Harbor Point : an ecological culture resort : Cape Town, South Africa

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Title:
Harbor Point : an ecological culture resort : Cape Town, South Africa
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Staerker, Amanda
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

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Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00004158:00001


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An Ecological Culture Resort

CAPE TOWN. SOUTH .AFRICA










Amanda Staerker
Spring 2011
Senior CapstoneTerminal Project
Department of Landscape Architecture
University of Florida




Acknowl7Cdjcmens




Thank you for the inspiration and knowledge you have imparted upon me
during my time at the University of Florida:

Tina Gurucharri, Associate Professor and Department Chair
Sara Katherine Williams, Associate Professor
Robert R. Grist, Associate Professor
Glenn Acomb, Associate Professor
Kevin Thompson, Associate Professor
Terry Schnadelbach, Associate Professor
Mary Padua, Associate Professor

With special thanks to:

Les Linscott, Senior Project Advisor, Associate Professor





Ackno/wldgmcens




Thank you to my friends and family:


AXEL FELDNIIANN-HAHN,
My jet setting global partner, without whom I would have not been graced with the magnificence of Cape Town
.C \ l. ~.,.:: .,'l -, ,'. i,: *', ,,:,.-

BILL AND DENISE STAERKER,
For the love and support throughout these years, my travel addiction, and of course... sending me to Africa!






JULIAN. CLARE. & JONAH BARTEL
The most wonderful hosts ever' Thank you foi all of yoLu time. hospitality, and fist hand insight'

RODDY LOUTHER & MARK THOMPSON
Getting to know the real Cape Town was a pleasure' Sci umpys. Sui fing. Cape to Cuba I II be back soon boys'

UF LA C 0 2011
Thank you so much foi the suppoi t. friendship. and motivation'
Best of luck'






S Carbb of intents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 3
PROGRAM INTRODUCTION
Purpose 8
Location Map 10
Surrounding Land Use 11
Program 12
Goals and Objectives 13
Ecological 15
Urbanism 16

RESEARCH
Site History 18
Area History/ Background 19
Architecture 20
Ecology 23
Botanical Program 24
Case Studies 25

ANALYTICAL DRAWINGS
Neighborhood and Site Selection 28
Site Visit Photos 29
Marine 30
Site Analysis 31 5








ANALYTICAL DRAWINGS


Cultural Inspiration
Site Info.
Views from Site
Grading

GREEN DESIGN
Purpose

DESIGN PROCESS
Design Guidelines
Concepts
Master Plan

DESIGN DETAIL


Materials
Bay Lofts
Commercial
Garden Villas
Marina
Culture Gardens


APPENDIX


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of (ontents


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Harbor Point is an ecological culture resort located in Cape Town, South Africa, near the popular Victoria and
Alfred Waterfront. It is an environmentally conscious urban resort which draws upon the riches of the South African culture.

The purpose of Harbor Point is for it to be a palette of cultural expression and interpretation while
simultaneously serving as a display for the ethno botanical resources, past and present, and for the Cape Point Fybnos
ecology, one of 20 UNESCO sites monitored for climate change. The vegetation will create a unique educational tool and
breathtaking backdrop to guests. The users will experience the wealth of Cape Town's sociocultural and environmental
resources.

The intent of the design is to explore principles such as authenticity, localization, and cultural interpretation in
the resort design field. With today's accessibility and connectivity, globalization takes over many of the unique elements and
ideas that define an area. This project should serve as an exercise of the practice of localization and cultural preservation while
not sacrificing contemporary desires.

Harbor Point has great potential for this program to embody a resort where style is a contemporary local
vernacular, accommodating both the culture and the modern context. It will draw on the beauty of the natural landscape
and find an appropriate medium between "elegance versus rustic, urban versus rural, modern versus traditional and
international versus vernacular" (ANSA). It will function alongside the upscale V&A and integrate local vibes into the blooms
and branches of the rare beauties it supports.


U \ 11 1 1 () N\ N




















Users of the resort will experience a relaxing and intimate stay by utilizing any of the spa attractions for
rejuvenation, enjoying the close contact with nature in the garden setting, or taking to the water for a day in the sun. When
looking for more upbeat activities there are social nodes that bring resort guest and day users together such as the braai pit,
pools and their facilities, bars and restaurants, and the promenade. These users will most likely be upscale, environmentally
aware, approximately 35 and over college graduates, traveling with self, a companion, or small group. They will be mostly
foreign visitors, possibly more cosmopolitan urbanites in search of peace with nature but still desire a certain level of comfort.
Their travel purposes may vary from visiting the beaches and natural areas to rejuvenation and pampering, learning about
another culture, staying at an ecofriendly renewable place, or enjoying the boating and yachting community.


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(aocxaion

The 4.16 hectare (approximately 10 acres)
property is located in Cape Town on the eastern
tip of South Africa just north of the Cape of Good
Hope. It is near the historical land mark Robben
Island and the famous Table Mountain. The
northeast coast abuts Granger Bay and Table Bay,
a site of popular sailing regattas. Most importantly
the southeast perimeter is directly integrated with
the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, with which this
project should compliment. Another land use that
could directly affect the project is the Green Point
Stadium, which could feed both spectators as
guests and day users, and players as guests for
physical rejuvenation.







SITE


TABL BA*
FAS BAY


eel *
ROBBENbISLAN


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(mOd (Use


rapL Lc (xlll6aund















CIVIC,
Cl\I







C( )MNI R( IAI MIXI- I) I [Si-

RESORT

"g RFSIFDENTI.Xl.
ICT
('I1I HIR.AI HISI()RI.\I

()PEN SPACE


11 1 1 () N\











Program & Site Amenities:


COMMERCIAL AREA
1,150 sq. m Lobby Building
(Fitness, Limited retail, Administration, Main entrance, Main spa)
283 sq. m Main Contemporary Heritage Dining Restaurant with Bar
361 sq. m Stand Alone Evening Wine Bar and Cigar Lounge
240 sq. m Marina Associated Casual Dining Restaurant
500 sq. m Retail Center
(Spa, Botanical Marine Accessories)
Associated Day Visitor Car Parking Spaces

