Marathon Shores : a coastal mixed-use development, Marathon, Florida Keys

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Title:
Marathon Shores : a coastal mixed-use development, Marathon, Florida Keys
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
D'Ascanio, Nicholas A.
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00003577:00001


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MARATHON SHORES
A Coastal Mixed-Use Development
NMarathon. Florida Keys /
0 0.




/ I


SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT APRIL 2011


Nicholas A. D'Ascanio



















I would like to dedicate this project to my mom and dad for putting me
through college and instilling in me the drive and passion necessary to be
a successful landscape architect.

Thank you


















MARATHON SHORES










Introduction & Project Description 4

Case Studies 15

Research, Analysis, & Synthesis 21

Program 47

Schematic Design 51

Community Master Plan 61

Master Plan 65

Grading & Drainage 69

Design Details 74

References 84











MARATHON SHORES: Table of Contents















INTRODUCTION & '"
PROJECT DESCRIPTION


i -i"r


MARATHON SHORES













Introduction:
Located in the heart of the Florida Keys, Marathon is seldom appreciated for its unique qualities and casual lifestyle, as it is often
seen as the "Road to Key West". However, if given a chance this thirteen mile long island provides a variety of outdoor and commu-
nity experiences that are unrivaled elsewhere in the Keys. With its tropical atmosphere, dedicated community involvement, and
beautiful scenery Marathon has the potential to be a prime location for a small community-oriented, mixed-use development.

The site of this project is located on the Northwest edge of the island, and at nearly 16 acres is a relatively large site in comparison
with others nearby. The site is open to the Gulf of Mexico and has direct access to the only highway in the Keys: US-1 Overseas
Highway. It is also centrally located between many important community and nature areas. This site provides ample opportunities
for the proposed middle to high-end residential and commercial development, along with having great existing amenities that can be
shared with the community.





Vision:
Marathon Shores will be a commercial hub along the waterfront that provides services and open space for the community, while inte-
grating middle to high-end residences into the development. The public spaces will be adaptive to account for the highly fluctuating
population and multi-use to make the most of space limitations. Both structures and landscaping will be representative of classic
Florida Keys styles and tolerant to the ever present danger of hurricanes. The site will also utilize, exemplify, and protect the many
natural resources that the Keys have to offer.


MARATHON SHORES: Introduction and Vision









NMarathon is in the center of the Florida Ke\ s
chain of islands It is approviimatel. a t\\o
IhoIi di i\e south from Nliami. and a hour
dri\e north from Ke\ \\est


\\ within the islands of Mlara-
thon. there are a \ ariet\ of des-
tinations tfor locals and toiiIsts
The site is located in the \\est-
ern half. \\hlch has more de\ el-
opiment and a greater concen-
tration of amenities


MARATHON SHORES: Site Location








































The Marathon Shores site is directly exposed to the Gulf of Mexico, but has a land barrier between it and the Atlantic Ocean.
There are a number of community destinations and residential neighborhoods very close to the site that add diversity and in-
terest to the program of Marathon Shores. With its central location, the site allows for easy access and can entice users from
Marathon and other islands of the Florida Keys.



MARATHON SHORES: Site Location
7





















The history of Marathon is closely tied with the Flagler Railroad. In the early 1900's, construction on the railroad began in Mara-
thon, which was a major destination because the train had two stops on the island. One at the port of Knight's Key and another along
what is now Overseas Highway. Prolonged construction of the railroad gave Marathon its name because it was a marathon of a pro-
ject. The completion of the railroad through Marathon changed the makeup of its residents from migrating fisherman to a tourism
town with a fishing industry.

The archipelago of the Florida Keys is a world renown fishing destination and Marathon sits at its heart. The warm waters of the
Gulf Stream bring fish throughout the year and the islands provide a buffer from winds, making for calm sailing on almost every oc-
casion. Commercial fishing for food and charter fishing with guides are crucial occupations for many locals, not to mention the res-
taurants and fisheries that established their business on the ocean's bounty.

The beauty and possibilities of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico have made the Florida Keys a thriving tourist destination.
With very little industry and manufacturing, tourism is Marathon's primary form of commerce. However, tourism fluctuates
throughout the year. The primary season is Christmas through Memorial Day and during this time the population increases by nearly
50%, from 10,496 to 15,579. Tourists and second-homeowners travel south in the winter and spring to avoid to the cold weather in
more northern locations. There are events in the summer and fall months that draw tourists in great numbers to the keys, including
4th of July and the opening of lobster season. However, very hot weather and the threat of hurricanes makes Marathon less desir-
able .

The Florida Keys has a long record of hurricane impacts. Probably the most notable is the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 that washed
out parts of the Flagler Railroad and destroyed anything else in its path. In 2005, Marathon was impacted by five tropical storms and
hurricanes, reestablishing that importance of hurricane tolerance.


MARATHON SHORES: History of Marathon
8 Image from http://tibetanspanielsfloridakeys.com









Part of what makes Marathon special is the allure that this quaint fishing town has on travelers. The casual lifestyle combined with
friendly locals makes for an enjoyable environment. Large community festivals and events are a part of the Marathon tradition,
bringing people together with island activities. Art shows, small concerts, sporting events, and the annual Seafood Festival are just a
few of Marathon's community events.

The casual, informal, care-free, outdoor-loving lifestyle that is associated with the Keys is very apparent in the Marathon culture.
However, after the gorgeous sunset, there is little nightlife in Marathon and what little that is there comes from an old one-theater
movie theater and a couple low key bars. There is potential for a nighttime destination in Marathon as long as it can be flexible and
attract a range of users. While a nightlife would be appreciated in Marathon, locals will tell you that partying and boating on the
weekends is what everyone in town looks forward to. The waters that surround Marathon are some of the most beautiful and have
the greatest abundance of fish, rivaling all other populated Florida fishing spots.

Marathon also has many cultural attractions and community destinations. Three white sand public beaches, three community parks,
four natural parks, the Crane Point Museum, Knight's Key Historic Railroad Visitor's Center, the infamous 7-mile bridge, an 18-hole
golf course, dive shops, marinas, and over thirty restaurants all add to the character of Marathon. Marathon's greatest community
destination is the 12 acre community park and sporting complex. This park includes tennis courts, bocce courts, a hockey rink with
basketball courts, softball fields, soccer fields, a skate park, outdoor amphitheater and a viewing tower. The Marathon Community
Park has become a unifying center of the town.


Classic ilonaa Keys aive snop somorero puolic oeacn


MARATHON SHORES: Cultural Context


Crane Point Museum and nature center


Key Misnenes restaurant on tme water









The Marathon Shores site is a 15.6 acre, multiple parcel property located on the northern shoreline of Vaca Key in the municipality
of Marathon. Included in the 15.6 acre site is a 2.4 acre saltwater pond that creates many interesting opportunities. The site has few
construction limitations except in shoreline or property setbacks and in the locations of mangroves. Constructing over the saltwater
pond is also an option in this project because it is not considered natural shoreline. The saltwater pond was excavated in the 1970s as
a limestone-fill barrow pit with the eventual hope to turn this into a marina. However, current regulations in the Florida Keys no
longer allow dredging, so connecting this pond to the Gulf of Mexico is not an option. Other amenities including a marina, 1,712
feet of bay front shoreline, multiple points of access, and several existing structures add to the character of the project.

There are currently three different uses occupying the site. These include a working marina with marine mechanics and fishermen, a
construction staging area, and a for-rent storage facility. The marina, Keys Boat Works, was established in 1952 and has become a
well known Marathon boatyard. There are 35 wet-slips that can be used for commercial fishermen, charter captains, boat repairs, and
temporary dockage. Adjoining the marina, are several metal structures used for dry-dock storage that can be reused or relocated on
site. The Marathon Shores project will enhance the uses of the marina and develop a notable destination.

The construction staging area and for-rent storage center are based out of temporary facilities. The staging area was created to ad-
dress that large quantities of fill that are being produced from the implementation of Marathon's sanitary sewer system. The fill is
staged there until it is sold or can be trucked off site. Some of this fill can be used on the Marathon Shores project where structures
need to be raised because of the flood plain elevations on site. The for-rent storage facility uses old shipping containers that have
little value and will need to be removed from the site.


