Minutes of meeting of February 2 and 3, 1940 ... Department of state

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Title:
Minutes of meeting of February 2 and 3, 1940 ... Department of state
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2 p. l., 2-25 numb. l. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of State. -- Division of Cultural Relations
Conference:
Conference on inter-American relations in the field of education, (1939. Temporary continuation committee
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Department of state
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Washington, D. C
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Subjects / Keywords:
Education -- Congresses   ( mesh )
Education -- Congresses, Internat., 1940
Co-operation, Intellectual
Intellectual cooperation -- Congresses   ( lcsh )
Education -- Congresses   ( lcsh )
Relations -- Latin America -- United States   ( lcsh )
Relations -- United States -- Latin America   ( lcsh )
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conference publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

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Also issued online.
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At head of title: Temporary continuation committee, Conference on inter-American relations in the field of education.
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Mimeographed.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 38255412
lccn - 40026466
ocm38255412
Classification:
lcc - F1418 .C785
ddc - 370.631
nlm - W3 C71 1939n
System ID:
AA00002850:00001

Full Text












TEMPORARY CONTINUATION COMMITTEE



CONFERENCE ON INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS
-IN THE
FIELD OF EDUCATION


MINUTES OF MEETING OF
FEBRUARY 2 AND 3, 1940.


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TEMPORARY CONTINUATION COMMITTEE CONFERENCE

ON INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS N TIHE

FIELD OF EDUCATION










MINUTES OF MEETING OF FEBRUARY 2 AND 3, 1940


Room 474

Department of State





















Department of State


April 1940






3 70. 3
C749-5








MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TEMPORARY CONTINUATION
COMMITTEE OF THE CONFERENCE ON INTER-AMERICAN
RELATIONS IN THE FIELD OF EDUCATION


The Continuation Committee of the Conference on Inter-
American Relations in the Field of Education met in
Washington on February 2 and 3, 1940, under the leadership
of George F. Zook, to assess and interpret the findings of
the Conference, to give careful consideration to the recom-
mendations and resolutions of the six discussion groups of
that body, and to consider the problem of what permanent
agencies were best designed to carry forward a coordinated
program of educational interchange with the other American
republics.

Present at the two-day deliberations were:

Harold Benjamin, Professor of Education and
Dean of the College of Education,
University of Maryland.

Allen C. Blaisdell, Director, International House,
Berkeley, California.

Lloyd E. Blauch, Consultant in Inter-American
Educational Relations, United States
Office of Education.

The Reverend Harold Carroll, representing
Monsignor Ready of the National Catholic
Welfare Council.

Ben M. Cherrington, Chief, Division of Cultural
Relations, Department of State.

Donald F, Christy, Chief, Division of Foreign
Agriculture and Agricultural Relations,
Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations,
Department of Agriculture.

Bernice B. Cronkhite, Dean, Radcliffe College.

Hugh S. Cumming, Director, Pan American Sanitary
Bureau.

William D. Cutter, Secretary, Council on Medical
Education and Hospitals,
American Medical Association.


Stephen Duggan,








-2-


Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International
Education.

Edward 0. Ernst, Assistant Director, Pan American
Sanitary Bureau.

Edgar J. Fisher, Assistant Director, Institute of
International Education.

Ernesto Galarza, Chief, Division of Labor and
Social Information, Pan American Union.

Willard E. Givens, Executive Secretary, National
Education Association.

Clarence H. Haring, Chairman, Committee on Latin
American Studies, American Council of
Learned Societies.

Rowland Haynes, President, University of Omaha, and,
President, Association of Urban Universities.

Isaac L. Kandel, Professor of Education, Teacherst
College, Columbia University.

Warren Kelchner, Chief, Division of International
Conferences, Department of State.

Fred J. Kelly, Chief, Division of Higher Education,
United States Office of Education.

Waldo G. Leland, Director, American Council of
Learned Societies.

Martin R. P. McGuire, Dean of the Graduate School,
Catholic University of America.

Carl H. Milam, Secretary, American Library Association.

The Right Reverend John F. O'Hara, Auxiliary Bishop
of the Army and Navy.

Richard Pattee, Division of Cultural Relations,
Department of State.

Harry H. Pierson, Division of Cultural Relations,
Department of State.

Sherwood








-3-


Sherwood D. Shankland, Secretary, American
Association of School Administrators,
National Education Association.

Guy Eo Snavely, Secretary, Association of
American Colleges.

Lee E. Sutton,-Dean, Medical College of Virginia.

Charles A. Thomson, Assistant Chief, Division of
Cultural Relations, Department of State.

John H. Tigert, President, University of Florida,
and President, National Association of
State Universities.

George A. Works, Dean of Students,
The University of Chicago.

Evan E. Young, Vice President, Pan American Airways.

George F. Zook, President, American Council
on Education.

