The Torchlight (published by the Alpha Lambda Chapter of Kappa Phi Kappa), Volume 1, Number 2

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Title:
The Torchlight (published by the Alpha Lambda Chapter of Kappa Phi Kappa), Volume 1, Number 2
Series Title:
The Torchlight (published by the Alpha Lambda Chapter of Kappa Phi Kappa)
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English
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Kappa Phi Kappa
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Box: 1
Folder: University Archives Small Collections - Kappa Phi Kappa

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Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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sobekcm - AA00003163_00002
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AA00003163:00002

Full Text






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The

TORCHLIGHT

February 1



published three times a year du-ring the -months of E'.'onbor,
February, and April by the Alpha Laibda chapter of KappaPhi Kapp&
national professional educational fraternity.



Editor-in-Chief

T. ALBERT DELEGAL$ AL-74



STAFF

Managing Editor ........seaborn McCrory Jr., AL-93
Feature Editor.........Clifton A. McClelland, AL-92
Make-up Editor.........Donald Dyal, AL-76
Make-up Editor........ William Chambers, AL-101
Make-up Editor .........Sidney Woinberg, AL-99
Make-up Editor.........Robert E. persons, AL-102
Make-up Editor........ Howard Banros, AL-108
Business Manager.....*.Henry C. Fox, AL-88
Contributors:

Frank Wells, AL-84 Gordon Lovcjoy, AL-104
Robert Benson AL-94 Richard Beach, AL-63
Joe James, AL-87


Address all communications to Kappa phi Kappa Headquarters,
344 Washington Street, Gainesvillo, Florida.


......... ............."ACROSS THE EDITOR'S DESK".....................


WE BEG YOUR PARDON for our apparent procrastination in
'r.nsing Torchlight Number Two before you. Honestly, alumni and
*Id fellow students, semester examinations held the staff in their
clutchess with such a vengeance that we couldn't possibly break
.ose with any literary ideas except upon the classic blue books.
From our mental density of the examination period, the
staff has profited in at least one respect: We saw the impracti-
cability of attempting to publish a January issue, thus you see
our changed (Continued on page 2)


"TORCHLIGHT"


page 1







ige 2 "TORCHLIGHT" =>.... -


aublication schedule which brings this bulletin to you three time-i a
year. In this way, we have eliminated most of the unfavorable cir-
cumstances surrounding our efforts, thereby making it possible to
produce a better planned medium of mutual contact.
XXXX----XXXX
WE HOPE YOU WILL be pleased with this number, but we shall
expect to hear from you alumni regardless of your reaction to the
Torchlight. progress thrives upon criticism, if constructive, and
only thru your evaluation of our ideas and rprposes can we expect to
improve upon either our bulletin or our general fraternal activities.
Again, let us remind you: WE WANT YOUR ADVICE AND YOUR CRITICISM.
Right here, the staff wishes to especially thank Mr.
Chester R. yates, 1044 W. Reynolds St., plant City, and Dean J. W.
Nbrman, college of Education, at the University, for their very en-
couraging letters in regard to the Torchlight. We hope to hear from
you again soon. we also hope that you other Kappa phi Kappa alumni
Will follow the lead of these two gentlemen and let us know your
addresses, your activities, and your ideas in regard to the frater-
nity.
XXXX----XXXX
RECENTLY A PROTEST petition was signed by practically every
man in the college of Education calling attention to the injustice
'f issuing state certificates to graduates of other colleges, pro-
'-ed they have only eighteen hours of Education, when graduates
ith degrees in Education, receiving the same certificates, have
'n required to complete much more professional training. Any
-irminded person can easily see the justification for this protest.
Certainly nobody would question the unfairness of placing
n amateur on the same footing with a professional and allowing the
ormer to compete in the wage scale with a man who has devoted four
c-rs toward preparing himself for the specific job of teaching. A
move to amend the present state requirements for certification
would certainly be a progressive measure, and one backed almost
unanimously be all Kappa phi Kappas as well as members and alumni
of the College of Education everywhere.
XXXX----xxxx
"UNITED WE STAND,..." certainly aplios to the teaching
profession in this state, and, perhaps, we shall be found "stand-
ing" when the next primary rolls around. This trite old phrase
applies to more cases than one, and certainly it can be construed
to fit our own particular Kappa phi Kappa case.
In this state, we not only run into trouble with the 'un-
washed" eighteen-hour teachers; we find various and sundry salary
and employment competition in the non-graduate class. To diminish
the severity of this problem, a union of the Education School
graduates could be accomplished.
Every movement must have a beginning, and why shouldn't
Kappa phi Kappa arrange to receive the credit for starting some-
thing worthy along this line by organizing an alumni association?
ALUMNI, LET'S HEAR FROM YOU ALONG THIS LINE! More about it next
time.
.....Al Delogal