Saltwater Pond


splasuhng a boat at the manna Uravel and nill staging


MARATHON SHORES: Project Description

























Northeast shoreline Wet boat slips


Metal frame dry docks


Abandoned structure and vegetation


Development of the site needs to consider several issues that are important throughout the Florida Keys. These issues include inte-
grating a range of user types and classes, maintaining high property value, dealing with potable water storage, and creating and re-
specting the culture. Low-income and blighted neighborhoods surrounding the site are in need of rehabilitation. Units with water-
front views and access demand two to three times the property value of a dry lot. Marathon receives all of its potable water by pipe-
line from the Biscayne Aquifer, which is at risk from hurricanes and is starting to lead to water shortages. Incorporating solutions to
these issues into a small scale residential and retail development in Marathon will provide the community with a much needed desti-
nation.











MARATHON SHORES: Project Description and Images











Site Context Scale- At this largest scale, the project will look at connections within the community and how people will travel to and
from the site. There is minimal public transit in Marathon, so allowing for vehicle, bicycle, and pedestrian friendly routes will be
key. It will also show how the location of the project can enhance the surrounding area.

Overall Site Scale This scale will show locations of site elements and how a unifying architectural style can unite the spaces. Also
shown, is how to maximize residential units and commercial buildings without sacrificing function and overall aesthetic. The layout
of these structures, along with the landscape will create aesthetic, definition, environmental restoration, and a tolerance to storms.
Specific design techniques and guidelines that are important to the overall theme and function will also be incorporated.


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Overall Site Scale


Site Context Scale


MARATHON SHORES: Scales of Concern










Keys Culture Create an appropriate sense of place that incorporates keys vernacular architecture and landscape styles along with the
casual keys life style.
Site Context Objectives
Create linkages to culturally important sites including tourist destinations, natural parks, and restaurants
Use design elements along these linkages that will restore and unify this area by beautifying the community and giving residents a sense of
community pride
Highlight key features that exemplify the area
Overall Site Objectives
Use microclimate to increase comfort for the changing seasons
Restore historic plant communities that still have remnants on site
Use the public spaces to connect the commercial and residential zones
Incorporate activities that apply to locals, part-time residents, and tourists
Develop a central gathering space that has multiple uses

Hurricane Tolerance Design a project that can withstand the reality of living in the Florida Keys. Hurricanes are a very destructive
force, but there are guidelines that can be implemented to reduce or even eliminate their effects.
Site Context Objectives
Have a network of roads, which allows for multiple routes and therefore easier egress
Use the actual location of the site with the island as a beneficial buffer
Overall Site Objectives
Use low vegetation and short fences to minimize debris and storm surge damage
Use landscape buffers to reduce wind impact on structures
Keep trees away from building facades to reduce potential damage from wind
Incorporate materials and vegetation that will withstand hurricanes and allow people to maintain necessary amenities

Water Resources Reduce the demand for potable water and reuse whenever possible. Control stormwater runoff and design for
future sea-level rise.
Site Context Objectives
Use the linkages to cultural sites as a means to educate people about the importance of sustainability
Reduce stormwater runoff along streetscapes
Make the berms and walls of the Marathon Shores site easily increased upon to connect to future waterfront sites
Overall Site Objectives
Accommodate sea-level where possible, fortify with walls and berms only when necessary
Incorporate features like cisterns and saltwater irrigation to reduce demand on city water


MARATHON SHORES: Goals and Objectives
















































MARATHON SHORES
14


















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CASE STUDIES ,

"1^ 1


MARATHON SHORES









Type: Mixed-Use Development XCKSIDOE
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Size: 11.6 acres
Year of Completion: 75% Completion

General Description: -
Dockside Green is redeveloping a former brownfield site into
an internationally known, sustainable, mixed-use develop-
ment. It is a large scale planned community that incorporates B '
a variety of services including, retail, office, hotel, recreation,
residential, and light industrial uses. The goal of the project- /
is to be an ecologically, socially, and economically responsi-
ble community. With LEED certification for all of the 26
proposed buildings and the preservation of the waterfront,
Dockside Green is an environmentally friendly project that
focuses on the overall benefit of the community.


Influences to Marathon Shores:
The incorporation of ecologic and economic sus-
tainability into a mixed-use development it very
similar to the goals behind Marathon Shores.
Dockside Green also uses the waterfront as a major
public attraction and surrounds it with retail build-
ings. Nearly all of the structures on the site have
views of the water making them more valuable.
Dockside Green accomplished this by staggering
the buildings and having the taller structures in the
rear. This project also integrates a network of
green spaces to encourage pedestrian traffic and
create and outdoor experience.


MARATHON SHORES: Dockside Green Case Study


www.docksidegreen.com









Type: Mixed-Use Development ,T ... ......i
Location: Edina, Minnesota
Size: 100 acres
Year of Completion: 2000

General Description:
Centennial Lakes is and infill site in a suburb of Minneapolis. The new pro-
ject includes 940,000 square feet of Class A office Buildings, 106,000 square
feet of medical office building, 250 residential condominiums, 96 luxury
townhouses, a 39,000 square-foot eight-screen movie theater, and 220,000
square feet of retail. The 25-acre Central park and lake connect the sites mul-
tiple uses along with providing recreation and natural beauty. This park also
makes Centennial Lakes a very pedestrian friendly development and a re-
gional destination.



ra...Ey Influences to Marathon Shores:
,p Centennial Lakes is a large scale development in a
J.:L.-'-.' 'P moderate size suburb. Although the size and quantities
S of the buildings are larger than Marathon Shores they
can be scaled down proportionally. Incorporating a
movie theater into the development at its relative size
can directly apply to Marathon Shores. Centennial
Lakes is also built around a linear public waterfront.
*..., ... ,L. .....-. .Although the lake is landlocked, it still provides great
,-... r"'"" scenery and a great outdoor experience. The central
p. park also creates a safe pedestrian environment in a
.....,, A.... suburb that is primary automobile driven.
rN_ CENTENNIAL LAKRB PARK -Jo B io Tli PapN Awlltorlne
tn ......... na .,. r... t..; E

[J, .... -. ....r ...p, "-'



MARATHON SHORES: Centennial Lakes Case Study
www.ci.edine.mn.us/content/facilities/centennial lakes.htm









Type: Condo-Hotel
Location: Marathon, FL
Size: 12 acres
Year of Completion: 2004

Description: Tranquility Bay is a Florida Keys Resort located on the calm waters ::
of the Gulf of Mexico. There are 87 units, all of which have access to a variety of
on-site and nearby amenities including award winning dining, two beaches, tropi-
cal gardens, fishing, diving, water sports, and a beachfront tiki bar. The resort is
also very close to the Marathon Airport, 18-hole golf course, tennis courts and
state parks.





Influences to Marathon Shores:
Located less than 1 mile west of the Marathon Shores
*site, Tranquility Bay shares many of the same commu-
nity amenities. They also successfully incorporate on-
site amenities such as a raised beach, sunset views, tiki
bar, restaurant, clubhouse, dock house, native landscap-
--ing, pools, and marina access; all of which would add
.- intrigue to Marathon Shores. Although Tranquility Bay
is associated as a resort, the layout, size, and design of
the buildings is very similar to the residential units for
Marathon Shores. The Keys style architecture that
Tranquility Bay uses on their structures is the same
style that the Marathon Shores project will incorporate
into the design.





MARATHON SHORES: Tranquility Bay Case Study
1 Q www.tranquilitybay.com























Architectural Style:
The Florida Keys vernacular style is recognizable by its features and materials. The buildings are
usually one to two stories with large porches and high, steep ceilings. Metal roofing and louvered
shutters are also typical to prevent storm damage. White picket fences and railings, whether wood or
metal, are also common with a variety of ginger-breading details. The building's facades will either
be siding or stucco, painted with light pastel colors, while the landscapes are lush with vibrant colors.
These elements will be incorporated into this project to reflect a sense of place characteristic to the
Florida Keys.


The photos of Tranquility Bay show the
classic key's style both in architecture
and landscape. The colorful, tropical
foliage not only adds color, but also
scales down the size of the building
units. Providing each unit with an ap-
pealing view adds value to the individ-
ual units and the site as a whole. Tran-
quility Bay also shows how to plan for
full capacity and keep the expectation of
a secluded oasis for the residents. The
needs and viewpoints of locals, part-
time residents, and tourists vary, but all
view this project as being conscious to
the Florida Keys lifestyle.











3 Bedr mrn Unit / Fist Floor






3 Bedroom Unit / Second Floor


MARATHON SHORES: Tranquility Bay Case Study
www.tranquilitybay.com
















































MARATHON SHORES
20

















RESEARCH, ANALYSIS,
& SYNTHESIS 9-
i .- ,,.


