Guide to residential preservation in Florida

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Material Information

Title:
Guide to residential preservation in Florida
Physical Description:
37p. : diagrams, photocopies.
Language:
English
Creator:
Black, James B.
Leuthold, William
Publisher:
College of Architecure, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
AFA HP document 513

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00001893:00001

Full Text

























guide to residential
preservation
in florida

preservation law march 1979
jim black
bill leuthold













TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction 1

Residential Preservation Plan 2

Options 4

Inspection Check List 6

Pre-Construction Guidelines 18

construction Guidelines 19

Building Codes, Permits, and Historic District 26
Guidelines

Archival Investigation 29

Recognition Programs 33
Bibliography 35

Guide to Architectural Styles in Florida 37






INTRODUCTION


This paper is an academic exercise intended to summarize
and delineate the nature of preservation in Florida today,
through an explanation of residential preservation
methodologies and concepts. Educational experiences and
information from preservation publications provided the
resource base for this project. As a final product this
unit could serve as a reliable source of information and
guideline for a homeowner, undertaking a residential
preservation project.






RESIDENTIAL PRESERVATION PLAN


INVESTIGATE
BUILDING









DEVELOP
PRIORITIES





MAKE A BUDGET




HIRING A
PROFESSIONAL


A preservation effort in any structure may entail any of a
number of types of activities. Therefore it is necessary for
a person to fully understand what he is getting into. The
first step of a preservationist should be to take the investi-
gation check list furnished in this report and visit the site,
taking into consideration the condition, usefulness, and aes-
thetic value of each piece.


Once the building is understood and an effort is to be taken,
a definitive list of priorities must be set up to give a series
of goals and objectives for which to aim. These shall be dic-
tated by the person's resources in time, effort and money.


Set aside a certain amount of money, either from a loan, grant
or personal investment. Since there are always unknowns in
this type of project, allow for some flexibility.


If the priorities and budget dictate that a professional will
be needed, a thorough investigation of the local architects,
lawyers, and contractors is in order. It is important that
the professionals display a knowledge in the field of pres-
ervation.







HIRING A The roll each professional would take includes;
PROFESSIONAL
Architect:
The architect will interpret the design and quality of
the structure. He can handle jobs including archival
research, documentation, filling out Florida Master-Site
File forms, and hiring consultants as required. He will
complete construction documents for the contractor to
follow and will oversee the contractor during construction
to insure that the owner gets exactly what is in the do-
cuments. He will also control payment to the contractor.


Lawyer:
The lawyer's roll will be to draft contracts, investigate
codes, taxes, and financing. He can also deal in the roll
of owner with the other parties.


Contractor:
A general contractor, usually a carpenter by trade, over-
sees the entire construction process, coordinating the
work of various specialists including masons, plumbers,
electricians and mechanical contractors. If the con-
tract is so arranged, the owner can hire the subcontractors
individually. This can sometimes save money, but requires
more involvement than some owners are willing to take.






OPTIONS


RESTORATION













REHABILITATION









ADAPTIVE USE


If the house is very significant and money is available, re-
storation could be feasible. This involves extensive research
with very accurate findings. Sometimes houses must be partial-
ly dismantled for an expert to interpret its construction.
The objective in restoration is usually to take it back to
a specific time period. Everything must be consistent, in-
cluding all finishes, detail, hardware, and mechanical systems.
It is a very expensive undertaking, and not feasible in a
residence.


This involves keeping the character of the structure, but
modernizing its working parts. This is an excellent option
for residences in that it allows all the comforts of a modern
house inside a historical environment. It allows some flexibil-
ity in design while maintaining the function for which it was
designed.


This involves placing a new function inside the existing shell.
The exterior is usually restored as much as possible while the
interior undergoes extensive change, preferably to a very con-
temporary style. Many interior walls must be removed, and
finishes and detail changed to allow for the different activity.
A fine example of this is converting an old house into pro-
fessional offices.







SALVAGE Entire buildings, when threatened by exterior forces can be
saved by moving them into a compatible area. Once moved, they
can be adapted in one of the previously mentioned methods.
If the building is in poor condition and endangered, salvage
can take on a different meaning. Its individual pieces can
be used in restoring or rehabilitating another similar structure.






INSPECTION CHECK LIST


INTRODUCTION TO
CHECK LIST


If someone is buying an old house or planning to restore one
they currently own, it is most important that they have a
definitive check list of areas that may cause problems in
the rehabilitation process. Although the list contains many
areas that may lead to severe problems, it is not intended to
discourage the preservation of the house, only to make the
owner aware of what he is getting into.


For this inspection you should bring; a flashlight, small mag-
net, plumbline, pocket knife, marble, pair of binoculars, pad
and pencil, and the inspection check list. You should wear
old clothes, since the areas of the house that carry the most
information are also the dirtiest areas.








Note: The check list is a revised version of the Old House
Journal Inspection Checklist, with certain sections
edited or added to for clarification.






