Final report - Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Final report - Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials
Series Title:
7th: Reuniones bibliotecológicas, no. 2
Physical Description:
v. : ; 22-30 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Columbus Memorial Library
Conference:
Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials
Publisher:
Pan American Union etc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C. etc
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Acquisition of Latin American publications -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
conference publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1st-7th; 1956-62.
Issuing Body:
Seminars sponsored by Columbus Memorial Library, Pan American Union with various other libraries.
General Note:
Title varies slightly.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 05296407
lccn - a 56009784
lccn - (F1401.T45)
lccn - (Z673.A1P3)
ocm05296407
Classification:
lcc - Z688.L4 S45a
ddc - 016.98
nlm - W3 SE469
System ID:
AA00002840:00001

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Working papers
Succeeded by:
Final report and working papers

Full Text










FINAL RE
OF THE


PORT


SEMINAR ON THE ACQUISITION

OF

LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY MATERIALS


CHINSEGUT HILL, BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA
June 14 15, 1956


- Sponsord& by the University of Florida Libraries
and the
- Columbus Memorial Library of the Pan American Union


%
4
AP


'725,

























UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA

LIB R ARIES



Chinsegut Hill .








SUnivesit of Florida Libraries






. :. *. .. ..











:":I." -O r















FINAL REPORT


of the

SEMINAR ON THE ACQUISITION

OF

LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY MATERIALS


CHINSEGUT HILL, BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA

June 14-15, 1956



Sponsored by the University of Florida Libraries
and the
Columbus Memorial Library of the Pan American Union


Miss Imogene Hixson
Rapporteur General







Gainesville, Florida
The University of Florida Libraries
1956


































LI~y








CONTN TS

Page

INTRODUCTION 1

PURPOSE vi

PROGRAM AND WORKING PAPERS viii

LIST CF WORKING PAPERS x

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS xii



SUMMARY REPORTS

SI. Selection of Materials and Bibliographic Sources 1

II. Book Materials..Purchase and Exchange 7

III. Non-Book Materials 9

"I IV. Latin American Periodicals and Their Acquisition 11

V. Government Publications and Documents of Tnter-
American Organizations 16

VI. Summary and Conclusions 18

RESOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 20



APPENDIX I 26
Mead, Henriquez Urena, and Leavitt Periodical Lists

APPENDIX II 31
Subject Headings Used in U.N. Index to 1aws in Force

APPENDIX III page following 33
Hispanic Acquisitions Studies: 15, by Howard F. Cline


N^











INT~aDUCTIGON


The problems concerning the acquisition of library materials from

Latin America are legion. They can, however, be grouped into three large

categories:

1. how to know what has been or is being issued;

2. how to get what is needed for the particular library; and

3. how to process and preserve the material acquired.

Cooperative efforts for the acquisition of Latin American publi-

cations are not new. More than a quarter of a century ago the American

Library Association named a Committee for Library Cooperation with Latin

America which concerned itself with acquisition problems. Early in the

19.30's the Inter-American Bibliographical and Library Association was

formed by a group of private citizens, encouraged by the Pan American

Union, to promote inter-American bibliographical work by means of coopera-

tion with bibliographical organizations, bibliographical experts, libraries

and related agencies in the Americas and by lending assistance in research

work on related subjects.

On an official level, the Seventh International American Confer-

ence meeting in Montevideo, 1933, recommended the creation in the Pan

American Union of a Center of Inter-American Bibliography whose responsi-

bility was to encompass the exchange of publications. The 1936CInter-

American Conference on the Maintenance of Peace agreed that each country

should publish a quarterly bulletin with "bibliographical notices of

recently published works and of those that may be published subsequently,

whether of scientific, historical, literary or artistic nature," primarily












for use abroad.

More recently the Tenth Inter-American Conference, meeting in

Caracas, 195h, proposed that the Inter-American Cultural Council study the

possible needs for revising previous inter-American agreements on exchange

or drafting a new convention. The Inter-American Cultural Council at its

meeting in Lima in 1956 studied the matter and agreed to postpone for

further information discussion of a new convention but urged each member

state to organize an adequate exchange program. The Council also recom-

mended the extension of the present library development program of the Pan

American Union. Specialized organizations such as the Pan American Insti-

tute of Geography and History have contributed considerably to bibliographi-

cal study and production.

On a governmental level, it is the Library of Congress which has

assumed the major responsibility for the dissemination of information about

Latin American official and non-official publications. It has served as

the official agency for the deposit of materials received on the bilateral

agreements with other nations and its Hispanic Gift and Exchange office

has been very active. The Hispanic Foundation has sponsored the publica-

tion of the series of Guides to the Official Publications of the Other

American Republics, the Handbook of Latin American Studies and other

bibliographical publications. The United States Book Review was issued

in fulfillment of the recommendation of the Buenos Aires conference of

1936 mentioned above. The several numbers of the Guide to Law and Legal

Literature of the Latin American nations, issued by the Law Library, are

still virtually the only sources of information on types of legal literature.









iii


In 1947 the Library of Congress, with funds from the Department

of State, convoked the first Assembly of Librarians of the Americas which

discussed the acquisition problems of libraries in the Americas. The

Interdepartmental Committee on Science and Cultural Cooperation which

functioned with the United States government during and after the war years

did much to promote the exchange of information and publications among the

American nations.

The government of the United States is today sponsoring programs

for the mutual exchange of publications. Through a contract with the

International Cooperation Administration the U.S. Book Exchange is able to

extend its services to scientific and research libraries in Latin America

on exchange for Latin American material.

Not only have official agencies concerned themselves with provid-

ing publications and information on publications from Latin America, but

non-governmental institutions and organizations have been most effective

in cooperative efforts. The American Historical Association has long been

engaged in bibliographical pursuits in the production of such publications

as the Hispanic American Historical Review, Carnegie Corporation of New

York in 1947 granted a sum of $250,000 so that four university libraries

could acquire the most important materials issued in the various areas of

Latin America and to promote studies in those areas. The Rockefeller

Foundation has provided funds for listing of materials useful in libraries

of the United States and Latin America.

The Farmington Plan, created by libraries in the United States,

for cooperative acquisition of materials published in other countries, has











included some of the countries of the other Americas. The Association of

Research Libraries is currently sponsoring a cooperative microfilming

project for foreign newspapers. The Conference on American Books Abroad,

sponsored by the National Book Committee in 1955, studied not only the

need abroad for useful American books, but the publications programs of

other nations.

International organizations of recent years have tended in general

to concentrate on the needs of underdeveloped countries. However, in the

field of bibliography and the promotion of bibliographic activities, their

efforts aid countries of all levels of cultural and economic development.

UNESCO, for instance, held last year in Havana a Regional Conference on

Bibliography during which the representatives from the countries of the

Caribbean and Central America agreed to pool their efforts in an attempt

to produce an annual bibliography of the area. The "Bibliographic Series"

of the Columbus Memorial Library as well as the monthly List of Accessions,

of the Pan American Union has served libraries throughout the world in the

selection of materials for acquisition.

The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials,

held at Chinsegut Hill, Brooksville, Florida, on June 14 and 15, 1956,

is the latest link in the chain of cooperative efforts to resolve mutual

acquisitions problems. Sponsored by the University of Florida Libraries

and the Columbus Memorial Library of the Pan American Union, it brought

together representatives of government agencies, university, special and

public libraries, Latin American bibliographers and scholars, the export-

import book trade, international organizations, and the U.S. Book Exchange.

OGf the eighteen recommendations .made by the Seminar, a considerable number












proposed continued and expanded cooperative efforts. The need for more

background knowledge was revealed in the decision to plan a second Seminar

for 1957 to study the publication and book trade situation in each country

so that more effective acquisitions programs could be initiated.

The following Summay Reports of the six sessions held during the

Seminar indicate the scope of discussions. Special gratitude should be

expressed to those who prepared the working papers which served as back-

ground material for discussions and in many cases raised questions which

the Seninar attempted to answer. The discussions were ably led by moder-

ators and recorded by rapporteurs. The other participants assisted in

the preparation of the summary reports of each session.

The physical comfort of the participants was amply attended by

Mr. and Mrs. Bradford Shaw who live at Chinsegut Hill and administer its

Library, and by Miss Lisa von Borowsky who was instrumental in providing

for the present use of Chinsegut Hill as a research center. To these and

all others who made the two-day seminar a possibility and a success (such

as Frederick Kidder who manned the tape recorder), the sponsors and the

participants owe a great debt of gratitude.


The Sponsors

Mr. Stanley West Miss Marietta Daniels
Director of Libraries Associate Librarian
University of Florida Pan American Union
Gainesville, Florida Washington, D. C.













SEMINAR ON THE ACQUISITION OF LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY MATERIALS

Chinsegut Hill, Brooksville, Florida

June 14-15, 1956


Purpose.- 1. To provide an opportunity for those persons chiefly
concerned with the selection, acquisition and processing of
library materials from the Latin American nations and depend-
ent territories of the Caribbean to meet together to discuss
these activities as they especially pertain to major Latin
American collections in the United States,

2, To assembly and disseminate information on the acquisition
of materials from this area that could be of value to libraries
throughout the United States,

Sponsorship,- The seminar is jointly sponsored by the Libraries of
the University of Floriaa and the Columbus Memorial Library of
the Pan American Union,

Participation.- Representatives of the following: 1) Institutions
with special interest in the collection of materials from the
Latin American nations and dependent territories of the Caribbean;
2) The export-import book trade in the United States and Latin
America; and 3) International organizations engaged in promoting
the exchange of library materials in the Americas. Because of
limited facilities at Chinsegut Hill, registration will be re-
stricted to twenty participants.

Plan of Organization.- Working papers on background information will
be prepared and distributed in advance so that the participants
will be able to devote full time to the discussion of the pro-
blems involved. Five meetings will be concerned with the acquisi-
tion of various types of materials, and the sixth and final one to
findings and conclusions of the discussions,

Working Papers.- Background papers of from 10 to 15 pages double spaced
are to be prepared by specialists. These papers should be sent to
the Director of Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, by
May 1, to insure reproduction and distribution well in advance of
the Seminar.















Registration.- Notification of acceptance of invitation should reach
the University of Florida by April 1 and of the representative
selected by May 1.

