Reunifying downtown Ocala

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Material Information

Title:
Reunifying downtown Ocala
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Ramhold, William L. II
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
The project will focus on the redevelopment opportunities adjacent to the Tuscawilla Park area to act as a catalytic node of activity, in order to re-establish a currently severed connection between the Downtown Ocala core and Tuscawilla Park. Development of the adjacent parcels will drive a well planned and designed urban collaboration of structure and open space. Such a development will not diminish the unique qualities of Tuscawilla Park and/or Downtown core, but will extend and enhance them by creating a more enjoyable and interactive connection, reinforcing the idea that development follows open space. This proposal will begin its investigation at multiple scales of concern to gain as much knowledge of the surrounding context as well as the intricate details experienced at the personal level. Indulging in such detail will result in a well designed master plan of the most influential parcels to be redeveloped. To complete the proposal, a master plan and details of the connecting greenspaces will reinforce the suggested development strategies. Ultimately, this proposal will create a wholistic vision for the future of the area nestled between the Downtown Ocala core and Tuscawilla Park, which will be presented to the City of Ocala.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00004144:00001


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IRel Downtown Ocala
























Undergraduate Senior Capstone Project

by

William L. Ramhold II
for the

University of Florida
Department of Landscape Architecture
2011


submitted in partial fulfillment
of the degree
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture
and as an
Honors Thesis


Faculty Advisor: Les Linscott








ITable of Contentsl

Acknowledgements i
Abstract iii
Overview v




Introduction 1.1
Location IContextj 1.3
History IDevelopment of a Cityl 1.5
Proposal IStrategyl 1.7




Research (Design Phase I) 2.1
Local Information IProposalsl 2.3
Case Study |Community Developmentl 2.7
Case Study |Housing Developmentl 2.9




Inventory/Analysis (Design Phase II) 3.1
Context Opportunities & Constraints 3.3
Context |Urban Structurel 3.5
Context ISocial Structurel 3.11
Context IGeographical Structurel 3.17
Site Opportunities & Constraints 3.19
Site IUrban Structurel 3.21
Site ISocial Structurel 3.25
Site IGeographical Structurel 3.27
Human Opportunities & Constraints 3.29
Human |Urban Structurel 3.31
Human ISocial Structurel 3.33


















Synthesis (Design Phase III) 4.1
Context / Site IStructures Reveall 4.3




Design (Design Phase IV) 5.1

Diagramming jUrban Connectionsl 5.3
Concepts ISpatial Organizationl 5.5

IREI
Proximities 5.9
Extension 5.11
Proposal 5.13
Master Plan 5.15
Phasing Plan 5.17
Enlargements 5.19

IREI
Greenway 5.23

IREI
Proposal 5.29
Yalaahe Park 5.31
Urban Plaza 5.33
Naturalistic Plaza 5.37
Tuscawilla Park Gateway 5.39



Conclusion 6.1


Bibliography 7.1







IAcknowledgementsl






would like to begin by giving thanks to everyone who contributed to this
project, particularly my advisor, Les Linscott, and Liz Houck, Marc Mondell and
Tye Chighizola who graciously represent the City of Ocala. Their willingness to
assist me during the development of this project is reason for its existence.

















appreciation is also in order for the entire faculty of the Department of
Landscape Architecture who have guided me through the past 5 years of my
undergraduate studies and have helped develop a foundation of design
fundamentals and theory evident within this project.




ost importantly, I would like to thank my parents and sister for supporting
me through the many years of my academic ventures. Their guidance and
advice have kept my vision clear and direction straight. I am also greatful for
the friendships that have formed with studiomates throughout the recent years
and will definetly carry the many memories shared among us.









IAbstractl


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The project will focus on the redevelopment opportunities adjacent to the
Tuscawilla Park area to act as a catalytic node of activity, in order to re-establish a
currently severed connection between the Downtown Ocala core and Tuscawilla
Park.

Development of the adjacent parcels will drive a well planned and designed urban
collaboration of structure and open space. Such a development will not diminish
the unique qualities of Tuscawilla Park and/or Downtown core, but will extend and
enhance them by creating a more enjoyable and interactive co-nactiz;
reinforcing the idea that development follows open space.

This proposal will begin its investigation at multiple scales of concern to gain as
much knowledge of the surrounding context as well as the intricate details
experienced at the personal level. Indulging in such detail will result in a well
designed master plan of the most influential parcels to be redeveloped. To
complete the proposal, a master plan and details of the connecting greenspaces
will reinforce the suggested development strategies. Ultimately, this proposal will
create a wholistic vision for the future of the area nestled between the Downtown
Ocala core and Tuscawilla Park, which will be presented to the City of Ocala.









IOverviewl


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The City of Ocala is increasingly progressive in respect to redevelopment planning
for the Downtown core as evident in the 1988 CRA and 2004 Downtown Master
Plan. The redevelopment strategy in the 2004 Downtown Master Plan gave some
direction for which the City has taken into consideration. This master plan had a
detailed focus on the immediate Downtown core area, although, it only briefly
suggested development possibilities for the area adjacent to Tuscawilla Park,
which can have a large influence on the success of the Downtown redevelopment.