INSPECTION CHECK LIST


ROOF: EXTERIOR



























ROOF: INTERIOR


What material is used?
Is there any sign of broken shingles? Do shingles look warn?
Does roof look new but lumpy? If so, new shingles may
have been added over old.
In a flat roof: are there any signs of bubbles, cracking or
separations in asphalt or roofing felt?
Is flashing intact? Look closely around chimneys, valleys,
and parapet walls.
In chimneys, is masonry cracked or crumbling? If so the mas-
onry will require repointing.
Are gutters intact? Are they firmly attached to eave? Look
for rotting in wood gutters and rust in metal ones. Do
they flow properly? Run hose in gutter to check. It
shouldn't back up under moderate pressure.
Check cornice. If metal look for rust. If wood look for
rot. If plaster look for water damage. If sagging, the
connection will require inspection.
Check for sagging ridges. Could be caused by natural settling
or structural damage.


Is sun light coming through any cracks in roof?
Are there any water stains on sheathing or rafters? This is
a sign of leaking.
Is the attic ventilated? This will control moisture buildup.
Are there any cracked or rotting rafters?











ROOF PROBLEM
AREAS


ELECTROLYSIS
(DIFFERENT METALS)





FLASHING OMITTED.
OR DETERIORATED



SURFACE FAILURE ,



BLOCKED GUTTER
OR LEADER BROKEN
DETERIORATED FLASHING
AND DORMER CHEEKS
ICE BUILD-UP


Source: A Primer: Preservation for the Property Owner

Preservation League of New York State


(CRICKET)


(SLATE-EROSION)







WALLS: EXTERIOR


What material is used?
Are the walls plumb? Check with a plumb line. If walls are
not plumb it could mean serious structural problems.
Look for warpage by sighting along walls. Major bulges could
mean serious structural damage.
Check paint condition. Is the paint new or old? Does it flake
off when scratched with a knife? Is it cracking, blister-
ing or alligatoring? If so it should be cleaned and re-
painted.
In wood walls: look for rot, insect and water damage. If
paint is in poor condition, check for exposure. Does
grade or foliage touch the wood at any point? If so,
these are prime areas for damage.
If clapboard walls, check for loose, warped or cracked boards.
If damage is minimal, caulking may be sufficient repair.
If walls are shingle, look for same problems as on roof.
In masonry walls: look for loose bricks and crumbling mortar.
This can be corrected with repointing. Also check for
cracks. Hairline cracks are not a major problem but
large vertical cracks usually mean major structural
damage in the foundation. Also look for crumbling
brick. This usually means the brick was underfired and
of poor quality.







DOORS & WINDOWS


Check the frames. Are they true? Are they properly caulked?
Are the windows and doors in place? If any are missing they
must be replaced immediately to keep the weather out of
the interior. It may be necessary to replace with ply-
wood or masonry as a temporary solution.
Do doors close tightly? New weather seals and threshold may
be required. Does hardware work?
Are windows operable? If not at least make sure that they are
stuck in the closed position.
In multi-pane windows, are any panes loose or missing? Mis-
sing panes must be replaced immediately. Loose ones
should be removed and re-compounded with new compound.
Are wood frames rotting or broken? These must be repaired.
Do sills show any sign of water damage? This can indicate poor
seals.







FOUNDATION


What is the foundation type? Wall, piers or slab?
What material is used?
Does grade slope away from the building?
Do downspouts have splashblocks to divert water away from the
foundation?
Does the structure have a basement? If so, check for signs of
insect involvement. These will be termite shelter tubes,
open holes in wood, and remains. Check for signs of
fungus, including fruit bodies and dark stains. Also
check for signs of water. Look for condensation on walls,
standing water on floor, and stains on walls and joists.
Is the basement ventilated? This can prevent condensation
build-up. Also look for cracking as in exterior walls.
If there is no basement, but the house is on piers, crawl
underneath and check for same problems as in basement.
Also look for metal termite shields at the points where
the wood rests on the masonry.
Check the condition of the piers. Look for spelling of brick
orstone, crumbling masonry, and the connection of mas-
onry to the wood structure.
If the house is constructed on a slab, check for cracks, dep-
ressions and raises areas in the floor. These could be
caused by poor compaction of the soil.or a build-up of
hydrostatic pressure under the slab. These can be ser-
ious problems.







INTERIOR


Floors:
What is the structure? Is it hardwood on joists, plywood
on joists or something completely different? It will
be necessary to check under the surface covering to re-
veal the structure.
What is the covering? An impervious surface such as linoleum
or tile will retain water if it gets inside, causing rap-
id deterioration. These areas should be checked thorou-
ghly.
Do the floors sag or tilt? This can easily be checked by
placing a marble on the surface and seeing if it rolls.
This could be the result of normal settling and corrected
easily with simple support or be major structural problems.
Does the floor bounce when walked on? This usually indicates
inadequate support, either in the design or in structural
damage.
Check around windows, doors and radiators for signs of water.







