Memoria

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Memoria
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 27-33 cm.
Language:
Spanish
Creator:
Las Villas (Cuba : Province)
Publisher:
Gobierno Civil de Santa Clara.
Place of Publication:
Villa Clara
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Las Villas (Cuba : Province)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
At head of title: -1901: Gobierno Civil de Santa Clara; 1902- : Gobierno Provincial de Santa Clara.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 244443462
lccn - 52047826
ocn244443462
Classification:
lcc - JS6.C9 L3
System ID:
AA00001632:00001

Full Text



AE 687
THE ROUNDHOUSE
R.J. CANGELOSI





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TABLE OF CONTENTS



A. PERSPECTIVE
B. SITE ANALYSIS
1. GRAPHIC HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF SITE
2. SITE'S BOUNDARY
3. SITE LOCATION AND ACCESSIBILITY
4. RELATIONSHIP TO SURROUNDING AREA
5. ZONING AND CODES
C. BUILDING ANALYSIS
1. GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF BUILDINGS
2. HISTORICAL EVOLUTION AND VERBAL DESCRIPTION
3. GENERAL CONDITION
4. CONDITIONS THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHS
D. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
1. MARKETING PROFILE
2. FINANCE
E. PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM A


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Perspective
THE CENTRAL RAILROAD AND CANAL CO. WAS THE FIRST RAILROAD
IN GEORGIA AND THE FIRST RAILROAD TO RECEIVE A UNITED STATES
CHARTER. THIS CHARTER, APPROVED ON DECEMBER 20, 1833 BY GOV.
LUMPKIN, WAS GRANTED TO CONSTRUCT A RAILROAD OR CANAL FROM
SAVANNAH TO MACON. HAVING DECIDED THAT A RAILROAD WAS THE
MOST FEASIBLE, THE FIRST RAIL WAS LAID IN DECEMBER OF 1835
AND THE INITIAL RUN WAS ON OCTOBER 13, 1834.

THE ELABORATE COMPLEX OF THE CENTRAL OF GEORGIA WAS LOCATED
AT THE SAVANNAH TERMINAL OF THE RUN ON A 35 ACRE SITE KNOWN
AS SPRING HILL, IN OGLETHORPE WARD. THIS COMPLEX HAS SURVIVED
AS THE OLDEST AND GRANDEST SHOP AND DEPOT COMPLEX IN THE
UNITED STATES. ITS DESIGNER, WILLIAM M. WADLEY, CONCEIVED
A MAST PLAN TO ACCOMMODATE FACILITIES FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF
PASSENGERS AND GOODS AND THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE
OF THE CARS AND ENGINES, INTO ONE DEPOT. COSTING ONE THIRD
OF A MILLION DOLLARS, THE TWO PART DEPOT WAS SUBSTANTIALLY
COMPLETED BY 1855.

THE TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT COVERED A 791,000 SQ. FT.
SITE EXTENDING FROM WEST BOUNDARY TO BROAD STREETS AND FROM
NEW TO RAILROAD STREETS. CONTAINED WITH IN THIS SQUARE WAS
THE PASSENGER DEPOT, COMPLETED IN THE 1860'S AND TWO WARE
HOUSES, THE 'UP' AND 'DOWN' FREIGHT HOUSES.

THE MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT CONTAINED ALL OF THE NECESSARY
FACILITIES FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF LOCOMOTIVES,
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER CARS. LOCATED IN THIS DEPARTMENT
WAS THE ROUNDHOUSE, MACHINE SHOP, BLACKSMITH SHOP, BOILER
ROOM, COPPERSMITH SHOP, CARPENTRY SHOP AND THE STACK FOR
THE FORGES AND BOILER.

SINCE THE INITIAL CONSTRUCTION, THE YARD HAS EXPANDED
WITH THE GROWTH OF THE RAILROAD. THE SITE AND BUILDINGS HAVE
ADOPTED TO THE CHANGING NEEDS AND EXPANSIONS. PERHAPS NO
WHERE ELSE IN THE COUNTRY IS THE EVOLUTION OF RAILROAD ARCHI-
TECHTURE MORE EVIDENT THAN IN THIS COMPLEX. BECAUSE OF THIS
IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NOT ONLY SAVANNAH ARCHI-
TECHTURE BUT THE ENTIRE COUNTRY, THE COMPLEX SHOULD BE CONSERVED
INTACT AS MUCH AS FEASIBLE. THIS PROJECT IS INTENDED TO DEVISE


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AN ECONOMICALLY FEASIBLE WAY TO CONSERVE THE MOTIVE DIVISION
PORTION OF THE COMPLEX TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE PROPOSED 42-
ACRE SAVANNAH BICENTENNIAL PARK. THE PROPOSED PARK IS A LARGE
RECREATIONAL AND HISTORIC COMMORATIVE PROJECT ON THE SITE
OF THE REVOLUTIONARY SIEZE OF SAVANNAH. PLANNED FEATURES
INCLUDE: A RECONSTRUCTED REDOUBT, A BATTLE MEMORIAL, RE-
CREATIONAL FACILITIES, A COMMEMORATIVE PLAZA AND MONUMENT, CHILD
CARE FACILITIES, BOTANICAL GARDENS AND AVIARY, A RECREATED
FROG TOWN STREET, A VISITORS CENTER, A RAILROAD MUSEUM AND A
HOTEL/OFFICE COMPLEX.

WORKING WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE PARK CONCEPT, THE
PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO SHOW A FEASIBLE SOLUTION TO PRESERVING
AS MUCH OF THE TOTAL FABRIC OF THE COMPLEX AS POSSIBLE AND NOT
DEMOLISH THE OLDER BUILDINGS OF THE COMPLEX AS PROPOSED.
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SITE GOES FAR BEYOND THE INDIVIDUAL
BUILDINGS TO THE COLLECTIVE WHOLE. LIKE THE 1,100 STRUCTURES
THAT COMPRISE THE HISTORICAL DISTRICT, IT IS THE COLLECTIVE
DISTRICT RATHER THAN THE SEPARATE STRUCTURES THAT HAS THE MOST
SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON OUR CULTURAL HERITAGE. IN LIGHT OF THIS
PERSPECTIVE, IDEALLY THE ENTIRE COMPLEX SHOULD BE PRESERVED.
THE FOLLOWING IS AN ANALYSIS AND PROPOSAL FOR THE ADAPTIVE
USE OF THE MOTIVE POWER DIVISION OF THE COMPLEX. THE FOLLOWING
OUTLINE WAS USED:

A. PERSPECTIVE
B. SITE ANALYSIS
1. GRAPHIC HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF SITE
2. SITE'S BOUNDARY
3. SITE LOCATION AND ACCESSIBILITY
4. RELATIONSHIP TO SURROUNDING AREA
5. ZONING AND CODES
C. BUILDING ANALYSIS
1. GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF BUILDINGS
2. HISTORICAL EVOLUTION AND VERBAL DESCRIPTION
3. GENERAL CONDITION
4. CONDITIONS THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHS
D. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
1. MARKETING PROFILE
2. FINANCE
E. PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM


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READING RAILROAD

Rent $25.
If 2 R.R.'s are owned 50.
If 3 100.
If 4 200.


Mortgage Value
Site
Analysis


$100.










Graphic Historical

Evolution of the Site


THE FOLLOWING ILLUSTRATIONS ARE A GRAPHIC ESSAY ON THE
SITES EVOLUTION

A. MAP OF SAVANNAH, 1770, BY THOMAS SHRUDER
B. PLAN OF FRENCH AND AMERICAN SIEGE OF SAVANNAH 1779
C. PLAN OF THE CITY AND HARBOR OF SAVANNAH, 1818 BY
I. STOUF
D. THIS PLAN OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAH 1820, JOHN MCKINNON
E. MAP OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAH WITH THE EXTENDED LIMITS,
1840 BY C. STEPHANS
F. TRACING OF THE PROPOSED RAILROAD DEPOT AT SAVANNAH, 1852
G. MAP OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAH, 1856 BY JOHN COOPER.
H. COLTON'S THE CITY OF SAVANNAH, 1859 BY J.H. COLTON
I. MAP OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAH AND VICINITY 1888 BY
P. SUGDAN
J. SANDBORN MAP.
K. KOCH VIEW OF SAVANNAH, 1891








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JANUARY 3.(FRO AN OLD PRINT.)


FIR JANUARY IS, 1S31. (FROM AN OLD PRINT.)


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Building
Analysis









Site Boundries

PRESENTLY ONLY A SMALL PORTION OF THE ENTIRE PARK SITE
IS OWNED BY THE CITY. HOWEVER, THE AREA OF CONCERN FOR THIS
PROJECT IS BOUNDED ON THE SOUTH BY JONES STREET, FROM PURSE
ST TO THE WESTERN ELEVATION OF THE CARPENTRY SHOP, ON THE WEST
BY THE CARPENDRY SHOP AND A LINE PROJECTED FROM THAT BUILDING
TO THE SITE OF THE OIL HOUSE, ON THE NORTH BY A LINE EXTENDING
FROM THE SOUTHERN ELEVATION OF THE OIL HOUSE TO PURSE STREET
AND ON THE EAST BY PURSE ST. AS SHOWN IN THE ACCOMPANYING MAP.









Site Location and

Accessibility

'WENT MYSELF TO VIEW THE SAVANNAH RIVER. I FIXED UPON
A HEALTHY SITUATION ON ABOUT TEN MILES FROM THE SEA. THE
RIVER HERE FORMS A HALF-MOON, ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE OF WHICH THE
BANKS ARE ABOUT FORTY FOOT HIGH, AND ON THE TOP FLAT, WHICH
THEY CALL A BLUFF. THE PLAIN HIGH GROUND EXTENDS INTO THE
COUNTRY FIVE OR SIX MILES AND ALONG THE RIVER-SIDE ABOUT A
MILE. SHIPS THAT DRAW TWELVE FOOT OF WATER CAN RIDE WITHIN
TEN YARDS OF THE BANK.'

