Bulletin - Center for Latin American Studies

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Title:
Bulletin - Center for Latin American Studies
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of Florida -- Center for Latin American Studies
Publisher:
Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Latin American studies -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Study and teaching -- Periodicals -- Latin America   ( lcsh )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 05258673
ocm05258673
System ID:
AA00002852:00001

Full Text

U OF F LIBRARY


BULLETIN
CENTER
FOR
LATIN AMERICAN
STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


+
378
FZLAC
1977/78
























































THE LATIN AMERICAN FACULTY
CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA






FOREWORD

The University of Florida has long had a particular interest in Latin
America and in the development of friendly and productive relations with
her peoples. Historically, this interest has been expressed through the
welcome accorded by the University to several generations of students
from Latin America, the interchange of its faculty with Latin American
institutions, its participation in agricultural assistance projects in Latin
America, and the development of programs of studies at both the un-
dergraduate and graduate level dealing with Latin American cultures and
languages.

Since World War II, Latin America has experienced a rapidly ac-
celerating social and economic revolution which has affected profoundly
her position in world affairs and her relationships with the United States.
The University of Florida has met these developments with a greatly
increased commitment to Latin American studies. Important additions
have been made to the Latin American Faculty; the curriculum in Latin
American Studies has been broadened; the University Library's Latin
American holdings have grown substantially; increased allocations of
funds have been made for research and graduate training; and annual
conferences on the Caribbean, initiated in 1950, were expanded in 1967 to
include problems common to Latin America in general. In 1963, a Center
for Latin American Studies was created to coordinate expanding instruc-
tional, research, and developmental-type programs.

It is our hope and belief that such efforts will permit us to provide
more effective service to our students, to the State of Florida, to the nation,
and to the peoples of Latin America.



uMIVERSI I FLORIDA LIBRARIES


LINTON E. GRINTER HALL






THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Functions and Organization
The Center is the University unit responsible for the development and
the direction or coordination of interdisciplinary instructional and
research activities related to the Latin American area. It also cooperates
with University departments, schools, institutes, and colleges in adminis-
tering and staffing developmental-type programs in Latin America and in
training campus and off-campus personnel for service in that area.
The Center is a separately budgeted component of the University and
is administered by a Director immediately responsible to the Vice
President for Academic Affairs. It is supported by University appropria-
tions, contracts with public and private agencies, and foundation grants.
Principal non-state sources of support are subventions from the United
States Office of Education under Title VI of the National Defense Educa-
tion Act.
State, federal, and private funds budgeted in the Center are used to
strengthen the Latin American faculty, and for research personnel,
3 3 graduate assistantships, research grants-in-aid, visiting professors, con-
sultants, lecturers, conferences, library acquisitions, and the publication
F C of scholarly research.

I 77/> 8 Physical Facilities

The Center occupies the entire third floor and certain portions of the
first and fourth floors of Linton E. Grinter Hall on the Plaza of the
AMERICA Americas. The modern spaces and facilities, including the Latin American
Data Bank and the Latin American Cartographic Research Laboratory,
designed for the Center, its faculty and students, provide a physical
"Center" to facilitate instruction, research, and, in particular, to encourage
cross-disciplinary and faculty-student communication.




GRADUATE PROGRAM
Degrees Offered

Master of Arts in Latin American Studies. This is an teaching career in traditional academic departments
interdisciplinary area degree offered directly by the but who require a broad knowledge of Latin American
Center. Requirements are: (a) a major of 21 credits cultures and appropriate language competence for their
consisting primarily of Latin American language or area career objectives. It is so structured, however, that
courses in one department, which may be food and students may move directly from it into departmental
resource economics, anthropology, economics, Ph.D. programs without interrupting or slowing down
romance languages (Spanish and Portuguese), their academic progress.
geography, history, political science, and sociology; (b) Departmental M.A. thesis degrees with Certificate in
18 credits of Latin American Language and/or area Latin American Studies. Through agreement with
courses in at least two other departments; (c) a thesis on divisions and departments of participating colleges, the
a Latin American topic for which up to 9 credits are requirements are: (a) at least 30 credits of work in the
given through registration in LA 699; (d) a reading, major department with a Latin American concentra-
writing, and speaking knowledge of a Latin American tion; (b) a 9-credit minor with Latin American content
language. The M.A. in Latin American Studies is in- in another department; (c) a thesis on a Latin American
tended primarily as a terminal degree for persons who, topic for which up to 9 credits are given; (d) a reading
initially in their graduate program, are not aiming at a knowledge of a Latin American language.






f) Departmental M.A. non-thesis degrees with Certificate in Latin
0) American Studies. Through agreement with departments permitting non-
O thesis degrees, M.A. Certificates in Latin American Studies may be
' awarded to those students who (a) satisfy departmental requirements for
the major and minor; (b) include in their course of study at least 18 hours of
Latin American content courses divided between at least two disciplines; 7
(c) complete at least 54 credit hours of graduate course work; (d) demons-
trate a reading knowledge of a Latin American language. In choosing area -
courses, the student taking this option should work closely with the
graduate coordinator of the Center for Latin American Studies. Only those
courses specifically approved by the coordinator will be counted toward
the required 18 hours of Latin American concentration. '
The Ph.D. degree. The Center does not offer an interdisciplinary Latin
American area degree at the doctoral level. Through agreement with par-
ticipating departments, however, it does provide a Certificate in Latin
American Studies which is awarded in conjunction with Ph.D. degrees in
agricultural economics, anthropology, economics, education, geography, .
history, political science, sociology, and Spanish. Requirements for the "
certificate are: (a) Latin American concentration within the major depart-
ment; (b) an area minor of at least 30 credits consisting principally of Latin
American language and area courses in two or more departments outside
the major and including at least 5 credits of LA 640-LATIN AMERICAN
AREA SEMINAR; (c) a dissertation on a Latin American subject; (d) a
reading, speaking, and writing knowledge of one Latin American language
and a reading knowledge of another; (e) residence in Latin America nor-
mally of at least six months duration and devoted primarily to dissertation
research. GRADUATE STUDENT CARREL



Graduate Awards
Graduate awards for fellowships and assistantships are based upon funds voted annually by
the Florida Legislature and, in the case of N.D.E.A. Title VI awards, by the U.S. Congress. Since the
funding may vary from year to year, the listing below is furnished only as a guide.



N.D.E.A. Title VI Latin American Language and Area Fellowships
The Fellowships provide for a basic stipend, dependents allowance,
and a supplementary allowance, if approved in advance, for dissertation
research overseas for more than six months. Also, tuition and fees, except
for Application Fee.


University Fellowships
Open to students both in interdisciplinary and departmental programs.
The Fellowship provides for a basic stipend covering the nine month
academic year.
Florida students holding the fellowships must pay the registration fee
each quarter. Non-Florida students holding the fellowships must pay the
registration fee and an additional out-of-state fee each quarter.
Note: A limited number of non-Florida tuition waivers (for the out-of-
) state fee) are available on a competitive basis.






Assistantships
Open to students in both interdisciplinary and departmental degree
programs.
The assistantships provide for a basic stipend for the academic year of
nine months (one third time), and for the academic year of nine months
(one half time).
Florida students holding assistantships must pay the registration fee
each quarter. Non-Florida students holding the assistantship must pay the
regular registration fee and an additional out-of-state fee each quarter.
Note: A limited number of non-Florida tuition waivers (for the out-of-
state fee) are available on a competitive basis.
Applications for N.D.E.A. Title VI awards are due February 1 each
year for awards commencing in September of that year. The deadline for
other awards is February 15 each year. Persons applying for the N.D.E.A.
awards may also, if they wish, be considered for University, Center, and
departmental fellowships and assistantships and may apply for all awards
on the same form. Application forms may be obtained from: The Graduate
Coordinator, Center for Latin American Studies, 319 Linton E. Grinter
Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.


RESEARCH
The Center provides or assists in providing research support for
members of the Latin American faculty and for students in graduate
degree programs. It places particular emphasis on multidisciplinary
research and on the employment of graduate students in research projects
as an integral part of their training. Among the representative individual
and group projects currently supported wholly or in part by Center funds
are the following: (1) Preparation of the annual serial publication, Latin
American Urban Research; (2) Aymara Language Project: English-
Aymara-Spanish dictionary and teaching materials; (3) Public Policy De-
terminants of Latin American Urbanization; (4) The Amazonian Highway
and Planned Settlement; (5) Human Tropical Ecology; (6) Publication of
Computer Map Atlases of Population/Resource Characteristics of Select-
ed Latin American Regions; (7) Chronic Drug Use in a Latin American
Urban Context. An indication of the range of faculty research interests is
provided in THE LATIN AMERICAN FACULTY (see insert in pocket
folder).


OTHER CENTER ACTIVITIES
The Latin American Data Bank
The Latin American Data Bank is an interdisciplinary social science
data archive which contains in machine readable form Latin American
economic, social, and political data for retrieval by scholars and interested
organizations. The data are kept in the lowest possible level of
disaggregation, often at the individual response level as in the case of
censuses and surveys. A number of these data sets are available nowhere
else in the world. The Data Bank maintains cooperative programs with
several Latin American census bureaus, including processing and tabula-
tion of censuses and registration statistics. Cooperative programs are also
maintained with various international organizations.


A PARTIAL VIEW OF THE CARTOGRAPHIC RESEARCH
LABORATORY






































A PARTIAL VIEW OF THE OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR, LATIN
AMERICAN DATA BANK


The Latin American Cartographic Research Laboratory
The Latin American Cartographic Research Laboratory was es-
tablished to provide map compilation-design services on a university-
wide basis for on-going projects in international studies. Its staff also
undertakes applied cartographic research in such areas as computer as-
sisted mapping. The Cartographic Laboratory provides technical assist-
ance to staffs of the various international studies programs. It maintains
and controls the use of the Center's air photo and map collection.