MARINA PROMENADE
Public and Private Waterfront Access
Event Lookout Tower
187 Yachting, Boating, Sailing Moorage slips
Associated car parking spaces Limited Trailer Parking
Vessel Launch
Fuel area
Sanitation Facilities

GARDEN VILLAS
308 Garden Villa Guest Units
Associated car parking spaces
Pool House/ Bar
Pool Amenities

BAY LOFTS
160 Bay Loft Guest Units
Associated car parking spaces
Pool Amenity
Pool House/ Bar

CULTURE GARDENS
Vinotherapy Walk Treatment Areas
Hydrotherapy Spa
Agriculture Display
Endemic Display
Medicinal Display







DEFINE AND INTERPRET THE RICHES AND CULTURE OF SOUTH AFRICA TO
CREATE AN AUTHENTIC INTIMATE AND EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE.
-Ensure communication of design intent with guests
-Appeal to all senses to describe aspects of culture
-Emphasize materials and material history
-'Elegant density': many concepts showcased in an uncluttered way

" FOSTER LOCAL PRIDE AND VISITOR EXPOSURE TO TRADITIONAL VALUES "
-Emphasize new unity by interpretation
-Celebrate diversity by interpretation

DRAW UPON SOUTH AFRICAN TRADITIONAL LIFE PRINCIPLES TO DEFINE
FORM AND FUNCTION, SUCH AS IGCKI, UBUNTU, INDIVIDUAL BEING CREATES
SPACES, KRAAL, SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS AND SETTLEMENT PATTERNS,
COURTYARD SPACES AND DENSITY... AMONGST OTHERS.
Align small/ fine scale program with larger program and goals/vision/purpose

LISTEN TO CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS TO DICTATE THE PROPER
SIZE, PROGRAMMING, AND LAYOUT
Incorporate Oceana Power Boat Club as a strong driving factor
Small scale commercial uses to compliment surrounding residential
Commercial/ Services/ Restaurant for adjacent stadium and recreational uses
Maintain community value and current program elements for OPBC
Create/ connect coastal pedestrian walkways, promenade, traffic
-Appropriately offset international style of V&A waterfront to exhibit cultural identity





Q9'aTlf atid icc/i vt~s

FORM COMMUNITY RELATIONS AS PART OF SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM AND
FOR INTEGRATED CULTURAL INTERACTION
Giving back to body of knowledge with research
Incorporating current users into new program and design
-Preserve portions of waterfront access to public
Making public feel welcome into commercial/restaurant/public areas (ex:
Pearl)

CREATE A COMFORTABLE, HOME LIKE FEELING GIVING A SENSE OF INTIMACY
WITH THE ENVIRONMENT
-Focus on human scale interactions and movement throughout site
-Create adequate visual and auditory separation from commercial areas
-Provide elegant social areas

CREATE WELLNESS RETREAT AND REJUVENATION OPPORTUNITIES
-Services should cater to both body and mind treatments
Incorporate day guests with resort guests facilities while maintaining security
-Utilize traditional medicine products in treatments

CREATE GROUNDS FOR ETHNO BOTANICAL DISPLAY

FOSTER CARE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT FROM GUESTS
-Keep grounds clean and unpolluted as possible by using many recycling opportunities
Allow for tangible environmental interaction for appreciation










COhyp 97cobgicalP


Many of the visitors to Cape Town take
advantage of the nearby world class natural
outdoor attractions, which include Table
Mountain National Park, Cape Point Nature
Reserve, Retvlei Nature Preserve, Rondvlei Nature
Preserve, and the unique mix of marine fauna
where the Indian and Atlantic Oceans intertwine.
However, I feel that since there is a growing group
of cosmopolitan 'urbanites that make up a large
portion of travelers, and the popular green
movement has had an effect on many of their
interest, the urban resort location will cater to
their familiar urban lifestyle while providing close
proximity to these ecological gems. The natural
vegetation component of the property enhances
the connection between the ecology of the ocean
and the Reserves. Part of ecotourism is that the
users' seek close involvement with authentic
natural and cultural experiences.... spiritual or
emotional recuperation.... relaxation and
recreation"


. --- --- ----- ----------



THE SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN SHOWS THE CLOSE PROXIMITY OF
THE RESORT TO NATURAL OUTDOOR ATTRACTIONS.


N





7Jrbanism and the 6Pultural omponwnt









* Current models of Eco Resorts and ecotourism are set in remote or rural locations with the thinking of immersing
tourists in the ways of the locals' daily lives. Siting this resort within the urban context refrains from spoiling or disturbing an
undeveloped areas people's culture.

* The urban setting, although globalized, still is an indicator of Capetonian modern culture. Even cities have an
interesting sense of place that helps define their inhabitants.

* Cape Town has always had some sort of palimpsest so CT culture is not spoiled by globalization as much as another
place could be; multiculturalism is celebrated and should be seen as an opportunity for cultural education.

* The ecological portion of the project allows the endemic vegetation display to show a vital part of the culture being
that many Capetonian rurals do live off of or in harmony with the land. It creates opportunity for exposure that many tourist,
nationals, and even locals may not have.


-NE



REFER TO NEIGHBORHOOD AND SITE
SELECTION MAP FOR FURTHER
EXPLORATION















r er






OCEANA POWER
BOAT CLUB


THE GRAND


VICTORIA AND ALFRED WATERFRONT


http://www.flickr.com/photos/coda/ http://www.thegrand.co.za/gbmain.html
3482432615/


'SA;E
5- .


*all sketch images scanned from 'The Making of Cape Town's Victoria & Alfred Waterfront", Birkby


0


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6@' n rQ


bite CisTrp


As you can see on the property
boundary map, today the site is
transected into two sub parcels,
both ultimately belonging to the
Victoria and Alfred Waterfront
(V & A). There are three separate
users which are under 18 year
leases soon to expire. With that
said, the V & A development
agency has come up with a few
development models for this site.
Each proposed model addresses
the need for small craft docking in
this area, as the majority is
created for large ships in the
working harbor. These models
reflect the need for a hotel or
combined hotel and residences
for the nearby popular tourist
l attractions. Located in the
waterfront are a few upscale
hotels, but are prescribed by the
urban form of their surroundings.




