Downtown Coral Springs : a model for suburban infill and redevelopment

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Downtown Coral Springs : a model for suburban infill and redevelopment
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Garcia, Marco A.
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College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
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Gainesville, Fla.
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Notes

General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment

Marco A. Garcia
Senior Captsone Project
University of Florida: Department of Landscape Architecture
Spring 2011





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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
The support and influence that brought me to this final project spans through out
my career as a student of Landscape Architecture at the University of Florida.

I first would like to thank my mother, Margarita, and my two sisters, Marlen and
Miriam, for their endless support in and out of school. Without you, I would have
lacked the motivation and work ethic needed to accomplish what I have so far.

A great thank you to my dear friend, Kayla Kuruc, for unknowingly helping me
make the best decision of my life. Without your nudge and support to change to
Landscape Architecture I would have never found my true calling.

It is impossible to express how much gratitude I have for all the guys that shared
the studio with me. Talking ourselves to death about every part of design and
constantly elevating our level of critical thinking made every all-nighter worth the
lack of sleep.
Thank you LA Frolf Team 2011.

Thanks to all the faculty within the department of Landscape Architecture. The
diversity and dedication of everyone allowed me to understand all levels of the
field and find my strengths and weaknesses.
Thank you Bob Grist for being the exact advisor I needed. You allowed me to
roam free in my design but brought me right back down to earth at the exact
moments before I went on unnecessary tangents.
A special thanks to Terry Schnadelbach for helping my true calling in the urban
realm and helping me find my "thumbprint". I will always carry connectivity as the
core of my designs.





ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





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Project Name:
Downtown Coral Springs:
A Model for Suburban Redevelopment and
Infill.

Undergraduate Thesis for a
Bachelors in Landscape Architecture
By Marco Garcia

Faculty Advisor:
Robert Grist
Spring 2011


Table of Contents:



Introduction-7.................................................................................................................1 -7

Case Studies................................................................................................................8-12

Project Vision...............................................................................................................13-15

Scale 1: Coral Springs Bikew ay.................................................................................16-22

Scale 2: The Dow ntow n District ................................................................................ 23-29

Scale 3: Dow ntow n Coral Springs..............................................................................30-32

Scale 4: City Center....................................................................................................33-45

Scale 4: City Center- Crossroads G reen................................................................... 46-53

Resources.....................................................................................................................54


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CONTENTS


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





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DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


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INTRODUCTION





Project Background>Project Description J


Project Information:
Project Type:
Suburban redevelopment/infill and
connectivity
Project Size:
City Scale proposals.
Redevelopment Site: 28 acres
Location:
Coral Springs, Florida
Southwest Corner of
University Drive and Sample Road
Coral Springs, FL 33065


Project Synopsis:
The current trend of mix use "walkable" developments and infill is quickly manifesting itself in suburban communities. In South Florida,
developments such as Mizner Park and City Walk have become iconic examples for projects of this nature. These developments show
beneficial progression for the suburban model and overall citizen life.
However, as the novelty wears away and these developments hopefully become a standard practice, it is possible to begin to ex-
amine further progression. Pertaining to suburban communities, there are two issues at the forefront of examination. First is the issue of
connectivity; the suburban fabric is one dedicated to the private vehicle, making the terms "density" and "walkability" isolated fea-
tures within mix use/tnd projects. While these redevelopment create a wonderful pedestrian atmosphere, most do not address the
physical connections to the surrounding context and sit as an outlying destination instead of an iconic hub or node within the urban
fabric. The second issue comes at the scale of the individual redevelopment where environment and sense of place are inadequate-
ly addressed. Before infill redevelopment becomes a mold, it is key to establish these two topics as a priority. Only in this way can each
city create its own identity through the same goals.

The city of Coral Springs, FL, a prototypical suburban community in the urban sprawl of South Florida, is in the process of redevelop-
ing the city's four main street corners (University Drive and Sample Road). The CRA for the city has the intent of creating a downtown/
Central Activity District (CAD) as the first step towards creating an image for the city and establishing future density. A redevelopment
study and proposal were created in 2002 that took much from already established developments but show no progression from the
designs of then to what the same spaces could be now. Currently, the city is waiting on economic changes in order to continue with
the proposed phases of redevelopment. As the 2002 plans become outdated, the city is open to new ideas and further study for the
design of its future "downtown".

The intent of this proposal is to create a downtown for Coral Springs that is an integrated emblem to the city rather than a disjointed
point in space.
To fulfill this vision, connectivity will be addressed at three scales before the actual downtown with a focus on pedestrian based con-
nectivity. At the scale of the city center, the main focus of this project, the attention will be on creating a separation between vehicle
and pedestrian in order to establish a true sense of pedestrian based density and create a true core for the citizens of Coral Springs.

The hope of this project is to take the current suburban model of fragmentation and car-oriented development and retrofit it with that
of a pedestrian based density.


INTRODUCTION


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


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SProject Background> City of Coral Sprinqs> Location and History
Location and History

Location:
Located in South Florida, the heart of the City of Cor-
al Springs is situated about 13 miles Northwest of Ft.
Lauderdale, FL and about 11 miles West of Atlantic
Coast.

Northern Border: City of Parkland
Southern Border: City of Sunrise and City of
North Lauderdale
Eastern Border: City of Coconut Creek
and City of Margate
Western Border: Everglades National Park

Major Access:
County: Sample Road, University Drive
State: State Road 7 (US 441)
Highway: 4 direct exits on Sawgrass Expressway (Flori-
da Turnpike extension)




History of Coral Springs:
Chartered on July 10th, 1963 by Coral Ridge Prop-
erties, the City of Coral Springs was the beginning
of western expansion in Broward County, Florida. A
drained swamp land, the original 3,860 acres of land
were designated as the perfect location for a new
masterplanned community.
By 1965, the city had acquired a total of 16
square miles, sold over 600 building lots, and was de-
signed for a population of 50,000 residents. In 1966,
the Westinghouse Electric Corportation purchased
Coral Ridge Properties in order to use the new city
as an "urban laboratory to evaluate new products".
Coral Springs developed an identity of a "progres-
sive" city by selling housing equipped with the future
of household living. Attracting new residents and
visitors were model homes containing state of the
art home utility centers, infrared heating systems, full
electric kitchens, and central air-conditioning units.
From this point, the city grew at a remarkable
pace reaching 50,000 residents by 1985. By this time,
the city had a well established infrastructure and to-
tal property value had passed $1 billion. Reaching
over 115,000 at the turn of the century the city had
received several awards including the first munici-
pality to receive a Florida Governors Sterling Award
in 1997, and again in 2003. In 2010, Coral Springs
ranked 1st in the state of Florida and 44th overall in
Money magazine's 100 Best Places to Live. Coral
Springs maintains it reputation as a successful subur-
ban community and is proactively looking forward
at the future landscape of a suburban community




DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
INTRODUCTION A model for suburban infill and redevelopment
3 ~~~~~~A model for suburban milladrdeeomn





Project Background> City of Coral Springs> City Data and Project Location L


Demographics

Population:
1980: 37,349
1990: 78,864
2000: 117,549
2010: 127, 359 (2009 Estimate)

City Population Data (2009 ACS Estimate):

Median Age: 36.7
Median Household Income: $64,029
Average Household Size: 3

One race: 98%.4
Two or more races: 1.6%


Race:
White:
Hispanic:
Black/African American:
Asian:
Native Hawaiin/Pacific Islander:
American Indian/Alaska Native:
Other:


56% (71,017)
23% (28,623)
15% (18,349)
5% (6,545)
0%
.1% (182)
.6% (722)


City Population Data (2009 ACS Estimate):


Land Area: 23.93 sq miles
Developed: 99%

Land Use:
Residential:
Traffic Circulation:
Waterways:
Commercial:
Recreation/Open Space:
Civic/Schools/Hospitals:
Industrial:
Local Activity Center:

Housing:
Numer of Households: 46,265
Single Family:
Multifamily:


49.0%
18.0%
10.0%
8.0%
54.2%
4.0%
3.0%
1.0%



52%
48%


Civic/Schools/Openspace:
Public/Charter Schools: 22
Elementary-12
Middle- 5
High School- 5
Number of Students: 28,476

Parks:
Number of Parks: 49
Number of Acres: 765
Specialty City Owned Facilities: Gymnasium,
Tennis Center, Aquatic Complex


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Downtown Coral Sorinas Aerial 1960's


Downtown Coral Sorinc


Aerial- 2010


INTRODUCTION


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS

A model for suburban infill and redevelopment






I Project Background> CRA Initiative> Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Plan


CRA Redevelopment Plan

2002 Proposal
In order to ensure the social and economic future of its citizens, the city of
Coral Springs initiated a Community Redevelopment Agency in 2001. Typically
a redevelopment plan is initiated when an area arrives at a near bottom or
bottom functional state. However, in an effort to avoid reaching this status the
CRA established its boundaries around the city's main intersection of University
Avenue and Sample Road. Though the main city intersection, the area is slow-
ly declining and offers no true benefits for the city and its residents.
The city hired Amera Urban Developers, Inc to create a redevelopment
plan for the 136 acres of CRA designated land. The development proposal
pictures is the company's 2002 proposal. With guidance from the city, the re-
development area was separated in to 8 areas comprised of the 4 corners of
the city's major intersection and the land surrounding the quadrants.

Southeast Quadrant:
As of 2011, it is the only constructed phase of the Redevelopment. At 19 acres,
it is comprised of a contemporary corner financial office building with Broward
Northwest Regional Library and Coral Springs Charter school tucked behind it.
Northeast Quadrant:
At 6 acres, the intent for this sector is to maintain its current land use with intent
to revitalize or replace existing structures.
The site held a Publix supermarket until a 2005 hurricane, the intent is to now
place a Publix Greenwise Supermarket when it is redeveloped.
Northwest Quadrant:
At 12 acres, this area contains a commercial strip and the City Hall.
Amera anticipated the area will be redeveloped with a new City Hall as the
focal point with a mixture of office and residential. Recent plans have an ad-
dition of a satellite campus for Broward College in the current location of City
Hall.