The Annual Latin American Conference
One of the functions of the Center is to encourage scholarly
conferences and symposia. For a quarter of a century the Center has
sponsored an annual conference dealing with various aspects of Latin
American affairs. For eighteen years these conferences were known as
The Caribbean Conference. The subject matter of the current series of The
Annual Latin American Conference has been expanded to include all of
Latin America. At these conferences, scholars of international reputation
from Latin America, the U. S., Europe, and other parts of the world,
together with panels of discussants, have dealt with subjects of wide-
ranging scope related to Latin America. The following are a few of the
themes of the Annual Latin American Conference: "Universities in Tran-
sition: The U. S. Influence in Latin American Education", "Fiscal Policy
for Industrialization and Development in Latin America", "Public Policy
and Urbanization in the Dominican Republic and Costa Rica", "Man in the
Amazon", and "Population Growth and Human Productivity".
The Annual Latin American Conference is held in the J. Wayne Reitz
Union, University of Florida, during the third week of February each year.

Colloquium
The Latin American Colloquium was established in 1964 by a group of
graduate students interested in discussing recent research related to Latin
America. The basic purpose of the Colloquium is to provide an interdis-
ciplinary forum for discussion of topics of contemporary interest. In 1971
it was approved as a student organization sponsored by the Center.
Under control of a Coordinator, who is selected at the beginning of
each academic year by the graduate students in the Latin American
Program in consultation with the Director of the Center, the Latin
American Colloquium prepares a program for the academic year, extends
invitations to guest speakers, and coordinates its program with the Public
Functions Office of the University. Approximately twenty speakers
address the Colloquium each year, often to standing room only crowds.

The Latin American Demography Program
Based upon the considerable resources of the Latin American Faculty,
particularly in the departments of geography and sociology, the Center's
Latin American Cartographic Laboratory and Latin American Data Bank,
the Tinker Foundation of New York has sponsored a teaching program in
"Latin American Demography and Population Geography." Classes com-
menced with the Fall Quarter 1972, with a faculty of 10 demographers. The
remaining 53 members of the Latin American Faculty assist this group to
offer a program of Latin American Demography and Population
Geography Studies consisting of 49 courses in 8 disciplines. Graduates of
the course in addition to receiving an M.A. or Ph.D. degree in their re-
spective discipline, receive an M.A. or Ph.D. Certificate in Latin American
Demography and Population Geography.



































PARTIAL VIEW OF THE CARD CATALOG OF THE LATIN
AMERICAN LIBRARY AND MAP COLLECTION


Tropical South American Program
This is a program for a limited number of graduate students in
Anthropology and related social and natural sciences to undertake studies
in the tropical lowlands of South America, specifically in the Amazon
Basin in its broadest sense. Each year two fellowships will be offered to
graduate students who will either: 1) take course work toward a graduate
degree thus preparing themselves for future research in the region; or 2)
will be writing a doctoral dissertation based upon previous research in the
region.
Priority will be given to students who wish to acquire training or who
wish to undertake research in problems relating to the aboriginal cultures
of tropical South America which are endangered by national develop-
ment. The study of rural populations and research among rural popula-
tions of the region will also be considered.
In addition, it is hoped to be able to provide two grants each year for
field research in tropical South America to allow students to gather the
data for doctoral dissertations. Such grants are primarily intended for
Ph.D. candidates at the University of Florida.
Applications for either fellowships or grants should be addressed to
Dr. Charles Wagley, Center for Latin American Studies, 301 Linton E.
Grinter Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.


International Programs
The University is a charter member of the Association of Caribbean
Universities. As such it is increasingly involved in cooperative social
science research in the Caribbean. Other international development
programs include a variety of activities such as (1) interdisciplinary
research on comparative urban studies, tropical ecology, and population;
(2) the administration of an intensive language and area studies program
for students of the State University System of Florida at the Universidad
de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia; (3) increased involvement in the
development of social sciences in selected Latin American universities; (4)
Amazonian studies in cooperation with the Federal University of Para; (5)
an interchange of graduate students with the Universidad Nacional Pedro
Ruiz Gallo, Lambayeque, Peri.

SUPPORTING UNITS AND PROGRAMS
The University of Florida Libraries

The University of Florida Libraries hold over 1,750,000 volumes, of
which more than 140,000 deal primarily with Latin America. These
include important document collections in the original, in transcript, and
on microfilm. The Rare Books and Manuscript Department houses the
Bromsen Memorial Collection of the books and manuscripts of the two
principal bibliographers of the Americas: Josd Toribio Medina (1852-1930)
and Henry Harrisse (1829-1910). The Libraries' Latin American holdings
are being augmented at the rate of approximately 8% a year. Under the
Farmington Plan it has a special responsibility for the acquisition of West
Indies materials, and funds from the Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, under the Libraries Facilities Act, are being employed in a major
Latin American Documents Acquisition Program.






In 1967, all Latin American materials were grouped in a separate Latin
American Library and Map Collection, immediately accessible from the
research offices and carrels of the Center. Holdings are well balanced
among history, literature, and the social sciences. Although the Collection
contains excellent basic materials for Latin America in general, it is
strongest in the West Indies, Circum-Caribbean and Brazilian areas.
Because of the excellence of the Latin American Library and Map
Collection materials, the G. K. Hall Company of Boston, Massachusetts,
has published a catalog of its holdings. The P. K. Yonge Library of Florida
History complements the Libraries' resources with a unique collection of
printed and manuscript materials dealing with the Spanish Southeast and
the adjacent Caribbean. The Spessard Holland Law Library contains over
2,800 volumes from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, and Cuba, and an im-
portant collection of sources from the British West Indies. The Hume
Agricultural Library holds more than 95,000 volumes in the environmental
sciences and tropical and sub-tropical agriculture, with special reference
to Latin America.

The Latin American Serial Documents Project
This project sponsored by the Center and the University of Florida
Libraries has responded to an urgent need for full, comprehensive collec-
tions and bibliographies of Latin American government documents, to
which researchers in many fields may turn. The culmination of more than
seven years of intensive work was the publication of a Union listing in the
fall of 1968 of the first volume of a series, Latin American Serials
Documents: A Holding List, Volume 1, Colombia. Subsequent volumes,
currently in print are: Volume 2, Brazil; Volume 3, Cuba; Volume 4,
Mexico; Volume 5, Argentina; Volume 6, Bolivia; Volume 7, Chile; Volume
8, Ecuador; Volume 9, Paraguay; Volume 10, Peri; Volume 11, Uruguay;
Volume 12, Venezuela. Holdings for the remainder of the Latin American
republics will be published in the following sequence: Volume 13,
Dominican Republic and Haiti; Volume 14, Costa Rica; Volume 15, El
Salvador; Volume 16, Guatemala; Volume 17, Honduras; Volume 18,
Nicaragua; and Volume 19, Panama.

The Aymara Language Program
A full two-year program in the Aymara language is offered. Aymara is
spoken by some 1,000,000 people in Bolivia and Peru. Aymara has been
accepted by the Graduate School to fulfill its language requirements,
provided it is relevant to a student's program of study. Aymara has also
been accepted as fulfilling the interdepartmental requirements in linguis-
tics for a non-Western European language. The University of Florida is the
only university in the United States regularly offering Aymara as an
academic subject.

Undergraduate Program in Latin American Studies
The Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Jour-
nalism and Communications offer to undergraduate students a special
curriculum leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree and a Certificate in Latin
American Studies. The course of study is designed to provide a broad
cultural base for graduate work in the field or for careers with Latin
American connections in business, government, or teaching.


PARTIAL VIEW OF LANGUAGE PRACTICE ROOM, AYMARA
LANGUAGE PROGRAM






The program is based on a departmental major leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts, or Bachelor of Science. The major may be selected from
the following fields: anthropology, economics, geography, history, polit-
ical science, sociology, Spanish, business administration, and journalism
and communication. The student must fulfill all of the requirements of his
college for admission and for obtaining the appropriate Bachelor degree.
Two special requirements exist for the certificate: (1) the student must
include in his program 36 credits in courses with Latin American emphasis
including LA 440-LATIN AMERICAN SEMINAR (5 credits), courses taken
within the major being counted in fulfillment of the requirement; (2) the
student must demonstrate a reading and speaking knowledge of Spanish
or Portuguese. This second requirement may be satisfied either through
course work or through special examination.
Students preferring to major directly in Latin American Studies at the
B.A. level may apply to do so under the individual interdisciplinary option
available through the College of Arts and Sciences.
Additional information may be obtained from the Undergraduate
Program Advisor, Center for Latin American Studies, 319 Linton E.
Grinter Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.


DISPLAY OF A FEW OF THE MORE THAN 100
PUBLISHED TITLES WITH LATIN AMERICAN
CONTENT.


PUBLICATIONS
In cooperation with The University Presses of Florida, Gainesville, the Center publishes
various scholarly multidisciplinary publications dealing with Latin America in the following
series: Latin American Monographs, General Book Series, Latin American Special Series, and
Latin American Conference Proceedings. Examples of publications from each of these series, in
sequence are: Afro-Asian Dimensions of Brazilian Foreign Policy, Spanish American Images of
the United States 1790-1960, Current National Bibliographies of Latin America: A State of the Art
Study, and Population Growth and Human Productivity: Proceedings of the 24th Annual Latin
American Conference. The Center also publishes the LATINAMERICANIST, a bi-monthly survey
and newsletter. A copy of Center Publications, the catalog of monographs, proceedings, and books
sponsored by the Center, may be obtained by writing to: Director, Center for Latin American
Studies, 319 Linton E. Grinter Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.






The University Presses of Florida, Gainesville
In addition to publishing items sponsored by the
Center, the Press has a long-established Latin American
publication program containing more than 100 titles
related to the area. Complementing individual items,
the Press also publishes the internationally-known
reference tool, the Handbook of Latin American
Studies, and the Latin American Gateway Series,
which consists of facsimile editions of rare books on
Latin America. A copy of Press publications including
titles with Latin American content and an additional
200 titles of scholarly interest, may be obtained by
writing to: Director, University Presses of Florida, 15 N.
W. 15th Street, Gainesville, FL 32611.