S TURAIAF7

At the morning session on February 2, the Committee
reviewed briefly.the work of the Conference0 It heard
statements from the chairmen of the section committees on
Scholarships and Fellowships, Curriculum and Courses,
Hospitality, Publications, Medical Education, and Primary
and Secondary Education, concerning significant develop-
ments in their particular fields since the Conference. In
addition, it received a statement on Agricultural Education.
The Committee then gave preliminary consideration to the
problem of committee structure to carry forward the recom-
mendations and proposals of the Conference. It heard re-
ports on the work done to date by the Continuation Com-
mittees of the Conferences on Inter-American Relations
in the Fields of Art, Music, and Publications and
Libraries. The Committee then began detailed consider-
ation of the recommendations submitted by the six discus-
sion groups on the final day of the Conference.

The afternoon session on February 2 was devoted to a
discussion of the most practical way of putting isto effect


the








-4.


the recommendations of the Conference discussion groups
and other proposals submitted for its consideration.
These concerned the development of additional fellowship
opportunities; stimulation of more adequate educational
facilities for Latin American studies in universities
and colleges, secondary and elementary schools, and adult
education; adjustment programs for foreign students;
more effective presentation in the United States of works
of scholars and writers in the other American republics
through educational journals and publications of learned
societies in this country; the development of cooperative
projects in the field of medical education and research;
and cooperation in agricultural education.

At its final session on February 3, the Committee
reviewed the discussion of the previous sessions and
passed the following resolutions:


FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

That the responsibility for developing additional
fellowship opportunities be referred to the Institute of
International Education.


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

That the responsibility for stimulating more adequate
educational facilities for Latin American Studies in
universities and colleges, secondary and elementary schools,
and adult education be assumed by appropriate organizations
and that the Division of Cultural Relations of the Depart-
ment of State be empowered to approach such organizations
with the request that they conduct activities in this field.


HOSPITALITY

That the administration of adjustment programs for
foreign students be delegated to the Continuation Com-
mittee recently organized by Section III of the Conference,
that said Committee be related to the Institute of Inter-
national Education, and that the creation of an advisory
council be left to the decision of the Hospitality
Continuation Committee.


PUBLICATIONS










PUBLICATIONS


That the recommendations of Group IV, concerning the
possibilities of more effective presentation in the
United States of works of scholars and writers in the other
American republics through educational journals and pub-
lications of learned societies in this country, be referred
to the Committee on Report and Recommendations of the
Conference on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
Publications and Libraries and that that Committee add
one or two representatives of Group IV to its membership.


MEDICAL EDUCATION

That the recommendations of Group V, for the develop-
mont of cooperative projects with the other American
republics in the field of medical and allied education
and research, be delegated to the Continuation Committee
in Medicine and Allied Fields, authorized by Group V and
now in the process of formation, and that its activities
be related to the Pan American Sanitary Bureau.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

That a committee for cooperation in agricultural
education be created, such committee to be associated
with the United States Department of Agriculture.


OTHER FIELDS OF EDUCATION

That the Division of Cultural Relations of the
Department of State be authorized to enlist the support
of appropriate organizations in other fields of edu,
national activity, such as engineering, where sufficient
interest is in evidence.


CORRELATION OF ACTIVITIES

That provisions for the correlation of the various
bodies to whom activities in inter-American relations
in the field of education have been delegated by this
Committee be referred to the General Advisory Committee
of the Division of Cultural Relations of the Department
of State and that said Committee be enlarged to become


more







-6-


more widely representative of the groups involved.

The Temporary Continuation Committee of the Con-
ference on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
Education then dissolved.


MORNING SESSION

February 2

In welcoming those in attendance, Dr. Cherrington
expressed the appreciation of the Department of State
for their sacrifice of valuable time and the diligent
effort devoted by members of the Committee toward bring-
ing about better understanding between the peoples of
thj Western Hemisphere through the development of a
reciprocal program of educational interchange between
the United States and the other American republics.

Dr. Cherrington outlined briefly the underlying
philosophy which had led the Department to create the
Division of Cultural Relationsi The Division,
Dr. Cberrington said, had been created
Functions of for the three-fold purpose of afford-
the Division ing to private initiative the good of-
of Cultural fioes of the Government in making more
Relations effective international activities of
a cultural nature, of acting as a co-
ordinating agency in order to eliminate duplication of
effort, and of unifying the cultural activities of the
various Government agencies participating in programs
of cooperation with foreign countries.

Dr. Cherrington then sketched briefly the history
of the Division. In the formulation of its program, he
added, it was suggested at first that a
Point of large national committee be set up to ad-
departure vise the Department on the best methods of
achieving the purpose for which the
Division had been created. It was later decided, however,
to organize a small committee composed of outstanding
leaders in the cultural life of the United States. This
committee, in consultation with officers of the Depart-
ment explored what was being done in the field of inter-
national cultural relations in order to arrive at a
point of departure from which the Department might initiate
efforts toward making existing facilities more effective
and bringing about their gradual expansion.
The








-7-


The decision was then reached to invite leaders in
the various fields of cultural effort to attend a series
.of four conferences in Washington devoted
Purpose of to inter-American relations in the fields
conferences of art, music, education, and publications
and libraries. These conferences, it was
felt, would afford opportunities for representatives of
national organizations, institutions, foundations, and
individuals to compare programs, assay facilities in
their particular fields, plumb the resources for effective
interchange with similar groups in the other American
republics, and lay the groundwork for a long range program
of inter-Americ-an cooperation. Invitations were extended
by the Secretary of State and on October 11 and 12, 1939,
some 150 leaders in the field of art discussed the pos-
sibilities of inter-American cooperation through the medium
of art. On October 18 and 19, 1939, approximately 150
leaders in the field of music discussed interchange with
the other American republics. The Conference on Inter-
American Relations in the Field of Education, attended by
over 600 persons, followed. The final conference, devoted
to inter-American relations in the field of publications
and libraries was held on November 29 and 30, 1939. Over
200 leaders in those allied fields were in attendance.