There are a number of underutilized and/or vacant parcels of land to be included
in this redevelopment study. These include a site currently being used as a horse
feed processing plant, and numerous parcels currently used for small commercial
and/or retail businesses and on-grade parking. Although unable to assign degrees
of contamination in regards to physical contamination to these sites, the City of
Ocala has accepted brownfield designation based on the perceived contamination,
in order to receive federal funding to benefit the community.

Employing the development suggestions from the 2004 Downtown Master Plan in
conjunction with future zoning provided by the City of Ocala and using a design
process of inventory, analysis, synthesis and design, the project will begin with a
detailed investigation of the area adjacent to Tuscawilla Park to propose a
redevelopment plan of the parcels. These particular parcels were chosen to be
included in the more detailed investigation due to their significant proximity to both
the park and downtown. Stormwater runoff and conveyance as well as the
infusion of green space will be the driving forces in the organization of urban forms
and infrastructure within the development. The final step in the design process
and conclusion of this particular project will be the detailing of an integral public
green space.


Redevelopment Area:
o (9) Parcels = 21 acres
o All parcels are privately owned
o Current land uses include medium industrial and retail services and offices




INTRODUCTION

































































1.2




INTRODUCTION


IContextl


Regional


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Local


I Tuscawilla Park
Project Location
Downtown Square


Ocala, Marion County, Florida




INTRODUCTION


IDevelopment of a Cityl


Timucuan Indian culture
discovered, largest
village called Ocali


Fort King site becomes
key military post during
Seminole Wars


Ocala incorporated as
county seat; largest city
in Marion County



Rail service introduced
to city


Thanksgiving Day fire
destroys downtown;
nicknamed "The Brick
City" after rebuild

"Big Freeze" damages
citrus crops; Ocala
adjusts as phosphate &
tourist destination


Downtown Community
Redevelopment Area
(CRA) established


Ocala Downtown
Master Plan created


Operation Tuscawilla
begins; multi-
department
improvement effort


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1894




1988




2004




2010


Chronological


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Physical


1998 Aerial


Incorporated in 1846 as the county seat and largest city in Marion County, Ocala
instills a long line of history. The city was focused around agriculture, especially
citrus in the nineteenth century, but was devastated by the 'Great Freeze' of 1894.
Ocala then began to thrive as a tourist destination, utilizing the nearby natural
springs of Silver Springs, and also becoming well-known on the thoroughbred
horse scene as 'The Horse Capital of the World'.

With increased popularity of the beautiful climate, friendly citizens, stunning
scenery and ideal central location within the state, Ocala began to grow at soaring
rates. Like most American cities, Ocala has fallen victim to urban sprawl. The
large influx of new residents scoured up large amounts of open land further away
from the downtown core. A strong reliance on the automobile has influenced the
development of shopping malls, strip commercial centers and residential
communities further away from the downtown. This resulting blanket of blight
draped over the historic roots of Ocala has taken its toll not only on the urban
infrastructure, but also on the community cohesion that once fortified this city.

The City of Ocala has recognized the negative impact that urban sprawl has had
on the downtown core and have taken action. A Community Redevelopment Area
(CRA), which encompasses the Downtown and Tuscawilla Park areas, was
established in 1988. In order to conserve and revitalize the Downtown, the CRA
provides recommendations for planning redevelopment and mechanisms for
stimulating such redevelopment through tax breaks, incentives and Tax Increment
Financing. To further emphasize the motivation the City of Ocala is portraying, a
Downtown Master Plan was developed by a consulting team in 2004. This
redevelopment plan offers a vision of the future for which the City can uphold.
Another progressive approach is a master plan for Tuscawilla Park to help
enhance the qualities of the park, which the City is currently implementing.




INTRODUCTION


IStrategyl
SOverall Goals and Objectives
/) area surrounding Tuscawilla Park

So Propose new land uses
0-
O o Incorporate mixed-use/medium-high density development

0. o Create a seamless transition between adjacent land uses

t Tuscawilla Park to Downtown Square of Ocala
o Create more walkable streets

o Propose a shared catalytic interest/activity

o Infill with green infrastructure as linking fabric

interest and social activity to Tuscawilla Park area
o Introduce/Re-introduce occasions for social gathering

o Establish year-round, all-day uses

o Utilize public interaction to create awareness and involvement










Design Process


The project will utilize a process of research, inventory, analysis, synthesis and
design. This problem solving process will efficiently and strategically develop an
understanding of data collected to develop a final design which will successfully
achieve the desired goals.



RESEARCH (Phase I)

Acquisition of data from the City of Ocala as well as other means create a
wealth of knowledge of the past, current and future wants and needs of the city
and its residents. Recent projects of similar scale and context are explored as
potential design influence as well.

INVENTORY /ANALYSIS (Phase II)

In-depth investigation of the acquired data is performed. Natural, human and
urban environments are examined to reveal key observations of each which
will become areas of focus for the resulting design. Three scales of concern -
context, site and human are established to comprehend the magnitude of
impacts this project may impose. Within each scale of concern, a further
division of data is separated into 'structures' urban, social, and geographical -
to create a method of organization which assist in interpreting as well as
presenting the data.

SYNTHESIS (Phase III)

General information absorbed through research, inventory and analysis are
represented in a single graphic. This presents an overall comprehension of
the data as well as important factors that will be taken into consideration during
the next phase of design.