Latin American Urban Research
This publication, sponsored by the Center, deals with
the major themes covered by much of the significant
research on Latin American cities and urban areas. The
first in this annual series of volumes was published in
1971 by Sage Publications, Inc., Beverly Hills, Califor-
nia. Leading scholars of the U. S. and Latin America
have contributed to subsequent issues.

RELATED PROGRAMS
The Summer Law Program in Mexico City
The College of Law, in cooperation with the Escuela
de Derecho of Mexico City, conducts a six-week session
each summer for law students throughout the United
States who have completed their first year of law
studies. A faculty comprised of professors from the
College of Law, University of Florida, the Escuela de
Derecho, and visiting professors from other law schools
in the United States, teaches a selection of courses in
both international law and, more specifically, Latin
American legal subjects. The program also provides
language instruction and scheduled meetings with of-
ficials of the legislative, executive, and judicial
branches of the Mexican government.

Latin American Business Symposium
The College of Law, in cooperation with the Interna-
tional and Comparative Law Committee of the Florida
Bar Association, each March conducts a symposium in
a Latin American country on various aspects of doing
business in Latin America. A faculty of professors from
the United States and from the host country offers a
series of lectures on subjects of interest. Meetings are
also scheduled with bar officials, investment promo-
tion experts and United States embassy personnel. The
program has drawn a large group from the United


States each year, as well as numerous Latin Americans
from the host country. For additional information on
both of the above programs write to: Chairman, Latin
American Program Committee, College of Law,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.

Urban and Regional Development Center
The Urban and Regional Development Center is
concerned with three basic tasks: education, research,
and service. Among its educational programs, the
Center offers an interdisciplinary certificate program to
graduate students with urban and regional interests.
The Center is committed to sponsoring urban and
regional research in all concerned disciplines, and
cooperates in research related to Latin American urban
and regional studies.

Communication Research Center
The Communication Research Center of the College
of Journalism and Communications conducts research
projects and provides consultation on all aspects of
communication. One field of strong emphasis relates to
communication and development in Latin America.
Studies conducted by the Communication Research
Center cover a wide spectrum. Examples include
research on media use, information diffusion, public
affairs information, media content, press freedom, in-
formation control, attitude change and media coverage
of controversy, communication education, and mass
communication and political instability. A number of
studies in methodology and communication research
have also been conducted, and several computer
programs for the analysis of communication research
data have been prepared.
For further information, write to: Director, Com-
munication Research Center, 400 Stadium, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

The Latin American Studies Association (LASA)
The Latin American Studies Association is a chari-
table and educational body. It is a national, non-profit,
learned society of scholars and specialists that fosters
the interests, both educational and professional, of
persons concerned with the study of Latin America and
that promotes education through more effective
teaching, training, and research.
The secretariat and offices of the Executive Secretary
of the Latin American Studies Association are located
in Rooms 133-135, Linton E. Grinter Hall, University of
Florida, and receive administrative support from the
Center. The Executive Secretary of LASA is a member
of the Center's Latin American Faculty.






The Center for Tropical Agriculture
The Center for Tropical Agriculture is a component
of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the
University's statewide complex of research, teaching
and extension programs in agriculture.
The Center for Tropical Agriculture assists in the
determination of policy direction and provides ad-
ministrative coordination within the Institute for
tropically oriented activities. Emphasis has been placed
on projects in the tropics of Latin America. The Center
provides research grants to faculty and students, assists
academic departments in curricula development, sup-
ports development of library and laboratory facilities,
publishes and disseminates results of tropical research,
and administers technical assistance contracts.
The Center draws upon excellent, and often unique
talent in providing assistance for tropical countries. A
professional staff of nearly 800 located on the main
campus and throughout the State serve a wide variety
of agricultural activities. Approximately one-fourth of
these staff members have had overseas tropical
experience. Another outstanding resource available to
the Center is a favorable geographic location on the
edge of the tropics. This permits research and education
centers located in the southern part of the state to con-
centrate on tropical problems.
Contract and grant research currently is being con-
ducted in practically all of the Latin American and
Caribbean countries. Technical assistance projects are
concentrated in Brazil, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and El
Salvador. On the basis of a contract signed with
USAID, the Center is conducting research and field
studies on feed composition data, and compiling infor-
mation on beef cattle in the Latin American tropics.
Laboratories in most of the Latin American countries
are cooperating in this study. Because of Florida's close
proximity to Latin America, the Center relies heavily on
short term staff visits in providing technical services.
This approach permits the Center to recruit from a wide
range of specialists who could not be spared from on-
going State projects for long-term assignments. A
tropical assignment with a specific problem focus often
has resulted in a research interest complementary to
work underway in Florida, reinforcing the Institute's
service capabilities.
The Center for Latin American Studies cooperates
with the Center for Tropical Agriculture in conducting
research and instructional programs involving person-
nel from both centers. Graduate students in Latin
American Studies programs may elect a minor in
Tropical Agriculture, while those students in Agricul-
ture may minor in Latin American Area Studies.


Additional information may be obtained from the
Director, Center for Tropical Agriculture, 2001 McCarty
Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.


STUDENTS FROM LATIN AMERICA
Approximately 600 students from sixteen nations
from Latin America and the Caribbean area are regis-
tered each year at the University of Florida. Latin
Americans enter freely into the academic and social life
of the campus and the community. Their presence is an
important factor in stimulating interest in Brazilian and
Spanish American languages and cultures among
students from the United States.
The University maintains an Assistant Dean for In-
ternational Student Services who counsels students
from abroad and, with the assistance of a Committee on
International Students, develops policies to facilitate
their adaptation to campus and community life. The
College of Agriculture has a special counselor for Latin
American students.
The English Language Institute provides an Intensive
English Course, which continues year-round on a
quarterly basis. International students may enter the
course at the beginning of each quarter.
Latin American students interested in attending the
University of Florida may obtain full information on
academic programs, financial aid, admission processes,
housing, and the like from the Assistant Dean for In-
ternational Student Services, International Center,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.


A Program of Living Experience with the
Spanish Language and Colombian Culture
at Universidad de los Andes, Bogotd, Colombia
The Center acts as administrative agent for the State
University System of Florida to provide up to two
semesters of academic work at the Universidad de los
Andes. In addition, U. S. students may enroll in an In-
tensive Course in Spanish for Foreign Students, con-
ducted for 6 weeks each summer in Bogota. U. S.
students live with Colombian families which have been
selected by the Universidad de los Andes. Academic
credit for courses satisfactorily completed will be ac-
cepted toward the degree awarded by the Florida in-
stitution. Costs are comparable to attendance at a
Florida institution. For additional information, write to:
Director, Center for Latin American Studies, 319 Linton
E. Grinter Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611.







PROGRAM "OUTREACH"
Assisted by grants from the U. S. Office of Education,
the Center is conducting a series of projects which will
bring the resources of the University of Florida to high
schools, community colleges, and smaller colleges and
universities in the Southeastern region of the United
States. These projects as a group comprise Program
"Outreach", of which the following are illustrative:

Upgrading of International/Intercultural Education
in Southeastern Grade and High Schools
In cooperation with the University of Florida's
Division of Continuing Education and the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools, the Center is
sponsoring a series of special programs and workshops
for curriculum supervisors, social science teachers, and
language teachers in each of the major population
centers of the State of Florida to develop Interna-


tional/Intercultural teaching modules, and to build a
resource base of library and teaching materials. The
program will eventually be extended to all Southeast-
ern states.

Touring Exhibit of Latin American Art
for Community Colleges and Small Universities
The Center, with the support of the University
Gallery, University of Florida, has sponsored several
major exhibits of Latin American art designed to
complement the Annual Latin American Conference
held in February of each year. Exhibit titles include:
"The Maya", "Some Brazilian Architecture: Old and
New", "The Sculptures of El Tajin", "Machu Picchu of
the Incas", and "Andean Folk Art Today".
Under a grant to the Center from the U. S. Office of
Education, these exhibits are available for circulation
to small colleges and universities throughout the
Southeastern region.


VIEW OF A LATIN AMERICAN SEMINAR ROOM






Development of Methods and Resources for the
Teaching of Latin American Language and
Area Courses for Secondary and
Community College Teachers
To serve the many college and high school instructors who teach
classes with Latin American content, four courses have been developed
with the cooperation of the College of Education and are available for
enrollment by students of the University of Florida and teachers in the
Southeastern region. These courses, relating to methods and resources for
teaching, are: ED 590 TEACHING ABOUT LATIN AMERICA, EDF 632
EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA, EDF 431 and EDF 631 COMPARA-
TIVE EDUCATION (Latin America).
Teachers of Latin American content courses in high schools and com-
munity colleges are invited to register for those courses listed above which
are taught during the Summer Quarter.
In addition the Department of Romance Languages has initiated a
program leading to a Master of Arts in Teaching in Spanish, through the
Division of Continuing Education, for secondary-school teachers in the
Jacksonville (Duval County) School System. The program emphasizes
language, culture, and teaching methodology. One summer of foreign
residence has been incorporated into the program.





The Computing Center services the Latin
American Data Bank terminals.


In 1973, on the basis of twenty eight proposals submitted by institu-
tions of higher learning in a nationwide competition, the Center for
Latin American Studies, University of Florida was one of six such
activities selected by the U.S. Office of Education to be Regional
Centers of Excellence in Latin American Studies.


This public document was promulgated at a total cost of $1,895.00 or
$.63 per copy to furnish information as to courses with Latin
American content taught at the University of Florida, and the various
programs sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies.






OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


William E. Carter ... . ..... Director, Center for Latin American Studies
Terry L. McCoy . ..... Assistant Director, Center for Latin American Studies
Gustavo A. Antonini ........ : .............................. Coordinator of Research
Manuel J. Carvajal . . . .. Director, Latin American Data Bank
Vivian G. Nolan ............... .................... ................Staff Assistant

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (LASA)

Felicity M. Trueblood . .... . Assistant Professor of English and History
Executive Secretary of LASA

THE LATIN AMERICAN FACULTY
Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education,
Journalism and Law

Faculty members listed below are regularly engaged in teaching Latin American language and area
courses, in research dealing with La:tn America, and hold joint faculty appointments with the Center.
The particular teaching and research interests of each is indicated. Asterisks indicate faculty who hold
affiliate faculty appointments with the Canter; they are engaged in research but do not regLilarly teach
Latin American content courses.