Area- c to cry cSackjround


-ROCK ART
-HUMAN ORIGINS


--







-DISCOVERY BY -OFFICIAL -DIAMONDS -APARTHEID
DUTCH EAST BRITISH COLONY DISCOVERED BEGINS
INDIA TRADING SPARKING
COMPANY MINING INDUSTRY


-NELSON MANDELA
PRESIDENCY


Previously called 'Foreshore' by the Dutch, the earliest European settlers of the Dutch East India Trading Company utilized it as a stopover
between the Indian Ocean and Europe to restock agricultural goods and other necessities. The Dutch, however, were not the first people.
They were called the Khoikhoi and the San. This area was home to many Table Valley residents as sports recreation such as horse races,
sailing regattas, and golfing. It acted as a prisoner-of-war camp during the South African War and associated with the still standing Ft.
Wynard site. A very important event in the history of South Africa was the end of Apartheid, a separation of blacks and whites. It is vital
that this part of their story be approached with sensitivity and great care.


SPRINGBOK RUGBY V & A WATERFRONT


LONG STREET


1IAlULt MUUiN IAIN


UKjbN rUIN I I ADIUM




97ntecnr and Architecturc








One of the most distinguishing architectural types is the Cape Dutch. It is defined by white plaster facades and
restios thatched roofs. It is a combination of the Dutch style with the traditional waddle and daub huts. Multicultural Cape Town is
made up of people of all nationalities, although there is a large Malaysian population. During apartheid it was not only the blacks
and whites that were separated but also'colored'and this forced people with skin colors neither black nor white into a sector. In
any community, people of the same culture will come together. In this case the'Malay'created an area of vibrant colors to spice up
the plaster homes and store fronts.

A modern interpretation of the Cape Dutch style will be the main character for the Bay Lofts, Garden Villas, and the
main lobby building to keep with the vernacular language and elegance. The colors of the Malay neighborhood should be a focal
point along the promenade and attract patrons. It delineates an area of energy and social interaction with that of peace and quiet.




ELEGANCE VS. RUSTIC


MNAI


MODERN VS. TRADITIONAL


CONTEMPORARY LOCAL VERNACULAR


ot,-xo
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ARCHITECTURE


r,


Q~4~d~ #~caWt'


GARDEN VILLAS
2 FLOORS, 28 UNITS


BAY LOFTS
3 FLOORS, 32 UNITS


ot'-xo
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tnasu Cw lcal OWdorld CVeritatsyge UJtek

















...~_ I


hii 'h.: une c:,or Or isr. I. 101 d.,Cumen:f

A :erl :.i .rC p Pro..nc, ;.:-uIh Afr.ic ma3d. upc I ,.ghI prolecied 3ara; co,,r.r.qg 55. i',),
h a Ihe C:3pE FiIral RHeg.C n or.'. of the niche : jire r.3)r plar,[ .n the u ld II repre.enit; lE; I hjn
1 5 )i e irC c.I Airi.a bul l horme To ne rly ;0' O Ire Conhrenri Fl1)r 3 The .ire d.:0I ;v C.ul.-
:.3ni.ng ac:,; iclq i a dr blC-IC-gCal P'reC: e: :i ,: :IOC i -d t'.h [-.e ivnlbc> egeTat.r. !,,,hCh :
urqu..e T.:. ti. C ap l oral Reg..,n Th- ouriiard.r.g d ,er:r, r, dClni ar. der"lderr,;m .or he loir are
amnr.fg the h.grhil torrld'.de 'Jnque plair.N rFproOdu,:tI. :irs j9eg.e adpile ro fre partrr.: cr
eiedd.i:peril b, n-teCle, a.i a'.*- i a; pan-.rn .:.I endemrr.,m 3rd dspli..e radcallor found ,r, he
'l(.r3 3rC .:,i Oul'I i nd q .ng lu.7 ci' :c..r.ce

UNJESCO


C.,/, I?. ,. I p -11,/^ L- L,. ,- L I., 7'
LEGEND















.. ,tr.n Cape Plann.ng 3 3 Zor.r.g Deporrment


I 4". l/.-/* it' L' C'c ".'/."/i,. c\'" x.L "

ENDEMIC AND NEAR ENDEMIC SPECIES
-Will create focal points and perform ornamental functions
-Drawing from (hose 190 species will emphasize the local connec tion
190 species known to be endemic specifically to Cape Town
13400 indigenous species to Cape Town 1200 in entire ULJK)
-Mostly Fybos unique to the Cape Floral Region
AFROMONTINE FOREST
-Biodiversity hotspot
-Provides shade and density required for resort
Forest common to the South African mountains
*Comnprise 0.5,.. of land cover making it unique in area
RENOSTERVELD
-Grassy plants help create visual transition from marine environment to forest
-Fulfills low height plant requirements where necessary on site
-Used by original people for food. medicine and grazing
Present when and where Dutch East India Trading Co's Van Riebeeck began
first vegetable gardens and rjheal culture
ETI1NOBOTANICAL PLANT DISPLAY S


U \ 11 1 1 () N\ N





Cotmfr&ai "rojr m


Ethnobotanical research and community involvement vision: New plants grown in trial gardens,
then to rural people for mass growth and hand processing, sent back to resort in form of spa products.

ETHNOBOTANY:

"Ethnobotany looks at the agricultural customs, plant lore, and plant uses of a culture."*

ETHNOBOTANICALL PLANTS:
were significant to early inhabitants, native species
endemic plants those introduced by early settlers,
culturally important plants,
crop plants cultivated,
those important components of food, clothing, medicine
Flora used in traditional, historical, or modern day natural products
Flora majorly used in historical or modern pharmacology"*

ETHNOBOTANICAL PLANT DISPLAYS
(Historic to Modern Culture)
Medicinal/ Spa Gardens
Agriculture and Textiles
Endemic (in addition to general use of botanical space)


ALOE


ROOBIOS























-RESORT GROUNDS USED FOR BOTANICAL RESEARCH
-URBAN LOCATION
-NIGHT GARDEN ACTIVATION
-LUXURY, WELLNESS PROGRAM
-HEAVY ARCHITECTURE AND GARDEN INTERACTION
-CONTEMPORARY STYLE COMPLIMENTED BY LANDSCAPING
-"PLACE IDENTITY THROUGH CONTRASTING LANDSCAPE
EXPERIENCES"