S I








?a_ __5_ "T~*_ OR HLI


D E D I C A T I N



We, the staff of the "Torchlight",
with a deep sense of appreciation and respect,
dedicate this, the second issue, the p. K.
yonge Laboratory School Number, to Dr. Arthur
Raymond Mead, Director of the p. K. yonge
Laboratory School, a man who through his high
character, modesty, and tireless effort has
made possible this groat, new enterprise.


Page 3


"TORCHLIGHT":







Page 4 "TORCHLIGHT" 4


THE PURPOSES OF THE P.K.YOCG-E LABORATORY S.FCOL

(by Dr. A.R. Mead, Director of Laboratory noools)
Great teachers are always an urgent need of each and every
generation. Not all of us can hone to be great teachers, but we ma--
aspire to become better teachers. In all modesty, ;thb, Monrem; rIul-
ty of the Colleae of Education is venturing into ne-. fields to ji-
nrove their own teaching. The new school must have a staff C' :'bl
te':chers--superior if they are available and can be found. T e
t.euichers will be e~xected to have a passion for teaching and 'rorking
.th children. We hope they will make "education their religion" in
-. ry real sense. To "learn" the children, i.e., to learn about
*ildren, will be as urgent as to hold classes. To guide children to
lo better those things they will do, can do, and should do, and to do
these things cooperatively with the children, are the main general
Purposes of these teaches. Perhaps somewhere among these teachers
may be one of exceptional rerit as a teacher. We covet such. Per-
haps among the children are many who need heln, encouragement, guid-
ance, and happiness as well as the skills of the school arts. "'e
hone the teachers can render these services. The best education we
can provide the children is the firit goal tr be attempted.
'7e learn by observing others and r.:he things. We hone
this school will become a cente-- to which t-'achers, principals, and
laymen -'a, come, observe, confer., and be helped. In some respects,
the very peuiDment of the school demonstrates how a small amount of
money can be used to provide flexible and useful facilities for use
in the classroom; and, conversely, sole equipment, more costly,
illustrates other advantages. Varied learning activities in each
classroom will provide a source of information for the observing
teacher and principal. Perhaps, the school may be able to demon-
strate a saving in time needed to master the essentials of the com-
mon elementary school subjects. w'e hone the beginner in the fine
art of teaching can find in this school rich suggestions, provocative
problems, stimulating advice from the teachers, and stimulus to
.i'rther growth. Perhaps the experienced teacher can go far beyond
1he realms of the beginner and raise questions which will richly re-
'crd all concerned.
There are vexing difficulties with us always. In these
;-s their number is legion. As a laboratory, the school is expect-
to put to test or to an experimental tryout possible solutions to
:oie of these vexing problems, if they are germane to the school and
.he education of children. The number and variety of such problems
ire baffling. How teach to attain character values? How to motivate
the disinterested? How to direct individuals who are different? How
to be sure the results we sought were attained? How rapidly can normal







