Camp Timpoochee : a regenerative landscape

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Camp Timpoochee : a regenerative landscape
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Koehnemann, Kristen
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
The Florida Panhandle has long served as a tourist destination, however previously only the gulf waters and white sands were all the attraction. The industry is seeing a change as people are becoming more sensitive to the environment. Ecotourism is gaining a larger niche in the market and now nature and interpretive centers are a growing destination. This proposal builds upon the existing structures and character of Camp Timpoochee. A master plan, character map, interpretative program, and phasing were constructed to express to the viewer the not only the potential of this site, but also how it may all be obtained.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00004100:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




4H CAMP
EDUCATION
COMPLEX


Design kristen koehnemann














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank









CAMP TIMPOOCHEE: A REGENERATIVE LANDSCAPE
Master Plan & Phasing Proposal


A Senior Project in Partial Fulfillment for
the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

Prepared for:
Camp Timpoochee
Florida 4H
Okaloosa County & Walton County


Envisioned by:
Kristen Koehnemann
Department of Landscape Architect
University of Florida
2011

Advised by:
Les Linscott














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank









ABSTRACT


The Florida Panhandle has long served as a tourist destination, however
previously only the gulf waters and white sands were all the attraction. The
industry is seeing a change as people are becoming more sensitive to the
environment. Ecotourism is gaining a larger niche in the market and now
nature and interpretive centers are a growing destination.


This proposal builds upon the existing structures and character of Camp
Timpoochee. A master plan, character map, interpretative program, and
phasing were constructed to express to the viewer the not only the potential
of this site, but alsohow it may all be obtained.














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank
















"Yet it is evident that in our daily lives nature must be
thought of not as a luxury to be made available if
possible, but as part of our inherent indispensable
biological need."
[Fredrick Law Olmsted]







Chapter [Introduction]
Site
Location
Context
History
Existing Boundary
Future Expansion
Statement
Chapter [Inventory]
Soil
Relief
Ecosystem
Landscape
Florida & Fire
Case Studies
Goals & Objectives


Chapter [Existing]
Character
Structures
Retained
Relocated
Chapter [Concept]
Program
Interpretation
Relationship
Environment
Master Plan
Fire Management
Chapter [Character]
Imagined
Design
Material
Vegetation


Chapter [Interpretative]
Network
Layout
Design
Water
Chapter [Phasing]
Existing
+/- Five
+/- Ten
+/- Twenty
+/- Third
+/- Fifty
Chapter [Credits]
Images
Bibliography


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank














Chapter [Introduction]












S'rS


TrF






A historic camp and education complex that has had continued
use since the 1920's, but has not matured to its full potential. This
project presents the vision of a future Timpoochee to evolve into a
fully sustainable complex, not only environmentally sustainable but
also economically sustainable.



Camp Timpoochee is a picturesque camping complex on the shore of
the Choctawhatchee Bay. It is a unique site for two main reasons:


*The equestrian program is very
popular and the horse facilities
are heavily used.


*The camp's location on
Choctawhatchee Bay, which
provides an excellent area for
marine science studies.


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape

















E1

3 c1 C

M z z
ilfir


m
Smr
C r


a 4 I
B


U 2







Location.............The site is located in the Florida Panhandle, just off the Gulf of Mexico. It is
positioned near several world famous tourist destinations, such as Fort Walton Beach,
Destin, and Seaside. The several state parks and preserves in the area lack a defined
educational or recreational program. There are several regional airports located in the
area, with the discrete presence of Eglin Air Force Base.

Context..............Situated directly on Choctawhatchee Bay to the south, complete with eight
bayous, one river delta, and direct access to the Gulf of Mexico. The camp's neighbors
to the east and west are low density residential communities. Containing the complex to
the north is a low-speed two lane residential road separating the existing site from a large
piece of preserved land owned by Eglin Air Force Base.













Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape



























I~














A
-. 4;

I.. -I'
I. VC










When Camp Timpoochee was established in the 1926 it was a high bluff covered
with hardwood trees and a beach with a sloping sand bottom. The area had been
used as a campground by Native Americans, and pottery shards were found
along the beach.

Over the past decades, the camp has been able to expand it's facilities through
donations from local companies and much volunteered time. However the site
has never acquired a master plan accounting for future growth. Through this
development structure there has been many missed opportunities.


Recently in the tourist industry there has been
a trend towards "ecotourism." These tourist
destinations are growing rapidly in popularity
as people are becoming more sensitive to
the environment;.


ECOTOURISM typically involves travel to
destinations where flora, fauna, and cultural
heritage are the primary attractions. One of the
goals of ecotourism is to offer tourists insight
into the impact of human beings on the
environment, and to foster a greater
appreciation of our natural habitats.


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
































S'l


- --- A -


#zk .Ate a,


id .
^ -t








Existing Land Boundaries


The existing site of Camp Timpoochee sits on
14 acres of land directly on Choctawhatchee Bay
with beach front. It is a low density development
with a central open space.


Land being acquired from the neighbor Eglin Air
Force Base borders the northern edge of the
existing site. The approximate 55 acres currently
has no development for program associated with .
Camp Timpoochee is free to do with the land what
ever they them deem the most appropriate use.
This presents a great opportunity to further the
educational and recreational program of the
existing complex.


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape


Future Expansion





a comprehensive master

plan phasing of

development


educational and

recreational experiences in an

interpretive environment.


the built and

natural environment, will inform a

program for the site.














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank














Chapter [Inventory]







SLittle Trout Creek


Choctawhatchee Bay
LEGEND
O CrILPY l DONOVAN
.I I1 OXORTH1 WATLR
0 1LAKLLAND AKfLAND
STIIPSIOPI


The surrounding area has 5 general soil types associated
with the vegetative regions:
Chipley Sand, 0 to 5 percent slope
Foxworth sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Lakeland sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Lakeland sand, 5 to 12 percent slopes
Dorovan muck, frequently flooded

Chipley Sand, Foxworth Sand, and Lakeland Sand
are the only onsite soil types.

The majority of the site is composed of Chipley Sand series
consists of very deep, somewhat poorly drained, rapidly
Permeable soils that formed in the sandy marine sediments.
Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent slope

No on site soil types limit any development.

Due to the flat landscape and fast draining soil, attention
should be made during the design process so that no
pollutants contaminate the nearby conserved lands,
Choctawhatchee Bay, or Little Trout Creek.







