Meginnis Creek Watershed and Greenway masterplan : integrating our neighborhood streams

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Title:
Meginnis Creek Watershed and Greenway masterplan : integrating our neighborhood streams
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Wilde, Nicholas
Publisher:
College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
The focus of this study is to provide a watershed and greenway masterplan that enhances, exposes and integrates the Meginnis Creek watershed within the community. The site encompasses a majority of the Meginnis watershed within the Lake Jackson Basin, located in Tallahassee, FL. Past, present, and future stormwater engineering projects provide the occasion for creating and extending public open space. Designs provide alternative stormwater mitigation strategies that focus on the long term health and function of the watershed. Seven phases are identified for implementation of the watershed master plan. As a whole, these phases form an important extension and link within the existing Tallahassee Greenways Masterplan. The seven phases include Brinkley Glen Park, trail extensions to Live Oak Plantation Rd. and Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park, the Meginnis Drainage Easement, Sharer Road gabion flood way, John Knox Stormwater Pond, Lake Jackson Storm-water Treatment Plant, and the Tallahassee Mall. Both the restoration of Brinkley Glen Park and the renovation of the Tallahassee Mall are highlighted as the catalyst and climax of the master-plan respectively. Through a meticulous analysis and delicate design I hope to inspire an resurgence of health and beauty within Tallahassee.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00002873:00001


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Full Text







Meginnis Creek Watershed and Greenway Masterplan:
Integrating Our Neighborhood Streams








A Senior Thesis Project
Nicholas Wil


by
de




Acknowledgements


I would like to extend my deepest appreciation to the following...

My capstone advisor, Les Linscott, for pushing me to discover a true masterplan
The entire Landscape Architecture faculty for shaping my goals and interests as a future professional
My family and loved ones for being there when it matters most



and most importantly to my classmates.. Love you.


LI-





Table of Contents


Meginnis Creek Watershed and Greenway Masterplan


Introduction

General Context

Research

Guidance

Analysis

Greenway Planning

Synthesis

Watershed and Greenway Conceptual Masterplan

Brinkley Glen Detail Masterplan

Regenerated Multi-use Destination


Conclusion and References


49-50


S -


11


17


22


26

30

31

41

44

46





Introduction


S -


Abstract

Project Location and Approach

Leon County Hydrological Context

The Community

Primary Concerns and Limitations

Goals and Relationships





Abstract


The focus of this study is to provide a watershed
and greenway masterplan that enhances, exposes
and integrates the Meginnis Creek watershed
within the community. The site encompasses a
majority of the Meginnis watershed within the
Lake Jackson Basin, located in Tallahassee, FL.

Past, present, and future stormwater engineering
projects provide the occasion for creating and ex-
tending public open space. Designs provide
alternative stormwater mitigation strategies that
focus on the long term health and function of the
watershed.


The seven phases include Brinkley Glen Park,
trail extensions to Live Oak Plantation Rd. and
Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park,
the Meginnis Drainage Easement, Sharer Road
gabion flood way, John Knox Stormwater Pond,
Lake Jackson Storm-water Treatment Plant, and
the Tallahassee Mall. Both the restoration of Brin-
kley Glen Park and the renovation of the Tallahas-
see Mall are highlighted as the catalyst and climax
of the master-plan respectively.
Through a meticulous analysis and delicate
design I hope to inspire an resurgence of health
and beauty within Tallahassee


Seven phases are identified for implementation
of the watershed master plan. As a whole, these
phases form an important extension and link
within the existing Tallahassee Greenways
Masterplan.


S -






Project Location and Approach


INTRODUCTION


IT


LOCATION:
- The northwest urban edgeTallahassee, FL.
-Meginnis Creek stretching from north of Brinkley Glen
Park to the Meginnis Arm of Lake Jackson
-Intersecting Meridian Rd. within the triangle of major
roads Thomasville, Monroe, and 1-10


APPROACH
Synthesis of the watershed is addressed first in relation to the Lake Jackson Basin, and then in relation to its immediate context.
Last, stormwater issues, environmental concerns, community integration and pedestrian accommodation will be addressed at each
site scale. A vast amount of public funds and projects target stormwater issues in the City of Tallahassee. The present norm of
pipe, ditch, and fence stormwater conveyance does not rightly serve our people or our land. Our neighborhood creeks are quickly
dissapearing and it is my hope to provide or inspire an alternative approach to these issues.


I_
,i


;ra~~ "







Leon County Hydrological Context


LEGEND


Waterbodies and Wetlands
Water Flow
SI Water Detention Basins
S I Lake Jackson Detention Basin
S I Lake Jackson Watersheds







LEGEND

t Site
* Capitol
Small Cities
Major Rivers
. --,- Water Detention Basins
B Lakes and Ponds
Wetlands


-c~~ .rC-- J- ,






SWestMeginnis Watershed
East MeginnisWatershed"
CatchmentAreas of Meginnis WS
BrinkleyGlen Park ,






Lake ,,- + '"- --
;- -







Talquin IL""

+~~- ...-,
j











04.
10 CI













A l%
M iles-I. 1. 9.