Southwest Quadrant:
The focal point of the Coral Springs Redevelopment. At 28 acres, The south-
west quadrant currently holds two financial buildings, several vacant lots, a US
post office and some multi-family residential units. It is the intent of the CRA to
make this phase the "heart" of Coral Springs. With a combination of office, re-
tail, residential around a central green space the city aims at creating a walk-
able and iconic town center. City Place and Mizner Park located in West Palm
Beach County were used as models to create the Coral Springs Downtown
Plan.
-As the focal point of redevelopment, this phase will make up the majority this
project, the 2011 Downtown Coral Springs proposal-

"The Walk" extention area:
Running North to South, The Walk is currently the focal commercial spine of
Coral Springs. It's northernmost border is currently not part of the CRA but con-
sidered to be an area of future extension in order to connect both develop-
ments.
Hospital Support/Transit Center:
About 17 acres of land sit to the west of the focal phase. This phase will in-
clude an expansion of the adjacent hospital and addition of health related
buildings. This will also serve as the location for a large parking garage to serve
the needs of the surrounding CRA areas.
Southside and Northside Areas:
Currently strip development sitting on both sides of Sample Road to the west
of the main quadrants, the intent for this area is to improve facade, parking,
and walkability to help tie in to the downtown area.


INTRODUCTION


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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS

A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


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INTRODUCTION


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS

A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


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Project Background> City Center> Pros and Cons



High density for suburban layout economic boost- _. _.
emphasis on mix use structures central open ..
space walkability within site

Cons: J
-No attention to keeping stormwater on site (or
water that is currently drained to site)

-Pedestrian flows and gateways poorly ad-
dressed leading to a lack of connectivity .

-Evokes same feel and follows trend of current.. _. .
"walkable" developments in South Florida caus-
ing site to lack a sense of place

-Urban design guidelines render central
greenspace functionless with no identity.




The proposal is now 10 years old and should be reassessed
to address design flaws, social changes, and future trends


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
7 iN T U T i O A model for suburban infill and redevelopment






DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


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CASE STUDIES





Case Studies > Sustainable Urbanism> Dockside Green


Dockside Green
Victoria, British Columbia

General Details:
Program: Infill harborfront mix-use residential, retail, commer-
cial, light industrial development
Land area: 15 Acres
Previous use: Underutilized industrial land
Timeline: 10 year build-out: First phase completed in 2007.
Currently under construction
Dwelling Units: Approx. 860
Commercial Square footage: 242,194 square feet


Highlights:
-All 26 buildings LEED platinum certified
-Building Energy savings: 45-55%--Potable water savings: 65%
-Dedicated pedestrian and cyclist routes run through site
-Car Sharing
-Neighborhood retail
-Biomass co-generation facility
-Biodiesel facility
-Centralized open space


Overview:
Dockside Green sits on 15 acres of former industrial lan on the
inner harbor of Victoria, British Columbia. This mix use develop-
ment aspires to be the lead in sustainable design by adhering
to a "triple bottom line concept" concerning social, econom-
ic, and environmental performance. Composed of retail, resi-
dential, live/work, office, light industrial, public amenities, and
cultural venues, the development will be home to 2,500 peo-
ple. The connections to the site are well integrated into the
surrounding neighborhoods as the pedestrian/bicycle paths
cut through the heart of the development. Following a linear
mold, a central vegetated corridor contains a water feature
that doubles as the site's stormwater remediation and the lo-
cation of prime real estate. Dockside green is one of the case
studies for the Neighborhood Development LEED program. It
is a prototype of the future of integrating sustainability in to
dense areas by addressing that a "sustainable" structure is only
1/3 of the equation to create more responsibly built spaces.
This project equally focuses on the required energy to transport
people and goods and the impact of design outside of the
structure.


Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs:


-Pedestrian and cyclic paths cutting through the center of the site
evoke a bold focus on the pedestrian scale

-High emphasis on smart infrastructure connecting structure, land,
and environment.

-Central open space establishes the focal point for civic identity

-Biodiversity corridors

-The municipal storm water system will not be utilized. The site will
utilize an onsite naturalized creek, a pond, and underground stor-
age to mange flows. This will be designed beyond LEED standards
and is built to sustain a 100-year storm.


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RESEARCH


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





Case Studies > Sustainable Urbanism > Glenwood Park


Glenwood Park
Atlanta, Georgia

General Details:
Program: Inner suburban new urbanist community consisting of
mostly residential homes assisted by a retail center and office
space.
Land area: 28 Acres
Previous use: Brownfield
Timeline: Construction started in 2003. Full build out by 2011
Dwelling Units: 328 units consisting of single family, condomini-
um, and townhouses
Retail Square footage: 50,000 square feet
Office Square footage: 21,000 square feet


Highlights:
-All homes are EarthCraft-certified (saving 1.3 megawatts of
energy per year)
-Direct access to MARTA transit system
-All retail and office is within a 5 minute walk from anywhere in
community
-Stormwater system reduced runoff by 2/3
-Central Open space doubles as stormwater management
feature
-Increased tax revenue of $4.5 million


Overview:
Glenwood Park aim to be an "antidote" to the sprawling
catastrophes of Atlanta, Georgia. This mix use new urban-
ist community has a strict emphasis on the human scale and
is a beautiful example of infill as it is constructed on an aban-
doned brownfield. Two miles from downtown Atlanta, this new
hub promotes condominiums, townhouses, and single family
homes. Within a 5 minute walk anywhere on the property resi-
dents and guests can access the central node of the property
through well designed alleys, pathways, and greenways. The
"towncenter" offers many options in retail with a true sustain-
able urbanist feel of widepathways, bioswales, native veg-
etation, and a strict reduction of large parking lots. The entire
property bleeds well in to the surrounding neighborhoods allow-
ing the Glenwood center to become the center of the urban
context. It is important to note that Glenwood Park does not
offer any affordable housing. The homes are considered to be
of luxury value and no home rental properties are available.


Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs:


-Glenwood Park Center ties in very well to the surrounding neigh-
borhoods establishing an new identity and value for existing prop-
erties

-Central open space is offers a dual function of recreational space
and stormwater management.

-Any part of the property can be walked to within 5 minutes. Archi-
tectural diversity and greenways make the walks enjoyable and
enticing


-80% of construction waste diverted from landfills


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RESEARCH


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





Case Studies > Sustainable Urbanism> Holiday Neighborhood


Holiday Neighborhood
Boulder, Colorado

General Details:
Program: Mix use development inspired by local history and
environment; high emphasis on affordable housing
Land area: 27 Acres
Previous use: Built on land previously zoned for big box retail
Timeline: Build out completed in 2007
Dwelling Units: 333 (40% affordable housing)
Commercial Square footage: 50,000 square feet


Highlights:
-Density allowed to be at 20/units per acre (double of previous
zoning
-133 affordable housing units. 49 units aimed at those at 20-
50% of median income; 86 units aimed at 60-80% of median in-
come; 3 units reserved for emergency transitional housing.
-Permanently affordable housing (will not change over time)
-Live/work studios, townhouses, duplexes, single family homes
-EPA funded stormwater technology and stormwater manage-
ment
-Central park featuring outdoor movie theatre (allusion to site
history) while doubling as innovative stormwater management
feature

Overview:
Holiday Neighborhood is a combination of sustainability and
affordability. Masterplanned by a public-sector land devel-
oper, it combines several housing types, life style functions,
and sustainable practices in to one lot. One of the last par-
cels available for development in Boulder, Colorado, it was
originally zoned for big box retail. The effort of the developers
and community convinced the city to make better use of its
limited land. Furthermore, the city allowed the zoning for units
per acre to increase from 10/acre to 20/acre, an outstand-
ing movement that allowed the site to establish a true sense
of density. Retail and office units are centralized between the
development and surrounding context, creating a community
center. The neighborhood its self is centered around a large
community park that cleanses the site's stormwater and has
an outdoor movie screen to tie in to the history of the site. Fur-
ther increasing the density was the ability to favor the pedes-
trian over the vehicle. Certain portions of the site contain 1.1
parking spaces per unit, compared to the standard 2 parking
space per unit. The sense of place is topped off by a refur-
bished Holiday Drive-Inn marquee.v


Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs:


-Effective change of zoning to 20/units an acre

-Bus pass provided for all residents, combined with 40% affordable
housing

-Central open space doubles as civic space and stormwater man-
agement feature

-Large Housing diversity

-Use of history to delineate theme and site elements. Co-Housing
development allows residents to deliniate desired conditions.