DESIGN (Phase IV)

The final phase of the design process takes into consideration all previous
phases as a final collection of ideas and intents is created. The goals and
objectives are achieved through the proposed design details. The intent to
S", ", and "f ," are the driving forces within the
final phase and created a framework for which the design process followed.




RESEARCH

































































2.2





RESEARCH


IProposalsj City of Ocala

2004 Downtown Master Plan
The ultimate goal of the Downtown Master Plan provided to the City of Ocala
in 2004 by Moore lacofano Goltsman (MIG), Inc. is to "build on the plans,
traditions and collective energy that have boosted Downtown's vitality to date,
while providing a guiding framework and specific, action-oriented
implementation steps". With a central focus on the Downtown Square, and
including strategies from the 1988 CRA and real-world economic analysis, the
master plan develops a very feasible redevelopment plan and vision for what
the Downtown area could return to economically and physically.


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Strategy Diagram
City of Ocala Downtown Master Plan

The strategy diagram is a graphical overview of the detailed analysis outlined in
the entire master plan document. The diagram visually explains the
recommendations provided to the City of Ocala in regards to downtown land
uses, adjacencies, transportation, circulation and open space networks.


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Primary Development Opportunity Sites
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IProposalsl City of Ocala

2010 Osceola Avenue Greenway


Silver Springs Blvd. / S.R. 40


1F in
S.E. Fort King Street

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Continuing with the design ideas recommended in the 2004 Downtown Master
Plan, a preliminary design was developed for a portion of Osceola Avenue to act
as a pedestrian greenway. The proposed multi-modal greenway begins at State
Road 40 and travels (4) blocks south to Southeast 3rd Avenue. If implemented,
this portion of the greenway will allow for pedestrian and cyclist circulation as
well as accommodate for the very minimal frequency of train traffic that occurs.
It will connect the collection of local government buildings including the
Chamber of Commerce and Ocala Electric Utility at the southern end, to the
downtown square (1) block west at the northern end.


RESEARCH


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2010 Tuscawilla Park Conceptual Master Plan
The city of Ocala has established a master plan for Tuscawilla Park to improve
and update its usability as well as visual aesthetic. The conceptual design
incorporates the addition of pavilions, playgrounds, fishing platforms, lake
fountains, improved parking and connecting sidewalks. Some of these ideas
have already begun to be implemented and have successfully extended the life
of the park.
at. art




RESEARCH


ICommunity Developmentl
0" Holiday Neighborhood: Boulder, Colorado
The Holiday Neighborhood project is a 27-acre mixed-use, mixed-income
neighborhood. The master plan, designed by Barrett Studio Architects, is
structured as a series of pedestrian-scaled spaces that create a sense of place
f for the community. Containing approximately 330 residences, the designers
provided 40% affordable housing with homes ranging from 580-2,700 square
I feet and pricing starting at $100,000. The overall layout provides a variety of
residential types, offices, neighborhood retail all with 3 story maximum height
C structures a large common park, as well as pocket parks, all of which are
< connected by walkable tree lined streets.














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The developer and design firm convinced the city of Boulder to adjust its zoning
parameters within the site to allow for more compact homes than traditional
residential subdivisions. This change allowed for 20 units per acre as opposed
to the previous 10 unit per acre maximum. By favoring mass transit over cars,
the design team also achieved a reduction in parking requirements to 1.1 space
per unit in the Wild Sage Co-housing portion. Similar in scale, this project
helped to understand the possibilities in proposing adjustments to city zoning
requirements in order to establish a better community-rich atmosphere as well
as enhanced livability and walkability, as opposed to traditional residential
subdivisions who promote vehicle use.










Railroad Square: Santa Rosa, California
The Railroad Square project is a proposed 5.4 acre development along the future
Sonoma Marin Area Rapid Transit (SMART) train line. In anticipation of the new
train system, WRT Solomon E.T.C. has designed a transit-oriented development
which is expected to revitalize the adjacent downtown of Santa Rosa. This new
"transit village" contains a mixture of restaurants, retail shops and community
facilities on ground level and 250 units of housing on upper levels which is
focused on providing for a intended group of SMART train users.


The heart of the village is a Food and Wine Center, which a market featuring local
foods and a space for a culinary school to be used by Santa Rosa Junior College
- will be situated. Other features of the project include a housing density of 61
units per acre, two pedestrian-only corridors and a central crescent-shaped open
space for impromptu gatherings and progressive energy and stormwater systems.
This particular project helped to understand the appropriate design approach in
relation to utilizing a future mass transit system, while also enhancing an existing
downtown currently bisected by a major thoroughfare. Railroad Square also
assists by providing a vision to include local community organizations as an anchor
which will eventually insure the projects' success and longevity.





RESEARCH



IHousing Developmentl
0 Thornton Creek at Northgate Commons: Seattle, Washington
Once a babbling creek with salmon, Thornton Creek has since been flowing
under a sea of infill and pavement in underground piping. Located at the
**- southeast corner of the Northgate Mall complex, the channel has now become
f a 2.7 acre stormwater treatment area and heart of a larger 8 acre mixed-use,
transit-oriented development. The development, designed by SvR Design
S Company, utilizes the site by incorporating 500 housing units as well as office
0 and retail space and almost 3 acres of open space that treat 680 acres of
stormwater runoff during small rain storms.