Cost.- The fee for the two-day conference will be $25.00 to cover
lodging for the nights of June 13, 14 and 15, meals for the
night of June 13, for three meals on June 14, and 15 and for
breakfast on June 16, papers and final report, as well as
local transportation.

Transportation.- Provision will be made for local transportation
from nearby rail and air terminals to Chinsegut Hill and return
after the Seminar. More specific information concerning connections
in Tampa and Gainesville will be given to participants well in
advance of the meeting,

Housing Accommodations.- Both discussion meetings and lodging will be
provided insofar as facilities permit at Chinsegut Hill,
a large nineteenth century country home. (Cool, informal
clothing is recommended for central Florida in June.)



For further information inquire from either:



Mr. Stanley West Miss Marietta Daniels
Director of Libraries Associate Librarian
University of Florida Columbus Memorial Library
Gainesville, Florida Pan American Union
Washington 6, D. C.


February 9, 1956







viii


SEMINAR ON THE ACQUISITION OF LATIN AMERICAN LIBRARY MATERIALS

Chinsegut Hill, Brooksville, Florida

June 14-15, 1956


Program and Working Papers



Time Agenda Working Papers

June 14, 8:30 a,m. Organizational meeting

9-11 a.m. I. Selection of Materials and Bibliogra-
phic Sources.

a. Sources of bibliographic
information and the problems
of selection.

b. Major Latin American
collections in U.S. libraries
and their special interests.

c. USBE activities in Latin
America and their relation-
ship to Latin American
collections in the U.S.

d. Problems of the treatment of
Latin American materials in
U. S, libraries.


2-4 p.m. II. Book Materials Purchase and Ex-
change.

e. Purchase through bookstores,
publishers and dealers.

f. Experience of Farmington Plan
in the Latin American field.

g. Major learned societies and
institutions in Latin America
with extensive publishing
programs,

h. Practical experience of U.S.
libraries in exchange of
publications with Latin America











Time Agenda Working Papers

June 14, 8-10 p.m. III. Non-Book Materials

i. Mapping services in Latin
America.

J. Manuscript and special col-
lections in Latin America
available for photographic
reproduction.


June 15, 9-11 a.m. IV, Latin American Periodicals and Their
Acquisition.

k. Problems of periodicals
acquisition.

1. Microfilm programs with
emphasis on periodicals and
newspapers.

m. Indexes and indexing services
to Latin American periodicals


2-4 p.m. V. Government Publications and Documents
of Inter-American Organizations,

h. Problems of acquisition of
government publications.

o. Documents of the Inter-Americ
System.


VI. Summary and Conclusions.


8-10 p.m.









LIST OF WORKING PAPERS


Number


Author


I a-i


Title

Selection of Materials and Bibliographic Sources

Sources of Bibliographic Information
and the Problems of Selection of
Latin American Materials

Selection and Acquisition of Latin
American Bibliographical Material

Major Latin American Collections in
Libraries of the United States

USBE Activities in Latin America and
their Relationship to Latin American
Collections in the United States

Problems of the Treatment of Latin
American Materials in U.S. Libraries


Book Materials--Purchase and Exchange

An International Bookseller's Rela-
tionship with Publishers and Dealers
in Latin America

Purchase of Latin American Materials
through Bookstores, Publishers and
Dealers

Which are the Latin American Books
United States Libraries Need

Experience of Farmington Plan in the
Latin American Field

Major Learned Societies and Institu-
tions in Latin America with Extensive
Publishing Programs

Practical Experience of U.So Libraries
in Exchange of Publications with Latin
America


Robert E. Kingery



Carlos Victor Penna


Josephine C. Fabilli


Alice Dulany Ball



Imogene Hixson


Dominick Coppola



Emma Crosland Simonson



Fermin Peraza


Edwin E. Williams


Howard F. Cline



Lilly Carter


I a-2


Ib


Ic


Id


II e


II e 2


II e 3


II g -


II h













Author


Title

Non-Book Materials


Mapping Services in Latin America


Arch C. Gerlach


Latin American Periodicals and Their Acquisitions


Problems of.Acquisition of Latin
American Periodicals

Microfilm Programs with Emphasis
on Latin American Periodicals and
Newspapers

Indexes and Indexing Services to
Latin American Periodicals and News-
papers


Irene Zimmemnan


Nettie Lee Benson



Jorge Grossmann


Government Publications and Documents of Inter-American Organizations


Problems of Acquisition of Government
Publications


Paul L. Berry


Number


III i


IV k


IV L


IV m


V n








LIST OF PARTICIPANTS


Mr. John Baroco
University of Miami
Coral Gables, Florida

Miss Nettie Lee Benson
University of Texas
Austin, Texas

Miss Louise 0. Bercaw
U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D. C.

Miss Lilly Carter
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Mr. Howard F. Cline
The Library of Congress
Washington 25, D. C.

Mr. Olan V. Cook
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Mr. ..Dominick Coppola
Stechert-Hafner, Inc.
New York, New York

Miss Marietta Daniels
Pan American Union
Washington, D. C.

Miss Gladys Doolittle
Yale University
New Haven, Connecticut

Miss Josephine C, Fabilli
Pan American Union
Washington, D. C.

Miss Imogene Hixson
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Mrs. Mabel Barrett Jones
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, North Carolina


Mr. Frederick E. Kidder
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Dr. Sturgis E. Leavitt
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Miss Gertrude Merritt
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina

Mr. Marion A. Milczewski
University of California
Berkeley 4, California

Mr. Lewis Morgan
University of Miami
Coral Gables, Florida

Mrs. Edith B. Ricketson
Tulane University
New Orleans, Louisiana

Mr. Rutherford B. Rogers
New York Public Library
New York, New York

Miss Gertrude Schutze
Grace Chemical Research and
Development Company
New York, New York

Mr. Bradford Shaw
Chinsegut Hill Library
Brooksville, Florida

Mr. Stewart Smith
Florida State University
Tallahassee, Florida

Mr. Stanley L. West
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Dr. A. Curtis Wilgus
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florid a


xii












Mrs. Fernande Wojewodski
United Nations
New York, New York


Miss Irene Zimmerman
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


LIST OF OBSERVERS


Dr. Charles Arnade

Miss Lisa von Borowsky

Miss Shirley Gaddum


Mrs. May Grodsky

Miss Alice McNairy

Mrs. Virginia Steen


xiii









SUMMARY REPORTS OF THE SEMINAR


I. Selection of Materials and Bibliographic Sources
Thursday, 9:00-11:00 A.M.
Moderator: Dr. A. Curtis Wilgus, University of Florida
Rapporteur: Josephine C. Fabilli, Pan American Union
Working Papers: Robert E. Kingery, Carlos Victor Penna,
Josephine C. Fabilli, Alice Delany Ball, Imogene Hixson.

The meeting began with a welcome by Bradford Shaw, librarian of

the Chinsegut Hill Library. Introductory remarks by Miss Marietta Daniels

then followed. Miss Daniels gave the background of the meeting, traced

the development of inter-American bibliographical interest and cooperation

since 1890, and spoke of UNESCO's interest in the subject. She reported

that at its recent meeting in Lima the Inter-American Cultural Council

accorded priority to library matters and to inter-American cultural co-

operation in general. After comments by those present on evidences of

growing interest in this field, the specific business of the morning ses-

sion began.

The theme of the Seminar was stated briefly by Dr. Wilgus--to

consider the problems involved in finding, buying, and controlling li-

brary matters relating to Latin America.

In commenting on a suggestion made in Robert E. Kingery's work-

ing paper, Dr. Cline spoke about the work now in progress at the Hispanic

Foundation to bring up to date the Handbook of Latin American Studies.

Volume 19,. which is expected to be published in February, 1957, will

include nearly all 1953, much 1954, and some 1955 material. Plans are

to make volume 20 and following numbers current; after that, a cumulative












index is contemplated. To increase the usefulness of the Handbook,

special features at the end may again be included from time to time.

A request by Dr. Leavitt for an explanation of the functions of

the United States Book Exchange prompted questions by Mr. Cook, Miss

Schutze, and others which showed that there was much interest in the USBE,

its scope, and its role in obtaining and supplying materials on and for

Latin America. The USBE now has over three million items, a quarter of a

million being on Latin America, Miss Ball said. Eighty-five percent of

the collection consists of periodicals. Increase in Latin American ex-

changes will make it possible for USBE to give special attention to U. S.

needs for Latin American publications. Miss Ball explained that USBE'S

plan of operation, through which the exchanging libraries pay for service

received, has been supplemented for Latin America by a grant from the

International Cooperation Administration.

Dr. Leavitt asked if information is available on private collec-

tions which are for sale. The general impression was that notices of

sales are not always readily available. Miss Daniels suggested the

Revista Interamericana de Bibliografia (Inter-American Review of Bibliog-

raphy) as a suitable publication in which to make announcements of sales,

and Dr. Wilgus mentioned the Information and Binational Centers of the

U. S. Information Agency as possible sources of information. Dr. Cline

pointed out that owners of valuable collections abroad do not always make

generally known the fact that they wish to sell, especially when they hope

to obtain higher prices outside their countries. This brought up the

matter of the cultural legacy of nations which, Miss Fabilli recalled, has












been discussed internationally and was one of the points mentioned in

September, 1949, when Dr. Luther H. Evans, then Librarian of Congress,

addressed the First Congress of Historians of Mexico in Monterrey. On

that occasion Dr. Evans stated the policy of the Library of Congress in

acquiring valuable manuscript collections from abroad: where national laws

prohibit export, the Library of Congress will not purchase or accept such

collections as gifts. Mr. Rogers remarked that Europeans, like Latin

Americans, dislike to lose their unique cultural documents. Prices for

valuable collections are going up, partly because European industrialists

wish to keep these materials at home.

On the subject of retrospective versus current interest in acquisi-

tions, Dr. Cline asked the question: What should be included in U. S.

university collections; how should they develop? In answer, Mr. Milczewski

said that it is difficult to plan in this area as the universities do not

always know what direction faculty researches will take from one year to

the next. Book selection is often primarily a faculty responsibility, and

a major portion of the book funds is spent by the faculty. With these com-

ments several persons from university libraries agreed, one or two adding

that in some universities there is a special Latin American fund spent at

the discretion of the librarian. Mr. Smith said that officers of some

major southern universities--Georgia, Florida, and others to be included

in the arrangement--consult among themselves in order to avoid unnecessary

duplication of serials.