Each conference created a continuation committee to
consider the recommendations of the conference and to
devise ways and means of putting into ef-
Continuation feet the proposals it deemed practicable
Committees and capable of completion, As the continu-
ation committees of each conference were of
a temporary nature, this, Dr. Oherrington said, led to the
problem of whether these bodies, having considered the
proposals of the conferences and.having recommended those
which they considered best designed to bring about effec-
tive inter-American cooperation, should cease to exist or
be reorganized and continued on a more permanent basis.

Dr. Cherrington pointed out that in 1939 the Congress
had passed an Act authorizing the President to render
closer and more effective the relationship'
Advisory between the American republics. This Act,
Committees he added, authorizes the President, sub-
jeot to such appropriations as are made
available, to utilize the services of the departments,
agencies, and independent establishments of the Government
in carrying out the obligations of treaties, conventions,


and






-8-


and other agreements proposed at the Buenos Aires Conference
in 1936 and the Lima Conference in 1938 which have been rati-
fied by this Government. The President is further autho-
rized in this Act to create such advisory committees as in
his judgment may be of assistance in carrying out these
obligations. Individuals appointed to such committees may
not receive compensation for their services but may receive
actual transportation expenses and per diem allowances not
to exceed $10 in lieu of subsistence and other expenses
while absent from their homes in the service of the Depart-
ment of State. While no appropriations have yet been made
for this purpose, Dr. Chorrington stated that it was hoped
funds would soon be made available by.the Congress.

Mrs. James reported briefly on the activities to date
of the Organizing Committee of the Conference on Inter-
American Relations in the Field of Music.
Music At its initial meeting in January, Mrs. James
Conference said, the Committee had recognized the urgent
need for a central clearinghouse to coordinate
the activities of various musical organizations and to pro-
mote closer relationships in the field of music between the
Americas. Such a clearinghouse would be initially consti-
tuted as an agency of the Music Organizing Committee. Vari-
ous subcommittees had been appointed to deal with specific
problems in the fields of music library exchange, music
education, community and recreational music, radio, music
recording, moving pictures and music, music management and
concert interchange, and music copyright and publishing. A
subcommittee was appointed to consult with one or more
philanthropic and possibly commercial institutions as to the
most desirable way of setting up a musical clearinghouse
and after these steps have been taken to submit to the
Music Organizing Committee a memorandum covering in general
form the administration, necessary staff, and approximate
budget for the proper operation of such a clearinghouse
over a given period of time. Mrs. James also announced
that Dr. William Berrien, Chairman of the Music Organizing
Committee had been granted a leave of absence at full
salary from Northwestern University in order to devote full
time to the formulation of a coordinated program of inter-,
American musical interchange.

Dr. Leland outlined the activities of the Committee
on Report and Recommendations of the Conference on Inter-
American Relations in the Field of Publi-
Conference on cations and Libraries. This Committee, he
Publications stated, was preparing a digest of the con-
and Libraries ference proceedings and would at a later
date meet to make its recommendations to
the Department of State. The Committee regarded itself,








-9-


he added, as of a temporary nature. It would bring to-
gether what had been said at the conference and, upon
the basis of its findings, submit certain recommendations
for the furtherance of inter-American relations in these
fields for the guidance of the Department.

Mr. Thomson outlined briefly the work of the Con-
ference on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
Art Art and stated that the Continuation
Conference Committee of that Conference would meet
in Washington on February 15 and 16, 1940.

There then followed a brief discussion of the two
divergent views: (1) whether the conference continua-
tion committees were appointed merely
Shall Continu- to report to the Department of State
ation Committees and recommend for its guidance what
be Permanent should be done in a particular field
or Temporary? of cultural cooperation with the other
American republics, or (2) whether such
committees should be continued as coordinating factors
in guiding private initiative in international intel-
lectual cooperation.

Dr. Duggan explained the function of the Subcom-
mittee on Exchange Fellowships and Professorships in
assisting the Department of State in the administration
of the Convention for the Promotion of
Functions of Inter-American Cultural Relations. This
Subcommittee treaty, he explained, had been ratified
on Exchange by the United States and twelve of the
Fellowships other American republics. It provides
and Profes- for the annual exchange of two graduate
sorships students or teachers and one professor
between each of the ratifying countries.
The Subcommittee, Dr. Duggan said, had drawn up a set
of standards upon which applicants for the exchange posts
might be judged and acted as a committee on selection in
the evaluation of the applications received.