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This channel provides habitat and functions as a bioswale mimicking a natural
stream bed by including cascading weirs, pools, boulders and rip-rap. It treats
stormwater runoff from the nearby Interstate, North Seattle Community College
campus, Seattle's north end public transit hub, adjacent streets and the
Northgate Mall. As a whole, the Thornton Creek and Northgate Commons
create a successful system in which urbane and natural structures interweave
to create a livable community while simultaneously enhancing the future
survival of the natural context.









Headwaters at Tyron Creek: Portland, Oregon
Buried for decades under 20 feet of urban development, a stream once feeding
into Tryon Creek a tributary of the Willamette River has been brought back to
life. Though the actual revitalization and daylighting of the creek included
acquisition of adjacent property in order to maximize the positive impact
downstream, this ephemeral creek has become the focal point of a new 3.7 acre
high density mixed residential housing development.

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Runoff of 65 acres from mostly developed upland drains into the creek, creating a
unique site amenity that is utilized by a 56-unit apartment building for low-income
senior citizens, two buildings of 100 affordable units and 14 condominium town
houses. Similar to the Thornton Creek case study, the daylighting of stormwater -
in this case, an actual creek may apply to the Tuscawilla Park area. The
implementation of high density residential in such limited constraints is also a key
factor related to this project.


2.10




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS

































































3.2




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IContextual Scalel

SScope of Analysis


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7{ Downtown Square


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Information


Opportunities

Great vehicular connection to area
Other redevelopment projects being planned for the area
Rezoning creates better use of existing land
Surrounding existing neighborhoods supply potential interest
Transportation hub located within area

Constraints

Urban sprawl has left area less desirable
Park is covered by an urbane fabric
Lack of connections to other green space and residential areas
Significant amount of heavily used roadways within area
Outdated zoning creates land use adjacency conflicts
Low density development reduces efficiency of land

Scales of Concern
1. Context
Urban Structure
Patterns
Connections
Walkability
Social Structure
_Population
Use
Identity
Geographical Structure
Geology

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INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IUrban Structurel Patterns


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IObservationsl


- Clear distinction of development patterns
- Irregular disbursement of large scale structures vs. regular
disbursement of small scale structures
- Low density development emits from downtown square


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Transportation Network
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Project Location

Downtown Square
I Structure
Road
Railway


IObservationsl


- Evident hierarchy of streets
- Typical grid street layout
- CSX Rail (Old Amtrak) = high traffic; Florida Northern R.R. = low traffic
- Grid layout losses integrity further away from downtown square


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INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IUrban Structurel Connections


Open Space


IObservationsl


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- Lack of connections between open spaces
- Limited amount of public open space
- Clear disconnect between project site and downtown square


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Institutional Structure i
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Primary Arterial Road
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bcRailway Line
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1Jy Traffic Count
Public Surface Parking I.
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|Observations| 0 250' 500' 1000

Substantial amount of surface parking
Abundant sources of mass transit and vehiclular circulation
Lack of bicycle connections, although will be enhanced by proposed
bicycle paths




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IUrban Structun


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Walkability


Tree Canopy Cover
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- Majority of canopy cover in less urban area to the east
- Canopy cover is very fragmented
- Limited canopy cover creates uncomfortable micro-climate


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5 Minutes


Project Location
'( Downtown Square
1/4 Mile Walking Distance
(5 min.)
1/2 Mile Walking Distance
(10 min.)
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- Site is within 5 minute walk of downtown square
- Site is within 10 minute walking distance of many existing amenities


Distance


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INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


ISocial Structurel Population

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- Majority of population on east side of project site


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Median Age


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Project Location


Downtown Square
People per Acre
10 20 (years of age)
20 30 (years of age)
30 40 (years of age)
40 50 (years of age)
50-60 (years of age)
60 -70 (years of age)
70 and Older (years of age


IObservationsl


.J U -l -. ... .... .......
ElI __-- Em



Oi 2i5 500' o 0

0' 250' 500 1,000


- Majority of adjacent residents are between 30 40 years of age.
- Projected increase of +3,000 residents every 5 years


3.12




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


X

LU
O
O


ISocial Structurel


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.. .... .. .
6; e1111


Use


Existing
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I*

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rM


0' 250 500' 1,000


IObservationsl


- Disarray among land uses
- Inappropriate land use adjacencies
- Fair amount of vacant parcels
- Fair amount of surface parking lots among downtown


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Future 2012 (City Proposed)

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....... ....... ......


Project Location

Downtown Square

Low Density Residential

Medium Density Residential

Neighborhood Business
Retail Services

Wholesale & Other Businesses
Light Industrial

Medium Industrial
Public Buildings / Facilities
Recreation Open Space

Downtown Commercial (CRA)
Public Facililtes (CRA)

Mixed Use 1 (CRA)
Mixed Use 2 (CRA)

Parking Lot

Vacant


111agg


0' 250' 500 1000'


IObservationsl


- Organization among land uses
- More appropriate land use adjacencies
- Community Redevelopment Areas (CRA) established
- Limited public open space


3.14


~------,
,.....,

'Il(t


LMI



J~




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


ISocial Structurel Identity


LUI
!-

O
C.)