6aose btudes


AMANJENA


-ELEGANT CULTURAL STYLE
-EXCURSIONS AVAILABLE TO LOCAL MARKETS, HERITAGE
-HISTORIC ISLAMIC GARDEN
-UNIQUE MOROCCAN SPATIAL FEATURES
-MOUNTAIN TREKS INTO ATLAS MOUNTAINS




















.L ,


z _


-100% NET PROFITS RETURNED TO COMMUNITY
- CARBON NEUTRAL OPERATION
-"DISCREET TECHNOLOGY ... TO KEEP ECO-AWARE"
-LOCAL ECONOMIC INCENTIVES TO PROTECT ENVIRONMENT
-EDIBLE LANDSCAPES
-"JUNGLE CARDIO"
-PRIVACY AND PAMPERING




















'-, .14 ;A m



E^ kdlB


U \ 11 1 1 () N\ N







F"a C3tudes


HERITANCE KANDALAMA
ambul OQbi aianka












-HERITAGE CUISINE PROGRAM
-INVASIVE PLANT AND BIO DIVERSITY PROTECTIVE & CONSERVAT
-ECO PARK
-VEGETABLE GARDEN
-COMMUNITY HELP INCLUDING 'LOCAL CRAFTS', HELPING SCHOOL
-REFORESTATION GUEST PROGRAM
-"TRANSCEND TIME AND REALITY"




















0o


BUSHMANS KLOOF
Cla^po O3outh-Ali.n


-GARDEN SPA RESORT
-MEDITATION LABRYNTH
-"ZEST STUDIO" FOR HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PROGRAMS
- MANICURED GROUNDS VERSUS PRESERVED NATURAL









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o.








m. C .


-ROCK ART EDUCATION
-HERITAGE CENTER
-WILDLIFE INTERACTION AND EDUCATION SANCTUARY
-MEDICINAL AND EDIBLE PLANT AREAS


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a






CNf/hborharkd and 03ite Gelction


1. WOODBRIDGE ISLAND


S1T IANDIT DNO


3. VICTORIA AND ALFRED WATERFRONT


groamn to QS ite blectiMn c arti

CRITERIA SITES CRITERIA SITES
1 2 3 1 2 3
SOCIOCULTURAL ECOLOGICAL


COMPATIBILIrT OF FROCPOSED UlSES
CON/siENiENCES
PARiS RECREATION ANDOPEN SPACES
LIFESr LE
ON SiTE AMBiANCE
SAFETY ANDSECURiTI
RELATIONSHIP TOCOMlMUNICATiON PTTERlNS
VIEWS AND VISTAS
RELAXATION ANDWELLNESS VALUE
PROVlMinr TO HERITAGE SITES
TRAVEL
TRAVEL EXPERIENCE
COMMUNir, AMEIANCE
SHOPPING AND COMMERCE
UPSCALE pL-TIvIi ACCESS
LU URVi SEP\ICES AVAILABILIrv
,COMMUNIr CONTRIBUTLIION
LINIOUE CIJLTIJRAL OPPORTuNITIES


TRAFFiCWA.,'
E'tPOSuPE ISUN WIND STORMS FLOODING
PERMANENT TREES AND COVER
SOIL IOl.IALIr AND DEPTHI
ADJACENT STRULICTURES
ECOLOGICAL COMMUNirt
ECOTOUIRISM SITES
HABiTATRESTOPATION
PREVIOLi.L'i DEVELOPED SITE
COMMUTNITr CONNECTiViri
MARINE ACCESS
MiCPOCLiMATE FOR RESEARCH
PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT
LANDSCAPE CHARACTER


* SEVERE LIMITATION
[] MODERATE CONSTRAINT
* CONDITION GOOD
O CONDITION EXCELLENT


C \ 11 1 1 () N\ N









-~ -


Jetty Road
-.," ,._ ..


Oceana Ramp


Lookout Parking


11 1 1 () N\ N


0^it Ci7t lhatos





c(fa7 ineW ap


Wy n cc7I ssufs/ Cfssues.

-TYPE OF CRAFT
-DEPTH REQUIREMENTS
-MARINE POLLUTION
-WASTE MANAGEMENT
-WATER QUALITY
-PIER ORIENTATION
-TERRESTRIAL CRAFT
SUPPORT
-KEY MARINE SPECIES
PROTECTION AND HABITAT



DEEPER THAN 20 METERS
DEEPER THAN 15 METERS
SHALLOWER THAN 15 METERS
SHALLOWER THAN 5 METERS
SHALLOWER THAN 5 METERS


TABLE BAY


LAGOON


PO MOUILLE
GREEN POINT. 4 PO-IRANGER
A& I *.BAY
THERE
ANCHOR
ROCKLANDS
BAY


0 METER LINE


SITE
4. SHIPWRECK

( MARINA

A SLIP

O LIGHTHOUSE

*.4 SEWER OUTFALL

LIGHTS


The marina component stems from the historical transportation mode of sailing. Today there
is a strong link of yachting and watercraft including a working harbor at the V & A. On site, the
Oceana Power Boat Club plays hosts to many different races and provides room for spectators
to many others. There are annual sailing regattas, one of which is the International Cape to Rio,
a major international event. Since the resort is aimed at a wealthier user group, it makes sense
that some of these participants will have interest in the resort, especially as an amenity before
or after these events. Other ocean recreation includes world class diving, whale watching, and
White Shark cage diving further south.





