Preservation resource center, Savannah, GA

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Title:
Preservation resource center, Savannah, GA
Physical Description:
33p.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cangelosi, Robert
Publisher:
College of Architecure, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
AFA HP document 142
General Note:
Thesis
General Note:
Committee : F. Blair Reeves ; Carl Feiss

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00001894:00001


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Full Text






















PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER


Savannah, GA


by


Robert Cangelosi


F. Blair Reeves, Committee Chairman
Carl Feiss, Committee Member




A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF
ARCHITECTURE
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR.THE
DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1977















In 1970 the University of Florida initiated its 2-2-2 architectural
sequence, introducing a perservation option to the architectural
curriculum of a master of architecture. For the first time ever, in this
country, architectural preservation was offered within the discipline
and is today one of only a handful of universities offering such an
option, despite repeated A.I.A. recommendations. Two years later, the
University further pledged its allegence to reservation by engaging in a
joint venture with other preservation agencies in establishing the
Preservation Institute: Natucket.

Once again the University of.Florida is "thinking big" with similar
field offices in other locals, such as, Tamna, Savannah, Pensacola and
Charleston, each city having an excellent historic environment from
which to draw from. This proposal was well suited to my desires to
do a contemporary design within a historic environment. So I have chosen
a field office for my terminal project. Of the four locations cited,
Savannah is perhaps the best because of its enormous wealth of architectural
diversity and realitively close proximity to Gainesville. This new field
laboratory, like the Nantbcket counterpart, is proposed in conjunction with
a preservation agency. However unlike the Nantucket adventure the agency
involved will maintain a permenant office at the school to serve Savannah
on a year round bases. This agency, namely the Preservation Resource Center:
Savannah (PRCS) is a non profit corporation sponsored by the Junior League
whose goals are as follows: 1) To inform the Citizens of Creater Savannah as
to the historic and environmental preservation effort, 2) to conduct re-
search on housing conservation and reservation ano to distribute such
information to individual persons, and 3) to endeavor to conserve and nre-
serve the historic environment of Greater Savannah. With a marriage between
the schools and PRCS each will complement the other's effectiveness.

SITE
The site chosen for the PRCS is, of course, in the historic district. Polaski
Square is one of the many wards that comprise Savannah's unique plan. The
square was laid out in 1P37 and is evolved into one of the richest squares
in Savannah containing some 29 architecturally significant major buildings.
On this square,at 205-7 West Charlton St., stood an 1870 wooden frame re-
sidence which was rated'notable'. However, the fine residence was raised by
fire, unraveling one of the many threads holding together the fabric of the
square. Today a set of play equipment stands where this fine Victorian
structure once stood, looking much like a missing front tooth. This vacant
lot, fronting on W. Charlton Street is sixty feet by one hundred feet and
is serviced by an alley to the south. To the east stand two Greek-revial
townhouses built in the mid-nineteenth century, flush against the right of
way. Along the alley stands two dependencies. To the west is an 1P46
townhouse built by John S. Strutevant. This house is recessed ten feet
from the right of way with an entrance stoop extending eight feet towards the
right of way,

In order to reestablish the visual continuity of the street scene, a
complimentary blenf of the past and present should be created in order to















guarantee the future a visually unified square.Thus this lot is a good site
for the proposed PRCS.


EXTERIOR
The proposed change in the streetscape must be guided in terms of the existing
street fabric so as to enhance and not depreciate the integrity of the total
environment. This new construction should be and is guided by law by a very
extensive set of design criteria, in order to insure continuity and compatability.
There are sixteen design criteria set forth by Savannah law, to ruide such
change. At least six of these criteria must be met to be anproved by the
review committee.
Height- Height is a mandatory criteria that all construction must satisfy.
A building must be constructed within ten percent of the average height of
existing adjacent buildings. However not only the total height but the corrinc
and the watertable heights as well as the fenistrations, balcony and stoop
heights should be considered. It is perhans the later heights that are more
important than the total height, since the trees on the square eliminate this
from view.
Building proportions- The relationship of width to height is defined as the
buildings proportions. This presents adichotomy o interpretations, since the
proportions of the Greek revial townhouses can be percieved in two ways.
If percieved as a single unit the proportions would be different than if it
was percieved as two buildings, when it would be similar to the 1L6 structure.
This same dual perspective could be applied to the PRCS.
Roof shape- Despite the fact that the Greek revial townhouse has a hip roof
below the parapet it is percieved as having a flat roof while the other
building has a gable roof. Implementation of both styles would be advantageous.
Fenestration proportions- The two buildings have an array of window sizes but
two factors remain constant. First, the lengths vary according to their
appropriate floor and secondly the widths remain constant. Doors are also
considered.
Rhythum of the solids to voids- The rhythm is similar in both buildings and
should be employed in the new structure.
Rhythum of Street entrances- This particular street elevation has the only
exception to the rule for the square. All entrances are on the right side except
for the 1846 structure where the reverse is the case, Inorder to be comparable
with both only a stoop on the left of the structure was used so as to continue
the sequence of the rest of the street elevation.
Materials- Texture- Color- The dominate material of the square is painted
wood and exposed Savannah grey brick. However the joining properties the
finishes are stucco and Philadelphia red brick.These two materials should
be used.
Details- Existing details on the snuare are dictated by the period of construction,
Hence,new construction should reflect a contemporary construction date yet
should be sympathic with the existing details.
Rhythum of buildings on the street- The way a person percieves the street rhythm
is also important. How the building is oriented to the lot, to the joining
properties and to the right of way is very important to maintain. Here two
distinctive orientations are in coexistant, a blend of the two orientations
















would be advantageous,
Directional expression of the front elevation- Once again two intrepretations
exist, a horizontal expression of the Greek townhouses and a vertical expression
in the 1846 townhouse, A harmonious interpretation'of the two is desirable.
Scale- Maintaining the existing scale is important, balconies, steps, cornices
watertables and alike should all be considered.
Wall continuity, Landscape, and Ground cover- Existing elements should be
considered: cast iron, wrought iron fence, the existing trees and the brick
paving.


INTERIOR
The interior design requirements of the PRCS were determined by an analysis of
the existing preservation program, the future goals of that program and the
present needs of the existing PRC in New Orleans. The combined criteria are as
follows;

PUBLIC
Orientation Area. This area should be centrally located for access to the
public, student, faculty and staff areas
A. Reception area with work space for secretary
B. Waiting and exhibit space
C. Two bathrooms.

Faculty and staff Area- This area should have reasonable acess to the student
public and work areas.
A. Three offices
B. A meeting room
C. A work room with storage, work space and space for reproduction
facilities.

Resource Center- Must be accessible to the public, student, faculty and
staff areas.
A. Open stacks and secured stacks
B. Verticle file space
C. Audio- visual area
D. Check out
F. Reading area
F. Lecture space for 150 people
G. Storage space for lecture chairs and equipment

Semi-public- Should have private entrances easily accessible from the
Front and rear. However it should be subordinate to the main public entrance.
All Of the subareas should have close interlations
A. Labratory space for 14 students
B. Research laboratory
C. Darkroom Facilities
D. Lecture space for Max. of 20 people.
E. Bathroom











F. Workshop as future expansion, this area should be separate from the
main building because of noise,

Living quarters- Should have separate private entrances where theepublic is not
encouraged.
A. Professional
1. Two one bedroom-apartments
2. One two bedroom apartment
B. Student
1.Living space for 14 students included are sleeping, dining, cooking,
and recreational areas.



The solution should solve all of the given criteria and meet all codes,










































































THE WISH LIST









DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECT I IF:


I I 1 V F I. P I "- ',


November 12, 1976


MEMORANDUM


TO: Arnold F. Butt

FROM: F. Blair Reeves .P

RE: Priorities for the Architectural Preservation Program, re: Dean's Request.


This list of priorities is divided into three major categories:

A) General information and recommendations.
B) Immediate priorities.
C) Long-term priorities.

These priorities were determined in conference with Philip Wisley and Susan Tate,
both of whom teach on a part-time basis in this program. Although this report
represents present thinking, we should want to express student and alumni input
obtained by questionnaires and interviews, suggestions from preservation firms
and agencies both public and private, and from consultants to the program. We are
already in process of polling our six-year students,

A) General Information and Recommendations

The architectural preservation program began its operation in 1970 as the department
initiated its 2-2-2 sequence. Charles E. Peterson, FAIA, founder of the Historic
American Buildings Survey and of the historic preservation program at Columbia
University served as the first consultant for program development, financed by funds
from the Walden Trust.(Support from the Walden Trust was stimulated by several work-
shops on architectural preservation in 1968-74 funded by the AIA, FAAIA and state
agencies.) Other consultants made available by outside sources have also advised
the program. The Preservation Institute: Nantucket, founded in 1972, increased
national awareness of the UF program and attracted non-Florida student participants.
Dr. Wm. Murtagh, Keeper of the National Register was visiting professor winter quarter
1976, sponsored by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the University of
Florida. Professors Tate, Feiss and Wisley joined the faculty in 1973-76. To date
there are approximately twelve graduates from the program, all actively engaged in
architectural preservation activities. Twenty-four students, our maximum, are
presently enrolled.