ILittle Trout Creek |


The overall site slopes south.
Majority of the site's runoff is direct to Choctawhatchee Bay "
C
The northern portion of the site flows to Little Trout Creek. <

S The site is very flat and topography will not be a concern. W

After examining the site's hydrology, it has been determined
that it will not be an issue and no further research will be
conducted.



atchee Bay
S HIGH 18'+
B MEDIUM 12'-17'
LOW 6V-10'
] WATER -6'







Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape







Little Trout Creek


>Hammock
Comprising the southern portion of the site
>Scrub
Fragments found throughout future expansion
landscape
>Pine Flatwoods
Majority of the land
>Scrubby Flatwoods
Mixed Hardwood Ecotone
Found between Scrub and Pine Flatwood ecosystems
>lnshore Marine
Beach
Choctawhatchee Bay
Delta
Bayous
>Urban
Bordering the site to the East & West
Contributing to ecosystem fragmentation













mull.
4-J




ccc
0s`~ :"t '~ ~ ~ f "'-:B?' r9
o i
Cd I(
E~


E



.... ...... + . ,
ccJ
0
cCp.-J a r g n at v






Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape






The terrain consists of five ecosystems
> Estuarine
An estuary is a partly enclosed coastal body of water with
one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free
connection to the open sea. Camp Timpoochee is situated
transition zone between Choctawhatchee River and the
Gulf of Mexico. This inflow of both seawater and freshwater,
is what makes estuaries among the most productive natural
habitats in the world. This along with marine influences such
as tides and waves makes Camp Timpoochee's position on
Choctawhatchee Bay a rich learning environment.


>Scrubby Flatwoods
Represents an ecotone between Pine Flatwoods and Scrub
habitats occurring on sites slightly higher and better drained
than Pine Flatwoods, but lower than Scrub. Sometimes
captures Pine Flatwoods sites that have been logged and
protected from fire.

>Scrub
Scrub ecosystems occur on well-drained sandy soils and are
dominated by a layer of evergreen oaks and Florida rosemary.


>Coastal Hammock
The majority of Camp Timpoochee contains vegetation
associated with Coastal Hammock. Majority of trees located
on the main campus are many fully matured Sand Live Oaks
which provide shade, when combined with the breeze off of
the bay, creates a very pleasant
micro-climate.

>Pine Flatwoods
The Pine Flatwoods and dry prairies constitute the most
extensive type of ecosystem in Florida, Eglin Air Force Base is
on e of a few good examples of Pine Flatwoods left. The vast
majority of the acquired land to the north of the main campus
is distinctive of Pine Flatwoods, characterized by low, flat
topography and sandy soils.





Evolution of Florida's Ecology &
Fire
>Pine Flatwoods
Fire is an overwhelming influence on the flora
and fauna, the elements of Pine Flatwoods
have evolved in response to frequent, low
intensity surface fires.

Requires frequent burning for a healthy
ecosystem: Intervals of 1-5 years

>Scrub
Maintained by high intensity, infrequent cycles
of fire. Many plants of this landscape evolved
rely on fire as the signal for regeneration.

Requires a much less frequent burning for a
healthy ecosystem: Intervals of 1-5 years
*A fire return interval of more than 100 years may lead to
xeric hardwood hammocks.

>Scrubby Flatwoods
Sharing characteristics of both Pine
Flatwoods and Scrub, the evolved response to
fire is averaged in between.

Requires burning for a healthy ecosystem :
Intervals of 5-8 years

>Coastal Hammock
Due to extreme rarity of fire, fire management
will be achieved through debris maintenance.


Photos of Eglin Air Force Base; fire management of the Pine Flatwoods ecosystem:


Land approximately one year after prescribed burn.

*Natural regeneration relies on older
trees left on the land to provide seed
to revive the site.


Land recently after a prescribed burn.


*Achieved through fire management
and prescribed burns.


REGENERATION Regrowth of lost or destroyed
parts, tissues, or organs.


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape









Kresge Foundation Headquarters


Underwood Family Landscape Laboratory


*Prescribed prairie burn designed with building structure
*Ecological stormwater management
*Native landscape & habitat restoration
*Tightly clustered buildings


*Learning landscape
*Promotes sustainable education
*Native vegetation for wildlife habitat









Oakdale Discovery Center


Schaar's Bluff Gathering Center


*Nature center
*"Green" building
*Ample views into the surrounding natural environment
*Boardwalk trail network
*Exhibition area
*Administrative offices
*Teaching facilities
*Event space


Image Five.
*Living environment
*Reuses rainwater
*Creates habitat
*Diverse gathering spaces









Weier Redwood Grove


The Sustainability Gardens at Turtle Bay


*Arboretum
*Low impact design
*Interpretative program


*Native Plantings
*Creating habitat
*Used as open space
*Vast meadow design





Planting Design to be Inspired by Piet Oudolf














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank





Goals & Objectives


Encourage visitors to learn about Florida's
natural environment.
Provide a variety of educational
activities to inspire and intrigue the
user into respecting Florida's
natural resources
Design spaces of differing scales to
accommodate both individual
learning and group interaction

Promote recreational opportunities for users
Integrating both leisure and
challenging activities for users
Integrate landscape elements
harmoniously with the surrounding
natural environment

Provide fire management design principles
Educate the user on evolution of
Florida ecology and fire
Give guidelines of appropriate
material choices


Establish a marketable Camp Timpoochee
to strengthen it's future and expand
the user base
Design new spaces that diversify
spaces for a wider range of
comfortable zones for people of
different organizations
Expand program for economically
sustainability
Improve the visual appeal of the
camp
Provide phasing of proposed
development


* Fire break requirements


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank














Chapter [Existing]













AL 2


....' ,. .
ii n

,,~rP


Alf F lt*
kS .. k <


1' K 4i.*' *'
;Si*i 1 .





F '** '' A..
.4 .9"an ..

^L4 AstiR

^.t1 *^*


,*^-


t*
4


LI -n '




A, .. ,


-4 ;


4


_Id:I'1 I :I


4.'% .'


/:F -


i











Existing Characteristics


Camp Timpoochee has gradually evolved over the decades in a simple manner.
Many elements of the camp are quaint and welcoming and these characteristics
are to be preserved and expanded upon. There are many historic features and
natural accents used and enjoyed by the 4H campers and other users.

This proposal is to retain the character that Camp Timpoochee has acquired.











Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape




IT b
)S~ 14Vi
I:) ra -


WAVs
m- kn ^ ^p f
.\ ^^ IL
) aas .
9w A s ^


p' ,"


~I~ ; ~
T~a*~






Existing structures documented at Camp Timpoochee:


Entry into camp


Tree grove


Equestrian stables


Dining Hall & Kitchen


Auditorium


Pavilion & Volleyball court


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape





l.i
^>s
w ^Jfc.~


9~wwg


JAW lm


r''~;L4~


!I~IC
e
A L~L~


"~
F












Structures to be Retained

Working towards a sustainable development, existing structures are to be
incorporated into the proposed design as much as possible. Structures that are to be
retained include:


* Dining Hall & Kitchen
* Auditorium
* Pavilion
* Cabins
* Managers Residence


* Sports fields: Baseball & Volleyball
* Dock
* Storage & Maintenance facilities


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape




w .* b
); 4V'
Si:) i,


Or
L ''li
C"rLV~


T.