There is little information now, continued Dr. Cline, on the

development and location of major Latin American collections in the United











States, as pointed out in the working paper on that subject. The diffi-

culty in keeping current is not so much in publishing the information as

in gathering and compiling it. Perhaps the Handbook of Latin American

Studies could publish occasional articles or sections on the subject, but

Dr. Cline felt that it could not at present undertake to collect the facts.

Miss Fabilli mentioned suggestions made to her for increasing current

information on collections: more lists and notices in the Revista Inter-

americana de Bibliografia, and more interest on the part of the Pan American

Institute of Geography and History. This Institute, however, is concerned

not with the humanities or general studies but primarily with the social

sciences. The Inter-American Bibliogrqphical and Library Association could

consider this matter, Dr. Wilgus said. Dr. Zimmerman added that the existing

regional councils on Latin American affairs might contribute information on

the subject and that perhaps non-governmental agencies might assume the

responsibility for collecting or publishing such information. At the present

time, however, not all areas of the United States are covered by regional

councils; where they do exist the councils vary in interest and activity.

It was recommended that this matter of major Latin American collections in

the United States be further discussed at coming library and cultural con-

ferences.

A question by Mr. Rogers started discussion of the problem of

securing publications abroad. Dr. Cline stated that it costs approximately

$15,000 a year to keep a buying representative in Latin America, including

travel and exclusive of purchases, Perhaps it would be advisable for a

number of libraries to pool resources in order to have one or more such

purchasers in the field. More than one person abroad would be advisable











for such a complicated service; the cumulative effects would not be felt

for several years, In addition to field representatives, said Mr.

Coppola, faculty members going overseas could be delegated to buy in

their respective disciplines. Miss Hixson, who had recently returned

from a buying trip in the Caribbean area, observed that limitations imposed

by insufficient subject knowledge can affect the quality of purchases made;

dealers like to sell but they do not always help one make the best selec-

tion.

There are not sufficient national and regional bibliographies, as

pointed out at many library meetings in the past, Even when book trade

information is available, the problem of evaluation, among others, is not

solved as lists are not often critically annotated. It was recommended

that production of book trade directories and bibliographies on a national

and regional basis be stimulated. The cooperation of U. S. groups, such

as librarians, the American Book Publishers' Council, and others, would

probably help bring results. Perhaps.R. R. Bowker could publish such a

directory. Mr. Coppola suggested that for the time being it might be well

to bring out an offset reproduction of bookdealers' catalogs, with a good

index, as has been done in Spain and Italy.'

On the subject of major book selection problems, Dr. Benson said

that she considered the chief one the fact that many publications are out

of print in a short time because they are issued in small editions. Even

if bibliographical information were quickly available there still remains

this problem of the smallness of editions. Other participants observed

that the difficulty is not solved by having local dealers do blanket order-

ing, for these dealers cannot always be relied on for good selections.










Also discussed was the physical condition of imported publications, which

is often poor, especially in quality of paper and binding. In order to

economize on the latter some university and other large libraries have

their books bound in the countries where they are purchased.

As the session drew to a close the major recommendation made was

to stimulate activity in the matters considered by proposing further dis-

cussion at conferences interested in these subjects. Among such meetings

to take place soon are those in connection with the opening of the new

National Library in Havana in October, the Primer Festival del Libro de

America to be held in Caracas in November, the library conference scheduled

for 1957 in Port-of-Spain, and the meeting of the Caribbean Commission

planned for 1959. These matters would probably be of interest also to

the new Institute of Puerto Rican Culture. It was recommended that the

proposals made during this Seminar be called promptly to the attention of

the persons and groups planning the above-mentioned conferences or others

of like nature,












II. Book Materials--Purchase and Exchange
Thursday, 2:00-4:00 P.M.
Moderator: Dominick Coppola, Stechert-Hafner, Inc.
Rapporteur: Gertrude Merritt, Duke University
Working Papers: Dominick Coppola, Emma Crosland Simonson,
Fermin Peraza, Edwin E. Williams, Howard F. Cline,
Lilly Carter.

In the second session, moderated by Mr. Coppola, the participants

discussed the desirability of publishing a list of booksellers in Latin

America, examined Mr. Williams' questions on the Farmington Plan, and

projected a plan for a second session of the Seminar on the Acquisition of

Latin American Library Materials. It was suggested that institutions hav-

ing lists of dealers submit them to the Pan American Union for inclusion

in its forthcoming directory. It would be useful to include also a list

of the "book scout" type of dealer. The directory of current Latin Ameri-

can scientific and learned periodicals now in preparation by the Pan

American Union is expected to be available early in 1957.

The question was raised as to whether other countries should be

included in the Farmington Plan. It was the general feeling that there

should be a broader coverage and that material assigned to the New York

Public Library should also be the responsibility of another library in

order to make it available on interlibrary loan. The participants could

not make definite commitments about assuming further responsibilities in

the plan without discussing it with their associates.

A plan for a second Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American

Library Materials was proposed by Dr. Howard Cline of the Hispanic Founda-

tion. He recommended:

1. That the seminar reconvene in approximately a year,











2. That the work program be organized geographically rather
than functionally, i.e. by country rather than by problem.

3. That institutions take responsibility for preparing working
papers.

U. That working papers attempt to cover comparable ground in
accordance with an outline to be developed by a drafting committee and
circulated for a comment.

5. That such outline cover points like the following.

a. Commercial book-trade, dealers, associations, etc,,
special features.

b. Institutions offering material on exchange,

c. Bibliographical controls.

d. Serials.

e. Government publications.

6. That after discussion at the seminar, revised versions be
published in volume form.












III. Non-Book Materials
Thursday, 8:00-10:00 P.M.
Moderator: Marion A. Milczewski, University of California
Rapporteur: Nettie Lee Benson, University of Texas
Working Paper: Arch C. Gerlach

The group expressed the opinion that Dr. Arch C. Gerlach's paper

presented as comprehensive a picture as possible on map acquisition, and

that the group had little to add in the way of specific experience or

suggestions. It was noted, however, that among universities, at least,

maps are widely dispersed and there is no central responsibility for them.

The group realizes the growing importance of maps as primary research

material. It was noted that there is little map publication going on in

Latin America, but that most of it is done by American Geographic Society

and U. S. Government agencies. The great need for atlases was felt.

The utility of a clearing house was indicated for the location of

microfilm of special manuscripts and archival materials of Latin America

now in the United States and for some form of annual check list of such

acquisitions.

Concern was expressed about the difficulty in locating informa-

tion about private manuscript collections and their availability for

microfilming.

The question was raised as to facilities available for photographic

reproduction in Latin America. It was suggested that the Documentation

Center*, where they exist, may be the best sources for such work.

Mention was made of the problems involved in acquiring other

non-book materials, such as motion picture films, records, performance

music, and art material.









10


It was noted that Dr. Lisa Lekis at the University of Florida is

now preparing a bibliography which will attempt to locate collections of

recorded ethnic and folk music of Latin America.

It was mentioned that the New York Public Library is acquiring

performance music from Latin America, by sponsoring the performance of the

music of Latin American composers.











IV. Latin American Periodicals and Their Acquisition
Friday, 9:00-11:00 A.M.
Moderator: Irene Zimmerman, University of Florida
Rapporteur: Gladys Doolittle, Yale University
Working Papers: Irene Zimmerman, Nettie Lee Benson,
Jorge Grossmann.

Dr. Nettie L. Benson brought up first the question of binding

periodicals. Miss Daniels described a new type of box used at the Pan

American Union for official gazettes. The cost of each box is $2.50

and it has flaps which protect the material. She also mentioned that

they have found a binder in Pennsylvania who will bind 7 to 9 inch books

for $1.50, or even for $1.00 for certain types of material. (Name on

request.) Dr. Cline and Mr. Cook will be glad to give information about

plastic bindings which are being used experimentally at their institutions.

Dr. Benson then brought up the difficulties which she encountered

in trying to find out which libraries have files of periodicals. Dr.

Cline said that the Microfilm Clearing House at Library of Congress would

be the place to obtain this information about holdings of all sorts of

materials on film (books as well as periodicals) if libraries would only

send in the information to be recorded there. This information could

probably appear as a supplement to the LC Information Bulletin.

Dr. Leavitt then told about his index to literary, linguistic,

and folklore materials which is to be published in Chile by the Fondo

Historico J. T. Medina. It includes material in about 250 magazines,

30,000 entries in all, from 1842 to 1935, with explanatory notes which

have been translated into Spanish.

The Hispanic Institute at Columbia University has an index to

literary periodicals on cards which is most useful for direct consultation












there.

Dr. Cline said that for the present they are concentrating on

bringing the Handbook of Latin American Studies up to date, Book entries

are prepared by the Hispanic Foundation for evaluation by the contributing

editors; the latter are responsible for entries and evaluation of periodi-

cal items. The Handbook staff keeps a record of the latest number of a

periodical received.

Dr. Cline also stressed that he welcomes suggestions and criticisms

of the Handbook and that the staff analyzes reviews in order to incorporate

suggestions from that source. He says that there are plans for making a

cumulative index to the Handbook after volume 20 has appeared. The Harvard

Law School has already made an index of the authors in volumes 1-17.

The subject of indexing was next discussed. Miss Daniels described

the method of indexing used at Pan American Union. They put the items on

salmon-colored cards and file them in the public catalog. Those before

1935 have now been removed and placed in a separate file.

The List of Books Accessioned and Periodical Articles Indexed

for the Month, published by the Columbus Memorial Library, includes bibli-

ographical and biographical material. In the December issue is an annual

list of periodicals indexed.

Miss Daniels suggested that a conference be held to consider a

cooperative indexing project. She thought this index might be done in

card form by multilithing extra copies of the index cards.