The faculty believe that the program should remain as an avenue to the professional
architectural degree, with enrollment limited to 24-30. Classes are and should be
limited to fifteen participants but where appropriate allowing non-majors to enroll.
The program should change only through striving for quality, not by becoming larger.
We do suggest, however, that it may one day be appropriate to offer a doctorate in
architectural conservation, a post-graduate option available to architects, archeologis
chemists, engineers and other appropriate specializations.

1 i- A, J 4 IVERSI TY LC FLORIDA, GAI; -,E ILL II 90 :-
'- ,-ULJI L:-I rIG ( C, ; TRUCT ION N 1 NTF -:IOR DESIGtN4LANDSCAPI. AF :, C J BA / .


c Q t L F MC L C, '.'-' T 7 r C' T .t: F i ;.., 7











MEMORANDUM Arnold F. Butt
Page 2


B) Immediate Priorities

The following priorities are in the "think little" category, goals which we feel
can be achieved by active support from the University, our profession and perhaps
minimum outside funding:

1. Desk for each student in one or more studios.
2. Faculty office spaces.
3. Seminar space for 30 participants.
4. Access to a general lecture space for 60 participants.
5. Preservation reading room in the library necessary to maintain security
for rare books necessary to this program.
6. Part-time teachers to supplement present faculty.
a. Reeves full time
b. Wisley Preservation/History
c. Tate Preservation/Interior Design
d. "X" Preservation/Technology
e. "X" Preservation/Design
7. Part-time secretary.
8. Consultant services.
a. Three nationally recognized consultants per year, 3-5 days each.
b. Six regional authorities per year, 1-2 days each.
(We have nearly achieved this through grant funding, but this should be
a regularly funded series.)
9. Graduate assistants to refine documenting drawings, photocopy work and
teaching assistance.
10. Field trips.
a. Archeological field demonstration.
b. Photogrammetry/rectified photography demonstration available in Miami-
Dade Community College.
c. Partly funded trip to preservation sites within the southeastern region.
11. Faculty travel to professional meetings.
12. Faculty release time for course refinement, special programs, research.
13. Programs in continuing education; example: by special invitation involve
a limited number of architects, planners, attorneys with appropriate con-
sultants to solve in charette a preservation problem at neighborhood level
(Jacksonville Riverside/Avon Park, Tampa Hyde Park, etc.) using our facilities,
faculty and students.
14. Development of additional interdisciplinary programs at graduate level (we
presently co-sponsor with the College of Law a course in preservation law).
15. Equipment.
a. Repair transits and ozalid machine.
b. 35 mm camera, wide-angle and telephoto lenses.
c. Filing equipment, flat and vertical.
d. Carousels, notebook covers and copy work of student projects (all projects
are used as teaching aids and reference sources for additional projects).
e. Purchase of available taped/TV programs, film strips and slides for
teaching aids.
f. Extension ladder.
g. Portable drafting table for fieldwork.
16. Development of case-study files to include contract documents, programs and
feasibility studies of preservation projects.






MEMORANDUM Arnold F. Butt
Page 3


C) Long-Term or "Think-Big" Priorities

1. Field office with supervisory faculty in locale of on-going preservation
programs (Tampa, Savannah, Pensacola, Charleston, etc.), or within field
offices of the NTHP or NPS, one quarter per year.
2. Visiting professor, for one quarter or academic year.
3. Faculty sabbaticals or travel/research opportunities to the Rome Centre, York, E
4. Exchange faculty program with other schools offering education in preservation
or with professional agencies.
5. Active intern program with private and public firms and agencies.
6. Student travel fellowships.
7. Space.
a. Materials/Techniques lab space (we have 100 18th and 19th century
carpenter tools for use in technology-history courses but no space or
technicians for this purpose.)
b. Darkroom
c. Small projection spaces for individual study from motion pictures, slides,
closed circuit television, etc.
8. Equipment.
a. Conservation laboratory equipment.
b. Equipment for rectified photography (transit, markers, camera, plates).
c. Darkroom equipment.
d. Materials for laboratory.
9. Fully supported annual field trip to Savannah, Charleston and Williamsburg
alternating with Mobile and New Orleans and San Juan, Puerto Rico.


FBR:ti





































































THE SITE






























C I





PULASKI WARD
Laid out in 1837, the ward and
square were named for General
'asimir Pulaski, Cavalry Officer, the
gallant Pole who was mortally
wounded in the Siege of Savannah
(n ()cober 9, 1779. Pulaski County
(Ga.) and Pulaski, Georgia, were
named for this great man.


. ( West I


~_ J














107-109 West Liberty
Architect, John B. Hogg
c. 1870 NOTABLE











108-110 West Harris Street
c. 1880 NOTABLE




311 Whitaker Street
c. 1880 NOTABLE












116 West Harris Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE




118-120 West Harris Street
c. 1880 NOTABLE












106 West Harris Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE











333-335 Whitaker Street
Builder, Adam Short
c. 1852 NOTABLE







123 West Charlton Street
Mid 19th c. NOTABLE






111 West Charlton Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE




@
Wing of 122 West Jones Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE


128-132 West Jones Street
ANTHONY BASLER HOUSE
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE

218-220-222 West Jones Street
JAMES M. BUTLER HOUSE


1853



rh
4'1f rj
'iL'.


NOTABLE


122 West Jones Street
Mid 19th C. EXCELLENT












118-120 West Jones Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE









208-210 West Jones Street
c. 1890 NOTABLE




114-116 West Jones Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE









212 West Jones Street
Late 19th C. NOTABLE




214-216 West Jones Street
c. 1880 NOTABLE








102-112 West Jones Street
REMSHART ROW
Mid 19th C. EXCELLENT












215 West Charlton Street
Builder, John S. Sturtevant
c. 1846 NOTABLE

@






344 Barnard Street
Late 19th C. NOTABLE




205-207 West Charlton Street
c. 1870 NOTABLE

@







331 Barnard Street
c. 1842 EXCELLENT



321 Barnard Street
C. 1842 EXCELLENT









201-203 West Charlton Street
Mid 19th C. NOTABLE














212-214 West Harris Street
c. 1870 NOTABLE












126 West Harris Street
c. 1850 NOTABLE



201-203-205 West Liberty
c. 1840 NOTABLE













312-314 Tattnall Street
Late 19th C. NOTABLE


The following buildings in this ward
are considered to be Worthy of
Mention:

W. Charlton St. Lane
117 W. Charlton St.


208-210 West Harris Street
ISSAC D. LaROCHE HOUSES
c. 1850 NOTABLE





































































SAVANNAH CODES











38-118


ARTICLE II. ZONING DISTRICTS.


Sec. 38-118. Established.

In order to protect the character of existing neighborhoods, to prevent
excessive density of population in areas which are not adequately served wtih
water, sewerage facilities and fire protection; to ensure that adequate and
suitable areas will be available in the city to provide housing for a growing
population, and to protect residential areas from the blighting effects of the
traffic, noise, odors and dust generated by commercial and industrial activity;
to provide for and accommodate growth and expansion of commercial and industrial
activities; to prevent blight and slums and to promote orderly growth and devel-
opment by grouping similar and related uses together and by separating dissimilar
and unrelated uses; and in order that the various other purposes of this chapter
may be accomplished, there are hereby established within the city zoning dis-
tricts identified as follows:

(a) C-A Agriculture Conservation. This district is established to protect
rural areas against the blight and depreciation which can result from premature
development; to encourage the development of rural areas in a'coordinated and
orderly manner; to protect the use of land adjoining roads passing through the
rural portions of the city against strip development which can lead to traffic
congestion and traffic hazards; and for other purposes.

(b) C-M Marsh Conservation. The purpose of this district shall be to pro-
tect and conserve a natural land and water condition for the recreational,
economic and general welfare of the citizens of the city.

(c) C-R Recreational Conservation. The purpose of this district shall be
to preserve for recreational use large open areas which because of location,
size or topography are particularly suited for recreational use and which are
needed to serve the recreation needs of an expanding population.

(d) R-20 One-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be to
maintain single-family dwelling density to not more than two single-family
dwellings per net acre of residential land, in order to protect the property
in this district from the depreciating effects of more densely developed resi-
dential uses.

(e) R-10 One-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be to
maintain single-family dwelling density to not more than four single-family
dwellings per net acre of residential land, in order to protect the property
in this district from the depreciating effects of more densely developed resi-
dential uses.