The Committee then began to give detailed consider-
ation to the recommendations of the six discussion groups
which had met on the second day of the Conference (Novem-
ber 10, 1939) to consider specific problems in the develop-
ment of programs of educational interchange with the
other American republics.


The








-10-


The recommendations of Group I, composed of executive
authorities of educational institutions who met to discuss
ways and means of stimulating greater ex-
nfelowshin changes of students, teachers, and profes-
opportunities sors, the methods of financing such ex-
changes and related problems were considered
first. This group had recommended:

1. That descriptive and fully informative literature,
in the Spanish and Portuguese languages be dis-
tributed in the other American republics in order
that citizens of those countries might be ade-
quately informed concerning the educational facili-
ties available in-the United States.

2. That the Institute of International Education
appoint a committee to canvass possible donors
with a view to increasing the number of fellow-
ships and scholarships available for inter-
American exchanges.

3. That the spread of information in each American
republic be facilitated and that the United States
legations and embassies be aided in every feasible
way to make available as widely as possible in-
formation concerning educational activities and
trends in the Western Hemisphere.

With reference to descriptive literature published in
the Spanish and Portuguese languages concerning educational
facilities in the United States, Dr. Duggan reported that
he had requested Nicholas Murray Butler,
Descriptive President of the Carnegie Endowment for
Literature International Peace, to publish in Spanish
the Guide Book for Foreign Students in the
United States issued by the Institute of International
Education. Dr. Leland suggested sending United States
college catalogs annually to centers in the other American
republics. Mr. Pierson reported that this was now being
done. He added that the Department of State was working
in collaboration with the Office of Education in the
distribution of catalogs through a number of American
consular and diplomatic offices in the other American
republics. The Department had sent circular instruc-
tions, Mr. Pierson said, to American diplomatic and
consular offices asking where collections of North Ameri-
can college catalogs might best be set up. Eleven posts


had






-11-


had indicated places where the catalogs might be dis-
played in order to assure that they would be seen and
examined by the largest number of persons possible.
The Office of Education, he said, had requested 145
colleges in the United States to send their catalogs
to the places indicated and added that the colleges had
responded very favorably. Dr. Zook stated that the book
American Universities and Colleges, published by the
American Council on Education, was sent to American
diplomatic offices abroad.

Arrangements to facilitate the spread of information
concerning educational activities and trends in the other
American republics were now getting under way, Mr. Pierson
said. He added that American diplomatic and
Educational consular offices in these countries had re-
trends ceived instructions to make reports on in-
stitutions of higher learning in their dis-
tricts and that the file of such reports was almost complete.
Dr. Leland corroborated the statements of Mr. Pierson, add-
ing that during his trip through South America last summer
he had found that at least one member of each mission had
been assigned to survey educational developments in that
district and that these men were extremely well informed
concerning educational trends in those countries. Dr. Kelly
stated that information of a technical nature was available
at the Office of Education. He added, however, that in
view of the cost involved a definite policy had not yet
been established by the Federal Security Agency concerning
the printing and distribution of this material among
interested groups and individuals throughout the United
States. Dr. Duggan stated that cultural institutes in many
of the other American republics had available facilities for
the distribution of information of this nature. Mr. Thomson
suggested that the Committee might wish to indicate to the
Department specific- services Foreign Service officers in
the other American republics might perform which would
make it easier to inform interested persons in this country
concerning educational developments and trends in the other
American republics.

Dr. Duggan pointed out that the number of fellowships
and scholarships available for inter-American exchanges had
increased materially in the past few years.
Fellowships The Institute of International Education was
and Scholar- canvassing colleges and universities for
ships scholarships and fellowships with.consider-
able success. He added that additional funds
it was hoped, would be made available by individuals inter-
ested iil the promotion of such exchanges. Dr. Leland


outlined







-12-


outlined the steps which had been taken by various organi-
zations and institutions to provide scholarship and fellow-
ship opportunities in the United States for students from
the other American republics. Most colleges and universi-
ties, he added, because of the expenses involved were un-
able to provide more than tuition scholarships. The im-
mediate need, he said, was to secure funds to defray the
costs of travel and living expenses for visiting students
in order that they might be able to take advantage of the
tuition scholarships and fellowships now offered by col-
leges and universities in this country.

Dr. Duggan expressed the opinion that scholarships
and fellowships should be offered for study and research
in United States colleges and universities rather than
for in-service training in business establishments in the
United States. The emphasis, he added, should be on
graduate students. Funds for such exchanges should be
provided by the large foundations.

This led to a discussion of the types of persons who
should be afforded opportunities to study abroad. Dr. Zook
was of the opinion that arrangements should
Should ex- be made for the exchange of teachers in
changes be secondary schools and school executives.
limited to He thought that we could learn much from
graduate schools in the other American republics
level? and they in turn had much to learn from us.
Several members of the Committee expressed
interest in the establishment of facilities for the exchange
of undergraduates and secondary school teachers. In view of
the fact that little provision had been made for satisfactory
living accommodations at colleges and universities in the
other American republics it was thought by many that for
the present at least large exchanges of undergraduates should
not be encouraged. Dr. Duggan stated that it was the
opinion of many who had had years of experience in inter-
national student exchanges that students should receive
their academic training in their own country.