"TORCHLIGHT"


children develop their vernacular vocabulary? Can the pro.bleh
"home work" be solved in a better way than now? '.bat Esh'. t.:: :rs
do with children with emotional ard nervous troubles? 'ha'. are
the superior methods of teaching high school pupils to read a f7or-
eign language? How do abilities derive- from industrial a.t activ-
ities differ from those in linguistic fields? C'n:r the major obijr-
tives of teaching high school science be se .' ...I ,s well by demor-
strations by teachers as can be secured bvy i i7ual laboratory
work? How can the modern typewriter be ,: to improve- the quality
of classroom teaching? Y'hat concept icns o. economic and social con-
ditions shall be taught in -ur schoolS.?, These are but suggestive
problems; the list could be exrpanded indefinitely. As an agency for
investigation and experiment;t -"_-; the school will be expected to
find the facts relative to suci: problems.
The schools will ccnt..i.-'uc co need some new teachers. A
small but selected. Group or)' our.:g people will continue to secure
their pre-service preparation at the University, and the school will
serve as their means of contact with actual school conditions. By
studying teaching done, by sharing in it, and by some supervised
student teaching, these young people will receive an improved intro-
duction into the school room arts. The teacher in service can be
benefitted also be visits, by study and by periods of investigation
,f teaching problems.
The school administrator can see in experimental action
-entures which he may wish to use in his own school, new uses for
.Id equipment, and uses for equipment easily available but not
onially used in schools.
The school is a laboratory school and hot primarily a
training college like those which serve the typical teachers'
cc leges.



KAPPA PHI KAPPA HOLDS
ALL PEABODY CLUB OFFICES


We would like to mention here sor 'al of our illustrious
young teachers-to-be, who are new or re' ir -; officers in the Pea-
body Club. Monday night, February 5, 1934. elections were held
and J. Q. Caldwell, aL-1-06. --a olect.d pre-sijcent. Cyrus Anderson,
AL pledge, was elected vicc:-,;'p"o..,1'.rnt, Gordon Lovejoy, AL-104, was
named as secretary by a unari r' '-: Joe Jarmncs, AL-87, was voted
the new critic. The man wnc ,il ;-.ain take care of the publicity
of the Club will be William C .-.or L-.. Wrilliam Makowsky,
AL-105, will manage the debati.g Lotoa. Those men retiring from
office were: Henry C. Fox, AL-88, president; J.Q. Caldwell, AL-106,
vice-president; Cyrus Anderson, AL pledge secretary; Al Delegal,
AL-74, critic; Richard Beach, AL-63, debate manapor.


Page 5







"TORCHLIGHT"


Page 6


FORMAL DEDICATION OF P. K. Y(NGE
LABORATORY SCHOOL TO BE EVENT OF
FEB. 16-17
(By Frank Wells)


February 16-17 will be Red-Letter days in thc ri .ur: :t;'
Florida education. The dedicatory exercises of tbe P. ,
Laboratory School, commencing at 10 A.M. Friday, and La.l: I; h
noon Shturday, will draw to the corridors of the new s~;ool r.' .,'
K.icational and political leaders of our state and nation, -;-; il
least one leader from a neighboring nation. The program w.ich has
been arranged by the faculty of the College of Education contains
a wide galaxy of speakers, well-known in educations circles.
The new laboratory school is, undoubtedly, the last word in
education. It is the result of a high vision for education coupled
with years of labor on the part of the educational leaders of the
state, the generosity of a great philanthro c organization, and
the willing contribution of the taxpayers c Florida. Special praise
is to be given Pres. John J. Tigert, Dean ,. W. Norman, and Dr. A.
R. Mead for their leadership in thia project, and to their many
cohorts in this work.
For the purpose of thib article we herewith present a
very condensed summary of the dedicatory program.

