Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens

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Material Information

Title:
Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Boyd, Benjamin Wayne
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00002979:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



































benjamin boyd












Jacksonville


N D


R D E N S


A SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT
BY
Benjamin Wayne Boyd


April 14th, 2011

PREPARED FOR THE
University of Florida
College of Design. Construction, and Planning
Department of Landscape Architecture
















Acknowledgements

Ben would like to thank:

Lad Hawkins of Genesis Group for
introducing me to the Arboretum
during my internship.

Bob Grist for his guidance during
this semester.

My girlfriend, Sarah for putting up
with late nights in the studio.

My classmates Marco, Will,
James, Shawn, Nick W, Nick D, and
Dan for making said studio nights
a blast.









SITE INFORMATION
Site Location
Duval County Florida
Demographics
History
Board of Directors + Stakeholders
Goals and Objectives
Natural Features
Stakeholder Analysis
Existing Conditions

SITE ANALYSIS
Adjacent Lands
Ecosystems + Ecology
Soils + Hydrology
FINAL SITE ANALYSIS

DESIGN SYNTHESIS
FINAL SYNTHESIS- ZONE1
FINAL SYNTHESIS- ZONE 2-4
Potential Activities Analysis
Garden Stakeholder Analysis


INITIAL CONCEPTS
Conceptual Plan
Conceptual Plan Detail 1
Conceptual Plan Detail 2


CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN
FINAL MASTER PLAN
Management Construct
Natural Resource Preservation
Wildlife Habitat Conservation
Collection Gardens
Woody Shrub Garden
Berry and Fruit Garden
Azelea Garden
Holly and Magnolia Garden
Viburnum and Camellia Garden
Park Use and Zones
Alpine Tower
Ropes Course
Trails and Boardwalks
Mountain Biking
Wedding Garden Plan
Wedding Garden Perspective
Visitors Center
Phasing Plan

APPENDIX
Infared Site Map + Legal Boundaries
Soils Map + Soil Layer Diagram
Parking Lot + Invasives


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SSite Information






Duval County, Florida


Ducal County is located in North Florida near the border with Georgia and surrounds
the mouth of the St. Johns River, one of a small number of rivers in the world that
runs north.

The county is roughly 918 sq. mi. in a area of which 144.5 is water. Much of that
aquatic number is however comprised of area in the Atlantic Ocean.

The City of Jacksonville dominates the area of Duval County, only yeilding to Jack-
sonville Beach and the small city of Baldwin. Jacksonville is the largest city in the
US in terms of both population and land area smaller in land area only to some five
cities in Alaska.

The whole area was originally occupied by the Timucua people and was the site of
a Frech colony at Fort Caroline in 1564. Occupied later by the British and then the
Spanish, Jacksonville was made an official town in 1822, one year after it was ac-
quired by the United States.











SOURCE
The Official Website of the City of Jacksonville, Florida April 2011 www.coj,.net


























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icksonville Beach


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Demographics
People of Jacksonville


POPULATION -
2009 900,518
2015 941,900
2020 1,007,60[
Growth Rate 20[
Growth Rate 20[


METROPOLITAN


-2015
-2020


POPULATION REGIONAL
2009 .1537.294
201F 1,l ,100,l
202b0 1,813,900
Growth Rate 2009 2015
Growth Rate 2009 2020

Households
Average Household Income
Media Household Income


AGE
0-17

35-54
55A64
65-79i

Meoian


5.1%
11.8%


8.1%
17.9%


24.7%
24.2%
28.9%
11%
8%
3.3%
35.8


RA E AND ETHNICITY
Ca casian
Af ican-American
His anic
Asin
Na ive American
Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Two or more races
Other


$371,435
$59,471
$48.312


SlURCES ?
The DFicial Website of the Bty f Jacksonville, Florida- April 'I201 w w col net
Florida Geographic Data Library US C nsus Block Groups 2D00
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30.8%

4.0%
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POPULATI DENSITY SEPEIRAtEBY CESIUSBLOCK





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History
A century of neglect.


About 1888, site was part of the Jacksonville,
Mayport R Pablo Railroad R Navigation Co.

Site used for mining Rutile, ilmenite, zircon,
and monazite (titanium) in 1944.

The City of Jacksonville acquired the parcel
as a buffer in the 1970's.

A dammed pond, now called Lake Ray, and a
borrow pit were built sometime between 1972
and 1975.


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Board of Directors


The Board of Directors is comprised of community leaders
who volunteer their time and expertise because they believe
in the mission of the organization and its value to the com-
munity-at-large.

The primary roll of the Board of Directors is to provide lead-
ership in determining organizational policy, insuring financial
stability, and supervising staff and resources.

Currently, the board is also the staff of the Arboretum and
participates in all aspects of the park including: site plan-
ning, site development, events, programs, fundraising and
management.

As money becomes available to hire staff, the board will
transition to a more traditional role and will launch its first
facilities capital campaign.





SOURCE
Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 200B









Lynda R. Aycock, Chair
Thomas Atkins
Elyse Bekiempis
Zim Boulos
President, Office Environments and Systems
Valerie Feinberg
Becky Mariotti Hamilton
Project Manager, Gate Petroleum Company/GL National, Inc.
Murray F. "Lad" Hawkins
Landscape Architect, Genesis Group
Michelle Hendryx, Corporate Secretary
Senior Scientist, Environmental Services, Inc.
Elmar von Kurzbach
Danny Lippi- Master Naturalist
Rachael Sulkers
Project Scientist, Environmental Services, Inc.
Merrill Varn
Varn Turpentine & Cattle Co.
Carol Wyninger
Master Naturalist (retired)

Judith P. Stevens, Ph.D
Founder
Gail Beverage
William Bishop
Vice President, Akel, Logan, Shafer, PA
Meg Gaffney
Landscape Architect, Blue Leaf Landscape
Trish Gramajo
Northeast FL Community Relations Manager, The Nature Conservancy
Mindy Hawkins
Independent Artist
Early Piety
Arborist, Tree Preservation Specialists
Carlton Higginbotham






CONSERVATION
Create large tracts of open space
Eradicte invasive species
Water Conservation
Responsible Use of Chemicals

TEACHING B RESEARCH
Create an outdoor laboratory for plant and eci
exploration
Create programs for public education and ex

COLLECTION
Maintain and develop plant collections
Native plant use
Provide seasonal interest

RECREATION
Create isolated zones of passive recreation
Integrate active recreation
Mitigate conflicts with natural world














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LAND USE: Public Buildings and Facilities
ZONING: Public Buildings and Facilities

The Jacksonville Arboretum is zoned "PBF"
because under the City of Jacksonvile
Ordinances this zone allows() agriculture
and related uses such as... conservation,
recreation... Natural conservation areas are
also permitted."