WHEN JAMES OGLETHORPE LAID OUT SAVANNAH, HE ARRIVED ON
THE SITE IN 1733 BY BOAT AS DID MANY OF THE EARLY SETTLERS.
TODAY, HOWEVER, ACCESS TO SAVANNAH CAN BE OBTAINED BY SEA, AIR,
RAIL AND HIGHWAY, THE LATTER BEING THE MOST PREDOMINATE MODE.
AT THE INTERSECTION OF TWO OF THESE KEY ENTRY POINTS, INTERSTATE
16 AND 95 LIES THE SITE OF THE COMPLEX. THE ENTIRE PROPOSED
BICENTENIAL PARK IS BOUNDED ON THE SOUTH BY THE 1-16 ENTRY RAMP
INTO SAVANNAH, AND ON THE WEST BY ROUTE 17A, A MAJOR NORTH-SOUTH
ROUTE ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST AND ON THE NORTH BY THE
HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT LOUISVILLE ROAD. THE SITE'S LOCATION
AND ACCESS ARE SITUATED IN AN IDEAL LOCATION FOR ORIENTATION
TO THE CITY AND THE HISTORICAL DISTRICT, IMMEDIATELY TO THE
EAST.

CENTRAL OF CEORCIA RAILWAY SYSTEM.

Distance Tables,


Savannah ..............
Clifton ......................
Pooler ...... .................
Bloomingdale.............
M eldriil ......... .....
Eden.........................
M3arlow ......................
Pineora ....... ..........
Guvton.....................
Brewer......................
Egypt ... .... ...........
Oliver....... ..... ........
lialcyon'dale............
Cameron ...................
Dover ....................
Ogechc ee................
flockl Ford ........
Scarboro ....................
Parramore Hill...........
iliel ..................
Cushiingville................
!Zoger. .......................


0 Herndon.................... 90 Bolingbroke................ 207
4 Midville .............. 96 Smarr's ................... 213
9 Gertrude................... 100 Forsyth ................... 217
12 WNadly ........ ....... 107 Colliers.................... 223
17 Bartow.......... ........111 Goggins................... 229
19 Johnson ................... 116 arnesville ....... 234
26 Davisboro ............. 1 ier..... 12 Milner ................ 240
27 Sun Hill... ................. 130 Orchard ll. ............... 245
30 Ten ille................. 135 Gri ...............13 i ..... 251
35 Oconce...................... 146 Vineyard............. ..... 254
41 Beech Hill................ 150 Pomona............. 256
46 Toonsboru.................. 155 Sunnyside................... 258
50 Mlntyre............ 161 hlampton.................. 262
55 (Gordol .................. 170 Lovejoy................... 267
57 Lewiston.............. 174 Jonesboro................. 274
62 Griswold............ .... 181 Morrow ......... ........ 278
66 3. tv A. Junction........ 186 Forest...... ............. 281
71 M a t....l ..... ............ 191 Ihapeville .................. 2
74 Macon Junction..... .. 1,2 East Point................ 288
79 Sumnmerfield............. 199 McPherson............... 291
83 Mits ..... .............. 203 Atlanta................. 294
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SAVANNAH
RIVER


TALMADGE BRIDGE
ALT. RT. 17


BAY STREET


LOUISVILLE ROAD


PA


LOOP 26


Canal


HISTORIC
DISTRICT


1-16 /
Will become major entry
to Savannah when 1-95
is completed.


Feet

0 2000
Savannah
Context










Relationship to

Surrounding Area

PRESENTLY, THE COMPLEX HAS LITTLE, IF ANY SIGNIFICANT
RELATIONSHIP TO A FIXED ARCHITECTURAL ENVIRONMENT. SITUATED
ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF A TRACT OF LAND BOUNDED BY JONES, WEST
BOUNDARY, RAILROAD AND WEST BROAD STREETS, THE COMPLEX IS
THE MOST IMPORTANT BUILDING GROUP IN THE SITE. SOUTH OF THE
COMPLEX IS A LARGE VACANT TRACT OF LAND, FORMERLY A NEIGHBOR-
HOOD. EAST OF THE COMPLEX, ALONG WEST BROAD STREET IS A VARIETY
OF COMMERCIAL AND OTHER MIXED USES. WHILE TO THE WEST IS A
VARIETY OF INDUSTRIAL USES. IMMEDIATELY TO THE NORTH, IS THE
SAVANNAH VISITORS CENTER IN THE OLD RAILROAD PASSENGER DEPOT.
A LARGE NUMBER OF HOTEL/MOTEL FACILITIES ARE LOCATED A FEW
BLOCKS NORTH OF THE COMPLEX ALONG OGLETHORPE AVENUE. SAVANNAH'S
NEW CIVIC CENTER IS LOCATED JUST A FEW BLOCKS EAST OF THE
COMPLEX.

THE MAJORITY OF THE SITE IS VISIBLE FROM THE 1-16 RAMP
INTO SAVANNAH. THIS VIEW COULD BE PARTICULARLY IMPORTANT TO
VISITORS ENTERING THE CITY FOR THE FIRST TIME. IN PARTICULAR
THE SMOKESTACK IS HIGHLY VISIBLE, DOMINATING THE SKYLINE AND
SERVES AS A LANDMARK FOR THE CITY.


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Historical Evolution
and Description



MOTIVE POWER DIVISION


'WHEN IT IS REMEMBERED THAT ALL THE BUILDINGS DESCRIBED
ARE NEW, AND OF FINE ARCHITECTURE AND ARRANGEMENT,
-WELL LIGHTED, WELL VENTILATED, AND EVERY WELL
ARRANGED, THE ROOFS OF IRON, AND WHEN IT IS
CONSIDERED THAT THEY HAVE NOT BEEN PUT UP PIECEMEAL,
BUT THAT THEY FORM A COMPLETE SYMMETRICAL WHOLE, -
WE DOUBT CANDIDLY, IF ANY OTHER STATION CAN BE FOUND
IN THIS COUNTRY WHICH CAN EQUAL THIS.'


DAILY MORNING NEWS, 17 JULY 1855 1/2+3
(FROM COLBURN'S NEW YORK RAILROAD ADVOCATE)
















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MACHINE SHOP

'ONE OF THE FINEST REPAIR SHOP ROOMS IN THE UNITED STATES.'

'I COULD GET MORE ACCOMPLISHED IN THESE OLD SHOPS THAN WHERE
WE ARE NOW.'


IN 1852 THE WALLS OF THE ENGINE HOUSE AND ITS ADJACENT
BUILDINGS, PRESUMABLY THE MACHINE SHOP, WERE ERECTED AND WAITING
THE ARRIVAL OF AN IRON ROOF FROM THE FIRM OF A. WHITNEY AND
SON OF PHILADELPHIA. THE CORRUGATED IRON ROOF HAD TO BE
IMPORTED FROM EUROPE CAUSING A DELAY IN THE COMPLETION OF
THE WORK.

THOUGH THE MACHINE SHOP APPEARS ON THE 1853 VINCENT MAP
OF SAVANNAH IT WAS NOT COMPLETED AND IN OPERATION UNTIL LATE
1855 WHEN THEY MOVED IN THEIR LAST OF THE MACHINERY.

CONTEMPORARY REPORTERS DESCRIBE THE 1855 STRUCTURE AS
WELL-LIGHTED BY LARGE WINDOWS ON THREE SIDES AND BY MEANS OF
A LANTERN IN THE IRON ROOF. THEY DESCRIBE THE WORK BENCHES AS
THE 'BEST WE HAVE SEEN, HAVING A SOLID HARD PINE TOP OF 6 INCHES
THICKNESS FOR THEIR WHOLE WIDTH BEING CLOSED UP IN FRONT WITH
A SLOPING WOOD WORK SHEATHING, LIKE A GROCERY COUNTER. THIS
PREVENTS THE COLLECTION OF OLD SCRAP, DIRT, AND RUBBISH UNDER
THE BENCHES.'

THE WINDOWS BY WHICH THE MACHINE SHOP WAS LIGHTED WERE
DOUBLE HUNG, 12 OVER 12 LIGHTS, WITH STONE LINTELS AND SILLS,
PROBABLY MADE OF GRANITE. THE FOURTH WALL OF THE MACHINE SHOP
CORRESPONDED TO THE OUTSIDE WALL OF A FORMER ENGINE HOUSE.

THE SCARCITY OF SUPPLIES DURING THE CIVIL WAR PROBABLY
ACCOUNTED FOR THE DETERIORATED AND LEAKING CONDITION OF THE
ROOF IN 1866. HOWEVER IT WAS NOT UNTIL TEN YEARS LATER IN
CONNECTION WITH THE ADDITION OF A SECOND STORY THAT THIS CON-
DITION WAS REMEDIED. THIS SECOND STORY GAVE ADDITIONAL ROOM
FOR WORK, AND THE STORING OF PATTERNS AND FINER QUALITIES OF
LUMBER. THIS ADDITION WAS NOT COMPLETED UNTIL EARLY 1878 AND
IT DREW THE ATTENTION OF THE SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS IN JUNE, 1877.

THE MACHINE SHOP, OR ROUNDHOUSE, AS IT IS GENERALLY CALLED,
OF THE CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, IS UNDERGOING CONSIDERABLE
IMPROVEMENT IN THE ADDITION OF AN UPPER STORY AND THE


I C _I _


I I II II









CONSTRUCTION,OF A FINE VENTILATED ROOF. THE OLD IRON
ROOF WHICH COVERED THE BUILDING MANY YEARS RENDERED IT
VERY HOT, AND WE UNDERSTAND THAT DURING THE SUMMER
SEASON THE WORKMEN HAVE SUFFERED GREATLY FROM THE HEAT.
THE IMPROVEMENTS NOW APPROACHING COMPLETION WILL RENDER
THIS BUILDING ONE OF THE MOST PLEASANT AND COMFORTABLE
WORKING PLACES TO BE FOUND IN THE SOUTH. THE UPPER ROOM
WILL BE USED FOR PATTERN WORK AND OTHER LIGHT MECHANICAL
LABOR. THE LOWER ROOM WILL BE USED FOR THE SAME PURPOSE
AS NOW. THERE HAS BEEN NO INTERRUPTION TO THE WORK IN
THIS DEPARTMENT DURING THE PROGRESS OF THESE IMPROVEMENTS.
THE COST WE UNDERSTAND IS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF $15,000
WHICH, CONSIDERING THE VAST IMPROVEMENT AND ADVANTAGES
IN COMFORT TO THE MEN AND FACILITIES IN WORKING, IS
MONEY WELL-INVESTED. THE WORK HAS BEEN MAINLY DONE BY
TWO OF THE RAILROAD MEN UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MR. D.D.
ARDEN, THE MASTER MACHINIST.