ANTHROPOLOGY


ART


Carter, William E., Ph.D. Columbia University. Professor
of Anthropology. Director. Center for Latin American
Studies. Ethnology of South America.
Doughty, Paul L., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor of
Anthropology. Applied Anthropology. Andean Re-
publics.
Hardman-de-Bautista, Martha J., Ph.D. Stanford University.
Professor of Anthropology. Latin American Indigenous
Languages.
Kimball, Solon T., Ph.D. Harvard University. Graduate
Research Professor of Anthropology. Community
Studies.
Margolis, Maxine L., Ph.D. Columbia University. Assistant
Professor of Anthropology. Cultural Anthropology.
Braiil.
Moore, G. Alexander, Jr., Ph.D. Colu'mbia University.
Associate Piofessor of Anthropology. Cultural Anthro-
S apology. Latin America.
S f Nunez, Theron A., Jr., Ph.D. University of California.
Berkeley. Associate Professor of Anthropology. Eth-
Fz-'lC. nology of Mexico.
Iq77/7 Wagley. Charles, Ph.D. Columbia University. Graduate
Research Professor of Anthropology. Contemporary
Latin American Culture.
Oliver-Smith, Anthony, Ph.D. Indiana Univcrsity. Assistant
Professor of Social Science. Andean Ethnology.


*Craven, Roy C., Jr., M.F.A. University of Florida. Professor
of Fine Arts and Director of University Gallery. Mayan
Art.




ECONOMICS

Bradbury, Robert W., Ph.D. University of Michigan. Profes-
sor of Economics, Emeritus, Latin American Trade,
Latin American Common Market.
Davis, Ronnie M., Ph.D. University of Virginia. Associate
Professor of Economics. Economic System Develop-
ment. International Economics.
Denslow, David A., Ph.D. Yale University. Associate
Professor of Economics, Economic Department.
Economic History of Braiil.
Goffman, Irving J., Ph.D. Duke University. Professor of
Economics. Public Finance. Latin American Public
Expenditures.
'Koefod, Paul, Ph.D. University of Geneva. Professor of
Economics. Economic System Development. Economic
Income Giowth.
Tyler, William G., Ph.D Flitcher School. Tufts. Associate
Professor of Econonmcs. Development Economics,.
International Economics, Econ ii s ti ItV lll Ac BRARIES




JOURNALISM


Casteel, J. Doyle, Ph.D. George Peabody College. Associate
Professor of Education, Social Science Education.
Hallman, Clemens L, Ph.D. Indiana University. Associate
Professor of Education. Foreign Language Education.
Romance Languages.
Renner, Richard R., Ph.D. University of Texas. Professor
of Education. Latin American Education.

GEOGRAPHY

Antonini, Gustavo A., Ph.D. Columbia University. Asso-
ciate Professor of Latin American Studies and Geo-
graphy. Geography of Latin America. Geomorphology
of the Caribbean.
Boswell, Thomas D., Ph.D. Columbia University. Assistant
Professor of Geography. Migration and Population
Geography.
Crist, Raymond E., Docteur es Lettres, University of
Grenoble. Research Professor of Geography, Emeritus.
Human and Cultural Geography of Latin America.
Niddrie, David L, Ph.D. University of Manchester. Profes-
sor of Geography. Agricultural Geography, Resource
Use Africa and Caribbean.
Paganini, Louis A., Ph.D. University of Florida. Assistant
Professor of Geography. Cultural Geography of Central
America.





HISTORY

Bushnell, David., Ph.D. Harvard University. Professor of
History. Latin American Independence Period, Colombia.
Goslinga, Cornelis Ch., Ph.D. University of Nijmegen.
Professor of Humanities and History. Caribbean History
(and Dutch Colonial History), History of Latin American
Art.
Macaulay, Neill W., Jr., Ph.D. University of Texas. Asso-
ciate Professor of History. Modern Brazilian and Cuban
History.
McAlister, Lyle N., Ph.D. University of California, Berk-
eley. Professor of History. Colonial Mexico, Civil-Mili-
tary Relations in Latin America.
Trueblood, Felicity M., M.A. University of Florida. Assist-
ant Professor of English and History. Mexico. Latin
American Intellectual History. The Political Novel,
Latin American Urbanization.
"Woodruff, William, Ph.D. Nottingham University. Graduate
Research Professor of Economic History. The Economic
Impact of the United States and Western Europe on
Latin America.


Kent, Kurt E., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Assistant
Professor of Journalism. Associate Director, Communi-
cation Research Center. International Communication.
Pierce, Robert N., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Associate
Professor of Journalism. Mass Communication.
Rush, Ramona R., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Associate
Professor of Journalism. International Communications.
Director, Communication Research Center.
Simmons, Robert E., Ph.D. University of Minnesota.
Associate Professor of Journalism.

LAW

Gordon, Michael W., M.A. Trinity College. Professor of
Law, Latin American Trade and Investment.
Hunt, E. L. Roy, J.D. University of Mississippi. Professor
of Law. Latin American Legal Institutions and Inter-
national Law.
Macdonald, William D., S.J.D. University of Michigan.
Professor of Law.- Latin American Legal Problems.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Fitch, John S., Ill, Ph.D. Yale University. Assistant Pro-
fessor of Political Science. Latin American Political
Models.
* McCoy, Terry L., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Assistant
Director, Center for Latin American Studies. Latin
American Public Policy.
Suarez, Andres, Doctor en Derecho, University of Havana.
Professor of Latin American Studies. Modern Revolu-
tionary Movements in the Caribbean, Latin American
Political Theory.

PORTUGESE

Davis, William M., Ph.D. New York University. Assistant
Professor of Portuguese and Spanish. Brazilian and
Portuguese Language and Literature.
Hower, Alfred, Ph.D. Harvard University. Professor of
Portuguese and Spanish. Brazilian and Portuguese
Literature.

SOCIOLOGY

Baden, Mary A., Ph.D. Indiana University. Assistant Pro-
fessor of Sociology. Social Stratification, Ethnic Groups,
Urban Studies. Criminology.
Smith, T. Lynn, Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Graduate
Research Professor of Sociology, Emeritus. Society in"
Latin America, Demography in the United States, Brazil
and Colombia.


EDUCATION






Soares, Glaucio Ary Dillon, Ph.D. Washington University.
Professor of Latin American Studies and Sociology.
Sociology of Latin American Development, Political
Sociology.
Traina, Frank J., Ph.D. Cornell University. Assistant Pro-
fessor of Sociology. Demography, Latin American
Institutions.

SPANISH

Allen, John J., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Professor of
Spanish. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age.
Coulson, Graciela B., Ph.D. Washington University. Assist-
ant Professor of Spanish. Spanish American Literature.
Contemporary Narrative and Argentine Literature.
Ibarra, Fernando, Ph.D. University of California, L.A.
Associate Professor of Spanish. Nineteenth and Twen-
tieth Century Spanish Literature.
Lasley, Murray, Ph.D. Columbia University. Associate
Professor of Spanish. Spanish Philology and, Linguistics,
Old Spanish Literature.
Ramirez, Adolfo, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Assistant
Professor of Spanish. Spanish American Literature,
Teacher Training.


Saciuk, Bohdan, Ph.D. University of Illinois. Associate
Professor of Spanish. Spanish and Portuguese Lin-
guistics.
Schulman, Ivan, Ph.D. University of California, L.A.
Graduate Research Professor of Latin American Liter-
ature. Modern Spanish-American Literature.
Wershow, Irving R., Ph.D. Yale University. Professor of
Spanish. Spanish American Literature.




ZOOLOGY

*Carr, Archie F., Ph.D. University of Florida. Graduate Re-
search Professor of Zoology. Ecology, Central American
and Caribbean Natural History.
*Emmel, Thomas C., Ph.D. Stanford University. Assistant
Professor of Biological Sciences and Zoology. Popula-
tion and Tropical Biology.
*McNab, Brian K., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Associate
Professor of Zoology. Physical Ecology with special
interest in climatic adaptations and the biology of
vertebrates in the lowland tropics.


LATINAMERICANISTS, ASSOCIATED PROGRAMS


Botany and Biology

*Ewel, John J.. Ph.D. University of North Carolina. Assist-
ant Professor of Botany. Plant Ecology.
*Ewel, Kathy, Ph.D. University of Florida, Interim Assistant
Professor of Biological Sciences. Animal Ecology.
Griffin, Dana C. Ill, Ph.D. University of Tennessee. Asso-
ciate Professor of Biological Sciences and Botany.
Bryophyte and Lichen.
*Lugo, Ariel E., Ph.D. University of North Carolina. Assist-
ant Professor of Botany. Plant Ecology.

Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering

Partheniades. Emmanuel, Ph.D. University of California,
Berkeley. Professor of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
Estuaries and Control of Thermal Pollution.

Florida State Museum

*Auffenberg. Walter, Ph.D. University of Florida. Curator
of Herpetology and Professor in Zoology. Zoogeo-
graphy of Neotropical Tortoises. Evolution, Ecology.


*Austin, Oliver L., Jr., Ph.D. Harvard University. Curator
Emeritus of Ornithology and Associate Professor in
Zoology. Systematics, Ecology, Demography and Con-
servation of Neotropical Birds.
*Bullen, Adelaide K., A.B. Radcliffe College. Associate in
Anthropology. Physical Anthropology of the Caribbean
Area.
*Bullen, Ripley P., Curator Emeritus of Anthropology.
Archeology of the Caribbean Area and Florida.
*Deevey, Edward S., Jr., Ph.D. Yale University. Graduate
Research Curator of Paleoecology and Graduate Re-
search Professor of Zoology. Paleoecology.
*Gilbert, Carter Rowell, Ph.D. University of Michigan.
Associate Curator of Ichthyology and Assistant Pro-
fessor in Zoology. Systematics, Zoogeography and
Ecology of the West Indies.
Hardy, John W., Ph.D. University of Kansas. Curator and
Chairman of Department of Natural Sciences and Pro-
fessor in Zoology. Behavioral Ecology and Systematics
of Birds. Especially Middle America.
*Humphry, Stephen, Ph.D. Oklahoma State University.
Assistant Curator in Mammology. Population Dynamics
in Tropical Bats.