~-J ,
4A


., l


?j: ~g
T~a*~


,,
~F' ~












Structures to be Relocated


Not all of the existing composition is to be retain. Structures that are to be relocated
include:
Barn
Historic Cabin
Equestrian Facilities

Being placed directly on Choctawhatchee Bay, the equestrian facilities pose a threat
to the water quality and must be move further inland. The historic cabin is to be
moved to a location where is will be better appreciated and used, and the barn is to
be moved to a more central location.








Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank














Chapter [Concept]







* Nature Center
Welcome Center
Camp Registration
Camp History Museum
Natural Features Gallery
Main Office
Classrooms
Meeting/Convention rooms
Amphitheater
Outdoor gathering spaces

* Discovery Center
Natural Features Gallery
Camping Check-In
Trail Guides
Additional offices
Gathering spaces
Amphitheater


* Trail Network
5 on site ecosystems
Hammock
Pine Flatwoods
Scrub
Scrubby Flatwoods
Inshore Marine
Pedestrian
Equestrian
Interpretive Stations
Ecosystem & Ecotone Trails
Educational signage


* Marine Education
Marine Lab
Aquatic Center
Boating Facilities
* Fire Management
Prescribed burns
Fire Education
* Equestrian
Arenas
Stables
Trails








The proposed program is to include:
Accessibility
Rest Areas
Boardwalk & hard material paths
Ramp entrances
Sustainability
Materials
Microclimate
Conservation of land
Native Plantings
Rainwater collection & use
Building a comprehensive interpretative environment




INTERPRETATION The action of explaining the
meaning of something.
INTERPRETATIVE PROGRAM A teaching
technique that combines factual with
stimulating explanatory information.



Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape






SERVICE
BUILDINGS
INTERPRETIVE
STATIONS


REQUEST
COMPLEX
U AQUATI
COMPLEX
I CABINS


H CAMPSI


RIAN
"X

X
-x
-x


TES


I PARKING


* Strong Points
Trail network
Equestrian complex
Nature center

* Weak Points
Use of parking
Aquatic center


* Strong Points
Equestrian complex
Interpretive centers
Aquatic complex


* Weak Points
Nature center
Trail network


* Strong Points
Interpretive facility
Equestrian complex
Interpretive centers

* Weak Points
Use of parking








Program Relationship


To begin the master planning process, a series of relationship bubble
diagrams were assembled. Then each was analyzed and assigned
strengths and weaknesses according to efficient use of land, proximity to
other relevant program placements.

Trail networks and road orientation were included in the diagrams. These
factors affected the placement of structures and the connection between
elements.














Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape





















Program Concept


+


Ecosystem Map


Final Concept








Relationship of Program and Environment


A final relationship concept was constructed from the strengths found.
To achieve an even further examination of program placement, the
relationship concept was overlaid with the ecosystem boundary map.
The elements were shifted with factors in mind such as:
Fire Management Relationship of programs
Conservation of trees Diverse user facilities
Clumping of buildings Varied experience
To strengthen the interpretative program, ecosystem boundaries were used in chorus with
the concept. By placing a campsite in the Scrub ecosystem and also in Pine Flatwoods,
users gain different experiences and an incentive to return and try the different landscape.
Another benefit to this layout is the different regimes of fire management for the two
ecosystems. While one campsite might be closed off for regeneration, the other site while
be fully operational. This ideology was used for interpretative centers, parking lots, and
cabin grouping.

The integration of ecosystems influenced the layout through the educational opportunities
their ecotones afford the user. By experiencing the changing of the ecosystems the user
can achieve a better understanding of the balance of the landscape. For this reason
interpretative stations and trail heads were intentionally located on ecotones.

Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape












. ,-,..,4 8:
'sri : .l~ F ,-:
ft '.,,.

9v
lidj


101-





',
.1



~ II
AT;


.. .. .





4_ .,
d-4,
do .0.4.n
+1tit &








Proposed Master Plan


A final Master Plan was constructed based on program, ecosystems, existing
structures and trail network.
*The program was expanded through added user facilities
*Equestrian Complex was placed in land and enlarged to
accommodate future expansion.
*A multiuse trail network was installed with three interpretative
stations and two trail heads.
*The evident need for expanded marine science facilities was
addressed with the enlarged Marine Center with Aquatic Pool.
*A welcome center, check in, and administrative building was
placed at the entry point of the camp for convenience and ease
of locating.
*Majority of development stayed in the existing land, for
conservation of land and also in accordance with fire
management.






Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
























O
'00 000
. 0


' '- A

-,:



,-. I c 0 -

<, ii~ ^
0 0 .




0 o




noo o
0 .- -'

S o 0 ,'" 0 "
,90 o


0 0



0o O

'-' o
". ,. O o
00
. ,- .- 0
S0 -




, n .
h;


'.o-


I'.

ID ,


0o
OO 00- n
no


.11


-J.


. I
. ..- _
,
",' _,*-


* o-"



A- -


\
\\


. '
) Is


0 -'


'I
. l .


I '


I








Influence of Natural Resource Management on Master Plan


In keeping with natural resource management, a focus was put on
stewardship of systems. This was done not only through minimizing
human influence and sustainable techniques but also permanence of
these natural resources and enabling landscape dynamics, such as fire.
Structures located in the Hammock landscape risk less
danger of burning since the ecosystem burns very rarely;
averaging about 100 year intervals.
Fire breaks were installed in areas maintained under
prescribed burns. Trails, roads and parking will serve also as
firebreaks.
To protect structures placed in prescribed burn zones, the
guideline of a canopy break of 30 feet was followed. Within
the 30 feet, no shrubs or trees are to be planted.
Landscape design using native grasses and wildflowers
which can be mowed to reduce fuel load are to be used in
zone of prescribed burns.
Campsites with fire pits are to follow a 15 feet canopy break
to reduce wild fire.


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank














Chapter [Character]












Am p :


4f~1~~


A -M.


11 7 .. ..









Imagined Characteristics


Camp Timpoochee will incorporate:
Native plantings and natural styles into the proposed
developments.
Unique installations to engage the user and give Camp
Timpoochee a distinct identity.
Incorporate the natural environment at every opportunity
Buffer storage and maintenance buildings with natural
materials and vegetation.


This proposal retains the character that Camp Timpoochee is today.








Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape








a... -


I
iiL


h~Up/


I; (


~ --


~dc'






Planting Design Nature Center

* Native, drought tolerant garden
* Multiuse facility: Welcome Center
Camp Registration
Camp History Museum
Natural Features Gallery
Main Office


Classrooms
Meeting/Convention rooms
Amphitheater
Outdoor gathering spaces


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape














91 ---4













A.














b bf
4; 4 4

I n


~iii~T"B4






Planting Desiqn Marine Center


* Designed to retrain connection to bay
* Create revenue through guest kayak rentals
* Specially designed Marine Center Logo for marketability
* Expanded marine science education facilities:
Aquatic pool
Classrooms
Expanded laboratory
Expansion of dock and boating amenities
















Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
MARINE CENTER








































































u


.. s




"3~1
*3 1~
'*E,
I
.b
~ ~tc~S~F~W~y `' G `~
~~ -
*

r
r




jrr;e*t. uc
Y


r .
P~ ~~r .li~r~






Planting Design Central Station
* Native Butterfly Garden
* Circulation plaza
* Additional outdoor seating for Dining Hall
* Passage from parking to bay
* Aesthetic entry for Auditorium
* Entry ramp for Auditorium
* Buffer Manager's Residence


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape





" I



PrA H


-I


y


* /y


.r;Y
:'






Planting Design Canopy Cabins
* Recovered site from equestrian facilities
* Expand parking
* Interpretative Station [3] Estuarine Education
* Sea grass planting
* Room for additional cabins
* Native rosemary meadow with Conradina
1E LC( I a.. f


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape





















i, 1
06













--
0.6,






:V
.:I*. *Pg IP .






Planting Desiqn Equestrian Complex


* Specially designed Equestrian Center Logo for marketability
* Additional stalls
* Room for trailer parking
* Trail entry
* Retain existing character


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape_
EQUESTRIAN COMPLEX








9I 4
9r



9e











m4






..4%









I
9
SbiL :Z~"~
S
1 iBi~~B
1 ~~






Planting Desiqn Meadow Cabins


* Differing style of cabin for a different experience
* Designed to accommodate prescribed burnings:
Cement, metal, clay material
Moveable picnic tables
30 feet canopy break to protect structures
Mowable planting choices to reduce flammable material:
Native wildflower and ornamental grass meadow


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape









~F~J'L
I,

~~t.

;SW5:

il

-r~

11\


106
, + -- _


.I..


1jrntu


" -'


* '


o^ .

,.
R"*' 1/






Planting Design Discovery Center

* Designed for prescribed burnings:
Cement, metal, clay material
Moveable picnic tables
30 feet canopy break to protect structures


* Multiuse building:


Natural Features Gallery
Camping Check-In
Trail Guides
Additional offices
Gathering spaces
Amphitheater


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape

























4 -cam llmpg
,gener l~
ganiY r
0 1 .,, '


Signage to be placed throughout sight and designed
to be subtly placed within the landscape and
constructed of metal and stone.
constructed of metal and stone.


























Directional signage to aid the diverse users navigate
through the complex; designed to be subtly placed
within the landscape and constructed of metal and
stone.


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape















" C~JI


Eu.








Material and Opportunity for interpretation
Interpretative program continued into material choice throughout the complex, user can identify areas of
prescribed burn through present structure material.
The materials for the site are to be broken into two categories:
* Camp Timpoochee South to retain natural wood material
* Camp Timpoochee North embody different character through cement, metal, stone and clay


SAreas of Prescribed burns
Metal
Clay
Concrete
Stone


SNaturalistic
Wood


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape





All Florida Native Plants
intL rL .. J/l J


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape








Vegetation and Opportunity for interpretation

By taking advantage of the beautiful native vegetation of Florida, the user
becomes familiar with the real landscape and gains an appreciation for the natural
environment. All native plants to be used are drought tolerant, and will not require
pesticides or fertilizers to flourish. The planting design throughout the camping
complex will serve as an example of native horticulture and garden design. This
will help to educate the diverse users of the facilities the benefits of native plant
choices and how to use them.


Attention should be made to
contain flammable vegetation
to the Hammock land cover
portion of the camp:


Serenoa repens
Lyonia lucida
Ilex glabra
Sabal etonia
Myrica cerifera
Juniperus silicola


Saw Palmetto
Fetterbush
Gallberry
Scrub Palmetto
Wax Myrtle
Red Cedar


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank













Chapter [Interpretative]














V1


0


*Multiuse
Exercise
Campsite Access
Regeneration through management
Education
Interpretation


*Trail network
>Scrub
>Pine Flatwoods
>Scrubby Flatwoods
>Scrub
>Hammock
>Estuarine























Design Interpretive Station : Nature Center
* Trail Head
Interpretive Center
Native Flora & Ecology of Florida Gallery
Historic Camp Timpoochee Museum
* Ecotone Education
Coastal Hammock
Scrub
* Exemplify native plants in garden design Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
TIMPOOCHEE TRAILS



























Design Interpretive Station : [3]
* Ecotone Education
Estuarine
Coastal Hammock
* Wooden dock with interpretative signage
* Create habitat


~h~B~


,I" '


r--
r


,r
sig~-."l *
'"
i ~'~s~\ ~.I ~g~l$


''
j.
':L





Design Interpretive Station : [2]
* Ecotone Education
Scrub
Pine Flatwoods
Multiuse facility
Outdoor classroom
Shelter
Maintenance & Storage
Metal and concrete design


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
TIMPOOCHEE TRAILS

























Design Interpretive Station :[1]
* Ecotone Education
Scrubby Flatwoods
Pine Flatwoods
Look out tower
Rustic water tower design
Placed in the less frequency burn zone: Scrub habitat
Over looks high frequency burn zone: Pine Flatwoods habitat
Metal frame and base

























Design Interpretive Station : Discovery Center
* Trail Head
Interpretive Center
Evolution of Florida & Fire Museum
Ecotone Education
Scrub
Pine Flatwoods
Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
TIMPOOCHEE TRAILS






























Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
TIMPOOCHEE TRAILS








Trail network and interpretation

Trail network is to have signage placed throughout the entire complex. In areas
of prescribed burn, the signage is to be designed using metal with breakaway
components. The trail network serves many purposes and offer an abundance
of educational opportunities for the user. The sign system will:
* Inform
How the trail network works with the natural functions of the landscape.
Educate
Native American history
4H history
Evolution of Florida's ecology
Identify
Areas of prescribed burn
Dates of past burns
Native flora
Invasive flora


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
TIMPOOCHEE TRAILS











Aff
3~i^*.*k. I *{y
W^^. v,
<'Sr1J


".i


WAI-"

*--- .21.~i J~Yi:


:Al


.


j; *.


" ,'
I '=, ?