MARATHON SHORES


*1
-4 -h


/ 1*











LEGEND

rn Commodity Cornm
U Sen, ice Com.
Specialty Corn.
rn Restaurant
- Mixed Com.
rn Abandoned Com.
Water Access


MARATHON SHORES: Community Context
22









The driving force behind the economy of Marathon is tourism. Therefore, the locations and types of commercial around my site need
to be well understood. The commercial business are broken down into six categories; commodity, service, specialty, restaurant,
mixed, and abandoned. Commodity commercial represents the chain stores or "big box" retailers. Service commercial represents
banks, real estates, repair shops, and other service providing businesses. Specialty commercial represents local businesses that have
a niche market. Mixed commercial is a combination of any of the above including restaurants. All six types are located within one
mile of the site with certain regions have a higher portion of one type than others.

US-1 is the primary traffic route in the keys, which facilitates the development of commercial business along this corridor. At the
western edge of the mile radius, there is a concentration of locally owner specialty shops along US-1 with no business located off the
main route. This area has a lower speed limit which allows buildings to be located closer to the street, so business can draw unfamil-
iar tourists into their shops. These commercial businesses include an antique book store, appliance store, salvation army, bicycle
shop, and tackle store. Most of which are both well known to locals and attractive to tourists.

Immediately west of the site, the commercial consists primarily of restaurants with a few specialty shops. The restaurants and shops
in this area are geared and advertise toward tourists because of their location to the water. This area is also home to Keys Fisheries, a
commercial fish market that supplies fresh seafood to many restaurants in the Keys. Seafood restaurants, especially those located on
the water, definitely have an advantage over other restaurant types.

East of the site, where Sombrero Boulevard intersects US-1 is one of two commercial cores in Marathon. This intersection has all of
the commercial types, but is anchored by several brand-name retailers. Kmart, Publix, Winn/Dixie, and CVS are all located at this
intersection. There is also a variety of service and specialty shops, with more retail and restaurants located in the u-shaped building
across the street. This commercial core is also beginning to stretch west along US-1 with the development of Home Depot.

Public connections to the water are also important because these are very popular tourist destinations and the Marathon Shores site
will need to incorporate this feature. Waterfront access is scattered throughout the region with no major interesting elements within
one mile. Sombrero Beach is a popular destination for locals and tourists, but is located approximately 1.5 miles away.









MARATHON SHORES: Community Context











LEGEND

School
Z Public Building
Commecial Unit
Residential Unit
CResort Unil

Public Zone
Park Zone

Industrial Zone
Mixed-Use Zone
Res. High Zone
Res. Med. Zone

.... ..,W..
Res. Mobile Zone











MIARATHON SHORES: Site Context Zoning and Land-Use Analysis
24









The surrounding context of Marathon Shores consists of seven zoning types, three of which are residential. The high density residen-
tial and mobile home residential areas are primarily low income, while the medium density residential is middle class, single family
units. The most abundant zoning type in Marathon is mixed-use, which promotes an integration of a variety of building types and
uses. The relatively small size of Marathon enables the prime real estate along the waterfront to have an immediate connection to
US-1. These two locations are where a majority of commercial buildings are found.

Within the site there are two zoning types, mixed-use and high density residential. The high density residential occupies 1.15 acres,
leaving the remaining 12 acres as mixed-use. Both mixed-use and residential zones are directly adjacent to the site. However, a ma-
jority of the mixed-use parcels are vacant of structure, with several being used for residential units. The residential zones have a
greater percentage of occupied parcels.

There are three key land-uses within the context of the site that are of notable community importance. The Stanley Switlik Elemen-
tary School that serves the entire middle keys, the Marathon Community Park which provides a location of community events, and
the Banana Bay Resort which is a tourism destination.


Commercial along US-1 Commercial Fishery Traps Neighborhood Home Neighborhood Low-Income Housing


MARATHON SHORES: Site Context Zoning and Land-Use Analysis











LEGEND

RU 0p Primary Road
we bi Secondary Road
---Sidewalk
SPoint of Entry
Marina
Elementary School
Restaurant
05 V Community Park
A .Child Day Care
SnCommunitr Park
*Restaurant
SBanana Bay Resort











MARATHON SHORES: Site Context Circulation and Connections Analysis
26









The primary means of transportation in Marathon is by automobile. Public transit is nonexistent and the only sidewalks in this area
are along US-1. Pedestrians and bicyclist do use the back streets, however, there are no dividers to separate vehicles from them. US-
1 is the busiest highway in the Keys, connecting Key West to the mainland. The north sidewalk along US-1 is in the process of being
modified to connect to the Florida Keys Heritage Trail, which will be an off-street path that runs the length of the Keys. The side
streets in this area are the start of a network than can be developed. This is relatively little traffic and low speed limits making them
great corridors for wayfinding and adding visual interest.

There are a number of important social destinations within a quarter-mile radius of the site. One of the few resorts in Marathon is
located one block from my site. There is no existing direct connection to the resort, but with the development of the site, tourists will
want to easily make the walk. Multiple marinas in the area attract boaters. If there is a restaurant close to the marina customers can
have access by the water, making for a great Keys experience. Other boaters are homeowners and dock their boats at the marinas for
quick use. Either way, capitalizing on both users at the marinas will bring more people to the site. The Marathon Community Park
located across US-1 from the site is a great opportunity. The park has all of the active recreation sports complexes including, soccer
fields, baseball field, tennis courts, a hockey rink, and skate park. It also has an amphitheater and a lookout tower. Access across
US-1 will need to be addressed. The Elementary school is also with walking distance of the site and Marathon High School is only a
couple miles away.

There are also many amenities that are within a five minute drive of the site including an 18-hole golf course, the 7-Mile Bridge, the
Crane Point Hammock Museum and Nature Preserve, the Marathon Airport, a beautiful white sand beach and many others.


. A -111 ....
1. Stanley Switlik Elementary School 3. Community Park Skate Park 4. Grace Jones Community Day Care 7. Banana Bay Resort


MARATHON SHORES: Site Context Circulation and Connections Analysis











S LEGEND
RU O Primary Road
e*U wu Secondary Road
----Sidewalk
a an 61 Proposed Access
Proposed Path
SPoint of Entry
Marina
*- Elementary School
*L Community Park
Child Day Care
.* 0 Banana Bay Resort
School
Public Building
UCarnmecia] Unit
Residential Unit
*,Resort Unit

Prop. Commercial
Prop. Residential
Prop Public


IMARATHON SHORES: Site Context Synthesis
28









The neighborhood surrounding the site needs to be represented as a whole and an axis through the residential areas that connects the
elementary school to the Grace Jones Community Center Day Care would help do so. This axis can act as an unifying element to the
community. A cross axis can connect the western edge of the site with US-1 and the eastern entrance of the community park. Plac-
ing a major entry to the site adjacent to US-1 will encourage the most customers and begin to create a network of routes around
Marathon Shores.

Pedestrian circulation throughout the site and along the axes will allow for an outdoor-friendly environment upon which the commu-
nity can build. A pedestrian connection can also be made to Banana Bay resort to the east and will entice tourists to the amenities
Marathon Shores has to offer.

With this map, one can begin to see a possible breakdown of uses within and around the site. Commercial should be easily accessed
by pedestrians and in locations that will attract business. Residential should have views of the water and have direct access to the
commercial and public spaces. The public spaces can be intermixed throughout the site and along the waterfront.


Major entry on US-1 Viewing north from park to site Viewing west toward Elem. School Viewing east toward site


MARATHON SHORES: Site Context Synthesis


























LEGEND
---- Property Line

S Marina
* Entry to Water
SSaltwater Pond
".j Access to Site
--- Summer Winds
SWinter Winds
Nx--- Good View
Poor View


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Key Features and Microclimate Analysis
30









Using and creating microclimate on the site is a must to provide human comfort. Wind and sun will be the two most influential ele-
ments on the site. One goal of this project is to create an enjoyable outdoor experience for the users and with the highly variable cli-
mate of the Florida Keys, the site's microclimate will play an important design role.

Marathon is a very narrow, linear island making it susceptible to winds from all directions. During the summer months, winds are
relatively mild (8-10 mph) and often have a cooling effect because they are cooled while crossing the Atlantic Ocean. These winds
generally blow out of the southeast because they are sea breezes. The winter winds are much different. They blow out of the north-
northwest and are associate with cold fronts. These winds can be very strong, it is not uncommon to see winds over 40 mph in these
cold fronts, and they are bitterly cold because they blow across the low temperature waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The Marathon
Shores site is severely exposed to these winter winds, while blocked from the more desirable summer winds. Buffers along the north
side and breeze ways from the southeast should be incorporated.