(f) R-6 One-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be to
maintain single-family dwelling density to not more than six single-family
dwellings per net acre of residential land, in order to protect the property
in this district from the depreciating effects of more densely developed resi-
dential uses.


-11-


38-118










38-118


Sec. 38-118. Established (continued).

(g) R-4 Two-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be to
maintain dwelling unit density to not more than nine dwelling units per net
acre of residential land in order to protect the property in this district from
the depreciating effects of more densely developed residential uses.

(h) R-M-25 Multi-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be
to maintain dwelling unit density to not more than twenty-five dwelling units
per net acre of residential land, except where approved by the board of appeals,
in order to ensure a healthful living environment in urban renewal and suburban
garden apartment areas.

(i) R-M-40 Multi-Family Residential. The purpose of this district shall be
to maintain dwelling unit density to not more than forty dwelling units per net
acre of residential land, except where approved by the board of appeals, in
order to ensure a healthful living environment in central built-up areas.

(j) R-I-P Residential-Institutional-Professional. The purpose of this dis-
trict shall be to create an area in which residential, institutional and pro-
fessional uses can be intermixed and at the same time achieve a healthful living
environment.

(k) R-B Residential-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to
create an area in which residential uses, institutional uses, professional uses
and certain types of convenience-shopping-retail sales and service uses can be
intermixed and at the same time prevent the development of blight and slum con-
ditions. This district shall only be established in those older sections of
the community in which by custom and tradition the intermixing of such uses has
been found to be necessary and desirable, and in those areas where it is found
necessary and desirable to create a transition zone between an R-District and
a B or I-District.

(1) B-H Highway-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to provide
and encourage the proper grouping of road-side service areas that will accommo-
date the needs of the traveling public in a manner that prevents traffic con-
gestion, traffic hazards, and blight on the streets and roads and highways within
the city.

(m) B-N Neighborhood-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to
provide convenient shopping facilities consisting of convenience goods and
personal services in neighborhood market areas of from three thousand to five
thousand people.

(n) B-C Community-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to pro-
vide community shopping facilities consisting of a wide variety of sales and
service facilities at locations that will be accessible to a market area con-
taining from thirty-five thousand to seventy thousand people.


-12-


38-118













Sec. 38-118. Established (continued).

--(o) B-C-1 Central-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to pro-
tect and enhance the central business district of the city which serves the
Savannah metropolitan area population,

' (p) B-G General-Business, The purpose of this district shall be to create
and protect areas in which heavy commercial and certain industrial-like activi-
ties are permitted.

S(q) B-B Bayfront-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to protect
the character of the commercial development along the Savannah River within the
City.

(r) I-L Light-Industrial. The purpose of this district shall be to create
and protect areas for those industrial uses which do not create excessive noise,
odors, smoke and dust and which do not possess other objectionable characteristics
which might be detrimental to surrounding neighborhoods or to the other uses per-
mitted in this district.

S(s) I-H Heavy-Industrial. The purpose of this district shall be to create
api protect areas in which industries which are not permitted in an I-L district
can be permitted.
er.--
(t) R-M-D Residential, Medium Density. The purpose of this district shall be
to permit the optimum development, redevelopment, or conversion of low density
residential uses fronting on major arterials, secondary arterials and collector
s reets for medium-density residential use, thereby extending the economic useful-
ness of such residential property while safeguarding the long established and
desirable character of such residential neighborhoods. Dwelling unit density
shall not exceed fifteen (15) dwelling units per net acre of residential land.

"(u) R-I-P-A Residential, Medium Density. The purpose of this district shall
b'e to stabilize land use intensity in R-I-P-A Zoning Districts to not more than
seventy (70) dwelling units per net acre of residential land. Further, the pur-
pose of this district shall be to assure a compatible land use pattern within the
unique physical environs of Old Savannah. This district shall only be established
within the area bounded by East Broad and West Broad Streets, between the Savannah
River and Park Avenue, where detached, semi-detached, and row houses are prevalent
and appropriate.

_" (v) R-I-P-B Residential, Medium Density. The purpose of this district shall
be to stabilize land use intensity in R-I-P-B Zoning Districts to not more than
seventy (70) dwelling units per net acre of residential land.

- (w) P- Planning District. The purpose of this district shall be to provide
areas within which comprehensive development plans shall be prepared and reviewed
by the Planning Commission in order to secure an orderly development pattern.
Such districts shall be considered "overlay" districts and the uses permitted in
such districts shall be those uses permitted in the zoning district which they
overlay.




-13-
REV. 9/21/73


38-118


38-119











38-118


Sec. 38-118. Established (continued)

(w) P- Planning District (continued).

Property may be rezoned to a "P" classification on a finding by the
Planning Commission that:

1. Such rezoning would be in the community's interest.

2. Unplanned and uncoordinated development could result in potential
problems in such areas as traffic flow, schools, recreation and
open spaces and public facilities.

3. To insure an orderly growth and development, it is appropriate to
acquire approval of specific development plans by the Planning
Commission Staff.


Sec. 38-119. Zoning Map.

The location and boundaries of zoning districts shall be shown on a map
entitled "Zoning Map of the City of Savannah," dated July 29, 1960, and as
such map may be amended subsequent to the adoption thereof. Such map is made
a part of this chapter to the same extent as if the information set forth on
such map was fully described and incorporated herein. The "Zoning Map of the
City of Savannah" shall be kept on file in the office of the clerk of council.




























-13a-

-EV, 9/21/73


38-119










APPLICATION


SAVANNAH HISTORIC DISTRICT BOARD OF REVIEW

FOR OFFICE USE ONLY:

DATE FILED:

CASE NUMBER:


Submit this form with specific requirements except for samples, renderings,
scale models in seven copies. (Specific requirements lists obtained from
Department of Inspections.) Owner or Owner's representative required to
be present.


Street Name


LOT AND WARD


PROPOSED STARTING DATE OF WORK HISTORIC ZONING DISTRICT

ZONING DISTRICT

Description of work and describe how you feel your application is in conformance
with the Historic Zoning Ordinance:















I certify that
is owner or tenant of premises
and that he consents to the per-
formance of the work described.


Signature of Applicant

Address


Telephone


LOCATION


Address










38-122(c) 38-122(c)



Development Standards Continued MINIMUM LOT AKEA (SQ.FT.)

One-Family Two-Family or Minimum
dwelling or Multi-Famn.ly Lo` Width
other use dwelling: lot (feet)
when listed area p-.r
District and Use dwelling nit

R-M-40 District
Residential:
1. One-Family.................. 6,000 ----- 60
2. Two-Family.................. ----- 3,600 60
3. 3-8 Family.................. 9,600 ------ 60
4. 9-Family or more............ ----- 1,100 60
5. Multi-Family................ ----- 1,100 60
(4 or more stories)
Non-Residential................ 6,000 ------ 60

R-I-P District
Residential:
1. One-Family.................. 6,000 ----- 60
2. Two-Family.................. ----- 3,600 60
3. 3-8 Family.................. 9,600 ---- 60
4. 9-Family.................... ----- 1,100 60
5. Multi-Family................ ----- 1,100 60
(4 or more stories)
Non-Residential................ 6,000 ----- 60


" Residential:
(a) detached................ 600 600 20
(b) semi-detached or end-row 600 600 20
S(c) attached or row......... 600 600 20

R-I-P-B District
Residential:
(a) detached................ 600 600 20
(b) semi-detached or end-row 600 600 20
(c) attached or row......... 600 600 10

R-B District
Residential:
1. Single-Family............... 6,000 ------ 60
2. Two-Family.................. 7,200 ------- 60
3. 3-8 Family.................. 9,600 ---- 60
4. 9-Family or more............ ----- 1,100 60

Non-Residential:
1. Hotel....................... ---- -------
2. Institutional............... -----
3. Other....................... --- -------


S-42-







SCHEDULE OF 1iVELOPMENT STANDARDS (continued)


Setback from center line of street
right-of-way for front yard purposes-feet


0 cr Cd 1-r 4-1 W W

District and Use H E () o0e W4 4 1t a o >
IR-M-0 0 4' D i ) QJ str
>. One-fa ........ 15 85 70 60 50 5 30 40 --
2. Two-fmily.......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 30 40 --
3. 3-8 f .......... 1) Q) 7 6 5 -- M