SUMMARY DESCRIPTION

THE MACHINE SHOP IS 162' 7 1/2" LONG BY 61' 10"
WIDE. IT IS 51' -0" HIGH TO THE TOP OF THE GABLE OR
59' 7" TO THE TOP OF THE MONITOR. THOUGH THERE IS NO
DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE THAT MULLER OR SCHWAAB WERE THE DESIGNERS
OF THIS BUILDING, ITS STYLE BEARS A REALTIONSHIP TO THEIR 1872
CITY MARKET (DEMOLISHED 1954).

THE APPEARANCE OF THE MACHINE SHOP IN 1855 WAS PROBABLY
NOT UNLIKE THAT OF THE BLACKSMITH SHOP. THE 1871 VIEW OF
SAVANNAH SHOWS NO LANTERN IN THE MACHINE SHOP ROOF, THOUGH
ONE IS DESCRIBED IN THE 1855 ARTICLE, NOR DOES IT SHOW THE
MACHINE SHOP DIRECTLY INTERSECTING THE ROUNDHOUSE, THOUGH
THIS WAS THE SCHEME OF THE ORIGINAL PLAN. THIS IS ASSUMED
TO BE AN ERROR ON THE PART OF THE ARTIST AS THIS ARRANGEMENT
APPEARS ON NO OTHER PLAN.

FOURTEEN TIMBER TRUSSES, 12' 3" ON CENTER, SUPPORT THE
1878 ROOF. THE SECOND FLOOR IS HUNG FROM THESE TRUSSES BY
MEANS OF METAL RODS, 1 1/4" DIAMETER, 11-12" ON CENTER,
LEAVING AN UNENCUMBERED WORKSPACE BELOW. THIS SECOND FLOOR


I --_I


sl- I I ~r









WAS REACHED BY MEANS OF A WOODEN STAIR, LATER AUGMENTED BY
THE INTRODUCTION bF AN ELEVATOR.

THE WALLS OF THE MACHINE SHOP ARE MADE OF BRICK, 18" THICK
WITH A HEADER COURSE EVERY FIVE COURSES. THE MOST RECENT
ROOF COVERING WAS WOOD WITH A METAL COVERING MADE BY CONKLIN'S
DIXIE (30 POUNDS COATING-KEYSTONE).

AT THE TIME OF THIS WRITING, THE MACHINE SHOP HAS ALMOST
TOTALLY COLLAPSED WITH ONLY THREE OF THE TRUSSES REMAINING.
THESE ARE EXPECTED TO FALL AT ANY TIME. LARGE SECTIONS OF THE
BEARING WALLS HAVE BEEN PULLED AWAY DOWN TO THE LEVEL OF THE
SECOND FLOOR. THERE IS EVIDENCE THAT TRUCKS HAVE BEEN IN THE
YARD STEALING THE LOOSE BRICK.

BLACKSMITH SHOP

THE ONE STORY BLACKSMITH SHOP FORMS AN 'L' TO THE
MACHINE SHOP ON ITS WESTERN SIDE. COMPLETED CA. 1855 WITH
THE MACHINE SHOP, IT FOLLOWS THE SAME GENERAL FORM OF MASONRY
AND TIMBER CONSTRUCTION, GABLE ROOF WITH MONITOR, OF THE MACHINE
SHOP. NEW ROOFS WERE ADDED IN 1875 AND AGAIN IN 1882 AFTER
STORM DAMAGE, BUT BASICALLY THE BUILDING REMAINS UNCHANGED.

ACCORDING TO THE 1852 PLAN, 50' OF THE BLACKSMITH SHOP
FORMED A SEPARATE ROOM, WHICH DIVISION IS NO LONGER THERE
EXCEPT THAT THE FLOOR MATERIAL CHANGES TODAY AT ABOUT THAT
POINT. THIS SEPARATION HOWEVER, ALSO DOES NOT APPEAR ON THE
1853 VINCENT MAP.

THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE BLACKSMITH SHOP IS GENERALLY THE
SAME AS THE MACHINE SHOP, WITH TIMBER TRUSSES SET 13' -2 3/4"
ON CENTER, AND MONITOR. THE MONITOR IS IN DETERIORATED
CONDITION AND IS 3/4 COLLAPSED.


SUMMARY DESCRIPTION


160' 5 1/2" X 40' 8 3/4" X


1111 1 I I


I~-I-- II CI~


HIGH.









TENDER FRAME BUILDING

FORMING AN 'L' ON THE EASTERN SIDE OF THE MACHINE SHOP,
IN LINE WITH THE BLACKSMITH SHOP IS THE ORIGINAL TENDER FRAME
SHOP, STORE ROOM, AND OFFICE. THIS WAS COMPLETED CA. 1855
AT THE SAME TIME AS THE MACHINE SHOP AND BLACKSMITH SHOP.
IN 1899 A SECOND STORY WAS ADDED TO THIS BUILDING AND USED AS
A LABORATORY. THE TENDER FRAME ROOM LATER BECAME THE TOOL
HOUSE AND AIRBRAKE CONSTRUCTION ROOM. THIS BUILDING WAS NOT
HARMED IN THE COLLAPSE OF THE MACHINE SHOP.


SUMMARY DESCRIPTION

TWO STORY BRICK BUILDING, 76' 6 1/4" X 40' 9 3/4" X


--r I--


Wlll I II








ENGINE / BOILER ROOM / PATTERN ROOM


ALTHOUGH THIS BUILDING APPEARS ON THE 1852 PLAN IT DOES
NOT APPEAR ON TEH 1853 VINCENT MAP, SUGGESTING THAT THIS STRUC-
TURE WAS NOT COMPLETED UNTIL 1854. A ROMANESQUE REVIVAL STRUC-
TURE, WITH CRENELATED PARAPET AND ARCADED CORBEL TABLE, IT
MATCHES IN STYLE THE 1852 BRIDGE ACROSS THE OGEECHEE CANAL AND
RIVALS THE LUMBER SHED AND STACK IN ORNAMENTATION.

CONTEMPORARY REPORTS DESCRIBE THE ENGINE ROOM AS 'UNUSUALLY
FINE; IT IS VERY HIGH AND WELL-LIGHTED; THE FINISH OF THE
WALLS BEING HARD AND SMOOTH, AND THE GENERAL APPEARANCE BEING
MUCH SUPERIOR TO THAT OF SUCH ROOMS IN OTHER MACHINE SHOPS.'

THE 1852 PLAN SHOWS TWO SEPARATE ROOMS FOR ENGINE AND
BOILER. THE SIZE OF THE ENGINE ROOM WAS APPROXIMATELY
40' X 20' AND THAT OF THE BOILER ROOM 40' X 13'. THOUGH THE
SEPARATE NAMES ARE STENCILED ON THE NORTH FACADE OF THE
BUILDING SUGGESTING TWO ROOMS, THE PARTITION HAS BEEN REMOVED
WITH ONLY STEEL 'I' BEAMS SEPARATING A SINGEL SPACE.

THE ROOM THAT RUNS THE ENTIRE WIDTH OF THE BUILDING ON
THE SOUTH SIDE WAS ORIGINALLY USED AS A PATTERN ROOM, AND WAS
APPROXIMATELY 35' X 20'. THIS ROOM WAS MOST RECENTLY USED
AS THE POWER HOUSE OFFICE.

A WOOD FRAME SHED WAS ATTACHED TO THE NORTH WEST CORNER
OF THE BUILDING SOME TIME AFTER 1907 TO STORE THE WOOD
SHAVINGS WHICH WERE BLOWN TO IT FROM THE PLANING MILL.- THE
SHAVINGS WERE PASSED THROUGH A SMALL IRON DOOR IN THE WEST
WALL OF THE BOILER ROOM WHERE THEY WERE BURNED. THE SHED
DIRECTLY BEHIND THIS SHED HOUSED A PUMP WHICH RECIRCULATED
WATER TO THE BOILER.

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION

OVERALL DIMENSIONS ARE 60'-7" LONG X 35'-4" WIDE
X 27'-2" HIGH. THE PATTERN ROOM IS SITUATED OVER A 6'
BASEMENT. THE WINDOWS ON THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE ENGINE
ROOM ARE ARCHED, DOUBLE HUNG 20/24 LIGHTS WITH WOOD FRAMES
AND MULLIONS. THE WINDOWS OF THE POWERHOUSE WERE ORIGINALLY
GLAZED 6/6, BUT SOME HAVE BEEN REPLACED WITH 6/4 AND 4/4.









THEY ARE DOUBLE HUNG WITH STONE LINTELS AND SILLS AS IN THE
BLACKSMITH SHOP.

THE NORTH ELEVATION OF THE ENGINE/BOILER ROOM HAS BEEN
DESTROYED.

LUMBER STORAGE SHED

THIS ONE STORY, MASONRY AND TIMBER BUILDING WAS BUILT
AFTER THE CARPENTRY SHOP HAD BEEN COMPLETED SINCE THERE IS
A FINISHED CORNER OF THE CARPENTRY SHOP WITHIN THE WEST WALL
OF THE LUMBER STORAGE SHED. THE DATE OF CONSTRUCTURE FOR THIS
BUILDING THEREFORE IS PROBABLY CA. 1855 AND IT IS INCLUDED IN
COLNURN'S ARTICLE. FOR A SHED THE BRICK WORK IS QUITE ORNAMENTAL,
THOUGH NOT QUITE AS ELABORATE AS THAT OF THE ENGINE/BOILER HOUSE.
THE DETAILING ALONG THE CORNICE LINE IS SIMILAR TO THAT ON
THE UP FREIGHT WAREHOUSE.