INTERIOR


Walls:
Use a plumb to insure that walls are true.
Check for loose plaster. Push on the walls. If spongy or
brittle it means the wall is damaged and the plaster
must be replaced.
Check for water damage. Likely spots will be near openings,
plumbing and around damaged exterior walls.
Find out what type of lath is used on plaster walls. Water
and insect damage can cause permanent damage in walls
with wood lath.


Ceilings:
Check for loose plaster in the same manner as on the walls.
It can be very dangerous in this situation.
Look for water damage, usually under bathrooms and areas of
faulty flashing on roof.


Stair:
Check for loose or broken treads. Does it feel secure when
walking on it? Does it bounce? Shake the banister.
Does it feel secure?


Fireplace:
Check for signs of recent use. This will usually mean it is
operational. Look up the flue to make sure it is open.
Check for smoke stains on interior. Could mean problems.







ELECTRICAL
SYSTEM


Find the main power box. Does it look neat? Are all wires
covered? Is amperage given?
If amperage is not given it is possible to find out by check-
ing the power hook-up at the exterior. (see diagram)
Three wires indicates 110-220 volt system with between
30 and 100 amps.
Two wires indicates only a 110 volt system with about
20 to 30 amps. This will have to be replaced with a
three wire system.
Check in the attic. Are wires exposed? If so they will have
to be replaced with a new system as they present a fire
hazard.
Is there at least one outlet per wall in each room? This
will be expected by a modern family. Do they work. Check
with a small light.
Do the wall switches work?





IDENTIFYING YOUR
ELECTRICAL
SERVICE


Source: Rehab Right
City of Oakland
Planning Dept.


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SPE-FC R fN 6ULIAUrFIED El FCTRI.6AN







PLUMBING


What is the material of the pipes? Brass or copper are very
good. Iron is good and lead will need replacing. Check
with a magnet, which will only be attracted to iron.
Lead is soft and will appear silvery when scratched with
a knife.
Check for adequate water pressure by turning on the top floor
sink faucets, then the bathtub and flush the toilet. If
the sink flow slows to a trickle, piping may be inadequate,.-
or clogged.
Where is water supplied from, city, deep well or shallow well?
City water is best and a shallow well is to be avoided.
Does the property have a septic tank or is it hooked up to
a city sewer? If a septic tank, does it drain well? Has
it been drained regularly?
Check the water heater. What is the capacity? 40 gallons will
be required for a family of four with a clothes washer.
Is it properly insulated?







HVAC Heating System;
What type is it? Space heater, furnace, boiler, heat strips?
What is its medium? air, water, steam?
What is its fuel? coal, fuel oil, gas, electricity?
Does it operate properly? (It can be tested, even in the sum-
mer by turning the thermostat to above room temperature.
An air system should present heat to registers within a
few minutes. A steam or hot water system should have
Sheated.radiators within 15-20 minutes. Check every rad-
iator or register to insure efficiency. Look for leaky
pipes, bad connections, and rust in radiators.)
Ask previous owner for copies of recent fuel and electric
bills, both for summer and winter.


Air Conditioning:
What general type is it? window units or central?
Check operation similar to above.
If it is a central unit, how were ducts, registers, and equip-
ment installed? Were ceilings dropped and architectural
detail covered over? Where is the compressor/condenser
unit located? Where is the air handling unit located?
In a closet, attic or was a room specially made for it?
If window units are present, did they do permanent damage to
the windows?






PRE-CONSTRUCTION GUIDELINES


STABILIZATION The first step involved in preservation of an old, unmain-
tained structure is to make it weather tight.


Roof:
A sound, tight roof is essential in the preservation of
a building. A permanent solution is to repair and re-
place all damaged structure and covering. Sometimes time
is of the essence and a temporary covering of felt, roll
roofing or even plastic sheets will be sufficient.
Also check and clean all cutters and downspouts.

Windows and doors:
Any unfilled openings must be filled as soon as possible.
The permanent solution is to replace with the original
or intended replacement. If time is short, the openings
can be filled with plywood, masonry, plastic or anything
else which will keep the elements out.

Exterior walls:
Fill openings permanently with proper material or tempo-
rarily with any material at hand.




CONSTRUCTION GUIDELINES


NEW WIRING


It will be necessary to upgrade a 2-wire, 110 volt, 30 amp
system to a 3-wire, 110-220 volt, 100 to 200 amp system to
allow for the modern appliances common in most dwellings.
This can be done at a reasonable expense by a qualified elec-
trician without harming the architectural quality of the
building.


Rewiring within the house will be necessary if current out-
lets and switches are inadequate. (see illustrations)


. O I ST


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Source: Rehab Right
City of Oakland
Planning Dept.