I Residential C
-

- Commercial O

Park Land + Open Space
t-
- Infrastructure

Wetland + Open Water

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Natural Features
You thought Florida was flat.

The Rosemary Scrub area is a fire-maintained
community composed of evergreen shrubs
found in the most infertile, dry sandy ridges
of the central third of the Arboretum.

Jones Creek bisects the southern third of the
Arboretum and then runs northward along the
eastern boundary. There are several feeder
creeks: one in the ravine area, a second just
south of the southern mined area, and a third
between the two upland mined areas.

Lake Ray is a man-made pond that was built
sometime between 1972 and 1975. It has prop-
erties similar to a plastic upland lake.

The Bottnmland EneBst is situated in a the
remains of a borrow pit that was dug between
1972 and 1975. The area is slighty overrun
With loblolly pines that were planted to stabi-
lize the pit following the excavation.














































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Stakeholders
The people who need convincing.



The analysis of stakeholders is a the
basis for the generation of potential '
amneticites and activities. This process
identifies those who will most likely be
influences by or benefit from the Arbo-
retum and its initiatives.

This graphic represents those primary
and secondary stakeholders associated
with the Jacksonville Arboretum and
Gardens. Imput and further analysis of
these stakeholders provides insight that
will inform future additions and poten-
tial programming.

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JEAARLINGTON EAST
WATER RECLAMATION
FACILITY






1-295 / SR 9A







ATLANTIC SELF/RV Et BOAT
STORAGE


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Major Ecosystems


The Rosemary Scrub area is a fire-
maintained community composed of
evergreen shrubs found in the most
infertile, dry sandy ridges of the central
third of the Arboretum.

Jones Creek bisects the southern
third of the Arboretum and then runs
northward along the eastern boundary.
There are several feeder creeks: one
in the ravine area, a second just south
of the southern mined area, and a third
between the two upland mined areas.

Lake Ray is a man-made pond that was
built sometime between 1972 and 1975.
It has properties similar to a plastic
upland lake.

The Bottomland Forest is situtated in
a the remains of a borrow pit that was
dug between 1972 and 1975. The area is
slighty overrun with loblolly pines that
were planted to stabilize the pit follow-
ing the excavation.


FLOODBaPLAINMAA






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Soils and Hydrology


The Rosemary Scrub area is a fire-
maintained community composed of
evergreen shrubs found in the most
infertile, dry sandy ridges of the central
third of the Arboretum.
Jones Creek bisects the southern
third of the Arboretum and then runs
northward along the eastern boundary.
There are several feeder creeks: one
in the ravine area, a second just south
of the southern mined area, and a third
between the two upland mined areas.
Lake Ray is a man-made pond that was
built sometime between 1972 and 1975.
It has properties similar to a plastic
upland lake.
The Bottomland Forest is situtated in
a the remains of a borrow pit that was
dug between 1972 and 1975. The area is
slighty overrun with loblolly pines that
were planted to stabilize the pit follow-
ing the excavation.


S Residential

-[ Commercial

Park Land + Open Space

- Infrastructure

I Wetland + Open Water

Park Land + Open Space

- Infrastructure

WI Wetland + Open Water


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Final Site Analysis


The Rosemary Scrub area is a fire-maintained
community composed of evergreen shrubs
found in the most infertile, dry sandy ridges
of the central third of the Arboretum.

Jones Creek bisects the southern third of the
Arboretum and then runs northward along the
eastern boundary.
*Note: More Site Analysis can be found in the Appendix


EXISTING
TRAIL


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SOUND
INTERFERENCE


PRESERVABLE
EDGE


POWERLINE
EASEMENT


OPEN VIEWS


IMPORTANT
TRAIL
INTERSECTION















JONES CREEK
FLOODPLAIN

























CHAMPION
BOBLOLLY
BAYGALL



JONES CREEK
BOTTOMLAND
FOREST


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Zone 1 Lake Ray and Bottomland
Forest

Activites are easily accessed from the parking lot and
surround the main focal point, Lake Ray. Trails around the
lake are service vehicle accessible and all trails in this zone
are handicap accessible.

OPPORTUNITIES
Large paths already earned around Lake Ray
Clearable vegetation north of Lake Ray
Existing Parking lot
Open space suitable for a building
Varied topography
Open, recessed space at lake edge
Many areas of moderate to deep shade )

CONSTRAINTS 0)
Thick and invasive vegetation
High ridges and floodable space
Impact of JEA water plant (smell/noise)

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p 2 Xeric Hammock and Rosemary Scrub

OPPORTUNITIES
Varied and interesting ecosystems
Views into Jones River Flood plain

CONSTRAINTS
Thick vegetation
Smaller trees and less shaded spaces
Distance from main entrance


; 3 Maple Hammock and Jones Flood Plain
OPPORTUNITIES
Varied and interesting ecosystems
Views into Jones River Flood plain

CONSTRAINTS
Road edge and noise
Power station at north edge

4 North Woods and Active Exercise Area
OPPORTUNITIES
Developed hardwood hammock
Natural state isolated from views of suburbia C

CONSTRAINTS
Invasive species in understory Q)
Distance from main entrance
(f)






TRAILS


COLLECTION
GARDENS


WEDDING GARDEN


LOOKOUT TOWERS


LEr "ar-


ALPINE TOWER


STREET ACCESS


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ART FESTIVALS


MOUNTAIN BIKING


When stakeholders are compared to
the potential activities or amenities,
a balance of elements geared
toward multiple stakeholders or
groups emerges to bring more
people to the Arboretum as well
as to garner more supporters or
donors.


'Size of circle correlates to stakeholder value.