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RESEARCH


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





I Case Studies> Bikeways> Cross Seminole Greenway


Cross Seminole Greenway
Winter Park-Oviedo, FL Sector

General Details:
Location: Overall trail will run from 1-4 Pedestrian bridge in Lake
Mary, Florida to Howel Branch Road at Orange County line.
Studied Area: Portion of trail running through suburban Winter
Park and Oviedo, FL
Land used: Utility ways, pre-planned corridors, public land.
Timeline: As of 2011 about 80% complete
Length: Overall- 24 milesStudied Area: Approx. 6 Miles
Maintenance: Majority maintained and own by Seminole
County Parks and Recreation. Trail through Winter Springs and
Oviedo is owned by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. Small lengths are maintained by the city of Lake
Mary and the Florida Department of Transportation


Highlights:
-Safe travel with minimal contact with vehicular traffic
-Privately owned land was acquired in order to connect full
trail
-Many parts of the trail cut through the heart of subdivisions.
-Most of trail is scenic and shaded
-Easy access and excellent signage
-Provides connections to park systems and commercial devel-
opments

Overview:
The Cross Seminole trail is set to run through about 5 cities and
connect to regional trails through out the Orlando area. It of-
fers a fantastic pedestrian connections to many civic and
public spaces as well as commercial developments. The trail
is mainly used for recreational purposes but a study of the trail
running through Winter Park and Oviedo depicted a good
amount of users make use of its functional connections to sur-
rounding necessities. Most of the trail is separate from roads
of high vehicular conflicts while crossings at intersections are
dealt with in a very obtuse and efficient manner to ensure as
much safety for both the users and vehicles. The studied area
cuts through many subdivisions and offers direct connections.
Many properties on the trail use it as a focal amenity for home
and parcel sales. The signage is well developed as location,
coordinates, and mile markers are readily found through the
trail.


Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs:

-Limited and effective interaction with vehicles


-Utility ways are used as corridors


-Public ownership


-Direct connections through subdivisions and parks.


-Commuting possibilities to local offices, stores, and
restaurants


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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment






DOWNTOWN


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PROJECT VISION




Project Vision>Intent and Inspiration


Glenwoocd Park\
Atlanta, Georgia
Functional Plaza






I Cross Seminole Trail
Oviedo, Florida
Suburban Bikeway

Dockside Greenl
Victoria, BC
Featured Stormwater
Management


I Holiday Neighborhood
Boulder, Colorado
Community Garden







[Dockside Green
Pedestrian Corridor


Project Intent:
An alternate rendition of the
focal Southwest quadrant
within the
Coral Springs Redevelopment
Area




Vision:
Creating a model for future
suburban redevelopment by
emphasizing true civic identity
through the fusion of connectiv-
ity and sense of place



Goals:
-Connectivity at all scales of city
> Address all citizens
-Higher sense of identity
> Becoming the "3rd" place
-Pedestrian oriented density
> Establish language for building
height and vehicular/pedestrian
interaction


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DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


PROJECT VISION





Project Scope>Connectivity> Scales of Concern
In order to truly emphasize civic
identity through connectivity, it is
imperative to address all citizens
of Coral Springs. Establishing direct
connections allows residents to truly
embrace the creation of their new
downtown and for the downtown to
become a unifying node instead of
a disjointed destination. cale 1: City Scale
..,.Coral Sprinqs Bikeway
Scales of Concern:


Proposal of a downtown oriented
bikeway Scale 2: One Mile Radius
-Creating a unique, pedestrian- The Downtown District
scale connection for all residents

1 Mile Radius:
Proposal of Downtown District
-Unifying the diversity of Coral -
Springs while reducing dependent Scale 3: CRA Redevelopment
cy of personal vehicles within a Downtown Coral S-n-s
Downown Coral Sprinqs
mile of the downtown '----/T

Redevelopment Area: -
Creating connections be-
tween phases with building and Scale 4: City Center
streetscape language. Using the -: s Redevelopment Core:
bikeway as connector to the sur- Crossroads Green
rounding context .C r Gre

City Center:
Using the study of the previous 3
scales to influence the design of the
focal scale




DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
15 P R E CT V I S I N A model for suburban infill and redevelopment









SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


Downtown Coral Springs oriented Bikeway
Design Intent:
Establishing a direct connection between the
citizen and the heart of the city

In order for Downtown Coral Springs to become a true city cen-
ter it needs to engage the entire city. A sense of belonging and a
unique experience to the residents of Coral Springs will form a lon-
getivity and strength in the bond between citizen and city. At the
city scale, connectivity is key and it is important to realize that the
user experience begins as soon one steps out the door. The city
of Coral Springs expects most of its visitors to arrive by vehicle as
Downtown Coral Springs will also be a major draw for those in the
adjacent municipalities. Increased bus frequency and an expan-
sion of bus routes will allow more users to access the Downtown.
However, a bus ride, as well as a car ride, does not innately unify
the user with the Downtown.With the intent to create the heart of
Coral Springs, citizens deserve an experience separate from the av-
erage user.
The possibility of a human scale experience from start to finish
is attainable through the design of a unique bikeway system. The
layout of a typical suburban community, including Coral Springs,
allows for the creation of a bikeway network separate from streets
and narrow sidewalks through the use of the city's canal ways, util-
ity ways, and parks.

In Coral Springs, a careful study of these attributes allows for the
design of a bike transit network oriented around Downtown Coral
Springs. Coming from all areas of the city, all residents have the op-
portunity to reach the downtown by bicycle efficiently, with minimal
vehicular conflict and in an ease solely available to the citizens of
Coral Springs.
Aside from the benefits of an efficient way to travel and reduced
vehicular traffic, this network establishes a human scale connection
between all nodes of the city including parks, preserves, commer-
cial, and civic locations. Working as the central node, Downtown
Coral Springs would rightfully serve as the hub for bicycle transit in
the city. Two proposed county bikeways cut through Coral Springs,
creating gateways to connections to surrounding municipalities
and Everglades National Park. These connections as well as a future
county wide bikeshare system will help promote a diversity of uses
to the Coral Springs Bicycle Network. As always, the intent of design
is for people. The positive aspects of health, sense of community,
and higherstandard of living are all integrated within this network.


Goals and Objectives:

Vision: Easy access to City Center by Bikeway


Goal: Connectivity to Secluded Subdivisions
Objective: Opportunities for quick access from subdivisions
Objective: Connections to those more likely to use cyclic
travel
Goal: Limit pedestrian/ vehicular conflict
Objective: Use of wasted spaces and canal ways as bike
way
Objective: Redevelop right of way in certain areas
Goal: Use Civic and Open space as Nodes
Objective: Utilize Parks as gateways for neighborhoods
Objective: Make city center the hub for all bikeway paths


-


U'.'





I Coral Springs Bikeway>Research> Vehicular Study


City scale connectivity:
-Highest traffic flow in city located at Downtown intersection
-Distance from highway and US 441 prime for a
"higher density" development

-Citizens of Coral Springs will face high congestion problems when development at-


tracts outside visitors
-County Bus Routes Limited
-City Bus routes are limited, do not address the entire
or past 6 PM
University


city, and never run before 8 am


Vehicular Circulation


5s:,4 I. ,--- City and County Bus Routes
r.,.' ^J. -jr--_ ~ -J : ~~ ~- : -*- j- -- -.-



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.. -
4'-H
G. i,,,USX.&
line


*me
ONE

U..


Legend
Highway -
Very High Traffic Volume -
High Traffic Volume
Medium Traffic Volume 0


Coral Springs: West Route
Coral Springs: East Route
Broward County Routes
Downtown Coral Springs


IEEE [ Medium Local Traffic
Iumul Lower Local Traffic


1 Mile


3 Miles


SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


-i


p4
N




I Coral Springs Bikeway>Research>Housing Types


Types


Notable Information:

Higher Density housing and
smaller housing lots are
mostly concentrated to the
southeast/southwest of the
city. A stronger connection
to the bikeway would be
more beneficial in these ar-
eas


-1 .


CONDOMINIA


HOMES FOR AGED
HOTELS, MOTELS
MULTI-FAMILY
MULTI-FAMILY LESS THAN 10 UNITS
SINGLE FAMILY


VACANT RESIDENTIAL


N


SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


- -





I Coral Springs Bikeway>Research>Commercial Types


I


. f.


1*
El'


Owe n m


W


-I-


MA ll


Notable Information:


The main corridor of com-
mercial landuse terminates
at Downtown Coral Springs.
This corridor can also be an
opportunity to connect the
bikeway to all existing com-
mercial


* li


A


mm
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Um
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BOWLING ALLEYS, SKATING RINKS, ENCLOSED ARENAS
COMMUNITY SHOPPING CENTERS
DEPARTMENT STORES
DRIVE-IN RESTAURANTS
ENCLOSED THEATRES, AUDITORIUMS
MIX USE: STORE AND OFFICE
NIGHT CLUBS, BARS, AND COCKTAIL LONGES
REGIONAL SHOPPING MALL
RESTAURANTS
STORES ONE-STORY
SUPERMARKET


.5 Miles 2 Miles


SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





I Coral Springs Bikeway>Research>Schools and Open Space


7 ji^


Schools & Open Space


a


Notable Information:


The location of open space
creates a prime opportunity
to create nodes and con-
nections to the bikeway.
Most schools in the city are
located near a utiliway and
can possibly be directly
connected


rKJ
F ~ll


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LINEAR PARK
S PARK


n


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L-,- \ ""-^-- !.jL/ '*."

--- ---: i _.^. ,".\l, .
/ ... *,.;, T-^'- --.

_. _=- :.;..- .. ... I'_


PRESERVE
SCHOOL OPEN SPACE
PRIVATE SCHOOL


PUBLIC SCHOOL


A


- -


SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


_ ___ 1 _


OWMM




I Coral Springs Bikeway>Research>Bikeway Analysis and Synthesis


? .J
iAl~t _______________
-_____ -- ________


Notable Information:

A close study of all canal
ways starts to delineate ar-
eas where the bikeway can
come to life.
This analysis and synthesis is
based on the demographic
studies, proposed county
greenways, and utility way
feasibility


-


SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment




Coral Springs Bikeway> Bikeway


Proposal and


Data


i Nil


Proposed Bikeway Data:
-Bikeway does not utilize any on-street bike lanes

-Parks with Direct Access: 12
-Parks within a 1/4 Mile of Access: 25

-Direct Access from all city high schools

-Direct access or within a 1/4 Mile of all Major
Commercial Nodes

-Longest Distance from center of a
subdivision to bikeway entrance:1.75 miles

-Longest Distance from Bikeway Access to Down-
town Coral Springs: 3 Miles (15-20 Minutes)


Leg(
Preserve
School
Open Space
Park

Commercial

Public School
Private/Charter
School
Downtown
Coral Springs


end


Proposed Primary
Bikeway


-_ Proposed Secondary/
Expansion Bikeway
Existing Expanded
Width Sidewalk
Designated County
Cost Feasible
Future Bikeway
Gateway


Major Street Intersection

Minor Street Intersection


1-3 Mile Radius


SCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAV


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


II


q






- S I.


SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


iem


Delineating the Downtown District
Design Intent:
Unifying the newly created downtown with


the sur-


rounding areas

The creation of the Coral Springs Bikeway aims to connect the en-
tire city through a unique experience. This is a radical look and
proposed change to the way residents of suburban communities
live. Obviously, not every resident will be enticed to ride the Coral
Springs Bikeway or deal with the climatic effects of South Florida.
Though it may be hard to curb the use of the personal vehicle at a
city scale, it is reasonable to propose efficient connections to those
on the cusp of a long walk or a short drive.
The mile radius around the City Center exhibits these opportuni-
ties and it is of paramount importance to find ways to connect the
surround context in a way that will help reduce the use of personal
vehicles.
A close study of this radius reveals the area as a snippet of all
Coral Springs has to offer. The diversity of housing, commercial units,
and civic and open spaces accumulate enough variety to delin-
eate this area as a district. This serves as the stepping stone to the
proposal of a Downtown District with the city center as its heart.
Civic Identity is strengthen by making those in the surrounding ar-
eas part of downtown. Positive effects such as property value and
further regional recognition are also possible benefits of the Down-
town District.
The main proposal and unifying factor of the Downtown District is
the proposal of a Downtown Shuttle. This shuttle will serve as a way
for residents in the district to go to the regional park, nature pre-
serve, city hall, performing arts center, and most of all, the City Cen-
ter.


Goals and Objectives:

Vision: Creating identity outside of the downtown borders

Goal: Alternative transport to destinations in the district
Objective: creation of downtown shuttle
Objective: shared parking and regional bus connection
Goal: Creating a connection between downtown and resi
dents
Objective: Use of "District" to elevate property value
Goal: Emphasize amenities of District
Objective: Easily walkable from City Center
Objective: Advertising program


23




I Downtown District>Research> Housing Types L


Notable Information:

The majority of the area in-
cludes single family hous-
ing but offers all the diversity
of multi-family housing and
high density multi-family
housing that Coral Springs
has to offer.


DDeoumi


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['. ,V-ATqn


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1 .1
Y~t~~TI1ti


FTTI I ITi .- IIIILlim11111ITIIT-.T-9


II


CONDOMINIA
HOMES FOR AGED
HOTELS, MOTELS
MULTI-FAMILY
MULTI-FAMILY
LESS THAN 10 UNITS
SINGLE FAMILY
VACANT RESIDENTIAL


N
.25 Mi. 1 /


-- ___ ____ ___


SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


gm 7=7=TDT =ru-u


r-r-rT-rl-T-rT-r-





Downtown District>Research>


Property Value


-. p -


Notable Information:

The area within a mile
downtown contains a


of
wide


range of property values
meaning the diversity of in-
comes is displayed within
the district


-iilB


m a


Aii~


En

4451
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Ut j
l.. ..& ,,R4, .......
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teti
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U $10 50,000
m $50,000 -100,000

1 $100,000- 150,000

I $150,000o 250,000
-m $250,000 350,000


$350,000


- 450,000


$450,000 550,000


$550,000

$750,000


- 750,000
- 1,000,000


$1 ,000,000+


N


.25 Mi.


1 Mi.


-~ I.


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


25


t1- lwm




I Downtown District>Research> Commercial Properties


Notable Information:

The district area contains
the main corridor of com-
mercial offerings within Cor-
al Springs. From local retail
to big box, making it prime
for district diversity.


I m


LI


* U
mm [ mo [m
SI m -
li U -UK,
El H Mu


. mi


r


mmI


BOWLING ALLEYS, SKATING RINKS,
ENCLOSED ARENAS
COMMUNITY SHOPPING CENTERS
DEPARTMENT STORES
DRIVE-IN RESTAURANTS
ENCLOSED THEATRES, AUDITORIUMS


MIX USE: STORE AND OFFICE
NIGHT CLUBS, BARS,
AND COCKTAIL LONGES
REGIONAL SHOPPING MALL
RESTAURANTS
STORES ONE-STORY
SUPERMARKET


m


.25 Mi.


1 Mi.


SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


N


-1 --If.


ma
ML on




I Downtown District>Research> Parks and Open Space |


Notable Information:

The biggest factor in the
ability to create a district
comes from the diversity of
schools and open space
within the district.


0


LINEAR PARK
PARK
PRESERVE
SCHOOL OPEN SPACE
PRIVATE SCHOOL
PUBLIC SCHOOL


n


N


I ~


/7 n


r--7


.25 Mi.


1 Mi.


-_ ^ I i


SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


F


27


I T


C3


FiA


175 ...


.,.,





I Downtown District>Research>Neiqhborhood Flows |


Notable Information:

Exploring the neighborhood
flows of the surrounding
context helps delineate the
possible route for the Down-
town Shuttle




Legend
** High Traffic Flow
*m m Medium Traffic Flow
mm Low Traffic Flow
Proposed Bikeway
o\,
Neighborhood Flow

Major Pedestrian Gateway


I '
I I






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IIhIimm...m.mu..14 a
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mmEhIm~mala...1~


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I Mi.


SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


___ U


mmmmmmmma


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Downtown District> Pro


osals


Downtown District: 1 mile radius from redevelopment area
Featuring: Range of Housing Types, City Hall, Center for the Arts, Large
Park, Churches, Medical Plaza, Large Retail, Town Center


Legend
C". Future Transmodal Hub
9** Proposed Signage/
** .* Gateway
* Proposed Pedestrian
Gateway
Proposed "Downtown"
Shuttle
Proposed Bikeway
- CS East Bus Route
CS West Bus Route


1/4- 1 Mile Radius

Downtown CS

Private School


Public School

Commercial


Preserve


Park


, Er.


i
4 Ii-... .. :
*.. i
4 : J.:


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gn
Soaqq. U 3 |
,a. a.E
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.
.


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it

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9


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SCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


- i


L. -


^^^lN%%%% k^^v






-I I.


SCALE THREE: DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


Downtown Coral Springs Redevelopment
Design Intent:
Create a unifying language between redevelopment
phases and the immediately surrounding context
At the scale of the redevelopment it is important to create fluid
connections between phases and the surrounding context in or-
der to have a City Center that bleeds in to the surrounding environ-
ment.
The proposal includes creating a unique language within the bike-
way that will help entice residents to walk to the city center. A clear
cut language on a well delineated path would be just enough to
induce a walking atmosphere
The intra-phase relationships are simple. On sample road and univ-
eristy, the streetscape should be unique to define the borders of the
downtown. At the corner of Sample and Univeristy, it is key that the
four buildings combine to create the vehicular emblem and gate-
way to the city.


Goals and Objectives:

Vision: Fluidity between city center and its surrounding context

Goal: Succesful intraphase relationships
Objective: Creating a proper gateway for the city
Objective: minimizing the daunting effects of a large inter
section
Goal: Easy connections to surrounding residential
Objective: Use of bikeway and redevelopment paths to


i





I Downtown Coral Springs>Analysis and Synthesis


Key Information:

-Most stormwater in area flows to Town
Center parcel
-Poor connections between Northern
residential within a walkable distance
-High walkability connections to the
south.


Legend
Main Vehicular
Entrance

Potential Main
Pedestrian Entrance

Stormwater Flow


Pedestrian Flows

Weak Pedestrian
Connection

Commercial Area

Residential Area


___ :N:


MINIMA F.e.Pe..TVIVAN
FL-OW. UN L- F FAE ?


T.ANF,V C


- 11


SCALE THREE: DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment





I Downtown Coral Springs> Connectivity Proposals |


Building Proposals:

The intersection of University
Drive and Sample Road is
key to establishing a gate-
way. A simple ellipse is used
to thin the severity of the
wide intersection while at
the same time unify the
buildings. The geometries
of the existing building in
the southeast corner is mim-
icked as the ellipse gen-
tly grazes the 3 supporting
phases and cuts deeply in
to the City Center in order
to accent its importance
over the other phases.


Existing
Residential





Commercial

Sample Road
Bikeway >g* i*M a
Arrival
Commercial


Bikeway
,Arrival
Existing- ,
Residential
4 Existing
|Residential

77 Grocery/
Commercial/ Commercial
ro rd Collqe .....
Possible Residential 0

*all 04004141 .1 .191 S 0.a0


I Existing Phase:
7 Office/Commercial
Regional Library
i Charter School


S

S


Existing
Medical
Plaza


Bikeway
Arrival


Existing
Residential


SCALE THREE: DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS


ansion
'nercial


Existing Office/
Commercial


DOWNTOWN


S % j.W.. Bikeway
Arrival
Existing
Residential


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


___ U


I.








SCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


i


City Center: Crossroads Green
Design Intent:
Creation of a city emblem that will be a regional des-
tination but will also function as the "3rd place" for
citizens of Coral Springs.
The study of the first three scales allows for a simple concept for the
city center: Allowing the exterior flows to influence the interior focus.
The flows from the surrounding context help establish the pedestrian
focused paths and plazas that will be the bones of the design.
Aimed to be a regional destination, development will consist of a
focal pedestrian mall that will offer a variety of experiences and
shopping opportunities. This will be integrated with a central board-
walk system that will work as a unique way to walk through down-
town or a place to lose oneself for a bit while taking a break from
shopping.