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IN< CNLEEAJME I


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PLUMBING


When lack of sufficient water pressure, clogging, inadequate
facilities or poor quality pipes cause a need for new plumbing,
it is most important that the new work be as unobtrusive as
possible.
*Use existing holes in wall or floor for pipe connections,
even if new holes will be out of sight.*
*Use hidden passages, crawl space, abandoned vents, and the
like to hide new runs of pipe and minimize destruction of
valuable wainscot or plaster walls.*
*Installation of a second story toilet or bathtub requires
a "P" shaped trap below the floor. Conceal this pipe
between the joists; never lower the first floor ceiling
to hide it. *
*On the exterior, locate pipes and vents as inconspicuously
as possible, preferably on the back or sides of the house.
Paint the pipe the same color as the wall behind it. *
If a new bathroom is added it is best to use fixtures which
are compatible with the existing ones. In rehabilitating or
moving a bathroom or kitchen, use existing fixtures wherever
possible. It is possible to have porcelain resurfaced, and at
a much lower cost than purchasing new ones. If replacement is
necessary, try to purchase reconditioned fixtures of the same
period, or if these are unavailable use contemporary fixtures
with clean, simple lines. Avoid ornate and frilly fixtures
and hardware.


*Source: Rehab Right
City of Oakland
Planning Board







HVAC The most obvious need in rehabilitating a Florida house is
of air conditioning. Although the houses were designed to
take advantage of breezes and kept the sun out with window
shading, people today have become accustomed to even cooler
conditions. When making this conversion, which can also re-
place an antiquated heating system, there are two basic routes
of action.


Window units:
*Advantages:
*Their initial cost is low.
*By being localized they can be used to cool only certain
areas of the house at a time, saving energy.
*They require no duct space or mechanical equipment rooms.

*Disadvantages:
*They break the rhythm of the house on the exterior by
protruding offensively from some of the windows.
*They represent a "temporary" solution to the problem.
*They prohibit the use of the windows in which they are
located.
*Their installation can sometimes permanently damage the
windows.







Central system:
'Advantages:
*By being within the house it allows for full use of the
windows on days when the system is not needed.
*Minimal exterior change is required as the compressor/con-
denser unit can be placed unobtrusively outside the house.
*More efficient in that only one mechanical unit is re-
quired instead of many separate, individual units.
*Represents a "permanent" solution.
*Can be installed unobtrusively on the interior by utilizing
attic and crawl space for ducts and attic or spare closet
for the air handling unit.


*Disadvantages:
'Higher initial cost
*Sometimes attic and crawl space are not available, re-
quiring dropped ceilings, vertical chases and covering of
architectural detail.








PAINT


ARCHITECTURAL
DETAIL


Through historical research and paint analysis, try to deter-
mine original paint colors and match wherever possible.


It is important that as much existing detail as possible be
retained in the new construction. Where existing detail is
unsalvageable it is important to try to match the original
as much as possible. Texture and scale are more important
than exact detail, so if reconstruction is undertaken it will
be possible to copy the "feel" of the element by using easy
to assemble stock wood sizes cut'to the proper shape. (see
illustrations)


Avoid the use of frilly, overdesigned detail such as wrought
iron railings and turned banisters unless they represent the
original design intent.




PROPORTIONAL REPRODUCTION:
A CORNICE


REPRODUCING
ARCHITECTURAL
DETAIL


6LAssI C4L. 6cOKJ 1CE:
1 e~~ ~ t~A~T FPAGrERN
3 D~RihZf t


Source: Rehab Right
City of Oakland
Planning Dept.


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REPRODUCING
ARCHITECTURAL
DETAIL









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SHOE MLOLDIN.

Source: Rehab Right CORNICE
City of Oakland
Planning Dept.


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BUILDING CODES, PERMITS, AND HISTORIC DISTRICT GUIDELINES


BUILDING CODES














HISTORIC DISTRICT
GUIDELINES













PERMITS


If a homeowner is going to involve himself in residential pre-
servation construction he should familiarize himself with
all local building codes and historic district guidelines.
Building codes for residential construction are usually ad-
ministered at city and county governmental levels for their
respective areas of control. Codes have been developed to
ensure the proper quality of materials and their methods of
installation. Inspections are required by municipal building
officials to ensure that codes have been followed and that
the homeowner has received the quality of construction intended.


Historic district guidelines or design criteria are necessary,
to preserve the significant character of a specific neighbor-
hood. Hopefully the guidelines have addressed the most impor-
tant issues and do not severely limit the homeowner's personal
preservation effort. If such guidelines do exist, the homeowner
should investigate these early in his planning process and
determine just how he intends to deal with them. Generally,
there will be an architectural review board for the district
or the city and all work done on a house will have to be approved
by the board.

Building permits are required for most improvements of property,
within most cities and counties. In most locales, the process








for submitting a building permit is the same for preservation
work as for new construction. The degree of alteration or addi-
tion to the existing building fabric, will usually determine
the type and quality of plans that must be submitted to a build-
ing official. Most building departments require that only an
owner occupant or licensed contractor may apply for a building
permit, and engage in the work. It must be acknowledged that
building permit procedures are necessary to protect a community
from unfavorable development and to provide a framework for
working within the laws and restrictions of a municipality.