PARKING



DEMO GARDENS


SHOWCASE PAVILION


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HABITAT
; RESTORATION






















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City of Jacksonville
Garden Club of Jacksonville, Inc.
Rose Garden Circle
Alderman Park Garden Circle
Bartram Campus, Bolles Environmental Club
Jacksonville Section, ASLA
King & Queens Garden Circle
North Florida Bonsai Club
Mandarin Garden Club
Pinnochio Rose Garden Circle
St. Augustine Garden Circle
W. Lasch Nature Photography
American Hibiscus Society
American Ivy Society
American Landscape Maintenance Association ()
American Orchid Socitey
- Association of Florida Native Nurseries
First Coast Koi, Goldfish & Water Garden Society
Florida Daffodil Society
Florida East Coast Bromeliad Society
Florida Fern Growers Association
Florida Forestry Association
Florida Herb Society
Florida Native Plant Society
Florida Turfgrass Association
Heliconia Society of Florida
Heart of Jacksonville African Violet Society
- Jacksonville Rose Society O
Jacksonville Bromeliad Society
Mandarin Garden Club
Laurel Garden Circle
First Coast Invasive Working Group
Hardscape Construction, Inc.
Lake Ray
Confederate Jasmine Garden Circle
Ervin Lovett & Miller l
Garden Center Newcomers
Greenscape of Jacksonville
North East Florida Landscape Association
Specialty Tree Surgeons L
Turning Leaf Yard Service
Violet Garden Circle
University of Florida Duval County Extension








































































































































































































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COLLECTION GARDENS


WEDDING GARDEN


SHOWCASE PAVILION


LOBLOLLY HAMMOCK


TRAILS AND BOARDWALKS


ALPINE TOWER


MOUNTAIN BIKING AREA


IMPORTANT TRAIL INTERSECTION


ROSEMARY SCRUB


LOOKOUT TOWER


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DRY POND BED
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DRY POND BED --^_^ 2 HAMMOCK ;
f' : HAMMOCK

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TREATMENT / --
FACILITY -

SOUND/SMELL ... -S
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-BUFFER -.- j .\
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JONES CREEK
TIDAL MARSHLAND


CHAMPION
LOBLOLLY
BAYGALL



JONES CREEK
BOTTOMLAND
FOREST


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CHAMPION
LOBLOLLY
BAYGALL




JONES CREEK
BOTTOMLAND
FOREST


The conceptual plan incorporates the garden spaces in an area
that is ripe for undergrowth clearing of crowded shrubs and inva-
sives. Utilizing existing paths, the collection gardens will include
the Champion Loblolly Baygall as well as offering an interesting
array of topography for visitors.

A wedding garden will be located at the west end of Lake Ray as
well as pavilion on the east end. These opposite amneties will serve
for functions and group events taking place in the park.

An alpine tower and ropes course will be incorporated into the
sprawling xeric hammick and hardwood forest areas north of the
collection gardens. The ropes course will allow visitors to take a
tour through the canopy of the forest a unique and exhilirating
experience that is hard to find in this region of the country.

Buffering will need to be incorporated into the area north of the
parking lot to block out smells from the neighboring JEA water
treatment plant. This will accomplished through thick planting of
ceder as well as berming when possible.


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The north area of the arboretum will be dominated by trails that
JONES CREEK lead through the dmany distinct ecosytems present on the site. Ac-
TIDAL MARSHLAND cess will be created on the north end of the site and parking added
to allow users that wish to use some of the these amneties better
access.

Mountain bike will be added to the north west end of the property
to tie active programming into the site. Trails will be cut for riding
however they will be smaller and less invasive than even pedes-
trian trails.

Protection of the rosemary scrub and dry pond will continue (0
through limited trail development in that area.
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BOTTOMLAND (
FOREST

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Structure
. Balance
Duality


Park Use and
Zones


SStakeholder Based
SInterest Creation Plan
Fundraising


Pest Management
Native Species
Relocation


Phased
Implementation


Wildlife Habitat
Conservation


SPlant Inventory
Preservation
Recovery


Natural Resource
Preservation


Arboretum

Management

Strategy
















Recreation


Collection


Active Programming
Safety:
Infrastructure


Documentation Inventory Plan
Themes
Teaching


Education
Art
Ecology.


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Interperative
Programs


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PRESERVATION OF OUTSTANDING LAND-
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XERIC HAMMOCK AND ROSEMARY SCRUB

LOBLOLLY BAYGALL

BOTTOMLAND FOREST AT JONES CREEK

TIDAL PLAIN AT JONES CREEK



0 MITIGATION OF DISTURBED LANDSCAPES

MESIC HARDWOOD UNDERSTORY

I UPLAND HARDWOOD UNDERSTORY


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The purpose of the Jacksonville Arboretum
collection is to encourage the appreciation,
understanding, maintenance and use of trees,
woody shrubs, and other plants, in northeast
Florida by demonstrating the value of plants in our
daily lives.

The Arboretum's collection policy anticipates that
its signature collections will include native plants
with a special emphasis on the plants which are
native to Duval, Baker, Nassau, Clay and St. Johns
counties


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Florida's various plant communities contain many native
species of shrubs suitable for landscaping. In recent
years, interest in the use of native plants for Florida
landscaping has greatly increased. Some of the reasons
for this include the loss to development of natural areas
in the state, coastal deterioration due to disturbance
of native vegetation, and concern about water use to
support exotic landscapes composed of introduced
species with greater irrigation requirements than some
native species.


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Edible berry and fruit plants are an essential staple to the Florida
economy as well as the character of the North Florida region.
The berries or fruit used in this garden are all natives that are
either cultivated or grow wild in the region.

These plants usually require a slight more acidic soil and will
do well in the highly to slightly acidic Kershaw and Leon soild
present in this area of the Arboretum.

The partial shade of established trees with be slightly
problematic for fruit production, but the selective pruning and
clearing of trees with open light pockets suitable for most
varieties.
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Azaleas in Florida bloom from late February to early
April, depending upon cultivar and seasonal variation.
Partial shade under the pine trees and spaced
hardwoods provides ample conditions for healthy growth
and optimum flowering. Hundreds of different varieties
of azaleas are grown in Florida.


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) Florida has II natives species of holly (ilex). The
flowers of some species such as Ilex glabra are
important honey plants. The fruit of hollies are
distinctive and often showy.
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magnolias grows best in moist, rich soils in full
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Florida has five native species of viburnum; all five are found
in north Florida, while none occur south of Lake Okeechobee. Q)
They tend to be found in shady woods of various kinds. The three E
species that prefer wet woodlands are on Florida's list of wetland
plant species.

The climatic conditions of North Florida are well suited for +
many camellia varieties. Florida's camellias will perform well in
this partially shaded location which is enhanced by good water E
drainage and air movement. Thousands of camellia varieties are
offered by commercial nurseries and many are introduced each
year from seedlings and mutations. Varieties with single tiered
or double flowers are available with colors from pure white
to brilliant crimson and combinations of colors in numerous
patterns.