DEDICATION P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL BUILDING
FEBI{UARY SIXTEENTH, NINETEEN THIRTY*FOUR
EXERCISES IN AUDITORIUM P.K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
10:00 A.M.
Dr. John J. Tigert, Pres., University of Florida, presiding
PRELUDE: March from Tannhauser Wagner
The University of Florida Symphony Orchestra
R. BeWitt Brown, Conductor
INVOCATION: The Reverend T. V. McCaul, Pastor
First Baptist Church
SOLO: "Dawn" Curran
Mrs. Sidney W. Godwin
Mrs. G. S. Waldo, Accompanist
TRANSFER OF BUILDING TO STATE AND ACCEPTANCE
Mr. Paul H. Smith, Paul Smith Construction Company
Mr. Rudolph Weaver, State Architect and Director,
School of Architecture and Allied Arts,
University of Florida
TRANSFER OF BUILDING TO UNIVERSITY AND ACCEPTANCE
The Honorable Dave Sholtz, Governor, for Florida
President John J. Tigert, for the University
Dean J. W. Norman, for the Collc-. of Education
ASSEMBLY SINGING ACCOMPANIED pv ;FrlESTRA
"America the BeauLJ.' "-
ANNOUNCEMENTS---------- ------------Dr. A. R. Mead
Director of Laboratory Schools
ADDRESS: "A New Deal in Education"
Dr. Boyd H. Bode, P'offssor of Education
Ohio State University


__ I_I I_ __







Rage 7 -........... .._ ...

DEDICATORY PRAYER--------------Th-e yv.'"I:: .. :-..
Pastor, F rst M.,,:r K ...;. s: '.:. :.-
A B J O U- -M g- -


INSPECTION OF BUILDING, 12:00 to 1:OC .^,.
LUNCHEON, UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA, 1:00 t' :.JO P.M.
Dr. John J. Tigert, PreAsident, Un;v- Lty Flo id.a
presiding
Introduction of Guests
Speaker: The Honorable George H. Baldwin, Chairman,
State Board of Control


DINNER (Place to be announced), 6:00 to 7:30 P.M.
Toastmaster: Dr. R. L. Eyman, Professor of Education,
Florida State College for Women
Introduction of Guests
Music
Greeting from Representatives of Fraternities
For Kappa Phi Kappa, Mr. W. W. Little Supervising
Principal, St. Petersburg, Florida.
For Kappa Delta Pi, Mr. W. L. Goette, Supervising
Principal, Cocoa, %Florida
For Phi Delta Kappa, Dr. G. B. Simmons, Assistant Dean,
College-og Educatilo,-University of Florida


GENERAL SESSION, LABORATORY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 8:00 P.M.
Dr. A. R. Mead, presiding
Solo: I "A Spirit F2lower" -- Campbell-Tipton
Mrs. Sidney W. Godwin
Mrs. Laura Lee Marsh, Accompanist
Address: "Some Features of Canadian Education"
Dr. Walter P. Percival
Director of Protestant Education
Province of Q.uebec, Canada
-The Use of Electrical Facilities in modernn School
Professor Joseph We'
Professor of Electrical Engineering and
-ead of Engineering Division, State Radio Station WRUF


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY SEVENTEENTH

GENERAL SESSION, LABORATORY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 11:00 A.M.

Address: Dr. J. W. Norman, Dean, presiding
Dr. Boyd H. Bode, Professor of Education
Ohio State University


COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT' CONFERENCE
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2:30 to 5:00 P.M.
P. K. YONgE BUILDING, ROOM 134


1







page 8 "T


COTJ'..;1T S PTT RF. INTT:-7WD7 ; ;' h '.T
SATURDLY. ..'""RCJT '" '. :
P X .. yCf\',G 2 .._, ri v p '';.... ^,,, '*-


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRTINP rIALS' I',SD :.'1 3.C..7 '
D : ,} Z~ ^ ,2 ,O ,- 1:.< .-., ?I.
P. K. YUYGE }.. :-iDE7ARTET RO0:"

ELEK"ITTARYtSCHOOL PIP01PLP, J..S, T];!) C1-;C'ib CONF-iC
SATUR;D.Y, PU?-R3i.:'.RY ,( 9-30 !. -Oc 00: -
P. ,1 YO" (--.' KIH.L .RJART ,' N :OC,] ....


HIGI SCHOOL Pi:'!CIP:R Al.;NC.
FRIDAY, P Y ... '-, .~;) P,. f .-
-L.-3O *.'.'.J 'c .' 7 ;', ': <* .1 ,

HIGH S,.(OGL K. ,.. ( '- K. F CE
SATURDAY, P';"1' '. 1. ; :L:00 A. A.



