The Inter-American Program of the University of Florida ..

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Title:
The Inter-American Program of the University of Florida ..
Physical Description:
21 p. : illus. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of Florida -- Institute of Inter-American Affairs
University of Florida -- Graduate Scool of Inter-American Studies
Publisher:
University of Florida Press
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

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Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
The Institute of Inter-American Affairs and the Graduate School of Inter-American Studies.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 40904295
ocm40904295
System ID:
AA00002846:00001

Full Text






iR-AMERICAN

P, PROGRAM


of the
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA If


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The Institute of Inter-American Affairs
and
The Graduate School of Inter-American Studies


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THE COVER
A portion of the University of Florida Plan show-
ing the central location of the crescent-shaped Plaza
of the Americas. The border on one side represents
the flags of the twenty-one American republics.





UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA

LIBRARIES







The


INTER-AMERICAN

PROGRAM

of the

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The Institute of Inter-American Affairs
and
The Graduate School of Inter-American Studies


Gainesville r\ 1950






F All


JOSE MARTI





Cuban liberator,
educator, writer,
and philosopher.


This bust of Marti was presented to the University of Florida by the
Alfaro Foundation in recognition of the work of the University in
Inter-American Affairs.








The Inter-American

Program

HE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Institute of Inter-American
Affairs is now greatly enlarging its program. This
includes courses and curricula on both undergraduate
and graduate levels, scholarships and counselling for
Latin American students, conferences and workshops of
scholars in this field, research in various phases of Inter-
American problems, and an awakening of the public to a
greater interest in and understanding of Inter-American
affairs.
Today, on the part of both faculty and administration,
there is a keener awareness than ever before of the importance
of our relations with the other American nations and of the
responsibility of this University for improving these relations
by adding to our knowledge concerning these countries.
Programs of Latin American studies have steadily increased
in number and scope, with attention most recently given to
expansion of opportunities for graduate study and research.
In consequence the School of Inter-American Studies, with
the same director as that of the Institute, has been established
to bring about a more effective direction and coordination of
the various phases of the whole plan, and in particular to make
possible a greatly enlarged graduate program which crosses
traditional departmental boundaries in the offerings to grad-
uate students.
There is also an active program for increasing the materials
in the University Library dealing with all Latin America,
with special emphasis on the Caribbean area. This is an im-
portant objective because graduate study and research in the
Inter-American field depend so largely on the quantity and
quality of the source materials available in written form.








The Institute of Inter-American
Affairs

T HE INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS coordinates all
phases of the Latin American program of the University.
Its enlarged program includes: (1) fellowships and scholar-
ships, (2) coordination of undergraduate area studies programs
in arts and sciences and business administration, (3) a Gradu-
ate School of Inter-American Studies, (4) a research program
including the humanities, social sciences, agriculture, and
other professional studies, (5) an active publication program
sponsored by the University of Florida Press, and (6) an an-
nual conference in the Inter-American field, beginning with
the conference on "The Caribbean at Mid-Century" to be
held December 7-9, 1950.
The Inter-American affairs program at the University of
Florida had its inception in the establishment in 1930 of the
Institute of Inter-American Affairs to translate into more
effective action the growing concern felt on the campus for. a
closer relationship between the American nations. The In-
stitute has helped the people of the United States and the
people of Latin America to know one another better by in-
terchange of students and teachers, and by dissemination of
cultural information.
The Institute program has been called "the Good Neighbor
Policy in action." Recognition of the significance of the In-
stitute's activity, as a means for achieving better international
relations, was given by the Federation Inter-Alliee des An-
ciens Combattants at its convention in Lisbon, Portugal, in
1932, when it awarded a medal to the University of Florida
for this new approach to the problem. The Institute has also
received grants from the Carnegie Foundation to implement
various phases of its program, including the holding of con-
ferences.








** 4ji *


The Plaza of the Americas is at the center of the University of Florida campus. Trees
received as gifts from each of the twenty-one American republics are planted around the
plaza. The flags of all the republics are displayed on the Plaza on appropriate occasions.


7




























'-I
44j


A group of Latin American students, with Benjamin V. Cohen (center), Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, and
John Fletcher Martin (far right), in charge of exchange of Latin American students at the University.