District and Use ... 115 85 7 0 60 0 5 0 40 --








(4 or more stories).
R-M-40 District
Residential:
1. One-family.......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 30 40
2. Two-family........... 115 85 70 60 50 5 30 40
3. 3-8 family........... 115 85 70 60 50 5 30 40
4. 9-family or more.... 115 85 70 60 50 5 30 40
5. Multi-family......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 30--
(4 or more stories).
Non-Residential........ 115 85 70 60 50 5 30 50 40
R-I-P District
Residential:
1. Onle-family.......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40 40
2. Two-family.......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40 40
3. 3-8 family........... 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40 40
4. 9 family........... 115 85 70 60 50 5 40 40
5. Multi-family............. 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40
(4 or more stories)
Non-Residentinal....... 115 85 70 60 50- 5 5 50 50.,
R-I-P-A District.......... --- -- -
R-I-P-B District.......... --- -- -- -- -- -- -- 75
R-B District
Residential:
1. Single-family....... 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40
2. Two-family.......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40
3. 3-8 family.......... 115 85 70 60 50 5 5 40
4. 9 family or more.... 115 85 70 60 50 5 4
Non-Residential:
1. Hotel............... 115 85 70 60 50 50
2. Institutional....... 115 85 70 60 50 50
3. Other.............. 115 85 70 60 50 0 or 10 5 -- -50
B-H District.............. 115 85 70 60 50 0 or 10 10'--


'.0
00


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SAVANNAH HISTORIC REVIEW BOARD


SUBMITTAL CRITERIA

Criteria listed below is the minimum submittal required for review.
It should be pointed out that it is in the interest of the Applicant and
the Review Board, both, that a clear description submittal be presented.
Accordingly, any data exceeding the listed minimum criteria that would
further clarify the application should be presented to expedite the review.
1. Signs
a. Face layout with dimensions and wordage. (Photo if sign is
existing.)
b. Description of Lighting and Colors.
c. Designation of location.
2. Remodeling and Additions
a. Elevation drawing indicating proposed alterations (Architectural
rendering acceptable)
b. Exterior material description and color.
c. Plot plan showing existing structure and proposed remodeling
and additions.

3. Painting and Material Changes
a. Written description of areas involved.
b. Sample of color and/or sample of materials involved.
c. Color snapshot of existing structure.
4. Demolition
a. Comply with Section 9, Paragraph 2, of Code.
b. Proposed use of site after demolition.

5. Parking Surfaces
a. Plot plan showing layout
b. Elevations of walls, fences, or shrubbery (sample of materials).
c. Area lighting location and fixtures sign location.
d. Surface material.

6. Parks, Monuments, Fountains
Same as parking surfaces.
7. New Buildings
a. Elevation drawings showing all sides and dimensions.
b. Front elevation must show relationship to existing adjacent
building.(Renderings acceptable as supplemental information).
c. Plot Plan.
d. Floor Plan showing setbacks and other exterior features such
as steps, door swing, windows, and other appurtenaces.
e. Material List with color and texture samples.
f. Sign location and lighting exterior.
g. Parking surfaces if applicable.















8. New Buildings Three stories in height or higher and all buildings
on the perimeter of a Square
a. First Submittal Mass and Height approval only.
1. Scaled site plan showing proposed building on
site and adjacent buildings on adjoining pro-
perties. Minimum scale to be 1 inch to 20 feet.
2. Outline of building elevations showing heights
and widths relationships to existing adjacent
buildings to scale. If there are existing
buildings of a height or mass that would influ-
ence the design of the new structure, these
should be depicted in a scaled relationship.
b. Second Submittal

1. The Review Board is charged with the responsibility
of making a judgement of compatibility of the pro-
posed building with the existing surrounding area
in accordance with the Ordinance. Therefore, pre-
sentation should include as a minimum but not limited
to the items a. through g. listed above under No.
7 "New Buildings".
The applicant should appreciate the fact that the
more complete his presentation the easier it becomes
for the Review Board to render a decision.
2. At this stage of presentation a Certificate of
Appropriateness will be issued if in the Boards'
judgement the submittal should be approved.

c. Third Submittal

1. If any changes in mass, color, material, or
fenestration are made subsequent to issuance of
the Certificate of Appropriateness it shall be
incumbent on the applicant to resubmit to the
Board of Review such changes for their review and
approval.


9.


General Requirements
a. Location/address of work to be done.
b. Zone Historic I or II.
c. Zoning Classification
d. Proposed starting date of work.
e. Applicant must be owner or authorized agent (agent must
authorized by owner by letter.)
f. All specific requirements for samples, renderings, scale
models, etc., to be in original and six (6) copies.


be










-3-




WE SHOULD HAVE ALL REQUESTED DATA BEFORE FILING IS ACCEPTED AND 30 DAYS
LIMITATION BEGINS.

Submittal fo Criteria 2 and 4 thru 9 must be made to the office of the
Director of Inspections no later than seven (7) days prior to meeting
date (usually 2nd Monday of each month at 3:00 P.M., 2nd floor of Gamble
Building).

Submittal for Criteria 1 & 3 should be made as stated above except that
for unusual cases, they may be made to the office of the Director of
Inspections up to noon of meeting date.






































































THF PRC GUIDELINES










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A E O. 3 ARTN0 JARe
6,e < !1_ an d -.. Wi'n I1 e dvD .





1 i J. ,, ncl,,ertdawc S^/ety aol Tf C^^t Sd .Y? clywoc<6ui ";

DO HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of the Articles of Incorporation of
PRESERVATION ALLIANCE OF NEW ORLEANS, INCORPORATED,
Domiciled at New Orleans, Louisiana, Parish of Orleans,
A corporation organized under the provisions of R. S. 1950, Title 12,
Chapter 2, as amended,
By Act before a Notary Public in and for the Parish of Orleans, State of
Louisiana, on May 31, 1974, '
'.: Was recorded in this Office on June 20, 1974, the date when cor-
porate existence began, and filed in the Record of Non-Profit
Corporations Book 44.



., ;' ,' :5V







1n landandy aeAete f ala y ce

'une 20, 1974.

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ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
PRESERVATION ALLIANCE OF STATE OF LOUISIANA
NEW ORLEANS, INCORPORATED PARISH OF ORLEANS



BE IT KNOWN, on this 5 day of 14, a-%/

BEFORE ME, a Notary Public, in and for this Parish and State,
personally came and appeared William H. Forman, Jr., of the full age of
majority whose signature is subscribed, who declared in the presence of
the undersigned competent witnesses, that availing himself of the.provisions
of Louisiana law, particularly the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950,
Title 12, Sections 201-269, as they may hereafter be amended, he does
hereby organize a nonprofit corporation as defined in Louisiana R.S. 12:201(7)
under and in accordance with these articles of incorporation:

ARTICLE I

NAME

The name of the corporation is the Preservation Alliance of New Orleans,
Incorporated, hereinafter called the Alliance.

ARTICLE II

NONPROFIT CORPORATION

The Alliance is a nonprofit corporation.

ARTICLE III

PURPOSES AND POWERS

1. The purposes for which the Alliance is formed is to establish a
Preservation Resource Center, the goals of which shall be as follows:
(a) To inform the citizens of Metropolitan New Orleans as to historic
and environmental preservation.

(b) To conduct research on housing conservation and preservation
and to distribute such information to individual persons.

(c) To endeavor to conserve and to preserve the historic neighbor-
hoods and environment of Metropolitan New Orleans.
2. The Alliance is not formed for pecuniary profit or financial gain.

3. Pursuant to those matters set forth in Section 1 hereof, and subject
to the limitations therein and hereinafter set forth, the Alliance
may:














(a) Purchase, lease, hire or otherwise acquire real and personal
property, improved and unimproved, of every kind and description
in furtherance of the purposes of this corporation,
(b) employ the necessary personnel to carry out the program as
aforesaid,
(c) raise funds by subscription, donation, and in any other method
that shall be deemed fit and proper.

4. No part of the net earnings of the Alliance shall inure to the
benefit of any member, director, or officer of the Alliance, or to
any private individual except that reasonable compensation may be
paid for services rendered to or for the Alliance affecting one
or more of its purposes; and no member, trustee, or officer of the
Alliance, or any private individual shall be entitled to share in
the distribution of any of the corporate assets on dissolution of
the corporation. A substantial part of the activities of the
Alliance shall not be devoted to attempting to influence legislation,
and the Alliance shall not participate in any manner in any political
campaign on behalf of any candidate for public office.

5. The Alliance shall distribute its income for each taxable year at
such time and in such manner as not to become subject to the tax
on undistributed income imposed by Section 4942 of the Internal
Revenue Code of 1954, or corresponding provisions of any subsequent
federal tax laws.

6. The Alliance shall not engage in any act of self-dealing as
defined in Section 4941 (d) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954,
or corresponding provisions of any subsequent federal tax laws.

7. The Alliance shall not retain any excess business holdings as defined
in Section 4943(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, or corres-
ponding provisions of any subsequent federal tax laws.

8. The Alliance shall not make any investments in such manner as to
subject it to tax under Section 4944 of the Internal Revenue Code
of 1954, or corresponding provisions of any subsequent federal tax
laws.

9. The Alliance shall not make any taxable expenditures as defined
in Section 4945(d) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, or corres-
ponding provisions of any subsequent federal tax laws.