PRl-S2RVICE' PHR 'PAR -TI ON OF T.-JACT:.IRS
FRIDAY, FEBiTU2RY 1., 2:30 5:00 P. I.
P. K. YO?-'G, HUILTDIN(r, ROOI 138


PRlE- EiR7TC: PR~?'.RA9'lOI, OF TeAC!HTRS
SATURDAY, F',BRUARY 17, 9:30 11:00 A. M.
P& X. YONJGEJ BUUILDjIHC, ROOI 138



? ? ? ? ? ? ?

Is it true that in the college of Education tho
Kappa Phi Kappans are knvwr arnonr the other stu-
dents as .hc "p.rcwnors"? Trf so, raybo that is one
explarnaton for such a high fratornity scholastic
average I




rhat a polittci::: .n:,-- .';*x :i our representa-
tive on the Prof. ;U:" .-: '..i erfraterni.ty Council
and is Presidev': oi .:-- :'er. !owa did ho do it?







page 9 "TOOCHLIC> -. pago .'



A WORD FT~I.: OTTR RZ :i' '




Dear Alumuni Brothers:

We were very pleased to receive letters from several of you.
re are glad that you have taken that means of showing your interest in
s. Let me urge all of you to write to us if you find it impossible to
isit us personally. Help us to got in touch with all our alumni mer-


Since the last publication of this bulletin, our chapter has
'o several definite forward steps. we have a larger and more cffic-
S.t working organization. of the projects mentioned in the initial
'Torchlight", all have either actually been accomplished or are well
advanced toward their final realization.

For example, we are now able to announce that there is a
Kappa phi Kappa house on the Florida campus. This is the home of the
organization and is the center of its activities. The new chapter
house is located at 344 Washington Street. Allow me to extend the most
cordial invitation of your professional fraternity to visit its active
chapter there.

In cooperation with Kappa Delt: pi, a series of radio ad-
dresses was broadcast over WRUF. A banquet was held during the Home-
coming week-end. Our research committee is working on several worthy
projects. The organization has submitted to Dean Norman a comprehen-
sive plan for the orientation of freshmen in the college of Education
under the direction of Kappa Phi Kappa.

We are looking forward to active service and common benefit
from working together. It will please us highly to receive comment,
advice and friendly words of encouragement from all of you.

Fraternally,


Joe B. James








Pag 10"TRHL :-~


A WORD TO THE ALLTUMT.T
By Richard BeaP&c


The progress and c.rth-lres of .... .-..": i, 5 .-'." :.. rociety
or club is measured by the ;~ r..- .' -.cr : t ..anl.
Kappa Phi Kappa is proud of t:.r .-. -,..-.:. .:.- a..'e oni .?tenty
striving to give efficient p:: .. :.. th, b,'aool c'atle-
ren of Florida under exlsct!.ng. ._ ; '.- c:. 'L0. .ur.s. The roa. teach-
er who loves his chosen pr)i'e .- .:, c. pts Lte cLaller.ge tlus given
him and does his utmost to maintain hih strzd.rds of successful
teaching. The temporary teacher or the one who is only using the
educational system as a "stepping stone" to some other profession
in life, accepts the condition as ;n excuse to abuse all of those
with which &4 comes into contact and to condemn teaching in gener-
1. The Monroe Doctrine of Education should read "America for
r.nerlcns" and "The Te-ching Profession for Teachers".

One of the aims of Kappa Phi Kappa is to foster and to
advance a greater feeling of cooperation between our active under-
:.duate members and our active Alumni Members. A few alumni have
written in to the chapter giving helpful advice and encouragement
to us who are anxious to enter the field, but it is our hope that
all of you graduates will cooperate with us and give us the advan-
tage of the experiences acquired in actual practice.

Allumni, we challenge you to do this, will you accept
the challenge offered you?