Dr. Duggan cautioned the Committee that the fields
of study in the other American republics in which North
American students might profitably engage
Opportunities are limited and that that problem had best
in other Ameri- be squarely faced. He was trying, he added,
can Republics to stimulate universities in the other
American republics to offer scholarships
and fellowships to students from this country, but that
an even exchange at the present time could not be


anticipated.






-13-


anticipated. He thought that before a student from the
United States should attempt to do advanced study in the
other American republics he should first have. a clear
picture of what was available there. A very pressing
need, Dr. Duggan said, was for the publication of material
in English outlining in detail the opportunities for study
in the other American republics which would be readily
available to the United States student planning to do ad-
vanced study there.


AFTERNOON MEETING

February 2

At the afternoon session on February 2, the Committee
gave consideration to the recommendations of the Conference
discussion Groups II, III, 1 m and V.

Group II, composed of curriculum authorities, de-
partment heads, and professors, who met to discuss and
compare programs for academic and pub-
Latin American lic education in inter-American affairs,
studies
had recommended:

1. That the study of the Spanish, Portuguese
and French languages be increased in the primary
and secondary schools, and colleges and uni-
versities in the United States.

2. That the United States Commissioner of Education
bring to the attention of the proper authorities
responsible for the conduct of education in the
various states the desirability of a greatly in-
creased program for the teaching of these languages
and that these authorities be asked to submit con-
certed suggestions concerning (a) the manner in
which an increase in these disciplines might be
effected within their present organizations, and
(b) what provisions might be made for the beginning
of the study of modern foreign languages on the
level of the elementary school.

Dr. Kelly stated that the teaching of foreign languages
was considered at a recent meeting of the chief State school
officers, but that, owing to the plan of
Study of for- school organization in the States general-
eign languages ly, local school systems should be approached
regarding instruction in foreign languages.
Mrs. James said that the Pan American Union would soon issue







-14-


a statistical report on instruction in Latin American
studies in our colleges and universities.

Dr. Benjamin stated that in the section of the Novem-
ber conference which dealt with these problems there was
some difference of opinion with respect to the desirability
of increasing the teaching of foreign languages. Many were
of the opinion, he said, that a teacher of a foreign
language should study and live at least one year in the
country whose language he taught. Dr. Kandel stated tlat
as a general rule teachers of Spanish were more concerned
with the culture of Spain and that more emphasis needed to
be placed on the intellectual achievements of Spanish
America. Dean Cronkhite stated that graduate schools
generally require a knowledge of French and German and
for this reason undergraduates are less likely to study
Spanish and Portuguese. She expressed tho opinion that
some effort should be directed to overcome this obstacle
to the increased study of the languages of the other
American republics. Dr. Benjamin stated that this was
now being done in many schools.

Mr. Blaisdell expressed the opinion that programs
emphasizing the literature and other cultural achieve-
Study of ments of the Americas should be
literature stimulated in colleges and uni-
could stimulate versities in the United States. If
interest in study this were adequately done, he added,
of languages students would logically be more
inclined to study the languages of those countries.

Following a report by Dr. Kelchner on the progress
made in planning and organizing the Eighth Pan American
Scientific Congress to be held in Washington in May, the
Committee considered methods by which it
Pan American might cooperate in the work of the Soc-
Scientific tion on Education of the Congress.
Congress Dr. Kandel indicated that the seven prin-
cipal problems to receive consideration by
the Section on Education of the Congress were (1) Educa-
tion and National Culture; (2) What is a Liberal Education;
(3) Current Educational Issues and Theories; (4) Problems
of Higher Education; (5) The Education of the Adolescent;
(6) Research in Education; and (7) Round table discussion
of Educational Materials to Promote Understanding Between
the American republics.

Dr. Oherrington suggested the possibility of utiliz-
ing the Congress in the formation of a confederation of


educators







-15-


educators in the Americas. Mrs. James said that thought
is being given to such an,organization and that it was
hoped that when the Bogota Inter-American Conference meets
a definite proposal will be ready.

Group III, composed of deans and advisers of men and
women, directors of international houses and hospitality
centers who met to discuss problems involv-
Student ing the adjustment of students from abroad
Orientation to their new environment and to formulate
plans for more effective guidance and
hospitality, had recommended:

1. Approval of the initial membership of a Continu-
ation Committee on the Adjustment of Foreign
Students in the United States and of the appoint-
ment of an Advisory Council.

2. Consideration of a survey, including its financing,
of organizations and agencies concerned with for-
eign students, of the experience of foreign students
now studying in the United States, of the colleges
and universities they attend, of existing facili-
ties for assisting and counselling foreign students;
and consideration of the publication and financing
of a revised Guidebook for Foreign Students in the
United States, in both English and Spanish editions.