The Inter-American Program and
Latin American Students

ONE OF THE PRIME FUNCTIONS of the Institute has been the
encouraging of Latin American students to come to the
University of Florida for study through the granting of schol-
arships. These students learn at first hand of the friendly
interest of Americans in them and their countries, and help
to dispel some of the misconceptions of Americans regarding
them. The Institute welcomes them, introduces them to the
teachers under whom they will study, and makes arrangements
for their maintenance. Most of these students live in dormi-
tories, and the Institute arranges that each shall have a con-
genial and sympathetic American as his roommate. In addition,
a special course in English is offered Latin American students
so that they may more rapidly overcome any language handicap
in other University courses.
Nearly three hundred Latin American students have
studied at the University of Florida. During 1949-50 seventy-
four Latin American students representing thirteen different
countries were enrolled. Seventy-five Latin American students
have received degrees from the University, fifty receiving
baccalaureate degrees and twenty-five receiving graduate
degrees, at either the master's or the doctorate level. Through
the Institute of Inter-American Affairs, sixty-three Latin
American students currently receive scholarships.




*








The Inter-American Program and
American Students

T HE UNIVERSITY, through the new School of Inter-American
Studies, offers a variety of courses designed to help
American students understand the language, culture, social
institutions, and economic conditions of Latin America, so
that they may acquire a sympathetic appreciation of the people
and their civilization. Through the years the number and
variety of these courses have been greatly increased, as the
teaching staff has been augmented by men with special knowl-
edge of Latin America.
Today the University offers several undergraduate cur-
ricula designed to give students a broad knowledge of Latin
American languages, literature, history, economics, geography,
government, social institutions, music, and art. At the under-
graduate level, personnel of the Institute act as advisors to
students in these programs. The curricula lead to degrees in
either the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business
Administration, the College of Agriculture, or other colleges,
which cooperate with the Institute. These courses also may
be chosen as electives by students in other colleges. In this
way many students who have no intention of going to live in
a Latin American country may yet become familiar with the
great contribution to our civilization made by other American
nations.
In the new School of Inter-American Studies there are
programs of study on the graduate level leading to either the
master's or the doctor's degree in Latin American phases of the
regular academic fields in the humanities and the social
sciences. In addition the professional colleges offer graduate
work in agriculture, forestry, and other areas where special
emphasis in many courses is placed on Latin American aspects
of the work. In recent years the University staff has been
strengthened by visiting professors with wide reputations in
Latin American scholarship.








;///


An Inter-American group at the University of Florida, including Captain Coldn Aloy Alfaro, head of the Alfaro Foundation (front row, third from
left); Sidney Berry, Director of the Voice of America, United States State Department (fifth from left, first row); and Faris Flint, President of the
American Foundation (right of Mr. Berry). These and other guests are received by President J. Hillis Miller (front row, fourth from left); Vice President
J. S. Allen (extreme right, second row); Director A. Curtis Wilgus (front row, frst on left); and members of the Inter-American staff at the
University of Florida.


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Ni








The Inter-American Program and
the General Public

T HE NEED TO CARRY THE PROGRAM beyond the classrooms
and to the general public, with activities both on and off
the University campus, has long been recognized. The In-
stitute of Inter-American Affairs has from its inception
endeavored to bring the cultural contributions of the Latin
American countries to the attention of the teachers, students,
and general public of Florida by means of lectures, showing of
films, and conferences. It has sponsored radio broadcasts and
personal appearances of Latin American students and of the
Director of the Institute before civic organizations over the
state. Many public lectures have been given at the University
by distinguished Latin Americans. Films and film strips on
Latin America, usually in Spanish and educational in nature,
are shown without charge in the Florida Union auditorium
several times each year. Conferences of teachers in Florida
interested in Latin American studies were held several times
during the decade 1930-40, and while these had to be dis-
continued during the war years and have not yet been started
again because of the very crowded postwar conditions at the
University, it is planned to resume them in the near future.
Publications, which will carry forward the work of spreading
cultural information regarding the other Americas, are con-
templated. A great contribution in recent years is the ac-
quisition of the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, in-
valuable for research in many phases of Latin American
history.











































Architect's sketch of the proposed Inter-American House.