Water Trail Network and interpretation

Timpoochee Trails is enhanced through the presence of Choctawhatchee
Bay. The natural features will add to the Marine science education will
bring in revenue from outside users visiting the area.
* Identify
River Delta
Gulf Inlet
Peninsula
Beaches
Bayous


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape
TIMPOOCHEE TRAILS














































This Page Intentionally Left Blank














Chapter [Phasing]


















"A. I &,


U

I


-I *



-'Sd
-A, V

d~ -'*= ~ -A
.' 4Y

~~M~& L *Li* 3 t- ** ~lE~Y


. i


~F\;


a~, ~;
`S~"f~l~
IlrT


~1
JL








Phasing Plan Break Down


To illustrate how this project can become reality, it has been broken down into
phasing. The levels of development can be done over a period of many years to
evidentially become one cohesive comprehensive recreational and educational
complex.

The timing of the different phases were determined by urgency of need for the 4H
program and environment protection. The phasing begins with simple and
inexpensive interventions and then progressing to more substantial programming
as funding will be acquired.












Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape

































- ,. .
SL


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape










* Archery Range
* Trail Network
* Instigate prescribed burns
* Clear land for campsites


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape





















F<


.3f t,


-j




'7. *J ,


NAA
I*I

Sd.


-o- 4. -. A
8X .J- -
-L Sd -. -1-S.,-.'
A r ~ J

--U~YF .J '.L-:~~LlA E


Im


J I










* Marine education complex
* Interpretive Stations


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape

































- ,. .
SL


Camp Timpoochee a regenerative landscape




Full Text

PAGE 2

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 3

CAMP TIMPOOCHEE: A REGENERATIVE LANDSCAPE Master Plan & Phasing Proposal A Senior Project in Partial Fulfillment for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Prepared for: Camp Timpoochee Florida 4H Okaloosa County & Walton County Envisioned by: Kristen Koehnemann Department of Landscape Architect University of Florida 2011 Advised by: Les Linscott

PAGE 4

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 5

ABSTRACT The Florida Panhandle has long served as a tourist destination, however previously only the gulf waters and white sands were all the attraction The industry is seeing a change as people are becoming more sensitive to the environment Ecotourism is gaining a larger niche in the market and now nature and interpretive centers are a growing destination This proposal builds upon the existing structures and character of Camp Timpoochee A master plan, character map, interpretative program, and phasing were constructed to express to the viewer the not only the potential of this site, but alsohow it may all be obtained

PAGE 6

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 7

thought of not as a luxury to be made available if possible, but as part of our inherent indispensable [Fredrick Law Olmsted]

PAGE 8

Chapter [Introduction] Site Location Context History Existing Boundary Future Expansion Statement Chapter [Inventory] Soil Relief Ecosystem Landscape Florida & Fire Case Studies Goals & Objectives Chapter [Existing] Character Structures Retained Relocated Chapter [Concept] Program Interpretation Relationship Environment Master Plan Fire Management Chapter [Character] Imagined Design Material Vegetation Chapter [Interpretative] Network Layout Design Water Chapter [Phasing] Existing +/ Five +/ Ten +/ Twenty +/ Third +/ Fifty Chapter [Credits] Images Bibliography

PAGE 9

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 10

Chapter [Introduction]

PAGE 11

Introduction

PAGE 12

Camp Timpoochee is a picturesque camping complex on the shore of the Choctawhatchee Bay. It is a unique site for two main reasons: A historic camp and education complex that has had continued its full potential. This project presents the vision of a future Timpoochee to evolve into a fully sustainable complex, not only environmentally sustainable but also economically sustainable. The equestrian program is very popular and the horse facilities are heavily used. Choctawhatchee Bay, which provides an excellent area for marine science studies.

PAGE 13

Location Florida Panhandle

PAGE 14

Location positioned near several world famous tourist destinations, such as Fort Walton Beach, Destin, and Seaside. The several state parks and preserves in the area lack a defined educational or recreational program. There are several regional airports located in the area with the discrete presence of Eglin Air Force Base. Context bayous, one river delta, and direct to the east and west are low density residential communities. Containing the complex to the north is a low speed two lane residential road separating the existing site from a large piece of preserved land owned by Eglin Air Force Base.

PAGE 15

Site History Image One.

PAGE 16

When Camp Timpoochee was established in the 1926 it was a high bluff covered with hardwood trees and a beach with a sloping sand bottom. The area had been used as a campground by Native Americans, and pottery shards were found along the beach. donations from local companies and much volunteered time. However the site has never acquired a master plan accounting for future growth. Through this development structure there has been many missed opportunities. Recently in the tourist industry there has been destinations are growing rapidly in popularity as people are becoming more sensitive to the environment;. ECOTOURISM typically involves travel to destinations where flora, fauna, and cultural heritage are the primary attractions. One of the goals of ecotourism is to offer tourists insight into the impact of human beings on the environment, and to foster a greater appreciation of our natural habitats.

PAGE 18

Existing Land Boundaries The existing site of Camp Timpoochee sits on 14 acres of land directly on Choctawhatchee Bay with beach front. It is a low density development with a central open space. Future Expansion Land being acquired from the neighbor Eglin Air Force Base borders the northern edge of the existing site. The approximate 55 acres currently has no development for program associated with Camp Timpoochee is free to do with the land what ever they them deem the most appropriate use. This presents a great opportunity to further the educational and recreational program of the existing complex.

PAGE 19

Statement of Intent To create a comprehensive master plan along with phasing of development for Camp Timpoochee which responds to the protecting the natural environment and natural resources on and near the site. The unique natural beauty one encounters at Camp Timpoochee provides visitors with a relaxing retreat, while also offering educational opportunities. Mature vegetative communities are plentiful throughout the site, and could be adapted to both educational and recreational experiences in an interpretive environment. The Camp Timpoochee site provides many opportunities for expansion and for master planning. Information collected from the existing conditions and the site analysis, of both the built and natural environment, will inform a program for the site.