0/t eAnalisf&


RETAIN EXISTING
VEGETATION
PARKING OTY. TO
REMAIN FOR MARINA
AND ASSOCL\TED
USES '\



PROPOSED C% ,",
BUS STOP--.-


DO NOT BLOCK
FORT VIEW OR
'FIRING RANGE'


OCEANA-^


POSSIBLE VISUAL/ FOCAL POINT


Z WINTER WINDS

MINIMIZE PEDESTRIAN/
VEHICULAR CONFLICT

SUMMER WINDS


-POTUIIE N CNTRIT


OPPRTNIIE

1. Grd chang prvie foI nqeashtcvle









3. Hig voum of pdsra /utcirclto last

poeta conflict zones
4 Grd-hnecetssgtvsblt sus


- AO'


PROPERTY LINE

SIGHT VISIBILITY

FOCAL POINT

PROPOSED BUS STOP


(i.) LOW POINT

HIGH POINT

S- PLATFORM


LEGEND

7 VISIBILITY ISSUE FORT VIEW *--- PRIMARY TRAFFIC

WATER ENTRANCE o PEDESTRIAN SECONDARY

AESTHETIC VIEW WINDS E TERTIARY TRAFFIC





Dulturral spiration


CFf9e Ondamis


I7T


o'bAm 5774Ld


cultural C@ons


HISTORICAl SIGNIFIC.\NCF
MAJOR POPULAR CULTURE


SITE LOCATION

SPIRITUAL


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MICROCLIMATE
During the summer (December-May) the"Cape Doctor" or southeast prevailing winds carry infrequent rain, whereas
during winter (June- November) the opposite occurs with northwestern winds bringing frequent rain.

Temperature averages from mid 50's for the minimum and low 70's for the maximum.

The sun will be strongest during winter and will be in full force on the north side of Table Mountain.

Azimuth Angles
Winter Summer
Sunrise 62 12 119 14
Sunset 297 88 240 86

NATURAL SPECIES
8 Red Data List plants species occur within the natural ecosystem although no endemics are known.

SOILS & GEOLOGY
Historically the soils were part of the Renosterveld Biome, highly fertile fine grained clay and silts which attributed
to the settlement of Cape Town as an agriculture stop over. Today, the soils will need to be amended to provide the
proper nutrients. Our site sits on top of an aquifer which means extra care should be given to treatment of
groundwater areas.





w from


Qsitc


A: Towards Southern Corner
DEVILS PEAK, TABLE MOUNTAIN, SIGNAL HILL


C: Towards Woodbridge Island from Coastal Edge
ACROSS TABRT F BAY TO WOODBRIDGF TST AND


C//
B


B: Towards Western Corner
SIGNAL HILL, GREEN POINT STADIUM




































MAIN DRAINAGE & WATER ISSUES


CURRENTLY:


-Prevent sheet flow across street
-Prevent runoff from entering ocean
-Aquifer protection
-Storage and reuse


-No recharge area
-Retention for cleansing
-Visible drainage outlets






reen







Ecofriendly measures include:

- Orientation and building siting to reduce energy use

- Shade to reduce heat

> -Habitat Creation

- Mass vegetation to improve city air quality

- Promotion of ethno botanical and cultural research

- Aquifer management
> Water cleansing

S- Coastal setback and treatment
> Height of buildings, erosion/construction treatment















-Horticultural waste and organic restaurant waste to be com posted for reuse in botanical gardens and other ornamental
landscaping areas.

-Marina to provide for specialty waste collection areas such as filament, oil, etc.

-Grey water systems reused for irrigation of ornamental landscaping areas

-Glass, plastic, and metal recycling to be available for both in room and public guest areas

-Rain collection systems will become a fresh source for culinary gardens and ethno botanical research areas

-Heat recovery systems in place for pool, hot tub, and other specialty spa uses

-Transportation reduced by providing energy efficient on site transportation and associated smart planning practices







K0











* Mix natural environmental areas with structured
* Public Waterfront Access- Victoria and Alfred Waterfront Stitch
* Address streetscape treatment including parking, public transport, drop off zones, and service areas
* Address noise issues
* Ensure guest safety and security
* Protect structures and create relief from strong winds
* Protect structures and create relief from heavy rains
* Minimize negative interaction from back of house functions and renewable energy processes, while
keeping them visible as to educate guest on their purpose
* Leave enough room for appropriate services
* Per apartheid interpretation: Use unity and diversity as design themes
* Respect high water setback and treat construction elevation appropriately
* Stabilize site from future erosion and water events
* Find out materials Availability (Site, Recycled, Local)
* Use climatic conditions as an advantage
* Achieve 'Elegant density': many concepts showcased in an uncluttered way




boncCpt


This concept brings all uses to a central focal point near the road thereby reducing need for day
guests to encroach upon the bulk of the site. This will reduce security issues and enhance
exposure from both pedestrian and vehicular traffic.


UBUNTU
^Unity




boncCpt


This concept solidifies the interrelatedness of the program elements. Most likely this would
require more attention to the design of the edges and to find an appropriate transition between
the edges. Types of users have a better chance of interaction between one another.


. .-. :17,-!S =


IGCKEBI
c



OncC pt


Here, the guest rooms of both types take advantage of the best views and siting strongly caters
to the function of the item instead of the relationship between each use.


KRAAL
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COMMERCIAL

1 LOBBY AND GUEST AMENITIES
FITNESS
LIMITED COMMERCIAL
ADMINISTRATION
MAIN ENTRANCE
2 CONTEMPORARY HERITAGE
DINING AND BAR
3 COMMERCIAL CENTER
MARINA ASSOCIATED CASUAL RESTAURANT
SPA AND BOTANICAL RETAIL
MARINE EQUIPMENT AND RETAIL
4 WINE BAR
BAY LOFTS
5 BAY LOFTS UNITS

6 BAY LOFTS AMENITY
GARDEN VILLAS
7 GARDEN VILLAS UNITS

8 WEDDING AREA

9 RETENTION FEATURE

10 VINOTHERAPY WALK

11 CROSSING

12 HYDROTHERAPY CAVE

13 GARDEN VILLAS AMENITY

MARINA PROMENADE
14 BOAT RAMP

15 SLIPS

16 LOOK OUT

CULTURE GARDENS

17 BACK OF HOUSE

P UNDERGROUND PARK








4~~tcn~rZs~


l 1.1 MATERI.\1 S OF HISTORICA\ 1 \ A.LIF
AND PROCURED IN AN APPROPRIATE MANNER











NATURAL PLASTER


BKLISHIEU LUNLKE I


Il-
PAITI- RN, C CI OR



MADE OF
NIGERIA N
P\I.M ,IHFI 1.