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) ACTIVE RECREATION


Active recreation requires more intense development and
often involves cooperative or team activities. The activities
planned for the Arboretum a "alpine" climbing tower, con-
nected ropes course, and mountain biking area serve to
create a viable option for exercise in the community and give
the Arboretum a unique set of qualities not found in the re-
gion. The usership created by these activities and subsequent
community ownership could evolve into a driving force in the
expansion of the Arboretums initiatives.

The organization of these spaces is strictly different than that
of passive recreation because it involves varying speeds of
movement by patrons. Buffering these spaces from those that 0)
are to be used by passive visitors helps to reduce conflicts
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PASSIVE RECREATION

Passive recreation by definatition is ambiguous in the sense )
that users are free to use the space without a strict program.
The spaces are inherently used by less intense activities such
as strolling, sitting, and enjoying scenic views. In many in-
stances, open spaces that attempt to integrate active areas
with these passive spaces find their users disheartened by the
disruption.
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An Alpine Tower is a tall structure utilized in a "challenge
course" that engages users in team based activities fostering
communication and self-esteem. A single structure can
accomidate 8 to 3B participants. There are a variety of
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The Arboretum ropes course would an extension of
the Alpine Tower activity area and give participants
a chance to experience a level of the forest that was
before, unreachable.

Supervision for this activity would be required and the
Arboretum could arrange group trips on weekends. The
ropes course is a hybrid between those wishing a fun
and exhilirating activity and those interested in various
subjects such as ecology, horticulture, and biology.






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S Mountain biking is a very active sport that brings people of all ages
together for some health and exercise in the outdoors. Because of
the interesting topography and wooded nature of the Arboretum, a
mountain biking course would be appropriate and beneficial to the
property, by adding interest, usage, and support by citizens.

The north parking area can serve the biking and the distance from the
main gardens would serve as a buffer to keep walking patrons from
the fast moving bikers. Street access would provide limited access and
could be controlled by a gate after hours.

Currently there are very few registered locations in Jacksonville where 1
riders can have such a natural course while being in close proximity to
the city center.
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The trails and boardwalks of the Arboretum
as the product of the hard work of volunteers
and board members who brave the untamed
areas of the park and clear brush and debris
for visitors. Portions of trails are blocked to
visitors until they are safe.

Continued expansion of trails will be under- O
taken in this manner in order to keep the
integrity of ecosystems. Path markers will be
better instituted to make sure navigation is
as easy as possible.

Some site elements such as trash cans and
benches will be added to maintain the park
like atmosphere of the site.
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The Wedding Garden serves the Arboretum in two capaci-
ties. First, it takes advantage of the spectacular views
across Lake Ray and to the opposite shore. Second, and
most importantly for a fledging Arboretum, it serves as a
revenue and interest generator.

Early implementation of a wedding garden could be criti-
cal to furthering the Arboretum's abitions and other pro-
grams. With minimal infrastructure the Arboretum could
have such a garden functional for such occasions in a very
short time.


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near the entrance for such a structure has a great potential for programming and intro-
ductory elements. A visitor's center near the wedding garden would serve as a gathering
place for receptions or meetings as well as house exhibits the Arboretum acquires through "
research or educational efforts.






YEAR 1-5
Wedding Garden
Restroom Structure
Trail Expansion
Invasive and Undergrowth Clearing
Signage Integration

YEAR 5-10
Mountain Biking Zone
kExpanded Shrub Specimen Gardens
Group Pavilion
Full Boardwalk Trail through Bottomland For
Art Installations


YEAR 10+
Alpine Tower
Expanded Garden Collections
North Trail Access and Parking
Expanded Ropes Course
Visitors Center


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The phasing plan is organized in order to institute low cost
and wider reaching improvements in the first five years.
The wedding garden will serve as a generator for other
amenities.

Mountain biking trails can be mapped after a few years
of trail expansion into that area of the park. It would also
require street access and proper security planning which
accounts for pushing it to after 5 years. Garden expan-
sions and a pavilion for meeting on the east side of Lake
Ray will further generate interest in the Arboretum and
hopefully garner investment or donation.

The alpine tower and visitor's center are both additions
that are defendant upon investment rather than making
the space for them. Should funds become available at an
earlier time, their addition could be hastened.


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Infrared Site Map
Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010




Full Text

PAGE 1

benjamin boyd

PAGE 3

Jacksonville ARBORETUMAND GARDENSA SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECTBY Benjamin Wayne Boyd April 14th, 2011 PREPARED FOR THE University of Florida College of Design, Construction, and Planning Department of Landscape Architecture

PAGE 5

Acknowledgements Ben would like to thank: Lad Hawkins of Genesis Group for intrducing me to the Arboretum during my internship. Bob Grist for his guidence during this semester. My girlfriend, Sarah for putting up with late nights in the studio. My classmates Marco, Will, James, Shawn, Nick W, Nick D, and Dan for making said studio nights a blast.

PAGE 7

Table of Contents SITE INFORMATION Site Location Duval County Florida Demographics History Board of Directors + Stakeholders Goals and Objectives Natural Features Stakeholder Analysis Existing Conditions SITE ANALYSIS Adjacent Lands Ecosystems + Ecology Soils + Hydrology FINAL SITE ANALYSIS DESIGN SYNTHESIS FINAL SYNTHESIS ZONE 1 FINAL SYNTHESIS ZONE 2-4 Potential Activities Analysis Garden Stakeholder Analysis INITIAL CONCEPTS Conceptual Plan Conceptual Plan Detail 1 Conceptual Plan Detail 2 CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN FINAL MASTER PLAN Management Construct Natural Resource Preservation Wildlife Habitat Conservation Collection Gardens Woody Shrub Garden Berry and Fruit Garden Azelea Garden Holly and Magnolia Garden Viburnum and Camellia Garden Park Use and Zones Alpine Tower Ropes Course Trails and Boardwalks Mountain Biking Wedding Garden Plan Wedding Garden Perspective Visitors Center Phasing Plan APPENDIX Infared Site Map + Legal Boundaries Soils Map + Soil Layer Diagram Parking Lot + Invasives

PAGE 9

Site Information

PAGE 10

JAX ARB LOCATION: Jacksonville, Florida Duval County United States of America SIZE: 118.5 Acres The Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens is located near Mill Cove a portion of the St. Johns River. The site is a short drive from I-295, the circulator highway for the City of Jacksonville. The proximity to major transportation as well as the downtown makes it unique and important area for conservation as well as recreation.