THE FLOOR PLAN OF THE LUMBER STORAGE SHED IS ESSENTIALLY
ONE LARGE ROOM WHICH OPENS OUT THROUGH LARGE ARCHED WINDOWS
AND DOORS TO A COURTYARD WHERE THE DANIELS PLANING MACHINE WAS
LOCATED. THE ARCHED OPENINGS ARE GLAZED FROM THE SPRINGLINE
OF THE ARCH, WHILE ON THE NORTH ELEVATION THE FIVE DOUBLEHUNG
WINDOWS ARE GLAZED WITH 12/12 LIGHTS.

THE PRESENT FLOOR OF THE ROOM IS OF CONCRETE SINCE THE
ROOM WAS USED AS A POWER HOUSE/DYNAMO ROOM IN THE 20TH CENTURY.
THREE CONCRETE PLATFORMS FOR THE MACHINERY INSTALLED DURING THAT
TIME ARE STILL PRESENT.


r.-- I s -r


~__._ I IIIl














CARPENTRY SHOP

POSSIBLY THE FIRST SHOP TO BE COMPLETED IN THE NEW MOTIVE
POWER YARD WAS THE CARPENTRY SHOP. THE BUILDING (AS ORIGINALLY
CONCEIVED) FORMED NEARLY THREE SIDES OF A HOLLOW SQUARE, AND
COMPRISED FACILITIES FOR 'BUILDING, REPAIRING, AND PAINTING
CARS OF ALL KINDS.' A WOOD PLANAR WAS LOCATED ON THE EASTERN
SIDE OF THE CARPENTRY SHOP AND THEREFORE THIS SIDE OF THE
BUILDING WAS PROBABLY ALWAYS THE PLANING ROOM.

AT SOME TIME PRIOR TO 1891 A WOODEN LUMBER STORAGE SHED
WAS CONSTRUCTED ON THE SITE OF THE OPEN PLATFORM IN THE CENTER
OF THE SQUARE. A ROOM WAS ADDED TO THE SOUTHERN END OF THE
PLANING MILL NEXT TO THE LUMBER ROOM AND USED IN LATER YEARS
AS A MACHINE AND LOCKER ROOM.

ON NOVEMBER 16, 1923 A FIRE DESTROYED MOST OF THE CARPENTRY
SHOP BUILDING.

EXCEPT AT THE END TOWARDS THE PLANING MILL, WHERE FIREMEN
CHECKED THE FLAMES BEFORE THE MACHINERY AND BUILDINGS
WERE TOTALLY DESTROYED, THERE WILL BE ABSOLUTELY NO
SALVAGE. .

THE 1923 ANNUAL REPORT LISTS THE FOLLOWING SHOP BUILDINGS
DESTROYED BY THE FIRE: PAINT SHOP, COACH AND CABINET SHOP,
PLUMBING SHOP, UPHOLSTERY SHOP, AND A NUMBER OF SMALL SHEDS
AND MINOR BUILDINGS. THE LOCATION OF THESE ROOMS IN THE
CARPENTRY BUILDING CAN BE DETERMINED BY REFERRING TO SANBORN
INSURANCE MAPS.

REPLACEMENT BEGAN IMMEDIATELY INCORPORATING WHAT REMAINED
OF THE OLD PLANING MILL.

DURING THE TIME THAT PLANS FOR THE NEW BUILDINGS WERE
BEING PREPARED A TEMPORARY PAINT SHOP WAS ERECTED AND THE
PLANING MILL WAS REBUILT SO THAT WITHIN FORTY DAYS AFTER










THE FIRE, WORK OF REPAIRING AND PAINTING COACHES WAS
RESUMED.

THE REBUILT STRUCTURE MADE USE OF THOSE ORIGINAL TRUSSES
THAT WERE NOT BURNED. THE EXTERIOR WALLS WERE SURMOUNTED BY A
BRICK PARAPET BENEATH WHICH WERE A ROW OF DENTILS MUCH LIKE
THAT ON THE UP FREIGHT WAREHOUSE, AND LUMBER STORAGE SHED.
ARCHES THAT ONCE PROVIDED LIGHT AND VENTILATION TO A BASEMENT
PORTION OF THE CARPENTRY SHOP WERE BRICKED IN AT THIS TIME.

THE TEMPORARY PAINT SHOP WAS REMOVED TO MAKE WAY FOR A
NEW STOREHOUSE ERECTED IN 1925 NEXT TO THE PLANING MILL
REMAINS OF THE CARPENTRY SHOP. THE WINDOWS ALONG THE EAST
WALL OF THE PLANING MILL WERE BRICKED IN AND FORMED THE WEST
WALL OF THE NEW STORE HOUSE.

DUE TO THE ADVANCED STATE OF DETERIORATION OF THE PLANING
MILL REMAINS IT IS PROBABLY THAT THE MAJOR PORTION OF THE OLD
TRUSS STRUCTURE WILL COLLAPSE WITHIN THE NEXT FEW MONTHS.


I --


II II














STACK

THE GREAT CHIMNEY STANDS IN THE YARD BETWEEN THE ENGINE
HOUSE AND BLACKSMITH SHOP. IT IS 125' HIGH. ITS DESIGN
IS ORNAMENTAL AND MOST ORIGINAL. ITS FORM IS POLYGONAL,
GIVING IT THE APPEARANCE OF A FLUTED CIRCULAR COLUMN.
AROUND THE BASE ARE PROJECTING BUTRESSES FORMING CELLS
BETWEEN THEM. THESE CELLS HAVE EACH DEEP VAULTS BETWEEN
THEM, AND ARE APPROPRIATED AS PRIVIES FOR THE MEN.
UPON THE TOP OF THESE CELLS, OR OF THE BUTRESSES WHICH
FORM THEM, IS A CASTIRON TANK, HOLDING 40,000 GALLONS -
THE OUTSIDES ARE PANELED, RICHLY ORNAMENTED. THESE PANELS
WERE CAST BY D & W ROSE. IT MUST BE UNDERSTOOD THAT THIS
TANK ENCIRCLES THE GREAT CHIMNEY SHAFT. THE CHIMNEY
TOP IS LAID UP IN ORNAMENTAL BRICKWORK, AND IS SURMOUNTED
WITH A HEAVY CAST IRON TOP. THIS CHIMNEY DRAWS THE SMOKE
FROM ALL THE BLACKSMITH, COPPERSMITH, AND BOILER SHOP
FIRES, AS WELL AS FROM THE BOILER OF THE STATIONARY ENGINE.
THE WATER PUMPED INTO THE TANK GOES TO SUPPLY THE TENDERS.
EVERY STALL IN THE ENGINE HOUSE HAS A PIPE AND VALVE FOR
FILLING THE TENDERS.

THIS IS A MOST ELABORATE AND UNUSUAL STACK. NOTABLE
NEARBY STACKS INCLUDE A SMALLER, LESS ELABORATE, POLYGONAL
STRUCUTRE IN CHARLESTON, S.C. AND THE CHIMNEY OF THE CONFEDERATE
POWDER WORKS AT AUGUST, GEORGIA, A RED BRICK OBELISK. THE
COMBINATION OF PRIVY AND STACK, HOWEVER APPEARS TO BE UNIQUE.

IN THE 1960'S THE TOP OF THE CHIMNEY WAS DISMANTLED
FOR SALVAGE. AN INTERESTING DETAIL ON THE CASTIRON TANK IS A CAST
IRON FOOTAGE INDICATOR IN THE SHAPE OF A HEART AND ARROW WHICH
MAKED THE LEVEL OF THE WATER IN THE TANK BY MEANS OF A FLOAT
SYSTEM.















ENGINE HOUSE

IN 1852 THE WALLS OF THE ENGINE HOUSE WERE ERECTED AND
AWAITING THE ARRIVAL OF ITS IRON ROOF. THIS ROUND HOUSE AS
DESCRIBED IN THE SAVANNAH DAILY MORNING NEWS OF 1855 WAS A
'CIRCULAR ENGINE HOUSE OF BRICK, 250' IN DIAMETER AND CONTAINING
40 STALLS OR PITS, WITH WATER PIPES ON EACH TRACK FOR FILLING
TENDERS. THIS BUILDING HAS AN IRON ROOF, AROUND THE CIRCLES
IN WHICH THE ENGINES STAND, THE CENTER BEING LEFT OPEN. THE
FLOOR OF THIS BUILDING IS LAID WITH BRICK PAVEMENT; THE
INNER CORNICE AND ROOF REST ON CAST IRON COLUMNS.'

IT SEEMS THAT NO CHANGES WERE MADE TO THIS STRUCTURE UNTIL
1881 WHEN THE REPORT OF THE MASTER MACHINIST INDICATED THAT THE
HURRICANE OF THAT YEAR DID CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE AND DISLOCATED
A PART OF THE ROUND HOUSE. THIS DAMAGE WAS REPAIRED THE
FOLLOWING YEAR.

IN 1886 A NEW TURNTABLE WAS INSTALLED, PROBABLY INDICATING
INCREASED LENGTH OF ENGINES.

IN 1888 A NEW ROOF WAS DESIGNED BY AUGUSTUS SCHWAAB FOR
THE ROUND HOUSE, AND THE TURNTABLE WAS REPLACE AGAIN IN 1906
AND 1923. THE 1923 TURNTABLE WAS THE 75' TABLE REMOVED FROM
COLUMBUS AND IT REPLACED A 65' TABLE AT SAVANNAH.

IN 1926 18 STALLS OF THE ROUND HOUSE WERE REBUILT. THE
NEW STALLS WERE 95'-4" LONG AND BUILT OF REINFORCED CONCRETE.
THE ENGINE PITS WERE EXTENDED 43', PROVIDING SPACE FOR A
WHITING ELECTRICAL DROP TABLE. THE SCOPE OF WORK INCLUDED
DEMOLITION OF A PORTION OF THE PREVIOUS ROUNDHOUSE, THE LAVATORY
ROOM, AND THE FORMER BOILER SHOP ADJOINING THE ROUNDHOUSE.