The Inter-American House


T HE INTER-AMERICAN HOUSE will be a building especially
planned as the center of the whole Inter-American pro-
gram of the University. Of great beauty and dignity, its
architectural style will at once identify it with Latin America,
so that students and visitors from the other American re-
publics will see at once that it offers a friendly and familiar
atmosphere, and Americans will be conscious of the deep
interest of the University in Latin America.
The Inter-American House will be the headquarters of the
Institute of Inter-American Affairs and will be under its
supervision. It will provide dormitory space for many Latin
American students and their American roommates. It will
contain a reading room supplied with periodicals and other
publications dealing with Latin America. It will make avail-
able attractive suites for lodging distinguished guests of the
University and visiting scholars. It will provide conference
rooms and an auditorium especially designed for conferences
and institutes. And it will have space set aside for exhibitions
of Latin American art and industrial displays. A feature of
particular interest will be seven rooms on the ground floor
dedicated respectively to Mexico, Central America, the
Antilles, Greater Colombia, Brazil, the Plata region, and the
Andean republics. Each room will be decorated and furnished,
so far as possible, in the style representative of its area, thus
helping impart to the Inter-American House a distinctively
Latin American spirit.
One of the important functions of the Inter-American
House will be to serve as the meeting place for annual in-
stitutes and conferences, which can bring together leading
scholars from all of the Americas. These meetings will not
only serve to advance mutual understanding among such in-
dividuals, but will also attract many people from Florida and
other states who are interested in Latin American affairs. This


10o








will, in effect, permit an expansion of the University's program
of adult education. Commodious and harmonious accommoda-
tions for such meetings will be an important factor in their
success, and these the Inter-American House will provide.
A Symbol of Florida's Heritage
IN ITS COLONIAL HERITAGE, Florida is a part of Latin America.
Upon its soil were established the first settlements made by
Spain within the borders of the present United States of
America. Although lacking the wealth of Peru and Mexico,
Florida was a strategically located-if unfruitful-colony.
While the silver galleons of New Spain sailed through the
Bahama Channel, the Florida peninsula was destined to serve
Spain as a bastion against French, English, or Dutch corsairs.
In time Florida became a bulwark against the inroads of the
English from the Carolinas and the French from Louisiana.
Always her role was that of an outpost in the empire's de-
fenses, and a very important outpost she was in the imperial
strategy.
The most renowned names of Florida colonial history are
Spanish: names like Ponce de Ledn, Panfilo de Narvaez,
Hernando De Soto, and Menendez de Avils. Much of
Florida's colonial heritage centers around these and other
Spanish names. Although few monuments remain as evidences
of their work, the Spanish background of Florida's history is
very real.
The Inter-American House, calling attention both to this
ancient heritage and to the modern renewal of economic and
cultural kinship, will be erected on a spot of historical sig-
nificance. The University of Florida campus occupies part of
a grant of some 200,000 acres made by King Ferdinand VII of
Spain to the Spanish grandee, Don Fernando de la Maza
Arredondo. The Arredondo Grant was made in 1817 under
Royal Letters Patent through Don Enrique White, Brigadier
General in the Royal Army of Spain, and Civil and Military
Governor of the Spanish Province of East Florida.


11ii
























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Participants in a Latin American Forum at the University of Florida. Representatives of six Latin American nations discuss cultural differences
of North and South America.


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The Inter-American Program and
the University


T HE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA has three principal functions:
resident teaching, organized research, and extension
work. All of these are integral parts of the Inter-American
program.
The teaching function is naturally the most highly devel-
oped of the three. Undergraduate curricula in two of the
University's largest colleges prepare students who wish to
concentrate in the Inter-American field. Opportunities for
graduate students to specialize in the Latin American phases
of their chosen discipline have existed for some time, but with
the organization of the School of Inter-American Studies these
are being greatly expanded. Because of climatic and other
similarities, students from Latin America find at the Univer-
sity of Florida courses in agriculture, animal industry, soil
science, and other technical fields, which are closely related
to the problems encountered in their own countries.
The research function is being greatly expanded. The
Library's holdings of Latin American materials, and partic-
ularly those relating to the Caribbean area, are being greatly
increased. Additional men who are specialists in the Inter-
American field are being added to the faculty. Distinguished
scholars, some of them from Latin America, are being brought
to the campus as visiting professors. Facilities for publishing
the results of scientific and scholarly studies are being im-
proved. One of the principal functions of the Institute and
the Graduate School of Inter-American Studies is to promote
research activities on the part of faculty and students.
The University's Inter-American program extends far
beyond the boundaries of the campus. Latin American
students and the professors alike give generously of their time
to appear before numerous civic and professional groups