Official documentation of intentions protects the owner from a
fraudulent contractor, to a degree. Just as in new construction,
large preservation projects would require that a certificate
of occupancy be issued at the completion of the project. The
certificate of occupancy is necessary to make the improvement
legal and protect the owner from future penalties. To make sure
that projects are completed and certificates of occupancies issued
most permits have time periods, within which construction must
start, progress made, and finally completed. These are gener-
ous timetables and necessary to avoid unsightly, uncompleted
projects. When the work is complete, all of the paperwork will
go on permanent public files as a record of the building
improvement.








These municipal regulations should not be interpreted as restric-
tive controls, but rather as attempts at preserving the safety
of an individual homeowner with respect to the building codes,
and preserving the quality:of a neighborhood through design
criteria and district guidelines.






ARCHIVAL INVESTIGATION


Archival research on a historical building could be the most
important part of a preservation effort. It may take a great
deal of work to find'all of the necessary information and there
may be many gaps in the final analysis of the building. There
are two main reasons why an archival investigation may be neces-
sary. In order to file the Florida Master Site File application
the building's historical background would have to be thoroughly
researched. Information gathered for this purpose would deter-
mine the level of potential designation. Accurate reconstruc-
tion, restoration, or rehabilitation could demand more research
than necessary for the Florida Master Site File designation.
To some degree these two objectives may be reached using similar
methods. However, many times manual inspection and selective
exposure of building elements may be the only way that specific
evidence about construction can be revealed.


Archival investigation is very time consuming and positive
results may be hard to come by. There are several. guidelines
that will aid the researcher in his investigation. First,
explore the resources of least resistance. Local historical
societies or preservation organizations may have already com-
pleted research on a residential area. If they cannot provide
specific information, they would most likely be able to direct
a person to his most productive sources. Libraries, generally








have local historical information in the form of books, news-
papers, and maps. Often books have been written on a city or
region by a local resident. Most cities had newspapers by the
early twentieth century. Some libraries have copies of papers
dating back to the 1880s. Sanborn insurance maps were originated
in the 1880s and are available in certain libraries around the
state. These maps were made every few years of certain cities
in Florida. They locate most buildings and provide approximate
dates of construction. Many cities were only mapped for a few
years, while other larger cities were mapped from the start of
the process until the 1930s when the mapping was stopped.
U.S. Geological Survey maps cover most areas right up to the
present time, and these also show building locations.

It will be very important to keep detailed bibliographies and
records of where information was obtained. This will be valuable
in the event of questions or conflicts about a restoration detail.
Original sources would be considered the most reliable and
preferred over second hand accounts. Not only will bibliographies
be important with respect to each project, but local preservation
organizations could benifite from the sources and research.
Throughout all phases of investigation the researcher should
look for indications of additional information sources parti-
cular to a specific structure, that other wise would not be








considered for investigation. Information on a deed or title
might lead to a newspaper article with a description or photo-
graph of a building or street. Special events or holiday cele-
brations have potential for providing detailed information
through photographs and extensive newspaper reporting.


PUBLIC RECORDS


Public records are documents that are available for public
review at any time. The local city hall or county court house
would have these records. In the case of residential property,
tax roles, deeds, and titles are some of the types of documents.
Building permit applications, liens, and easements are also
matters of public record. This type of information will always
be valuable to any researcher. A homeowner should familiarize
himself with the procedures of reviewing these documents and
possibly seek advice as to how this information could provide
leads and relationships to other sources.

A great deal of information might just seem insignificant and
unrelated to obvious direction of research. Small details could
be found that support previously unsupported general data. Tax
increases might indicate additions or improvements to a house,
that otherwise would have been overlooked. Census records can
provide information on past owners. Personal interviews with













PROPERTY ABSTRACT


older residents should be carefully evaluated as primary infor-
mation sources, but they can give leads to documentable material
on specific buildings.


The property abstract is a record of all deeds, mortgages, wills,
probate records, litigation proceedings, and tax sales. Property
owners, transaction dates, and property boundaries are some of
the things included in an abstract. An abstract is necessary
to recieve title insurance, for a piece of property, and it is
usually prepared by a professional. There could not be a more
thorough investigation of a piece of property than by this
method. While the abstract may be the most complete analysis,
of the property, the original documents should be further
analyzed for material that would describe a building and its
contents.






RECOGNITION PROGRAMS


NATIONAL LANDMARK
PROGRAM













NATIONAL REGISTER
OF HISTORIC PLACES


This program recognizes districts, sites, buildings, structures,
and objects. The landmarks must be significant in terms of
American history, archaeology, and culture at a national level.
Landmarks must retain that significance in order to remain a
landmark. Projects generated on the basis of a landmark desig-
nation are eligible for federal support that can provide up to
fifty percent of the preservation costs. There are many other
financial and prestigious advantages to being designated as a
National Historic Landmark, that make this designation very
valuable.