"Patton, Thomas H., Ph.D. University of Texas. Assistant
Curator in Vertebrate Paleontology and Assistant Pro-
fessor in Zoology. Systematics, Evolution and Zoo-
geography of Fossil and Recent West Indian Vertebrates.
Shaak, Graig D., Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh Assistant
Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology and Assistant
Professor in Geology. The Marine and Fresh Water In-
Vertebrate Fossil Deposits.
'Thompson, Fred G., Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh. Assist-
ant Curator of Malacology and Assistant Professor in
Zoology. Systematics, Ecology and Zoogeography of
Neotropical Snails.
*Webb, Sawney David, Ph.D. University of California. Asso-
ciate Curator in Vertebrate Paleoncology and Associate
Professor in Biology. Systematics, Evolution and Zoo
geography of Fossil Vertebrates in Central America.
Wilkerson, S. Jeffyy K., Ph.D. Tulane University. Assistant
Curator Social Sciences and Assistant Professor of
Anthropology. Mexican Archeology. Ethno-Iistory. of
Mexico.
*Wing, Elizabeth S., Ph.D. University of Florida. Assistant
Curator in Zooarcheology and Assistant Professor in
Zoology. Zooarcheology of Central America.



Electrical Engineering

Chenette, Eugene R., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Pro-
fessor and Chairman of Electrical Engineering. Solid
State Circuitry.

Environmental Engineering

*Odum, Howard T., Ph.D. Yale University. Graduate Re-
search Professor of Environmental Engineering. Systems
Ecology.
Snedaker, Samuel C., Ph.D. University of Florida. Assistant
Professor of Ecology and Environmental Engineering.
Systems Ecology.





Geology

Brooks, Harold K., Ph.D. Harvard University. Professor of
Geology. Marine Geology and Paleontology.
Eades, James L., Ph.D. University of Illinois. Associate
Professor of Geology. Economic and Engineering Ge-
ology.
Miffin, Martin D., Ph.D. University of Nevada. Associate
Professor of Geology. Ground Water Geology.
Pierce, Robert W., Jr., Ph.D. University of Ill:nois. Assistant
Professor of Geology. Stratigaphy. Micro-Paleontology.


J. Hillis Miller Health Center

*Burgess, Patrick P., M.S.P.H. University of North Carolina.
Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. Director, Division of
Population and Family Planning. Family Planning.
*Reynolds, Richard C., M.D. Johns Hopkins University.
Professor of Medicine. Community Health and Family
Medicine.






Latin American Data Bank

Carvajal, Manuel J., Ph.D. University of Florida. Director,
Latin American Data Bank. Assistant Professor of Re-
search in Latin American Studies. Econometrics, Eco-
nomic Aspects of Fertility in Latin America.

Latin American Studies Association LASA

Trueblood, Felicity M., M.A. University of Florida. Execu-
tive Secretary. Assistant Professorof English and. History.
Mexico, Latin American Intellectual History The Polit-
ical Novel, Latin American Urbanism.


University of Florida Libraries

Bushnell, Peter S., M.S. in Library Science, Florida State
University. Associate Librarian, Latin American Cata-
loging.
*Clarke, Berta Lou, M.A. in Librarianship, University of
Denver. Assistant Librarian. Senior Latin American
Cataloger.
Ferris, Mary, M.L.S. University of Texas. Assistant Librar-
ian, Latin American Collection.
*Mesa, Rosa, M.A.L.S. University of Havana. Associate
Librarian. Latin American Government Documents.
*Monti, Laura, Ph.D. University of Buenos Aires. Librarian.
Latin American Special Collections.
Thomas, Virginia, M.A.T. Spanish, Universi / of New
Mexico, M.L.S. University of Michigan. Assistant Latin
American Cataloger.
To Be Appointed, Assistant Librarian. Latin American
Acquisitions.
*Zimmerman, Irene, Ph.D. University of Michigan. Librarian.
Latin Amelican Collection.






CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
Faculty with Latin American Orientation


Faculty members listed below are regularly engaged in teaching and/or research dealing with Latin
America. Asterisks indicate those who, though engaged in relevant research, do not regularly teach Latin
American.content courses.


FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

*Andrew, Christopher O., Ph.D. Michigan State University.
Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. Agri-
cultural Marketing. Policy and Institutional Develop-
ment.
Clark, Harold B., Ph.D. University of Kentucky. Professor
of Agricultural Economics. General Marketing, Com-
modities and Credit.
*Dow, J. Kamal, Ph.D. University of Missouri. Associate
Professor of Agricultural Economics. Colombia, Ecuador,
Latin American Free Trade.
*Eddleman, Bobby R., Ph.D. North Carolina State Univer-
sity. Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics.
Research in Agricultural Economics.
Emerson, Robert Donald, Ph.D. Purdue University. Assist-
ant Professor of Agricultural Economics.
Mathis, W. Kary, Ph.D. Texas A&M. Assistant Professor
of Agricultural Economics. Livestock Production and
Marketing.
McPherson, Woodrow W., Ph.D. Harvard University. Grad-
uate Research Professor of Agricultural Economics.
Economic Development.
Schwartz, Michael, Ph.D. University of Florida. Assistant
Professor of Agricultural Economics. Production Econ-
omy and Marketing.
*Smith, Cecil N., Ph.D. University of California. Berkeley.
Professor of Agricultural Economics. Marketing of
Tropical Products, Particularly Horticulture.
Polopolus, Leo, Ph.D. University of California. Berkeley.
Professor of Agriciltural Economics. Research and
Administration in Agricultural Economics.
Upchurch, Melvin- L., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin.
Public Policy and Development.



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION

*Grigsby, Shaw E., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor of
Agriculture and Extension Education. Training Special-
ists for Agricultural Extension Seivice.


*Loften, William T., M.A.E.-University of Florida. Asso-
ciate Professor of Education. Agricultural Extension
Education and Vocational Agriculture.
*Pierce, Harry E., Ph.D. Cornell University. Agricultural
Education Advisor. Agricultural Education.
*Straughn, Alto A., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Assistant
Director.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

*Choate, Rush E., M.S.A. University of Florida. Professor
of Agricultural Engineering. Water Control.
*Nordstedt, Roger N., Ph.D. Ohio State University. Assist-
ant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. Waste Manage-
ment and Pollution Control.
*Smerdon, Ernest T., Ph.D. University of Missouri. Profes-
sor of Agricultural Engineering. Irrigation and Water
Management.




AGRONOMY

-Green, V.E., Jr., Ph.D. Purdue University. Professor and
Agronomist. Basic Grains.
*Kretschmer, Albert E., Ph.D. Rutgers University. Professor
of Agromony. Tropical Field Crops.
LeGrand, F., M.S. .The Netherlands and Florida Atlantic
University. Assistant Professor of Agronomy. Sugarcane.
McCloud, Darell E., Ph.D. Purdue University. Professor
of Agronomy. Tropical Agronomy.
Mott, Gerald O., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor of
Agronomy. Development of Tropical Pastures.
Norden, Alan J., Ph.D. Iowa State University. Associate
Agronomist. Tropical Agronomy.
*Prine, Gordon M., Ph.D. Ohio State University. Associate
Professor.
*Rodgers, E.G., Ph.D. Iowa State University. Professor
Sof Agronomy. Fiber Crops;
*Whitty, Elmo B., Ph.D. University of North Carolina.
SAssistant Professor of Agronomy, Field Crop Production.





ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY


*Ammerman, Clarence B., Ph.D. University of Illinois.
Professor of Animal Science. Animal Nutrition.
*Conrad, Joseph' H., Ph.D. Purdue University. Professor
of Animal Science. Animal Nutrition.
*Cunha, Tony J., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Professor
of Animal Science. Livestock Feeding, Nutrition and
Production.
'Koger, Marvin A., Ph.D. University of Missouri. Professor
of Animal Science. Animal Breeding and Cross Breeding
Programs.
*McDowell, Lee R., Ph.D. Washington State University.
Assistant Professor of Animal Science. Animal Nutrition.
"Moore, John E., Ph.D. Ohio State University. Associate
Professor in Animal Science. Animal Nutrition.
*Warnick, Alvin C., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Professor
of Animal Science. Animal Fertility and Reproduction
Problems.
*Wallace, Harold D., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor of
Animal Science.





BOTANY

Ewel, John, Ph.D. University of North Carolina. Assistant
Professor of Botany. Plant Ecology, Vegetation of
Tropics.
Griffin, Dana C. Ill, Ph.D. University of Tennessee. Asso-
ciate Professor of Biological Sciences and Botany.
Bryophyte and Lichen.
Lugo, Ariel E., Ph.D. University of North Carolina. Assist-
ant Professor of Botany. Plant Ecology, Vegetation of
Tropics, Water and Atmospheric Pollution.
*Lucansky, Terry W., Ph.D. Duke University. Assistant
Professor of Botany. Morphology and Anatomy of Trop-
ical Ferns.


DAIRY SCIENCE

*Krienke, Walter A,, M.S.A. Oklahoma A&M. Associate
Professor of Dairy Science.
*Reaves, Clarence W., M.S.A. University of Florida. Pro-
fessor Emeritus.
*Wilcox, Charles J., Ph.D. Rutgers University. Associate
Professor of Dairy Science. Dairy Cattle Breeding and
Genetics.
*Wing, James M., Ph.D. Iowa State University. Professor
of Dairy Science. Dairy Cattle Nutrition and Manage-
ment.