,- &7~4 4 W.1.+-.-1Of
Miles A 4. +,+ .,+. .,"
-e ~) rU


Streams and Creeks


City Limit


N


11 *'. **-


I











The Community


INTRODUCTION


Jul 16. N')IU

Dear Neighbors
As you may have heard, the City of Tallahassee is considering a major construction project in Brinkley Glen
Park which would take about nine months to finish. Surveing was completed and markers installed.
After recent expression of concern by some residents, the onginal plan to install a large. 52" pipe in place of
the drainage ditch Ifor almost the full length of the Park) was withdrawn from consideration It would have
required clearing many trees, bringing in heavy equipment to dig a new (straight) ditch for the pipe placement
filline in the remaining ditch area, planting new trees, and increasing the volume and speed of water flow south
from Middlebrooks Circle. There was no explanation as to why this project should be done especially when
the cost was reported to be about $1 5 million The reason given for the project was because of "erosion
There has never been that kind of "erosion" in Brinkley Glen at least not during the past 32 years.
There has been uncertainty) as to exactly what the plan was. and why a project was even being considered
The matter was brought to the anention of the neighborhood association, and about a month ago they requested
a meeting with the City to get more information On Wednesday, July 14. most of the WHNA officers and
board members met with four City staff personnel at the north end of the Park at Lothian Dnre. I also attended
the meeting Two surv'e maps were presented and discussed. By this time, the "plan" had been modified to
include only the north end of the Park (west of Lothian Drive), and extending up to Middlebrooks Circle There
is some erosion in the ditch at the west end of Middlebrooks Circle at the comer), but that doesn't justify
earning up the Park. The small area of erosion is on private property, a 1 + acre < scant lot berween the north end
of the Park and liddlchrooks Circle. At Middlebrooks, apparently the speed of the water flow is great enough
to erode the banks, and a large tree has fallen across the drainage area Drive north on Middlebrooks (from the
corner) and you can see the drainage ditch running under Piedmont Dnte all the way to the north side of Live
Oak Plantation Road. It's not clear whether we're getting any water flow from 1-10. but that's not likely Also.
large rocks may be placed in a '..dd:. open ditch area from Middlebrooks to the north pan o' the Park where a
large catchment basin i filled with rocks) will replace the current trees and \egetation
Those residents who li-e near the Park do not want to have changes made which could cause the
andLor increase the nsk of flooding Enen residents whose houses are not in the "flood plain" could
more water is forced to move more quickly into this area. or if tree limbs or other materials obstruct
flow. especially if it obstructs flow through the culvert under Merndian Road (the real bottleneck). 'I Jul
of the reasons why many residents have volunteered to pick up limbs and other debris from within tl Dea
When Mendian Road was built, it created a new "basin" to the east of Mendian Road Then. when I T
upgraded several years ago. they put in a culern that was still too small to handle the water flow dur alor
heaviest rains But it successfully handles "most" rains the
Md
Another explanation for the newest plan is that the design will take care of flood concerns "'mo
time." Sol ing the problem "most of the time" onl) guarantees that there will be flooding at some p The
dam
future. And it only needs to happen once. is ir
There seems to be more to this project than we are bemn told. It doesn't make sense not een tsew
proposal The Citr has agreed to hold a meeting at the Universalisr Unitarian Church on Mendian R se
Tuesday. August 1 time not yet determined) They want to have five City' staff members talk to on Add
dlree residents at a time. and are obiecting to a smile meeting here everyone can attend and hear a stor
questions and all the answers together This also doesn't make sense. We should be informed of wt the
going on Besides "erosion," another justification given for the project is to create jobs and help will whi
economy. That's 1.5 million (or some other unexplained amount) of our taxpayer money, and even e
"creates jobs that is no justification for unnecessarily placing people's homes at nsk of flooding of the
destroying the natural beauty of Brinkle) Glen Park or an adjacent, vacant lot. What would $1 5 m aLst,
us. The small erosion problem at the comer of Middlebrooks Circle does not warrant this The
The contact person for the City is Mr. Sam Amantia. phone 891-5300 The Assistant City Manal
department is Mr. Tom Cue, phone 891-8208. The neighborhood association will be sending out not
meeting time Please be at the meeting on August Q10. Thank )ou. ; -,


S30 2010
ir Talahassee Resident,


Entrance pillar




LL H, ASSEE
ILLAHASE


City ot Tallahassee is beginning the process of implementing an erosion control project
ng the aitch that runs from Middlebrooks Circle to Wavery Road. Erosion is occurring along
futl length of the ditch; however atthis time. the City is proposing only doing repairs from
dlebrooks Circle to the north edge of Brinkley Glen Parlk
erosion in this area is caused by storwater runoff that pushes sediment downstream,
aging Doth public and private property in the process. If the problem is not addressed, there
Ie potential for the integrity of the road on Middlebrooks Circle to be compromised. Sanitary
er lines thal run through the eroding area have also become exposed. which could lead to
rage leaks and unsanitary conditions.


itionally Cty crew
water from badcfl
park Fiing problem
ie the erosion aoes
gnbomtood president
Sfar rom the night
erosion in the park I
urD the existing eco
Sproect is still in the



in thl


The event will take phI
Staff wil be available II
if you rnae any questao
Cit's Pubic Works Daq


The primary neighborhoods of concern include Waverly Hills, Meridianna Estates,

and Spruce Creek. Meginnis Creek impacts all these residential neighborhoods

which in general are:

-Single Family Detached Housing

-Medium Density



With Waverly Hills leading the way, several public meetings discussing the Brin-

kley Glen Stormwater project took place that effectively changed the original

design solutions.



The community has showed strong opposition to the proposed plans that would

have piped up the entire creek, destroying the majority of the trees, and essentially

the park. They succeeded in stopping the initial project and due to no other op-

tions, settled for limiting the pipe section outside park property. The character of

the creek was kept intact but the problems within the park still exist.


Dear MioOleDrooks Circle and Brinkley Glen Park neighbors
Tnank you for your interest an involvement in the MedaleDrooks Circle Erosion Control project
Dunng the Aug 1D open house. we got a lot of good feedback and intornalion from the
ne'ghbort'ood aboul what you would like to see occur during the implementation of this projecl
Pan of that feedback included limiting the impact to Bnnkley Glen Park Witn thal in mind the
City has since purchased Ed Dor. s property at the southwest comer of the ered in
Middlebrooks Cricle Iparael number 11-18-20-258-000-0) Tne poioect has been redes.gnea to
reduce its impact on the park by containing the majonty of the project to that parcel The ditch
on the west side of Middlebrooks Circle is now proposed to be enclosed from the bend ir the
road back to the street corner at Piedmont Drive The dncn on the east ase of the street wii
also ne enclosed for a longer distance man originally proposed and improved iTh concrete
ditch paying to minimize eroson and keep water in me alTcn
At the bend in the road on Middlebrooks Circle the current erosion problem area will be
enclosed into a pipe system Al the end of the pipe system will be an energy dissipater bo1 to
help slow the water pror to it reaching Btnkley Glen Park as well as a Gabon trock-filled)
BasKet structure with cneck dams designed to mimi: me natural flow in tne aton Tnere will not
De a holding Dond Duilt on the property as pan of ths project Tne water will still flow like a
natural stream through the park though it will be en-asulated alo.rg Ed Dion's former property


Wnile the malonty of me morovementa wall take place out of te Dark. erosion issues at aoewic
Thank you for your tum spot in the park wl
Sincerely. correct tnese 6ssue


Sam Amantia
Ass stran Manager
Public Works Operator
C.ty of Tallahassee Pul
891-5299
sam arnanta@talgov 6


CiTY HALL
30 Sonh AdI ,,
I.ilhao st Fi. 'i i i
8a0.891L0O
TOD t7l*illl *


Through the outcry of a neighbor, Waverly Hills

neighborhood took a stand to save its beloved park.