Solar radiation and associated temperatures are closely tied with the winds., however there is one additional factor, the Gulf Stream.
The Gulf Stream regulates the islands temperature so that it is cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. This is one reason
why the Florida Keys is such a desirable location for vacation and winter residences. Temperatures in the summer range between
740 as the low and 900 as the high. The high humidity makes it feel much warmer and when there is no wind temperatures can reach
the low 100s, making shade a must. The winter temperatures range between 560 as the low and 770 as the high. Temperatures in the
winter can fall below 500, but this is uncommon and only lasts a short time. Solar orientation and shade is discussed on the following
page.


intersection at west entry view IooKing norm irom center oi site iNonnwest waterfront view


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Key Features and Microclimate Analysis


iNonneast waterfront view











,.--15'-0 ----


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Summer Solstice 10:00 AM


Summer Solstice 4:00 PM


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I.


Winter Solstice 10:00 AM


The summer and winter solstices show the extremes of the solar orientation
and the shade provided. With nearly 50% longer days in the summer (over
14hrs of daylight compared to 10), shade in the summer becomes much
more important. The slightly south angle of the summer shadows allows for
more shadow over land instead of water. This angle also makes sunset visi-
ble in the summer. The winter shadows can be avoided by locating trees on
the south side of unused space or where deciduous trees can be used. This
will allow for greater sun radiation and higher human comfort.


Winter Solstice 4:00 PM





MARATHON SHORES: Solar Orientation


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Vernal Equinox 10:00 AM


Vernal Equinox 4:00 PM


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^^*r -<


13-C------6-7 B'-5' 4


Autumn Equinox 10:00 AM


Autumn Equinox 4:00 PM


The vernal (spring) and autumn equinox represent the mean solar orientation and shade. Marathon can still be very warm during this
time with temperatures averaging 70 to 80 degrees creating a need for areas with shade. This time of year is also known for its cool
breezes over the water necessitating sunny enclosed areas. A variety of microclimates can be created and used during the spring and
autumn months to account for the fluctuating weather conditions.





MARATHON SHORES: Solar Orientation


N



'42


-- 15'-0" --/


1-'-5' 2' -11' -


N


O


f-i s-o-- r










I


AE 9'
AE 8'


LEGEND

.-- Property Line
O" High Point
t Downward Slope
Exposed Caprock
VE 14' Elev.
VE 12' Elev.


^-^r4,


0 100' 200' 40


VE 1 I' Elev.
AE 9' Elev.
AE 8' F I.


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Topography Analysis


VE 14'
VE 12'
2' VE 12'
VE 11'
VE 11'
AE 9'


_f--









Over eighty percent of the site has a slope ranging from 0.5% to 3%. The remaining locations have a topographic change of up to
8% and these areas are primarily located near the coastline and where large soil mounds have been deposited. The general direction
that the site slopes is towards the Gulf of Mexico waterfront. Stormwater runoff can be detrimental to this water body, especially
since all waters surrounding the Florida Keys are designated as Florida Outstanding Waterbodies. The City of Marathon has placed
regulations for new developments that require all stormwater to remain on site and these regulations are determined by rainfall and
impervious coverage.

The average annual rainfall for Marathon is just over 47", however, it is the way in which this rainfall is received that is important.
Almost half of the rainfall occurs during the summer months and is usually associated with a few large rain events from tropical sys-
tems. As stated above the stormwater calculation guidelines are based on impervious coverage. A site with less than 40% impervi-
ous coverage bases its retention capabilities on a 0.5" rain event, while a site with greater than 40% impervious coverage must ac-
commodate an 1.25" rain event. Further complicating this, is the extra security taken to protect the Florida Outstanding Waterbody,
which imposes a multiplying factor of 1.5 to the rainfall amount.

The soil on the site is an urban land complex (udorthent) comprised of a variety of Keys soils and aggregates. This soil was brought
in as fill to raise the site's elevation and make for more feasible construction. This urban land complex varies in depth across the
site, but it averages between 3' and 5'. However, there are several locations on the site where spoils of soil have built up, which can
protrude an additional 5' above grade and still other areas where there is no udorthent soil and caprock is exposed. Florida Keys
caprock is the remnants of an ancient reef. It is very porous, but has great structural integrity. Most buildings and even small struc-
tures in the Keys need to be fastened to the caprock, usually with pilings, to eliminate the effects of settling. Udorthent soils have
moderate construction properties and are moderately well drained, however it is a poor growing material because there are very few
organic.

The Marathon Shores site also includes a number of FEMA flood plains that represent the possible inundation after a 100 year storm.
This site has five such flood plains that decrease in height from 14' to 8' as they recede from the waterfront. Since Marathon is an
island, this storm event is not based off rainfall amounts, but rather hurricane storm surge and the distance it will penetrate. Hurri-
cane storm surge is equivalent to a flood with addition destructive forces like wind and waves accompanying it. With a major hurri-
cane the storm surge can be nine feet plus depending on the direction of the storm making for a lethal moving body of water and even
more reason to design for these forces. The flood plains are based off a 100 year storm. There are also two different flood plain
types AE (High Risk Zone) and VE (High Risk Zone with velocity hazard). The difference between these will be discussed in the
structure's analysis.


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Topography Analysis





























Current sea-level elevation as of 2010


Projected sea-level rise of 20" by 2060. 2060
is the estimated life span of the project based
on similar developments and physical design
and materials.


Projected sea-level rise of 36" by 2100. The
site should be designed to accommodate de-
velopments in the distant future.


The Marathon Shores site faces the shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The minimal amount of wave action, wind, and current
yields little erosion, making the waterfront a low energy shoreline. This allows for a static sea-level rise solution to be successful and
economically practical. A landscape berm that can be added to and allows vegetation to recede is the best option and this solution
can be adapted to fit most of the site's shoreline. However, there are some locations around the marina that will require a seawall to
protect the developable property. Implementing these modifications will also mitigate the damages caused by hurricane wind and
surge, along with aiding in keeping stormwater runoff on site.


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Relief and Sea-Level Rise Analysis
36 Sea-level projections from the International Panel for Climate Change










Sea-level Rise Solution for a Low Energy Shoreline


A Minimal Rise can cause
Extensive Damage


Developnc ni
to Protect


Current M.H.W.L.


Construct a landscape berm to protect the development from sea-level rise and mini-
mize storm damage. f


A 4 storm surge Hooded backstreets and
several houses below the floodplains.


20" Sea-level Rise
Current M.H.W.L.


Vegetation seaward of the berm can recede and absorb the sea-level rise for the life of
the project.



>pment ,
ect 36" Sea-level Rise

Current M.H.W.L.


As sea-level continues to rise, increasing the backside of the berm is a cost-effective
way to allow the vegetation to recede and maintain a fluctuating ecosystem.







MARATHON SHORES: Sea-Level Rise Solutions and Guidelines


A 6' storm surge flooded all roads and
properties on the gulf-side including US-1.


Development
to Protect







E 14'
VE 12'
VE 12'
\E 11'

VE 11'
AE 9'









AE 9'
AE 8'




LEGEND

.--- Property Line

SConcrete Bldg.
Metal Bldg. Good
m Metal Bldg. Bad
SStorage Container
U Dock

Riprap
Bldg. Setback


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Structure Analysis
38









The Marathon Shores site has a variety of setbacks along the entire property line including the waterfront. There are two categories
of shoreline setbacks on the site, altered and unaltered. A majority of the site's shoreline is altered with a seawall or riprap boulders
to protect from wave erosion. However, in the middle of the site's waterfront is a portion of unaltered shoreline, where exposed
caprock gradually slopes into the water. The altered shoreline only requires a 20' setback, while the unaltered shoreline requires a
50' setback. The setback distance is measured from Mean High Water Line (M.H.W.L.). The other setbacks on the site are either
10' or 20' measured from the property line depending on several factors including adjacent land uses, proximity to US-1 and orien-
tation on the site.

There are two types of buildings existing on the site, concrete and metal frame, and only one building is suitable for reuse. This
building is an open metal structure with tall ceilings and a sturdy frame. The others are in poor condition and will need to be demol-
ished. The concrete from the demolition can be crushed and used as fill, some materials can be salvaged to add character to the pro-
ject, and the rest need to be removed from the site. The storage containers are temporary metal structures that will also need to be
removed. Structures including the docks and boat ramp will remain and be incorporated into the project's design.