113]








throughout the state and elsewhere. Radio broadcasts, lec-
tures, the showing of films and slides, conferences, and ar-
ticles in the newspapers and magazines help to disseminate
more widely accurate information about Latin America.
The presence of selected young people from Latin America
at the University and in the community does much to bring
reliable information about their countries to the United States;
and when they return each of them becomes a living source
of knowledge about this country.


The Inter-American Program-
Past, Present, and Future

T HE INTER-AMERICAN PROGRAM has been and is being
developed by an outstanding staff of specialists in the
fields of teaching and research. The following departments
(1950-51) offer courses dealing with Latin America: Agricul-
ture, Anthropology, Art, Economics, Geography, History,
Music, Political Science, Sociology, and Spanish.
The teaching staff in social sciences and literature is com-
posed of such scholars as Richard F. Behrendt (Political
Science), R. W. Bradbury (Economics), Pedro V. Fernandez
(Literature), John M. Goggin (Anthropology), Francis C.
Hayes (Literature), T. Lynn Smith (Sociology), A. Curtis
Wilgus (Visiting Professor of History), and Donald E. Wor-
cester (History), who have written more than a score of books
and several hundred articles in the Inter-American field.
These contributions represent research in all the fields named.
In addition, in the field of sciences, the University has mem-
bers of the staff who are making and have made significant
contributions. As early as 1920, the Director of the Univer-
sity of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was chosen
by Brazil to establish and direct its School of Agriculture


1141








at Minas Geraes, Brazil. H. Harold Hume, Provost Emeritus
for Agriculture, is Chairman of the Advisory Committee of
the Inter-American Institute for Research in Agricultural
Sciences, Turrialba, Costa Rica. In cooperation with Ar-
gentina, a laboratory is maintained in that country for the
study of certain citrus diseases. Many consulting projects
are currently in process between Latin American countries
and the University staff in agriculture. A number of Latin
American students, undergraduate and graduate, have stud-
ied various phases of engineering at the University of Florida.
In the past few years many leading authorities on Latin
America have been visiting members of the staff or have
given a series of lectures. Among these are: Ernesto Monte-
negro, Guillermo Francovich, M. Camarinha da Silva, Samuel
Guy Inman, Juan Clemente Zamora, and John A. Crow.
The Inter-American program of the University of Florida
is a continually developing one, and the future program will
provide new national and international leadership in teaching
and research.








*









Major Academic Units of the University
of Florida

The Lower Division
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.-The University College registers all stu-
dents in their first two years of undergraduate work. A broad program of
liberal education is provided, and some work preparatory to the colleges of
the upper division (the last two years of undergraduate work) may also
be taken. A special course in English for Spanish-speaking students is
available.
The Upper Division
The Upper Division Colleges are responsible for programs of teaching
during the last two undergraduate years and for programs of research; the
senior members of the staff also teach in the Graduate Division.
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE.-Because much of the work of the
College of Agriculture has special application to Latin America, this work
is described subsequently in the section of this booklet outlining special
programs concerned with Latin America.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS.-Programs
in this college are offered in Architecture, Building Construction, Land-
scape Architecture, Painting and Drawing, Commercial Arts, Interior
Design, and Crafts. Because of similarity in climate with much of Latin
America, the problems of building design studied have direct application to
construction in Latin America.
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES.-This college offers the usual
programs in the humanities, social sciences, biological sciences, and phy-
sical sciences. Offerings in the humanities and social sciences having special
application to Latin America appear among the courses listed subsequently
in this booklet.
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION.-Special under-
graduate sequences are offered in this college in Accounting, Banking and
Finance, Real Estate, Marketing, Transportation and Public Utilities,
Public Finance and Taxation, Foreign Trade and Economic Geography,
Economics, Business Management, and allied fields. In many of these,
courses may be taken which give special emphasis to Latin American phases
of the topic. Some of these courses are listed subsequently.