Underground Utlith
saniltry sewer mal
The purpose of the
park tourndary
The Cny v planning


a*.. F
I 0*1i1i


An upaale on nhe p
puDic quesbons anl
rneebng or have an
manager a1891-8
Thank you ror your


Gannel Menendez
Director ol City Of1


WAVERLY HILLS NEWS -

q^. 9 February 2011 w- W) i-.
(Don't lorgel ValerImne s Dnr Is February 14i 1)

UPDATE ON MIDDLEBROOKS CIRCLE/BRINKLEY GLEN PARr EROSION PROJECT
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S-I-


Map of Meginnis Creek's surrounding neighborhoods


,v~51.~ ~c~-- ~--







Meginnis Watershed Site Synl


Lhesis


Primary Watershed Concerns:
-Erosion has impaired roadway structure, tree stability, stream
banks, and bridges in Brinkley Glen Park as well as exposed
sanitary sewer lines crossing the creek.
-Flooding is a problem along the watershed but primarily in
Waverly Hills, as 391 acres make up the basin that drains
through the one 10' by 6.5' culvert under Meridian Road.
-Sediment buildup just west of Meridian Road inhibits flows
and requires full scale dredging multiple times a year to remove
sediment from erosion upstream, inhibiting flow.
-Extremely poor water quality north of the Tallahasse Mall due
to runoff from the mall.
Lack of any vegetation at the Sharer Road gabion
-Industrial and dated stormwater treatment facilities prior to
Meginnis Arm.
Limitations
-The stream butts against many properties between Meridian
road and the John Knox Pond making property easements, and
allocation necessary for greenway and restoration plans.
-The dense hardwood forest in Brinkley Glen Park allows close
to no space for stream bank stabilization and construction
without major demolition.
-The majority of active residents adjacent to the watershed, es-
pecially to Brinkley Glen Park oppose increased traffic or recre-
ation in the area.
-The 6 foot fence requirement for gabions and basins.



LEGEND
0 Poor Water Quality
SErosion
Sedimentation
Gabion
(3 Potential Feature
U, Poor Feature
SConnection Needed
Flow Direction








Goals and Relationships


-A=


INTRODUCTION


1. Develop a watershed enhancement masterplan that's integration of conveyance function, environmental benefits,
aesthetic integrity, and pedestrian accommodation will serve as a model for the future management of stormwater

Design in harmony with the aesthetics or the integrity of the site.

*Control Erosion and Sedimentation

Prevent flooding within property lines

Enhance storm water quality

Provide for wildlife habitat and corridor function

2. Utilize the watershed as a community greenway to foster community enhancement, connection,
interaction, and education of stormwater while not imposing on the welfare of adjacent properties

Provide a multiuse trail system that engages the user with the stream

Provide for community access that encourages walking or biking from adjacent neighborhoods Provide
Access &
Connections
Welcome and invite safe interaction with the stream

Provide spaces and related amenities for both recreation and solitude

SBuffer adjacent properties where necessary and design appropriate functions in proximity

Provide extensions to other parks and greenways

3. Develop a design language honoring historic qualities, the existing character of the site,
and character of the surrounding community

*Look to existing qualities of Brinkley Glen Park, especially its seclusion of the user

Recognize the historical significance of Meridian Road and Live Oak Plantation Road

*Draw from ecological, scenic, and lifestyle aspects of the historic Red Hills Region


Maintain
Property
Rights..,.
I. Develop a
sense of
Ownership
,/~


Mitigate
SErosion &
SedimentationJ
\ /


Ensure
Flood
Protection


Improve
Water
\ Quality


Restore
Habitat


Goal Realtionships


I





General Context


S -


Climate and Habitat

Soils and Drainage Classes

Digital Elevation Model

Land Use

Parks and Recreation







Climate and Habitat


General Context


Vegetation:


Leon County has a moderate climate. Summers are
long, warm, and humid. Winters are mild to cool. The
Gulf of M lexico moderates maximum and minimum
temperatures. About 47% of rainfall occurs fromJune
through September. October and November are the
driest months. Afternoon rainfall is typical in summer
months and sometimes 2 to 3 inches occur per rain
shower.
Tallahassee average annual rainfall: 64.59 inches
January average temperature high/low: 64/40
August average temperature high/low: 92/73
Record high temperature: 104
Record low temperature: 2
Highest average month of precipitation: July at 8.04
inches
Lowest average month of precipitation: October at 3.25
inches
January average wind speed: 6.7 mph
August average wind speed: 5 mph
Prevailing winds in spring and summer: From south
Prevailing winds October to January: From north


Suited Hardwoods:
southern live oak, water oak, laurel oak, white oak,
overcup oak, post oak, black oak, american sweet-
gum, magnolia, hickory, dogwood, red maple,
redbud. shortleaf pine, loblolly pine, longleaf pine
Suited Understory:
greenbrier, honeysuckle, muscadine grapes, wax-
myrtle, sawpalmetto, inkberry, wild mulberry,
pineland threeawn
Suited Grasses:
fescue, coastal bermudagrass, bahiagrass
Suited Aquatic Vegetation:
arrowhead, blue flag iris, pink Sabatia, bullrush,
soft rush, cypress and black gum tupelo, juncus,
pickerel weed, pond cypress, tulip poplar, river
birch


S-I-


Climate:


Wildlife:

Primary game species:
white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail, gray squirrel,
wild turkey, mourning dove, and waterfowl
Noted bird species:
canadian geese, cormarants, blue heron, redwing
blackbird
Other:
raccoon, opossum, fox, bobcat, rabbit, fox squirrel,
armadillo, hawks, owls, bats, and a wide variety of
songbirds, woodpeckers, wading birds, wood
ducks, reptiles (snapping turtles, frogs)
Endangered:
Red-cockaded woodpecker
Keystone:
Gopher tortoise
Problematic:
Geese can eat harm recently established plants







Soils and Drainage Classes GeneralCon


text


LEGEND
Lake Jackson Watersheds
Major Roads
-- Streams and Creeks
Soil Name
II Albany loamy sand
S Arents, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Norfolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Norfolk loamy fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Ocilla fine sand
J Orangeburg fine sandy loam, 2 to 5 percent slopes
[I Orangeburg fine sandy loam, 5 to 8 percent slopes
IIJ Orangeburg fine sandy loam, 8 to 12 percent slopes
m Orangeburg-Urban land complex, 2 to 12 percent slopes
Z Plummer fine sand
Urban land
10 _- Wagram loamy fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes


SOILS: _/
Meginnis Creek and its watershed mainly inter- ((
act with Ocilla fine sand, Norfolk loamy fine
sand (5-8% slopes), Orangeburg fine sandy
loam, (8-12% slopes), Orangeburg Urban Land
Complex (2-12% slopes), Albany loamy sand,
and Plummer fine sand within the stormwater
treatment areas. These soils generally share a
sandy loamy surface layer and sandy clay loam
subsoils.