COLT.EGE OF EDUCATION F7''.- T BUREAU

We are all very +r...- th. [-..here is an employment
bureau in conjuctlorn t n.- -.. z.: L.ooratory School and
the College of Educatiun. t i., .:..c: i b ou'" .asstarnt dean,
Dr. Simmons, and all m:-..teres .I:. through his office All
graduates from the College of u r'., on of the- University of Florida
and summer school session of thE ;:.' .. .iy of Florida are eligible
to use this bureau. The service is free of charge.

Letters of application and inquiries for teachers should
be addressed to the College of Education Employment Bureau, care of
Dr. s. B. Simmons, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, Gainesville, Florida.
Dr. Simmons has already received many letters of application for
positions a.nd there are several positions which have not been filled
to date. We hope that the Alumni of this institution and also of
I'PK will use this bureau as much As possible.


Page 10


"TORCHL GH-T "







Page 111 3.-. -, -,


KAPPA PHI KArP- 13 :':pSr
PROFESSIi0 .'.;. F' TO OC',1'-
ITS OWNI :'TI .S 'I. .; ".A '

On February 1, 1934, Alpha Lambda chapter o:
rn.-, opened its own chapter house on the corner of `aLs:".- L.: ._
rt Streets, three blocks off campus. By so doing, it bo:-:.l-
:"irst professional fraternity on the campus of the Tniv.-riTt
SFlorida to open a house.
The present fraternity house is a modern six-room cottage
-.hich seven of the members are living. The two main rooms :'ave
been fitted up for meetings. The other four rooms are occupied by
the m-mb,-rs. All of the furnishings are the property of the chapter.
It is hoped that the present houge will serve as a nucleus
around which will revolve the activities of the chapter. As the
chapter grows, plans call for a larger house. Eventually, it is
honed, that the fraternity will be able eith-:r to build or to pur-
chase its own house.
The idea of opening a fratcrr'ty -use was not a new one
when the arrangements s for the pres,-nt house ,ere made. However,
until late this fall the plans had not crystallized. Actual planning
began shortly aft-r the fall s(n-me-ster opened. In December committees
charged with making arrangements.' for a house were appointed.
After a survey of -iA t1 vacant houses in the neighborhood
of the campus, the present cha,.,t r -ocuse '-is selected. Then the
committee charged with furni.-sh:.i.., t-I. nouse went into action. Simul-
taneously with the advent of the new semester, came the formal
opening of our new house.
Although the venture attendant upon opening the house
was one in which the entire active membo-ship of the club participate:1
much credit must be given to Joe James, the president; to Henry
Pox, the treasurer; and to the assisting committees.
The committee chargeo.d w'4th securing the house wa3 e-,."os'-d
rdon Lovejoy, chai:mr.n; Sidney Weingerg, William Rob'ert.:. -nnd
..er '.akefield. The ommiitbec wn'.ch supervised the furnishi-r. o0
House was made up of Cliftor Mcuul elland, chairman; Howard brnaes
i Earl Harris.
All alumni members of Alpha Lambda and all visiting Kappa
:.i Kappa members are invited to visit the new chanter ho-.se.


WITH THE BRIGHT BOYS........... .

We are proud to know that the only two men to make straight
A averages in the College of Education this past semester were mem-
oers of our organization. These men were Gordon Lovejoy, AL-104, and
Eldridge Collins, AL-96. Harold Ireland, pledge, made A's in all
his courses except one in which he made aB B' .us. Ten others made
the honor roll and many made honorable .







e 12 ______-
P ae 12 "TORC),! -


RESEARCH COM:'IT1E. .'Fj..s


byJaes P. 4::



The Research Committee has ,:'. j'.'.S in '..>ir of
second-semester registration, with a vt~i to .:..:mU]; ; acnU
of registration whereby many of the glaring dfec.tse .)f Lth. ;Js
*nlsaystem may be eliminated. Through the committee is not yet
ready to make a final report with respect to its findings and pro-
posed remedies, it is able to state the widely accepted fact that
there should have been more than one day for registration. There
was a great deal of congestion and the movement was very slow.
One just had to push and pull until he finally reached a tableJ
only to find, on finishing his business, a crowd around him so
located that he had to i4zght his way out.
The committee, along with various other committees in
the several professional fraternities, is making a thorough study
of this problem, and results of the work will be treated in a
'.iter issue.