3. Consideration of the question of a loan fund and
group health and accident insurance for foreign
students.

Mr. Fisher, after reviewing briefly a meeting held
prior to the November Conference and several more recent
meetings in New York City at which problems involving the
adjustment of students from abroad had been discussed,
suggested the names of persons who might be appointed to
the Continuation Committee on the Adjustment of Foreign
Students in the United States which had been recommended
by the Conference. Such a group, he added, should contain
at least one specialist in surveys. With reference to the
survey recommended by the Conference, Dr. Fisher said that
this study should cover the entire field rather than only
the institutions having students from the other American
republics. He suggested the preparation ofa master list
of persons interested in foreign students. He further ad-
vocated the establishment of a service for students prior






-16-


to their departure for the United States, the purpose of
such a service being to assist the students in obtaining
visas, and in other practical ways. This service, he
stated, should be supplemented with facilities in the
United States for assisting the student upon his arrival
in this country and affording him guidance and counsel
until he is enrolled and thereafter assisted by the
hospitality group at the institution he attends.

Group IV, composed of editors of journals of educa-
tion and editors of journals of learned societies, authors
and publishers, who discussed the pos-
Publications sibility of more effectively acquainting
the United States with scholars and writers
in the other American republics, had recommended:

1. That a list of Latin American writers, classi-
fied according to their fields of interest, be
made generally available.

2. That a classified list of periodicals and
publishers in the other American republics
be prepared and made generally available.

3. That the possibility of implementing the
second convention agreed upon at Buenos Aires
in 1936 concerning the interchange of publica-
tions between national libraries be investi-
gated.

4. That the whole problem of the sale of books,
including credit facilities, in the other
American republics be brought to the attention
of publishers in the United States.

5. That publishers in the other American republics
be informed of the current interest in the
United States in their publications and the
desirability of having book exhibits from time
to time in this country.

It was reported that inasmuch as the recommendations
of this section had been discussed at the Conference on
Inter-American Relations in the Field of Publications and
Libraries, held on November 29 and 30, 1939, it was thought
advisable that the conclusions of Group IV be transmitted
to the Committee on Report and Recommendations of the
Conference on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
Publications and Libraries for appropriate consideration.


Group V,







-17-


Group V, composed of representatives of medical and
allied fields, who met to consider cooperative projects
with the other American republics in
Cooperation in the the field of medical education and
field of medical research, had recommended:
and allied educa-
tion and research 1. That a study and analysis
of medical education, medical schools,
and research institutes in the American republics
be undertaken.

2. That the reciprocal exchanges of journals,
bibliofilm and loan collections be undertaken.

3. That a section Continuation Committee composed
of representatives from the fields of Medicine,
Tropical Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Public
Health, Sanitary Engineering, Hospital Adminis-
tration, and Vital Statistics, be created to
explore these and other recommendations, and
to advise on the selection of medical students
and professors who apply for fellowships and
professorships under the Convention for the
Promotion of Inter-American Cultural Relations.

Dr. Cutter reported that the Continuation Committee
recommended by the Section was now in the process of forma-
tion and would meet in the near future .o give detailed con-
sideration to the proposals made at the Conference. General
Cumming stated that he was informed that a large medical
publishing house planned to publish some works in Spanish
and that a beginning had been made in putting into effect
some of the exchanges of journals and loan collections
recommended by the Section.

The question arose as to whether the interchange of
medical students created a problem. Dr. Cutter replied
that it gave rise to many problems. The exchanges, he
said, should be on the graduate level, as exchanges at
the undergraduate level were not feasible. Internships,
Dr. Cutter said, would be available in the United States
for well recommended graduates of medical schools in the
other American republics. The problems of medical
licensure, however, were great, he said.

With respect to United States medical students wish-
ing to do advanced study in the other American republics,


Dr. Cutter







-18-


Dr. Cutter stated that this posed many problems. Latin
American countries, he said, had validated European
medical schools but not medical schools of the United
States. It was difficult therefore, for our students
to enter medical schools in the other American republics.

Dr. Duggan stated that he had experienced difficulty
in obtaining internships for foreign students in the
United States. Dr. Cutter replied that the situation had
changed materially in recent years. He stated that there
were available in the United States about 1,000 more
internships than there were medical graduates. Dr. Cumming
stated that he had placed eight interns from Chile this
year and that there was no difficulty in placing men in
post graduate schools.


FINAL SESSION

February 3

Group VI, composed of primary and secondary school
administrators and teachers who met to discuss curriculum
materials for Latin American
Curriculum materials studies and teacher exchanges,
for Latin American had recommended:
studies in primary
and secondary schools 1. The study of Latin American
history in elementary and secondary
schools, materials and procedures to be adapted
to the respective levels.

2. The study of Spanish, Portuguese and Frenchshould
be encouraged and in conjunction with such language
study there should be the study of Latin American
civilization.

3. That a survey be made of the courses, projects,
units, assembly programs, and other activities
relating to Latin America.

4. That a committee of competent persons be appointed
to carry out this study and to make recommendations
for the preparation of additional materials such
as maps, motion pictures, text books, reading lists,
bibliographies, translations, and anthologies.

5. That elementary and secondary school teachers and
administrators, chosen with regard to their ability






-19-


to represent their own culture and to appreciate
sympathetically the culture of the other American
republics, be included in any program of teacher
exchanges.