DRAINAGE:
Its primary path lies completely within the
"Somewhat Poorly Drained" class and the "Not
Drained Class" due to impervious pavement in
the dense urban area. All major concerns of
flooding and erosion lie within these areas.



SITE SPECIFIC:
The manipulation and concentration of water flow has altered many soil
characteristics, specifically dealing with slope and erosion.


LEGEND
W | Lake Jackson Watersheds
-- Streams and Creeks
- Major Roads
Soil Drainage Class
S Excessively drained
W | Well drained
SI Moderately well drained
Somewhat poorly drained
Poorly drained
Very poorly drained
Not Drained





Digital Elevation Model


General Context


I


ASSESSMENT:
-Over 200 feet of elevation change in the
Meginnis watersheds.
-This topography yeilds high flow velocities
and quick collection.
-These slopes help form the character loved in
this area.


LEGEND
Elevation (ft.)


High


: 253.6 ft.


Low: 26.4 ft.
Contours
II Waterbody Basin
I IWatershed
- Water Flow


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General Context


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Land Use Map


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Legend

o,*..* City Limits
A Urban Service Area Boundary
Existing Land Use 2010
Single Family Detached/Mobile Home
Single Family Attached
Two-Family Dwelling
SMulti-Family
Motel/Hospital/Clinic
Retail
Office
Warehouse
Government Operation
School
Open Space Undesignated
Open Space Common Areas
Open Space Resource Protection
Open Space State & National Forest
S Open Space Recreation/Parks
Religious/Non-profit
Transportation/Communications/Utilities
Water
Vacant


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Parks and Recreation General Context




Park Specifics:
Maclay Gardens State Park: Daily fee's required for
a beautiful historic residence and gardens and trail
around Lake Hall.

Timberlane Ravine Park: Possesses two trails that
dense hilly forest. Lacks any singage and paths lac
is uncertain, with at least signage being installed.

Brinkley Glen Park: Well regarded neighborhood j
turning a peaceful meandering creek with unique st

Trousdell Center: Indoor gymnastics with an outd
and kids play area with a giant slide. Admission is
berships required.

Macon Community & Neighborhood Park: Featur
fields and courts as well as a playground. Primary

Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park: F
Historic platform mounds, that acted as the south
ceremonial center of the large Mississippian culture
(900-1540 A.D.). Lake Jackson, called Ochopeekee
point of power for a vast region.

Mission San Luis: Historic site established in the 1
mained as the western capital of Spanish Florida ft
tremely unique do to the peaceful combination of I
Native American cultures.


Legend
Passive Recreation ( 1/2 Mile Radii
SActive Recreation 0 Parcel Bounda
SNature Preserve U Site Boundary
SHistoric Park
Restricted Use
Miles A Future Park


0 0.2 0.4


r entry. Contains
.s that meander


cut through a
k clarity. Future


)ocket park fea-
eep clay banks.

floor olympic pool
charged or mem-


es recreation
users

features two large
astern regions
re civilization
,, was the focal


600's that re-
Dr fifty years. Ex-
European and





us
iry
7


0.8 N





Research


S -


Red Hill Region

Cotton Plantations and Quail Preserves

Tallahassee's Historic Canopy

Past Stormwater Treatment Projects









The Red Hills Region


INTRODUCTION


The Red Hills

W welcome to the Red Hills-a fascinating and unique
region of golden wiregrass, stately pines, and his-
toric plantations. Bracketed between two southern rivers
and straddling the Georgia- Florida border, the Red Hills is
as geologically, biologically, and culturally distinctive as any
area in the U.S.
Considered to be one of "America's Last Great Places"
by The Nature Conservancy, the rolling landscape is a
mosaic of pine parklands,
hardwood forests, grassy
plains, and natural lakes that
are rich in biological diversity
and historical significance.
Serving as a lifeline
between coastal and north-
ern wildlands, the Red Hills
provides a 'bio-reserve' that
ensures habitat corridors and
genetic diversity, necessary
for the survival of far-rang-
ing mammals and migratory
birds. The decades ofac-
tive land management have
provided local settings for such rare species as the feder-
ally endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker, the gopher
tortoise and associated animals and native plants; at least
64 threatened species are currently documented in the Red
Hills region.
A satellite photograph of the area reveals a clearly
identifiable triangular patch of green dominated by natural
areas where more than 300 miles of paved and unpaved
public roads wind their way through the quail hunting
plantations of the Red Hills. Travelers experience close-up
glimpses of an American landscape that has remained virtu-
ally unchanged since the late 1800s. The landscape unfolds
on these winding roads as a sequence of visual experiences,
from wildflower laden pine parklands to vast open fields,


from tobacco barns to cemeteries, from marshes to groves
of live oaks.
Driving down the moss draped, oak-canopied scenic
dirt roads, travelers will see a great diversity of unusual
plant species which thrive in the clayey sands and loamy
soils, which lie on top of dense layers of clay, which lie on
top of a limestone base. Water works its way past the clays
to the limestone, which dissolves the soft rock to form
fissures and sinkholes where streams will disappear under-

Welcome to the Red Hills-

a fascinating and unique

region ofgolden wiregrass,

stately pines, and historic

plantations.

ground not to reappear for miles.
Naturally occurring fires historically have had the great-
est influence on the ecosystem's plants and animals, which
have adapted or become dependent on periodic burns for
their survival, including longleaf pine, wiregrass, bobwhite
quail and the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker
which is found in greater numbers on private lands in the
Red Hills than any other area of the country.
In prehistoric times, Native Americans farmed the
region until European settlers arrived to establish cotton
plantations. After the Civil War, the region prospered when
the great plantations evolved into winter retreats and bob-
white quail hunting plantations.
In the late 1800s, landowners from the North, together
with their relatives, friends, and business associates,
acquired vast amounts of land between Albany and


S. ........ .... ..... ... ... .......
Tallahassee as hunting grounds 1o take advantage of the '
region's superb quail population. To maintain a proper
quail habitat, careful and attentive land management
techniques such as periodic burning have been
practiced now for more than a century. The result is
the largest collection of undeveloped plantation lands
in the country.
The maintenance of private "quail plantations"
made possible the protection of large areas of natural
habitats such as upland pine forests, lakes, and stream
watersheds, and hardwood hammocks. Some of the
South's best remaining examples of old growth long-
leaf pine-wiregrass ecosystems are found on plantation
lands near Thomasville.
The Red Hills stands apart from other regions
today in part because of human intervention, rather
than in spite of it; for much of the land has retained its
pristine beauty by virtue of this unique pattern of land
ownership and management that developed during the
last 100 years.
Today and into the future, the greatest threat facing
the region is urban sprawl.