Historic resources listed on the National Register must follow
the same criteria as landmarks except that they need not be
nationally significant. People in Florida wishing to have a
resource listed on the National Register must complete the
Florida Master Site File form and submit it to the Division
of Achives, History, and Records Management.(D.A.H.R.M.).
D.A.H.R.M. will edit the submitted material and complete the
National Register of Historic Places application and submit it
to Washington, D.C., providing that the resource passes a
review by the state review board. Register resources carry
no restrictions with regard to use or alterations,,as do land-
marks, but like landmark resources,they are protected when
federal funds would be used to the detriment of the resource.








FLORIDA MASTER
SITE FILE


This program is part of the state administered comprehensive
preservation program. As a continuing program it fulfills the
state's obligation to conduct a survey of historic resources in
Florida. A'survey is required in order for the state to be
eligible for federal preservation funds. Any historical
resource can be submitted for consideration, as this is only
a survey unless further pursued. In order to be considered for
nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, all
historic resources must apply through the Florida Master Site
File program, as described in the National Register summery.





STAIE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Division of Archives. History
and Records Management
DS-HSP-3A Rev. 11-78

Site No.

Qi+e Nlm mn


FLORIDA MAST
SITE FILE


1009= =


ER
FDAHRM 802= =


County 808= =

830= =


Other Nam

Other Nos.

Other Mast

NR Classifi

Address of

Instructions


e(s) for Site 930= =

for Site 906= =

er Site File Nos. for Site 899= =

cation Category 916= =

Site 905= =


3 for locating site


813= =

Vicinity of
Location: 868 =
subdivision name block no. lot no.
Owner of Site:
Name
Address 902= =
Occupant, Tenant, or Manager:
Name
Address 904= =

Reporter (or local contact):
Name
Address 816 =
Recorder:
Name
Address 818= =

Survey Date 820= = Type Ownership 848= =

Name of Project (under which site was recorded)
980= =
Classification of Project: Check One
F1 Federal 982= = n State 982= = L Local 982== L County 982= =
Inventory Status 914= =

Previous Survey(s), Excavation(s) or Collection(s): (enter activity/title of project or survey/nameldatelrepository)



839= =
Recording Station 804= =
Date of Visit to Site 828= = Recording Date 832= =

Photographic Record Numbers
860 = =






Location of Site (Specific):
Map Reference (incl. scale & date)


809= =


Township Range Section %1/ Sec. 14 /4 Sec. 1/4 /4 Sec.

'* I 812= =


LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE COORDINATES DEFINING A POLYGON LOCATING THE PROPERTY
LATITUDE LONGITUDE
Point Degrees Minutes Seconds Degrees Minutes Seconds






OR
LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE COORDINATES DEFINING THE CENTER OF A PROPERTY OF
LESS THAN TEN ACRES

800= =
Zone Easting Northing
UTM Perimeter:




890 =


UTM Coordinates: 891= = 892= 893= -
zone eating nothing




Condition of Site: Integrity of Site:
Check One Check One or More
] Excellent 863= = Deteriorated 863= = l Altered 858 = = Restored( )(Date: )( )858= =
l Good 863= = D Ruins 863== = Unaltered 858== = Moved( )(Date: )( )858 =
L Fair 863= = Unexposed 863= = L Destroyed 858= = Original Site 858==
l Redeposited863==



Condition of Site (Remarks): ( )(

)( )863=


Threats to Site:
Check One or More
0 Zoning( )( )( )878 = = Transportation( )() ) 878 =
11 Development( )( )( )878== 1 Fill(( ))( )878==
O Deterioration( )( )( )878== = Dredge( )( )( )878==
L Borrowing ( )( )878= =
D Other(See Remarks Below): 878= =
Threats to Site (Remarks):


879= =








STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STA
Division of Archives, His
and Records Manageme
DS-HSP-3B


Site No.


TE
tory
ent


Site Name


Rev. 11-78


HISTORIC SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT


Present Use (Check one or more as appropriate)
L] Agricultural 850== = Government 850= = Park 850= l Transportation 850= =
SCommercial 850= = l Industrial 850= = 0 Private Residence 850= = Other (specify):
D Educational 850= = Military 850= = El Religious 850= = O 850= =
SEntertainment 850= = Museum 850= = l Scientific 850= = 0l 850= =



Original Use (check one or more as appropriate)
D Agricultural 838= = Government 838== l= Park 838== = Transportation 838 =
l Commercial 838= = O Industrial 838= = D Private Residence 838= = Other (specify):
D Educational 838= = Military 838= = Religious 838= = 838= =
D Entertainment 838== = Museum 838= = 0 Scientific 838= = 838 =


Cultural Classification: Specific Dates: Beginning 844 =

Culture/Phase 840 =


Period (check one or more as appropriate)
l Pre-Columbian 845= = 16thCentury 845= = l 18thCentury 845= = l 20thCentury 845= =
l 15thCentury 845 = DO 17thCentury 845= = L 19thCentury 845= =