ALL BUT A FRACTION OF THE WALLS OF THE EARLIER ROUNDHOUSE
HAVE BEEN REMOVED BY 1975, SO THAT THE PRESENT ROUNDHOUSE IS
ESSENTIALLY A 1926 STRUCTURE.


I


-a -- I II IIC









IN JANUARY, 1870 SCHWAAB FORMED A CO-PARTNERSHIP WITH
MARTIN P. MULLER AND THE FIRM WAS KNOWN AS MULLER AND SCHWAAB,
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS. THEY IMMEDIATELY RECEIVED THE COMMIS-
SION TO BUILD A NEW CITY MARKET (DEMOLISHED 1954). THE STRUCTURE
WAS SURMOUNTED BY THREE ROOFS, THE MIDDLE ONE 50' FROM THE
LEVEL OF THE STREET, THE ADJOINING ROOFS ON EITHER SIDE
ATTAINED A HEIGHT OF 37'. THE ARCHED WINDOWS AND GENERAL
APPEARANCE OF THE BUILDING BEARS A STRONG RESEMBLANCE TO
THE MACHINE SHOP OF THE CENTRAL, BUILT 20 YEARS BEFORE.

THE FIRM OF MULLER AND SCHWAAB DESIGNED IN 1870 AN IRON
BRIDGE AT THE FOOT OF DRAYTON STREET WHICH WAS PROBABLY REMOVED
IN 1886 AT THE TIME OF THE BUILDING OF THE COTTON EXCHANGE.

THEIR INTERESTS TOOK THEM INTO VARIED FIELDS. THEY
INVENTED STEAM PROPELLED CANAL BOATS THAT WORKED ON THE
PRINCIPLE OF A LOCOMOTIVE AND CONTENDED FOR A PREMIUM OF
$100,000. OFFERED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF NEW YORK FOR THE
BEST AND SIMPLEST PLAN FOR PROPELLING BOATS ON THE ERIE CANAL
WITH STEAM.

THE SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS WROTE AT THE TIME THAT 'SAVANNAH
MECHANICAL AND INVENTIVE GENIUS HAS, ON NUMEROUS OCCASIONS,
BEEN REWARDED WITH GRATIFYING SUCCESS, AND WE TRUST THAT SUCH
MAY BE THE CASE IN THIS INSTANCE.'

AFTER 1874, AUGUSTUS SCHWAAB CARRIED ON HIS BUSINESS ON
BAY STREET, COMPLETING A SMALL, TWO STORY BRICK DWELLING FOR
LAURENCE DUNN AT THE CORNER OF HOUSTON AND CONGRESS STREETS,
A MODEST LOW-STOOPED HOUSE WITH OVERHANGING, BRACKETED ROOF,
AND HE BUILT THE SAVANNAH HOTEL ON CONGRESS STREET BETWEEN
JEFFERSON AND MONTGOMERY STREETS (NOW DEMOLISHED). IN 1880
AND 1884 HE DESIGNED SEVERAL COTTON FACTORIES IN A 'PLAIN, BUT
SUBSTANTIAL MANNER.' NEITHER FACTORY STANDS TODAY.
IN 1885 HE COMPLETED THE DOUBLE RESIDENCE FOR THE MOHRBROTHERS
ON GORDON STREET, A THREE STORY STUCCO OVER BRICK STRUCTURE
WITH CORBELS UNDER A PROJECTING BRACKETED ROOF.

AUGUST SCHWAAB DIED IN 1899 IN MILLEDGEVILLE. HIS DEATH
NOTICE GIVES HIS AGE AS 78 YEARS OLD. HE IS BURIED IN LAUREL
GROVE CEMETERY IN SAVANNAH.












ARCHITECTS. ENGINEERS AND IRON FOUNDERS


THE ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS WHO DESIGNED THE INDIVIDUAL
BUILDINGS AT THE SAVANNAH DEPOT DESERVE FAR MORE CREDIT THAN
THEY HAVE YET RECEIVED IN SAVANNAH'S ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIES.

THE EARLIEST DOCUMENTED REFERENCE TO AUGUSTUS SCHWAAB
IS IN THE 1859 SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT WHICH MENTIONS
THAT THE BRICK BRIDGE ACROSS THE OGEECHEE CANAL WAS APPROACHING
COMPLETION UNDER THE CHARGE OF MR. AUGUSTUS SCHWAAB, CIVIL
ENGINEER. THE SUPERINTENDENT'S COMMENT THAT THE BRIDGE WOULD
BE A LASTING MONUMENT TO MR. SCHWAAB'S SKILL AS AN ENGINEER IS
CERTAINLY APPROPRIATE IN LIGHT OF THE LONG LIST OF HIS CONTRI-
BUTIONS TO SAVANNAH IN THE BUILDING ART AND BY THE FACT THAT
THE BRIDGE IS STILL STANDING HAVING LITTLE CHANGE OVER THE
YEARS.

TRADITION CREDITS SCHWAB, ALONG WITH ANOTHER ARCHITECT-
ENGINEER, MARTIN P. MUELLER WITH HAVING DESIGNED THE STACK,
MACHINE SHOP, BLACKSMITH SHOP, ENGIN/BOILER ROOM, CARPENTER'S
SHOP, UP FREIGHT HOUSE, DOWN FREIGHT HOUSE, GRAY BUILDING,
AND OTHER STRUCTURES IN THE COMPLEX. THE SOURCE FOR THIS
ATTRIBUTION APPEARS TO BE AN UNDOCUMENTED ARTICLE IN THE RIGHT
WAY MAGAZINE, A PUBLICATION OF THE CENTRAL, DATED MARCH, 1925.
OTHER THAN THE STYLISTIC SIMILARITIES WITH LATER BUILDINGS
THERE IS NO WRITTEN EVIDENCE THAT MUELLER AND SCHWAAB WERE
THE ARCHITECTS OF THESE BUILDINGS. IN FACT THE EARLIEST
DATED REFERENCE TO THE FIRM OF MUELLER AND SCHWAAB IS NOT UNTIL
THAT FIRM'S INCORPORATION IN 1870. ADMITTEDLY, SINCE
SCHWAAB WAS THE ENGINEER FOR THE PASSENGER HOUSE IN 1860, HE
COULD HAVE CONCEIVABLY DESIGNED THE REST OF THE COMPLEX, BUT
FURTHER DOCUMENTATION WILL HAVE TO BE FOUND TO SUSTAIN THIS
THEORY.
THE 1860 CENSUS LISTS AN AUGUSTUS SCHWARTZ, 45, BORN
HANOVER, GERMANY. IF THIS IS INDEED AUGUSTUS SCHWAAB, THEN THE
CENSUS TAKER WAS MISTAKEN IN BOTH SCHWAAB'S NAME AND PERHAPS EVEN
HIS AGE WHICH DOES NOT AGREE WITH THAT GIVEN AT THE TIME OF
HIS DEATH.

THERE ARE NO OTHER REFERENCES TO SCHWAAB UNTIL AFTER THE
CIVIL WAR IN WHICH HE APPARENTLY ATTAINED THE RANK OF MAJOR.


II lr I


~ ------ Il Is









F.W. FULTON, JR., A PARTNERSHIP WHICH DID NOT LAST LONG, FOR
IN 1866 HE WAS TEAMED UP WITH DEWITT BRUYN AND WORKING ON
COMPLETING THE PLANS FOR THE MERCER-WILDER HOUSE WHICH JOHN
NORRIS HAD BEGUN BEFORE THE WAR. IN 1867 THEY MULLERR AND
BRUYN) HAD COMPLETED THE WYLLY-MEINNARD BUILDING ON BROUGHTON
STREET WHICH FEATURED DECORATIVE CAST IRON WORK FROM THE
FOUNDRY OF BARTLETT, ROBBINS AND CO. OF BALTIMORE. IN 1869 THEY
COMPLETED THE KELLY RANGE ON THE RIVER WHICH BURNED IN 1876.

MULLER DESIGNED THE IRON SUSPENSION BRIDGE ACROSS THE
THOROUGHFARE LEADING DOWN THE BLUFF TO THE RIVER, AT THE FRONT
OF ABERCORN STREET. THE CASTINGS WERE COMPLETED AT THE FOUNDRY
OF MR. A.N. MILLER, THE SAME MAN WHO 20 YEARS BEFORE HAD
PROVIDED A SINGLE CYLINDER BEAM ENGINE ENCASED IN AN ELABORATE
GOTHIC FRAME IN THE ENGINE ROOM OF THE CENTRAL OF GEORGIA
RAILROAD, SAVANNAH SHOPS.

THE ASSOCIATION OF MULLER AND BRUYN WAS DISSOLVED BY
MUTUAL CONSENT IN 1870, THE SAME DAY THE CO-PARTNERSHIP
BETWEEN MULLER AND SCHWAAB WAS FORMED.

MULLER LEFT SAVANNAH FOR ALBANY, GEORGIA IN 1874 WHEN HE
WAS APPOINTED ASSISTANT ENGINEER FOR THE ATLANTIC ANDGULF
RAILROAD. HE DIED IN ALBANY IN 1876 OF CONSUMPTION.

ALVIN N. MILLER'S IRON FOUNDRY WAS ESTABLISHED AT THE
EASTERN WHARVES IN 1839. IN 1848 HE IS LISTED IN THE CENSUS
OF THE CITY OF SAVANNAH BY JOSEPH BANCROFT AS A MANUFACTURER OF
ALL KINDS OF MILL AND LOCOMOTIVE MACHINERY.

MILLER WAS A NATIVE OF NEW YORK, AND HE AND A FELLOW
APPRENTICE, JOHN ROACH, A SHIP BUILDER, LEARNED THE TRADE OF
MACHINIST AND FOUNDRYMAN IN THE SAME SHOP.