-U-- 'a


-The red clay soil was deposited during the

last ice age from the Appalachian Mountains


-Largest concentration of undeveloped

plantation lands in the United States


-One of the highest recharge areas of the

Floridan Aquifer


-Designated as one of America's "Last Great

Places" by the Nature Conservancy


-Periodic burns have been implemented as

land management for over a century


River
Vall1
Lowlai


) Appa


<,


Coasta]


lachicola
I Lowlands


Woodville
Karst Plain


Leon County Physiographic Regions


S-I-


Liver
alley
lands


G! IF


1







Cotton Plantations and Quail Preserves


INTRODUCTION


John Branch (1782-1863), territorial Governor of Florida chose the Live Oak
area in 1833 for his cotton plantation home that included the county's first pri-
vate golf links among many other amenities.

Susan Bradford Eppes, his granddaughter described the Live Oak dwelling:
"and he selected as a site for his dwelling a magnificent grove of
live oaks crowning a high hill overlooking the blue waters of Lake
Jackson. Here he built a large and handsome residence in colonial
style, and had a landscape gardener from France to lay out the
grounds. A steep declevity led from the garden to a grove of mag-
nolias, and in their midst was a beautiful spring which from its
boiling depths sent forth an immense volume of sparkling water.
Here Governor Branch installed a ram, which carried this delight-
ful water to his dwelling...where rare flowers, collected from all
parts of the earth were to be found" (Haywood). The spring was de-
stroyed during the construction of interstate 10 in 1970.

In 1845, when Florida became a state, Governor branch hosted a celebration
which his daughter related in a letter: "Bonfires blazed at the edge of the
grove, and lanterns were hung in the shrubbery. The house was
brilliantly lighted, and from top to bottom was open to the
public. Across the front entrance, in large letters of living green
on a white banner, was 'State of Florida,' and inside the house all
was jollity and congratulation, feasting and music" (Haywood).

Purchased by Edmund H. Ronalds of Edinburg in 1887, Live Oak Plantation
was the first antebellum plantation to be converted to a quail preserve. At once
extending 3,226 acres with 2 miles of lake frontage, the plantation now sits on
65.7 acres.

Waverly Plantation was an adjacent plantation of 429 acres that John Branch
had also purchased. It held intact from 1851 to 1953, function later as a farm,
and then quail preserve before being subdivided into suburban residential tracts.


Li~-
\C4ED


The abundance of Bobwhite quail at-
tracted \\ healthy northern vacationers
to the area beginning in the 1900's.


Present view of the Live Oak house from Live Oak Plantation Rd.


Originally constructed in 1909, the cottage style Waverly
plantation home was modest in size. Moved and remodeled
in 1984, the house is now located at 2920 Ivanhoe Road.


The Neo-classical main house of Live Oak, built by General Foods
executive Leon T. Cheek. The house faces the road, set far back from
the road, and was the third built after two burnt down.


S-I-







Tallahassee's


Historic Canopy


INTRODUCTION


The rolling clay hills along meridian would become
hazards during rain


,. "i i ^
NATIVE -
... .._ ? .. .....................
Existing "Quail Trail" historic driving tour provided
by Canopy Roads and Country Lanes of Leon County


Meridian Road is a county designated canopy road with a rich his-
tory. The road was first laid out in lengths of chain by Federal survey-
or Benjamin Clements in order to establish the state's Prime Meridian.
This is the origin for all land surveys in Florida and cuts a northern
path directly through the center of Tallahassee
(Historic Tallahassee Preservation Board).



Live Oak Plantation Rd. cuts a winding canopy drive between Me-
ridian Rd. and Thomasville Rd. Its majestic oaks, view towards the
historic Live Oak Plantation home, and wealthy set back properties
make it one of the most stunning drives in Tallahassee. It has immense
recognition and could soon be registered as a canopy road to protect
this great character.


Current view of down Live Oak Plantation Road


Existing Registered Leon County Canopy Roads


S-I-








Past Stormwater Treatment Proiects


INTRODUCTION


As a result of the major decline in water quality and ecological functioning of Lake Jack-
son, the Lake Jackson Meginnis Arm Stormwater Treatment facility was constructed in
1983. It treats stormwater with a detention pond, sand filter and 3 cell constructed marsh.
The I-10 Meginnis Creek Pond Facility, a classic detention was constructed on the north
side of 1-10 in 1993 to treat stormwater bypassing treatment. As most damage had already
occurred to the lake, utilizing a dry period in 2000, a major 8.2 million dollar project target-
ed excessive sediment build up in southern portion of the lake. Nearly 400,000 cubic yards
of bottom layer muck was removed in the Meginnis and Ford arms during phase one and
phase two additional removed an additional 1.6 million cubic yards of sediment further into
the southern area of the lake. The main cause was runoff inputs carrying various chemical
pollutants and sediment.




Completed in 1999 by DEP, the John Knox Stormwater Pond
featuring a two pond system is located at the end of East branch of
the Meginnis watershed. This project has turned out very scenic
but offers no seating and limited access.




More recently, from 2008 to 2009, about 2.5 million dollars was
spent for the Sharer Road Stormwater Improvements. Essentially
the study and construction resulted in a gabion conveyance struc-
ture.



Overall, the facilities have helped runoff pollution but have not
restored ecological function to Lake Jackson. Further, they require
routine maintenance and offer no further function to the city (City
of Tallahassee).