Areas of Significance (check one or more as appropriate)
F Aboriginal 910== Community Planning 910== = Landscape _910== Sculpture 9_10-==
l Archaeology 910== = Conservation 910= Architecture 910= = Social/Humanitarian 910= =
Prehistoric 910== Economics 910= = Law 910= = Theater 910=
SArchaeology Historic 910== l= Education 910 = = Literature 910== F Transportation 9 10 -
SAgriculture 910== D Engineering 910= = Military_ 910= Other (specify):
SArchitecture 910== O Exploration & 910== L Music 910= = Fl 910= =
SArt 910== Settlement 910= = Philosophy 910== 910 =
Commerce 910== l Industry 910= = Politics/Govt. 910== = 910= =
D Communications 910== = Invention 910 = = Religion 910== __ 9_910 =
L] Science 910== O 910==


Remarks & Recommendations:







835= =


Accessible:


D yes: restricted


l yes: unrestricted


Status: [F occupied


E no


D work in progress


L] unoccupied









Statement of Significance (use continuation sheet if necessary)


911= =










STATE OF FLORIDA Site No.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Division of Archives, History Site Name
and Records Management
DS-HSP-3G Rev. 11-78

ARCHITECTURAL SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT
ARCHITECT 872= =

BUILDER 874= =

STYLE 964= =

PLAN TYPE 966= =

EXTERIOR FABRICS) 854= =

STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS) 856= =

FEATURE OF STRUCTURE (942):

PORCHES, VERANDAS, GALLERIES AND BALCONIES:

942= =

FOUNDATION: 942= =

ROOF TYPE: 942= =

SECONDARY ROOF STRUCTURESS: 942= =

CHIMNEY LOCATION: 942= =

WINDOW TYPE: 942= =

MATERIALS (882):

CHIMNEY: 882= =

ROOF SURFACING: 882= =

ORNAMENT EXTERIOR: 882 = =

QUANTITATIVE DATA (950-960):

NO. OF STORIES 950= =

NO. OF CHIMNEYS 952= =

NO. OF DORMERS 954= =








OTHER NOTABLE FEATURES OF BUILDING (FREE TEXT)

MAIN ENTRANCE:


865= =

WINDOW PLACEMENT: 865= =

WINDOW SURROUNDS AND DECORATION:



865= =

EXTERIOR ORNAMENT AND COLOR:



865= =


INTERIOR COMMENTS:







865= =


OTHER (SPECIFY):

865= =


MAJOR ALTERATIONS (FREE TEXT):


857= =


OUTBUILDINGS (FEATURES OF SITE):



876= =


864= =


SURROUNDINGS (CLASSIFICATION)

RELATIONSHIP TO SURROUNDINGS (FREE TEXT):


859= =






STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Division of Archives. History
and Records Management
DS-HSP-3BB Rev. 11-78


Site No.

Site Name


HISTORIC SITE DATA SUPPLEMENT
Page 2
Present & Original Physical Appearance (use continuation sheet if necessary) (935= =):






Verbal Boundary Description




















Site Size (Approx. Acreage of Property)-


833= =


Major Bibliographic References


920= =






BIBLIOGRAPHY


Blumenson, John J.-G. Identifying American Architecture: A
Pictorial Guide to Styles and Terms, 1600-1945.
Nashvilles American Association for State and
Local History, 1977.

Chambers,J.Henry.AIA. Cyclical Maintenance for Historic
Buildings. Washington,D.C.:Office of Archeology
and Historic Preservation: National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior,1976.

A Guide to Completing The Florida Master Site File Forms.
Florida Department of State: Division of Archives,
History, and Records Management: Bureau of Historic
.Sites and Properties,

Guidelines for Rehabilitating Old Buildings: Principles to con-
sider when planning rehabilitation and new construc-
tion projects in older neighborhoods. Washington,
D.C.: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment: U.S. Department of the Interior,1977.
Historic Resources Survey Manual. Albany: Division For Historic
Preservation: Office of Parks and Recreation,1974.
Our Past...Our Future: Florida's Comprehensive Historic Preser-
vation Plan. Tallahassees Division of Archives,
History- and Records Management; Florida Depart-
ment of State, 1973.

Pitts, Carolyn: Fish,Michael:McCauley,Hugh J.AIA:Vaux,Trina.
The Cape May Handbook. Philadelphia; Atlantic
Richfield Foundation,1977.






BIBLIOGRAPHY continued


Preservation and Building Codes: Papers from the Preservation
and Building Codes Conference, sponsored by the
National Trust for Historic Preservation. Wash-
ington,D.C.:Preservation Press, National Trust
for Historic Preservation,1974.

Preservation Guide-Book For the Old Section Of the City of
Key West. Key West: Old Island Restoration
Commission, 1975.

Rehab Right: How To Rehabilitate Your Oakland House Without
Sacrificing Architectural Assets. City of Oakland
Planning Department. Oakland:1978.