Dr. Wilgus brought up the question of whether it would be possible

to issue revised editions of early numbers of the "Bibliographic series" of












the Pan American Union. Miss Daniels said she did not think they could do

it themselves. It was decided that the Inter-American Library and Biblio-

graphical Association could properly undertake this task, in cooperation

with the Pan American Union. Dr. Wilgus said he thought some professors

would be willing to work on it.

Mr. Rogers then gave a brief history of the indexing done by the

New York Public Library and the methods used. He estimated that they

index about 6,000 items a year in all fields. In view of the similarity

between programs, he thought that a meeting such as the one suggested by

Miss Daniels would be a very good idea.

Dr. Cline stated that extra slips could be made for items included

in the Handbook of Latin American Studies, to be incorporated in an index

file.

Mr. Milczewski said that he would prefer an index in book form to

one on cards; but it was generally agreed that it would be well to start

with cards, and work toward the issuance of a cumulation in book form when

and if possible.

Mrs. Wojewodski described the Index to laws in force which is

being compiled at the United Nations. This is to cover 93 countries, though

actually only 59 are included now. It is on cards at present, but will be

accumulated in book form semiannually. It is not annotated, and covers six

main fields: political, economic and social matters, international law,

international legal matters, general provisions, and human rights. She had

a list of the subject headings used, which will be published as one of the

appendices to the reports of this Seminar,












Dr. Cline remarked that the Library of Congress Law Library makes

an index of this sort also. The Handbook of Latin American Studies, how-

ever, does not index individual laws, entries being restricted chiefly to

major compilations and works on jurisprudence.

Miss Daniels said the H. W. Wilson Company would charge $25,000

to publish the index compiled by the Columbus Memorial Library each year;

and it was agreed that this figure was too high for consideration.
/
It was recommended that the lists of Leavitt, Mead, and Henriquez

Urena be published in the Appendix to the papers of this Seminar.

The subject 'of microfilming came up for discussion next. One

question which arose was whether one negative and one positive should be

in a central point, or scattered about the country. The consensus seemed

to be that it did not matter too much where they were located, as long as

there was a way to find out where they were. If a list were published

showing holdings, everyone would be satisfied because they would be

accessible.

As to whether the retrospective or current material should be

filmed first, the general agreement seemed to be that the older material

should have priority; though Dr. Cline pointed out that Library of Con-

gress would give priority to current material.

Dr. Leavitt agreed to add a paragraph when he sends out his list

of periodicals to libraries to have the checking brought up to date. He

will ask what their holdings are, what holdings they have on microfilm,

what items they would like to have on microfilm, and what items in their

possession they would be willing to have microfilmed. Miss Daniels said









15

that she thought Pan American Union could undertake to publish this list;

Dr. Cline said it could probably come out as a supplement to the LC In-

formation bulletin or otherwise.

It was definitely recommended that a conference be held on the

subject of cooperative indexing, as suggested by Miss Daniels.











V. Government Publications and Documents of Inter-American Organizations
Friday, 2:00-4:00 P.M.
Moderator: Rutherford B. Rogers, New York Public Library
Rapporteur: Stewart Smith, Florida State University
Working Paper: Paul L. Berry

The Fifth Session of the Seminar was devoted to a discussion of

the acquisition of government publications from Latin America, and to

publications of the Pan American Union. All of the libraries represented

were interested in Latin American government publications, but with vary-

ing degrees of comprehensiveness. The group considered the desirability

of microfilming official national gazettes on a cooperative basis. The

Library of Congress has done some work along this line with back files of

Mexican state official gazettes, and The New York Public Library is micro-

filming part of the Cuban National Gazette. The Library of Congress will

be requested to report in the summary paper of this Seminar the status of

Library of Congress efforts in the microfilming of official gazettes.1

The following resolution was duly presented and unanimously passed:

(NU. 12. of Recommendations on p. 23)

Dr. Cline reported that the Library of Congress is experimenting

with the revision of A Guide to the Official Publications of the Other

American Republics, beginning with Haiti, Honduras, and one other country.2



IThe Library of Congress reports that it is not carrying on an
active program of microfilming national gazettes.

2John Baroco supplied the following information by letter dated
July 24, 1956: Bayitch, Dr. Stojan Albert, comp. A Guide to Interamerican
Legal Studies; a Selective Bibliography of Works in English.
This work will be published in mimeographed format by the Uni-
versity of Miami Law School by the end of 1956. The compilation will be











Miss Fabilli gave a.summary of the publication program of the Pan

American Union. After questions and general discussion, the following

resolution was offered by Dr. Wilgus, duly seconded and unanimously passed:

(No. 13 of Recommendations' on p. 2)-24)


the first of a series of publications relating to Latin American law
which will be made possible by a grant from the Ford Foundation.
This guide will be the first comprehensive bibliography of books
and articles available in English relating to the law of the Latin Ameri-
can.nations. It will include references to English translations of the
statutes of the various countries, as well as bibliographical and descrip-
tive works on the area. The work is arranged by area, with subdivisions
by topic.











VI. Summary and Conclusions
Friday, -O00-10:OO P.M.
Moderator: Howard F. Cline, the Library of Congress
Rapporteur: Imogene Hixson, University of Florida

The announced purposes of the Seminar were stated by Dr. Cline as

having been achieved.

Previous to the opening of this session twenty-eight draft

resolutions and recommendations were prepared from the working papers and

from the summary reports of each of the five preceding sessions. Each

resolution was read and separately considered for action. The resolutions

and recommendation% as approved, are listed at the close of this report.

A number of earlier problems were briefly discussed again, as

resolutions touching them were opened for debate from the floor. As to

exploring the possibilities and feasibility of arranging for an acquisi-

tions agent in Latin America, Dr. Leavitt remarked that there were many

complications involved. Mr. Rogers replied that no harm could be done by

investigating and it might prove helpful to interested libraries. Dr.

Cline agreed to explore, with other government agencies, the possible cost,

etc.,-to make this information available to others interested, and to

report his findings at the second seminar.

During the discussion on compiling and publishing of book direc-

tories for Latin America, Mr. Coppola remarked that the California list

supplemented by lists from other libraries might serve as a directory. He

suggested also that domestic dealers be included. Miss Daniels said that

within a few weeks Pan American Union would publish a directory of book

publishers and book dealers, Since this is being done it was the feeling

of the group that to publish a partial list at this time would be unnecessary.









There was much discussion about what to reply to Mr. Williams'

question as to the desirability and method of extending the Farmington

Plan. It was suggested that at the second seminar we could give a more

detailed answer after investigating the local situation. Mr. Coppola

said that we were not prepared to give a specific answer. Dr. Cline

insisted that we reply to this request. Miss Ball suggested that we send

a letter saying we did not know what method to recommend at this time.

Mr. Kidder suggested and it was the consensus of the participants that we

should direct this point to the agenda of the second meeting and prepare

to answer more concretely a year from now.

Dr. Zimmerman explained that it was not the intention of the

group to recommend that the New York Public Library give up its partici-

pation in the Farmington Plan. However, it would be helpful from the

standpoint of inter-library loan, if interested universities covered the

same ground.

Mr. Rogers said that he understood from Mr. Berry's paper that

Library of Cohgress was attempting to microfilm currently the legal

gazettes of Latin America. Miss Daniels suggested that if the Associa-

tion of Research Libraries does consider this matter, they will surely

take the Library of Congress into consideration.

Mr. Cook expressed the regrets of Dr. Andrew Horn who was unable

to attend, congratulated the University of Florida on acquiring Chinsegut

Hill, and described the Seminar as very rewarding.

Mr. West expressed appreciation to the participants for efforts

going into the working papers and to Miss von Borowsky for making it pos-

sible to have this first major conference at Chinsegut Hill.

As a veteran of conferences, Miss Daniels remarked that this was

the easiest conference in which she had participated.










RESOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE SEMINAR


I. Selection of Materials and Bibliographic Sources


The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

recommends:

1. That the Inter-American Bibliographical and Library Association, in

cooperation with interested institutions, consider the compilation

and publication of data on the location, scope, development, and

current acquisition policies and practice, of major Latin American

collections in the United States as a supplement to the information

published in Ronald Hilton's Handbook of Hispanic- Source Materials

and Research Organizations in the Ulhited States.

a. It is further recommended that, if possible, the interest of the

Commission on History of the Pan American Institute of Geography

and History in this project be enlisted;

b, It is further recommended that the attention of the several

Regional Councils on Inter-American Studies be drawn to this

project and their aid and support be solicited.

c. It is recommended that as soon as possible an annotated bibli-

ography concerning Latin American collections in the United

States be prepared and published.

2, That the general and particular acquisition needs of Latin American

collections in United States libraries be brought specifically to

the attention of U. S. Book Exchange, and that USBE be urged to

continue and increase specialized activities in terms of working











with the group of United States libraries engaged in the collec-

tion of Latin American materials.



II. Book Materials--Purchase and Exchange


The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

recommends

3. That interested libraries explore the possibilities and feasibility

of maintaining on a cooperative basis one or more full-time

acquisitions agents in Latin America.

4. That the Library of Congress, in cooperation with interested insti-

tutions, develop a Handbook of Latin American Learned Societies

with Exchange Programs, to list universities and societies, their

affiliates, publishing programs, response or exchange partners and

other relevant data.



III. Non-Book Materials


The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

recommends:

5. That efforts be made by the Latin American Specialist, National

Archives, in cooperation with interested persons and institutions,

to develop clearing house activities to report on location of

manuscripts and special Latin American materials on microfilm and

the publication of annual check lists of such acquisitions.

6. That efforts be made by The National Archives, in cooperation with












interested institutions, to develop more microfilming and documenta-

tion centers in Latin America where inadequate photocopying

facilities now exist,

7. That the Hispanic Foundation remind all institutions holding

microfilm and engaging in microfilming of Latin American materials

to report their activities to the National Microfilming Clearing

House (Union Catalog Division, Library of Congress), and that the

Library of Congress compile and publish such information,



IV. Latin-American Periodicals and Their Acquisition

The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials

recommends:

8. That the Hispanic Foundation, in cooperation with interested

institutions, prepare and publish a cumulative index to the Hand-

book of Latin American Studies.

9. That the Inter-American Bibliographical and Library Association,

in cooperation with Pan American Union, revise and extend the

older Pan American Union bibliographic publications most in demand.