Along with setbacks, FEMA flood plains also regulate structures. Unlike setbacks that limit location of structures, flood plains deter-
mine the elevation of the first floor. The two flood plain categories, AE and VE, differ from where the first floor elevation is meas-
ured. AE zones are measured from M.H.W.L. to the top of the finished floor elevation (F.F.E.), while VE zones are measure from
M.H.W.L. to the bottom of the lowest structural horizontal member. There can be no habitable structures built below the flood plain
limitations. This is particularly important because Marathon has a height limitation of 37' from grade to the tallest structural ele-
ment.













tal frame building in good condition Trailer and storage container Abandoned commercial building Riprap and debris shoreline edge


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Structure Analysis

























--.- -1: x' T^ "', 7.(' LEGEND
2I y---' ,i "l__-Property Line
k, .g Native
Exotic
S" Invasive Exotic
Tree Canopy

MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Vegetation Analysis
40










Existing Species Legend

Sym. Qty. Botanical Name
BUS 2 Bursera simaruba
CAE 28 Causarina euisetifolia
COU 3 Cocoloba uvifera
CON 17 Cocos nucifera
COE 16 Conocarpus erectus
FIA 1 Ficus area
HIT 2 Hibiscus tiliaceus
OPH 2 Opuntia humifusa
PIP 1 Piscidia piscipula
RHM 15 Rhizophora mangle
SCA 1 N. ,.". .1 actinophyhlla
SCT 12 Schinus terebinthifolius
TEC 3 Terminalia catappa


Common Name
Gumbo Limbo
Australian Pine
Sea Grape
Coconut
Buttonwood
Strangler Fig
Mahoe
Prickly Pear
Jamaican Dogwood
Red Mangrove
Umbrella Tree
Brazilian Pepper
Tropical Almond


Status
Native
Invasive Exotic
Native
Exotic
Native
Native
Invasive Exotic
Native
Native
Protected Native
Invasive Exotic
Invasive Exotic
Invasive Exotic


Design Options
Remain/Relocate
Remove
Remain/Relocate
Remain/Relocate
Remain/Mitigate
Remain/Relocate
Remove
Remain/Relocate
Remain/Mitigate
Selective Trimming
Remove
Remove
Remove


Protected Native Species


Red Mangrove Stand


Design Option Notes:
Rhizophora mangle and other mangrove species are vital to the natural ecosystem and therefore are protected in the Florida Keys.
There are strict regulations regarding these species. Mangroves may not be removed even if mitigated, unless given a variance,
which is nearly impossible. There is also strict rules on the trimming of the branches that depends on the height of the tree and di-
ameter of the branches. Red Mangroves have an aesthetic character that can be highlighted in the project.

Some natives, not including mangroves, that do not transplant well can be removed and replaced with a 3:1 mitigation. This is a
good option because it allows creativity and also ensures the replanting of more natives. Species that transplant well or are speci-
mens should be relocated on site.

There are five invasive species on site and they heavily out number the natives. This is probably caused by the poor growing proper-
ties of the soil that give durable species the advantage over natives. All invasive species must removed from the site before any con-
struction may begin.


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Vegetation Analysis








Existing noninvasive plants on site


Historic Plant Communities of the Region
Mangrove Swamp: Usually found in low lying areas often adjacent to saltwater coastlines. This ecosystem is located throughout the Florida
Keys
Associated species include Red Mangrove and Black Mangrove
Salt Marsh: This ecosystem is also prominent around coastlines, but migrates further inland. The salt marsh is sometimes seen connecting
mangrove swamps to hammocks where there is minimal topographic change. These plants are very salt and wind tolerant.
Associated species include Red Mangrove, Black mangrove, Buttonwood, Sea Grape, and Poisonwood
Tropical Hammock: This is a higher elevation ecosystem that requires better soil and greater wind protection. There are a full range of canopy
and under-story species in this plant community making it dense and diverse.
Associate species include Gumbo Limbo, Thatch Palm, Poisonwood, Pigeon Plum, Mahogany, Paradise Tree, Stopper, and Jamaican Dogwood


MARATHON SHORES: Vegetation Research









Proposed Native Plant Palette


Proposed Exotic Plant Palette


Bursera simaruba
( lIh, ,,/I m icaco
Clusia rosea
Coccothrinax argentata
Cocoloba uvifera
Conocarpus erectus
Ernodea littoralis
Ficus citrifolia
Galphimia gracilis
Guaiacum sanctum
Helianthus debilis
Hymenocallis latifolia
Pseudophoenix sargentii
Sabal palmetto
Suriana maritima
Thrinax radiata
Uniola paniculata
Zamia pumila


Gumbo Limbo
Red Tip Cocoplum
Autograph Tree
Silver Palm
Sea Grape
Buttonwood
Beach Creeper
Shortleaf Fig
Thryallis
Lignumvitae
Dune Sunflower
Spider Lily
Buccaneer Palm
Cabbage Palm
Bay Cedar
Thatch Palm
Sea Oates
Coontie


Bambusa vulgaris 'Vitatta'
Bougainvillea sp.
Cocos nucifera
Codiaeum variegatum
Copernicia balieyana
Delonix regia
Dioon edule
Gardenia jasminoides
Hamelia nodosa
Paspalum vaginatum
Phoenix dactylifera
Pimenta diocia
Strelitzia reginae
Veitchia arecina


Golden Hawaiian Bamboo
Bougainvillea
Coconut
Croton
Bailey Palm
Royal Poinciana
Silver Dioon
Gardenia
Dwarf Firebush
Seashore Paspalum
True Date Palm
Allspice
Orange Bird of Paradise
Sunshine Palm


The above species represent a range of native
plants that thrive in the Florida Keys and are
readily available.


The above species are very durable and read-
ily available. They are also associated with
the Florida Keys aesthetic and bring color
and interest to the garden.


MARATHON SHORES: Proposed Plant Palette






















LEGEND

---- Property Line

Downward Slope
.) Access to Site
-- Summer Winds
--_ Winter Winds
N'x- Good View
Poor View
SProp. Vegetation
) Tree Canopy
Buffer
SBIdg. to Remain
Setback


MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Synthesis
44









The Marathon Shores site has many natural and human opportunities and constraints. One of the greatest opportunities is the ability
to protect, restore, and develop the existing mangrove and native plant stands into native plant communities for strolling paths and
education. These stands will also help with sea-level rise and protection from storm surge and wind. There is also the opportunity
for a linear public space along the shoreline, which will provide everyone with great views offshore. One of the biggest constraints is
the thin strip of land west of the pond. This 29' wide corridor has many native plants and is adjacent to a residential roadway. The
100' wide by 930' long saltwater pond is a great visual amenity, but creating circulation from one side to the other will be challeng-
ing.

The central portion of the site can contain a majority of the development because cold winter winds can be blocked, cooling summer
breezes of the saltwater pond can be funneled in, there are multiple points of access, and this location allows for over 1800 of water-
front view. The central portion also has the highest elevations, creating viewsheds and reducing standing water. The west and south-
east sections of the site are also suitable for development and have great access. Constructing and cantilevering structures over the
saltwater pond is a great opportunity that can make Marathon Shores a unique destination.

Intercepting stormwater runoff before it reaches the coast and reusing the water on site is a obligation of the development. Minimiz-
ing structures in the VE flood plains along with creating rain gardens and cisterns will aid in this goal. A buffer along the waterfront
will stop direct runoff, but reusing the water and allowing it to go through multiple purification processes will be most beneficial.
Cisterns and rain barrels are the best option because the water table is so close to finished grade.

The lack of reusable structures on site creates a financial restraint because demolition and removal of the structures from the site is
mandatory. There is one metal frame structure that can be reused as a covered open space. This structure can be relocated to make it
more useful. The structures that need to be demolished are old and in poor condition, some of which are abandoned and in ruins.
There are homes in a similar condition in the neighborhood south of the site, that have the potential to be restored or buffered from
view of the site.












MARATHON SHORES: Overall Site Synthesis
















































MARATHON SHORES
46





















/ 1*


*1
-4 -h


PROGRAM


MARATHON SHORES









The Marathon Shores site has two categories of program elements, those that are required and those that need to be explored.

The required program elements are derived from developers, architects, and chamber of commerce members and are what they be-
lieve the project needs to incorporate for it to be economically and financially successful, along with being a unique and attractive
destination for its proposed users. The required program elements include a connection to the community, increased night time at-
tractions, 35,000 to 50,000 square feet of commercial, and 56 to 68 market rate residential units. In addition to the market rate units
there needs to be 12 to 17 affordable residential units. Several architects and a realtor have also outlined the size of the residential
units. 1,600 to 2,000 square foot units are currently the most saleable and most efficient to build. Single-family detached is very ex-
pensive and having more the six attached units deters from the Keys atmosphere and low-key, tropical lifestyle.