COLLEGE OF EDUCATION.-The College of Education offers several
programs designed to train teachers for the various levels of schools and
to prepare public school administrators.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.-The College of Engineering offers
work in the following areas: Aeronautical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, In-
dustrial, Mechanical, and Sanitary Engineering. A number of Latin Ameri-
can students have studied in this college. Research in location of tropical
hurricanes through electronics is carried on. Much of the other work, such
as beach erosion, treats subjects of interest to Latin America.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY.-A teaching and research program dealing
with forestry problems and wild-life management is carried on by this
school.
SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM.-Programs of study are offered by the
School of Journalism in Advertising, Editorial Work, and Newspaper
Reporting.
COLLEGE OF LAW.-The Law College is a postgraduate college
offering work leading to the LL.B. degree.
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY.-A standard program is offered in the
various phases of pharmacy. Experimental work in the medicinal plant
garden includes work with plants common both to Florida and Latin
America.
COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION.-A professional program
is offered for those desiring to specialize in teaching physical education or in
recreation work.

The Graduate Division
GRADUATE SCHOOL.-The Graduate School of the University has
jurisdiction over the various programs leading to the M.A. and Ph.D.
degrees.
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF INTER-AMERICAN STUDIES.-This
school, operating under the general rules of the Graduate School, coordinates
the programs pertaining to Latin America in the languages, literature, the
other humanities, and the social sciences. Graduate students in these areas
register in this school.
INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS. The program of
the Institute coordinates all phases of the University work in teaching and
research which pertain to Latin America.


f171









Administrative Officers


J. HILLIS MILLER, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D., L.H.D ........ President
of the University
JOHN STUART ALLEN, Ph.D.............. Vice-President of the University
WILLIAM T. ARNETT, M.A. in Arch............ Dean of the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts
GEORGE F. BAUGHMAN, LL.B., M.A................. Business Manager
HARLEY W. CHANDLER, M.S .................. Dean of the University
HENRY A. FENN, LL.B ..................... Dean of the College of Law
PERRY A. FOOTE, Ph.D ................. Dean of the College of Pharmacy
LEWis F. HAINES, Ph.D.................. Director of the University Press
RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S.P. .......................... Registrar
WINSTON W. LITTLE, M.A................ Dean of the University College
JOHN F. MARTIN, M.A....... Director of Latin American Student Affairs
WALTER J. MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D.............. Dean of the College of
Business Administration
HAROLD S. NEWINS, M.F............... Director of the School of Forestry
CLARENCE V. NOBLE, Ph.D........... Dean of the College of Agriculture
RALPH E. PAGE, Ph.D...........Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
J. WAYNE REITZ, Ph.D. ... ...... .......... Provost for Agriculture
DENNIS K. STANLEY, M.Ed...... Dean of the College of Physical Education,
Health and Athletics
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S .................. Dean of the College of Engineering
RAE O. WEIMER .................. Director of the School of Journalism
STANLEY L. WEST, LL.B., B.S. in L.S.... Director of the University Libraries
JOSEPH B. WHITE, Ph.D................ Dean of the College of Education
A. CURTIS WILGUS, Ph.D........ Acting Director of the Graduate School of
Inter-American Studies


1181









Courses Having Special Application
to Latin America

Agriculture

HORTICULTURE
423-MAJOR SUBTROPICAL FRUITS.
424-MINOR SUBTROPICAL AND TROPICAL FRUITS.
435-436-CITRUS CULTURE.
437-CITRUS MATURITY AND PACKINGHOUSE PROCEDURE.
514-ADVANCED CITRICULTURE.
520-CITRUS PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT.
Florida agriculture is similar to that of many Latin American cotintries
because of comparable climate, soils, and other growing conditions. For
this reason, most of the courses offered by the College of Agriculture are
pertinent and useful to Latin American students. The courses listed above
are included among 214 undergraduate and 83 graduate courses offered in
the College of Agriculture in the fields of Agricultural Chemistry, Agricul-
tural Economics, Agricultural Education, Agricultural Engineering, Agri-
cultural Extension, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Botany, Dairy Manu-
factures, Entomology, Forestry, Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry,
Soils, and Veterinary Science.
Principles of agriculture are taught in classroom lectures; and the appli-
cation of principles is stressed in laboratory experiments and class visits to
farms and other agricultural enterprises throughout Florida.
Courses in agriculture are offered by a staff of 76 professors. In addition
to the staff and facilities of the College of Agriculture, the staff and facilities
of Florida's widespread system of Agricultural Experiment Stations are
available to students in the College of Agriculture. This includes the Main
Station at Gainesville and 13 substations and field stations located through-
out Florida, from the Subtropic Station at Homestead in South Florida to
the West Florida Station at Milton.