PAGE 20

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 21

Chapter [Inventory]

PAGE 22

Soil Analysis The surrounding area has 5 general soil types associated with the vegetative regions: Chipley Sand 0 to 5 percent slope Foxworth sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes Lakeland sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes Lakeland sand, 5 to 12 percent slopes Dorovan muck, frequently flooded Chipley Sand, Foxworth Sand, and Lakeland Sand are the only onsite soil types. The majority of the site is composed of Chipley Sand series consists of very deep, somewhat poorly drained, rapidly Permeable soils that formed in the sandy marine sediments. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent slope No on site soil types limit any development. Due to the flat landscape and fast draining soil, attention should be made during the design process so that no pollutants contaminate the nearby conserved lands, Choctawhatchee Bay, or Little Trout Creek. Little Trout Creek Choctawhatchee Bay

PAGE 23

The overall site slopes south Choctawhatchee Bay The northern portion of the site flows to Little Trout Creek. The site is very flat and topography will not be a concern. that it will not be an issue and no further research will be conducted. Little Trout Creek Choctawhatchee Bay Relief Analysis

PAGE 24

Hammock Comprising the southern portion of the site Scrub Fragments found throughout future expansion landscape Pine Flatwoods Majority of the land Scrubby Flatwoods Mixed Hardwood Ecotone Found between Scrub and Pine Flatwood ecosystems Inshore Marine Beach Choctawhatchee Bay Delta Bayous Urban Bordering the site to the East & West Contributing to ecosystem fragmentation Ecosystems Little Trout Creek Choctawhatchee Bay

PAGE 25

Pine Flatwoods Estuarine Coastal Hammock Scrub

PAGE 26

The terrain consists of five ecosystems Estuarine An estuary is a partly enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. Camp Timpoochee is situated a transition zone between Choctawhatchee River and the Gulf of Mexico. This inflow of both seawater and freshwater, is what makes estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world. This along with marine influences such position on Choctawhatchee Bay a rich learning environment. Coastal Hammock The majority of Camp Timpoochee contains vegetation associated with Coastal Hammock. Majority of trees located on the main campus are many fully matured Sand Live Oaks which provide shade, when combined with the breeze off of the bay, creates a very pleasant micro climate. Pine Flatwoods The Pine Flatwoods and dry prairies constitute the most extensive type of ecosystem in Florida, Eglin Air Force Base is on e of a few good examples of Pine Flatwoods left. The vast majority of the acquired land to the north of the main campus is distinctive of Pine Flatwoods, characterized by low, flat topography and sandy soils. Scrubby Flatwoods Represents an ecotone between Pine Flatwoods and Scrub habitats occurring on sites slightly higher and better drained than Pine Flatwoods, but lower than Scrub. Sometimes captures Pine Flatwoods sites that have been logged and protected from fire. Scrub Scrub ecosystems occur on well drained sandy soils and are dominated by a layer of evergreen oaks and Florida rosemary. Character Natural

PAGE 27

Fire Pine Flatwoods Fire is an overwhelming influence on the flora and fauna, the elements of Pine Flatwoods have evolved in response to frequent, low intensity surface fires. Requires frequent burning for a healthy ecosystem: Intervals of 1 5 years Scrub Maintained by high intensity, infrequent cycles of fire. Many plants of this landscape evolved rely on fire as the signal for regeneration Requires a much less frequent burning for a healthy ecosystem: Intervals of 1 5 years A fire return interval of more than 100 years may lead to xeric hardwood hammocks. Scrubby Flatwoods Sharing characteristics of both Pine Flatwoods and Scrub, the evolved response to fire is averaged in between. Requires burning for a healthy ecosystem : Intervals of 5 8 years Coastal Hammock Due to extreme rarity of fire, fire management will be achieved through debris maintenance. Natural regeneration relies on older trees left on the land to provide seed to revive the site. Achieved through fire management and prescribed burns. Photos of Eglin Air Force Base; fire management of the Pine Flatwoods ecosystem: Land approximately one year after prescribed burn. Land recently after a prescribed burn. REGENERATION Regrowth of lost or destroyed parts, tissues, or organs.

PAGE 28

Case Studies Kresge Foundation Headquarters Prescribed prairie burn designed with building structure Ecological stormwater management Native landscape & habitat restoration Tightly clustered buildings Underwood Family Landscape Laboratory Learning landscape Promotes sustainable education Native vegetation for wildlife habitat Image Two. Image Three.

PAGE 29

Case Studies Oakdale Discovery Center Nature center Ample views into the surrounding natural environment Boardwalk trail network Exhibition area Administrative offices Teaching facilities Event space Bluff Gathering Center Living environment Reuses rainwater Creates habitat Diverse gathering spaces Image Four. Image Five.

PAGE 30

Case Studies Weier Redwood Grove The Sustainability Gardens at Turtle Bay Image Six. Image Seven. Arboretum Low impact design Interpretative program Native Plantings Creating habitat Used as open space Vast meadow design

PAGE 31

Case Studies Planting Design to be Inspired by Piet Oudolf Bluff Gathering Center Image Group Eight.

PAGE 32

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 33

natural environment. Provide a variety of educational activities to inspire and intrigue the natural resources Design spaces of differing scales to accommodate both individual learning and group interaction Promote recreational opportunities for users Integrating both leisure and challenging activities for users Integrate landscape elements harmoniously with the surrounding natural environment Provide fire management design principles Educate the user on evolution of Florida ecology and fire Give guidelines of appropriate material choices Fire break requirements Establish a marketable Camp Timpoochee the user base Design new spaces that diversify spaces for a wider range of comfortable zones for people of different organizations Expand program for economically sustainability Improve the visual appeal of the camp Provide phasing of proposed development Goals & Objectives

PAGE 34

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 35

Chapter [Existing]

PAGE 37

Existing Characteristics Camp Timpoochee has gradually evolved over the decades in a simple manner. Many elements of the camp are quaint and welcoming and these characteristics are to be preserved and expanded upon. There are many historic features and natural accents used and enjoyed by the 4H campers and other users. This proposal is to retain the character that Camp Timpoochee has acquired.

PAGE 39

Entry into camp Equestrian stables Tree grove Dining Hall & Kitchen Pavilion & Volleyball court Auditorium Existing structures documented at Camp Timpoochee:

PAGE 41

Structures to be Retained Working towards a sustainable development, existing structures are to be incorporated into the proposed design as much as possible. Structures that are to be retained include: Dining Hall & Kitchen Auditorium Pavilion Cabins Managers Residence Sports fields: Baseball & Volleyball Dock Storage & Maintenance facilities

PAGE 43

Structures to be Relocated Not all of the existing composition is to be retain. Structures that are to be relocated include: Barn Historic Cabin Equestrian Facilities Being placed directly on Choctawhatchee Bay, the equestrian facilities pose a threat to the water quality and must be move further inland. The historic cabin is to be moved to a location where is will be better appreciated and used, and the barn is to be moved to a more central location.

PAGE 44

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 45

Chapter [Concept]

PAGE 46

Program Proposed Nature Center Welcome Center Camp Registration Camp History Museum Natural Features Gallery Main Office Classrooms Meeting/Convention rooms Amphitheater Outdoor gathering spaces Discovery Center Natural Features Gallery Camping Check In Trail Guides Additional offices Gathering spaces Amphitheater Trail Network 5 on site ecosystems Hammock Pine Flatwoods Scrub Scrubby Flatwoods Inshore Marine Pedestrian Equestrian Interpretive Stations Ecosystem & Ecotone Trails Educational signage Marine Education Marine Lab Aquatic Center Boating Facilities Fire Management Prescribed burns Fire Education Equestrian Arenas Stables Trails

PAGE 47

Accessibility Rest Areas Boardwalk & hard material paths Ramp entrances Sustainability Materials Microclimate Conservation of land Native Plantings Rainwater collection & use Building a comprehensive interpretative environment The proposed program is to include: INTERPRETATION The action of explaining the meaning of something. INTERPRETATIVE PROGRAM A teaching technique that combines factual with stimulating explanatory information.

