Address by Richard Eberhart: Third World Congress of Poets, Baltimore; June 13-27, 1976 (2 pages)

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Material Information

Title:
Address by Richard Eberhart: Third World Congress of Poets, Baltimore; June 13-27, 1976 (2 pages)
Series Title:
Address: Third World Congress of Poets, Baltimore; June 13-27, 1976. June 22, 1976. Two Xeroxed items. Signed presentation to UF library, 5/77
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Eberhart, Richard 1904-2005
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 1
Folder: Address: Third World Congress of Poets, Baltimore; June 13-27, 1976. June 22, 1976. Two Xeroxed items. Signed presentation to UF library, 5/77

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Maryland -- Baltimore

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00003101:00001

Full Text


*Third World Congress of Poets


By poetry as spirit I mean poetry as representing the spirit of man. A

poem is a material thing but a poem may have spiritual overtones, the best

poems of an age increasing the spiritual heritage of man. I locate poetry

in struggle, spiritual struggle to realize oneself and to communicate poetic

realization as the highest quality of the self, which may become a manifestation

of the dreams, hopes, and despairs of a society and a time.

A world congress of poets is a material body, but from this body may

arise its spirit, imponderable, unevaluated, diffuse, the intellectual emanations of

its members spreading out, world-reaching.

I think that since the world has shrunk due to space communication and

since instant realizations of intelligence can be known by satellite), poetry

should expand its borders and be universally known. It should not be limited

to being known to one country, or one part of one country. The poets in

each country should know the poetry of many other countries as well as their

own. Nationalism should be superseded by internationalism. Whereas Dante

spoke for his Italy, Shakespeare for his England, Lope de Vega for his Spain

a future world should produce a world poet who would comprehend the feelings of

people in all nations to write a compendious body of work which will become

universal.

The point of a world congress of poetry such as this is to break down

national and ideational barriers and to assert that not only can all peoples

understand each other if they try but that poets should envision and try to

enact a world view of their art. If we can fly from Paris to Washington in

three hours and a half there is no reason why poets cannot have perceptions

of poets in distant lands as if they were close to them in their own country.

I do not think such awareness would defeat individualism, but it could erase

provincialism. A world poetry shared by poets of all nations would increase

the stability of man's spirit by making this spirit more nearly universal due


Baltimore June 13-27, 1976








to this respect for his fellow man, his belief in the possibility of a brotherhood

and sisterhood of all rren and vwomn. The spirits of the nations would leap

together toward a spiritual union of nankind, which would then have universal

poets to tell them how potent they are and that poetry as spirit is realizable.

I have just announced a plan that is impracticalL, unrealistic, and

imJrobable, based on too idealistic a picture of the nature of man. However,

since to dream, to imagine new worlds is a characteristic of poets, let this

be one of mine, and maybe one of yours.

Richard EbLrhart






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