10. Notwithstanding any other provision of this certificate, the Alliance
shall not conduct any activities not permitted to be conducted by
an organization exempt under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal
Revenue Code and its Regulations as they now exist or as they may


-2-















hereafter be amended, or by an organization, contributions to which are
deductible under Section 170(c) (2) of such Code and Regulations as they
now exist or as they may hereafter be amended.

11. When the Alliance is dissolved, its assets shall be distributed
exclusively to charitable, religious, scientific, literary, or
educational organizations which would then qualify under the
provisions of Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code and
its Regulations as they now exist or as they may hereafter be amended.


ARTICLE IV

DURATION

The Alliance shall enjoy perpetual corporate existence.

ARTICLE V

REGISTERED OFFICE

The location and post office address of the Alliance's registered
office is 4319 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, Louisiana, 70115, and the
name and address of the registered agent is William H. Forman, Jr.,
5301 Camp Street, New Orleans, Louisiana, 70115.

ARTICLE VI

INCORPORATOR

The name and address of the incorporator of the Alliance is William
H. Forman, Jr., 5301 Camp Street, New Orleans, Louisiana, 70115.

ARTICLE VII

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

.1. The administration and direction of the Alliance shall be vested
-in the board of directors. The number of directors, their qualifications and
-manner of selection shall be stated in the By-Laws.

2. The names of the first directors and their post office addresses
are as follows:

Mr. Beauregard Bassich, 824 Union Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. William Bell, 5049 Bissonet Drive, Metairie, La.














Mrs. W. Kent Carruth, 2225 Chestnut Street, New Orleans, La.

'Mr. Ron Chisom, 1821 Orleans Avenue, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. William Christovich, 900 Amethyst Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Eugene D. Cizek, 928 Kerlerec Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Wayne Collier, 630 Chartres Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. John Chrestia, City Hall, 1300 Perdido Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Jack Davis, 3800 Howard Avenue, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Carling Dinkler 1037 Nashville Avenue, New Orleans, La.
li J--? P o P e ";ti -1-T
Dr. John Ernst III, 4631 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La.

S. Stewart Farnet, 612 Royal Street, New Orleans, La.

Miss Judy Filipich, 111 Iberville Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. William H. Forman, Jr., 5301 Camp Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Stanton M. Frazar, 1300 Valence Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Richard W. Freeman, Jr., 1050 Jefferson Davis Parkway, New Orleans,La.

Mr. James Hays, 1821 Orleans Avenue, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. D.H.Johnson, Jr., 5800 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La.

Dr. Robert Judice, 1323 Eighth Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Francis P. Keevers, 823 Perdido Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Louis R. Koerner, Jr., 5036 S. Prieur Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Henry Krotzer, 1537-Canp Street, New Orleans, La.

Dr. Bernard Lemann, 7703 Buther Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. Guy Lyman, 1320 Phillip Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. John P. Manard, 1137 Delachaise Street, New Orleans, La.

Miss Diane Manget, 1010 Third Street, New Orleans, La.












Mr. David Marcello, 111 Iberville Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. Lois Martin, 2135 Second Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. William McKemie, 820 St. Louis Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Mark McKiernan, 533 Royal Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. Martha G. Robinson, 3823 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La.

Mr. George Rummel, City Hall, Room 4W04, 1300 Perdido Street

New Orleans, La.

Mr. Ray Samuel, 1225 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Duncan Strachan, 1717 Coliseum Street, New Orleans, La. 70130

Mrs. Duncan Strachan, 1717 Coliseum Street, New Orleans, La.

l Thuiu St. Julien, 1923 Joseph street, W'ew 'Ur'leans, La.

Mr. Thomas A. Taylor, 823 Perdido Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. Ralph Thayer, 1205 St. Mary Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Ralph Thayer, 1205 St. Mary Street, New Orleans, La.

Mrs. Ben C. Toledano, 5360 Chestnut Street, New Orleans, La.

Mr. Samuel Wilson, Jr., 1121 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, La.

-Mr upont, III, 1435 Octavia ete--New-Orl-eans--a.

ARTICLE VIII

BASIS OF ORGANIZATION

1. The Alliance shall be organized on a non-stock basis.

2. There shall be two classes of membership individual person and
group.

3. Membership shall be open to any individual or group who is interested

in the Alliance's purpose and goals.

ARTICLE IX

DUES AND ASSESSMENTS

1. Each member of the Alliance shall pay such dues and assessments as
may be fixed by the By-laws.

-5-













2. Non-payment of dues or assessments after reasonable notice shall
authorize cancellation of membership by the board of directors.

ARTICLE X

BY LAWS

1. The membership shall have the power to adopt, amend and repeal
By-Laws to govern the Alliance.

2. The Alliance's executive committee shall consist of the president,-
vice president, secretary, treasurer and three members at large. The
committee shall be elected each year by the membership, and it shall
have the power to govern the Alliance until By-Laws are adopted.

ARTICLE XI

LIABILITY

No member or director shall ever be held liable or responsible
for contracts, debts, defaults or other acts of the Alliance.

THUS DONE AND SIGNED in my office in the City of New Orleans,
Parish of Orleans, State of Louisiana, on / ,a4 J) /'7-/'
in the presence of the undersigned competent witnesses and me, Notary, after due
due reading of the whole.

WITNESSES:




William H. Forman, Jr.






*NOTARY PUBLIC
PATRICK D. BREEDER
1aOor Public. Parish of Ouleans, Stol of Lc
My Commission ia issued Uk bc. -


-6-

6 T7 t .

W~~etrvI~lhrZ




BY-LAWS

OF

THE PRESERVATION ALLIANCE OF NEW ORLEANS, INC.

ARTICLE I

MEETING OF MEMBERS

1. Annual Meeting. There shall be an annual meeting of the membership

each year in April during which officers and directors of the Alliance shall

be elected by a majority of the members present. A quorum for the meeting

shall be one-fourth of the membership in good standing. If an officer or a

director resigns from office before the term ends, then the president shall

appoint a replacement.

2. Special Meetings. Special meetings of the members may be called

by the President, the Board of Directors, or not less than one-tenth of the

members having voting rights.

3. Voting. Voting shall be in person only; absentee voting or voting

by proxy shall not be allowed. Voting shall be by show of hands, except as

otherwise specified herein.

4. Quorum. A quorum of the membership for transaction of business

shall be one-fourth of the membership in good standing.

5. Rules. Roberts' Rules of Order (Revised) shall govern both meetings

of members as well as all other meetings, subject to the special rules which

may be adopted.

6. Membership. Membership shall be open to any individual or group

who is interested in the Alliance's purpose and goals. Annual individual

membership dues are five dollars ($5.00) and annual group membership dues

are fifteen dollars ($15.00).

ARTICLE II

OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS

1. Powers. The administration of the Alliance shall be vested in the

board of directors, who shall be elected by the membership each year. A

quorum for meetings of the board of directors shall be one-fourth of the

board's membership, which shall include the Alliance's officers.

2. Officers. The officers of the Alliance shall include a president,

vice-president, treasurer, secretary, and executive director. These officers

and three members-at-large shall constitute the Alliance's executive committee.







3. Duties of Officers. The president shall preside at all meetings of

the Alliance and the board of directors. The president shall perform all

duties incident to the office, including the appointment of committees. Tne

vice-president shall act in the absence of the president. The treasurer shall

receive and disburse the funds of the Alliance. The secretary shall be respon-

sible for keeping the minutes of all meetings of the Alliance and for perform-

ing all duties in connection with the Alliance's correspondence. The executive

director shall perform all such duties as directed by the Board of Directors

and he may be compensated for this.

4. Duties. The Board of Directors shall prepare annually by the

annual meeting of members a report, verified by the President and Treasurer

showing in appropriate detail the following: (a) the assets and liabilities of

the Corporation as of the end of the fiscal year immediately preceding the

annual meeting; (b) the principle changes in assets and liabilities during the

year immediately preceding the date of the report; (c) the revenue or receipts

of the Corporation, both unrestricted and restricted to particular purposes,

for the year immediately preceding the date of the report; (d) the expenses or

disbursements of the Corporation, for both general and restricted purposes,

during the year immediately preceding the date of the report; (e) the number

of members of the Corporation as of the date of the report, together with a

statement of increase or decrease in such number during the year immediately

preceding the date of the report, and a statement of the place where the names

and addresses of the current members may be found. The annual report of the

Board of Directors shall be filed with the records of the Corporation and an

abstract thereof entered in the minutes of the proceeding of the annual meeting

of members.

ARTICLE III

COMPENSATION OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS

Directors and Officers except for the Executive Director shall not receive

any stated salary for their services as such, but by resolution of the Board,

the expenses of attendance at meetings and necessary expenses incurred in the

furtherance of the aims and goals of the Corporation may be allowed. The Execu-

tive Director shall receive a salary to be fix by the Board of Directors.