MILLER CAME TO SAVANNAH IN THE 1830'S, AND WAS SUPERINTEN-
DENT OF THE IRON STEAMBOAT COMPANY, WHICH OPERATED A LINE OF
STEAMBOATS BETWEEN SAVANNAH AND AUGUSTA. AT HIS FOUNDRY ON
THE EASTERN WHARVES HE CONSTRUCTED A GREAT DEAL OF MACHINE
AND CAST ORDINANCE FOR THE CONFEDERATE GOVERNMENT INCLUDING
SOME OF THE HEAVIER CANNONS.

AFTER THE WAR HE HAD CHARGE OF THE USINA AND JONES DRYDOCKS









ON HUTCHISON'S ISLAND AND AFTERWARDS WAS PORT WARDEN FOR
SEVERAL YEARS. HE THEN BECAME SUPERINTENDENT OF THE CONSTRUCTION
OF THE WATERWORKS AND LATER SUPERINTENDENT OF THE WATERWORKS,
UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1889.

COLBURN'S NEW YORK RAILROAD ADVOCATE HAD THIS TO SAY
ABOUT MILLER'S MACHINE FOR THE CENTRAL OF GEORGIA ENGINE ROOM
IN 1855:

THE ENGINE IS OF SAVANNAH BUILD, FROM THE WORK OF A.N.
MILLER. IT IS A SINGLE CYLINDER BEAM ENGINE, 15-INCH
BORE, AND 48-INCH STROKE. THE FRAME IS OF THE ARBOR
PATTERN, OF EXQUISITE PROPORTIONS AND BEAUTIFULLY
ORNAMENTED WITH TRACERY AND GOTHIS DETAILS. WERE WE
TO SAY THAT THIS ENGINE WAS BUILT AT THE NOVELTY WORKS,
OR AT THE BOSTON STEAM ENGINE WORKS, NONE OF OUR READERS
WOULD REJECT OUR STATEMENT, THAT IT IS OF BEAUTIFUL
DESIGN AND FINISH. BUT BEING OF SOUTHERN CONSTRUCTION,
THERE ARE NANY WHO WOULD NOT SUPPOSE IT TO POSSESS ANY
EXTRAORDINARY EXCELLENCE. BUT IN THE MOST PRACTICAL SENSE,
AND WITH THE KNOWLEDGE OF STILLMAN, ALLEN, AND COMPANY'S AND
TUFFT'S PATTERNS, WE SAY WE HAVE SEEN NO ENGINE OF EQUAL SIZE,
AND OF NORTHERN MANUFACTURE, WHICH EXCELLED .

DAVID AND WILLIAM ROSE WERE NATIVES OF PRESON, ENGLAND.
WILLIAM WHO CAME TO SAVANNAH ABOUT 1851 WAS EMPLOYED IN THE
CENTRAL ROAD SHOPS

MARTIN P. MUELLER (LATER SPELLED MULLER), ALSO A NATIVE OF
NORTHERN GERMANY, WAS AN ENGINEER WITH THE CHRLESTON AND
SAVANNAH RAILROAD COMPANY. IN 1861 HE FORMED AN ARCHITECTURAL
FIRM WITH BORN IN HANOVER, GERMANY. FURTHER INQUIRY INTO HIS
BACKGROUND, EDUCATION AND IMMIGRATION MAY GIVE THE SOURCE OF
THE TRUSS AS WELL AS THE SOURCE FOR THE CASTELLATED BUILDINGS OF
THE SHOP COMPLEX WHICH MR. PETERSON ALSO THINK HAVE A GERMAN
ORIGIN.


-II I


~IC -~ -. 1~1










Building Conditions

IN ORDER TO ASSESS THE POSSIBLE FEASIBILITY OF REHABILITAT-
ING AND INCORPORATING EXISTING RAILROAD BUILDINGS INTO THE
BICENTENNIAL PARK, AN ENGINEERING INSPECTION WAS MADE OF THE
STRUCTURES IN THE CENTRAL OF GEORGIA RAILROAD SHOP AREA. THE
MOST SIGNIFICANT RAILROAD STRUCTURE ON SITE IS AN OLD ROUND-
HOUSE BUILDING CONSTRUCTED OF REINFORCED CONCRETE AND MASONRY
WALLS. MOST OF THE ROUNDHOUSE WALLS ARE CONSTRUCTED OF SAVANNAH
GRAY BRICKS WHICH HAVE IMPORTANT HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTUR-
AL VALUE. THIS ROUNDHOUSE BUILDING IS IN GENERALLY FAIR CONDITION.
THERE ARE CONSIDERABLE CRACKS IN THE CONCRETE SLAB ROOF DECK
AND THERE SEEMS TO BE EVIDENCE OF LEAKS THROUGH THE CRACKS.
IN GENERAL, THE ROUNDHOUSE IS IN RELATIVELY SOUND STRUCTURAL
CONDITION, ALTHOUGH SUBSTANTIAL REINVESTMENT IS NECESSARY TO
REUTILIZE IT FOR THE BICENTENNIAL PARK PURPOSES.

THE ROUNDHOUSE IS DIVIDED INTO TWO MAJOR CRESCENT-SHAPED
SECTIONS WHICH ARE SEPARATED BY A LARGE FORMER MACHINE SHOP
BUILDING. THIS BUILDING CONNECTING THE TWO SEGMENTS OF THE
ROUNDHOUSE IS IN EXTREMELY POOR CONDITION WITH PAPROXIMATELY
HALF OF THE ROOF IN A COLLAPSED STATE AND THE OTHER HALF
BARELY-STANDING. THIS BUILDING WOULD REQUIRE COMPLETE
RECONSTRUCTION IN ORDER TO BE SAFELY UTILIZED.

A SMALL TWO-STORY OFFICE-WAREHOUSE BUILDING IS ATTACHED
TO THE WESTERN SIDE OF THE MACHINE SHOP BUILDING. THE FIRST
STORY IS CONSTRUCTED OF SAVANNAH GRAY BRICKS AND SECOND STORY
OF COMMON RED BRICK, MANY OF WHICH ARE FLALING. THE ROOF IS
IN VERY POOR CONDITION FROM MOISTURE DAMAGE AND THE SECOND-
STORY FLOOR IS BEGINNING TO FALL IN. ATTACHED TO THE OTHER
SIDE OF THE LARGE MACHINE SHOP SEPARATING THE ROUNDHOUSE INTO
TWO SEGMENTS IS ANOTHER BUILDING IN VERY POOR CONDITION. THIS
BUILDING IS ALSO CONSTRUCTED OF SAVANNAH GRAY BRICKS. THERE IS
NO FLOOR AND A WOODEN DECK ROOF. DUE TO THE VIBRATIONS
CAUSED BY THE LARGE ENGINES FORMERLY USED IN THIS ROOM, THE
MASONRY IS VERY LOOSE AND THE WALLS ARE QUITE UNSTABLE. THE
DECK IS BADLY DAMAGED BY MOISTURE AND THIS BUILDING ALSO WOULD
REQUIRE SUBSTANTIAL REINVESTMENT TO BE REHABILITATED TO PROPER
AND SAFE STANDARDS.









TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE ROUNDHOUSE IS A COMPLEX OF FIVE
ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS. A TWO-STORY BRICK BUILDING WITH WOODEN
DECK WAS ORIGINALLY USED AS A BOILER ROOM. THE WALLS ARE
SAVANNAH GRAY BRICKS WITH VERY ORNATE FACIA BRICK WORK.
THREE SIDES OF THE BUILDING ARE BRICK WITH ONE SIDE HAVING A
LARGE ENTRANCE DOORWAY. SERIOUS ROOF DAMAGE EXISTS IN THE FORM
OF MOISTURE DAMAGE AND THE JOISTS ARE STARTING TO CRACK. THE
BUILDING HAS VERY INTERESTING AND ORNATE BRICK WORK ON THE
EXTERIOR AND IS THE PRIME CANDIDATE FOR REHABILITATION.

FURTHER TO THE WEST IS A SINGLE-STORY BRICK MASONRY STRUCTURE
WITH WALLS OF SAVANNAH GRAY BRICK AND ARCHED ENTRANCES WITH
ORNATE BRICK FACIA. MOISTURE DAMAGE IS EVIDENT IN SOME OF THE
WOOD TRUSES. ALSO WEST OF THE BOILER ROOM IS A LARGE
(12,000-SQUARE-FOOT) BRICK MASONRY STRUCTURE. THIS SINGLE-
STORY BUILDING IS CONSTRUCTED OF SAVANNAH GRAY BRICK AND HAS THE
SAME ARCHITECTURAL TREATMENT AS THE PREVIOUSLY DESCRIBED BUILDING.
MOST OF THE WOOD JOISTS IN THE ROOF NEED REPAIR AND THE FIRST-
FLOOR WOOD FLOOR PLANKS ARE APPROXIMATELY 50 PER CENT IN NEED
OF REPLACEMENT. ATTACHED TO THIS BUILDING'AND THE BUILDING
DESCRIBED PREVIOUSLY IS A SMALL, SINGLE-STORY BRICK MASONRY
BUILDING WITH WOODEN DECK AND ARCHITECTURAL TREATMENT SIMILAR
TO THE PREVIOUS TWO BUILDINGS. IT HAS NO WINDOWS AND TWO
FREIGHT DOORWAYS OPEN TO THE EAST.

THE REMAINING BUILDING( IN THIS FIVE-BUILDING COMPLEX IS A
LARGE (13,000-SQUARE-FOOT) SINGLE-STORY WAREHOUSE BUILDING
CONSTRUCTED IN 1925. THE BUILDING !HAS A REINFORCED CONCRETE
FLOOR AND COMMON RED BRICK WALLS WITH CONCRETE PILLARS. THE
ROOF IS APPROXIMATELY 10 YEARS OLD AND APPEARS TO BE IN GOOD
CONDITION. WHILE THIS BUILDING IS IN GENERALLY GOOD STRUCTURAL
CONDITION AND WAS USED UNTIL RECENTLY FOR MANUFACTURING PURPOSES,
IT DOES NOT HAVE MANY DESIRABLE ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES AND
WOULD PROBABLY REQUIRE ARCHITECTURAL TREATMENT TO FIT INTO
THE THEME OF THE BICENTENNIAL PARK.