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BAULAU


ROSE GUM


QUARTZITE


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BAY LOFTS POOL
The Bay Lofts Pool area was created as a retreat for the denser loft units. It takes the form of the jetty curve, leaving enough room for
the deck to meet the sea wall, where the winds bring the waves crashing up. It is oriented towards the northwest to maximize sunlight
without the buildings casting shadows. For retreat from the sun lounges are available on the sun shelf which lets the water cover ap-
proximately half of a foot (.15 meters). There are two hot tubs located on either side of the pool providing shade and adequate deck-
ing around them for daytime use. All resort guest will have access to both pools, however, the Bay Lofts Pool is the largest, and one of
the most social areas on site.






SUN LOUNGE


Traditional African
style textiles will
drape the sides of the
sun lounges
providing privacy
when closed. They
will hang from natural
Rose Gum branches
to give a wilder touch
to the plaster col-
umns. All furniture is
waterproof and re-
movable during the
evenings to prevent
excessive wear.






BRAAI PIT


MARINA RETAIL &
COMMI-RCIAL


Braai's are traditional South African
bar-be-que's and a popular past time.
The Braai pit is created to accommodate
cleaning and preparation of the day's
catch before it is perfected on the open
fire grill. It has been located near the
safety of the Bay Lofts and Commercial
buildings, with a wall of its own to
protect from the strong winds.










t*- / I ..


^2


I.-


"N


ART WALK


UNITY PLAZA


.1


Upon entrance to the site day users will drop their car for valet and proceed upon the art walk to the
commercial portion of the site after crossing the Unity Plaza. The art walk should display items of cultural
importance select historical artifacts and sensitive interpretation of apartheid. Unity Plaza could be used as
an extension of the restaurant for special events or for a community gathering or performance of the local
Cape Jazz genre. The walk also extends through the Culture Gardens to the Bay Lofts Amenity area.






ENTRY





KEY
















The Harbor Point entry plaza comes off of Jetty Rd., over the retention bridge, and into the two story Lobby building where your
car will be valeted, directed to parking, or pointed through to the marina. Formal planting is planted along the edges of the road as a
transition from the city into the project where it gives way to unstructured forest. The vegetation focal point of the arrival sequence is
the iconic Baobob tree. The pedestrian path hugs the traditional white plaster walls adorned with periodic depressions to show rock
art from human origins. Acting as decorative pillars on the end are Zulu inspired pottery with planters on top.






CROSSING


PEDESTRIAN
VEHICULAR


SECURITY


SLOBBY I I ARDEN
BUILDING I ELEVATED PEDESTRIAN CROSSING VILLAS
BUILDING IVILLASI


The crossing brings pedestrians from the lobby and waterfront portions of the property to the more
private guest residence of the Garden Villas. Only guests and visitors to the spa are granted access to
provide security, exclusivity, and privacy. Since the wall is 13 meters above grade it is not possible to
pass at ground level, except for at the 'corners' of the property closer to the roads. The wall is to mimic
mountain sides and is planted with natives in the crevices, as would be found in the natural environment.


Q6







teN

,.
iI
Typical Unit Garden Area -
'- \ ~ t ,', J l '^, 17


FURNITURE EXAMPLES








SPA








.* .. ...















CAnotherapp ceuts
The Garden Vilas spa program consist of a Hydrotherapy Cave and Vinotherapy massage huts
amongst a botanical display of historical spa and medicinal gardens.Outside of Cape Town lie
bubbling hot springs, a rejuvinating experience which is brought into the Hydrotherapy Cave and
combined with the Swedish practice of hot water then immediate cold water immersion. Vinotherapy
is a unique massage practice using the residue of wine making and rubbing it into the skin. Wine is a
very popular part of South African culture, with a selection to be proud of.





MARINA PROMENADE

-rfl 122 UJLOOKOUT
FREE DOCKING :.W
(NO SIZE REOUIREMENTSp






SLIPS
I? l m -, I ,



j7.17\ a- x"
t iii**{!iW ;




SA]

V3 ^ A,


-OKN I _


S RI I


It)H RK


SECTION B-B


Here at the marina there are a few main components such as the dock slips, FILL
staging, and the promenade. At the junction of dock staging and the slip
gangways are sculptures on top of the pilings. From the staging area stairs lead
along the quartzite rock wall past the plaster planters heading up to the
promenade for a restaurant or the shops. The terminal jetty point provides the
perfect place for a lookout tower to view or judge any of the watersport races put
on or observed by current users of the Oceana Power Boat Club. It can double its
use as a protected area from the sun when not in use as a lookout. As always,
emergency equipment is required which an be found as a built in compartment to
the planters. '


10


DOCK BEGINNING OF
-PROMENADE STAGING--DOCKING SLIPS

SECTION A-A


NI IS |


NI AN % ,I


O)lI 1I1 RS


1--_


U""





ulture &arden. ( thnobotanical Wlant lsplAs














MEDICINE L/SPA GARDENS .
AGRICULTURE AND TFXTII.ES .


MEDICINAL/ SPA GARDENS




PLANTING GUIDELINES
Culture Gardens to be arranged by aesthetic properties and current/historical
use
Endemic species planted more formally and with distinction from botanical type
highlighted and to act as ornamentals and accents, providing educational
interest
Pedestrian movement within specific plant displays dependent on smaller scale
designs
All placement ultimately dependent on plants growth condition requirements


SPECIALIZED ENDEMIC DISPLAY AREA










LEGEND

L FORESTED AREAS
L (AFROMONTANE AND RENOSTERVELD)

( ) LARGE TREES- 18.3m+





AFROMONTANE F Ra ctcr OmaEST

AFROMONTANE FOREST


RENOSTERVELD &
FYBNOS










Base: Creating own base map from site visit, Google Earth, Cape Town Property Appraisers website,
and Cape Town GIS files

GIS Files Available:
Western Cape Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning
Artificial Surface Area, Biomes, Climate, Coastal Zones, Forest, Geology, Geological Lithos,
National Parks, City Parks, Nature Reserves, Soil Types, Vegetation Zones,"lrriplaceablity"
Values, Natural Remnants, Cape Priority Grids: CAPE Plan System, Marine Reserves,
Protected Natural Environments, Sensitive Lower Vertical Areas, Agricultural Land Use,
Land Cover, Contours, Transport (airfields, railroads, Roads), Drainage Regions
- STATUS: INFORMATION COMPILED