PAGE 11

Site Information

PAGE 12

Duval County, FloridaDucal County is located in North Florida near the border with Georgia and surrounds the mouth of the St. Johns River, one of a small number of rivers in the world that runs north. The county is roughly 918 sq. mi. in a area of which 144.5 is water. Much of that aquatic number is however comprised of area in the Atlantic Ocean. The City of Jacksonville dominates the area of Duval County, only yeilding to Jacksonville Beach and the small city of Baldwin. Jacksonville is the largest city in the US in terms of both population and land area smaller in land area only to some ve cities in Alaska. The whole area was orignally occupied by the Timucua people and was the site of a Frech colony at Fort Caroline in 1564. Occupied later by the British and then the Spanish, Jacksonville was made an of cial town in 1822, one year after it was acquired by the United States. SOURCE The Of cial Website of the City of Jacksonville, Florida April 2011 www.coj,.net

PAGE 14

DemographicsPeople of JacksonvillePOPULATION METROPOLITAN 2009 900,518 2015 946,900 2020 1,007,600 Growth Rate 2009 2015 5.1% Growth Rate 2009 2020 11.8% POPULATION REGIONAL 2009 1,537,294 2015 1,663,100 2020 1,813,900 Growth Rate 2009 2015 8.1% Growth Rate 2009 2020 17.9% Households $371,435 Average Household Income $59,471 Median Household Income $46,312 AGE 0-17 24.7% 18-34 24.2% 35-54 28.9% 55-64 11% 65-79 8% 80+ 3.3% Median Age 35.8 RACE AND ETHNICITY Caucasian 61.4% African-American 30.8% Hispanic 6.6% Asian 4.0% Native American 0.3% Hawaiian/Paci c Islander 0% Two or more races 1.2% Other 2.3% SOURCES The Of cial Website of the City of Jacksonville, Florida April 2011 www.coj,.net Florida Geographic Data Library US Census Block Groups 2000

PAGE 15

POPULATION DENSITY SEPERATED BY CENSUS BLOCK

PAGE 16

1943 HistoryA century of neglect. About 1888, site was part of the Jacksonville, Mayport & Pablo Railroad & Navigation Co. Site used for mining Rutile, ilmenite, zircon, and monazite (titanium) in 1944. The City of Jacksonville acquired the parcel as a buffer in the 1970’s. A dammed pond, now called Lake Ray, and a borrow pit were built sometime between 1972 and 1975.

PAGE 17

DEVLOPMENT HAS OCCURED WITH LITTLE DISTURBANCE TO THE SITE THE JEA WATER TREATMENT PLANT WAS1988 1975 1960BUILT AROUND 1985

PAGE 18

Board of DirectorsThe Board of Directors is comprised of community leaders who volunteer their time and expertise because they believe in the mission of the organization and its value to the community-at-large. The primary roll of the Board of Directors is to provide leadership in determining organizational policy, insuring nancial stability, and supervising staff and resources. Currently, the board is also the staff of the Arboretum and participates in all aspects of the park including: site planning, site development, events, programs, fundraising and management. As money becomes available to hire staff, the board will transition to a more traditional role and will launch its rst facilities capital campaign.SOURCE Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 2006

PAGE 19

Lynda R. Aycock, Chair Thomas Atkins Elyse Bekiempis Zim Boulos President, Of ce Environments and Systems Valerie Feinberg Becky Mariotti Hamilton Project Manager, Gate Petroleum Company/GL National, Inc. Murray F. “Lad” Hawkins Landscape Architect, Genesis Group Michelle Hendryx, Corporate Secretary Senior Scientist, Environmental Services, Inc. Elmar von Kurzbach Danny LippiMaster Naturalist Rachael Sulkers Project Scientist, Environmental Services, Inc. Merrill Varn Varn Turpentine & Cattle Co. Carol Wyninger Master Naturalist (retired) Judith P. Stevens, Ph.D Founder Gail Beverage William Bishop Vice President, Akel, Logan, Shafer, PA Meg Gaffney Landscape Architect, Blue Leaf Landscape Trish Gramajo Northeast FL Community Relations Manager, The Nature Conservancy Mindy Hawkins Independent Artist Early Piety Arborist, Tree Preservation Specialists Carlton Higginbotham

PAGE 20

CONSERVATION Create large tracts of open space Eradicte invasive species Water Conservation Responsible Use of Chemicals TEACHING & RESEARCH Create an outdoor labratory for plant and ec o exploration Create programs for public education and ex p COLLECTION Maintain and develop plant collections Native plant use Provide seasonal interest RECREATION Create isulated zones of passive recreation Integrate active recreation Mitigate con icts with natural world

PAGE 21

Goals and Objectives o sytem p loration

PAGE 23

LAND USE: Public Buildings and Facilities ZONING: Public Buildings and Facilities The Jacksonville Arboretum is zoned “PBF” because under the City of Jacksonvile Ordinances this zone “allow(s) agriculture and related uses such as... conservation, recreation... Natural conservation areas are also permitted.” Land Use and Zoning Residential Commercial Park Land + Open Space Infrastructure Wetland + Open Water

PAGE 24

Natural FeaturesYou thought Florida was flat. The Rosemary Scrub area is a re-maintained community composed of evergreen shrubs found in the most infertile, dry sandy ridges of the central third of the Arboretum. Jones Creek bisects the southern third of the Arboretum and then runs northward along the eastern boundary. There are several feeder creeks: one in the ravine area, a second just south of the southern mined area, and a third between the two upland mined areas. Lake Ray is a man-made pond that was built sometime between 1972 and 1975. It has properties similar to a clastic upland lake. The Bottomland Forest is situtated in a the remains of a borrow pit that was dug between 1972 and 1975. The area is slighty overrun with loblolly pines that were planted to stabilize the pit following the excavation.