Mr. Galarza reported that this Section had organized
the National Committee on Latin American Studies in
Elementary and Secondary Schools which was outlining and
developing the program recommended by the Conference.
Members had been appointed to three State committees, and
it was likely, he added, that six or seven state committees
would be cooperating with the National Committee in the near
future. Mr. Galarza listed the following activities pro-
jected by the National Committee:

1. Stimulation of the teaching of Spanish.

2. Study of the problems in teaching Spanish to
elementary and secondary school pupils,

3. Preparation of teaching materials.

4. Survey of books available for use in elementary
and secondary schools.

5. Survey of methods of organizing the curriculum
in Latin American studies.

Mr. Galarza explained that this committee desired to
conduct its activities primarily from the point of view of
the classroom. It did not wish, he said, to become a
research group. The Committee, he indicated, had been set
up as a permanent channel for the expression of classroom
experience and enthusiasm.

Mr. Shankland expressed the opinion that if a program
of cooperation with the other American republics in the
field of education was to receive the support of the
American people generally it was necessary ti~tach the
masses through the elementary and secondary schools. He
suggested a number of organizations that should be taken
into account. Among such organizations he listed the
National Association of Secondary School Principals; the
Society for Curriculum Construction; the National Council
on Social Studies; the American Youth Commission; the Of-
fice of Educati on; the Pan American Union; and the De-
partment of Supervisors and Directors of Instruction,
the Department of Elementary School Principals, and the
Department of Classroom Teachers, of the National Educa-
tion Association.


Mr. Christy







-20-


Mr. Christy reported on the development of inter-
American activity in the field of agriculture and
agricultural instruction. The Department of Agriculture,
he said, was interested in pro-
Inter-American cooper- moving the production of agri-
ation in the field of cultural products which do not
agriculture and agri- compete with domestic commodi-
cultural instruction ties. He cited the dependence
of the United States and the
other American republics upon products which have reached
a high degree of development in the East Indies, many of
which are indigenous to the soil of this hemisphere. Among
such products he cited quinine, insecticidal and medical
plants, tropical fibers and rubber.

The Department of Agriculture, Mr. Christy stated,
was much interested in promoting agricultural education
and research in tropical and semitropical America and
had loaned numerous advisers to the American republics
in these areas. He submitted the following proposals
for the consideration of the Committee:

1. Creation of a committee on agriculture to
consider problems in ti s field and to ad-
vise concerning the activities of those
institutions interested in inter-American
agricultural education.

2. Consideration of the proposal for an Institute
of Tropical Agriculture as recently approved
by the Inter-Departmental Committee on Co-
operation with the other American republics.

Dr. Zook, the presiding officer, summed up the
previous discussion and laid before the Committee the
question of apportionment of
Apportionment of responsibilities, and the com-
responsibilities mittee framework to be created
in carrying forward the recom-
mendations of the Conference.

Dr. Cherrington stated that the function of the
Department in the field of cultural relations was
primarily to facilitate better correlation of activi-
ties and to serve as a clearing center for information
among various groups, institutions and agencies concerned
with the development of more effective international
intellectual cooperation. The motivation of the program,


Dr. Cherrington







-21-


Dr. Cherrington said, was found in the dynamic character
of culture itself. The program, 'e added, should develop
naturally and not be stimulated artificially. The four
conferences on inter-American relations in the fields of
art, music, education, and publications and libraries held
in the fall, Dr. Cherrington said, were in accordance iith
this plan and purpose.

The attitude of the Department of State in the formu-
lation of policy in the field of cultural relations,
Dr. Oherrington emphasized, was that the program must be
the program of the people of the United States and not of
the Government of the Unlited States. The Government could
be helpful and could assist, but the development of the
program of cultural relations should arise from our people
and their institutions.

The Committee then debated the question of the func-
tions it had been created to perform. Two points of view
were expressed. One was that the Conference
Functions of on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
the Education had been called by the Department
Committee of State, the Conference had appointed the
Committee, and the Committee had been called
in meeting to advise the Department of State. The second
view was that the Committee had been created to advise the
various groups and organizations represented at the Con-
ference. After some discussion it was decided that the
functions of the Committee were to advise the Department of
State. This was put in the form of a formal motion which
was passed..

A second resolution was approved stating that the
motions passed by the Committee would be.a part of a
report to be submitted to the Division of Cultural Rela-
tions of the Department of State and that the action of
the Committee would be merely advisory.

In considering the problem of committee structure to
carry out the recommendations of the conference and other
proposals submitted for the Committee's
Committee consideration, Dr. Cherrington introduced
framework a series of questions which, at the request
of the Committee,had been prepared by the
Division of Cultural Relations and which related to the
question at hand.

The first of these questions was:


What








-22-


What agency or agencies shall assume responsibility
for developing the additional fellowship opportunities
considered by Discussion Group I of the Conference?

After some discussion it was the sense of the
Committee that this responsibility should be assumed
Fellowship by the Institute of International
Opportunities Education. This was put in the
form of a formal motion which was passed.
The next question considered was:

What organization or organizations shall be respon-
sible for stimulating more adequate educational facili-
ties for Latin American studies in (a) universities and
colleges; (b) secondary and elementary schools; and (c)
adult education?