*Blanton, F.S., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor of
Entomology. Medical Entomology.
*Eden, William G., Ph.D. University of Illinois. Professor
of Entomology and Nematology. Pesticides and Insect-
icides.
'Fairchild, Graham, Ph.D. Harvard University. Courtesy
Professor.
*Habeck, D.H., Ph.D. North Carolina State University.
Associate Professor of Entomology. Immature Insects.
Kuitert, Louis C., Ph.D. University of Kansas. Professor
of Entomology. Fruit, Vegetable and Pasture Insects.
Perry, Vernon G., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Professor
of Nematology. Tropical Nematology.
*Smart, G.C., Jr., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Associate
Professor of Nematology. Nematode Problems of Trop-
ical Crops.
*Whitcomb, Willard H., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor
of Entomology. Insect Control by Pest Management.
*Wilkinson, R.C., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Professor
of Entomology. Forest Entomology.




FOOD SCIENCE

*Bates, Robert P., Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology. Assistant Professor of Food Science. Tropical
Food Processing.
*Dennison, Raymond A., Ph.D. University of Iowa. Pro-
fessor of Food Science. Tropical Food Processing.

FORESTRY

Kaufman, Clemens M., Ph.D. University of Minnesota.
Professor of Forestry. Tropical Forest Ecology.

FRUIT CROPS

*Campbell, Carl W., Ph.D. Purdue University. Professor.
Tropical Fruit Production.
*Grierson, William, Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor.
Post-Harvest Physiology, Citrus and Tropical Fruits.
Krezdorn, Alfred H., Ph.D. Texas A&M. Professor of Fruit
Crops. Variety Improvement in Root Stocks.
Malo, Simon E., Ph.D. University of Florida. Assistant
Professor. Topical Fruit Production.
Soule, James, Ph.D. University of Florida. Professor of
Fruit Crops. Fruit Handling.
Wiltbank, William J., Ph.D. University of Florida. Assist-
ant Professor of Fruit Crops. Fruit Physiology.
Ziegler, Louis W., Ph.D. University of Florida. Professor
of Fruit Crops. Citrus Production Management.


ANIMAL SCIENCE





INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURE


Marwel, Mason E., Ph.D. West Virginia University. Assist-
ant Director. International Programs. Professor of
Vegetable Crops Production.
Popenoe, Hugh L, Ph.D. University of Florida. Associate
Professor of Soils. Director, Center for Tropical Agri-
culture and International Programs. Tropical Soils, Land
Management, Vegetation. Ecology.
*Rsa, James E., Ph.D. University of Illinois. Assistant
Dean, Cooperative Extension Service. Economic Devel-
opment. Agricultural Policy and Trade, Agricultural
Marketing.


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE

Sheehan, T.J, Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor of
Ornamental Horticulture. Orchidology.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

Cook, Allyn A., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Professor
of Plant Pathology. Programs in Disease Control of
Tropical Fruits.
Miler, Howard N., Ph.D. University of California, Davis.
Professor of Plant Pathology.
*Purdy, Laurence H., Ph.D. University of California. Davis.
Professor of Plant Pathology. Programs in Disease
Control of Tropical Fruits.

POULTRY SCIENCE

*Harms, Robert H., Ph.D. Texas A&M College. Professor
of Poultry Nutrition.
*Wilson, Henry R., Ph.D. University of Maryland. Associate
Professor of Poultry Physiology.


"Blue, William G., Ph.D. University of Missouri. Biochemist.
Soils Depdrtment. Soil Fertility in Tropical Pasture
Production.
Caldwell, Robert E., Ph.D. Purdue University. Professor
of Soils. Morphology, Genesis and Classification of
Tropical Soils.
*Hubbell, David H., Ph.D. Cornell University. Assistant
Professor. Assistant Soils Microbiologist.


VEGETABLE CROPS


*Gull, Dwain D., Ph.D. Cornell University. Associate Horti-
culturist. Tropical Root Crops.
Kelly, John, Ph.D. Michigan State University. Professor
of Vegetable Crops. Physiology of Food Legumes.
*Marlowe, George A., Jr., Ph.D. University of Maryland.
Professor. Horticulturist. Program Development.
*Nettles, Victor F., Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor.
Horticulturist. Tropical Vegetable Crops.

VETERINARY SCIENCE

Bradley, Richard E., Ph.D. University of Georgia. Associate
Parasitologist. Parasites of Importance in the Tropics.
*Cornelius, C.E., Ph.D. University of California. Dean of
College of Veterinary Medicine.
*Edds, George T., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Professor
of Veterinary Science. Toxicology-Poisons and Chemi-
cal Residues; also Irradiation to Produce Parasite Vac-
cines.
*Simpson, Charles F., Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Pro-
fessor of Veterinary Pathology. Hypercalcemia.


SOILS






LATIN AMERICAN COURSES
Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education,
Journalism and Law

The list below includes only regularly offered courses which deal primarily with the Latin American
area and languages and which are regarded as meeting the criterion of "Latin American Specialization"
in undergraduate and graduate degree programs. With approval of his supervisory committee the student
may take other courses not listed, if they are related to his Latin American area specialization.


Anthropology

APY405-RACIAL AND CULTURAL MINORITIES. 5
credits.
APY410-CONTEMPORARY PEOPLES OF LATIN
AMERICA. 5 credits.
APY441-NATIVE PEOPLES OF MEXICO. CENTRAL
AMERICA. AND THE CARIBBEAN. 4
credits.
APY450-PEASANT SOCIETY AND CULTURE. 5
credits. (Prerequisites: APY 200, APY 202
or permission of instructor).
APY 506-LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. 5 credits.
APY 540-TRIBAL PEOPLES OF LOWLAND SOUTH
AMERICA. 4 credits.
APY 542-THE PEOPLES OF BRAZIL. 4 credits.
APY 543-PEOPLES OF THE ANDES. 4 credits.
APY545-CARIBBEAN CULTURAL PATTERNS. 4
credits.
APY 596-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 1-5 credits.
APY615-PROBLEMS OF NATIONAL INTEGRATION
IN LATIN AMERICA. 5 credits.
APY620-DIRECTED CULTURE CHANGE IN LATIN
AMERICA. 5 credits.
APY 621-SEMINAR IN ARCHEOLOGY. 5 credits.
Maximum 15 credits.
APY 640-SEMINAR: ANTHROPOLOGY OF LATIN
AMERICA. 5 credits.
APY 690--SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY.
(Example Mezo-American Ethno-History).
5 credits.
APY696-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 1-5 credits. Maximum
15 credits.
APY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0-9 credits. Maximum
23 credits.
APY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1-15 credits.

Economics

ES 341-INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS. 5 credits.
ES345-INDUSTRY AND TRADE OF LATIN AMER-
ICA. 3 credits.
ES 418-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 4 credits.


ES444-INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS.
4 credits.
ES449-COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. 4
credits.
ES 496-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 1-5 credits.
ES 545-FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND FISCAL POL-
ICIES OF SELECTED LATIN AMERICAN
COUNTRIES. 3 credits.
ES549-COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC
SYSTEMS. 4 credits.
ES617-THEORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.
5 credits.
ES618-SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.
5 credits.
ES641-THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 5
credits. (Prerequisites: ES 401--Micro-
economics and ES 402--Macroeconomics).
ES644-INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS. 5
credits.
ES645--THE ECONOMY OF SPANISH LATIN AMER-
ICA. 5 credits.
ES 646-THE ECONOMY OF BRAZIL. 5 credits.
ES649--SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. 5 credits.
ES696--INDIVIDUAL WORK IN LATIN AMERICAN
ECONOMIES. 1-5 credits.
ES 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0-9 credits.
ES 799- DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1-15 credits.


Education

EDF 431-COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (LATIN AMER-
ICA). 5 credits.
EDF 590-TEACHING ABOUT LATIN AMERICA. 5
credits.
EDF 631--COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (LATIN AMER-
ICA). 4 credits.
EDF 632-- EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA. 4 credits.


Geography


GPY384 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY OF LATIN
AMERICA. 4 credits.






GPY485-GEOGRAPHY OF MIDDLE AMERICA AND
THE CARIBBEAN 4 credits.
GPY 486-GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH AMERICA. 4
credits
GPY 496 INDIVIDUAL WORK 1 5 crplits.
GPY 535 LAND TENURE. 4-credts.
GPY551 RESEARCH METHODS IN POPULATION
GEOGRAPHY. 4 credits.
GPY685- SEMINAR: MIDDLE AMERICA AND THE
CARIBBEAN: 5 credits.
GPY 686 -SEMINAR: SOUTH AMERICA. 5 credits.
GPY 688-RESOURCE UTILIZATION AND CONSERVA-
TION IN LATIN AMERICA. 3 credits.
GPY689-SEMINAR: LAND, MAN AND MIGRATION
IN LATIN AMERICA. credits.
GPY 690 -TROPICAL LAND.' AND THEIR UTILIZA-
TION. 12 credits.
GPY696-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 1-5 credits. Maximum
15 credits.
GPY 699 -MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0-9 credits. Maximum
24 credits.
GPY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1-15 credits.
History

HY370--CURRENT LATIN AMERICAN EVENTS. 3
credits.
HY371-COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY.
4 credits.
HY372--MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. 4
credits.
HY374-THE INTER-AMERICAN SYSTEM. 3 credits.
HY421-AGE OF DISCOVERY: THE PORTUGUESE
AND SPANISH, 1415-1763. 4 credits.
HY465-CULTURAL HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA.
1500 to 1650. 4 credits.
HY466--CULTURAL HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA.
1650 to 1800. 4 credits.
HY470-PROBLEMS IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF
LATIN AMERICA I. 4 credits.
HY471-PROBLEMS IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF
LATIN AMERICA II. 4 credits.
HY 472-CARIBBEAN, THE OLD COLONIAL SYSTEM.
4 credits.
HY473-CARIBBEAN, 19th and 20th CENTURIES.
4 credits.
HY 474 -MODERN MEXICO. 4 credits.
PY 475-THIE GRAN COLOMBIAN NATIONS. 4 credits.
HY 476- TH PLANTING REPUBLICS. 4 ciedits.
HY 477 -GRAZ.IL TO 1822. 4 crethts.
HY 478- BRAZIL SINCE 1822. 4 credits.
HY499 SPECIAL STUDY IN HISTORY. 1-5 credits.
HY503 TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY.
(Repe, t with charune in content.1 4 credits.
M,iaximum 16 credits.