PAGE 26

StakeholdersThe people who need convincing.The analysis of stakeholders is a the basis for the generation of potential amneticites and activities. This process identi es those who will most likely be in uences by or bene t from the Arboretum and its initiatives. This graphic represents those primary and secondary stakeholders associated with the Jacksonville Arboretum and Gardens. Imput and further analysis of these stakeholders provides insight that will inform future additions and potential programming. n n c c c c i i i n n n g g g s s s s s a a a a t t t t h h h h e e e e e t t t t e e n n n t t t t i i i i a a a a a l l l l i i i s s s s s p p p r r r r r o o o o o c c c e e e e e e s s s s s s s s l l l l l i i i k k k e e e l l l l y y y b b b b e e e t t t h h h h e e e A A A A r r r r b b b o o o e e e p p p r r r i i i m m m m a a a r r r y y y y a a a s s s s s s s s s o o o o c c c i i i a a a t t t t e e e e d d d u u m m m m a a a n n n d d d n n n a a a a a l l l y y y y s s s s i i i s s s s o o o o f f f f n n n n n s s s i i i g g g g h h h t t t t t t t t t h h h a a a t t t t t n n n d d d d d p p p o o o o t t t t e e e n n n n

PAGE 29

Existing Conditions

PAGE 31

Site Analysis

PAGE 32

ADJACENT PROPERTIES LOCATION: Jacksonville, Florida Duval County USA SIZE: 118.5 Acres JEA ARLINGTON EAST WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY I-295 / SR 9A ATLANTIC SELF/RV & BOAT STORAGE

PAGE 33

MILL COVEHOLLY OAKS LAKEJAXARB ADVANCE AUTO PARTS WETLAND

PAGE 34

U P L A N D M I X E D F O R ES T A N D M I X E D S A N D H I L L U P L A N D U P L A N D S N D H I L L U F L O O D P L A I N M A R S H S H S H F L O O D P L A I N M A R S X E R I C H A M M O C K X E R I C H O C B O T T O M L A N D FO RE S T O R A N D FO RE S T Major Ecosystems The Rosemary Scrub area is a remaintained community composed of evergreen shrubs found in the most infertile, dry sandy ridges of the central third of the Arboretum. Jones Creek bisects the southern third of the Arboretum and then runs northward along the eastern boundary. There are several feeder creeks: one in the ravine area, a second just south of the southern mined area, and a third between the two upland mined areas. Lake Ray is a man-made pond that was built sometime between 1972 and 1975. It has properties similar to a clastic upland lake. The Bottomland Forest is situtated in a the remains of a borrow pit that was dug between 1972 and 1975. The area is slighty overrun with loblolly pines that were planted to stabilize the pit following the excavation.

PAGE 36

Soils and Hydrology The Rosemary Scrub area is a remaintained community composed of evergreen shrubs found in the most infertile, dry sandy ridges of the central third of the Arboretum. Jones Creek bisects the southern third of the Arboretum and then runs northward along the eastern boundary. There are several feeder creeks: one in the ravine area, a second just south of the southern mined area, and a third between the two upland mined areas. Lake Ray is a man-made pond that was built sometime between 1972 and 1975. It has properties similar to a clastic upland lake. The Bottomland Forest is situtated in a the remains of a borrow pit that was dug between 1972 and 1975. The area is slighty overrun with loblolly pines that were planted to stabilize the pit following the excavation. Residential Commercial Park Land + Open Space Park Land + Open Space Infrastructure Infrastructure Wetland + Open Water Wetland + Open Water

PAGE 38

Final Site Analysis IMPORTANT TRAIL INTERSECTION OPEN VIEWS POWERLINE EASEMENT PRESERVABLE EDGE SOUND INTERFERENCE EXISTING TRAIL The Rosemary Scrub area is a re-maintained community composed of evergreen shrubs found in the most infertile, dry sandy ridges of the central third of the Arboretum. Jones Creek bisects the southern third of the Arboretum and then runs northward along the eastern boundary. *Note: More Site Analysis can be found in the Appendix

PAGE 39

MAPLE HAMMOCK XERIC HAMMOCK JEA WATER TREATMENT FACILITY UPLAND MIXED FOREST JONES CREEK BOTTOMLAND FOREST CHAMPION BOBLOLLY BAYGALL JONES CREEK FLOODPLAIN BORROW PIT RAVINE DRY POND BED PARKING LOT ROSEMARY SCRUB

PAGE 41

Design Synthesis

PAGE 42

4 3 3 2 2 1 1

PAGE 43

3 2 1 Site SynthesisActivites are easily accessed from the parking lot and surround the main focal point, Lake Ray. Trails around the lake are service vehicle accessible and all trails in this zone are handicap accessible. OPPORTUNITIES Large paths already carned around Lake Ray Clearable vegetation north of Lake Ray Existing Parking lot Open space suitable for a building Varied topography Open, recessed space at lake edge Many areas of moderate to deep shade CONSTRAINTS Thick and invasive vegatation High ridges and oodable space Impact of JEA water plant (smell/noise)Zone 1 Lake Ray and Bottomland Forest

PAGE 44

4 3 2 1 Zon e Zon e Zon e

PAGE 45

Site SynthesisOPPORTUNITIES Varied and interesting ecosystems Views into Jones River Flood plain CONSTRAINTS Thick vegetation Smaller trees and less shaded spacesDistance from main entranceOPPORTUNITIES Varied and interesting ecosystems Views into Jones River Flood plain CONSTRAINTS Road edge and noise Power station at north edge OPPORTUNITIES Developed hardwood hammock Natural state isolated from views of suburbia CONSTRAINTS Invasive species in understory Distance from main entrance e 2 Xeric Hammock and Rosemary Scrub e 3 Maple Hammock and Jones Flood Plain e 4 North Woods and Active Exercise Area

PAGE 46

COLLECTION GARDENS WEDDDING GARDEN LOOKOUT TOWERS ALPINE TOWER STREET ACCESS TRAILS

PAGE 47

MOUNTAIN BIKING PARKING DEMO GARDENS ART FESTIVALS Potential Activities Analysis When stakeholders are compared to the potential activities or amenities, a balance of elements geared towared multiple stakeholders or groups emerges to bring more people to the Arboretum as well as to garner more supporters or donors.*Size of circle correlates to stakeholder value.SHOWCASE PAVILION HABITAT RESTORATION