ARTICLE IV

AGENTS AND REPRESENTATIVES

The Board of Directors may appoint such agznt. and representatives of

the Corporation with such powers and to perform such acts or duties on behalf

of the Corporation as the Board of Directors may see fit, so far as may be

consistent with these By-laws, to the extent authorized or permitted by law.

ARTICLE V

CONTRACTS

The Board of Directors, except as in these By-laws otherwise provided,

may authorize any officer or agent to enter into any contract or execute and

deliver any instrument in the name of and on behalf of the Corporation, and

such authority may be general or confined to a specific instance; and unless

so authorized by the Board of Directors, no officer, agent, or employee shall

have any power or authority to bind the Corporation by any contract or engage-

ment, or to pledge its credit, or render it liable pecuniarily for any purpose

or to any amount.

ARTICLE VI

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The Board of Directors may appoint from its number, or from among such

persons as the board may see fit, one or more advisory committees, and at any

time may appoint additional members thereto. The members of any such committee

shall serve during the pleasure of the Board of Directors. Such advisory com-

mittees shall advise with and aid the officers of the corporation in all mat-

ters designated by the Board of Directors. Each such committee may, subject

to the approval of the Board of Directors, prescribe rules and regulations for

the call and conduct of meetings of the committee and other matters relating

to its procedure.

ARTICLE VII

VOTING UPON SHARES OF OTHER CORPORATIONS

Unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Directors, the President shall

have full power and authority on behalf of the Corporation to vote either in

person or by proxy at any meeting of shareholders of any corporation in which

this corporation may hold shares, and at any such meeting may possess and

exercise all of the rights and powers incident to the ownership of such shares

which, as the owner thereof, this corporation might have possessed and exercise







if present. The Board of Directors may confer like powers upon any other

person and may revoke any such powers as granted at its pleasure.

ARTICLE VIII

FISCAL YEAR

The fiscal year of the Corporation shall commence on January 1 of each

year and end on December 31.

ARTICLE IX

PROHIBITION AGAINST SHARING IN CORPORATE EARNINGS

No member, Director, officer, or employee of or member of a committee

of or person connected with the corporation or any other private individual

shall receive at any time any of the net earnings or pecuniary profit from

the operations of the corporation provided that this shall not prevent the

payment to any such person of such reasonable compensation for services ren-

dered to or for the corporation in affecting any of its purposes as shall be

fixed by the Board of Directors; and no such person or persons shall be

entitled to share in the distribution of any of the corporate assets upon

the dissolution of the corporation. All members of the corporation shall be

deemed to have expressly consented and agreed that upon such dissolution or

winding up of the affairs of the corporation, whether voluntary or involun-

tary, the assets of the corporation after all debts have been satisfied, then

remaining in the hands of the Board of Directors shall be distributed, trans-

ferred, conveyed, delivered, and paid over, in such amounts as the Board of

Directors may determine or as may be determined by a court of competent juris-

diction upon application of the Board of Directors, exclusively to charitable,

religious, scientific, literary, or educational organizations which would then

qualify under the provisions of Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code

and its Regulations as they now exist or as they may hereafter be amended.

ARTICLE X

INVESTMENTS

The Corporation shall have the right to retain all or any part of any

securities or property acquired by it in whatever manner, and to invest and

reinvest any funds held by it, according to the judgment of the Board of

Directors, provided, however, that no action shall be taken by or on behalf







of the corporation if such action is a prohibited transaction or would result

in the denial of the tax exemption under Section 5G3 or Section 507 of the

Internal Revenue Code and its Regulations as they may hereafter be amended.

ARTICLE XI

AMENDMENTS

1. By Directors. The Board of Directors shall have power to make, alter,

amend, and repeal the By-laws of the corporation by affirmative vote of a

majority of the Board, provided, however, that the action is proposed at a

regular or special meeting of the Board and adopted at a subsequent regular

meeting, except as otherwise, provided by law. All By-laws made by the

Board of Directors may be altered, amended, or repealed by the members.

2. By members. The By-laws may be altered, amended, or repealed at

any meeting of members of the corporation by a majority vote of all the mem-

bers, represented in person, provided that the proposed action is inserted

in the notice of such meeting.

ARTICLE XII

INSURANCE AND INDEMNITY

To the extent permitted by law and under the provisions of Section 501

(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code and its Regulations as they now exist

or as they may hereafter be amended, the corporation shall indemnify its

Officers and Directors for any amounts which they are called upon to pay and

the corporation shall, if it is economically feasible, seek insurance to pro-

tect its said officers and directors from such liability.

ARTICLE XIII

RESIGNATION

A member may resign at any time by giving written notice of his resigna-

tion to the Board of Directors or requesting at the annual meeting that his

name be removed from the roster of members.

ARTICLE XIV

EXEMPT ACTIVITIES

Notwithstanding any other provision of these By-laws, no member, director,

officer, employee, .or representative of this Corporation shall take any action

or carry on any activity by or on behalf of the Corporation not permitted to


































be taken or carried on by an organization exempt under Section 501 (c) (3) of

the Internal Revenue Code and its Regulations as they now exist or as they

may hereafter be amended, or by an organization contributions to which are

deductible under Section 170 (c) (2) of such Code and Regulations as they

now exist or as they may hereafter be amended.

Adopted by the Board of Directors and effective the 20th day of Nov-

ember, 1974.









At the meeting of Board of Directors of the Preservation

Alliance of New Orleans held on the 19th day of December, 1974,

the following changes in the By-Laws were made and approved by

the members of the Board who were present at that meeting.

Only those articles and paragraphs set forh hereinafter have

been changed, everything else remains as previously sent to you.


AMENDED PROVISION


ARTICLE I


FORMER PROVISION


ARTICLE I


1. Annual Meeting. There shall 1. Annual meetingg. There shall be
be an annual meeting of the an annual meeting of the member-
membership each year in April ship each year in April during
druing which officers and which officers and directors
directors of the Slliance shall of the Alliance shall be elected
be elected by a majority of by a majority of the members
the members present. A quorum present. A quorum for the meeting
for the meeting shall be twenty shall be one-fourth of the members
members in good standing. If an in good standing. If an officer
officer or a director resigns fromor a director resigns from office
office before the term ends, then before the term ends, then the
the president shall appoint a president shall appoint a
replacement. replacement.


4.. Quorum. A quorum of the
membership for transaction of
business shall be twnty members
in good standing.

6. Membership.ilembership shall
be open to any individual or
group who is interested in the
Alliance's purpose and goalS..
.Annual individual membership
dues are five dollars ($5.00)
and annual group membership dues
are fifteen dollars ($15.00)
Each paid membership shall have
cne vote.


4. Quorum. A qiuoumi.of.ethe member-
ship for transaction of business
shall be one-fourth of the
members in good standing.

6. Membership. Membership shall
be open to any individual or
group who is interested in the
Alliance's purpose and goals.
Annual individual membership
dues are five dollars ($5.00)
and annual group membership
dues are fifteen dollars ( 15.00)


ARTICLE II


1. Powers The administration
of the Alliance shall be vested
in the board of directors, who
shall be elected by the member-
ship each year. A quorum for
meetings of the board of direct-
ors, shall be one-.fourth of the
board's membership, which board
shall include the Alliance's
officers.


1. Powers The administration of
the Alliance shall be vested
in the board of directors, who
shall be elected by the member-
ship each year. A quorum for
meetings of the board of Directc:r
shall be one-fourth of the bcard',
membership which shall include
the Alliance's officers.













2. Officers. The officers of
the Alliance shall be a
president, vice-president,
treasurer, and secretary. These
officers and three board
members-at-large shall constitute
the Alliance's executive
committee.

3. Duties of Officers.The
president shall preside at all
meetings of the Alliance and
the board of directors. The
president shall perform all
duties incident to the office,
including the appointment of
a nominating committee composed
of five members, three of whom
shall come from the present
board and two from the general
membership, which committee
shall report a slate of
candidates for the positions
of officers,members-at-large of
the executive committee and
directors. The president may
appoint such additional
committees as may be deemed
advisable. The vice-president
shall act in the. absence of the
president. The treasurer shall
receive and disburse the funds
of the Alliance. The secretary
shall be responsible for
keeping the minutes of all
meetings of theAlliance and
for performing all duties in
connection with the Alliance's
correspondence.


5. The Board of Directors shall
appoint an executive director who
shall perform all such duties as
diro.cted by the President and
the Board of Directors and shall
be under the supervision of and
responsible to the President.
The executive director will be
compensated for his duties. His
salary shall be fixed by the
Board of Directors.


2. Officers. The officers of the
Alliance shall include a president
vice-president, treasurer, and
secretary, and executive director.
These officers and three members-
at-large shall constitute the
Alliance's executive committee.