THE TATTLER'S CORNER

(by Tale)




From the skilled manner in which the Dean moved filing
cases, it would appear Horace has a competitor

---o00---

We wondered why CollifV nose loolzd 0 so ehsarp Wher'g
grades came out, we learned why. (Lovejoy brought this up)A
---000---

Ask Prexy Joe about the girl who sent him a note in a
written-.report.
---000---

For a boy who can't practice at home, McClelland plays
a mighty fine game of bridge.

---ooo---

What about the boys who have one class in the artillery
stable and a second in the Laboratory School? They must be good
two milers.








Page 13 T "TORCH1C- '(- E "


THE TATTLERT COPdIE

(cornt"^'




Dyal seems to be spcciJl;.zni~ in lagg',ges. rnEv* you
heard his "French"?::!!,,
--000--

Then we have Ireland who got back from Tallahassee on
Tuesday afternoon with the story that his ride left him behind.--
We've heard it before.

--o000o--

Seminole Deficit Vanishes ----Durrance pays for all his
-rginization pictures.

--000--
(ccnsored)
Capt. Al Delegal, Al-74, ,i ~t-.A_#,..fi # # .',
.* .-J.W : t .. Won-
der if that new shine on Major Connor's Ford had any weight upon
the appointments?

--0oo--

Gordon Lovejoy, AL-104, was named t.e new Business
Manager of the Florida Review for 1933-34 and did not choose
a KVKian as an assistant manager. Why?

S--ooo--

KPKians want to kno-T, hat interest there was in Tampa
last week-end besides the Fair .nd .-asparilla for McCrory to
spend three days there.

--000--

Big Contest: pick the article that Weinberg wrote in
this issue of the "Torchlight".

--000--

Father Hamilton and Johnnie Caldwell certainly do like the
chicken" in the Cafeteria.

--ooo--

Can it be that William Chambers is registered in the
wrong course(BSE)? (Note: Even at that he might not need Political
Science, judging from the recent Peabody Club elections."







1Page 14 '.Y...LTCH"

--PLEDGE A I'TOUNCETI'WT3--

"....right welcome to this honorable order !"

William F. Blois, a member of the Crd'drJ of -;h. p-~.-,
'abody Club, and Theta Kappa Nu social frater.t-i--y. He > :1
n)b'm ore on the campus and hails fro.:i Jacksonville.

Boze H. Kitchens, a Jun.tor in the Ccllcge o_' Zdu.F.tion,
'.vjh a very high average in his scholastic work. He comes f.'(:.'
Pine Mount, Florida.

Maurice Fletcher, a Sophomore on the campus, hailing from
Okeechobee. He has a high average and majors in science and history.

Roy. H. Clark, a phi Kappa Tau and an active in the
College of Education. Roy is a senior, majo- .ig in commercial
subjects and French. He comes from Cle-vvv >.

Charles W. Betis, one of the Health and Physical Education
students who has taken an .rtirve 7jart in campus athletics. Charlie
is a Senior and hails from MarJ-nna.

patterson j. Land, a sophomore in the college with a high
scholastic standing. He holds membership in phi Eta sigma. "pat"
was one of the two freshmen last year to make wrestling numerals.
His home is in Miami.

Cyrus E. Anderson, a Senior in the College of Education
who intends to make teaching his profession. -He was a valuable mem-
ber of the debating team that won the Inter-Club Debating Trophy.
fis home is in Jacksonville.

C.V.Thompson, a student with high grades in his scholastic
ork. He is majoring in social sciences, this being his junior year
-) the campus. Thompson resides in Tallahassee.

George H. Ireland, a Senior on the campus and a member
of Kappa Delta pi. He lives in Tallahassee.




BE SURE TO ATTEND THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL DEDICATION

EXERCISES, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY? FEBRUARY 16-17



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