Class discussion notes by Elmer Emig on "Journalism"

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Material Information

Title:
Class discussion notes by Elmer Emig on "Journalism"
Series Title:
Mass Communications Jm 505
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Emig, Elmer Jacob
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 2
Folder: Mass Communications Jm 505

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00003111:00003

Full Text



CLASS DISCUSSION-JOURNALISM 505


Any improvements in radio television, and movies
is the individual responsibility of the communicator.
Morality can't be compelled,

Any effort to compel or limit communication thought
in our country wouMd run right into a violation of
"freedom to express."

Mr. DeBerard asked why the motion picture code
was such a hypocrisy. He emphasized indecent costumes
and suggestive dances.

Mr. Moss said he believed that there were actually
few violations of the code.

Miss Johnston stated that hermain objection to
code violation was in the crime movies where the crim-
inal was portrayed by a handsome actor who presented
his side so convincingly that by the time you had fol-
lowed him for two hours, you didn't want him to get
caught.

Mr. Scarlett asked if we didn't think the movies
overstepped their boundaries in the fields where they
were likely to be free from public censure. Public
opinion is the most powerful thing involved, Prof. Emig
agreed.

Mr. DeBerard said he didn't necessarily object
to the movies, but that he thought they ought to either
change the code to fit them or do away with it.

Mr. Moss held that he was definitely for retaining
the code no matter how flagrantly it was violated.

Mr. Scarlett asked if it wasn't possible that the
movies set up the code to rule themselves voluntarily
to keep# from being under the jurisdiction of the law.
Prof. Emig said this was probably the case.

Sports and society writers and critics seem to have
a poetic license with the public, Prof. Emig stated in
answer to Mr. Scarlett's question about sports being
written as straight news,

Prof. Emig questioned members of he class as to
the progress of their research papers.