I


Downtown Ocala
Historic Distct

S.R. 40


IObservationsl


Preservation


Tuscawilla
Park


.. I !
Tuscawlila Park
H toric Distrct



] 1
L --d


/ rI : Is ILI
1 4! I lip la
j I -l --
Ocala Historic Disrict
0' 250' 500 1,000'


- Large collection of historic structures
- City is proactive in the historic preservation community
- Influential streets carry historic value











Historic Architectural Styles


- Queen Anne Revival .. -- -.- al
- Queen Anne
- Mediterranean Revival
- Classic Revival
- Tudor Revival
- Romanesque
-American Bungalow *
- Georgian Revival e
- Frame Vernacular
- Vernacular
- Spanish Colonial Revival
- Colonial Revival
- Carpenter Gothic
- Gothic
- Neoclassical
- Second Empire
-Bungalow
- Masonry Vernmacular
- Commercial Vernacular





















1 IILDREN WALK
FEB U E W PM






Project Location '
II
Downtown Square ..

HistoricStreet

L. Historic District

Contributing Structure

Non-Contributing Structur


IObservationsl

Many historic architectural styles, both residential and commerical
Strong representation of the history
Signage educates public of uncovered and preserved history


3.16




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IGeographical Structurel Geology


Topography
-4 1


IObservationsl


- Site is included in watershed of Tuscawilla Lake
- Downtown square is at higher elevation than site
- View of Tuscawilla Park from downtown square is hidden by
topography change


X
LU
F-
Z
0
C)


0' 250' 500o 1,000'











Soils


- Project Location
Z' Downtown Square
Very Poorly Drained Soil
Somehwat Poody Drained So
Well Drained Soil


0 250' 500' 1,000


IObservationsl


- Majority of context is poorly drained soil
- All soil types contain 30-50% urban mixture
- Site is southward of a flood prone area (Tuscawilla Lake)


3.18




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


ISite Scalel


Scooe of Analysis


:------ I
*-""
S------Project Location
7" Downtown Square


0' 125 250' 500











Information


Opportunities

Reverse impermeability to reduce runoff from sites
Adaptive use of existing commercial/industrial structures
Vacant parcels afford limitless design possibilities
Water retention ponds act as existing green spaces
Passive/active recreation park adjacent to parcels
Wide right-of-ways allow for street expansion/streetscape

Constraints

Flanked on west by highly commercialized/industrialized land
uses
Large amount of impervious surfaces (parking lots) with large
amounts of runoff
Busy railroad creates northern border
Individual parcels of concern separated by roads

Scales of Concern

Urban -e



Us





2. Site
Urban Structure
Connections
Environmental
Social Structure
Use
Geographical Structure
_Geology


3.20





INVENTORY / ANALYSIS



IUrban Structurel Connections


Circulation


'I__________
'I


I I




III


1
----ST~-.R40
---


IObservationsl


0' 125' 250' 500'


- Multiple modes of connectivity
- Lack of sidewalks around project location limit pedestrian connection to
Tuscawilla Park
- Many curb cuts create vehicle / pedestrian conflicts along sidewalks
- S.R. 40 creates substantial separation between North / South downtown


_-- -


SI



:1




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SI



-I








Vertical Transects










I



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a.






I


I


E-

.R. 40


Project Location


Downtown Square
Traffic Signal
S Direclion of Traffic
SRailway Line
Sidewalk
Public Bus Route
On-Street Parking
*-.... Future On-Street Bicycle Path
S Mass Transit Hub


IObservationsl


0' 125' 250' 500'


- Very urbane western adjacent transect
- Scale of buildings remain constant along western transect
- More naturalistic eastern adjacent transect
- Scale of buildings diminish south to north along eastern transect


3.22


F
a


9


-->
Ui


U+





INVENTORY / ANALYSIS



IUrban Structurel Environmental

Stormwater Conveyance


* -...


Lake
Tuscawilla


* L


4


*K


0



S.R. 40

4
c-9.
9?


9 *9i ...'c~-
*, i


--


- -I


0' 125' 250' 500'


- All of stormwater within the downtown area is directed to Tuscawilla Lake
- Main stormwater pipes flow thru or adjacent to project site
- 23 inlets located adjacent to or within project site


*4t


labservationsi








Permeability

I ir
OfP
asop
er USsa


Lake
Tuscawilla


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No=


Project Location
I Project Location
SDowntown Square
* Stonrwater Drain Inlet
Stormwater Pipe
Pervious Surface
Impervious Surface (Paving)
SImpervious Surface (Structure)


U1I




I


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S.R. 40 -- a

|Itr


| observations
lObservationsi


. n e 4.. ...

m .


1


0' 125' 250 500'


- Substantial amount of area is impervious surface
- Majority of pervious surface is in retention pond, Tuscawilla Park, housing
- 73% of site is impervious surface (structure + paving)


3.24


I" F*-


I


nh


a:'


I
;; II




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS

ISocial Structurel Use
I Existina


N























































-.. Project Location
S Downtown Square


Statistics

Site 1
- Address:
- Use:
- Owner:
- Value
- Parcel Size:
- Description:

Site 2
- Address:
- Use:
- Owner:
- Value:
- Parcel Size:
- Description:

Site 3
- Address:
- Use:
- Owner:
- Value:
- Parcel Size:
- Description:

Site 4
- Address:
- Use:
- Owner:
- Value:
- Parcel Size:
- Description:

Site 5
- Address:
- Use:
- Owner:
- Value:
- Parcel Size:
- Description:


335 N.E. Watula Avenue "
Medium Industrial
Seminole Feed
$1,750,000
8.4 acres
Processes, manufactures and distributes horse feed