View of trench process during muck re-
moval within Meginnis Arm (COT)


View of Sharer Road gabion conveyance
away from Tallahassee Mall


Aerial view of M uck removal within
M cginnis Arm (COT)


v iew ot bSarer Road gabion conveyance
towards the Tallahassee Mall


Cross section view of connection between
John Knox Pond and the Tallahassee M\all


East view of John Knox Pond standing
beyond the canopy trees


S -


__





Guidance


Inpiration: Olmsted, Access, and Open Space

Thornton Creek

Greenways Masterplan


S -







iration: Olmsted, Access and Open Space


Case Studies


Olmsted's Green Cay Wetlands:
Considered the father of Landscape Architecture, Frederick Law Olmsted was
the guru of open space design. The infamous Emerald necklace meanders
through the city of Boston as a ribbon of parks featuring wetlands, lawns, and
scenic walks.
How it came to be...
-An engineering solution was needed for the Muddy River due to stench,
flooding, and mud.
-Olmsted refused to work until acquiring a multidisciplinary council and a 3
year time frame.
-The land was close to impossible to develop- two engineers quit during the
very first meeting.
-Collaboration with a storm sewer specialist allowed Olmsted to brainstorm
the most beneficial solutions.
-Arrived at the "result that would serve all the engineering requirements as
well as they) should be served in a basin of masonry and be much less objec-
tionable on the score of taste" (Olmsted)
-With recognition, he took over the next engineering project, extending the
Back Bay Fens with another w\holistic solution
-Continued on to form the Emerald Necklace from what was essentially three
engineering solutions tied together with a meandering stream.
(Olmsted)
The city of Boston grew around this network that essentially preserved the
common life of the pedestrian. As cities today have already outgrown them-
selves, the process is more difficult and more essential. My study must break
through the existing framework of the city, and breathe life back into the pe-
destrian.
In using Olmsted's process, my study of the Meginnis watershed logically
and instinctually led me to a community greenway. The character of the creek
and issues around it formed my solutions and inspiration.


Statewide Outdoor Recreation
Participation Study (SWORP):
Residents were asked to what would best help to en-
courage their participation in outdoor recreation. The
top three measures are:
-Increased Accessibility to Parks and Public Lands
-More Information About Facilities
-More Outdoor Facilities
Tallahassee's region a was among the highest partici-
pation rates for non-boat freshwater fishing
(SWORP)


Seattle Open Space Initiative:
Guiding Principals:
1. Regional Responsiveness
2. Integrated and Multi-functional
3. Equity and Accessibility
4. Connectivity/ Coherence
5. Quality, Beauty, Identity, and Rootedness
6. Ecological Function and Integrity
7 Health and Safety
8. Feasibility, Flexibility, and Stewardship
The initiative plans for a regenerative green infrastructure
that holds economic, social, and ecological sustainability.
(Open Space Seattle 2010)


The Last Landscape:


"If these elements can be linked, each will gain a much greater
access, and the sum can make a very effective whole"
(Whyte)

"The most important elements for linkage already exist.
Nature has laid down a regional design of streams and valleys
that provide superb natural connectors, and into the very
heart of the urban area" (Whyte).

"It is not how people think about open space so much as how
they feel about it that makes them give their support"
(Whyte)


I:







Greenways Masterplan Tallahassee-Leon County Site A


: '' q 4 l '

c.," ., i.: "i: .,' .
i

Legend
.iy Id 4
t1 -'"""
I.
City Limits
City Parks
j Proposed Greenways ,,:.
III Existing Trails
... .-% '-
SSite .. .. ...





r i ,"1

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.7 k
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t~? --



N 1 4 1 7
A K v IF IF
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n -4 _. :. ,-;

\ :,, ., 1 .. .
k"' .,/ .''; ," -,;,, : 'o.c:', .


Miles


analysis


Five Primary Objectives
1. Enhance the protection of remaining
natural systems.
2. Provide greenway connections among parks,
schools, historical and cultural sites, and
neighborhoods.
3. Create an economic amenity that attracts higher
value investment and promotes sustainability.
4. Provide additional recreation and open space and
expand opportunities for walking, hiking, biking
and horseback riding,
5. Complement greenway planning activities occur-
ring at the regional and state levels.


r N Miles
N O 0 25 0.5 1


0 1 2 4


21






Thornton Creek


Case Studies


I:


METHODOLOGY:
-Increased open space by about 50%.
-Shortens pedestrian commute by 50% by linking
adjacent commercial and residential neighborhoods.
-Reduced impervious surfaces by 78%
-Water quality channel designed to provide 40-80% removal of
Total Suspended Solids.
-Provided new habitat within the heavily paved
commercial area.
-Catalyzed 200$ million in two adjacent parcels for private
residential and commercial development.


TO THORNTON
CREEK


J OUTLET
STRUCTURE


f .
RUNOFF
FROM 20
ACRES


,, --
-_. UPPE -' ----" WATER
CASCADE -- QUALITY
SWALECHANNEL
S WALE
NORMAL
FLOWS TO
CHANNEL S -


60-INCH
BYPASS PIPE


0H FLOW
PASS


HIK
BYI


RUNOFF FROM 660
ACRES


r--

DIVERSION STRUCTURE
WITH WEIR GATE


22




Analysis


Impervious Pavement In Watersheds
Impaired Watershed Classifications
City Easements and Flood Zones
Fema Flood Zones within Parcels


23


L





IMPERVIOUS PAVEMENT IN WATERSHEDS Site Analysis



ASSESSMENT:
The red masses within each watershed (
pervious pavement distribution. The in
brightness within each watershed visua
the density and span of impervious mat
eater density.
The bottom two watersheds (East Meg
West Meginnis) easily stand out.
THE FACTS:
Impervious materials increase the volun
and contamination of water inputs into
The direct effect is an increase in erosion
tion, and flooding.









LEGEND

Impervious Pavement
LakeJackson
M Site


24


display im-
tensity of
lly portrays
trials and

innis and



ie, velocity,
streams.
n, sedimetna-





IMPAIRED WATERSHED CLASSIFICATIONS Site Analysis



ASSESSMENT:
Impervious pavement directly correlated
tamination. The entire Meginnis (east a
watershed is the only significant waters
flied as impaired by both the DEP and EF
(Department of Environmental Protection and En
Protection Agency).
The Lake Jackson waterbody is alsoclas
impaired by both.
THE FACTS:
The Meginnis watershed is the
PRIMARY source of contamination
to Lake Jackson.




LEGEND

Impervious Pavement
j No Impairment
DEP Impairment
I-! EPA Impairment
C DEP and EPA Impairment
Lake Jackson (DEP and EPA)
M Site


s with con-
nd west)
;hed classi-
PA
vironmental

sified as






CITY EASEMENTS AND FLOOD ZONES Site Analysis




Legend EASEMENTS:
Road Edge -These easements do not include warrar
SParcel Lines right of way, or miscellaneous
Parks -Easements have the potential to be utilr
FEMA Flood Zone public access through legal processes
City Easements involving the property owner.