10. That the Pan American Union, in cooperation with interested instiw

tutions, call a conference of those institutions and groups inter-

ested in or now engaged in cooperative indexing of Latin American

periodicals.

11. That as the first step in the microfilming of rare and significant

Latin American periodicals

a. Libraries in the United States be circularized as to their












holdings of the fifty magazines which appear in the Leavitt

Index, and

b. These libraries be asked if they are disposed to participate

in the microfilming of some or all of these materials.



V. Government Publications and Documents of Inter-American Organizations


12. The members of the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American

Library Materials, meeting at Chinsegut Hill Library of the Univer-

sity of Florida on June 15, 1956, under the sponsorship of the Pan

American Union and the University of Florida, discussed the problem

of availability of current issues and the problem of deterioration

of retrospective files of the official gazettes of Latin American

countries. As a result of the discussion, the Seminar unanimously

recommends:

That the Association of Research Libraries be, and
it hereby is, requested to investigate the feasibility
of sponsoring the cooperative microfilming of retro-
spective files of the official gazettes of Latin Ameri-
can countries and to continue said files by microfilm-
ing currently on a cooperative basis.

13, Representatives of the various libraries attending the Seminar on

the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials expressed seri-

ous concern with present distribution practices and bibliographical

control of the documents of the OAS and the publications of the PAU.

They find it impossible to ascertain what is being or what has been

published by the Pan American Union, what they should receive as

"depository libraries" and how to determine which documents and













publications may be lacking. For greater availability and useful-

ness of the documents of the OAS and the publications of the PAU,

the Seminar respectfully requests that the OAS study as soon as

possible the creation of the following services:

a, Compilation of a documentation symbol system for numerical

identification of both documents and general publications,

possibly controlled through a Documents or Editorial Office.

b. Systematic study of the distribution of documents and publi-

cations to assure complete coverage by depository subscribers.

c. Indexing service to current documents and publications similar

in scope and form to the UN Documents Index.

d. Compilation of a retrospective list of the publications of the

Pan American Union and the documents of the OAS.

e. Revision of the current catalog of PAU publications to make

it more usable, through such devices as series listings, index,

and fuller annotations.

f. Coordination of these activities with the Inter-American

Bibliographical Committee of the OAS as recommended by the

second meeting of the Inter-American Cultural Council.

The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials agrees-

14. To call to the attention of the Latin American Regional Conference

on Exchanges in Havana the need for appropriate domestic legisla-

tion to support the exchange of official publications with both

governmental and non-governmental institutions.











General Resolutions


The Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials agrees:

15. That a Second Seminar on Latin American Library Materials be con-

vened, preferably within one year, to explore further the problems

discussed at this meeting, the Organizing Committee to consist oft

a. The Library of Congress

b. Pan American Union

c. Inter-American Bibliographical and Library Association and

other interested parties

d. Host

16. That the recommendations of this meeting be transmitted to forth-

coming state, regional, national, and international meetings of

librarians, especially the UNESCO Latin American Regional Conference

on Exchanges (Havana, October 1956), International Conference of

National Librarians,:of America (Havana, October, 1956), and the

Primer Festival del Libro de America (Caracas, November, 1956) for

their consideration and possible action.

17. That collective thanks be expressed on behalf of the group to the

co-sponsoring organizations, and especially to Miss Marietta Daniels,

Organization of American States, and to Mr. Stanley West and his

staff members, and to those who prepared working papers for the

Seminar and for the efficient pre-seminar preparations.

18. That special appreciation be expressed to the University of Florida

and to Miss Lisa von Borowsky for the use of Chinsegut Hill, and to

Mr. and Mrs. Bradford Shaw for the gracious hospitality dispensed.









APPENDIX I


Choices of Robert G. Mead, Jr.


Abside, Mexico.

Atenea, Concepcion, Chile.

Books Abroad, Stillwater, Oklahoma.

Boletin del Instituto Caro 7 Cuervo,
Bogott. /Now Thesaurus

Casa de la Cultura Ecuatoriana,
Quito.

Criterio, Buenos Aires.

Cuadernos, Paris.

Cuadernos Americanos, Mexico.

Hispania (AATSP), Wallingford,
Connecticut (Editorial office)

Hispanic American Historical Review,
Austin, Texas and Durham, N. C.

Hispanoamericano, Mexico.

Hispanic American Report, Stanford.
California.


Humanismo, Mexico.

Iberica, New York.

Imago Mundi, Buenos Aires.

Las Letras Patrias, Mexico.

Libros de Hoy, Buenos Aires.

Mar del Sur, Lima.

Repertorio Americano, San Jose,
Costa Rica.

Revista Hispanica Moderna, New York.

Revista Iberoamericana, Mexico.

Revista Interamericana de Biblio-
grafia, Washington.

Sur, Buenos Aires.

La Torre, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico.

Vision, New York.


This list of 25 Latin American periodicals, which in the opinion

of the editor of the section "The Hispanic World" in Hispania "gives the

widest coverage of the field of interest of the wideawake humanistic

student of Hispanic America," was provided at the request of Irene Zimmerman

for her study, Latin American Periodicals of the Mid-Twentieth Century as

Source Material for Research in the Humanities and the Social Sciences (Ph.D.

thesis, University of Michigan, June, 1956), in a letter dated February 25,

1955. It is included in the Appendix. Compare his expanded and somewhat

revised list in Hispania 38:h27-429 (December, 1955).











Choices of Pedro Henriquez Urena


Alfar, Montevideo. (Dates not
given)

Amauta, Lima. 1927-c.1930

Atenea, Concepcion, Chile. 1923--

Ateneo portorrigueno, San Juan, P.R.
(Dates not given)

Contemporaneos, Mexico. 1928-1931.

Cuadernos americanos, Mexico.
1912--

Cultura venezolana, Caracas.
1918-c.1927.

Fronteiras, Recife, Brazil. 1932--

El Hio Prodigo, Mexico. 1941--

Ko.!asu o, La Paz. (Dates not
given

Letras de Mexico, Mexico. 1937--

Martin Fierro, Buenos Aires. 1925-
1928.

Mercurio peruano, Lima. 1918--

Mexico modern, Mexico. 1920-1922


Plan-Alto, Sao Paulo. 1941--

Repertorio americano, San Jose,
C.R. 1920--

Revista bimestre cubana, La Habana.
Nueva series, c. 1906--

Revista chilena, Santiago. 1917-
1928.

Revista cubana. La Habana. 1935--

Revista de America, Bogota. 1945--

Revista de advance, La Habana.
1927-1930.

Revista de Guatemala, Guatemala.
1943--

Revista de las Indias, Bogota.
1936--

Revista do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro.
1916--

Revista national de cultural,
Caracas. 1938--

Sur, Buenos Aires. 1930--

Valoraciones, La Plata, Argentina.
1923-1928.


"Important publications of recent years." Listed by Pedro

Henriquez Urena in his Historia de la cultural en la America hispanica

(Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1947), page 155. Alphabetically

arranged by Irene Zimmerman.










Spanish-American Periodicals Indexed by Sturgis E. Leavitt

Anales del Ateneo del Uruguay, Montevideo, 1881-1886. 10 vols.

Anales de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, B.A. 1888-1902. 15 vols.

Anales de la Universidad de Chile, Santiago. Dates not stated.

Anales del Ateneo de Costa Rica, San Josd 1912-1916. 5 vols.

Ateneo de Honduras; revista mensual, Tegucigalpa. 1913-1923. 5 vols.
(Nos. 1-66)

Ateneo de Lima, Lima. 1886-1889. 8 vols.

Atlantida, Buenos Aires. 1911-1914. 13 vols.

Cojo ilustrado, Caracas. 1892-1915. 24 vols.

Contempordneos, M4xico. 1928-1931. 1 vol.

Cuba contemporanea, Habana. 1913-1927. 44 vols.

Cultura venezolana, Caracas. 1918-1934. 47 vols.

Letras, Quito.. 1912-1917.

Mexico modern, Mdxico. 1921-1923. 3 vols.

El Nacional, Mexico. 1880-1884. 8 vols.

El Renacimiento, Mexico. 1869. 2 vols.

El Mercurio peruano, Lima. 1918-1931. 20 vols.

El Mosaico, Bogota. 1858-1865. 4 vols.

Nueva revista de Buenos Aires, B.A. 1881-1885. 13 vols.

Papel periodic ilustrado, Bogota. 1881-1888. 5 vols.

Repertorio americano, San Jose, C.R. 1919-1'now." 3.e., ca. 193575

Repertorio colombiano, Bogotdo 1878-1899. 20 vols. and 1 number.

Revista azul, Mexico. 1894-1896. 5 vols.

Revista argentina, B.A. 1868-1872. 13 vols.

Revista chilena, Santiago. 1875-1880. 17 vols.










Revista chilena, Santiago. 1917-1930, 14 vols. (Nos. 1-128)

Revista cubana, Habana. 1885-1895. 21 vols.

Revista de Bogota, Bogota. 1871-1872. 1 vol.

Revista de Buenos Aires, B.A., 1863-1871. 24 vols.

Revista de Chile, Santiago. 1881-1881 (2). 2 vols.

Revista de Chile, Santiago. 1898-1901. 7 vols.

Revista de Cuba, Habana. 1877-1884. 16 vols.

Revista de derecho, historic, y letras. B.A. 1898-1923. 76 vols.

Revista de la Universidad de Honduras, Tegucigalpa. 1909-1923. 13 vols.

Revista de Santiago. Santiago, Chile. 1848-1850. 7 vols.

Revista de Santiago. Santiago, Chile. 1855. 7 vols.

Revista de Santiago. Santiago, Chile. 1872-1873. 3 vols.

Revista de la Sociedad Universitaria, Montevideo. 1884-1885. 4 vols.

Revista de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, B.A. 1904-1923. 52 vols.

Revista del Instituto Paraguayo. 1896-1904. 6 vols.

Revista del Pacifico, Valparaiso, Chile. 1858-1861. 5 vols.

Revista del Paraguay, B.A. 1891-1898'. 4 vols.

Revista del Rio de la Plata, B.A. 1871-1877. 13 vols.

Revista literaria, Bogotd. 1890-1894. 6 vols.

Revista modern, Mexico. 1898-1903. 6 vols.