232 N.E. Watula Avenue .....-
Retail Services
UniFirst
$1,000,000
2.8 acres
Supplier of uniforms, workwear and related products


210 N.E. 2nd Street ( Prudential
Retail Services
Prudential: Florida Realty of Ocala
$460,000
2.3 acres
Real estate brokerage firm


203 E. Silver Springs Blvd. SUNTRUST ATHE
Retail Services
Suntrust Bank & Atheros Communications
$3,600,000
1.7 acres
Branch bank & production of chipsets for wired/wireless
communication


315 E. Silver Springs Blvd.
Retail Services
Walt's Pawn
$375,600
.58 acres
Pawn and jewelry shop


ROS


WALT'S:"
IPAWNSk7OOLD BUYER


[Observationsl

- Diverse collection of businesses
- Site 4 utilizes the large building as office space for two companies
- Highest value along Silver Springs Blvd.


3.26


A/M -I


FT


Now--
............... ..




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IGeographical Structurel


IObservationsl


- Elevation change of 18 feet within site
- Site slopes down from south to north
- Steepest slope within site is 8%, while the majority is 1-2%


Geology


100
0' 125 250 500'























Project Location


C-C,


B-B'


Project Location


Project Location


r------,
SProject Location

S Downtown Square


A-A'


Project Location


Sections








D-D'


-~


3.28


-- --.- .'
I -




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


-IHuman Scalel


Scooe of Analysis


SProject Location
.------ Project Location


0' 125 250 500










Information


Opportunities

Walkable streets create connections to surrounding areas
Existing park provides key element of interest
Urban greenspaces can allow for stormwater education
Introduce vegetation to enhance microclimate

Constraints

Unfriendly streetscape/walkability
Homeless create awkward situations
Depleted community activities in area
No "place" to go, no reason to be here
Unbearable microclimate due to non-existent vegetation

Scales of Concern










3. Human
Urban Structure










Viewsheds
Social Structure










Walkability
Quality of Life
-;Social Structure


3.30




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


IUrban Structurel


Viewsheds


IObservationsl
- Views toward project location are unsightly
- Views toward Tuscawilla Park are very valuable
- Views along western edge present backside of buildings
- Views of Seminole Feed intrude upon views from within Tuscawilla Park








































































,-----1
*- : 'Project Location

Downtown Square





3.32




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS


ISocial Structurel Walkability


'.4.


. .
A
-I


IObservationsl

- Majority of walkable streets are not pedestrian friendly
- Downtown square and east side of project site are walkable
- Negative visuals produce unwelcome atmosphere






















A"L


N


,------,
' ': Project Location

S Downtown Square


3.34




INVENTORY / ANALYSIS

ISocial Structurel Quality of Life
SUsers










Program

- Support adjacent activities

- Enhance adjacent activities

- Neighborhood feel

- Mix of affordable housing

- Separate vehicle and pedestrian

- Alternate transportation integration

- Act as rotary for surrounding activities in city

- Iconic symbol to assist in wayfinding





Sense of Place


3.36




SYNTHESIS































































4.2




SYNTHESIS


IStructures Reveall

Following the inventory and analysis phase, a compilation of the most important
Cf) and relevant information that drive the next phase of design, is compiled into a
single map. This illustration helps to graphically represent the key observations
points and organize these points into a hierarchical system of consideration.
Along with the key observations described, other significant information
explained in the synthesis map is the direction of stormwater flow which will be
UI an important design element within the proposed redevelopment area. The
possible gateways into and out of the redevelopment area are important design
.. observations as well.










Synthesized Observations


Retention
Pond


Hub


Lake Tuscawilla


Project Location

SPoint of Interest
Important Viewshed

S1 Possible Gateway

Important Intersection
m a Highly Used 4-lane Road
) i Possible Pedestrian Greenwa
j,~UWtf Possible Buffer
S-... Stormwater Flow
c=aE = Enhance Connection
0 > Important Connection
0- Dangerous Connection






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S.R. 40




Downtown Sqaure


*3


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0' 125' 250' 500'


IKey Pointsl


- Possible pedestrian greenway acts as connecting spine
- Stitching severed connection across S.R. 40 is key to project survival
- Utlize, preserve and enhance key views of Lake Tuscawilla and ret. pond
- Utilization of Transit Hub is key to project survival


4.4


9




DESIGN

































































5.2





DESIGN




IUrban Connectionsl


Roadway Infrastructure
..-"


d


r --- g
SRIII O
---------;;;1.

-ec
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........ ..:....... .. .setj=.. J.


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-= i

SR 40 0


SR4
-- .- _
SR.40 6


a




- p I -


Green Space
- Proposed Road
- Existing Road


IKey Pointsl

- Roadways extended I added to reinforce existing grid pattern
- Create system that will support pedestrian walkability and connectivity
- Allow greenspace to directly influence layout of road infrastructure


1 ;.1
I .ZZ-.1


SR 40
Viseraa ...


---C------C- -


t


~---i ~--


,--










Program Linkages


IKey Pointsl

- Investigation of pedestrian linkage and circulation through direct connections
- Abstraction allows for manipulative meanings of graphic language
- Thought of program zoning begins to take form




DESIGN

ISpatial Organizationl


111


Concept I



---- .
--- -
-- -I


A


IKey Pointsl


- Linear green space provides connection to key arterial north/south street
- Direct access for adjacent housing to linear green space
- Road bisects linear park, creating separation and multiple
pedestrian/vehicle conflicts.










