Letter from William G. Carleton to U.S. Representative Pat Cannon, October 30, 1939

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Material Information

Title:
Letter from William G. Carleton to U.S. Representative Pat Cannon, October 30, 1939
Series Title:
Cannon, Pat (US. House of Representatives). 1939
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Carleton, William G. (William Graves), 1903-1982
Publication Date:
Physical Location:
Box: 1
Folder: Cannon, Pat (US. House of Representatives). 1939

Subjects

Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00003068:00001

Full Text






October 30, 1939


Hon. Pat Cannon, M.C.
House Office BuiLding
Washington, D.C.

Dear Mr. Cannon:

In the pest several weeks I have b-on all over the state of
Florida speaking at various times to professional, civic and
educational meetings, I find that many loyal Democrats and
supporters of Hoosevelt are sincerely alarmed at the President's
evident partiality for the allies and the conspicuous ways in
which he shows it. There is a general feet that if the embargo
is repealed the President will regard it as a green light and
signal to go ahead in his present policy of favoring one side
in the conflict.

Personally, I have been an ardent N'ew Dealer and a supporter of
the President's domestic policy. Perhaps no one in private life
in this state has made more speeches to our people explaining
the New Deal policies and philosophy, But I must admit that
in the present crisis 1 am alarmed at the President's strong
feelings with respect to the European situation. I have a feel-
ing that he is maneuvering us into a difficult international
position.

At the present time I personally would favbr title and carry,
strict cash and carry, no weakening of the original carry pro-
visions and retention of the embargo. Is there no way that the
legislative tangle can be so expedited as to give us both cash
and carry and retention of the embargo?

As I get over the state and feel the pulse of public opinion I
am amazed at the number of people who feel as I do. Many of
them are, like myself, strong supporters of the Hoosevelt domes-
tic policies. I hope that you cen see your way clear to vote for
a bill that will give us both cash and carry and retention of the
embargo.

I have been extremely reluctant to write this letter to you. I
have a feeling that in the discharge of their high discretionary
duties Members of Congress should be free from *Zganized pressure.
I 'am writing you solely as an individual, But in the present
crisis 1 feel that I have been justified in giving you the result
of my personal observations in this state. I hope that you will
vote to keep the President's feet on the ground.
Sincerely yours,


William G. Carleton,
Associate Professor of Political Science