POTENTIAL:
-Provides the means for pedestrian conn
and public access, indicating potential c
-Easement laws must be rewritten to all
/ public access and support it.





FL Statute 373.139
(2)The governing board of the district is er
and authorized to acquire in fee or less tha
real property, easements and other interest
therein, by purchase, gift, devise, lease, ema
domain, or otherwise for flood control, wa
water management, conservation and prot
water resources, aquifer recharge, water re
water supply development, and preservati
lands, streams, and lakes. Eminent domain
may be used only for acquiring real proper
control and water storage or for curing title
encumbrances to real property owned by t
or to be acquired by the district from a will
26


ity deeds,

ized for





sections
corridors
ow








powered
n fee title to
ts or rights
inent
ter storage,
section of
:source and
on of wet-
. powers
ty for flood
e defects or
:he district
ing seller.






FEMA FLOOD ZONES WITHIN PARCELS


i


Site Analysis


i


C -


FLOOD ZONES:
-These flood zones represent a 1% annual chance
of flooding, classified as zones A and AE
(AE are now FIRM's)
-This equates to a 26% chance of flooding over the
life of a 30-year mortgage.
-Flood zones (X) with a 0.2% annual chance
of flooding were disregarded, requiring
no flood insurance.


PARCELS:
-Floodzones within properties are
outlined in red.
-These properties are targets for
greenway connections.
-Flooding can be significantly
reduced if easements
are granted.
ai -


-'9


rJA


I t


44"


Ir
"U


r


F-


A
"'


LEGEND
II Flood Zone in Parcel
Floodway
SFlood Zone
II Parcel Lines


Parcels in Flood Zone




Synthesis


Target Feature Location and Phasing
Target Feature Issues and Solutions
Brinkley Glen Park Synthesis
Tallahassee Mall Synthesis


28


L





Target Feature Location and Phasing Synth


Lake Jackson Indian
Mounds State Park
ja 1 f


Lake Jackson
Treatment Facility
6


esis


Live Oak Plantation





Brinkley Glen Park





Neighborhood
Drainage Easement





John Knox Pond
5,


Sharer Rd. Gabion


Tallahassee Mall
00






Target Feature Issues and Solutions Synt


hesis


2b








,


2a


Lake Jackson
Indian Mounds
Archaeological SacredGrounds
State Park -Sacred Grounds
I -Low Density





Lake Jackson -Poor Views
Stormwater -No Trespasing
Treatment -Dead Land
Plant -Open Space

ment



Engineered
Gabion -Industrial/ Eye-sore
Floodway -No Trespassing
Floodway -Isolated
-High Density
-No vegetation




Tallahassee -Dying Mall
Mall -Vast Impervious Pavement
-Major Pollution Source
-Lacks Pedestrian Access
-Successful IMAX Cinema


1


Historic Appeal
for Trail Extension






-Provide Habitat
-Open to Public as
Educational Amenity






-Amenity for Workers
-Provide Access and
Seating
-Vegetate Gabion
-Provide Shade




-Provide New Look
-Reduce Imper\ious
-Aesthetic Treatment
-Community Backyard
-Healthy Lifestyle


3.
A


5


Live Oak
Plantation
Rd.






Brinkley Glen:
Pocket Park







Meginnis
Drainage
Easement






John Knox
Stormwater
Pond


-Stunning Canopy
-Historic Plantation
-Governor Branch
Hosted Celebraation
for Florida's Induction
-High Income Residences


-Severe Erosion
-Flooding
-Exposed Sanitary
Sewer Lines
-Adjacent Properties
-Valued Creek and Park




-Sedimentation
-Flooding
-Lack Property Rights
-Adjacent Properties





-Native Plants
-Beautiful Feature
-Infrequent Use
-Outside views blocked
-Connection Limited


-Register Live Oak
as Canopy Road
-Utilize for Pedestrian
Access
-Historic and Aesthetic



-Maintain Sense of Place
-Eco-sensitive restoration
-Community Input
-Bioengineering methods
-Provide entrance features





-Easement Purchases
-Bioengineering Methods
-Provide Recreation






-Open towards
Rec-Center and Mall
-Provide Recreation
-Boardwalk Connections


/ I







Meginnis Watershed Site Synl


Lhesis


Primary Watershed Concerns:
-Erosion has impaired roadway structure, tree stability, stream
banks, and bridges in Brinkley Glen Park as well as exposed
sanitary sewer lines crossing the creek.
-Flooding is a problem along the watershed but primarily in
Waverly Hills, as 391 acres make up the basin that drains
through the one 10' by 6.5' culvert under Meridian Road.
-Sediment buildup just west of Meridian Road inhibits flows
and requires full scale dredging multiple times a year to remove
sediment from erosion upstream, inhibiting flow.
-Extremely poor water quality north of the Tallahasse Mall due
to runoff from the mall.
Lack of any vegetation at the Sharer Road gabion
-Industrial and dated stormwater treatment facilities prior to
Meginnis Arm.
Limitations
-The stream butts against many properties between Meridian
road and the John Knox Pond making property easements, and
allocation necessary for greenway and restoration plans.
-The dense hardwood forest in Brinkley Glen Park allows close
to no space for stream bank stabilization and construction
without major demolition.
-The majority of active residents adjacent to the watershed, es-
pecially to Brinkley Glen Park oppose increased traffic or recre-
ation in the area.
-The 6 foot fence requirement for gabions and basins.



LEGEND
0 Poor Water Quality
SErosion
Sedimentation
Gabion
(3 Potential Feature
U, Poor Feature
SConnection Needed
Flow Direction







BRINKLEY GLEN PARK


Site Synthesis


Primary Concerns:
-Impaired roadways, tree stability, stream banks, bridges,
exposed sanitary sewer lines.
-Flooding risk due to bottle-neck of 10' by 6.5' culvert under
Meridian Road.
-Sedimentation at Meridian and Waverly intersection

Opportunities:
-Extension of open space through property acquirement
and erosion/sedimentation/flooding mitigation
-Steep red clay slopes hold unique character
-Showcase community stand with design
-Intersection with historic canopy road

Limitations:
-Adjacent residential properties with value in privacy
-Major water flow from private school (NFC)
-Dense hardwood forest limits construction flexibility
-Meridian Rd. is registered Canopy Road with buffer
-No parking available besides cul-de-sac at Lothian Dr.
-Major road bisects creek and potential extension



LEGEND


U Erosion
* Sedimentation
Gabion
a Potential Feature
Water Hindrance


O Entrace
. Buffer Residents
A Pipe outlets
S** Flood Hazard
u** Flow direction


^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ & -^^


I


32







Tallahassee's Dying Mall


INTRODUCTION


Once a booming mall, the Talahassee mall's 100 acres were
auctioned off in January of 2011 for 100$, completing a foreclosure suit.