PAGE 49

City of Jacksonville Garden Club of Jacksonville, Inc. Rose Garden Circle Alderman Park Garden Circle Bartram Campus, Bolles Environmental Club Jacksonville Section, ASLA King & Queens Garden Circle North Florida Bonsai Club Mandarin Garden Club Pinnochio Rose Garden Circle St. Augustine Garden Circle W. Lasch Nature Photography American Hibiscus Society American Ivy Society American Landscape Maintenance Association American Orchid Socitey Association of Florida Native Nurseries First Coast Koi, Gold sh & Water Garden Society Florida Daffodil Society Florida East Coast Bromeliad Society Florida Fern Growers Association Florida Forestry Association Florida Herb Society Florida Native Plant Society Florida Turfgrass Association Heliconia Society of Florida Heart of Jacksonville African Violet Society Jacksonville Rose Society Jacksonville Bromeliad Society Mandarin Garden Club Laurel Garden Circle First Coast Invasive Working Group Hardscape Construction, Inc. Lake Ray Confederate Jasmine Garden Circle Ervin Lovett & Miller Garden Center Newcomers Greenscape of Jacksonville North East Florida Landscape Association Specialty Tree Surgeons Turning Leaf Yard Service Violet Garden Circle University of Florida Duval County Extension Garden Stakeholder Analysis

PAGE 51

Initial Concepts

PAGE 52

COLLECTION GARDENS WEDDING GARDEN SHOWCASE PAVILION LOBLOLLY HAMMOCK TRAILS AND BOARDWALKS ALPINE TOWER MOUNTAIN BIKING AREA IMPORTANT TRAIL INTTERSECTION ROSEMARY SCRUB LOOKOUT TOWER STREET ACCES S

PAGE 53

Conceptual Plan MAPLE HAMMOCK NORTH PARKING S XERIC HAMMOCK JEA WATER TREATMENT FACILITY JONES CREEK BOTTOMLAND FOREST CHAMPION LOBLOLLY BAYGALL JONES CREEK TIDAL MARSHLAND BORROW PIT RAVINE PARKING SOUND/SMELL BUFFER DRY POND BED

PAGE 54

XERIC HAMMOCK JEA WATER TREATMENT FACILITY BORROW PIT RAVINE PARKING SOUND/SMELL BUFFER DRY POND BED

PAGE 55

JONES CREEK BOTTOMLAND FOREST CHAMPION LOBLOLLY BAYGALL The conceptual plan incorporates the garden spaces in an area that is ripe for undergrowth clearing of crowded shrubs and invasives. Utilizing exisiting paths, the collection gardens will include the Champion Loblolly Baygall as well as offering an interesting array of topography for visitors. A wedding garden will be located at the west end of Lake Ray as well as pavilion on the east end. These opposite amneties will serve for functions and group events taking place in the park. An alpine tower and ropes course will be incorporated into the sprawling xeric hammick and hardwood forest areas north of the collection gardens. The ropes course will allow visitors to take a tour through the canopy of the forest a unique and exhilirating experience that is hard to nd in this region of the country. Buffering will need to be incorporated into the area north of the parking lot to block out smells from the neighboring JEA water treatment plant. This will accomplished through thick planting of ceder as well as berming when possible. Garden Stakeholder Analysis

PAGE 56

MAPLE HAMMOCK NORTH PARKINGSTREET ACCESSXERIC HAMMOCK JEA WATER TREATMENT FACILITY BORROW PIT RAVINE PARKING SOUND/SMELL BUFFER DRY POND BED

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JONES CREEK BOTTOMLAND FOREST CHAMPION LOBLOLLY BAYGALL JONES CREEK TIDAL MARSHLAND The north area of the arboretum will be dominated by trails that lead through the dmany distinct ecosytems present on the site. Access will be created on the north end of the site and parking added to allow users that wish to use some of the these amneties better access. Mountain bike will be added to the north west end of the property to tie active programming int o the site. Trails will be cut for riding however they will be smaller and less invasive than even pedestrian trails. Protection of the rosemary scrub and dry pond will continue through limited trail development in that area. Garden Stakeholder Analysis

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Master Plan

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ALPINE TOWER MOUNTAIN BIKING LOBLOLLY BAYGALL LOOKOUT TOWER ROSEMARY SCRUBLIVE OAK TRAIL ROSEMARY RIDGE TRAIL LOOKOUT TRAIL MAPLE HAMMOCK TRAIL MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS NORTH HARDWOOD TRAILSNORTH PARKINGFORT CAROLINE ROAD MERRILL ROAD

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Jacksonville ARBORETUMAND GARDENSA SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECTBY Benjamin Wayne BoydWEDDING GARDEN COLLECTION GARDENSLAKE RAYLOWER RAVINE TRAIL LAKE TRAIL PAVILION SOUTH HARDWOOD TRAIL JONES CREEK TRAILMILCOE ROADMONUMENT ROAD AZELEAS GARDEN VIBURNUM AND ROSES GARDEN HOLLY AND MAGNOLIA GARDEN BERRY GARDEN WOOD SHRUBS GARDEN INTERSTATE 295

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Arboretum Mangement StrategyPhased Implementation Wildlife Habitat Conservation Natural Resource Preservation Park Use and Zones Plant Inventory Preservation Recovery Pest Management Native Species Relocation Stakeholder Based Interest Creation Plan Fundraising Structure Balance Quality

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Management Construct Interperative Programs Collection Recreation Active Programming Safety Infrastructure Documentation Inventory Plan Themes Teaching Education Art Ecology

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Natural Resource PreservationPRESERVATION OF OUTSTANDING LANDSCAPES XERIC HAMMOCK AND ROSEMARY SCRUB LOBLOLLY BAYGALL BOTTOMLAND FOREST AT JONES CREEK TIDAL PLAIN AT JONES CREEK MITIGATION OF DISTURBED LANDSCAPES MESIC HARDWOOD UNDERSTORY UPLAND HARDWOOD UNDERSTORY

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Wildlife Habitat Conservation

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Collection Gardens The purpose of the Jacksonville Arboretum collection is to encourage the appreciation, understanding, maintenance and use of trees, woody shrubs, and other plants, in northeast Florida by demonstrating the value of plants in our daily lives. The Arboretum’s collection policy anticipates that its signature collections will include native plants with a special emphasis on the plants which are native to Duval, Baker, Nassau, Clay and St. Johns counties

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Florida’s various plant communities contain many native species of shrubs suitable for landscaping. In recent years, interest in the use of native plants for Florida landscaping has greatly increased. Some of the reasons for this include the loss to development of natural areas in the state, coastal deterioration due to disturbance of native vegetation, and concern about water use to support exotic landscapes composed of introduced species with greater irrigation requirements than some native species.

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Woody Shrub Garden

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Berry and Fruit GardenEdible berry and fruit plants are an essential staple to the Florida economy as well as the character of the North Florida region. The berries or fruit used in this garden are all natives that are either cultivated or grow wild in the region. These plants usually require a slighlt more acidic soil and will do well in the highly to slightly acidic Kershaw and Leon soild present in this area of the Arboretum. The partial shade of established trees with be slightly problematic for fruit production, but the selective pruning and clearing of trees with open light pockets suitable for most verieties.