Goals and Objectives:

Goal: Interactive corridors connecting to surrounding context
Objective: Open ended paths that connect to the rest of
the city
Objective: Several scales of experience for all types of
users
Goal: Central space that acts as heart of city
Objective: flexible use for civic events and large
gatherings
Objective: Everyday use with several seating options
Goal: Meet all proposed landuse and density projections of city
Objective: Same density projections less vehicle
Objective: More varying forms of land use
Objective: Integrate civic uses


- a


33




I City Center> Research>User types and flows |


I "l IItI

WI
' 2rA I $F- OM ICI FFc MP-Y6
I I I I I I I l l l I i I ~ l ~ l l I ~ l i I


-I 1


DOWNTOWN
SCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER A model for suburban


CORAL


SPRINGS


in infill and redevelopment





I City Center> Research>site analysis j


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$TRUCTURE*
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----

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m
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Legend


Building to be Removed



Tree(s) to be kept



Pedestrian Gateway



Wind flow



Stormwater Drain/Pipe


,..I
tb %016


U St fl TRAPEWINPS
t~,r ,PURING SUMMER.
TRANSZTZONAL- WINP*
VARY GY VARIOUS CLIMATE
I FACTOR$


35 SCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


-I


I '


m m





I City Center> Research>User types and flows j


144nH Vei. INFt-U
--Pxwzvr A5AP
PEP. FLOW
----------------------~f"", ----------------
Hmmm mmm Imu m
U. I *.......
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1
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CANAL WTPTh5mmm m
VANP LOCATION CONVERGENCE
TO BE CHANGE
TO APPRE 55
CURRENT ANP
FUTURE
,TORMWATER '
NEEP .........----
,MINIMAL-/NO SUN EXPOSURE ., m
.. ^ P KG
7. .... I.



------------------------- ------------------------------
EP. FLOW ,


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'-- P:IeT A5>AP


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j
I
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J
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PEP. FLOW


DOWNTOWN


SCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


-IL







Concept:
Allowing exterior flows to deter-
mine interior focus


~-> csrSZ"


City Center
Creation of the


Intent:
city's emblem that


acts dually as a regional destination
and as the "3rd Place" for the citi-
zens of Coral Springs

Program:
-Central Open Space
< Flexible for various event
scales
<"Core of City"
-Pocket Plazas/ Varying seating
space scales
< Alternatives to main plaza
and corridors
-Interactive corridors connecting to
surrounding context
< Pedestrian Mall with varying
experiences
-Stormwater management as a
feature
< Limit stormwater flow to
municipal system


.4


J I .


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~ $;S~. ;4* 14. At
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Ir I \\ -:..'


DOWNTOWN


CORAL


SPRINGS


A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


V *


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r
A'
4"'r


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37 SCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER


%


^





I City Center> Circulationj


A- --


Vehicular Circulation


Primary Vehicular Circulation 1 ] ] [] a ^ "s *
Secondary Vehicular Circulatior 4 mm i i Parking Garage ^^U
Tertiary Vehicular Circulation -- Shared Parking Possibility w


-, .... .
-J^'.' '- L '"" ~~ ir--, "' ," -- --
J -.4 Ve ."-. ,.
^^-^*^sr- d '
j^ v7 ~^^ ^ *^ -'-^ z-- --?f**sii ?




Pedestrian Circulation":

Pedestrian Circulation


Stormwater Management


/


-
Vt -

-I..
y 2J_'-~---~ _- -


-p


/


/
0,91


Vegetated Stormwater
Detention/Retention


Primary Pedestrian Circulation
Secondary Pedestrian Circulation
Tertiary Pedestrian Circulation .-. Coral Springs Bikeway


The introduction of only two roads allows

pedestrians to flow freely through and
outside of the city center with little to no
vehicular conflict


SCALE FOUR: CITYTV CENTER


DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


-I


1 '9 6 4 -V"
IL / *- 'job


_-^


I .Akw


v





I City Center> Landuse and Data


Legend
Office

Residential

Retail/Commercial

Retail

Civic (United States Post Office)

Civic (City Hall and City Office)


Building Height
60' 50' 50' 70'


i.- -



Legend
Office

Residential

Residential/Retail

Retail/Commercial l

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Research Resources:

"Accommodating the Pedestrian (Open Library)." Welcome to Open Library! (Open Library).
.

Coral Springs CRA. "Community Redevelopment Plan."
Web. .

Coral Springs CRA. "Urban and Landscape Design Guidelines."
Web. .

Dunham-Jones, Ellen, and June Williamson. Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs.
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Print.

Gause, Jo Allen., and Richard Franko. Developing Sustainable Planned Communities.
Washington, D.C.: Urban Land Institute, 2007. Print.

Farr, Douglas. Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design with Nature.
Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2008. Print.

Gauzin-Miller, Dominique, and Nicolas Favet. Sustainable Architecture and Urbanism: Concepts, Technologies, Examples.
Basel: Birkhauser, 2002. Print.

Giulianelli, Mario. Enhancing Urban Environment by Environmental Upgrading and Restoration.
[New York]: Springer Science Business Media, 2005. Print.

Moroni, J. Broken Woods Park.
Gainesville: U of F, FL. 2008. Print.

Pinsof, Suzan Anderson., and Terri Musser. Bicycle Facility Planning: a Resource for Local Governments.
Chicago (122 S. Michigan Ave., Suite 1600 60603): American Planning Association. Planning Advisory Service, 1995. Print.

Imagery and Data Sources: Personal Resources:

www.google.com/images Erdal Donmez- Coral Springs City Manager
Google Earth Sarah Davis- CRA Project Coordinator
Labins.org Paul Carpenter- Coral Springs Transportation Planner/Community Developer
Florida Department of Transportation Edwin Kohlhorst- CAD/GIS Tech
Broward County GIS department Mark Horowitz- Broward MPO
Coral Springs Mapping and GIS department Robert Grist- UF Faculty
FGDL.org








Resources DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS
A model for suburban infill and redevelopment


i




Full Text

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentACKNOWLEDGEMENTSACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:The support and in uence that brought me to this nal project spans through out my career as a student of Landscape Architecture at the University of Florida. I rst would like to thank my mother, Margarita, and my two sisters, Marlen and Miriam, for their endless support in and out of school. Without you, I would have lacked the motivation and work ethic needed to accomplish what I have so far. A great thank you to my dear friend, Kayla Kuruc, for unknowingly helping me make the best decision of my life. Without your nudge and support to change to Landscape Architecture I would have never found my true calling. It is impossible to express how much gratitude I have for all the guys that shared the studio with me. Talking ourselves to death about every part of design and constantly elevating our level of critical thinking made every all-nighter worth the lack of sleep. Thank you LA Frolf Team 2011. Thanks to all the faculty within the department of Landscape Architecture. The diversity and dedication of everyone allowed me to understand all levels of the eld and nd my strengths and weaknesses. Thank you Bob Grist for being the exact advisor I needed. You allowed me to roam free in my design but brought me right back down to earth at the exact moments before I went on unnecessary tangents. A special thanks to Terry Schnadelbach for helping my true calling in the urban realm and helping me nd my “thumbprint”. I will always carry connectivity as the core of my designs.

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCONTENTS Project Name: Downtown Coral Springs: A Model for Suburban Redevelopment and In ll. Undergraduate Thesis for a Bachelors in Landscape Architecture By Marco GarciaFaculty Advisor: Robert Grist Spring 2011 Table of Contents:Introduction.................................................................................................................17 Case Studies................................................................................................................8-1 2 Project Vision...............................................................................................................13 -15 Scale 1: Coral Springs Bikeway.................................................................................16-22 Scale 2: The Downtown District ................................................................................ 23-29 Scale 3: Downtown Coral Springs..............................................................................30-32 Scale 4: City Center....................................................................................................33-45 Scale 4: City CenterCrossroads Green ...................................................................46-53 Resources .....................................................................................................................54

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION 1

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION Project Information:Project Type: Suburban redevelopment/in ll and connectivity Project Size: City Scale proposals. Redevelopment Site: 28 acres Location: Coral Springs, Florida Southwest Corner of University Drive and Sample Road Coral Springs, FL 33065The current trend of mix use “walkable” developments and in ll is quickly manifesting itself in suburban communities. In South Florida, developments such as Mizner Park and City Walk have become iconic examples for projects of this nature. These developments show bene cial progression for the suburban model and overall citizen life. However, as the novelty wears away and these developments hopefully become a standard practice, it is possible to begin to ex amine further progression. Pertaining to suburban communities, there are two issues at the forefront of examination. First is t he issue of connectivity ; the suburban fabric is one dedicated to the private vehicle, making the terms “density” and “walkability” isolated features within mix use/tnd projects. While these redevelopments create a wonderful pedestrian atmosphere, most do not address the physical connections to the surrounding context and sit as an outlying destination instead of an iconic hub or node within the urban fabric. The second issue comes at the scale of the individual redevelopment where environment and sense of place are inadequately addressed. Before in ll redevelopment becomes a mold, it is key to establish these two topics as a priority. Only in this way can each city create its own identity through the same goals. The city of Coral Springs, FL a prototypical suburban community in the urban sprawl of South Florida, is in the process of redeveloping the city’s four main street corners (University Drive and Sample Road). The CRA for the city has the intent of creating a d owntown/ Central Activity District (CAD) as the rst step towards creating an image for the city and establishing future density. A redevelopment study and proposal were created in 2002 that took much from already established developments but show no progression from the designs of then to what the same spaces could be now. Currently, the city is waiting on economic changes in order to continue w ith the proposed phases of redevelopment. As the 2002 plans become outdated, the city is open to new ideas and further study for th e design of its future “downtown”. The intent of this proposal is to create a downtown for Coral Springs that is an integrated emblem to the city rather than a di sjointed point in space. To ful ll this vision, connectivity will be addressed at three scales before the actual downtown with a focus on pedestrian based con nectivity. At the scale of the city center, the main focus of this project, the attention will be on creating a separation betw een vehicle and pedestrian in order to establish a true sense of pedestrian based density and create a true core for the citizens of Coral Springs. The hope of this project is to take the current suburban model of fragmentation and car-oriented development and retro t it with that of a pedestrian based density. Project Background>Project Description Project Synopsis: 2