Revista modern, Mexico. Second series, 1903-1911. 16 vols.

Revista national de literature y ciencias sociales, Montevideo. 1895-1897.
3 vols.

Revista nueva, Panama. 1916-1919. 6 vols.

Revista peruana, Lima. 1879-1880. 4 vols.

Santafe' Bogota~, Bogota. 1923-1930. 13 vols.









30

Vida modern, Montevideo. 1900-1903. 10 vols. and 1 number.

Vida modern, Montevideo. Second series, 1910-1911. 2 vols.


This list was enclosed with a letter dated September,26,.1953,

from Dr. Leavitt to Irene Zimmerman.

"The criteria were long runs, importance of the editor or its

contributors, and representation from as many countries as possible.

...The index includes over 30,000 entries covering literature, literary

criticism, translations, biography and folklore."







APPENDIX II


Subject Headings (Preliminary List) Used for
United Nations Index to Laws in Force


Sul divisions and all cross-references are omitted. Complete copy

(revised version due soon) may be obtained from the U. N. Library. Mrs,

Wojewodski writes in letter dated September 5, 1956:

This index to laws in force is still in the experimental stage;
the first issue covering January to June 1955 is due out soon in photo
offset. Its title will be International Index of Legislation. To
date, it is for internal use only and its future will be determined
by the demand for it, of course, coming not only from the United
Nations Secretariat and the Delegations, but also from "outsiders"
so to speak. Hense my mentioning it at the Conference: to make
it known,


Accident insurance, Affiliation, Aged persons, Agriculture, Aid to the
enemy, Air transport, Aircraft industry, Airlines, Alcoholis beverages,
Alcoholism, Alien property, Aliens, Aluminum, Amnesty, Animal diseases,
Animal industry, Apprenticeship, Arbitration, Arbitration and award, Arma-
ments, Armed forces, Asylum, Atomic energy, Atomic weapons, Attorneys-
generalo

Balance of payments, Bananas, Banks and banking, Beer, Bills of exchange,
Blind persons, Boundaries, Bread, Brushes, Budget, Budgetary systems and
policies, Building, Building industry, Building materials, Business, Butter.

Cement, Censuses, Cheese, Child and youth welfare,Children, Cigarettes,
Cigars, Civil codes, Civil procedure, Civil service, Claims, Clothing, Coal,
Cocoa, Coffee, Commodities, Communicable diseases, Community development,
Constitutional instruments, Consular practice, Consumers, Continental
shelf, Cooperative societies, Copper, Copyright, Corn, Corporations,
Corporations(Public), Cost of living, Cotton, Courts, Credit, Criminal
codes, Criminal law, Criminal procedure, Criminal procedure codes, Crops,
Cultural agreements, Currensies, Customs agreements.

Dairy products, Dangerous goods, Leath duties, Defense, Diplomatic privi-
leges and immunities, Disabled persons, Discrimination, Divorce.

Earthquakes, Economie cooperation, Economic development, Economic planning,
Education, Educational aids, Eggs, Election law, Electric power, Emeralds,
Emigration, Ethnic groups, Evidence,Excess profits tax, Expatriation, Export
and Import, Exports, Expropriation, Extradition.









Family benefits, Fertilizers, Firearms, Firemen, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing,
Flags, Flour, Fodder, Food, Foreign aid, Foreign exchange, Foreign invest-
ments(from one country to another), Free ports and zones, Freedom of the
seas, Friendship agreements, Frontier formalities.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, Genocide, Gifts, Government publi-
cations, Grain sorghums, Grains, Grapes, Ground rents, Guardianship, Guns.

Handicapped persons, Health insurance, Hemp, Honey, Hose, Housing, Human rights.

Immigration, Imports, Income tax, Incompatibility of offices, Industrial mobili-
zation, Industrial property, Industrial research, Industrial statistics, Indus.
tries, Institutions, Interest and usury, International cooperation, International
law, Investments(International), Iron and steel.

Judgments, Justice(Administration of), Jute, Juvenile courts, Juvenile courts,
Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile offenders,

Land, Land transport, Landlord and tenant, Law: codification, Lawyers, Leather,
Legal instruments, Legitimacy, Leprosy, Life annuities, Loans, Loans(Inter-
national), Local government.

Maintenance(support), Maritime law, Marriage, Matches, Maternity insurance,
Maternity welfare, Meat, Medieal care, Medical instruments, Medical service,
Mental health, Mentally handicapped persons, Merchant marine, Metals, Metric
system, Mica, Midwives, Migration, Military courts, Military law, Military
occupation, Military service, Military supplies, Mineral water, Miners, Mines,
Mining law, Money, Monopolies, Mortgage banks, Mortgages, Motor vehicles.

Narcotic drugs, Nationality, Nationality of ships, Nationalization, Natural
resources, Naturalization, Nature, Nickel, Notaries.

Obscene publications, Occupations, Offenders, Offenses, Oils and fats.

Paper, Passports, Patents, Peanuts, Pensions, Perjury, Petroleum, Pilots
and pilotage, Plant diseases, Plant protection, Plastics, Police, Popula-
tion, Ports, Postal savings banks, Postal service, Postal workers, Pota-
toes, Press, Prices, Privileged debts, Probation, Professional workers,
Profits, Property, Public administration, Public debt, Public finance,
Public health, Public prosecutors, Public utilities, Publis welfare,
Purchase tax.

Quarantine.

Rabies, Railways, Recording and registry, Refugees, Rent control, Research,
Rice, Rivers, Roads, Rubber, Rugs, Rum.

Safety at sea, Sales, Salesmen, Salt, Saving and savings, Savings-banks,
Scholarships, School children, Schools, Scrap metal, Sea-water, Seamen,
Self determination, Servicemen, Sheepskin, Shipbuilding, Shipping, Ships,
Smoking prevention, Social assistance, Social insurance, Social security,
Social welfare, Stamp duties, State emergency, State sueeession, Stateless,
ness, Statistics, Stock exchange, Students, Subsidies, Sugar, Sugarcane,
Surplus products, Surplus property.








33


Tax evasion,i Tax exemption. Taxation, Taxation(Double), Taxation(Indireet),
Teachers, Technical training, Telecommunications, Terminology, Territorial
sea, Textiles, Timber, Tobacco, Tonnage, Tourism, Town and country planning,
Trade agreements, Traffic in personsTransport of goody, Transport of pas-
sengers, Transport workers, Transportation, Treaties, Tuberculosis.

Unemployment.

Varnish and varnishing, Venereal diseases, Veterans, Vital statistics, Voca-
tional education, Vocational training.

War, War cemeteries, War crimes, War damage, War pensions, Water, Water
transport, Weights and measures, Wheat, WHO, Wine and wine making, Witnesses,
Women, Women workers, Wood, Wool.

Youth, Youth organizations.



















HISPANIC ACQUISITIONS STUDIES: 15


Howard F. Cline, Director
Hispanic Foundation
Library of Congress
Washington, D. C.














Submitted for the Seminar on Latin American Library Materials
The Chinsegut Hill Library of the University of Florida
June 14-15, 1956









1. Problem. To ascertain in quantative terms the receipts in number

of pieces and the amounts vouchered for materials purchased in

Hispanic areas during fiscal 1955. Within this general inquiry,

it is the purpose here also to ascertain the amounts of money spent

from Increase General and from Trust Fund Incomes for such acquisi-

tions, and .also to ascertain the relationship between current and

non-current materials obtained.

The larger problem is to obtain data on which consistent

acquisitions policies for purchase of materials from Hispanic areas

can be based, by learning from which areas-receipts are apparently

abundant, adequate or inadequate. Although these are known in very

general terms, one problem is to provide a quantative base for these

subjective impressions and to modify them where necessary.

2. Procedure. From machine run statistics on purchases, provided by

the Order Division, materials bearing on Hispanic areas have been

excerpted, rearranged, tabulated, and analyzed in accordance with

standard statistical procedures. Manual rather than machine tabu-

lation is responsible for the sums in the appended tables, and

percentages, where presented, are to slide rule accuracy only.

3. Discussion. Reference is made to Hispanic Acquisitions Studies: 1,

(September 16, 1953), 2 (September 21, 1953), and 13 (September 20,

1955). These analyze in more or less detail purchases from Hispanic

areas. The present study is one more in the series being made to

build up accumulative picture of purchases. No comparative analysis

is included in this particular study, as a subsequent one proposes









-2-


to make comparative statements, based on the data to date.

U. Conclusions. The conclusions from this inquiry are presented in

tabular form, as Attachments. Herewith is a list of those Tables.

Table Title

1 Receipts and Amounts, Hispanic Area Purchases, Fiscal 1955
2" Current vs. non-Current Purchases, value, by countries
3 Current vs. non-Current Purchases, Receipts, by countries
4 Books and-Pamphlets, by Groups of Supplying Countries
$ Books and Pamphlets, Receipts and Values, Individual
Countries
6 Books and Pamphlets, Receipts and Values, by Sources of
Funds
7 Serials and Periodicals, by Groups of Supplying Countries
8 Serials and Periodicals, Receipts and Values, Individual
Countries
9 Serials and Periodicals, Receipts and Values, by Sources
of Funds
10 Hispanic Area Purchases vs. Total L.C. Purchases

The following comments highlight the conclusions which can be

drawn from each of the Tables.

Table 1. Receipts and Amounts, Hispanic Area Purchases, Fiscal 1955.

This is a global table summarizing purchase vouchered during 1955.

As in earlier cases, there is no feasible way of indicating Hispanic

materials purchased from non-Hispanic areas.

During fiscal 1955, a total of $19,878.05 was vouchered, with

receipts of 25,100 pieces. Some 62 per cent of the value was

defrayed from Increase General, with approximately 38 per cent com-

ing from Trust Fund Incomes. Receipt of current serials, some

19,619 pieces, dominated the receipts, amounting to 78 per cent.

In passing, it can be said that both receipts by pieces and expendi-

tures rose measurably over comparable figures for 1954 and for 1953.









-3-


Table 2. Current vs. Non-Current purchases, Value, by Countries.

Two striking generalizations emerge from this table, The first is

that roughly the same amounts are being spent for current and non-

current materials. This means that the collections are being built

by annual normal increments, and at the same time earlier gaps are

being filled.