PAGE 48

Program Relation diagrams Strong Points Equestrian complex Interpretive centers Aquatic complex Weak Points Nature center Trail network Strong Points Interpretive facility Equestrian complex Interpretive centers Weak Points Use of parking Strong Points Trail network Equestrian complex Nature center Weak Points Use of parking Aquatic center

PAGE 49

Program Relationship To begin the master planning process, a series of relationship bubble diagrams were assembled. Then each was analyzed and assigned strengths and weaknesses according to efficient use of land, proximity to other relevant program placements. Trail networks and road orientation were included in the diagrams. These factors affected the placement of structures and the connection between elements.

PAGE 50

Program with Environment Ecosystem Map Program Concept Final Concept

PAGE 51

Relationship of Program and Environment Fire Management Conservation of trees Clumping of buildings Relationship of programs Diverse user facilities Varied experience A final relationship concept was constructed from the strengths found. To achieve an even further examination of program placement, the relationship concept was overlaid with the ecosystem boundary map. The elements were shifted with factors in mind such as: To strengthen the interpretative program, ecosystem boundaries were used in chorus with the concept. By placing a campsite in the Scrub ecosystem and also in Pine Flatwoods, users gain different experiences and an incentive to return and try the different landscape. Another benefit to this layout is the different regimes of fire management for the two ecosystems. While one campsite might be closed off for regeneration, the other site while be fully operational. This ideology was used for interpretative centers, parking lots, and cabin grouping. The integration of ecosystems influenced the layout through the educational opportunities their ecotones afford the user. By experiencing the changing of the ecosystems the user can achieve a better understanding of the balance of the landscape. For this reason interpretative stations and trail heads were intentionally located on ecotones

PAGE 53

Proposed Master Plan A final Master Plan was constructed based on program, ecosystems, existing structures and trail network. The program was expanded through added user facilities Equestrian Complex was placed in land and enlarged to accommodate future expansion. A multiuse trail network was installed with three interpretative stations and two trail heads. The evident need for expanded marine science facilities was addressed with the enlarged Marine Center with Aquatic Pool. A welcome center, check in, and administrative building was placed at the entry point of the camp for convenience and ease of locating. Majority of development stayed in the existing land, for conservation of land and also in accordance with fire management.

PAGE 55

Influence of Natural Resource Management on Master Plan In keeping with natural resource management, a focus was put on stewardship of systems. This was done not only through minimizing human influence and sustainable techniques but also permanence of these natural resources and enabling landscape dynamics, such as fire. Structures located in the Hammock landscape risk less danger of burning since the ecosystem burns very rarely; averaging about 100 year intervals. Fire breaks were installed in areas maintained under prescribed burns. Trails, roads and parking will serve also as firebreaks. To protect structures placed in prescribed burn zones, the guideline of a canopy break of 30 feet was followed. Within the 30 feet, no shrubs or trees are to be planted. Landscape design using native grasses and wildflowers which can be mowed to reduce fuel load are to be used in zone of prescribed burns. Campsites with fire pits are to follow a 15 feet canopy break to reduce wild fire.

PAGE 56

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 57

Chapter [Character]

PAGE 59

Imagined Characteristics Camp Timpoochee will incorporate: This proposal retains the character that Camp Timpoochee is today. Native plantings and natural styles into the proposed developments. Unique installations to engage the user and give Camp Timpoochee a distinct identity. Incorporate the natural environment at every opportunity Buffer storage and maintenance buildings with natural materials and vegetation.

PAGE 61

Planting Design Nature Center Native drought tolerant garden Multiuse facility: Welcome Center Camp Registration Camp History Museum Natural Features Gallery Main Office Classrooms Meeting/Convention rooms Amphitheater Outdoor gathering spaces

PAGE 63

Planting Design Marine Center 01 Planting Design Marine Center Designed to retrain connection to bay Create revenue through guest kayak rentals Specially designed Marine Center Logo for marketability Expanded marine science education facilities: Aquatic pool Classrooms Expanded laboratory Expansion of dock and boating amenities

PAGE 65

Planting Design Central Station Native Butterfly Garden Circulation plaza Additional outdoor seating for Dining Hall Passage from parking to bay Aesthetic entry for Auditorium Entry ramp for Auditorium Buffer

PAGE 67

Planting Design Canopy Cabins 01 Planting Design Canopy Cabins Recovered site from equestrian facilities Expand parking Interpretative Station [3] Estuarine Education Sea grass planting Room for additional cabins Native rosemary meadow with Conradina

PAGE 69

Planting Design Equestrian Complex 01 Planting Design Equestrian Complex Specially designed Equestrian Center Logo for marketability Additional stalls Room for trailer parking Trail entry Retain existing character

PAGE 71

Planting Design Meadow Cabins 01 Planting Design Meadow Cabins Differing style of cabin for a different experience Designed to accommodate prescribed burnings: Cement, metal, clay material Moveable picnic tables 30 feet canopy break to protect structures Mowable planting choices to reduce flammable material: Native wildflower and ornamental grass meadow Image Seven.

PAGE 73

Planting Design Discovery Center 01 Planting Design Discovery Center Designed for prescribed burnings: Multiuse building: Image Four. Image Eight. Cement, metal, clay material Moveable picnic tables 30 feet canopy break to protect structures Natural Features Gallery Camping Check In Trail Guides Additional offices Gathering spaces Amphitheater

PAGE 74

Design Signage Signage to be placed throughout sight and designed to be subtly placed within the landscape and constructed of metal and stone. Entry Road Sign Design and Placement

PAGE 75

Directional signage to aid the diverse users navigate through the complex; designed to be subtly placed within the landscape and constructed of metal and stone. Way Finding Design and Placement

PAGE 76

Design Material

PAGE 77

Interpretative program continued into material choice throughout the complex, user can identify areas of prescribed burn through present structure material. Material and Opportunity for interpretation The materials for the site are to be broken into two categories: Camp Timpoochee South to retain natural wood material Camp Timpoochee North embody different character through cement, metal, stone and clay Areas of Prescribed burns Metal Clay Concrete Stone Naturalistic Wood