Through the developers, architects, and chamber members plus additional suggestions from restaurant owners, community represen-
tatives, and locals there are numerous program elements to be explored. There are various types of commercial buildings that can
attract a variety of users along with providing interest during the day and night. Marathon currently has a small, one theater cinema
that is constantly sold out. A movie theater is a great night time business and this has proven to be successful elsewhere in the Keys.
A two theater cinema was recently expanded to five in the upper keys, which has brought new life to a retail center. A dock house to
serve the marina and specialty retail shops that carry apparel, fishing supplies, and tourist commodities can also be successful.

Restaurants and bars are also great day and night attractions, especially if located on the water where people can sit back and relax.
Do to the number of restaurants with close proximity to the site, there is little opportunity for single use restaurants, especially ones
that only serve breakfast. There is a high end restaurant close to the site that is willing to relocate closer to the water, which can be a
great opportunity for Marathon Shores. This restaurant plus a bar & grill, a beach side bar, and a small deli could be a great combi-
nation. Several successful restaurants that I am looking at as precedents are Morada Bay, Barracuda Grill, and Cabana Breezes out-
door bar. Morada Bay is a 4,000 square foot bar and grill that seats approximately 120 people and is famous for its beach side seat-
ing. Barracuda Grill is a 2,200 square foot high end restaurant that seats approximately 60 people. Cabana Breezes outdoor bar is a
800 square foot open air hut that seats approximately 25 people right on the water.

There is also a lot to be explored regarding public uses and amenities. A waterfront park that connects the residential units to the
commercial business would be a great amenity and a first for Marathon. This park could be the symbol of the project and unique at-
traction to boost the projects success. A small amphitheater, beachside tiki huts, and covered picnic areas can also be incorporated
into the site. Trails and boardwalks can connect all of the public uses plus the marina. The trails can be used for exercise, viewing,
and education.




MARATHON SHORES: Program Criteria











Residential
Type
Single Family Market-Rate Unit
Single Family Affordable Unit


Quantity
60
12


Total Squarefootage
1,760
800


Footprint
1088sf (22'x54')
N/A


Comment
Quadplex
Above Commercial


Parking Ratio
spots: lunit
1 spot: lunit


Total Parking
120
12


Commercial
Type


Seats Total Squarefootage


Movie Theater

Restaurant A


Restaurant B
Bar
Fishing Club w/ marina services


12,500

4,000

2,500
800
2,577

19,755


Retail


Footprint Comment
3-theater w/ parking below, stager
12,500sf show time to reduce parking

4,000sf indoor/outdoor dining


2,500sf
800sf
2.577sf


dining on the water

parking below


19,755sf Art, Clothing, Fishing, Souvenirs


Parking Ratio Total Parking


lspot:3 seats in use
lspot:3seats +
spot: 1 employee
lspot:3seats +
spot: 1 employee
10spots:1000sf
spots: 1000sf
3 spots: 1000sf +
spot: 1 employee


Public Uses
Type
Waterfront Park
Marina & Docks
Boardwalk and Trails
Amphitheater
Parking Garage
Bicycle


Total Parking


Comment
Open to anyone
Includes commercial fishing, charters, and boat repairs
Exercise and relaxation for locals and tourists
Community events and daily shade structure
242 parking spots
Spot: commercial and public spots


Total Parking Required = 337*

* Residential parking is incorporated into the unit and driveway


MARATHON SHORES: Program Elements
















































MARATHON SHORES
50














/ 1*


-4 -h


Schematic -
Design
r,.-.' JT


r


MARATHON SHORES













WATERFRONT:


A Florida Keys Lifestyle


Greater pro .,r T- n.
forhomes.,r ,'.


on Gulf of Mexico


0 IIcn 1 M I'l
0 IO' t' 400


property Line Com Structure On-Site
Vehicle Circulaton
--- Pedestrian Circulation Res. Structure On-Site
Commune ty Site
Residential Development
Resort Development Public Open Space
Com. Structure Off-Site Res Private Space


MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design


in i~t II


Resort along
US-1


Commecial Entry
on US-1 Corridor











The Waterfront concept exemplifies a typical Florida Keys development. The uses along the shoreline and structures with waterfront
views are a priority. Real estate that is adjacent to a body of water is a minimum of twice the expense as the same on dry land. This
concept also realizes that commercial business are most successful along the busiest street, therefore placing the commercial entry on
US-1 creates a highly visible entry. Within the site, there are great amenities to both the residences and commercial users including
community open spaces, a pedestrian friendly atmosphere, and both residential and commercial waterfront property. The layout of
residences along the waterfront and small individual commercial business is also typical of the Keys. This concept provides direct
pedestrian circulation through the site, however, connections to surrounding community elements is at a minimum.

Objectives:
Focus on the US-1 corridor
Commercial on highest traffic route with shoreline connection
Residential along waterfront for greatest value with direct US-1 access
Separation between residential and commercial
Maximum build-out
Multiple structures with open space integrated between to create Keys atmosphere

Specifications:
Market Rate Units 68
Affordable Units 17
Commercial Square footage: 50,000
Circulation 2,800 linear feet
Public Waterfront 1,000 linear feet












MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design













CONNECTIONS:


Community Networking


& Circulation


, : .uli


Residential


Pedestrian
connection
to resort


I --


Elementary School
Terminates Axis


Community Park


0 06 a < N'
0 i06 ACV ittdi


-- -- Property Line
Vehicle Circulation
Streetscape
S- Pedestrian Circulation
Community Site
Residential Development
,OO Resort Development
[ Public Structure Off Site
Com. Structure Off-Site
ORes. Structure Off-Site


M Corn. Structure On-Site
F- Res. Structure On-Site
Parking Lot
SPublic Open Space
Res- Private Space


MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design











The overwhelming theme behind the Connections concepts was the network that the site needed to have with its surrounding commu-
nity elements. Streetscapes on two major axes became community unifying elements along with being vehicle and pedestrian
friendly routes. Rotaries and islands would enable the use of public art or design elements to distinguish this unique neighborhood
from others. The north/south axis is the major thoroughfare to the site. This allows direct connection to US-1 and the community
park across the street while also having the potential of becoming a commercial corridor. This concept places the commercial in a
linear fashion to encourage future growth. This concept also allows for residential units along the waterfront and a vast amount of
public open space. Vehicles and pedestrians have a number of entries to the site that all connect to form a network so that there are
no dead ends. A pedestrian connection is also extended to the resort to the east to attract addition users.

Objectives:
* Axial connections to community elements
* Streetscape to absorb stormwater runoff
* Connections to residential neighborhoods
* Accommodate vehicle and pedestrian circulation on backstreets
* Create an open space network within the site

Specifications:
* Market Rate Units 60
* Affordable Units 12
* Commercial Square footage 40,000
* Circulation 3,100 linear feet
* Public Shoreline 800 linear feet
* Public Marina


MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design












HIGH GROUND:

A Commercial Destination


'I "I I,, -. rHr.I,,.
*| **1.. nl II,..


Resort w/
Marina


w/ Marina


I., I I ..


a -~ ceo 400


Res Private Space


P Resort Development
Com. Structure Off Sit


MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design











The High Ground concept concentrates on providing the best solution to accommodate sea-level rise. The highest elevation on the
site is located in the central area, which is where the commercial core is. The commercial core is located here because this allows for
on grade access to the business without having to incorporate stairs. This is a big advantage for attracting people, second floor retail
never sells as well as first floor retail. The residential units can be located on lower elevations because they have garages on the
ground floor and stairs are an acceptable means of entry. The commercial core also creates a destination that will be unique to the
site and allows for great public access to the shoreline. The buildings have been offset from the shoreline to allow for flexible public
uses along the waterfront and to accommodate future sea-level rise. This concept also looks at connections to other marinas in the
area by water, which is an alternative means of travel that many users enjoy taking part in. In this concept the vehicle has taken a
back seat. Minimal vehicle circulation opens the possibility of successful pedestrian and bicycle traffic to the site.