TWO ADDITIONAL STRUCTURES ON THE SITE WERE ALSO INSPECTED.
IN THE NORTHEAST QUADRANT OF JONES STREET AND WEST BOUNDARY
STREET IS A LARGE REINFORCED CONCRETE FRAME BUILDING WITH STEEL
TRUSSES AND INTERESTING FACE BRICK DETAILS. WHILE THIS BUILDING
APPEARS IN GOOD CONDITION STRUCTURALLY, THE ROOF DECK WAS
SEVERELY DETERIORATED AND HAS MANY LEAKS. THE BUILDING HAS









STEEL SASH AND A STRUCTURAL CONCRETE FLOOR AT GROUND LEVEL,
AND WAS DESIGNED FOR VERY HEAVY FLOOR LOADS. THE BASEMENT IS
APPROXIMATELY 20 FEET DEEP BELOW THE GROUND LEVEL. WHILE NOT
IN SERIOUS CONDITION, THE BUILDING WOULD REQUIRE EXTENSIVE
REPAIRS TO RENEW THE ROOF DECK AND ROOFING AND BRING INTO
USABLE FORM, PERHAPS AT INORDINATE COST. HOWEVER, REMOVAL
OF THEIR STRUCTURE WOULD ALSO BE EXTREMELY COSTLY DUE TO THE
EXTREMELY HEAVY CONCRETE FRAMEWORK. BOTH COSTS WOULD BE
CONSIDERABLY LESS THAN DUPLICATING THE SQUARE FOOTAGE IN A
NEW BUILDING. IF REFURBISHED, THIS LARGE STRUCTURE HAS MANY
REUSES, SEVERAL OF WHICH WERE DISCUSSED WITH THE TECHNICAL
COMMITTEE AND OTHERS.

FINALLY, A MOST INTERESTING ARCHITECTURAL FEATURE OF THE
SITE IS A SMOKESTACK APPROXIMATELY 125 FEET IN HEIGHT LOCATED
IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF THE ROUNDHOUSE. IT IS POLYGONAL IN SHAPE,
GIVING'THE APPEARANCE OF A CIRCULAR COLUMN. NEAR THE BOTTOM OF
THE BASE IS AN ORNAMENTAL IRON WATER TANK WHICH SHOWS NO
DAMAGE AND IS EXTREMELY DECORATIVE. BELOW THE WATER TANK ARE
PROJECTED BUTTRESSES WHICH WERE ORIGINALLY UTILIZED AS PRIVIES
FOR THE WORKERS IN TEH RAILROAD YARD. THE MASONRY IN THE SMOKE-
STACK IS IN POOR CONDITION, PARTICULARLY TOWARD THE TOP WITH
BRICKS OCCASIONALLY FALLING IN HIGH WIND CONDITIONS. THE
PRIVY ROOMS AT THE BOTTOM WOULD ALL REQUIRE CONSIDERABLE
REHABILITATION FOR ANY TYPE OF REUSE.

IN SUMMARY, THE BUILDINGS ON SITE HAVE INTERESTING AND
IMPORTANT ARCHITECTURAL AND HISTORIC FEATURES AND WERE RECOG-
NIZED AS SUCH BY REGISTRATION ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF
HISTORIC PLACES. IT SHOULD BE NOTED, HOWEVER, THAT IT WILL BE
EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE TO RESTORE ANY OF THESE BUILDINGS INTO A
USABLE CONDITION.


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SOUTH ELEVATION OF TENDER FRAMIE SHOP


BOILDR/EITGINIE/PATTEEII SHOPS SCOUL7iU: ELEVATION








Zoning and Codes
THE CITY OF SAVANNAH PRESENTLY USES THE STANDARD SOUTHERN
BUILDING CODE WITHOUT ADDITIONAL REGULATION. HOWEVER,
ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS ARE PENDING GOVERNMENTAL APPROVAL. THE
SITE IS ZONES B-G, GENERAL BUSINESS WHICH PROVIDES FOR A HOST
OF VARIED ACTIVITIES. THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF PERMITTED
USES:

B-G General-Business. The purpose of this district shall be to create
and protect areas in which heavy commercial and certain industrial-like
activities are permitted.


The following is a list of uses permitted in B-G zoning districts:


1. One-family dwelling
A. Detached
B. Semi-detached or end-row
C. Attached or row

2. Two-family dwelling
A. Detached
B. Semi-detached or end-row
C. Attached or row

3. Multi-family dwelling
A. Detached
B. Semi-detached or end-row
C. Attached or row

4. Multi-family dwelling, four story or more *

5. Garage apartment or carriage house

7. Hotel or apartment hotel

8. Hotel or apartment hotel, four story or more *


9. Motel









10. Boarding house or rooming house

11. Church or other place of worship

12. Convent or monastery

14. Eleemosynary or philanthropic institution

15. Public uses
Including, but not restricted to schools, fire and police
stations, park and recreation facilities.

15a. Heliport, helistop *

16. Public utility

18. Telephone Exchange

20. Club or lodge

20a. Assembly halls
Including union halls, conference halls, business meetings,
civic halls and activities of a similar nature. Such use
may include office space where incidental to the principal
use.

20b. Day Nurseries and Kindergartens
Provided, that one hundred square feet of outdoor play
space is provided each child.

20c. Infant Day Nurseries

25. Animal hospital, veterinary clinic, animal boarding place or
animal grooming salon

25a. Animal grooming establishment
Provided, that such establishments shall not board
animals overnight.


__ _


I -









26b. The use of public facilities or public parks for carnivals,
rodeos, horse shows, shooting or athletic event, community
fair or other events of public interest
Such public facilities or public parks shall be owned
and operated by either an agency.of government or a
unit of government.

29. Amusement or recreational activities carried on wholly within
a building
Indoor theatre, billiard parlor, dance hall and
activities of a similar nature.

30. Indoor shooting range

32. Food and drugstores
Drugstore, meat market, bakery products, dairy products,
confectionery shops, liquor store and stores of a
similar nature.

33. Personal Service Shops
Barber shop, beauty shop, health club, massage parlor
"as an incidental use", shoe repair, dry cleaning and
laundry pick-up station, laundromats, watch repair
and services of a similar nature.

34. Clothing stores and dry goods
Shoe store, men's shops, women's shops, variety stores
and stores of a similar nature.

35. Home furnishing and hardware
Appliance store, hardware store, paint, appliance repair,
sporting goods store, furniture store and stores of a similar nature.

36a. Specialty shops
Gift shops, florist, hpbby shops, camera shops, book stores,
and stores of a similar nature.

36b. Craft shops
Gift shops which produce goods used for special orders and/or
for sale in specialty craft shops.


I -_, _









37. Banks and offices, three stories or less
Banks, loan agencies, professional offices, business
offices, and facilities of a similar nature.

38. Office or commercial building, four stories or more *

39. Department stores

39c. Sale and display of monuments and stones

40. Photography studio

41. Funeral parlor

42. Ambulance service or rescue squad

43. Radio or television studio or tower

44. Telegraph or messenger service

45. Taxi stand

46. Freezer locker service, ice storage

47. Commercial schools

47b. Fortune Telling

48. Restaurants

48a. Cocktail lounge, night club, taverns and stores of a similar nature
where such uses utilize pouring or package license.

49. Drive-in restaurants

50. Automobile filling station including an automobile washeteria
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

51. Automobile repair and paint shops
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)


I C-


- -








52. Automobile, truck or boat and non-residential trailer sales
or rentals
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

52a. Motorcycle, motorscooters, and bicycle sales and services
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

53. Automobile upholstery shop

54. Retail Automobile parts and tire store
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

55. Automobile parking lot or parking garage
May include gasoline pumps.

56. Residential trailer sales room and sales lot

57. Laboratory serving professional requirements, dentists, medical, etc.

59. Farm implement sales and storage and similar activities

60. Feed and grain sales and storage

61. Electrical repair and similar repair

62. Locksmith, gunsmith and similar activities

63. Building supplies and materials
Provided, this shall not include outdoor storage unless
storage yards are permitted in this district.

63a. Prefabricated structures sales lot
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

64. Glass sales and installation

68. Building contractor and related construction contractors
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

69. Newspaper









70. Printing or letter shop

71. Newspaper and magazine distributor

71a. Book cover processing

72. Express office

73. Cold storage and freezer plant

74. Railroad or buss station

75. Wholesaling or warehousing
Provided, that there shall be no external storage of goods
and materials.

83o. Dry cleaning plants and Laundry plants
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

83r. Unclassified light manufacturing *
(See Zoning Ordinance for conditions)

86. Principal use sign

87. Separate use sign

88. Incidental use sign

89. Home occupation

90. Accessory uses
Provided, that temporary accessory uses or buildings
shall not be permitted for more than a twenty-four
month period.



Permitted with Savannah Zoning Board of Appeals approval only.