Concept 2


Greenspace
Civic
(2 Story)
Single Family
(2 Story)
Townhomes
(2 Story)
E Multi-Family Housing
(3 Story)
SMixed Use
(3 Story)
M Parking Structure


O




OIII
O -- T-*

*H L




I
i.Eii






dl


S.R. 40


IKey Pointsl

- Linear park creates direct access from greenway to Tuscawilla Park
- Roads along linear park establish separation/privacy from residential
- Building forms provide for more connectivity and flow for pedestrians
- Civic building eliminates linear park connection to the west


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5.8




DESIGN


IREI

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Beginning with the notion to 'redevelop', and taking into account issues presented
in the previous concept plans, the introduction of the final master plan is
positioned into a contextual background to illustrate the relationship with the
significant surrounding amenities.

The proposed re-zoning map highlights areas for which land use adjustments are
recommended. With an original land use of mixed-use, the parcels within the
redevelopment area are adjusted accordingly to relate closely to the 2004
Downtown Master Plan, which recommended a land use of high density
residential. The introduction of an art district is also proposed to extend interest
and activity northward. An art district is intended to attract a broader demographic
of residents that will influence community involvement in regards to art, design and
culture, reflecting the historic and existing sense of place of Ocala.







Proposed Re-zoning Map

















5


1 Existing Transit Hub
2 Existing Downtown Square
3 Existing Tuscawilla Park
4 Proposed Redevelopment
5 Art District
6 Downtown Commercial
7 High Density Residential
8 Medium Density Residential


S.R. 40


5.10




DESIGN


IREI


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Downtown Greenway / Trolley Connections
: lsa- Hffilf nillassL ;I-ssnyEW


A




s.E.4i- St.
, -
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The re-introduction of a downtown trolley is also proposed. The trolley utilizes the
existing rail line imbedded within Osceola Ave, in the downtown area, which is also
a part of the proposed greenway extension. Future expansion of the downtown
trolley extends southward to incorporate other important parts of the city, which will
eventually create more efficient connections within and to downtown Ocala, the
redevelopment area and Tuscawilla Park. Further expansion may include a
northern extension of the trolley line to reinforce efficient connectivity within the
surrounding areas of downtown Ocala.















































1 Existing Transit Hub
2 Existing Downtown Square
3 Existing Tuscawilla Park
4 Project Location
SO Proposed Greenway
- Existing Greenway
- Proposed Future Greenway
Downtown CRA Boundary
- Governmental
- Park
- Medical
- Educational


5.12




DESIGN


IREI
SDevelopment Specific Goals and Objectives
Wl) area surrounding Tuscawilla Park
O
0 o Propose new land uses
Use city proposed zoning as base
O Adjust zoning as necessary
Update CRA Master Plan
So Incorporate mixed-use/medium-high density development
High density residential as focus
Neighborhood retail as public interest
Provide for commercial/retail lacking in context
o Create a seamless transition between adjacent land uses
Integrate form based code
Use historic architectural character
Coordinate various structural density/scale with building uses

Tuscawilla Park to Downtown Square of Ocala

o Create more walkable streets
Expand road right-of-ways
Integrate street trees to improve microclimate
Activate the street with human scale details
o Propose a shared catalytic interest/activity
Development anchor sustains current/future development
Neighborhood retail strategically positioned
Unique greenspace characteristics
o Infill with green infrastructure as linking fabric
Incorporate multi modal greenway
Expose stormwater conveyance/drainage as feature
Strengthen gateway from urban to natural

Interest and social activity to Tuscawilla Park area

o Introduce/Re-introduce occasions for social gathering
Utilize open space as pallet for aesthetics
Incorporate local characteristics
Integrate adjacent development types as focus
o Establish year-round, all-day uses
Create enjoyable microclimate
Propose multi-modal opportunities
Utilize variety of seasons for vegetation
o Utilize public interaction to create awareness and involvement
Incorporate stormwater abatement as educational aspect
Involve neighborhood associations in maintenance and care
Allow personalization of vegetative features











Further expansion of the overall goals and objectives create more detailed goals
and objectives which are specific to the redevelopment area. These new goals
and objectives create a better understanding of the program to be established
within the redevelopment as well as explain more of the experiential systems that
begin to lay out guidelines for the more humanistic scale of detail.


5.14




DESIGN

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Focusing on goals of implementing high density residential, incorporating a multi
modal greenway and developing stormwater abatement as site features, the final
design of the master plan is created. The greenway and linear park, called
Yalaahe Park, are public spaces that are the activity spine for which the
development is supported. Including single family housing, townhomes and
multi-family apartment style housing, mixed-use retail, commercial and residential
uses, there are also private open spaces provided. Stormwater abatement is
integrated by way of bioswales, settlement ponds and curb cut basins. The
master plan presents a designed urban collaboration of structure, function, and
open space.



Systems


Spatial









Stormwater







Green Space








Transportation


p~~-C C~
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1 Parking Structure
2 Civic Building
3 Trolley Stop
4 Greenway
5 Apartment Building
6 Single Family Housing
7 Tuscawilla Park Gateway
8 Linear Park
9 Multi-Family Housing
10 Storrnwater Creek
11 Mixed-Use Building


Road


5.16


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Phase I: Public Greenway (1,600 ft.)