HY599 SPECIAL STUDY IN HISTORY. 4 credits.
MaximutIm 116 :r .dit,.
HY 602-THEORIES AND METHODS I (R.lnuield of all
candidates M.A., M.A.T.. Ph.D. dogic e..)
5 credits.
HY603--THEORIES AND METHODS II. (RquiIired of
all candidates M.A.. M.A.T Pih.D dcgices.)
5 credits.
HY 630--INDIVIDUAL STUDY. 5 crifits.
HY670-THE HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF LATIN
AMERICA I. 5 credsl:,
HY671-THE HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF LATIN
AMERICA II 5 credits
HY 672-SEMINAR 'IN BRAZILIAN HISTORY (may be
rep atlr'll 5 credits.
HY 673--SEMINAR IN COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICA
(may be repeated). 5 credits.
HY 674--SEMINAR IN INDEPENDENT SPANISH AMER-
ICA (may be repeatedd. 5 credits.
HY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 1-15 credits.
HY 700-COMPARATIVE HISTORY (considerable Latin
American content). 5 credits.
HY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1-15 credits.


Humanities

HUM 250--LATIN AMERICAN HUMANITIES. 4 credits.





Journalism

JM 419-WORLD COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 4 credits.
JM 599-MASS COMMUNICATION IN LATIN AMERICA.
3 credits. (Also available as COM 630. 3
to 5 credits.)
ADV433.-INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING. 4 credits.
COM 619- INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION. 4 cro.
dits.

Latin American Studies

LA 440-LATIN AMERICAN AREA SEMINAR. 5 credits.
LA 496--INDIVIDUAL WORK. 4 credits.
LA 640- LATIN AMERICAN AREA SEMINAR 3 credits.
LA696--INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 5 credits. (Includes
special studies iin Aymara.)
LA 697-SUPERVISED RESEARCH. 1.5 credits.
LA 699 MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0-9 credits Maximum
24 credits.
LA 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 5 credits.






Law

LW 677--SEMINAR: LATIN AMERICAN LEGAL INSTI-
TUTIONS. 3 credits. (Prcrequisite: LW 694,
Preparation.)
LW678--SEMINAR: LATIN AMERICAN TRADE AND
INVESTMENT. 3 credits. (Prerequisite:
LW 694, Preparation.)
LW 694-SEMINAR: PREPARATION. 1 credit.

The following courses are taught each summer in Latin
American Law Program in cooperation with Escuela Libre
de Derechos. University of Mexico. Mexico City. Mexico.
(All carry the LW 695 rubric.):

LW 695-COMPARATIVE NATURAL RESOURCES AND
ENVIRONMENT LAW (Mexico). 3 credits.
LW 695--COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (Mex-


ico). 3 credits.
LW 695--LAWS AND POLICIES AFFECTING
INVESTMENT IN MEXICO.
LW 695 SEMINAR: JOINT VENTURES IN


FOREIGN
3 credits.
'.EEXICO.


3 credits.




Linguistics

APY 310-INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE A:'D CUL-
TURE. 5 ciedlts.
LIN 375- INTRODUCTORY AYMARA LA:'GUAGE
AND CULTURE I. 5 credits.
LIN 376--INTRODUCTORY AYMARA LANGUAGE
AND CULTURE II. 5 credits.
LIN 377-INTRODUCTORY AYMARA LANGUAGE
AND CUL.TUR'E II. 5 credits.
LIN 415-ADVANCED AYMARA LANGUAGE AND
CULTURE I 5ciedits.
LIN 416-ADVANCED A \'iARA LANGUAGE AND
CULTURE II b csedits.
LIN 417- ADVANCED AY'.-\RA LANGUAGE AND
CULTURE IIl. credits.
APY503- INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC FIELD
METHODS. 5 ci'dits.
APY 505-PRINCIPLES OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL LIN-
GUISTICS. 5 credits.
APY 511 PHONOLOGY. 5 credits.
LIN 610 PHONOLOGY I..1 Icicdits.
LIN 611- PHONOLOGY II. 4 credits.
FLE 619- INTRODUCTION TO ROMANCE LINGUIS-
TICS 5 :iidits.
LIN 620 MORPHOSYNTAX. 4 credits
LIN 621 SYNTAX. 4 cirdits.
LIN 624 SEMINAR IN LINGUISTIC FIELD METHODS.
5 credits.


PE 504- PORTUGUESE PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY.
4 credtls.
SH 404 SPANISH PHONETICS. 4 cr .iits.
SH 406 THE STRUClURE OF SPANISH. 4 crdc.,ts.
SH505 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND SYNTAX.
5 credits.
SH 512 -HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE.
4 credits.
SH 606--SPECIAL STUDY IN SPANISH LINGUISTICS.
5 credits.



Political Science

PCL 207 MODERN POLITICAL SYSTEMS. 5 crtedts.
PCL 326--GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE DE-
VELOPING COUNTRIES. 5 credits
PCL 327-THE MILITARY IN POLITICS. 5 cred:s.
PCL 340 INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN POL-
ITICS. 5 cro(its.
PCL 438--INTERNAl IONAL POLITICS OF LATIN
AMERICA. 5 credits.
PCL 441 POLITICAL SYSTEMS OF LATIN A'.'ERICA:
MODERNIZATION, AUTHORI7ARIAN-
ISM, REVOLUTION (Unclrgracr:.3l). 5
credits.
PCL442 CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN LATIN
AMERICAN POLITICS (Undcer-.aduate).
5 credits.
PCL 540-INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF LATIN
AMERICA. 5 credits.
PCL 541-POLITICAL SYSTEMS OF LATIN A'.'ERICA:
MODERNIZATION. AUTHORITARIAN-
ISM, REVOLUTION (Graduate). 5 credits.
PCL 542-CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN LATIN
AMERICAN POLITICS (Graduate'. 5 cre-
dits.
PCL620 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY.
5 credits.
PCL 70 -SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN GOVERN-
MENT AND POLITICS I (Pie:-.lIuisit:
knnowl: d(le of S;p),iish or PortugL,.sui). 5
crli' ts.
PCL 672 SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN GOVERN
MENT AND POLITICS II (Prere-.lulisiti:
knowlidgle of Spaiiish or Portunguei ).
5 cril tits.
PCL 674 SEMINAR IN BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT
AND POLITICS (PierMluisite: PCL 541.
are;hng krrn \led(je of Pirtuluuese(). 5 credits.
PCL 696 INDIVIDUAl. WORK. 1 5 credits. Majxuum
16 clrdits.
PCL 699 MASITER'S R[ SiARCH. 0 9 crtdlits.
PCL 799 DOCI ORAL RESEARCH. 1 15 credits.





Portuguese

,PE133-BEGINNING PORTUGUESE -I (Not available
for graduate- credit). 5 credits.
PE 134-BEGINNING PORTUGUESE II (Not available
for graduate credit). 5 credits.
PE-135-BEGINNING PORTUGUESE III (Not available
for graduate credit). 5 credits.
PE 250-MODERN BRAZILIAN LITERATURE IN
TRANSLATION. 4 credits.
PE 301-INTRODUCTORY PORTUGUESE, ACCELERA-
TED (Prerequisite: SH 135;.or FH 135,
or equivalent). 5 credits.
PE 304-ORAL PRACTICE IN PORTUGUESE (Prerequi-
site: PE 135 or equivalent). 4 credits.
PE 305-COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. 4 credits.
PE328--INTRODUCTION TO BRAZILIAN LITERA-
TURE I. 3 credits.
PE 329-INTRODUCTION TO BRAZILIAN LITERA-
TURE II. 3 credits.
PE451-MACHADO DE ASSIS AND HIS CO;T'T.;PO.
RARIES. 4 credits.
PE 452- ECA DE QUEIROS AND HIS CONTEMPORAR-.
IES. 4 credits.
PE600-SPECIAL STUDY IN BRAZILIAN. OR PORTU.
GUESE LITERATURE. 3-5 cecd;ts. taxi-
mum 15 credits.
PE651-THE 19th-CENTURY BRAZILIAN NOVEL. 5
credits.
PE652-THE 20th-CENTURY BRAZILIAN NOVEL. 5
credits.
PE 653- BRAZILIAN POETRY. 5 credits.
PE 654-BRAZILIAN DRAMA. 5 credits.






Sociology

SY360-SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN SOCIETIES.
4 credits.
SY460- -COMP-ARATIVE SOCIOLOGY. 4 credits.
SY 463- 1MODERNIZA1 ION IN. LATIN AMERICA. 4
credits.
SY 470 POPULATION POLICY. 4 credits.
SY 471 -POPULATION. 4 crtedits;
SY 49G-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 4 credits..
SY658--SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY OF RURAL DE-
VELOPMENT. 4 ciedits.
SY 664-SEMINAR IN SPANISH AMERICAN SOCIE-
TIES. 4 c:idits.
SY G65--SEMINAR INBRAZI-LIAN SOCIETY. 4 credits.
SY:673-SEM1NAR IN LATIN AMERICAN POPULA-
TION. 4 credits.