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION Location and History Location:Located in South Florida, the heart of the City of Coral Springs is situated about 13 miles Northwest of Ft. Lauderdale, FL and about 11 miles West of Atlantic Coast. Northern Border: City of Parkland Southern Border: City of Sunrise and City of North Lauderdale Eastern Border: City of Coconut Creek and City of Margate Western Border: Everglades National Park Major Access:County: Sample Road, University Drive State: State Road 7 (US 441) Highway: 4 direct exits on Sawgrass Expressway (Florida Turnpike extension)History of Coral Springs:Chartered on July 10th, 1963 by Coral Ridge Properties, the City of Coral Springs was the beginning of western expansion in Broward County, Florida. A drained swamp land, the original 3,860 acres of land were designated as the perfect location for a new masterplanned community. By 1965, the city had acquired a total of 16 square miles, sold over 600 building lots, and was designed for a population of 50,000 residents. In 1966, the Westinghouse Electric Corportation purchased Coral Ridge Properties in order to use the new city as an “urban laboratory to evaluate new products”. Coral Springs developed an identity of a “progressive” city by selling housing equipped with the future of household living. Attracting new residents and visitors were model homes containing state of the art home utility centers, infrared heating systems, full electric kitchens, and central air-conditioning units. From this point, the city grew at a remarkable pace reaching 50,000 residents by 1985. By this time, the city had a well established infrastructure and total property value had passed $1 billion. Reaching over 115,000 at the turn of the century the city had received several awards including the rst municipality to receive a Florida Governors Sterling Award in 1997, and again in 2003. In 2010, Coral Springs ranked 1st in the state of Florida and 44th overall in Money magazine’s 100 Best Places to Live. Coral Springs maintains it reputation as a succesful suburban community and is proactively looking forward at the future landscape of a suburban communityProject Background> City of Coral Springs> Location and History 3

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION DemographicsPopulation: 1980: 37,349 1990: 78,864 2000: 117,549 2010: 127, 359 (2009 Estimate) City Population Data (2009 ACS Estimate): Median Age: 36.7 Median Household Income: $64,029 Average Household Size: 3 One race: 98%.4 Two or more races: 1.6% Race: White: 56% (71,017) Hispanic: 23% (28,623) Black/African American: 15% (18,349) Asian: 5% (6,545) Native Hawaiin/Paci c Islander: 0% American Indian/Alaska Native: .1% (182) Other: .6% (722) City Population Data (2009 ACS Estimate): Land Area: 23.93 sq miles Developed: 99% Land Use: Residential: 49.0% Traf c Circulation: 18.0% Waterways: 10.0% Commercial: 8.0% Recreation/Open Space: 54.2% Civic/Schools/Hospitals: 4.0% Industrial: 3.0% Local Activity Center: 1.0% Housing: Numer of Households: 46,265 Single Family: 52% Multifamily: 48% Civic/Schools/Openspace: Public/Charter Schools: 22 Elementary-12 Middle5 High School5 Number of Students: 28,476 Parks: Number of Parks: 49 Number of Acres: 765 Specialty City Owned Facilities: Gymnasium, Tennis Center, Aquatic Complex Project Background> City of Coral Springs> City Data and Project Location 4

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Southeast QuadrantNewly Constructed Corner Building Southeast QuadrantNewly Constructed Corner Building Generalized Existing Landuse DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION CRA Redevelopment Plan 2002 Proposal In order to ensure the social and economic future of its citizens, the city of Coral Springs intiated a Community Redevelopment Agency in 2001. Typically a redevelopment plan is initiated when an area arrives at a near bottom or bottom functional state. However, in an effort to avoid reaching this status the CRA established its boundaries around the city’s main intersection of University Avenue and Sample Road. Though the main city intersection, the area is slowly declining and offers no true bene ts for the city and its residents. The city hired Amera Urban Developers, Inc to create a redevelopment plan for the 136 acres of CRA designated land. The development proposal pictures is the company’s 2002 proposal. With guidance from the city, the redevelopment area was separated in to 8 areas comprised of the 4 corners of the city’s major intersection and the land surrounding the quadrants. Southeast Quadrant: As of 2011, it is the only constructed phase of the Redevelopment. At 19 acres, it is comprised of a contemporary corner nancial of ce building with Broward Northwest Regional Library and Coral Springs Charter school tucked behind it. Northeast Quadrant: At 6 acres, the intent for this sector is to maintain its current land use with intent to revitalize or replace exisiting structures. The site held a Publix supermarket until a 2005 hurricane, the intent is to now place a Publix Greenwise Supermarket when it is redeveloped. Northwest Quadrant: At 12 acres, this area contains a commercial strip and the City Hall. Amera anticipated the area will be redeveloped with a new City Hall as the focal point with a mixture of of ce and residential. Recent plans have an addition of a satellite campus for Broward College in the current location of City Hall. Southwest Quadrant: The focal point of the Coral Springs Redevelopment. At 28 acres, The southwest quadrant currently holds two nancial buildings, several vacant lots, a US post of ce and some multi-family residential units. It is the intent of the CRA to make this phase the “heart” of Coral Springs. With a combination of of ce, retail, residential around a central green space the city aims at creating a walkable and iconic town center. City Place and Mizner Park located in West Palm Beach County were used as models to create the Coral Springs Downtown Plan. -As the focal point of redevelopment, this phase will make up the majority this project, the 2011 Downtown Coral Springs proposal“The Walk” extention area: Running North to South, The Walk is currently the focal commercial spine of Coral Springs. It’s northernmost border is currently not part of the CRA but considered to be an area of future extension in order to connect both developments. Hospital Support/Transit Center: About 17 acres of land sit to the west of the focal phase. This phase will include an expansion of the adjacent hospital and addition of health related buildings. This will also serve as the location for a large parking garage to serve the needs of the surrounding CRA areas. Southside and Northside Areas: Currently strip development sitting on both sides of Sample Road to the west of the main quadrants, the intent for this area is to improve facade, parking, and walkability to help tie in to the downtown area. Project Background> CRA Initiative> Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Plan G A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G E E E E E E E E E E F E D C B A G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 5

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First Floor Building Use Proposed Building Heights Desired Central Space Node DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION Project Background> Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Plan > City Center 1

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentINTRODUCTION Project Background> City Center> Pros and Cons 7

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCASE STUDIES 1

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Dockside Green Victoria, British ColumbiaGeneral Details: Program : In ll harborfront mix-use residential, retail, commercial, light industrial development Land area : 15 Acres Previous use : Underutilized industrial land Timeline : 10 year build-out: First phase completed in 2007. Currently under construction Dwelling Units : Approx. 860 Commercial Square footage : 242,194 square feet Highlights: -All 26 buildings LEED platinum certi ed -Building Energy savings: 45-55%--Potable water savings: 65% -Dedicated pedestrian and cyclist routes run through site -Car Sharing -Neighborhood retail -Biomass co-generation facility -Biodiesel facility -Centralized open space Overview: Dockside Green sits on 15 acres of former industrial lan on the inner harbor of Victoria, British Columbia. This mix use development aspires to be the lead in sustainable design by adhering to a “triple bottom line concept” concerning social, economic, and environmental performance. Composed of retail, residential, live/work, of ce, light industrial, public amenities, and cultural venues, the development will be home to 2,500 people. The connections to the site are well intergrated into the surrounding neighborhoods as the pedestrian/bicycle paths cut through the heart of the development. Following a linear mold, a central vegetated corridor contains a water feature that doubles as the site’s stormwater remediation and the location of prime real estate. Dockside green is one of the case studies for the Neighborhood Development LEED program. It is a prototype of the future of integrating sustainability in to dense areas by addressing that a “sustainable” structure is only 1/3 of the equation to create more responsibly built spaces. This project equally focuses on the required energy to transport people and goods and the impact of design outside of the structure. Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs: -Pedestrian and cyclic paths cutting through the center of the site evoke a bold focus on the pedestrian scale -High emphasis on smart infrastructure connecting structure, land, and environment. -Central open space establishes the focal point for civic identity -Biodiversity corridors -The municipal storm water system will not be utilized. The site will utilize an onsite naturalized creek, a pond, and underground storage to mange ows. This will be designed beyond LEED standards and is built to sustain a 100-year storm. Case Studies > Sustainable Urbanism> Dockside Green Creek-front property. Creek doubles as stormwater retention.Constructed rst phase feature bioswales and structural diversityAesthetic stormwater pond with a ordable housing DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentRESEARCH9