Anthropology
339-THE SOUTH AMERICAN INDIAN.
539-THE SOUTH AMERICAN INDIAN.

Art
396-LATIN AMERICAN ART.


119]









Economics
296-INDUSTRY AND TRADE OF LATIN AMERICA.
347-PRINCIPLES OF FOREIGN TRADE.
385-ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH AMERICA.
386-EcoNOMIC GEOGRAPHY OF CARIBBEAN AMERICA.
441-FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND FISCAL POLICIES OF SELECTED LATIN
AMERICAN COUNTRIES.
449-INTERNATIONAL FINANCE: FOREIGN EXCHANGE.
545-THE ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA.

Geography
295-GEOGRAPHY OF THE AMERICAS.
405-ADVANCED REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY.
582-REGIONAL SEMINAR.
583-RESEARCH SEMINAR.
590-THESIS SEMINAR.

History
363-364-SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY.
373-MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN AREA.
374-THE PLATA REGION.
375-HISTORY OF BRAZIL.
376-THE ANDEAN REPUBLICS.
477-CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN PROBLEMS.
587-588-SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY.

Music
315-LATIN AMERICAN MUSIC.

Political Science
410-THE GOVERNMENTS OF LATIN AMERICA.
440-INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS.
531-532-SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS.
546-LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY.

Portuguese (Brazilian)
In addition to introductory courses in Portuguese Language and
Literature, the following courses conducted in Portuguese should
be specially noted:
303-304-SURVEY OF PORTUGUESE AND BRAZILIAN LITERATURE.


1201









Sociology
364--PEOPLES, CULTURES, AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF SPANISH AMERICA.
365-PEOPLES, CULTURES, AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF BRAZIL.
564-PEOPLES, CULTURES, AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF SPANISH AMERICA.
565-PEOPLES, CULTURES, AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF BRAZIL.

Spanish
In addition to offerings in Spanish Language and the Literature
of Spain, the following courses should be specially noted:
325-326-LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION.
400--LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE-EL MODERNISMO.
407-408-LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE.
451-COLONIAL LITERATURE OF LATIN AMERICA.
453-THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT IN LATIN AMERICA.
454-THE REALISTIC MOVEMENT IN LATIN AMERICA.
509-CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE.
520-SPANISH AND LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION.











*~


* 121]









Faculty Members Offering Courses Having
Special Application to Latin America


Anderson, Edward A., M.A., Instructor in Art

Behrendt, Richard F., Dr. Rer. Pol. (University of Basel), Professor of
Political Science

Bradbury, Robert W., Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor of Economics

Collins, Ernest Clifford, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Organiza-
tion and Operation

Fernandez, Pedro Villa, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish

Goggin, John M., Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor of Sociology and An-
thropology

Hayes, Francis Clement, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of
Spanish

Pierson, William Haskell, M.S., Associate Professor of Geography

Smith, T. Lynn, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Sociology

Sterrett, Delbert E., M.A., Instructor in Music

Topete, Jose M., Ph.D. (University of Southern California), Interim As-
sistant Professor of Spanish

Wershow, Irving R., Ph.D. (Tale), Assistant Professor of Spanish

Wilgus, A. Curtis, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Acting Director of the Graduate
School of Inter-American Studies and Acting Professor of History

Wolfe, Herbert Snow, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor of Horticulture

Worcester, Donald Emmet, Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor of
History

Ziegler, Louis William, B.S.A., Assistant Professor of Horticulture


1221







SUNIVERSirr OF FLORIDA


3 1262 05613 9982




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W LITHO IN U. S. A., DREW, JACKSONVILLE