SY674-SEMINAR IN DEMOGRAPHIC PROCESSES
AND METHODS. 4 credits.
SY 696 -INDIVIDUAL WORK. 4 credits.
SY 699- MASITER'S RESEARCH. 0.9 cirdits. Maximum
23 credits.
SY 799--DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1-15 credits.
Spanish

SH 103, BEGINNING SPANISH (ALTERNATE) I. (Not
available for graduate credit.) 5 credits.
SH 104- BEGINNING SPANISH (ALTERNATE) II. (Not
available for graduate credit.) 5 credits.
SH 105--BEGINNING SPANISH (ALTERNATE) III. (Not
available for graduate credit.) 5 credits.
SH 133-BEGINNING SPANISH I. (Not available for
graduate credit.) 5 credits.
SH 134- BEGINNING SPANISH II. (Not available foi
graduate credit.) 5 credits.
SH 135 BEGINNING SPANISH III. (Not available for
graduate credit.) 5 credits.
SH202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH (Not availalile foi
graduate credit.) 4 credits.
SH 204-ORAL PRAC3 ICE IN SPANISH. 4 credits.
SH 251 THE MODERN SPANISH-AMERICAN NOVEL
IN TRHANSSLATION. 4 cred!:t;.
SH 305--GRAMV.'AR AND COMPOSITION I. 4 credits.
SH 306- GRA.'1iAR AND COMPOSITION II. 4 credits
SH330 SPANISH AND SPANISH-A,.MEHICAN CIVIL:
ZATION. 4 credits.
SH 475--INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH-AMERICAN'
LITERATURE I. 4 credits.
SH 476-INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH-AMERICAN
LITERATURE II. 4 credits.
SH477-1NTRODUCTION TO. SPANISH-AMERICAN
LITERATURE II1.. 4 credits.
SH 479--THE SPANISH-AMERICAN NOVEL FROM ORI-
GIN TO CRIOLLISMO'. 4 credits.
SH 512-HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE
4 ci edits.
SH 600--SPECIAL STUDY IN SPANISH-AMERICAN
LITERATURE. 5 credits.
SH605--INDIVIDUAL WYORK. 2-5 credits. Maximum
T5 credits.
SH 010- INTRODUCE ION TO GRADUA E STUDY AND
RESf'.ARCH 5 ci :Iits.
SH.655- ARGENTIN'E L .I i RATUR 5 credits.
SH 660-THE MOD-FHNIST MOVMDIT OVlMtNT 5 crldit-..
SH 665 THE SPANISH-AMERICAN ESSAY. cledlts.
SH 667--CONTEMPORARY SPANISH-AMERICAN NOV
EL 1. 5 credits.
SH 668 CONTEMPO RARY SPANISH AM.RICAN NOV
EL II 5 creflits.
SH 699 :MAS1 ER'S RESELARCH. 09- cietdis. Mjximum
24 c redits:
St 799 DOC1ORAt. RESEARCH. 1.15 credits.







Zoology

ZY430-TROPICAL BIOLOGY. AN ECOLOGICAL
APPROACH. 12 credits.


BLY 610-ADVANCED TROPICAL BOTANY. (Taught
jointly with Zoology, during( tih; sunnim'r
in Costa Rica.i) 12 creditt.
ZY 610-ADVANCED TROPICAL ZOOLOGY. 12 credits.


CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
Latin American Content Courses


Food and Resource Economics

FRE 411-MANAGEMENT OF FARMS IN T.ROICAL
AREAS credits
FRE 423-INTERNATIONAL AND INTER-E-GiOC'AL
TRADE IN AGRICULTURE Pre-:.: s re:
FRE 320, eqnival-nt, or conser: of in-
structor.) 3 creclts.
FRE 430-LAND AND WATER ECONOMICS c-d;ts.
FRE 541-FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL DEVEL:C'.'ENT
PLANNING. (P.rrerqcu.ste: FRE 301! 5
credits.
FRE 602--ECONO.'.11CS OF AGRICULTURAL DEVE'-P-
MENT AND RESOURCE USE 5 ? c e::.;s.
FRE 640--FOUNDATIONS OF AGRICULTURAL PDLI-
CIES. 3 credits.
FRE 645-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND AGRICUL-
TURE. (Prerequisites: EC 301. EC 302 or
AS 301) 5 credits.
FRE 646-AGRICULTURE'S ROLE IN THE G=OV'.TH
OF LATIN AMERICAN NATIONS. 4
credits.
FRE 650 INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL POLICY
AND TRADE 5 ..-tdti.
FRE 682-REGIONAL ECONOMIC PLANNING. 5 cred;ts.


AED623-PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCA-
TION. 1.12 credits.
AED625-ADULT EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE.
4 credits.
AED 627-RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL AND EX-
TENSION EDUCATION. 1-5 credits.




Agricultural Engineering

MCA 301--AGRICULTURAL WATER MANAGEM.'IENT
4 c-i:dts.
MCA310-ENGINEEfIING CONCEPTS IN AGRICUL.
TURE. 4 credits.
MCA 333-AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL
QUALITY. 4 credits.
MCA 426- ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES OF PLANT
AND ANIMAL ENVIRONMENT. 4 credits.
MCA450 -SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION EN-
GINEERING. 4 credits.
MCA451-DRAINAGE AND IRRIGATION ENGINEER-
ING. 4 ciudits.
MCA 5555 ANIMAL 'WASTE MANAGEMENT. 5 crci..!
MCA 671-ADVANCED SOIL AND WATER MANA.(.i:
MENT ENGINEERING. 4 credits.


Agricultural and Extension Education


AED 301 DEVELOPMENT AND ROLE OF EXTENSION
EDUCATION. 4 cre.di'..
AED 407--AGRICULTURAL YOUTH PROGRAMS. 4
credits.
AED 601-ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP.
4 credits. MlaxJiuni 12 c edcts.
AED-604-AGRiCULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCA
TION THROUGH GROUP ACTION. 4 cre-
dits. Maximum 12 credits.
AED 605 -METHODOLOGY OF PLANNED CHANGE IN
AGRI BUSINESS 4 cretdis.
AED 621-DEVELOPING COMMUNITY PROGRAMS IN
AGR ICULTUR E.-4 crvd ts..


Agronomy

AY505--RICE 4cfrldts.
AY b09--SUGARCA.NE. 4 cr.tdits.
AY513-OILSEED CROPS: 4 credits.
AY 514- FIBERCROPS. 4 ctedits.
AY536--TROPICAL PASTURE AND FORAGE SCI
-ENCE. 5 ciedis.
AY 646- CROP ECOLOGY. 5 credits.
AY647-CROP PLANTS IN TROPICAL ENVIRON
MENTS. 12.credits,








Animal Science

AL 411 --BEEF CATTLE SCIENCE. 5 credIts.
AL 413- SWINE PRODUCTION. 3 crerlts.
AL 527-ANIMAL NUTRITION. 5 credits.
ADP535-ANIMAL PRODUCTION IN THE TROPICS.
4 credits.

Botany

BTY 301-INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGY. 5 credits.
BTY 500-PLANT GEOGRAPHY. 4 cr-dits.
BTY 501-ADVANCED ECOLOGY. 5 credits.
BTY 604-ECOSYSTEMS OF THE TROPICS. 4 credits.
BTY605--TROPICAL BIOLOGY: AN ECOLOGICAL
APPROACH. 12 credits.
BTY 607-ADVANCED TROPICAL BOTANY. 12 cre-
dits.

Entomology and Nemotology

EY301-PRINCIPLES OF ENTOMOLOGY 4 c:.-lits.
EY303-PRINCIPLES OF NEMATOLOGY. 4 cr.-dIts.
EY 351--FOREST ENTOMOLOGY. 4 credits.
EY 411-APICULTURE. 4 credits.
EY420-.MEDICAL AN'-D VETERINARY ENTO'.'OL OGY.
4 credits.
EY 518-TROPICAL ENTOMOLOGY. 4 cred:is.
EY 522-TROPICAL NEMATOLOGY. 5 credits.
EY622-BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INSECTS. 5
credits.
EY 623--IMMATURE INSECTS. 5 credits.

Food Science

FS452-FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROCESSING. 4
credits.
FS502-NUTRITIONAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL AS-
PECTS OF FOODS. 4 cic,it...

Forestry

FY618 TROPICAL FORESTRY. 4c:..-hts.

Fruit Crops

FC335 INTRODUCTION TO CITRUS CULTURE. 4
credits.


FC 341 CITRUS GROWING. 4 credits.
FC441 CITRUS PRODUCTION. 4 cii:dits.
FC 523- MAJOR TROPICAL FRUIT-;. 4 citdrtt.
FC 524--MINOR TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL
FRUITS. 4 credits.
FC 604-TAXONOMY OF FRUIT CROPS. 3 credits.
FC608--RESEARCH METHODS IN FRUIT CROPS.
1 4 credits. Maximum 12 credits.
FC 610-CITRICULTURE. 5 credits.
FC615 AGRICULTURAL METEOROLOGY. 5 creitts

Ornamental Horticulture

OH 462 -MANAGEMENT OF SOUTHERN TURF-
GRASSES. 4 credits.
OH 11--ORCHIDOLOGY. 4 credits.

Plant Pathology

PT301--LECTURES IN'J BASIC PLANT PATHOLOGY
2 credit's
PT 312- LABORATORY IN TROr'iCAL PLANT PATHr
OLOGY 3 ced ;,.
PT500 FFROBLE.:S I PLAN'.T PATHOLOGY. 3
cred,:
PT 541 TROPICAL PLA'.T PATHOLOGY. 4 c.::;..

Soils

SLS325-TROPICAL SOILS AND THEIR ENVIRON.
MENT 4 cudits.
SLS 428 SOILS SURVEY. 3 credits.
SLS 525 TROPICAL SOILS. 3credits.
SLS 622 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY. 5 credits.
SLS 623 SOIL GENESIS AND CLASSIFICATION. 3
credits.
SL.S 626-SOII FERTILITY. 4 ctchits.

Veterinary Science

VY 632 VETERINArY PHARMACOLOGY I. 5 cr-it.,.
VY 633 VETERINA Y PHAH .iACOL.OGY II. b cr'o-s.
VY 6-12 VETERiN \ARY MICI')1OBIlOLOGY I. 6 :cr:.,.
VY 643- VETERINARY .MICROBIOLOGY II. 6 ci:..
VY 663. PARASITIC DlISEASLS IN THE TROPICS ANi)
SUBTI'ROPICS bc:re' .
VY 522- VETERINARY PHYSIOLOGY 1. 5 crcd;t.
VY 523 VE1 LRINARY PHYSIOLOGY II. 5 ccldis.




WN SITY OF FLORIDA
I II iil'i iH lll ll
3 1262 04390190 8


LATIN AMERICAN LANGUAGE AND AREA COURSES
CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA




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