South African Surveyor-General
- Park, Street, Street Name, Unanlienated River Bed
- STATUS: INFORMATION COMPILED

South African Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning
Ramsar Sites, Botanical Gardens, Biodiversity Network, Planning_Urban_Edge, Wetlands,
Indigenous Vegetation
- STATUS: INFORMATION COMPILED




CSibjragp~h


Reference and Information Maps:

General Soils Map AFR_ZA1000_TOSO
http://eusoils.jrc.ec.europa.eu/esdb-archive/eudasm/africa/images/maps/download/afr-za 1000_tos
o.jpg

Zone Map Al Hydrological Zone 5
Zone Map A2 Coastal Protection Zone and Dune 5
Zone Map A3 Conservation and Biodiversity Zone 5
Zone Map A4 Cultural and Recreational Resources Zone 5
Zone Map A5 Natural Economic Resources Zone 5
Zone Map A6 Urban Uses and Utilities Zone 5

Plan PI New Development Areas
Plan P2 Urban Restructuring
Plan P3 Spatial Development Plan


Cape Town Green Map




Cibjgrawpkh


TEXT:
Schmid, Anne M, and Mary Scoviak-Lerner. International Hotel and Resort Design. New York: PBC
International, 1988. Print.

Faiers, Julia. Exotic Retreats: Eco Resort Design from Barefoot Sophistication to Luxury Pad. Mies,
Switzerland: RotoVision, 2005. Print.

Rutes, Walter A, Richard H. Penner, Lawrence Adams, and Walter A. Rutes. Hotel Design, Planning, and
Development. Oxford: Architectural Press, 2001. Print.

Bjorklund, Richard A. A New Product Design Model:The Case of a Caribbean Resort Destination. S.I:
s.n., 1977. Print.

Kunz, Martin N, and Barbel Holzberg. Best Designed Wellness Hotels: North & South Africa, Indian
Ocean, Middle East. Ludwigsburg: Avedition, 2004. Print.

Baud-Bovy, M, Fred R. Lawson, and M Baud-Bovy.Tourism and Recreation Handbook of Planning and
Design. Architectural Press planning and design series. Oxford: Architectural Press, 1998. Print.
Rykwert, Joseph.The Seduction of Place:The City in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Pantheon
Books, 2000. Print.


Invernizzi, Luca. Ultimate Tropical. New York: Rizzoli, 2009. Print.




Cibjgrawpkh

TEXT:
Henderson, Justin. Jungle Luxe: [indigenous-style Hotel and Remote Resort Design Around the
World]. Gloucester, Mass: Rockport, 2000. Print.

Brunn, Stanley D, Jack F. Williams, and Donald J. Zeigler. Cities of the World: World Regional Urban
Development. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003. Print.

Kunz, Martin N. Luxury Hotels:Top of the World. Kempen:TeNeues, 2006. Print.

Masso, Patricia. Cool Hotels: Ecological. Germany: TeNeues, 2006. Print.

Richards, Greg. Cultural Tourism: Global and Local Perspectives. NewYork: Haworth Hospitality Press,
2007. Print.

Booth, Norman K. Basic Elements of Landscape Architectural Design. New York: Elsevier, 1983. Print.

Lauber, Pascale. Cape Town, Architecture & Design. Cologne: Daab, 2007. Print.

Marschall, Sabine, and Brian Kearney. Opportunities for Relevance: Architecture in the New South
Africa. Pretoria: UNISA Press, 2000. Print.




Cibjgrawpkh

TEXT:
Baud-Bovy, M, Fred R. Lawson, and M Baud-Bovy.Tourism and Recreation Handbook of Planning and
Design. Architectural Press planning and design series. Oxford: Architectural Press, 1998. Print.

Veitch, Neil. Waterfront and Harbour: Cape Town's Link with the Sea. Cape Town: Human & Rousseau,
1994. Print.

Dunn, Lily.Time Out Cape Town. London:Time Out, 2004. Print.

Atlas, Randall I. 21 st Century Security and Cpted: Designing for Critical Infrastructure Protection and
Crime Prevention. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2008. Print.

Arnold, Guy. The New South Africa. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000. Print.

Hampton, Carrie, and Andrew Mcllleron.Table Mountain. Cape Town: Struik, 2006. Print




Cibjgrawpkh

TEXT:

South African Tradition: A Brief Survey of the Arts and Cultures of the Diverse Peoples of South Africa.
Pretoria: Dept. of Information, 1974. Print.

Campschreur,Willem, and Joost Divendal. Culture in Another South Africa. New York: Olive Branch
Press, 1989. Print.

Cape Town:The Cape Peninsula National Park and Winelands. Discoverthe magic. Johannesburg,
South Africa: Jacana, 1998. Print.
A Sense of Place: Regeneration









WEB:


http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/media-news-detail?oid=315153&sn=Detail&pid=276571 &-Domestic-Travel-in-South-Africa-

http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/research-home

http://www.gbcsa.org.za/home.php

http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/EnvironmentalResou rceManagement/projects/MarineCoastal/Pages/defau lt.aspx

http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/EnvironmentalResou rceManagement/projects/ClimateChange/Pages/defau lt.aspx

http://www.biomimicryinstitute.org/

http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/EnvironmentalResou rceManagement/projects/Pages/Environmentall nformationSystem.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture

http://www.ecotourism.org/site/c.orLQKXPCLmF/b.4832143/k.CF7C/The International Ecotourism Society Uniting Conservation Communities
and Sustainable Travel.htm

www.ilasa.co.za




ontaiar and gquidancc







Julian Bartel- Landscape Architect, Cape Town, South Africa

Axel Feldman- Landscape Construction-Johannesburg, South Africa

Hector Perez- Associate Professor, Department of Horticulture, UFL

SANBI-

Dave Wurst- Architecture Advisor, Miami, Florida







Full Text

PAGE 1

1

PAGE 2

CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA Harbor Point 2

PAGE 3

Acknowledgements 3

PAGE 4

AXEL FELDMANN HAHN No matter where our heads may BILL AND DENISE STAERKER JULIAN CLARE, & JONAH BARTEL RODDY LOUTHER & MARK THOMPSON UF LA C/O 2011 Acknowledgements 4