The second major feature, which is true of succeeding detailed

Tables, is that almost without exceptions all supplying areas are

represented, both in current purchases, as well as in non-current

items. In very broad terms it can be noted that the American

republics were represented slightly more in non-current materials

than in current, due chiefly to microfilm receipts from Mexico.

The Iberian Peninsula consistently shows more purchases of current

than of non-current materials,

Table 3. Current vs Non-Current Purchases, Receipts, by Countries.

Here the striking feature is the difference in number of current,

as compared with non-current, pieces received. For approximately

the same amount of money, some 22,748 current pieces were received,

while only 2,980 non-current pieces were received, Obviously this

great difference represents the fact that current serials and

periodicals are come by more cheaply if we get them while they are

appearing. Put another way, the cost of non-current materials was

nearly ten times that of current materials, so that for the same

expenditure only about 1/10 as many pieces of non-current material

were received.











Table 4. Books and Pamphlets: By Groups of Supplying Countries.

The categories, five Groups arranged in descending order by amounts

of purchases, are the same as those employed in earlier Hispanic

Acquisitions Studies, to facilitate later comparative analysis.

Without at this time entering into such comparative studies, it

can be said that no major shifts were noted during 1955. The

major publishing centers in the Hispanic world were represented

roughly in the order of their publishing importance. It can be

taken as an optimistic indication that Group V is a decreasing one;

these are the countries from which we get less than $50 worth of

books and pamphlets per year. It now seems down to an almost

irreducible minimum, as the countries in it probably do not produce

more than $50 worth of commercial books and pamphlets per year

which L.C. would wish to add to its collections.

Table 5. Books and Pamphlets, Receipts and Value, Individual Countries.

According to this table, the total outlay for books and pamphlets

was $7,931.39; this is approximately 40 per cent of the total expendi-

tures during year for Hispanic materials. As in previous years,

Spain accounted for the greatest proportion of expenditures and

receipts of material. So far as items are concerned, the Iberian

Peninsula accounted for more than all the American Republics combined.

Although the figure is not too illuminating, perhaps it is

worth noting the unit prices reflected in this Table. These unit

prices are derived by taking the number of books and pamphlets in

the tabulated columns and dividing them into the amounts paid for

such items. These arithmetical operations give the following results:








-5-


UNIT COSTS--BOOKS & PAMPHLETS, 1955

Pieces Total Cost Unit Cost
American Republics
Current 1456 $2,828.29 $1.94
Non-current 426 1,343.84 3.15
Iberian Peninsula
Current 1485 2,580.26 1.73
Non-current 558 954.67 1.72
Totals
Current 2981 5,560.24 1.86
Non-current 1000 2,371.15 2.37

Table 6. Books and Pamphlets, Receipts and Values, by Sources of

Funds. This table tells us the proportion of burden on Increase

General and on gift funds for the purchase of books, current and

non-current. In both categories, gift funds account for better

than half of the purchases, measured by receipts and by vouchered

amounts. According to this Table, the total outlay during 1955,

charged against gift funds, was slightly above the annual income

from the Huntington Acquisitions Fund, and therefore if the rate

of recommendation continues to rise, Increase General will neces-

sarily be the source to which additional recommendations will

necessarily be charged, as the upper limit of gift fund expendi-

tures for current materials within the foreseeable future will be

annual income from the Huntington Fund. As matters now stand, the

expenditure from gift funds for current books and pamphlets falls

below the annual income of the Huntington Fund, leaving a slight

margin for non-current materials to be purchased. However, with

the rising rate of recommendation this margin for purchase of non-

current materials is likely to disappear, along with the backlog

in he gift funds. The situation at this point is not critical












enough for specific action, and this discussion merely highlights

a problem which can be worked out in detail when comparative figures

and trends are derived from the series of Hispanic Acquisitions

Studies.

Table 7. Serials and Periodicals by Groups of Supplying Countries.

The categories used here were those employed in Hispanic Acquisi-

tions Studies: 2. With but few exceptions the trends noted for

groups of countries supplying books and pamphlets is the same for

suppliers of periodicals. In this particular instance, Mexico

appears in Group I rather because of one single purchase of mater-

ials, non-current, than because it generally supplies an amount

comparable to Spain or Brazil. Again, appearance of many of the

areas listed in Group V, sending less than $25 worth per year, is

probably caused by poverty of production rather than fault of

acquisition.

Table 8. Serials and Periodicals, Receipts and Values, by Individual

Countries. The dominant feature here is the preponderance of cur-

rent materials over non-current in terms of receipts by pieces,

although the value does not show the same wide discrepancy. How-

ever, it should be noted that one purchase from Mexico, amounting

to $645.90 representing 83 items, accounts for more than half of

the value of non-current serials and periodicals for 1955.

Table 9. Serials and Periodicals, Receipts and Values, by Sources

of Funds. In marked contrast to Table 6, Table 9 indicates that

Increase General supports nearly 100 per cent of serial purchases,








-7-


nearly all of them for current items. Expenditures from gift

funds for serials were chiefly for non-current items, but even in

this category the outlay from Increase General was three times

that of gift fund outlay. In passing it should be noted that the

total sum expended for current Hispanic serials and periodicals is

far above what the gift funds could bear if subscriptions were

transferred to them. The ceiling of $500 for current serials and

continuations allocated in the Huntington Acquisitions Funds is prob-

ably about right, as it gives opportunity to subscribe to necessary

serials in the occasional crises when no funds are available from

Increase General, but this policy should be understood to be for

emergencies only.

Table 10. Hispanic Area Purchases vs. Total L.C. Purchases.

This Table combines the purchases from Increase General and from

trust and gift funds, but omits purchases on Law Library funds.

The results show that from Hispanic areas approximately 5 per cent

of all pieces purchased for the Library's general collections come

from Hispanic areas. Approximately 7 per cent of the total purchases,

in terms of value, come from those areas. Taking the sources of

funds separately, from Increase General approximately 5 per cent of

current pieces are received from Hispanic areas, representing

slightly more than 3 per cent of the total amounts vouchered; for

non-current material only about 2.4 per cent of the pieces come

from Hispanic areas, although the amounts vouchered correspond to

approximately 12 per cent of the total outlay for non-current

material.











-8-


When trust and gift funds are examined it is noted that better

than 1/3 of all the pieces, either current or non-current come

from Hispanic areas. Approximately 32 per cent of the gift fund

acquisitions purchases are made in Hispanic areas, and nearly 18

per cent of the total amounts vouchered for non-current materials

from gift funds are expended there.

There seems to be a significant difference between the outlay

in Hispanic areas for current and for non-current materials from

the combined trust and gift fund plus Increase General Funds.

Although in all cases receipts seem to be about 5 per cent, the

proportion expended in Hispanic areas for non-current material,

in terms of value, in nearly 14 per cent. One interpretation of

this figure is that the "hard to get" items to fill in gaps in

the Hispanic collections are more expensive, and their continued

purchase takes a seemingly disproportionate share of the total

outlay for non-current materials.










-9-


Table 1. Receipts and Amounts, Hispanic Area Purchases, Fiscal 1955


Source Class


General-Current
Books
Serials
Other
Sub-total

General-Non-Current
Books
Serials
Other
Sub-total
General-Totals


Gift-Current
Books
Serials
Other
Sub-total

Gift-Non-Current
Books
Serials
Other
Sub-total
Gift-Totals


Pieces
Number


1,191
19,619
66
20,876


475
198
302
975
21,851


1,791
160
18
13969-


525
121
634
1,249
3,2h9


Percent


78.0

83.0




h.o
87.0


7.8




5.2
13.0


Value
Amount


$2, 364.48
3,624.99
402.37
$6,391.8


$ 1,326.06
836.02
3,841.73
6,003.81
$12,395.65


$3,244.76
106.11
284.35
$3,635.22


$1,574.94
249.39
29022.85
3,847.18
$7,482.40o


Grand Totals 25,100 100.0% $19,878.05 100.0%


Percent


32.0




30.0
62.0


18.0




20.0
38.0









-10-


Table 2. Current vs. Non-Current

Country Current


Purchases, Value,
Value
Non-Current


by Countries

Total


Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba.
Dominican Repub.
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
AMERICAN REPUB.
BWI-General
Barbados
Jamaica
Trinidad
Br. Guiana
N.W.I.
Puerto Rico
AMERICAN DEPEND.
WESTERN HEMISPHERE
Spain
Portugal
IBERIAN PENINSULA
Angola
Macao
Philippines
AFRICA-PACIFIC
Sub-Totals
Grand Totals


$ 1,019.143
123.56
1,527.35
284.59
162.67
22.53
476.50
8.50
1.16
7.20
57.95
159.50
1.90
732.23
3.40
4.70
3.60
290.51
150.09
548.29
5,585.66
30.00
4.05
9.11
.95
52.00

30.00
126.11
5,711.77
3,062.61
863.614
3,926.25
16.80

372.24
389.04
1,315.29
10,027.06


$ 304.68
243.95
211.34
22.01
56.90
3.28
108,60
67.00
38.96

96.25
34.45
2.50
4,h44944
.75
10.66

320.81
22.09
2.50
5,996.08


10.03

11.67
1.60
23.30
6,019.38
3,186.31
45.16
3,231.o7

51.87
16.61
68.48
3,299.95
9,319.33


$ 1,324.11
367.51
1,738.69
306.60
219.57
25.81
585.11
75.50
40.12
7.20
154.20
193.95
4.40
5,181.67
4.15
15.36
3.60
611.32
172.09
550.79
11,581.75
30.00
4.05
9.11
10.98
52.00
11.67
31.60
149.i71
11,731.16
6,248.92
908.80
7,157.72
16.80
51.87
388.85
457.52
7,615.24
19,346.40











Table 3. Current vs. Non-Current Purchases, Receipts, by Countries
Pieces
Country Current Non-Current Total