3. Duties of Officers. The
president shall preside at all
meetings of the Alliance and
the board of directors. The
president shall perform all
duties incident to the office
including the appointment of
committees. The vice-president
shall act in the absence of
the president. The treasurer shal
receive and disburse the funds
of the Alliance. The secretary
shall be responsible for
keeping the minutes of all
meetings of the Alliance and for
performing all duties in connectici
with the Alliance's correspondence
The executive director shall
perform all such dities as ..
directed by the Board of Directo.'z
and he may be compensated for this.




































































THE CURRICULUM










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976






AE 581 SURVEY OF ARCHITECTURAL PRESERVATION 4 credits


Presents an overview of the history, philosophies,
processes, programs and careers in preservation.


Course Objectives:

-to provide an overview of the historical evolution of philosophies,
processes and participants in architectural preservation:

-private sector, individuals and organizations
-public agencies at the international, national,
state and local levels
-preservation processes of inventory, stabilization,
adaptive use, salvage, restoration, reconstruction
and design within stable environments.

-to allow students to consider specialization in preservation.


Each student will keep an 8 1/2 x 11 daybook for lecture notes, interviews
with consultants' and to record individual experiences.

There is no text for this course because sufficient multiple copies of
texts are in the Library.



















101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 3Z611, 904-392-0Z05
ARCHITECTURE.BUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNGLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY A FIrMATIE ACTION E'.: ,C'ER.











COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 582 DOCUMENTATION 4 credits

Provides basic instruction in measuring and drawing,
photographic techniques and written description of
significant buildings. AE 582 will be coordinated
with AE 621 Architectural Interpretation.


Course Objectives:

-to instruct the student in the techniques of inventory.
-to instruct the student in the building documentation process,
primarily the techniques of measured drawings.
-to introduce the student to the variety of documentation
techniques of the recording process.
-to allow the student to apply those instructions in the field
by measuring and drawing an historic building.


This course will assist the student in developing an understanding of
building forms, planning arrangements, construction techniques and
details, and use of materials through direct observation. The student
will be working with the actual fabric of an historic building.

The use of measured drawings is vital not only to the preservationist
as an architectural record but also to the architect and developer in any
restoration, remodelling or rehabilitation project.

The measuring and drawing of each building is a group project with each
student participating in every phase of the process with individual
responsibilities.

Buildings selected for AE 582 will also be used for AE 621, 684 or 685
with students enrolled in both courses working on the same building.

Text: Recording Historic Buildings, Harley McKee (the library has
sufficient copies of the book for use.)

PRINTED HANDOUT ON RECORDING PROCESS








101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITECTUREsBUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNeLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*URBAN AND REGIONAL PLAN!


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION E'.': OYER


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA











COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 621 ARCHITECTURAL.INTERPRETATION 4 credits (Special Study)


Involves a detailed study of a historic building through
visible analysis of its structure, finish and fenestration
elements; analysis of historical documents in county and
town archives and preparation of a comprehensive report.


Course Objectives:

-to assist the student in interpreting the history of an historic
building through:

-visual analysis and surface archaeology
-historical records and other documentary resources

-to assist the student in developing observation abilities and archi-
tectural vocabulary through the completion of an Historic American
Buildings Survey architectural write-up for the building.

-to assist the students in developing their ability to evaluate physical
conditions of the building by completing a maintenance report.

-to present the findings in a comprehensive building report.


In most cases, buildings undergo physical changes without benefit of
written or visual documentation of those actions. The building itself is
frequently the only record of the change. This course offers the opportunity
to examine the building for clues of change. With the assistance of faculty
and consultant Paul Buchanan, students search for those traces and present
a report of the evolution of the building form. Public records, library
and private sources are also consulted.

The study of the building is a group project with each student responsible
for a specific portion of the report. Buildings selected for this course
will also be used for AE 582. Students enrolled in both courses will work
on the same building for 582.


Text: CYCLIC MAINTENANCE OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS, J. Henry Chambers
Case studies of historic buildings.
Student projects for previous years.

Faculty Consultant: Paul Buchanan, Restoration Architect, Colonial Williamsburg;
Richard Frank, Herschel Shepard and others.
I01C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITECTUREeBUILDING CONSTRUCTIONsINTERIOR DESIGNeLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE URBAN AND REGIONAL PLAN'


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRM-ATIVE ACTION E-'.-LGYER


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 675 SURVEY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE I


Course Objectives:

-To trace the development of American Architecture, and the determinants
affecting its functioning form and expression from its beginnings to
the end of the Colonial Era (c. 1790) with an emphasis on vernacular
architecture.

-To increase a student's knowledge of cultural history of this period.

-To foster and understanding of the principles of architectural design
and construction during this colonial era.

-To increase a students ability to objectively analyse and evaluate
the merits of any building in the context of its own time, purpose
and successfulness and to utilize this ability as a tool in the
formulation of a philosophy and process in design.


Content:

-Illustrated lectures covering the history of American Colonial
architecture.

-Supervised individual research paper examining some aspect of cultural,
political, social, economic or intellectual history of one of the
European Cultures responsible for immigration to America.

-An individual written analysis of a selected text.


Texts: to be chosen from selected bibliographies.













I01C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
RCHITECTUREOBUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNOLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNIP

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER











COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 676 SURVEY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE II


Course Objectives:

-To trace the development of American Architecture, and the
determinants affecting its functions,form and expression
from the beginnings of the Republic (c. 1790) to the beginning
of the first World War.


-To increase a students knowledge of cultural history of this period.

-To foster and understanding of the principles of architectural design
and construction during the 19th and early 20th Century in America.

-To increase a students ability to objectively analyse and evaluate
the merits ofany building in the context of its own time, purpose
and successfulness and to utilize this ability as a tool in the
formulation of a philosophy and process in design.


Content:

-Illustrated lectures covering the history of American Architecture
during the nineteenth and early twentieth century with an emphasis
on vernacular architecture.

-Supervised individual research examining in detail; 1) the life and
work of a selected architect; 2) the development of a specific
building type in America; or 3) the process of design and construction
of a significant building.

-Practice in the terminology and technique of writing architectural
descriptions with in-class and field exercises.


Texts: to be chosen from selected bibliographies.









101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITEC--REEBUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNOLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*UREAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY .AFFIRMATIVE ACTION E.tFLCYER


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 681 PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY I: MATERIALS AND METHODS


Course Objectives:

-To study in an historic context the properties and processes of
manufacture of basic building materials such as wood, masonry,
metals, glass, paint, and fabrics, and to study the tools,
personnel and traditional methods involved in their installation.


Content:

-Illustrated lectures outlining properties and process of the
above materials.

-Supervised individual research with an illustrated presentation
of the findings into some aspect of traditional building materials.

Copy of the above research and slides will be retained for the Department
Archives to be used for instructional purposes.



























101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITECTURECBUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGN*LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURESURBAN AND REGIONAL P


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY AFFIRF ATIV C-IC ; E'.ILOC ER










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


FALL QUARTER


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


1976


AE 682 PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY II:


MATERIALS AND METHODS


Course Objectives:

-To study in an historic context the application of traditional
building materials as they relate to a building's elements
such as Foundations, Framing, Roofs, Windows, Doors, Trim and
Finish, Hardware, Lighting, Heating, Ventilation, Site or
Landscape Elements, etc.


Content:

-Illustrated lectures outlining development of the above
building elements.


-Supervised individual research with an illustrated presentation
of findings into some aspect of the development of building
elements.

Copy of the above research and slides will be retained for the Department
Archives to be used for instructional purposes.

























101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITECTURE.*BUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNOLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTUREGURBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/AF Fi;I ATIv E CTIOC : E'.'F~, YE











COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 683 -TECHNOLOGY OF PRESERVATION III: Problems and Process


Course Objectives:

-To introduce the student to the problems and process of maintenance,
stabilization, and restoration of architecturally and historically
significant structures.


Content:

-Lectures and individual research on noteworthy restoration and
rehabilitation projects.


-Investigation of current methods of restoration, stabilization, and
maintenance as practiced by agencies involved in the conservation
of buildings.

-Laboratory exercises illustrating the application of the above
methods.

-Individual analysis of a selected building to ascertain in detail
its maintenance problems, causes of these problems and the possible
solutions to these problems. The selected building will later be
used for course work in AE 684 and AE 685.

Text: Preservation and Conservation Principles and Practices, by
The Preservation Press; et.al.
Cyclic Maintenance of Historic Buildings, J. Henry Chambers

















101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITECTUREEBUILDING CONSTRUCTIONeINTERIOR DESIGNSLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION' EtMPLOYER


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA











COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976


AE 684 TECHNOLOGY OF PRESERVATION: PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN I 4 credits


Provides instruction in the techniques of programming
necessary to problems involving adaptive uses of existing
buildings, building complexes or neighborhoods.