The Secretary


of the Interior's Standards For Rehabilitation
and Guideliines for Rehabilitating Historic
Buildings. Washington,D.C.s Office of Archeology
and Historic Preservation: Heritage Conservation
and Recreation Service: U.S. Department of the
Interior,1978.






GUIDE TO ARCHITECTURAL STYLES OF FLORIDA


GREEK REVIVAL 'i .: '















Asa May House, Capps



1820's to 1860's
Popular style for plantation houses during the
Antebellum period. Located mostly in North Florida,
these structures are distinguished by their columns
and pediment. They were usually constructed of wood
or brick.








Source: Identifying American Architecture
Blumenson, John J-G.


The Grove, Tallahassee









SPANISH PERIOD
ARCHITECTURE


The Spanish occupied the state in
two periods, the First Spanish
Period, 1513 to 1763, and the Second
Spanish Period, 1783 to 1821. The
houses are noted for their simple
design with gable roofs, narrow
eaves, small windows and side en-
trance. They are also noted for
their structure of stucco covered
coquina and of wood. The site plans
are notable in that the houses are
placed directly on the street, with
the entrance through a side gate
into a courtyard.







Source: The Houses of St. Augustine
Manucy, Albert


















RAISED CREOLE
COTTAGE


A typical small wood house of West
Florida. They came to the state from
Louisiana with the French. The house
is noted for its simple design, raised
off the ground with a full width front
porch, with the gable always running
laterally.
















SHOTGUN HOUSE


A simple West Florida house of the late
19th and early 20th century which even--
tually spread into the Central Florida
region. Noted for its gable ends to the
front and rear, these houses usually had
a porch at the entrance. The name "shot-
gun" comes from the fact that the plan
has a hall running the full length of
one side, opening to.the front and rear,
and if a man were to open both doors he
could fire a shot into the front that
would come out the back without hitting
anything between.















THE DOG-RUN HOUSE

Another simple West and North
Florida design, noted for its
open "run" between two enclosed
rooms, all covered by a single
roof. The houses were originally
log cabins in the 1850's and
1860's but evolved into wood

frame later.









GOTHIC REVIVAL


A style popular in the mid 19th century for
everything from cottages to mansions to edu-
cational buildings. Characteristics are steep
gable roofs, wall dormers, hood molds over
windows, and a curvilinear trim along the eaves
and gable edges. In Florida, they were usually
constructed of wood.







Source: Identifying American Architecture
Blumenson, John J-G.








QUEEN ANNE STYLE


A victorian style of the late 19th century.
The asymmetrical composition consists of a
variety of forms, textures, materials, and
colors. Architectural parts include towers,
turrets, tall chimneys, projecting pavilions,
porches, bays, and encircling verandahs.
The textured wooden wall surfaces occasion-
ally are complemented by colored glass panes
in the windows.


Source: Identifying American Architecture
Blumenson, John J-G.









THE BUNGALOW
STYLE

A residential style which spread throughout
the country in the early 1900's, the bungalow
is a one story house with gently pitched
broad gables. A lower gable usually covers
an open or screened porch and a larger gable
covers the main portion of the house. Rafters,
ridge beams and purlins often extend beyond
the wall and roof. Chimneys are of rubble,
or rough faced brick. Porch piers are usual
ly oversized with wood column supporting
the roof structure. The porch roof structure
is often exposed and painted white. Windows
can be either sash or casement.











Source: Identifying American Architecture
Blumenson, John J-G.


_ r--_ -'----y~p-~s~%8it;Eg~L~TaCSILaeZ







SPANISH
MEDITERRANEAN

A style of the wealthy, built as mansions
along the resort areas of Florida from
1915 to 1940. These structures rode the
land boom of the 1920's and became a fa-
miliar style in the state. The buildings
are usually finished with stucco and have
red tile roofs. A.-unique feature of the style is
the ornate low relief carvings highlighting
arches, columns, window surrounds, cornices
and pediments. Windows can be either
straight or arched, with or without iron
grillwork. The facades are often enriched
with curvilinear and decorated parapets,
cornice window heads, and a symbolic bell
tower.*











Source: Identifying American Architecture
Blumenson, John J-G.

















ART DECO

Found almost exclusively in the
Miami area, these buildings re-
present a style of the 1930's and
1940's which spread into this area
with the hotel boom. The style is
noted for its smooth surfaces,
curved corners, horizontal band
windows, eyebrows, emphasis on
the corner, use of industrial
quality parts, and use of white
and pastel colors.









CONCH COTTAGE


Located almost exclusively in Key West as a one and one half

story frame dwelling. They have a lateral running gable roof

and a full width porch on the front.



k < -I (:
'' t a ,Ii44

^^^^~~ '^*^ -^'J^'rt&t'i"


18~
--
~CI'~
-'--
--- ~ ~
..
--~-~ ~I
-e r
c
--







BAHAMA COTTAGE


A two story frame house found mainly in Key West.


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