK EXTENSION CHAPTER ELEVEN

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69 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG RIVERWALK PARKPERSPECTIVE SHOWING THE VIEW FROM THE WATER INTO RIVERWALK PARK

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70 RIVERWALK DISTRICT THE WESTMORELAND BUIDLING AND MOONRAKER PLAZAThe Westmoreland Building and Moonraker Plaza welcome the patrons from the Riverwalk Boardwalk extension and the patrons of Riverwalk Park with outdoor seating areas with natural shade and tables with umbrellas. There is about 350 feet of direct riverfront access. The park offers world class “shing and birding opportunities and spaces for meetings and events. The buidling and plaza were worked around existing trees and vegetation to provide excellent views of the River and Botanical Gardens. The building and plaza space area are also available to rent for special events or meetings. Inside the building there will be a display of the history of the site and area. There will also be a St. Lucie River Watch Station Lab that will allow visitors to test the water quality, salinity levels and health of the River. Displays and exhibits on how the public can help stop the pollution of the River and practice more sustainable ways of living will also be on display.CHAPTER ELEVENPERSPECTIVE LOOKING OUT TO THE RIVER FROM THE DROP OFF AREA

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71 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG THE NORTHFORK CANOE AND KAYAK HUB-The North Fork Canoe and Kayak Hub area offers three different launch sites, the existing small boat ramp, a dock area that steps down into the water, and a beach entry. There is deck space with seating under existing sabal palms. Also, there is a canoe and kayak rental shop that offers equipment and concessions. The hub offers access to the many miles of paddle trails throughout the North Fork of the St. Lucie River. The canoe / kayak hub will promote a more eco-friendly and affordable way for the public to experience the St. Lucie River. The canoe / kayak hub area can be used to host paddle only “shing tournaments and other paddle friendly gatherings. RIVERWALK PARKPERSPECTIVE FROM A KAYAK APPROACHING THE NORTH FORK CANOE / KAYAK HUB RENTAL SHACK AND BEACH AREA

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72 RIVERWALK DISTRICT THE PLAY AREAThe play area in the center of the park is a Treasure Coast theme, with pirate ships, Spanish galleons, manatees and atlantic bottle nosed dolphins. There is an area for toddlers and an area for older children. The play area is nestled between existing stands of scrub oaks, pine trees, and sabal palms for natural shade. The play area also offers plenty of seating, with benches and picnic tables around the perimeter. The play area is surrounded by green open space. The area around the play equipment will be a soft surface colored blue to aid in the imagination of the kids. The concrete pathways will have imprints of local wildlife tracks and plant leaves to allow opportunities for kids to learn about the local ecosystem and take rubbings of the imprints.CHAPTER ELEVENPERSPECTIVE SHOWING THE TREASURE COAST THEME PLAYGROUND AREA

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75 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGCONCLUSION CHAPTER TWELVE H A P T E R W E L V E

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76 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER TWELVE R T W T T ELV E SUMMATIONOverall the Riverwalk District is a destination for all ages that provides a place for the public to enjoy the outdoors. The Riverwalk District provides connections for the community via greenways and blueways. It provides public access to our natural resources that previously would not be available. The Riverwalk District brings the St. Lucie River into the visitors lives, but most importantly, it showcases what the St. Lucie River and Port St. Lucie have to offer.

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77 DANIEL MCRAE SUGG 77 D A N IEL M C R AE R R S U CONCLUSION THANK YOU

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79 DANIEL MCRAE SUGGREFERENCES CHAPTER THIRTEEN H A P T E R H I R T E E N