Course Objectives:

-to instruct the student in the techniques of:

a. Building analysis or assay of an existing building
1) Site condition
2) Structural elements
3) Mechanical systems
4) Enclosing elements
5) Fenestration

b. Maintenance problems necessary for stabilization emergency
and long-term.

c. Primary and adaptive functional analysis.

d. Proposals for adaptive uses.

e. Analysis of appropriate building codes, zoning and other legal
conditions.

f. Availability of materials, systems, technicians, etc.

g. Program writing and data organization.


Each student will select a building for use in AE 684 during his participation
in AE 683 and prepare his assay as part of that course work. In AE 864
he will organize this information into a program, assign an adaptive use
to the building and prepare a preliminary solution to the problem. This
program and preliminary solution will be reviewed by faculty, faculty-
consultants, consulting architect and potential sponsor/owner when
appropriate.

When conditions permit, it will be possible for a student to satisfy con-
ditions for AE 685-686 through interning in the offices of an architect
specializing in solving adaptive-use projects.




101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205
ARCHITECTURE.BUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNeLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE


COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

FALL QUARTER 1976




AE 685 TECHNOLOGY OF PRESERVATION: PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN II 4 credits


Provides instruction in the techniques of design
preliminaries, working drawings and specifications.


Course Objectives:

-to instruct the student in the techniques of:

a. the processes of design necessary to adaptive use.
b. preparation of drawings, models and other means
necessary for thorough explanation of design decisions.
c. working drawings involving all traditional drawings
and, where possible, rectified photography and
photo-drafting.
d. outline specifications.


The student will prepare a notebook to record work prepared for AE 685
and AE 686 to include all programming information, preliminary and
final design solutions, working drawings and specifications necessary
to the project. All materials will be limited to 8 1/'2x 11". A copy
of this project will remain on file in Department Archives to be used
for instructional purposes.






















101C AFA, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 32611, 904-392-0205

ARCHITECTURE*BUILDING CONSTRUCTION INTERIOR DESIGNSLANDSCAPE ARCHITECTUREOURBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING


EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY' AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 'EPLGYE=






































































AE 632 PROGRAM












AE 632 Winter, 1976 Project II


Instructors: Merritt, Lo, Lisle

A School for the Study of Architectural Preservation

Reacting to national goals of conservation and, in particular,
to desires to promote preservation of significant components of our
architectural heritage, an unnamed (hypothetical) national foundation
proposes to establish a multi-city, national scale institute for graduate
studies in architectural preservation. The concept for the school is for
it to be a supplement to existing preservation programs in universities
around the country providing up to one year of intensive special study in
actual on-going preservation projects.

The institute proposes to locate facilities to accommodate the
training of approximately 70-75 students in each of no less than four
cities in the United State. The basT -for the choice of these cities
is that they have large historic districts of significant quality that
will provide active centers for challenging programs based in actual
preservation projects and that each city present a physical situation
consequentially different than the rest to maximize potential for
experiential variation.

Savannah, Georgia, has been selected a, one of the participant
cities, Southeastern U:A, (San Francisco, Chicago, and Boston are expected to
be the other three.) Each student in'AE 932 can assume that he/she has
received the commission to design the Savannah educational facility.

The site for the school is in the historic district of Savannah
on Monterey Square, one of the finest of the numerous squares that are
part of the ciTty plan that gives Savannah its unique identity. The
specific site is a 60 x 180 foot "trustee lot" on the eastern side of the
square, the northern most ofTitt two on that side. A synagogue is on
the trustee lot to the south across Wayne Street. Projects of such
public nature are appropriate for these special lots that were, from
the time of the original Oglethorpe plan, set apart especially for such
important public uses as churches, banks, places of assembly, schools,
official residences, and similar uses.

For the purpose of the project we are assuming that the existing,
rather nondescript building on the site has been removed after being
gutted by fire and structurally damaged beyond saving. We also assume
that the present occupant has chosen to relocate their activities else-
where.
The functional requirements of the school that the designer
is responsible for providing for are as follows:

J1. Library: ~%iVAL

a) Open stacks for 15000 volumes. \c
b) Reading area for 25 persons;both lounge and
table seating with current periodicals and
card file included in this space.









Page -2-


x '~


Checkout counter.
Librarian's office.
,Rare book room.
.Binding and repair.


Lecture and Seninar Rooms:

a) 1 for 60 persons each
b) 2 for 30 persons eac-
c) 4 for 12 persons each

Auditorium: e f ,t


t I\o STf

+150 sq.ft.
100 sq. ft.

frtnv

1. Flexible seating, blackboard, A/V.
h II II II II
h. "


a) 1 for 120 persons with slope floor and minimal
stage area and A/V setup. Separate public access.

Design Laboratoris: fnV \1

a) 6 labs for 12 persons each;provide space for
drafting and model building.


. Exhibition Space: hPvU C


+1000 sq. ft.


a) For exhibit of both projects and traveling
exhibits. Public should have reasonable
access.
b) Exibition storage


Shop:


1 200 sq. ft.

+ 800 sq. ft.


a) Woodworking largely, model making especially.


Photography Darkroom:

Printing and Reproduction:


+ 200 sq. ft.


a) Convenient to students, staff and faculty.

/9. Lounge and Recreation Space:

a) For students and faculty, include coffee
mess and vending, consider relationship
to exhibition, loinne seating, T.V.,
billiards, bulletin board.-J 9 C^

10. Administration, Staff, and Faculty:
a) Reception and waiting area for 8 persons plus
receptionist and 2 secretaries.
b) Directors office.
c) Work storage room.
d) 5 permanent faculty offices.
e) 2 visiting faculty offices.


+ 150 sq. ft.


S250 sq. ft.
+ 250 sq. ft.
+ 150 sq. ft.

t -^ ^ -
i rzj"6 ^


J2.




J3.



J4.


6.


7.

8.









Page -3-


11. Building Superintendent Suite:

a) Two bedroom apartment, provide private entrance

12. Building Maintenance and Garage:

a) 1 stake truck \ A
b) 1 station wagon X '
c) 1 12 passenger van.
d) Building materials and maintenance storage. + 200 sq. ft.

.wb )V / 13. Student Housing: -- 03
Assuming that approximately 25-30 percent of the
students due to being married or for other reasons will
choose to live in private rental housing in the neighbor-
hood, only 50 students will be provided for on the site.
Plan for groups of students to share cooking, dining,
living facilities (designer to determine group size) but
each student shall have a private sleep-study space.
Students may share a bath. Provide reasonable access
to street from housing without violating academic spaces.
Provide: laundromat (2 washers and 2 dryers). Bike
storage for 80 bicycles. Small ground level storage ar- 1V It
(locker?) for each student.

14. Provide mechanical equipment space, public and private circulation,
public restrooms, suitable entrance, foyer, etc. as appropriate.

No automobile parking on site is required. Either on street parking or
rented space off site will be used.

Minimum Presentation Requirements:

Context Model 1"= 20

Model that will disassemble to show interior spaces. May include 1/4"= 1'i
furnishings and other information.

Floor plans to show furniture arrangement if not included in large 1/4"= 1'(
model.

Large section perspective through the major space/spaces of building. 1/2"= 1'(
Pickup structural and mechanical systems and materials.

Two exterior perspectives (1 fixed location, other optional location)
from blown up photos of actual street scenes. Emphasize exterior
scale and materials considerations.

Note: Any other drawings (sections, perspectives, site analysis, structural
or mechanical systems analysis, etc.) are welcomed but not required. In
any case, we are looking for excellent designs, excellently.presented witn
full understanding and description of structural systems, mechanical systems,
materials, furnishings, and spacial and functional relationships.




















BIBLIOGRAPHY:


Bannister, Turpin C. "Ogelthorpe's Sources for the Savannah Plan".
Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. Vol. XX,
No. 2, May, 1961, pp. 47-62.


An interesting discussion of the possible origins of
(for America) city plan of Savannah by the past Dean
College of Architecture and Fine Arts, U. of F.

Chatham County Savannah Metropolitan Planning Commission.
Area Regulations. May, 1969.
Official document of the city.
Historic District Zoning Ordinance. February, 1975.
Likewise.


the unique
of the


Historic


Historic Savannah Foundation, Inc. Historic Savannah, 1968. (Introduction
by Carl Feiss).
Call No. 720.97581/H673h
An excellent source for both city plan and architectural scale
data. Each ward and square dealt with individually and all
consequential buildings evaluated.

Lane, Mills. Savannah Revisited, A Pictorial History. The Beehive
Press, Savannah, Georgia, 1973. Call No. 975.8724/S264/1973.
A very good picture book of the city.


Reps, John, W. The Making of Urban America.
Princeton, N. J., 1965. pp. 185-192.


Princeton University Press,
Call No. 711.40973/R425m.


A brief description/discussion of the city plan and its origins.

Town Planning in Frontier America. Princeton University Press,
Princeton, N. J., 1969, pp. 238-260. Call No. 711.40973/R425t.


Similar to other book by Reps above.






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