PAGE 78

Design Vegetation All Florida Native Plants 01

PAGE 79

Vegetation and Opportunity for interpretation By taking advantage of the beautiful native vegetation of Florida, the user becomes familiar with the real landscape and gains an appreciation for the natural environment. All native plants to be used are drought tolerant, and will not require pesticides or fertilizers to flourish. The planting design throughout the camping complex will serve as an example of native horticulture and garden design. This will help to educate the diverse users of the facilities the benefits of native plant choices and how to use them Attention should be made to contain flammable vegetation to the Hammock land cover portion of the camp: Serenoa repens Saw Palmetto Lyonia lucida Fetterbush Ilex glabra Gallberry Sabal etonia Scrub Palmetto Myrica cerifera Wax Myrtle Juniperus silicola Red Cedar

PAGE 80

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 81

Chapter [Interpretative]

PAGE 82

Multiuse Exercise Campsite Access Regeneration through management Education Interpretation Design Trail Network Trail network Scrub Pine Flatwoods Scrubby Flatwoods Scrub Hammock Estuarine

PAGE 83

Design Interpretive Station : Nature Center Trail Head Interpretive Center Native Flora & Ecology of Florida Gallery Historic Camp Timpoochee Museum Ecotone Education Coastal Hammock Scrub Exemplify native plants in garden design

PAGE 84

Design Interpretative Stations Ecotone Education Estuarine Coastal Hammock Wooden dock with interpretative signage Create habitat Design Interpretive Station : [3]

PAGE 85

Ecotone Education Scrub Pine Flatwoods Multiuse facility Outdoor classroom Shelter Maintenance & Storage Metal and concrete design Design Interpretive Station : [2]

PAGE 86

Design Interpretative Stations Ecotone Education Scrubby Flatwoods Pine Flatwoods Look out tower Rustic water tower design Placed in the less frequency burn zone: Scrub habitat Over looks high frequency burn zone: Pine Flatwoods habitat Metal frame and base Design Interpretive Station : [1]

PAGE 87

Trail Head Interpretive Center Evolution of Florida & Fire Museum Ecotone Education Scrub Pine Flatwoods Design Interpretive Station : Discovery Center

PAGE 88

Design Trail

PAGE 89

Trail network is to have signage placed throughout the entire complex. In areas of prescribed burn, the signage is to be designed using metal with breakaway components. The trail network serves many purposes and offer an abundance of educational opportunities for the user. The sign system will: Inform How the trail network works with the natural functions of the landscape. Educate Native American history 4H history Identify Areas of prescribed burn Dates of past burns Native flora Invasive flora Trail network and interpretation

PAGE 90

01 Multiuse Exercise Campsite Access Regeneration through management Education Interpretation Trail network Scrub Pine Flatwood Scrubby Flatwood Hammock Equestrian Design Trail Network

PAGE 91

Water Trail Network and interpretation Timpoochee Trails is enhanced through the presence of Choctawhatchee Bay. The natural features will add to the Marine science education will bring in revenue from outside users visiting the area. Identify River Delta Gulf Inlet Peninsula Beaches Bayous

PAGE 92

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 93

Chapter [Phasing]

PAGE 94

Phasing Existing

PAGE 95

Phasing Plan Break Down To illustrate how this project can become reality, it has been broken down into phasing. The levels of development can be done over a period of many years to evidentially become one cohesive comprehensive recreational and educational complex. The timing of the different phases were determined by urgency of need for the 4H program and environment protection. The phasing begins with simple and inexpensive interventions and then progressing to more substantial programming as funding will be acquired.

PAGE 96

Phasing +| Five Years

PAGE 97

Archery Range Trail Network Instigate prescribed burns Clear land for campsites

PAGE 98

Phasing +| Ten Years

PAGE 99

Marine education complex Interpretive Stations

PAGE 100

Phasing +| Twenty Years

PAGE 101

Relocate equestrian complex Plant trees for future Canopy Cabins Conradina experiment plots Marine Cabins

PAGE 102

Phasing +| Thirty Years

PAGE 103

Nature Center Central Station Meadow Cabins

PAGE 104

Phasing +| Fifty Years

PAGE 105

Discovery Center Canopy Cabins

PAGE 106

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

PAGE 107

Chapter [Credits]

PAGE 108

Image One: history.shtml Image Two: Kresge Foundation Headquarters; Source: asla.org Image Three: Underwood Family Landscape Laboratory; Source: asla.org Image Four: Oakdale Discovery Center; Source: asla.org Image Five: Bluff Gathering Space; Source: asla.org Image Six: Enskoping Gardens; Source: oudolf.com Image Seven: The Sustainability Gardens at Turtle Bay Gardens; Source: oudolf.com Image Eight: Oudolf Piet. Gardening with Grasses Portland, Or.: Timber, 2001. Print Image Credits* All photography credited to Kristen Koehnemann unless otherwise noted.

PAGE 109

Online Resources http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/florida_forestry_information/forest_resources/pine_flatwoods.htm http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/fspubs/07232816/page06.htm#sharl#flatwoods http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/fspubs/07232816/page06.htm#shar http://crocdoc.ifas.ufl.edu/msrpmap/scrubby_flatwoods.php http://www.archbold station.org http://www.fnai.org/PDF/NC/Scr_Flatwds.pdf http://alabamapioneers.com/index.php/Biographies of Notable Not so Notable Alabamians/timpoochee barnard yuchee chief.html http://florida4h.org/about/history/camptimpoocheehistory.shtml http://www.externalaffairs.uga.edu/costa_rica/ Printed Resources Blaylock, Dewey A. Choctawhatchee Bay: Analysis and Interpretation of Baseline Environmental Data : Marine Advisory Program, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, 1983. Print. Booth, Norman K., and James E. Hiss. Residential Landscape Architecture: Design Process for the Private Residence. Upper Sadd le River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999. Print. Hancock, Jan. Equestrian Design Guidebook for Trails, Trailheads, and Campgrounds Missoula, MT: USDA, Forest Service, Technology and Development Program, 2007. Print. Littlefair P. J. Environmental Site Layout Planning: Solar Access, Microclimate and Passive Cooling in Urban Areas. London: CRC, Cons tru ction Research Communications, 2000. Print. Marsh, William M. Landscape Planning: Environmental Applications. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley, 1983. Print. McHarg Ian L. Design with Nature New York: Wiley, 1992. Print. Myers, Ronald L., John J. Ewel and Marjorie H. Carr. Ecosystems of Florida Orlando: University of Central Florida, 1991. Print. Oudolf Piet. Gardening with Grasses Portland, Or.: Timber, 2001. Print Whitney, Eleanor Noss ., D. Bruce. Means, and Anne Rudloe Priceless Florida: Natural Ecosystems and Native Species Sarasota, FL: Pineapple, 2004. Print. Bibliography