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Azaleas in Florida bloom from late February to early April, depending upon cultivar and seasonal variation. Partial shade under the pine trees and spaced hardwoods provides ample conditions for healthy growth and optimum owering. Hundreds of different varieties of azaleas are grown in Florida.

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Azelea Garden

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Holly + Magnolia GardenFlorida has 11 natives species of holly (ilex). The owers of some species such as Ilex glabra are important honey plants. The fruit of hollies are distinctive and often showy. Adapted throughout north and central Florida, magnolias grows best in moist, rich soils in full sun.

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Viburnum + Camellia GardenFlorida has ve native species of viburnum; all ve are found in north Florida, while none occur south of Lake Okeechobee. They tend to be found in shady woods of various kinds. The three species that prefer wet woodlands are on Florida’s list of wetland plant species. The climatic conditions of North Florida are well suited for many camellia varieties. Florida’s camellias will perform well in this partially shaded location which is enhanced by good water drainage and air movement. Thousands of camellia varieties are offered by commercial nurseries and many are introduced each year from seedlings and mutations. Varieties with single tiered or double owers are available with colors from pure white to brilliant crimson and combinations of colors in numerous patterns.

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ACTIVE PASSIVE HYBRID PASSIVE J

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Park Use and ZonesACTIVE RECREATION Active recreation requires more intense development and often involves cooperative or team activities. The activities planned for the Arboretum a “alpine” climbing tower, connected ropes course, and mountain biking area serve to create a viable option for exercise in the community and give the Arboretum a unique set of qualities not found in the region. The usership created by these activities and subsequent community owenership could evolve into a driving force in the expansion of the Arboretums initiatives. The organazation of these spaces is strictly different than that of passive reacreation because it involves varying speeds of movement by patrons. Buffering these spaces from those that are to be used by passive visitors helps to reduce con icts that could leave a negative impression of the Arboretum as a whole. PASSIVE RECREATION Passive recreation by de natition is ambiguous in the sense that users are free to use the space without a strict program. The spaces are inherently used by less intense activities such as strolling, sitting, and enjoying scenic views. In many instances, open spaces that attempt to integrate active areas with these passive spaces nd their users disheartened by the disruption.

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Alpine Tower An Alpine Tower is a tall structure utilized in a “challenge course” that engages users in team based activities fostering communication and self-esteem. A single structure can accomidate 8 to 36 participants. There are a variety of challenges and can be coordinated to t different skill levels.

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Ropes Course The Arboretum ropes course would an extension of the Alpine Tower activity area and give participants a chance to experience a level of the forest that was before, unreachable. Supervision for this activity would be required and the Arboretum could arrange group trips on weekends. The ropes course is a hybrid between those wishing a fun and exhilirating activity and those intersted in various subjects such as ecology, horticulture, and biology.

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Mountain Biking Mountain biking is a very active sport that brings people of all ages together for some health and exercise in the outdoors. Because of the interesting topography and wooded nature of the Arboretum, a mountain biking course would be appropriate and bene cial to the property, by adding interest, usage, and support by citizens. The north parking area can serve the biking and the distance from the main gardens would serve as a buffer to keep walking patrons from the fast moving bikers. Street access would provide limited access and could be controlled by a gate after hours. Currently there are very few registered locations in Jacksonville where riders can have such a natural course while being in close proximity to the city center.

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Trails and Boardwalks The trails and boardwalks of the Arboretum as the product of the hard work of volunteers and board members who brave the untamed areas of the park and clear brush and debris for visitors. Portions of trails are blocked to visitors until they are safe. Continued expansion of trails will be undertaken in this manner in order to keep the integrity of ecosystems. Path markers will be better instituted to make sure navigation is as easy as possible. Some site elements such as trash cans and benches will be added to maintain the park like atmosphere of the site.

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Wedding Garden About 1888, site was part of the Jacksonville, Mayport & Pablo Railroad & Navigation Co. Site used for mining Rutile, ilmenite, zircon, and monazite (titanium) in 1944. The City of Jacksonville acquired the parcel as a buffer in the 1970’s. A dammed pond, now called Lake Ray, and a borrow pit were built sometime between 1972 and 1975. The Wedding Garden serves the Arboretum in two capacities. First, it takes advantage of the spectacular views across Lake Ray and to the opposite shore. Second, and most importantly for a edging Arboretum, it serves as a revenue and interest generator. Early implementation of a wedding garden could be critical to furthering the Arboretum’s abitions and other programs. With minimal infrastructure the Arboretum could have such a garden functional for such occasions in a very short time.

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Wedding Garden

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Visitors CenterA visitor’s center is a little far off for the Arboretum in terms of funding, but the space near the entrance for such a structure has a great potential for programming and introductory elements. A visitor’s center near the wedding garden would serve as a gathering place for receptions or meetings as well as house exhibits the Arboretum acquires through reserch or educational efforts.

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YEAR 1-5 Wedding Garden Restroom Structure Trail Expansion Invasive and Undergrowth Clearing Signage Integration YEAR 10+ Alpine Tower Expanded Garden Collections North Trail Access and Parking Expanded Ropes Course Visitors Center YEAR 5-10 Mountain Biking Zone Expanded Shrub Specimen Gardens Group Pavilion Full Boardwalk Trail through Bottomland Fo r Art Installations

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Phasing Plan r est and Maple HammockThe phasing plan is organized in order to institute low cost and wider reaching improvements in the rst ve years. The wedding garden will serve as a generator for other amenities. Mountain biking trails can be mapped after a few years of trail expansion into that area of the park. It would also require street access and proper security planning which accounts for pushing it to after 5 years. Garden expansions and a pavilion for meeting on the east side of Lake Ray will further generate interest in the Arboretum and hopefully garner investment or donation. The alpine tower and visitor’s center are both additions that are dependant upon investment rather than making the space for them. Should funds become available at an earlier time, their addition could be hastened.

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Appendix +

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Infrared Site MapJacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010

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Legal Boundaries MapJacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010

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Soils MapJacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010

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Soil Layer DiagramJacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010

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Parking Lot Construction DrawingsJacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010

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Invasive Location MapJacksonville Arboretum and Gardens Resource Management Plan 10-27-2010