PAGE 5

5

PAGE 6

6

PAGE 7

Project Introduction 7

PAGE 8

8 INTRODUCTION Purpose

PAGE 9

9 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 10

10 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 11

11 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 12

Program & Site Amenities: COMMERCIAL AREA Lobby Building (Fitness Limited retail, A dministration Main entrance, Main spa) Main Contemporary Heritage Dining R estaurant with Bar Stand Alone Evening Wine Bar and Cigar Lounge Marina Associated Casual Dining Restaurant Retail Center (Spa, Botanical Marine Accessories) Associated Day Visitor C ar P arking S paces MARINA PROMENADE Public and Private Waterfront Access Event L ookout T ower Yachting, Boating, Sailing Moorage slips Associated car parking spaces Limited Trailer Parking Vessel Launch Fuel area Sanitation Facilities GARDEN VILLAS Garden Villa Guest Units Associated car parking spaces Pool House/ Bar Pool Amenities BAY LOFTS Bay Loft Guest Units Associated car parking spaces Pool Amenity Pool House/ Bar CULTURE GARDENS Vinotherapy Walk Treatment Areas Hydrotherapy Spa Agriculture Display Endemic Display Medicinal Display Program 12 INTRODUCTION 1 150 sq. m 283 sq. m 361 sq. m 240 sq. m 500 sq. m 187 308 160

PAGE 13

DEFINE AND INTERPRET THE RICHES AND CULTURE OF SOUTH AFRICA TO CREATE AN AUTHENTIC INTIMATE AND EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE FOSTER LOCAL PRIDE AND VISITOR EXPOSURE TO TRADITIONAL VALUES DRAW UPON SOUTH AFRICAN TRADITIONAL LIFE PRINCIPLES TO DEFINE FORM AND FUNCTION, SUCH AS IGCKI UBUNTU, INDIVIDUAL BEING CREATES SPACES, KRAAL, SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS AND SETTLEMENT PATTERNS, LISTEN TO CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS TO DICTATE THE PROPER SIZE PROGRAMMING, AND LAYOUT Goals and Objectives 13 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 14

FORM COMMUNITY RELATIONS AS PART OF SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM AND FOR INTEGRATED CULTURAL INTERACTION CREATE A COMFORTABLE, HOME LIKE FEELING GIVING A SENSE OF INTIMACY WITH THE ENVIRONMENT CREATE WELLNESS RETREAT AND REJUVENATION OPPORTUNITIES CREATE GROUNDS FOR ETHNO BOTANICAL DISPLAY FOSTER CARE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT FROM GUESTS Goals and Objectives 14 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 15

15 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 16

Urbanism and the Cultural Component 16 INTRODUCTION REFER TO NEIGHBORHOOD AND SITE SELECTION MAP FOR FURTHER EXPLORATION

PAGE 17

Research 17

PAGE 18

18 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 19

19

PAGE 20

Interior and Architecture 20 RESEARCH

PAGE 21

21 RESEARCH

PAGE 22

22 RESEARC H

PAGE 23

23 ANALYTICAL

PAGE 24

ETHNOBOTANY : ETHNOBOTANICAL PLANT DISPLAYS Botanical Program 24 ANALYTICAL ALOE ROOBIOS

PAGE 25

25 RESEARCH

PAGE 26

26 RESEARCH

PAGE 27

Analytical Drawings 27

PAGE 28

28 ANALYTICAL

PAGE 29

29 ANALYTICAL

PAGE 30

30

PAGE 31

31 Site Analysis ANALYTICAL

PAGE 32

32 ANALYTICAL

PAGE 33

Site Info. MICROCLIMATE NATURAL SPECIES SOILS & GEOLOGY 33 ANALYTICAL Winter Summer Sunrise 62.12 119.14 Sunset 297.88 240.86 Azimuth Angles

PAGE 34

34 Views from Site A B C DEVILS PEAK, TABLE MOUNTAIN, SIGNAL HILL SIGNAL HILL, GREEN POINT STADIUM ACROSS TABLE BAY TO WOODBRIDGE ISLAND ANALYTICAL

PAGE 35

35 Existing Drainage & Grading MAIN DRAINAGE & WATER ISSUES ANALYTICAL CURRENTL Y :

PAGE 36

Green Design 36

PAGE 37

Purpose 37 GREEN DESIGN

PAGE 38

38 GREEN DESIGN

PAGE 39

39 Design Process

PAGE 40

Design Guidelines 40 PROCESS

PAGE 41

41 Concept PROCESS

PAGE 42

42 Concept PROCESS

PAGE 43

43 Concept PROCESS

PAGE 44

44 Master Plan

PAGE 45

45

PAGE 46

46 Design Detail

PAGE 47

47 Materials DETAIL

PAGE 51

Commercial DETAIL 51 Upon entrance to the site, day users will drop their car for valet and proceed upon the art walk to the commercial portion of the site after crossing the Unity Plaza. The art walk should display items of cultural importance, select historical artifacts, and sensitive interpretation of apartheid. Unity Plaza could be used as an extension of the restaurant for special events or for a community gathering or performance of the local Cape Jazz genre. The walk also extends through the Culture Gardens to the Bay Lofts Amenity area.

PAGE 54

54 Garden Villas DETAIL FURNITURE EXAMPLES

PAGE 56

56 DETAIL Marina

PAGE 59

DETAIL 59 AFROMONTANE FOREST RENOSTERVELD & FYBNOS Landscape Character Images

PAGE 60

Appendix 60

PAGE 61

Base Materials 61 APPENDIX

PAGE 62

Bibliography 62 APPENDIX

PAGE 63

Bibliography 63 APPENDIX

PAGE 64

Bibliography 64 APPENDIX

PAGE 65

Bibliography 65 APPENDIX

PAGE 66

Bibliography 66 APPENDIX

PAGE 67

Bibliography 67 APPENDIX

PAGE 68

Contacts and Guidance 68 APPENDIX

PAGE 69

69