After a discussion of the various organizations and
associations active in this field it was decided that in
order to assure the greatest adminis-
Stimulation of trative flexibility possible the
Latin American Division of Cultural Relations of the
Studies Department of State should be empowered
to enlist the support of appropriate
organizations functioning at the various levels. Among
the organizations mentioned were: The National Education
Association, College and University Associations, Associa-
tion of Adult Education, Committee on Latin American
Studies, American Council on Education, and the Institute
of International Education.

A formal motion was then made and passed authoriz-
ing the Division of Cultural Relations of the Department
of State to request appropriate organizations to assist
in carrying out the recommendations of the Conference
with respect to the stimulation of Latin American Studies
at the various scholastic levels.

The next question considered was:

Shall the administration of adjustment programs for
foreign students be delegated to the Continuation Commit-
tee recently organized by Discussion Group III of the
November Conference and, if so, to what organization or
organizations shall the Committee be related?


Dr. Fisher







Dr. Fisher moved that the administration of adjust-
ment programs for foreign students be delegated to the
Orie.tation of the Continuation Committee recently
visiting student organized by Section III, that
the Committee be related to the
Institute of International Education, and that the crea-
tion of an advisory council be left to the decision of
such committee.

The motion was passed.

The next question considered was:

Shall the conclusions of Group IV be referred to
the Committee on Report and Recommendations of the
Conference on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
Publications and Libraries, or should some other course
be followed?

Dr. Kandel moved that the recommendations of
Group IV be so referred and that it be recommended that
Publications the Committee on Report and Recom-
mendations add one or two represen-,
tatives of Group IV to its membership. The motion of
Dr. Kandel was passed.

The next question considered Was:

Shall the recommendations of Group V and other
activities in the field of medical and allied relations
be delegated to the Committee authorized by Group V now
in the process of formation and, if so, shall this com-
mittee be related to some existing organization?

Dr. Cutter moved that it be recommended that the
Continuation Committee in Medicine and Allied Fields
Medical education now in the process of forma-
and research tion be continued and that its
activities be related to the
Pan American Sanitary Bureau.

The motion was carried.

The next question considered was:

Shall a committee for cooperation in agricultural
education be 'created and, if so, shall it be related to
some existing institution?
Dr. Kelly moved that it be recommended that the
Committee for Cooperation in Agricultural Education
Cooperation in be created and associated
Agricultural Education with the United States De-
partment of Agriculture.


The motion was passed.


The







-24-


The next question considered was:

Shall committees be formed for cooperation in other
fields of educational activity, such as engineering or
commercial education?

Mr. Pattee stated that the American Council on
Engineering had indicated its interest in the possibili-
Other fields of ties of cooperation with the other
educational American republics and would likely
activity welcome the creation of such a
Committee. After some discussion
it was recommended that the Division of Cultural Relations
of the Department of State be authorized to enlist the
support of appropriate organizations in other fields of
educational activity, such as engineering, where suffi-
cient interest was in evidence.

The next question considered was:

What provision, if any, should be made for the cor-
relation of the various activities involved in the develop-
ment of a program of cooperation with the other American
republics in the field of education?

In the consideration of this problem the question
arose as to whether the General Advisory Committee of
Correlation of the Division of Cultural Relations
activities of the Department of State already
in existence was not the proper agency
for the correlation of activities in the field of inter-
American educational cooperation.

Dr. Cherrington stated that with respect to educa-
tional activities the advice of the Temporary Continua-
tion Committee of the Conference on
Need of counsel
in determining Inter-American Relations in the Field
policy of Education would be helpful in
determining the functions of the Gen-
eral Advisory Committee. The Department, Dr. Cherrington
added, earnestly sought the wisest counsel available in
the United States in the determination of policy and that
it needed the services of an advisory body composed of
individuals of recognized standing who commanded the
respect and confidence of leaders in all cultural fields.

After considerable discussion a motion was made
by Dr. Haynes that the Temporary Continuation Committee








-25-


of the Conference on Inter-American Relations in the
Field of Education recommend to the Department of State
that the correlation of
General Advisory Committee inter-American educational
to assume responsibility activities be referred to
for correlation of inter- the General Advisory Com-
American educational mittee of the Division of
activities Cultural Relations and that
said Advisory Committee be
enlarged to become more widely representative of the vari-
ous agencies in the United States participating in programs
of educational interchange with the other American republics.

This motion, amended to include the recommendation
that one or two representatives of business active in the
other American republics be added to the membership of
the General Advisory Committee, was passed.

Motions were adopted thanking the Department of State
for its initiative in calling the Conference on Education
and the meeting of the Continuation Committee; and ex-
pressing the appreciation of the Committee and the Depart-
ment of State for the effective and efficient manner in
which Dr. Zook had presided over the meeting of the Con-
tinuation Committee.

On a rising vote the Committee instructed that its
recommendations be submitted to the Department of State,
and that the Temporary Continuation Committee of the Con-
ference on Inter-American Relations in the Field of
Education stood dissolved.














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