60 ft. Right-of-Way
Bike Path
Pedestrian Walkway
Rail line w/ trolley


z

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444* #. *' ,' II
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I r
- r***Ae I j
---







S.R. 40


Phase III: Tuscawilla Commons (2.8 ac.)
o 30 Townhome Style Units (+1,600 s.f. 2 story units)
o 37 Apartment Style Units (+1,000 s.f. units)


DESIGN


IREI


r










Phase II: Yalaahe Park (13.25 ac.)


31 Single Family Units
16 Townhome Style Units (+2,000 s.f. 2 story units)
60 Apartment Style Units (+1,000 s.f. units)
20,000 s.f. Retail
39,000+ s.f. Commercial
10,000+ s.f. Civic
4 Level Parking Structure (480 space)
1.8 ac. Park


Fr--






S.R. 40


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Phase IV: Commercial Corner (4.9 ac.)

o 32 Townhome Style Units (+1,600 s.f. 2 story units)
o 54 Apartment Style Units (+1,000 s.f. units)
o 46,000 s.f. Retail
o 60,000 s.f. Commercial
o 4 Level Parking Structure (480 spaces)


|I---T--(



I- o

4 0


S.R. 40


5.18


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0




DESIGN


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Stormwater Creek



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One of two in the development, the vegetated bioswale offers the surrounding townhome
style residential units a private oasis for the occupants, which can be viewed from intimate
backyard decks. As well as reducing flow intensity of stormwater runoff, the vegetated
bioswale also begins removing pollutants from the water before entering Tuscawilla Lake.



......_,..... "
'.'.. :--:


I Walking Bridge
2 Vegetated Bio-Swale
S'3 Housing Unit
4 Housing Unit Outdoor Deck
5 Stormwater Settling Pond
- 6 Seating / Picnic Area
7 Street Median Bio-Swale


i-


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Development Gateway


MI I


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The gateway into the northern section of the greenway provides the opportunity
for a distinct entry plaza surrounded by mixed-use buildings. The plaza is a
place of refuge for the workers in the adjacent offices, as well as for shoppers of
the retail stores. With water features, natural shade and formal seating, the
plaza is a offers both public and private outdoor spaces.


r-,' -* '- .*^ "- "::'
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7 ; ,,,.


Rail Line w/ Trolley
8' Bike Path
6' Pedestrian Path
Bike Rack
Raised Planter
Water Feature
Secluded Outdoor Seating Area
Benches


5.20















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5.22




DESIGN


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- - - -
























The notion to 'reconnect' is proposed by way of a linear, multi-modal greenway
utilizing the existing rail line. This greenway provides for multiple transportation
possibilities, such as walking, biking, trolley and even vehicle. The spatial quality
along the greenway as well as adjacent building uses can be seen as the user
progresses northward along the greenway. Transitioning from downtown
development with mixed-use, through high density residential....


fl


5.24


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DESIGN

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.....and into medium density residential with a mix of commercial and retail, the
traveler enjoys a visually appealing and comfortable experience. The greenway
offers the ability for the nearby resident and general public to choose between an
array of transportation methods, which establishes a high connectivity within and
to the redevelopment area.


--r


5.26


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5.28




DESIGN


IREI
Yalaahe Park Goals & Objectives

< o Utilize open space as pallet for aesthetics
O Create a transition from urban to natural environment
Establish various levels of social activity for users
- Implement gateways as iconc wayfinding elements
O
0 o Create enjoyable microclimate

.l Incorporate cooling characteristics of water
Provide protection from extreme weather conditions
Allow air circulation in and thru areas

o Provide public interaction to create awareness
Expose traditional methods of stormwater runoff conveyance
Interweave stormwater features and user amenities
Provide didactic experiences with features








Concluding with the notion to 'reinvigorate', a set of goals and objectives for
Yalaahe Park is shown. The word Yalaahe is taken from the Seminole Indian
Miccosukee language, and means orange when translated to the English
language. This correlation is derived from the significant influence the
Seminole Indian culture has had on the city of Ocala and the economical
history of Ocala.
The park program is focused on 3 main ideas; A primary entry, urban plaza and
a naturalistic plaza. Surrounding these main ideas are detailed descriptions of
design elements to be included within the park design in order to provide the
necessary amenities for the expected users.









Yalaahe Park Program


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5.30




DESIGN


1., IREI


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Focusing on the entry into the park by way of the greenway, the
trolley stop acts as a iconic wayfinding element creating a sense of
arrival into the park. The design intent was to create spaces for
both active and passive activities, as well as to transition physically
and functionally from the urban environment (west) to the natural
environment (east), ultimately preparing the user for entry into
Tuscawilla Park. Exposure of contemporary stormwater practices
is also integrated to create a didactic user experience.


Linear Park (1.8 ac. 800 x 100)
Urban Plazas (2 @ 3,500 s.f./ea.)
Open Green Space (.85 ac.)
+50% Pervious Surface


1 Community Center
2 Urban Plaza
3 Trolley Stop
4 Multi-modal Greenway
5 Naturalistic Plaza
6 Tuscawilla Park Entry
7 Tuscawilla Lake (Existing)
8 Settlement Pond (Existing)











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Full Text

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