Objectives:
Accommodate a 1-meter sea-level rise, while protecting the development
Access by water to other important destinations
Structures offset from shoreline to minimize hurricane impacts
Separate residential and commercial entries to reduce vehicle/pedestrian conflict
Requires Zoning Change

Specifications:
Market Rate Units 56
Affordable Units 15
Commercial Square footage 45,000
Circulation 1,650 linear feet
Public Shoreline 1,700 linear feet
Public Marina










MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design












COMPILATION:

Adjoining the Best


mm Grand entry onUS-


, Community Park 3 Grand entry on US-1


N


0 0 aMw


!1., 1


Commecial entry to site
Public space on US-1
In-ground amphitheater
Native vegeation stroll garden
Pedestrian corridor
Viewing platform
Restaurant and Bridge


I .,-I .I ,rdIIJ 'l

13 Covered Pavilion
14 Movie Theater + Parking
15 Parking Garage
16 Restaurant
17 Dock House
18 Residential Park
19 Pedestrian Boardwalk


MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design


Pedestrian
connection to
Resort & Marina


Residential
Development











The Compilation concept is a mixture of the best features from the previous three designs. A central commercial core is above the
proposed sea-level rise and also terminates an axis that connects to other community elements. There is a sense of community unity
and a network of pedestrian and bicycle circulation. There is ample community open spaces along with private spaces for the resi-
dences. Each residence has a view and amenity, many of which are waterfront. Vehicle circulation has been limited to reduce con-
flict between pedestrians and create a more informal atmosphere along the waterfront. There is also ample parking for the users that
wish to drive. The Compilation concept make the Marathon Shores project a unique destination that will attract users from the sur-
rounding neighborhoods, islands, and cities.

This concept also starts defining specific program elements and their locations

Objectives:
Green connections to community elements
Network of pedestrian and vehicle circulation
Central commercial destination
Greatest public amenities
Waterfront access with Keys atmosphere
Tolerant to hurricanes and sea-level rise

Specifications:
Market Rate Units 60
Affordable Units 16
Commercial Square Footage 49,000
Circulation 2,550 linear feet
Public Shoreline 1,700 linear feet
Public Marina
Parking 280spots








MARATHON SHORES: Schematic Design
















































MARATHON SHORES
60













/ 1/*


-4 -h


Community L i
Master Plau


r


MARATHON SHORES







At, %.-q
4' ,.'


>' I


C:


-----V
V


Ia'c


~1


4
400


MARATHON SHORES: Community Master Plan


A it









General Specifications


Connects 156 Residential Houses
Connects 15 Commercial Retailers
Connects 6 Restaurants
Connects 3 Community Destination
Adds 3 Public Waterfront Access Points



Legend

1. Elementary School
2. Waterfront Restaurant
3. Residential Housing
4. Commercial Retail along US-1 (mostly restaurants)
5. Canopy road for comfortable pedestrian environment
6. Marathon Community Park
7. High-end Residential Development
8. Commercial Fishery property and storage
9. Vehicle rotary to slow traffic
10. Main Vehicular Entry
11. Grand Entry to Site
12. Community Day Care Center
13. Palm Allee for focusing view into site
14. Side entrance to site residences
15. Resort connected to site by pedestrian path
16. Big-box Commercial Store (Home Depot)


* The site connects neighborhoods, a commercial corridor,
schools, parks, a resort, and the waterfront
* The streetscape is an unifying element to the surrounding
neighborhoods
* An axial streetscape network of back roads encourages safe
walking and biking
* The main entry along the US-1 corridor gives the site street
frontage and adds curb appeal
* Multiple access points make it easy for vehicles and pedestrians
to enter the site
* Public access to the site and to the waterfront amenities make it
part of the community fabric
* Possibility for future sea-level rise accommodation and fortifica-
tion along the waterfront of neighboring sites


MARATHON SHORES: Community Master Plan


Key Features
















































MARATHON SHORES
64



















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MARATHON SHORES
















































MARATHON SHORES: Master Plan
66








Site Specifications


1. Public Gardens & Pergolas
2. Townhouse Quadplex (60 total units)
3. Residential Swimming Pool
4. Marina (21 total slips)
5. Visitor Dockage (17 total slips)
6. Dock House & Fishing Club (2,577s.f)
7. Retail Boating (1,800s.f)
8. Retail Apparel w/ Cistern Below (2.500s.f.) (140,000 gal.)
9. Retail Keys Living w/ Cistern Below (2.500s.f.) (140,000 gal.)
10. Restaurant Bar & Grill (4,000s.f)
11. Retail Art (1,700s.f)
12. Retail Accessories (1,840s.f)
13. Retail Apparel (2,325s.f)
14. Retail Tourist Souvenir (2,100s.f.)
15. Covered Public Open Space
16. Tiki Bar (800s.f.)
17. Waterfront Access
18. Pedestrian Promenade
19. Grand Entry
20. 3-Theater Cinema w/ 1st-Floor Parking (12,.500s.f.) (36 parking spots)
21. Retail Coastal Products w/ 1st-Floor Parking & 3rd-Floor Affordable
Residential Units (4,990s.f) (14 parking spots) (4 total units)
22. Affordable Residential Units (8 total units)
23. Restaurant (2,500s.f.)
24. Covered Seating Over Water
25. Natural Bay Scenery
26. Viewing Platform at Point
27. Lagoon fountain for aeration
28. Native Garden Platform
29. Amphitheater
30. Parking Lot (36 spaces)
31. Parking Lot (15 spaces)
32. 4-Level Parking Garage (242spaces)
33. Parking Lot (12 spaces)


Acreage 15.6
Market Rate Residential Units 60
Affordable Residential Units 12
Commercial Square Footage 42,132
Visitor Parking Spots 343
Boat Slips 36




Key Features

* Multiple access points create some separation between residential
and commercial sections of the site.
* The waterfront and other public spaces unite commercial and resi-
dential zones
* Parking connected to the main entry gets the users out of their
cars and directly onto the pedestrian promenade
* The buildings are separated by vegetation to maintain the small
scale Keys atmosphere
* Vegetation and berms are implemented around the structures to
reduce wind and flood impacts
* The promenade and major pedestrian pathways are useable by
service vehicles and emergency vehicles
* A separate road for 'back of house' service is also provided
* The central pedestrian promenade is a linear space bordered by
retail shops and restaurants
* Native vegetation stands along the waterfront return portions of
the site to its original condition
* The public waterfront and covered seating area can be used for
community events


MARATHON SHORES: Master Plan


Legend
















































MARATHON SHORES
68















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Grading & 7
ra 11.


Drainage


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MARATHON SHORES

















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The grading on the site has
been modified to accommo-
date sea-level rise, stormwa-
ter runoff, and hurricane
flooding. Varying elevation
and topography throughout
the site were also created to
add interest to the landscape.
The site is completely handi-
cap accessible. The northern
shoreline was returned to its
natural slope so that native
vegetation can be reestab-
lished. This also allows easy
access to the water. Restor-
ing the waterfront slope pro-
vided some of the fill soil
that is required to construct
the pedestrian promenade.
There were also several fill
spoils that can be used, but
there will still be a need to
bring in soil from external
sources.


N

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MARATHON SHORES: Site Grading









The site has been graded to ac-
commodate a 3' sea-level rise.
This has been accomplished
through several fortifying tech-
niques including a landscape
berm and retaining wall. These
elements are placed on the water
side of the structures and are as
close to the structures as possible,
while still allowing for an 8%
slope.

The site and uses within the site
can actually accommodate a 5'
sea-level rise without any modifi-
cations. However, a 5' sea-level
rise would flood the roads con-
necting the site making it in-
accessible. If the berm and re-
taining wall were continued down
the waterfront properties or the
elevation of the roads raised, the
site will be functional into the fu-
ture.




The BLUE areas show elevations
that would be inundated with a 3'
r sea-level rise


MARATHON SHORES: Sea-Level Rise and Hurricane Tolerance









The Marathon building codes requires
that all stormwater runoff being col-
lected on-site and allowed to percolate
into the soil. The site has a total land
area of 13.17 acres. If the impervious
coverage is less than 40%, the site needs
to accommodate a 0.75" rainfall event.
The site will also incorporate two
140,000 gallon cisterns located under
the apparel and keys living retail stores.