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80 RIVERWALK DISTRICT CHAPTER THIRTEEN BIBLIOGRAPHY-WEBSITES AND WEB PUBLICATIONS GIS MAPPING INFORMATION WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM WWW.FGDL.ORG WWW.DOT.STATE.FL.US LANDUSE INFORMATION WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM/CRA/CRA_INFORMATION_PACKAGE.HTML PSLGIS.CITYOFPSL.COM/IMAGES/MAPS/LANDUSE.PDF SOIL MAP INFORMATION WWW.FGDL.ORG ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION WWW.RIVERSCOALITION.ORG WWW.FLORIDAOCEAN.ORG WWW.AUDUBONOFFLORIDA.ORG/PUBS_OKEECHOBEEREPORT.HTML WWW.SFWMD.GOV/PORTAL/PAGE/PORTAL/XREPOSITORY/SFWMD_REPOSITORY_PDF/STLUCIE.PDF WEATHER INFORMATION WWW.NOAA.GOV WWW.WUNDERGROUND.COM OTHER INFORMATION AND IMAGES WWW.PSLBOTANICALGARDENS.ORG WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM/CRA/CRA_INFORMATION_PACKAGE.HTML WWW.CITYOFPSL.COM/PLANNING-ZONING/PDF/DESIGN_STANDARDS.PDF WWW.LNT.ORG WWW.LOXAHATCHEERIVER.ORG/RIVER_CENTER_EDUCATION.PHP WWW.STLUCIECO.GOV/PDFS/04_PUBLIC_INVOLVEMENT_AND_NEEDS_ASSESSMENT.PDF WWW.PPS.ORG/ARTICLES/STEPSTOCREATINGAGREATWATERFRONT/ WWW.JACKMARYETC.COM/PAD/PSLPARK.HTM WWW.CANOEOUTFITTERSOFFLORIDA.COM/SHOWPAGE.ASP?PAGE=SUMMERCAMP WWW.STLUCIECO.GOV/ERD/OXBOW/ WWW.ESC.MARTINSCHOOLS.ORG/ WWW.MARTIN.FL.US/WEB_DOCS/PRD/WEB/DOCS/XX_IRSP_ALBUM1.PDF WWW.STLUCIEHISTORICALSOCIETY.ORG/ HTTP://EXPLORER.ARCGIS.COM/?OPEN=409798E8AE304A4F9BC9A10CD0C5A694 HTTP://WWW.TCPALM.COM/NEWS/2011/APR/02/EVE-SAMPLES-CALLING-ALL-20--AND-30-SOMETHINGS-ST/ HTTP://PSLANGLERS.COM/DEFAULT.ASPX HTTP://WWW.STLUCIECO.GOV/PDFS/02_RESEARCH_OF_OFFICIAL_DOCUMENTS.PDF HTTP://WWW.PBCGOV.COM/PARKS/LOCATIONS/RIVERBEND.HTM HTTP://ARCHIVES.FLORIDASPORTSMAN.COM/CONTENT/ST-LUCIE-RIVER-GREEN-ALGAE-BLOOM-BACK HTTP://WWW.RIVERSCOALITION.ORG/DOCS/WQ%20ANALYSIS%20REPORT.PDF BOOKS ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION MYERS, RONALD L. AND JOHN J. EWEL. ECOSYSTEMS OF FLORIDA. UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA, 1990 WHITNEY, ELLIE AND D. BRUCE MEANS AND ANNE RUDLOE. PRICELESS FLORIDA. PINEAPPLE PRESS, 2010 OTHER INFORMATION GRUNWALD, MICHAEL. THE SWAMP: THE EVERGLADES, FLORIDA, AND THE POLITICS OF PARADISE. SIMON & SCHUSTER, 2007 HARRIS, CHARLES W. AND NICHOLAS T. DINES. TIME-SAVER STANDARDS 2ND EDITION. MCGRAW-HILL PROFESSIONAL, 1997 WILLIAMS, ADA COATS. IMAGES OF AMERICA: FORT PIERCE. ARCADIA PUBLISHING, 2003 DEPARTMENTS AND PEOPLE CITY OF PORT SAINT LUCIE PLANNING AND ZONING DEPARTMENT CITY OF PORT SAINT LUCIE GIS MAPPING DEPARTMENT CHRIS COOPER AT THE PSL BOTANICAL GARDENS RIVERS COALITION ST. LUCIE PROPERTY APPRAISERS OFFICE LOCAL RESIDENTS

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