Issues:
Downward economic trend
Lack of Pedestrian Access- No sidewalks
Few elite retails and most anchors have left
Poor aesthetics- Dated exterior
Impervious pavement and hoorible water quality
Opportunities:
Consistently used by a senior citizen group for early morning walking
AMC Theatres still the primary Cinema in the city
Solutions:
Create connection to neighborhoods and accommodate pedestrians
Daylight the stormwater conveyance pipe and treat the water
Emphasize water as a feature and destination
Transform the mall into an outdoor mixed use center
Create vehicular gateway and entrance


H(


, jj ^ .... :, : ;
'0 i-'
"** M *'. ^l!.A : .
*'.1 .. .^-
*-~;" -


/' ," "; .. &..
." .*. :' -*
"'1


,..... "


! -' ....
I .
p. j
.. W .:1


*c -I


' $
\\ -^
*A/~


1+N


The current site plan of the Tallahassee Mall


The original Gayfers, eventually becoming
33 Dillards


Tension is high at the Tallahassee
Mall. I was asked to leave the
property while conducting re-
search. I spent my childhood
walking to the mal for movies,
games, shopping, and mainly
messing around. Things have
changed.


South facing entrance


0


The la t of te llhihihti th


The layout of the mall, highlighting the wa vs


S -





Watershed and Greenway Conceptual Masterplan


Conceptual Greenway
Masterplan
Masterplan-2


34




^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ & -^^


Conceptual Greeenway


N. :. "^
I-


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S'N

KI


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_-',~ _. -- .; -. I i I ,-f.: ,Z.. ,- I -; ..I;,:




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'r i -- -I _L_ ,'. i r .., .. .. '
i ~~ ~ I _- --_--_ _' ( : ._ -I I[ I i .~~ 1 1 1 1 i i ,
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: :--I : :=: # t: __ T: ;[:i:.'."::: ] I~ I I.I' / ', -. I N Ii l
II I I I = I I I I I II I .. i I I L : -- I -- -- -- -- : [ 1 [ i l l / I~ I i I! I : I i i
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I. -*
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LEGEND


$ Trailheads

0 Destination

Active Open Space

Passive Open Space

Seating


1i,
IpJ, I i
,," ,,.-' ,' :% I


*i^ -: f: i
2111:




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MASTERPLAN





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46


Conclusion


I initially chose this project after hearing my childhood
creek and park hangout (Brinkley Glen) were both being
threatened. What was so significant at the time, was just
one part of a greater picture. and greater misfortune. Not
only is most of the watershed in poor shape but the entire
context has also degraded. I was able to fish the great Lake
Jackson as a child, skimboard the creek, mess around at the
Tallahassee Mall, discover new land in the forests. The pres-
ent day ghost-like appearance and foreclosure of the Talla-
hassee Mall, overall dismissal of Lake Jackson, downward
property values, suffering schools, and removal of neighbor-
hood creeks was extremely disheartenting.

Through the masterplanning process I was able to learn
the delicate integration of each of these issues and how utliz-
ing one common entity can just as easily reverse a trend or
start its own.


I










References




BOOKS

Fabos,Julius Gy., Gordon T. Milde, and V. Michael Weinmayr. Frederick Law Ohnsted, Sr.:: Founder of Landscape Architecture in America. Amherst: University
ofMassachusetts, 1970. Print.

Farr, Douglas. Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design with Nature. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2008. Print

Olmsted, Frederick Law. The Papers of Frederick Law Ohnsted. Baltimore:Johns Hopkins UP, 1997. Print.

Whyte, William Hollingsworth. The Last LaMiscape. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1968. Print.

Sanders, Therman E. SoilSurvey of Leon County, Florida. Washington, D.C.?: U.S. Dept. ofAgriculture, Soil Conservation Service and Forest Service, 198 I.
Internet resource.

Thompson,J. William. and Km iSonig ',iiut nh abil', qla, ,'i, rrnu, tiii .1 gu, tIgin Itr, l bdilg i orii ultr Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 2000. Print.

1nicrnmann R lll aid K.and I %nn I.eu i., lnki iiiii. n rthe i r, .irapi uh ir411rr ur.. nl rrh111i'lolh.tIl ,l.fr walkingand bicycling. New York: Van Nostrand
Reinhold, 1984. Print

W\EBqITF,

Enforcement, law. Nlcongine: rang Techniques For Erosion Prevention." C Ra'ltal Riri, l Ii ta i N.p.,n.d.
.

"Florida Geographic Data Library." Florida Geographic Data Library. N.p., n.d. .

"General Publications and Maps- Talgov.com." Talgov.com The Official Website of the City of Tallahassee. N.p., n.d.
.

"LEON COUNTY Stormwater Maintenance." LEON COUNTY- Florida's Capital County. N.p., n.d.
.

"MNlegn ni Creek: Water Quality TLC.WaterAtlas.org."Welcone TLCWaterAtlas.org. N.p, n.d.
.

"cpen2n 100 org Seattle Open Space Initiative. N.p., n.d. .

Penson, Georgann. "Features Vol 46 No 5- Restoring a Di,'ppeariing Lake." Land and Water Magazine. N.p., n.d.
.

"Red Hillk ,erni c Road," Tall Timbers. N.p.,n.d. .

"Seattle Public Utilities -- Projects." Scrtle.igor Home Page The Official Web Sitefor the City of Seattle, I a.l,,jgrili. N.p., n.d. Web.
Talgov.com The Off ial Website of the (t id f Tallahassee. Web. .

'The Trust for Public Land Homepage." The Trustfor Public Land- Homepage. N.p., n.d. .

"Urban Creeks Council." Urban Creeks Council. N.p, n.d. .

"Welcome- TIC WatrIAtrl .org Welcome- TI C.ll;t h lila' ir.. N.p., n.d. .

ORGANIZATIONS

Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation Archives

Capital Enginrerinrg Ser\ ices

( it o'Tallahassee Public Works Department


47




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44 45 Brinkley Glen Park Masterplan Design Development 90 180 FEET 0 Waverly Rd. Meridianna Dr. Lothian Dr. Middlebrooks Circle Piedmont Dr. Henderson Rd. Sinclair Rd. Meridian Rd. 41

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