Argentina 1,868 107 1,975
Bolivia 775 162 937
Brazil 3,910 32 3,942
Chile 112 7 119
Colombia 225 11 236
Costa Rica 35 2 37
Cuba 1,995 46 2,041
Dominican Rep. 5 31 36
Ecuador 1 7 8
El Salvador 2 2
Guatemala 323 2 325
Haiti 1,117 9 1,126
Honduras 1 2 3
Mexico 736 892 1,628
Nicaragua 2 1 3
Panama 2 2 $
Paraguay 1 1
Peru 93 94 187
Uruguay 301 5 306
Venezuela 190 2 192
AMERICAN REPUB. 11,695 fTT 13,109
BWI-General 626 626
Barbados 13 13
Jamaica 5 5
Trinidad 1 1
Br. Guiana 730 730
NWI 7 7
Puerto Rico 2 2 4
AMER. DEPEND. 1,377 9 1386
WESTERN HEMISPHERE 13,072 1,423
Spain 5,237 1,515 6,752
Portugal 3,207 34 3,241
IBERIAN PENINSULA 1,7hh 9,993
Angola 313 313
Macao -5 5
Philippines 919 3 922
AF-PACIFIC 1,232 1,240
TOTALS 9 67 557 11,233
Grand Totals 25,728


-11-







-12-


Table 4. Books and Pamphlets:


Group I $1,000 and Over
Spain


By Groups of Supplying CoUnitries


Pieces

1,734


Amounts

$3,017.26


Group II $500 to $1,000 (Descending Order, amount)
Argentina 424
Brazil 214
Mexico 343
Portugal 309


Group III $100
Bolivia
Chile
Colombia
Cuba
Guatemala
Peru
Venezuela
Philippines


to $1499 (Alphabetical Order)
129
82
229
129
6
85
83
39


Group IV $50 to $99
Dominican Republic
Haiti
Uruguay
Macao

Group V $0-$49
Costa Rica
Ecuador
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Puerto Rico


871.15
811.25
546.05
517.67

228.76
255.52
136.95
259.65
111.25
255.12
432.15
158.70

69.00
84.95
53.05
51.87

15.81
23.96

2.50
.75
10.66
3.60
1.60


*








-13-


Table 5. Books and Pamphlets, Receipts and Values, Individual Countries


Country


Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dom. Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
Amer. Repub.
BWI-General
Barbados
Jamaica
Br. Guiana
Trinidad
N.W.I.
F.W.I.
Puerto Rico
DEPENDENCIES
WESTERN HEMIS


Spain
Portugal
IBERIAN
Angola
Macao
Philippine
AFR-PACI
Sub-Tota
TOTALS


Value
Curr. Non-Curr.


581.22
67.56
618.36
238.57
80.05
1:2.53
183.85
2o00


15.00
50.50

3312 24
-
3.60
163.11
51.05
429.65
2,828.29


.49




.)49
2.828.78


2,105.44
474.82
PENIN 2,50.26


is 151.20
FIC 151.20
ls 2 73146


289.93
161.20
192.89
16.95
56.90
3.28
75.80
67.00
23.96

96.25
34.45
2.50
214.81
.75
10.66

92.01
2.00
2.50
1,3T3.8




11.67

1.60
13.27
1,357.11
911.82
42.85
95T4.67

51.87
7.50
59.37
1,01)4.04
2,371.15


Pieces
Total Curr. Non-Curr.


871 15
228.76
811.25
255.52
136.95
15.81
259.65
69.00
23.96

111.25
84.95
2.50
546.05
.75
10.66
3.60
255.12
53.05
432.15
4,172.13

-
.049


11.67

1.60
13.76
4,185.89
3,017.26
517.67
3, 53).93

51.87
158.70
210.57
3,745.50
7,931.39


317
52
214
78
218
11
86
2


4
22

276



56
39
81
-


3
91---
287
T^-


37
37
r32?


107
77
30
4
11
2
43
31
6

2
9
2
67
1
2

29
1
2
772-


2
9
435
536
22
^-

5
2
7

1,000


Total

424
129
247
82
229
13
129
33
6
-
6
31
2
343
1
2

85
40
83





9

2
12


309


9
39

2,087
3,9o3Z













Table 6. Books and
of Funds


Pamphlets, Receipts and Values, by Sources


Pieces
Number Percent Amount
CURRENT BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS


Increase General
Gift Funds
Totals


1,191
1 791
27.,72-


ho.0 o
60.0
100.0%


$2,364.48
3. 244.76
5,609.21


NON-CURRENT BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS


Increase General
Gift Funds
Totals


475
525
1,000


TOTAL CURRENT AND NON-CURRENT BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS


Increase General
Gift Funds
Totals


Value


Percent


42.0
58.0
100.0%


47.5
52.5
100.0%


1,325.06
1,574.94
2,901.00


44.0
56.0


1,666
2 316
3,982


42.0
58.0
100.070


3,690.54
4 ,819.70
8,510.24


43.0
57.0
100.0%











Table 7. Serials and Periodicals, by Groups of Supplying Countries

Amount Pieces
Group 1. Above $500
Brazil $ 894.41 3,695
Mexico 747.17 515
Spain 1,119.46 4,247

Group II. $250 to $500
Argentina 452.96 1,561
Cuba 259.65 1,907
Portugal 373.66 2,925
Group II111 $100 to $250
Peru 112.96 75
Uruguay 119.0o 264
Philippines 221.o04 880

Group IV. $25 to $100
Bolivia 66.00 736
Chile 24.96 27
Colombia 82.62 7
Guatemala 42.95 319
Haiti 60.00 1,095
Venezuela 63.20 106
B.W.I. General 30.00 626
British Guiana 52o00 730

Group V. $0 to $25
Costa Rica 10.00 24
Dominican Republic 6.50 3
Ecuador 16.16 2
El Salvador 7.20 2
Honduras 1.90 1
Nicaragua 3.4o 2
Panama 4.70 3
Paraguay -
Barbados 4.05 13
Jamaica 8.62 4
Trinidad 10.98 14
Angola 16.80 14











Table 8. Serials and Periodicals, Receipts and Values, Individual
Countries


Value
Curr. Non-Curr.


Receipts (Pieces)
Total Curr. Non-uurr. Total


Argentina
Bolivia
Brazjil
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dom. Repub.
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
AMER. RE-
PUBLICS
BWI-General
Barbados
Br.Guian.
Jamaica
Trinidad
Dependencies
WEST. HEMIS.
Spain
Portupal
Iberian BFkn.
Angola
Philippines
Afr.-Pacific
Sub-Total
TOTAL


$ 438.21
56.00
875.96
20.50
82.62
10.00
259.65
6.50
1.16
7.20
42.95
60.00
1.90
101.27
3.40
4.70

34.16
99. Oh
63.20
2,168o.72

30.00
4.05
a 52.00
8.62
.95
95.62
.2,264.05
855.56
373.66
1,229.22
16.80
221. Oh
237.8
1,l67.06
3,731.11


14.75
10.00
18.45
4.46
h. 6



15.00



645.90


78.80
20.00

607



10.03
10.03
817.39
263.90

263.90


263.90
1,081.29


452.96
66.o00
894.-41
24.96
82.62
10.00
259.65
6.50
16.16
7.20
42.95
60.00
1.90
747.17
3.40
4.70
112.96
119 .0o
63.20
2,975.78

20.00
4.05
52.00
8.62
10.98
105.65
3,081.4
1,119.46
373.66
1,793.12
16.80
221.0 o
237.84
13730.96
4,812.UO


Country


1,551
730
3,693
26
7
24
1,907
3
1
2
319
1095
1
432
2
3
12
262
106
10,176
626
13
730
h
1
1 374

4,123
2.913
7,036
880

7 916
19,666


63
h






13

124
16

139.


1,561
736
3,695
27
7
24
1,907
3
2
2
319
1,095
1
515
2
3

75
264
106
10,346
626
j3
730
h
14

11,733
4,247
2.925
7,172
880









-17-


Table 9. Serials and Periodicals, Receipts and Values, by Sources
of Funds


Pie ces
Number Percent


Amount


Value


Percent


CURRENT SERIALS AND PERIODICALS


Increase General
Gift Funds
Totals


19,619
160
19,779


99.7


$3,624.99
106.11
3,731.10


NON-CURRENT SERIALS AND PERIODICALS


Increase
Gift Funds
Totals


198
121
319


TOTAL CURRENT AND NON-CURRENT SERIALS AND PERIODICALS


Increase General 19,817
Gift Funds 281
Totals 2009


97.5


62.0
38.0
100.02


836.02
249.39
1, 085.1a


77.0
23.0
100.0%


99.0
1.0
100.070


4,461.01
355.50
4, 616.51


91.5
8.5
100.0u







-18-


Hispanic Area Purchases vs Total L.C. Purchases


All Purchases
Pieces Amount


Hispanic Purch.
Pieces Amount


Hispanic Percent
of Total
Pieces Amount


INCREASE GENERAL
Current l417,928
Non-Current 40,167
Totals 458,095

TRUST & GIFT FUND
Current 5,662
Non-Current 3,236
Totals


COMBINED TRUST
Current
Non-Current
Totals


& INCREASE
423,590
43 603
,66;993


$196, 491.37
49,524.70
246,016.07


11,342.26
21 535.324
32,877.60

GENERAL
207,833.63
71,060.0o4
278, 893.67


20,876
975
2l,85T


1,969
1 280



22,845
2 255
25100


$ 6,391.84
6,003.81
12,395.65


3,635.22
3,847.18
7,782.70


10,027.06
9,850.99
19,878.05


Table 10.


2.4
77.7


34.8
39.4
3. 7


5.4
5.2
7335


3.3%
12.1



32.0
17.8
23.0


4.8
13.8
7.1



















3 1262 04235 5817

AJ

^ SVIFLV

i9SW



-V .


* Ar


'U.


. ''*' '






-. *~4 'IRS ~*h.
.4-.. 44' j..44

.~..' 'r~ z.rs~i.. T2L.7 -.
%W -A4- 4
*r~* *"b-
.~ '

v-- '-- -

a, -'



I'








.










r


7 4. .. -.
'C.,


A. ~-
--4-'



r
4-. -.4, a.-.;, -






$44 ~'


,v.flh,. '.4-.
I

.1% ~' 4-
<"4- '4-
.4-
t -

4-7~ 4-

~r#' '-'., -, ~ .4-



4.$~4 ,44 ..~ r.
'-4$- *"~~




'4W