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Glenwood Park Atlanta, GeorgiaGeneral Details: Program : Inner suburbian new urbanist community consisting of mostly residential homes assisted by a retail center and of ce space. Land area : 28 Acres Previous use : Brown eld Timeline : Construction started in 2003. Full build out by 2011 Dwelling Units : 328 units consisting of single family, condominium, and townhouses Retail Square footage : 50,000 square feet Of ce Square footage: 21,000 square feet Highlights: -All homes are EarthCraft-certi ed (saving 1.3 megawatts of energy per year) -Direct access to MARTA transit system -All retail and of ce is within a 5 minute walk from anywhere in community -Stormwater system reduced runoff by 2/3 -Central Open space doubles as stormwater management feature -Increased tax revenue of $4.5 million Overview: Glenwood Park aim to be an “antidote” to the sprawling catastrophies of Atlanta, Georgia. This mix use new urbanist community has a strict emphasis on the human scale and is a beautiful example of in ll as it is constructed on an abandoned brown eld. Two miles from downtown Atlanta, this new hub promotes condominiums, townhouses, and single family homes. Within a 5 minute walk anywhere on the property residents and guests can access the central node of the property through well designed alleys, pathways, and greenways. The “towncenter” offers many options in retail with a true sustainable urbanist feel of widepathways, bioswales, native vegetation, and a strict reduction of large parking lots. The entire propery bleeds well in to the surrounding neighborhoods allowing the Glenwood center to become the center of the urban context. It is important to note that Glenwood Park does not offer any affordable housing. The homes are considered to be of luxury value and no home rental properties are available. Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs: -Glenwood Park Center ties in very well to the surrounding neighborhoods establishing an new identity and value for exisiting properties -Central open space is offers a dual function of recreational space and stormwater management. -Any part of the property can be walked to within 5 minutes. Architectural diversity and greenways make the walks enjoyable and enticing 80% of construction waste diverted from land llsCase Studies > Sustainable Urbanism > Glenwood Park Property Map. Longest walk for property would be 1/2 mile. Community open space featuring residential diversity in background Aerial of development as of 2008. Central space for retail center featuring outdoor seating. DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentRESEARCH1

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Holiday Neighborhood Boulder, Colorado General Details: Program : Mix use development inspired by local history and environment; high emphasis on affordable housing Land area : 27 Acres Previous use : Built on land previously zoned for big box retail Timeline : Build out completed in 2007 Dwelling Units : 333 (40% affordable housing) Commercial Square footage : 50,000 square feet Highlights: -Density allowed to be at 20/units per acre (double of previous zoning -133 affordable housing units. 49 units aimed at those at 2050% of median income; 86 units aimed at 60-80% of median income; 3 units reserved for emergency transitional housing. -Permanently affordable housing (will not change over time) -Live/work studios, townhouses, duplexes, single family homes -EPA funded stormwater technology and stormwater management -Central park featuring outdoor movie theatre (allusion to site history) while doubling as innovative stormwater management feature Overview: Holiday Neighborhood is a combination of sustainability and affordability. Masterplanned by a public-sector land developer, it combines several housing types, life style functions, and sustainable practices in to one lot. One of the last parcels available for development in Boulder, Colorado, it was originally zoned for big box retail. The effort of the developers and community convinced the city to make better use of its limited land. Furthermore, the city allowed the zoning for units per acre to increase from 10/acre to 20/acre, an outstanding movement that allowed the site to establish a true sense of density. Retail and of ce units are centralized between the development and surrounding context, creating a community center. The neighborhood its self is centered around a large community park that cleanses the site’s stormwater and has an outdoor movie screen to tie in to the history of the site. Further increasing the density was the ability to favor the pedestrian over the vehicle. Certain portions of the site contain 1.1 parking spaces per unit, compared to the standard 2 parking space per unit. The sense of place is topped off by a refurbished Holiday Drive-Inn marquee.v Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs: -Effective change of zoning to 20/units an acre -Bus pass provided for all residents, combined with 40% affordable housing -Central open space doubles as civic space and stormwater management feature -Large Housing diversity -Use of history to delineate theme and site elements. Co-Housing development allows residents to deliniate desired conditions. Case Studies > Sustainable Urbanism> Holiday Neighborhood Individual Housing connections to site pathways Desired feel of towncenter Community garden, doubles as backyard for a ordable housingRecalling heritage and establishing a sense of community through Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs: pg E ff ect i ve chan g e o f zon i n g to 20/un i ts an acre Bus p ass p rov i ded f or all res i dents, comb i ned w i th 40 % a ff ordable hous i n g Central o p en s p ace doubles as c i v i c s p ace and stormwater man a g ement f eature Lar g e Hous i n g d i vers i ty -Use o f h i story to del i neate theme and s i te elements. Co-Hous i n g develo p ment allows res i dents to del i n i ate des i red cond i t i ons. DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentRESEARCH11

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Cross Seminole Greenway Winter Park-Oviedo, FL SectorGeneral Details: Location: Overall trail will run from I-4 Pedestrian bridge in Lake Mary, Florida to Howel Branch Road at Orange County line. Studied Area : Portion of trail running through suburban Winter Park and Oviedo, FL Land used: Utility ways, pre-planned corridors, public land. Timeline : As of 2011 about 80% complete Length : Overall24 miles__Studied Area: Approx. 6 Miles Maintenance : Majority maintained and own by Seminole County Parks and Recreation. Trail through Winter Springs and Oviedo is owned by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Small lengths are maintained by the city of Lake Mary and the Florida Department of Transportation Highlights: -Safe travel with minimal contact with vehicular traf c -Privately owned land was acquired in order to connect full trail -Many parts of the trail cut through the heart of subdivisions. -Most of trail is scenic and shaded -Easy access and excellent signage -Provides connections to park systems and commercial developments Overview: The Cross Seminole trail is set to run through about 5 cities and connect to regional trails through out the Orlando area. It offers a fantastic pedestrian connections to many civic and public spaces as well as commercial developments. The trail is mainly used for recreational purposes but a study of the trail running through Winter Park and Oviedo depicted a good amount of users make use of its functional connections to surrounding necessities. Most of the trail is separate from roads of high vehicular con icts while crossings at intersections are dealt with in a very obtuse and ef cient manner to ensure as much safety for both the users and vehicles. The studied area cuts through many subdivisions and offers direct connections. Many properties on the trail use it as a focal amenity for home and parcel sales. The signage is well developed as location, coordinates, and mile markers are readily found through the trail. Elements of use to Downtown Coral Springs: -Limited and effective interaction with vehicles Utility ways are used as corridors -Public ownership -Direct connections through subdivisions and parks. -Commuting possibilities to local of ces, stores, and restaurants Case Studies > Bikeways > Cross Seminole Greenway Individual Housing connections to site pathways Bikeway cuts through a Subdivision in Winter Park rough Winter Springs and Oviedo the trail crosses minimal intersections and crosses under a highway. Gateways are uni ed with subdivision entrancesMajor Street crossings are well delineatedResidences back up to trail and o er a unique amenity Several connections to retail and o ce developments o er easy commuting opportunities Community garden, doubles as backyard for a ordable housingRecalling heritage and establishing a sense of community through DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentRESEARCH

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentPROJECT VISION 13

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Project Vision>Intent and Inspiration Individual Housing connections to site pathways Bikeway cuts through a Subdivision in Winter Park rough Winter Springs and Oviedo the trail crosses minimal intersections and crosses under a highway. Gateways are uni ed with subdivision entrancesMajor Street crossings are well delineatedResidences back up to trail and o er a unique amenity Several connections to retail and o ce developments o er easy commuting opportunities Recalling heritage and establishing a sense of community through DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentPROJECT VISION

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Project Scope> Connectivity> Scales of Concern In order to truly emphasize civic identity through connectivity, it is imparative to address all citizens of Coral Springs. Establishing direct connections allows residents to truly embrace the creation of their new downtown and for the downtown to become a unifying node instead of a disjointed destination. Scales of Concern:City Scale: Proposal of a downtown oriented bikeway -Creating a unique, pedestrianscale connection for all residents 1 Mile Radius: Proposal of Downtown District -Unifying the diversity of Coral Springs while reducing dependen cy of personal vehicles within a mile of the downtown Redevelopment Area: Creating connections between phases with building and streetscape language. Using the bikeway as connector to the surrounding context City Center: Using the study of the previous 3 scales to in uence the design of the focal scale DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentPROJECT VISION 15

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Downtown Coral Springs oriented BikewayDesign Intent: Establishing a direct connection between the citizen and the heart of the cityIn order for Downtown Coral Springs to become a true city center it needs to engage the entire city. A sense of belonging and a unique experience to the residents of Coral Springs will form a longetivity and strength in the bond between citizen and city. At the city scale, connectivity is key and it is important to realize that the user experience begins as soon one steps out the door. The city of Coral Springs expects most of its visitors to arrive by vehicle as Downtown Coral Springs will also be a major draw for those in the adjacent municipalities. Increased bus frequency and an expansion of bus routes will allow more users to access the Downtown. However, a bus ride, as well as a car ride, does not innately unify the user with the Downtown. With the intent to create the heart of Coral Springs, citizens deserve an experience separate from the average user. The possibility of a human scale experience from start to nish is attainable through the design of a unique bikeway system. The layout of a typical suburban community, including Coral Springs, allows for the creation of a bikeway network separate from streets and narrow sidewalks through the use of the city’s canal ways, utility ways, and parks. In Coral Springs a careful study of these attributes allows for the design of a bike transit network oriented around Downtown Coral Springs. Coming from all areas of the city, all residents have the opportunity to reach the downtown by bicycle ef ciently, with minimal vehicular con ict and in an ease solely available to the citizens of Coral Springs. Aside from the bene ts of an ef cient way to travel and reduced vehicular traf c, this network establishes a human scale connection between all nodes of the city including parks, preserves, commercial, and civic locations. Working as the central node, Downtown Coral Springs would rightfully serve as the hub for bicycle transit in the city. Two proposed county bikeways cut through Coral Springs, creating gateways to connections to surrounding municipalities and Everglades National Park. These connections as well as a future county wide bikeshare system will help promote a diversity of uses to the Coral Springs Bicycle Network. As always, the intent of design is for people. The positive aspects of health, sense of community, and higherstandard of living are all intergrated within this network. Goals and Objectives: Vision: Easy access to City Center by Bikeway Goal: Connectivity to Secluded Subdivisions Objective: Opportunities for quick access from subdivisions Objective: Connections to those more likely to use cyclic travel Goal: Limit pedestrian/ vehicular con ict Objective: Use of wasted spaces and canal ways as bike way Objective: Redevelop right of way in certain areas Goal: Use Civic and Open space as Nodes Objective: Utilize Parks as gateways for neighborhoods Objective: Make city center the hub for all bikeway paths DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAY

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Coral Springs Bikeway> Research> Vehicular Study DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAY 17

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Coral Springs Bikeway> Research>Housing Types DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAY Notable Information: Higher Density housing and smaller housing lots are mostly concentrated to the southeast/southwest of the city. A stronger connection to the bikeway would be more bene cial in these areas

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Coral Springs Bikeway> Research>Commercial Types DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAYNotable Information: The main corridor of commercial landuse terminates at Downtown Coral Springs. This corridor can also be an opportunity to connect the bikeway to all existing commercial19

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Coral Springs Bikeway> Research>Schools and Open Space DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAYNotable Information: The location of open space creates a prime opportunity to create nodes and connections to the bikeway. Most schools in the city are located near a utiliway and can possibly be directly connected

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Coral Springs Bikeway> Research>Bikeway Analysis and Synthesis DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAYNotable Information: A close study of all canal ways starts to delineate areas where the bikeway can come to life. This analysis and synthesis is based on the demographic studies, proposed county greenways, and utility way feasibility 21

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Coral Springs Bikeway> Bikeway Proposal and Data DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE ONE: CORAL SPRINGS BIKEWAY

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Delineating the Downtown DistrictDesign Intent: Unifying the newly created downtown with the surrounding areasThe creation of the Coral Springs Bikeway aims to connect the entire city through a unique experience. This is a radical look and proposed change to the way residents of suburban communities live. Obviously, not every resident will be enticed to ride the Coral Springs Bikeway or deal with the climatic effects of South Florida. Though it may be hard to curb the use of the personal vehicle at a city scale, it is reasonable to propose ef cient connections to those on the cusp of a long walk or a short drive. The mile radius around the City Center exhibits these opportunities and it is of paramount importance to nd ways to connect the surround context in a way that will help reduce the use of personal vehicles. A close study of this radius reveals the area as a snippet of all Coral Springs has to offer. The diversity of housing, commercial units, and civic and open spaces accumulate enough variety to delineate this area as a district. This serves as the stepping stone to the proposal of a Downtown District with the city center as its heart. Civic Identity is strengthen by making those in the surrounding areas part of downtown. Positive effects such as property value and further regional recognition are also possible bene ts of the Downtown District. The main proposal and unifying factor of the Downtown District is the proposal of a Downtown Shuttle. This shuttle will serve as a way for residents in the district to go to the regional park, nature preserve, city hall, performing arts center, and most of all, the City Center. Goals and Objectives: Vision: Creating identity outside of the downtown borders Goal: Alternative transport to destinations in the district Objective: creation of downtown shuttle Objective: shared parking and regional bus connection Goal: Creating a connection between downtown and resi dents Objective: Use of “District” to elevate property value Goal: Emphasize amnenities of District Objective: Easily walkable from City Center Objective: Advertising program DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT 23

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Downtown District> Research> Housing Types DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT Notable Information: The majority of the area includes single family housing but offers all the diversity of multi-family housing and high density multi-family housing that Coral Springs has to offer.

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Downtown District> Research> Property Value DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT Notable Information: The area within a mile of downtown contains a wide range of property values meaning the diversity of incomes is displayed within the district 25

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Downtown District> Research> Commercial Properties DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT Notable Information: The district area contains the main corridor of commercial offerings within Coral Springs. From local retail to big box, making it prime for district diversity.

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Downtown District> Research> Parks and Open Space DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT Notable Information: The biggest factor in the ability to create a district comes from the diversity of schools and open space within the district. 27

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Downtown District> Research>Neighborhood Flows DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT Notable Information: Exploring the neighborhood ows of the surrounding context helps delineate the possible route for the Downtown Shuttle

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Downtown District> Proposals DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE TWO: THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT 29

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Downtown Coral Springs RedevelopmentDesign Intent: Create a unifying language between redevelopment phases and the immediately surrounding contextAt the scale of the redevelopment it is important to create uid connections between phases and the surrounding context in order to have a City Center that bleeds in to the surrounding environment. The proposal includes creating a unique language within the bikeway that will help entice residents to walk to the city center. A clear cut language on a well delineated path would be just enough to induce a walking atmosphere The intra-phase relationships are simple. On sample road and univeristy, the streetscape should be unique to de ne the borders of the downtown. At the corner of Sample and Univeristy, it is key that the four buildings combine to create the vehicular emblem and gateway to the city. Goals and Objectives: Vision: Fluidity between city center and its surrounding context Goal: Succesful intraphase relationships Objective: Creating a proper gateway for the city Objective: minimizing the daunting effects of a large inter section Goal: Easy connections to surrounding residential Objective: Use of bikeway and redevelopment paths to DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE THREE: DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS

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Downtown Coral Springs> Analysis and Synthesis DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE THREE: DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS office, residential, + future satellite campus for broward college major vehicular viewshed sample road/university ave intersection will have very high rates of traffic difficult flow from “dt” to grocery store high possibility of pedestrian flow commercial: financial + rear parking garage future medical structures + parking garage minimal pedestrian flow unless addressed minimal pedestrian flow unless addressed 31

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Downtown Coral Springs> Connectivity Proposals DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE THREE: DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGS Building Proposals: The intersection of University Drive and Sample Road is key to establishing a gateway. A simple ellipse is used to thin the severity of the wide intersection while at the same time unify the buildings. The geometries of the existing building in the southeast corner is mimicked as the ellipse gently grazes the 3 supporting phases and cuts deeply in to the City Center in order to accent its importance over the other phases.

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City Center: Crossroads GreenDesign Intent: Creation of a city emblem that will be a regional destination but will also function as the “3rd place” for citizens of Coral Springs.The study of the rst three scales allows for a simple concept for the city center: Allowing the exterior ows to in uence the interior focus. The ows from the surrounding context help establish the pedestrian focused paths and plazas that will be the bones of the design. Aimed to be a regional destination, development will consist of a focal pedestrian mall that will offer a variety of experiences and shopping opportunities. This will be integrated with a central boardwalk system that will work as a unique way to walk through downtown or a place to lose oneself for a bit while taking a break from shopping. Goals and Objectives: Goal: Interactive corridors connecting to surrounding context Objective: Open ended paths that connect to the rest of the city Objective: Several scales of experience for all types of users Goal: Central space that acts as heart of city Objective: exible use for civic events and large gatherings Objective: Everyday use with several seating options Goal: Meet all proposed landuse and density projections of city Objective: Same density projections less vehicle Objective: More varying forms of land use Objective: Integrate civic uses DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER 33

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City Center> Research>User types and ows DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER

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City Center> Research>site analysis DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER 35

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City Center> Research>User types and ows DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER 37

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City Center> Circulation DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER

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City Center> Landuse and Data DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER39

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City Center> Phasing DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER City Center> Phasing > Phase 1 41

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER City Center> Phasing > Phase 2

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER City Center> Phasing > Phase 3 43

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER City Center> Phasing> Phase 4

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentSCALE FOUR: CITY CENTER City Center> Phasing Completed 45

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCITY CENTER: CROSSROADS GREEN City Center> Pedestrian Spine> Crossroads Green

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCITY CENTER: CROSSROADS GREEN City Center> Crossroads Green>Coral Springs Gateway 47

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCITY CENTER: CROSSROADS GREEN City Center> Crossroads Green>Walkway

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCITY CENTER: CROSSROADS GREEN City Center> Crossroads Green> Central Boardwalk 49

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCITY CENTER: CROSSROADS GREEN City Center> Crossroads Green>Amphitheater

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCURRENT SUBURBAN MODEL Current Suburban Model> Car oriented fragmentation 51

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentPROPOSED VISION Proposed Vision of suburban model> Pedestrian based density

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DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentCITY EMBLEM53

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Research Resources:"Accommodating the Pedestrian (Open Library)." Welcome to Open Library! (Open Library). . Coral Springs CRA. “Community Redevelopment Plan.” Web. . Coral Springs CRA. “Urban and Landscape Design Guidelines.” Web. . Dunham-Jones, Ellen, and June Williamson. Retro tting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Print. Gause, Jo Allen., and Richard Franko. Developing Sustainable Planned Communities. Washington, D.C.: Urban Land Institute, 2007. Print. Farr, Douglas. Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design with Nature Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2008. Print. Gauzin-Mller, Dominique, and Nicolas Favet. Sustainable Architecture and Urbanism: Concepts, Technologies, Examples Basel: Birkhauser, 2002. Print. Giulianelli, Mario. Enhancing Urban Environment by Environmental Upgrading and Restoration [New York]: Springer Science Business Media, 2005. Print. Moroni, J. Broken Woods Park Gainesville: U of F, FL. 2008. Print. Pinsof, Suzan Anderson., and Terri Musser. Bicycle Facility Planning: a Resource for Local Governments Chicago (122 S. Michigan Ave., Suite 1600 60603): American Planning Association. Planning Advisory Service, 1995. Print.Imagery and Data Sources:www.google.com/images Google Earth Labins.org Florida Department of Transportation Broward County GIS department Coral Springs Mapping and GIS department FGDL.orgPersonal Resources:Erdal DonmezCoral Springs City Manager Sarah DavisCRA Project Coordinator Paul CarpenterCoral Springs Transportation Planner/Community Developer Edwin KohlhorstCAD/GIS Tech Mark HorowitzBroward MPO Robert GristUF Faculty DOWNTOWN CORAL SPRINGSA model for suburban in ll and redevelopmentResources