Impervious Surface Type Square Footage
Foundations/Slabs 158,273
Deck/Patios 19,187


Driveways
Sidewalks/Dockage
Promenade


:-^?- -

K L
'> *' -^


-- --- -----

- --------


5,049
10,788
23,003


The total impervious square footage
is 216,300 square feet, or 37.7% of
the site

The total required retention
volume is 13,465 cubic feet


Swale Volume (cf) -Swale Volume (cf) Swale Volumie (cf) Swale Volume (cf)


A 276
B 948
C 580
D 1,154
E 522
F 713


I 1,351


Q 227


J 133 R 233


K 286
L 208


Y 89
Z 306


JI


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S 1131 Aa 306
S 791 Ab 198


M 86 U 402 Ac 2,084


N 626


V 181 Ad 656


The total provided retention
volume is 19,486 cubic feet


G 57 0 282


H 5,561


P 242


W 278
X 351


Ae 228


MARATHON SHORES: Site Drainage


T" -








zi









As drought duration continues to lengthen and growing populations are requiring more resources, potable water will become a limit-
ing factor. The Keys already experiences fresh-water restrictions, making alternative sources a great option for new developments.
The Marathon Shores project will collect stormwater from 10 commercial building rooftops with a combined surface area of over
44,000 square feet, along the pedestrian promenade, and will store the harvested water in two 140,000 gallon cisterns. The 280,000
gallons of cistern water can be used for irrigation or a variety of other grey water uses. The water can also be used, in extreme case,
as drinkable water in the event of a devastating hurricane.

Since most of the potable water in the Keys is used for irrigation and 280,000 gallons is not enough volume to sustain irrigation on a
13.3 acre site, there is an alternative irrigation option. This option is to irrigate certain portions of the landscape with saltwater. With
periodic flushing of freshwater (approximately once every two weeks) and the addition of salt eating microbes in to the soil, many
plants can withstand this high salt environment. Many of the coastal native plant species including paspalum grass, zoysia grass, and
island plants like coconuts are not hindered by this irrigation technique. This would save copious amounts of water and lower the
impact of the project.


Elevation of cistern under retail space


Cistern construction in the honda Keys


Cistern Dimension Diagram


isiern construction in me rionaa keys


MARATHON SHORES: Potable Water Alternatives















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Design Details ;

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MARATHON SHORES

















S


A


B


Detail Key


'-


MARATHON SHORES: Detail Key & Site Section


LVI


Gulf of Mexico Public Waterfront Berm Public Open Space Retail Building Promenade Theater w/ Parking Below Side
Buffer
A Site Section from the movie theater to the waterfront











Legend


1. Waterfront Seating
2. Colorful vegetation to accent
i backyard
3. Open Lawn
S4. Hammocks
5. Covered porch for cooling at-
mosphere
6. Raised floor elevation creates
better views and lessens im-
S" pact of flooding
7. Space between vegetation and
.... facade to reduce damage
8. Foliage to create privacy
9. Grass access path to backyard
10. Runoff Retention Pond
11. Pervious Pavement Roadway
12. Shared entry to units
13. Pervious Pavers Driveway
14. Dense foliage to reduce wind











0 4 5- 16, 32.

B Residential Plan Detail along the water



MARATHON SHORES: Residential Detail























C Residential Front Elevation


D Residential Side Elevation from marina to swimming pool


MARATHON SHORES: Residential Architectural Details











-amella nodoea


MARATHON SHORES: Residential 1st Floor and Planting Plan










3 Bed, 2 1/2 Bath Residence (1760 square feet)


Front Back
Yard 0 Family 8 Yard
0r3-,, Room p



1/2
Bath




I ,I Guest
Bath Master
Bath Master
Bedroom
Guest 1
Front 8 '' Back
Yard 4 Yard
Yad Guest 2










MARATHON SHORES: Residential 2nd and 3rd Floor Plans











-; 'Legend
1. Marina Covered Seating
S"2. Dock House & Fishing Club
w 1 3. Retail
.....jj- .4. Pavers for Pedestrian
5 Promenade
S- 5. Promenade seating, open and
^ .. "' covered
,,4 i '6. Canopy to provide shade
J 7. Grass access to water
8. Restaurant
S.., '9. Outdoor restaurant seating
S. ,. 10. Coconut Palm to set tropical
h"s"\ ~ atmosphere
S11. Restored natural slope to
'" access water
.. 12. Raised pedestrian path to
emphasize views and block
.. "0 K '"' .sea-level rise
S' '" ''" 13. Native vegetation along wa-
-- terfront, storm tolerant and
--- .... acts as a wind buffer

f.-" '" 15. Dense foliage for shade and
... / create lush aesthetic
'" ^ ? -. 16. Low planting at building
S"- base for color and scale



E Plan Detail of retail shops along the pedestrian promenade



MARATHON SHORES: Commercial Promenade Detail



























F Promenade Balcony Perspective


G Promenade Elevation


MARATHON SHORES: Promenade Details









































H Waterside Dining & Seating Perspective at north end of the saltwater pond


MARATHON SHORES: Waterside Seating Detail
82












































I Waterfront Perspective of public shoreline, tiki bar, and retail shops


MARATHON SHORES: Waterfront Detail
83






















/' ,1


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References ,_


_"
.


MARATHON SHORES









An Analysis of Strategies for Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Florida
University of Florida Master's Thesis
Michael Volk. 2008

Architectural Graphic Standards
10th Edition
Ramsay and Sleeper
John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2000

Caribbean Style
Suzanne Slesin and Stafford Cliff
Clarkson N. Potter, Inc. New York, NY. 1985

Coastal Construction Manual
FEMA. 2005

City of Marathon Code of Ordinances
www.municode.com

City of Marathon
www.ci.marathon,fl,us

City of Marathon Comprehensive Plan
www.ci.marathon.fl.us/index.aspx?NID=29

D'Asign Source, LLC
Florida Keys Design/Build Firm
Franco D'Ascanio and Matthew Prince
Marathon, FL

Ecosystems of Florida
Ronald L. Myers and John J. Ewel
University of Central Florida Press. Orlando, FL, 1990


Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail Master Plan
Michael Design Associates
The Board of County Commissioners. Monroe County, FL. 2000

Gardens by the Sea
The Garden club of Palm Beach
The Garden Club of Palm Beach. Palm Beach, FL. 1999

Living in the Key West Style Anywhere
David L. Hemmel and Judi S. Smith
Duval Publishing. Key West, FL. 2004

Marathon 1906-1960
Dan Gallagher
Museums and Nature Center at Crane Point. Marathon, FL, 2004

Monroe County and Incorporated Municipalities Local Mitigation Strategy
Local Mitigation Strategy Working Group. 2010

Monroe County Soil Survey
U.S. Department of Agriculture. 1995

National Hurricane Center
www.nhc.noaa.gov

Priceless Florida
Ellie Whitney, D. Bruce Means, and Anne Rudloe
Pineapple Press. Sarasota, FL. 2004

Urban Land Institute
www.uli.org


Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority
www.fkaa.com


MARATHON SHORES: References




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9 4 '-! + %'&'+& 0'%''2+-&2 n-2 +! ,.' 1#"n '!2+!2.' (, $ '( !$! %' $ 0'& &#" 21,+ +( 1* +@ &! '! .1#" %' 02 1 &!0 )'!* + '1 '(,,2 00" %'10 + '0 ,'.2 $ % $ + '00!,% !&&.1 & 1' ''!'0',+0!1!!!1$' -&2 '0&%'! ,>-' '"& '!-0 0 0 ,' '' 2.0'&&+ 1!' (2-, $ %& 0 (-', +&. ,.-% &' '2 '0 -' &'-& $ 2+ '(&.10'1' + % '2 & '!!. '2 &'0' >-.',+(%B12' &',2' 1&' % % '&&-+n'. !'#"0'& 1' %%'-+ %'. 0 $ %'&% -!1( 0 !(2 20 !( -'(. +'.(!. %'. &% '!.-, #", !2 !!' & '+,,.1! 0 !'1+ -% & ,+ &+& ,0$ &!'$ 0 -!1<" 10-' ( 9" A'!1 ( n&&.-&!-' n' '$ ( ''%'(2 -0-, !2 !&+ 9AA+ 3&&-+n'.. n'. 76' &&-++' +,. & '+

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< 4 + /''+ =nn !D= 0

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3 4$ +) -' !' & + @ '0' % !!, ',! = ,0!%! !'--' !-". &%+'! = ,$ ', '2!+

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33 4'' = '>-74n = '>-4 --&>-4 --&>-74n $ 'L%'1M!--& >-' %' & '' '2 $ '+,'&!-'1 & &% '-' $ '119
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37 4$ %1'%++ % !%'. @ r $ =7 == =;;< =

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3< 4$ '--' + =7 == =;;< = A&% 2!A-!1 &%''+'1 2 &$ A-!1

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7 4$ = 1 + %+, 12'! %+, 12'!

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77 4$ + @ '+ -'+ 1A' B = ,A-00 = ,A-00 '&A-00 11'-! 2-! '%0!

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