----, ~-


I ---_



























Economic










Marketing Analysis

IN ORDER TO PERCEIVE A TRUE ECONOMIC PROFILE FOR THE
PROJECT, THE 'ECONOMIC ISSUES' OF SAVANNAH MUST BE CONSIDERED.
ACCORDING TO THE METROPOLITAN PLANNING COMMISSION'S ECONOMIC
ANALYSIS FOR CHATHAM COUNTY, THE MAJOR INDUSTRIES IN SAVANNAH
HAVE SHOWN CONSIDERABLE GROWTH, HOWEVER THIS GROWTH GENERALLY
TRAILS THE GROWTH OF OTHER COMPARABLE GEORGIA METROPOLITAN
AREAS. FOR EXAMPLE, SAVANNAH'S RETAIL TRADE INCREASED ABOUT
27% BETWEEN 1963 AND 1967, A FIGURE 8.2% UNDER THE STATE
AVERAGE AND LOWEST OF ALL GEORGIA SMSA AREAS. SIMILAR TRENDS
WERE REVEALED IN OTHER SECTORS, NOTABLY WHOLESALE TRADE, SERVICES
AND MANUFACTURING, ALL OF WHICH SHOWED STEADY INCREASES,
CONSISTENTLY LOWER THAN THOSE OF COMPARABLE AREAS. PERHAPS
THE PRIME FACTOR CONTRIBUTING TO THIS SITUATION IS THE HISTORI-
CAL BROADNESS OF SAVANNAH'S URBAN ECONOMIC BASE, IN CONTRAST
TO THE AGRARIAN ORIENTED ECONOMIES OF OTHER SOUTHEASTERN
CITIES. AREAS WITH A HISTORICALLY AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY ARE
STRIVING TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL OF URBANIZATION INHERENT TO
SAVANNAH'S ECONOMY, PLACING SAVANNAH'S ECONOMY IN A COMPARABLE
STABLE LIMELIGHT. THUS IT IS IMPORTANT TO EXAMINE SAVANNAH'S
ECONOMY ONLY IN COMPARISON WITH ITSELF.

THREE ASPECTS OF SAVANNAH'S ECONOMY WHICH ARE LIKELY TO
BE SERVICED BY AN ADAPTIVE USE FOR THE COMPLEX, WILL BE EXAMINED.
THESE ASPECTS ARE RETAIL, SERVICES, AND TOURISM.

A: RETAIL TRADE:

BECAUSE THE MEASUREMENT OF RETAIL SALES AND RETAIL EMPLOY-
MENT IS A GOOD GAUGE OF THE ECONOMY, THESE STATISTICS HAVE BEEN
PROVIDED IN THE ACCOMPANYING CHARTS. ACCORDING TO GOVERNMENT
STATICS, SAVANNAH, DURING THE 1960'S EXPERIENCED BOTH A DE-
CREASE AND INCREASE IN THE RETAIL MARKET. THIS FLUX CAN BE
DIRECTLY TRACED TO THE CLOSING AND REOPENING OF HUNTER AIRFORCE
BASE. THIS REACTIVATION, ACCOMPANIED BY THE OPENING OF OGLE-
THROPE MALL CAUSED A TREMENDOUS GROWTH IN NOT ONLY RETAIL SALES
BUT APARTMENT CONSTRUCTION. SALES TAX REPORTS (SEE TABLE) FROM
THE GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE SHOW THAT CHATHAM COUNTY


-I- I II


-J I --












RETAIL SALES

Savannah, Chatham County, and the Savannah Region
As a Percentage of Georgia
($1,000)


Total Total Total
Sales Sales Sales
1958 1963 1967

Savannah 175,741 190,503 234,599
Percentage of 91.6 87.5 84.8
Chatham County 191,672 217,677 276,362


Chatham County 191,672 217,677 276,362
Percentage of 82.0 81.4 80.4
Savannah Region* 233,330 267,325 342,861


Savannah Region 233,330 267,325 342,861
Percentage of 6.6 5.8 5.5
Georgia 3,528,236 4,570,023 6,174,685


Savannah Region includes Chatham, Bryan, Liberty, and Effingham Counties
in Georgia, and Beaufort and Jasper Counties in South Carolina


Source: U. S. Census of Business, Retail Trade, Georgia and South Carolina


rrr ---r- II













SMSA

Albany

Atlanta

Augusta

Columbus

Macon

SAVANNAH

*Albany


1958 Sales
*

1,229,461

191,344

180,911

170,231

191,672

was not a d


RETAIL SALES, GEORGIA SMSA's
($1,000)

Percent
1963 Sales Change 19

98,520 N/A

1,618,757 17.6 2

249,162 30.2

229,498 26.8

231,777 36.1

217,677 13.5

designated SMSA in 1958


NUMBER OF



1963

684

8,146

1,894

1,730

1,557

1,557


RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS

Percent
Change
1958-1963 1967

-- 758


5.5

2.2

1.4

11.1

-2.7


9,351

1,992

1,807

1,694

1,534


Source: U. S. Census of Business, Retail Trade, Georgia


67 Sales

128,391

,337,132

362,069

308,050

317,360

276,362


Percent
Change

30.3

30.1

45.3

34.2

36.9

26.9


SMSA

Albany

Atlanta

Augusta

Columbus

Macon

SAVANNAH


1958



7,721

1,852

1,706

1,401

1,622


Percent
Change
1963-1967

10.8

14.7

4.1

4.4

8.7

-2.7


eL~e I rr


IL --














Total Sales ($1,000)


RETAIL TRADE IN THE SAVANNAH SMSA

1958 1963

191,672 217,677


CATEGORIES:

Building Materials, Hardware
and Farm Equipment, Dealers

General Merchandise Group Stores

Food Stores

Automotive Dealers

Gasoline Service Stations

Apparel and Accessory Stores

Furniture, Home Furnishings and
Equipment Stores

Eating and Drinking Places

Drug Stores and Proprietory Stores

Miscellaneous Retail Stores

Non-Store Retailers


Percent of Total Sales


5.9


10.8

23.1

16.5

7.7

10.2

5.8


5.7

3.5

8.8

2.0

100.0


4.3


11.7

22.5

20.5

9.6

8.1

5.9


5.6

3.2

7.3

1.3

100.0


Source: U. S. Census of Business, Retail Trade, Georgia


1967

276,362


3.5


13.8

22.5

17.1

9.9

7.5

6.0


6.4

3.8

7.9

1.6

100.0


--" I I
















First Quarter

Second Quarter

Third Quarter

Fourth Quarter

Annual Total


1967

78,538

88.331

92,962

101,250

364,999


19

91,

101,

107,

113,

413,


CHATHAM COUNTY SALES TAXES
($1,000)

Percent Pei
Change Ch
68 1967-1968 1969 1961

494 16.5 106,811 1

023 14.4 121,808 2(

635 15.8 124,472 1

241 11.9 129,334 1

394 13.3 482.425 1


Source: Georgia Department of Revenue, Sales and Use Tax Unit


1970

113,108


Percent
Change
1969-1970

5.9


recent
range
3-1969

6.7

0.6

5.6

4.2

6.7


_~ c










EMPLOYMENT: RETAIL TRADE SECTOR

1958

nt 8,993


CATEGORIES:

Building Materials, Hardware
and Farm Equipment, Dealers

General Merchandise Group Stores

Food Stores

Automotive Dealers

Gasoline Service Stations

Apparel and Accessory Stores.

Furniture, Home Furnishings and
Equipment Stores

Eating and Drinking Places

Drug Stores and Proprietory Stores

Miscellaneous Retail Stores

Non-Store Retailers


1963

3,228


1967

9,058


Percent of Total Retail Employment


16.5

13.7

8.8

6.6

11.5

5.9


14.5

4.4

(D)

(D)


16.4

13.2

11.4

8.0

10.5

5.4


15.7

4.6

8.3

2.5


15.7

14.1

10.0

7.8

9.5

6.1


19.1

(D)

(0)

2.5


(D) Withheld to avoid disclosure


Source: U. S. Census of Business, Retail Trade, Georgia


Total Retail Employme


_~I_ I---











SMSA

Asheville

Charleston

Chattanooga

Jacksonville

Montgomery

SAVANNAH


PAYROLL ($1,000)
Percent
1963 1967 Change

7,030 9,830 39.8

8,581 14,576 69.9

16,364 24,505 50.4

29,595 48,800 64.9

9,153 12,383 35.2

7,995 11,346 41.9


NUMBER OF PAID


1963

2,437

3,590

5,695

10,368

3,463

3,031


1967

2,650

4,487

7,224

13,142

3,628

3,173


SMSA

Asheville

Charleston

Chattanooga

Jacksonville

Montgomery

SAVANNAH


1958

658

859

,401

1,337

780

877


NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS
Percent
1963 Change 1967

795 20.8 865

1,033 20.3 1,277

1,665 18.8 1,809

2.851 22.0 3,123

863 10.6 882

932 6.2 962


Percent
Change

8.8

23.7

8.6

9.5

2.2

3.2


1958

17,668

22,479

39,878

85,278

23,592

24,404


2

3

5

11

3

2


TOTAL RECEIPTS ($1,000)
Percent
1963 Change 1967

6,551 50.3 32,842

0,464 35.5 52,307

7,906 47.7 80,554

0,272 29.3 178,331

2,532 37.9 43,048

8,081 15.1 35,729


Source: U. S. Census of Business, Selected Services: Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Tennessee,
and North Carolina; 1958, 1963, 1967.


Percent
Change

24.1

71.7

39.1

61.7

32.3

27.2


EMPLOYEES
Percent
Change

8.7

25.0

26.8

26.7

4.8

4.7


PROPRIETORS

1963 1967

779 627

962 896

1,617 1,269

2,570 2,098

842- 616

873 622







NUMBER AND TYPE OF RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS
CHATHAM COUNTY AND OUTLYING SHOPPING CENTERS


TYPE

Building materials, hardware
and farm equipment dealers

General merchandise group
stores

Food stores

Automotive dealers

Gasoline service stations

Apparel and accessory stores

Furniture, home furnishings,
and equipment stores

Eating and drinking places

Drug stores and proprietary
stores

Miscellaneous retail stores

TOTAL


CHATHAM COUNTY
1963 1967

52 39


MAJOR RETAIL
CENTER #1
1963 1967

3 2


MAJOR RETAIL
CENTER #2
1963 1967

1 1


250 256

1,489 1,441

RETAIL SALES
($1,000)


MAJOR RETAIL MAJOR RETAIL
CHATHAM COUNTY CENTER #1 CENTER #2
1963 1967 1963 1967 1963 1967

TOTAL 214,747 272,119 12,380 23,512 9,069 13,397

Convenience goods 65,412 82,437 3,981 5,200 1,063 2,038

Shopping goods stores 55,767 75,246 7,082 14,011 (D) (D)

All other stores 93,568 114,436 1,317 4,301 (D) (D)

(D) Information withheld to avoid disclosure of individual operations
MRC #1: Includes the planned centers known as "Cross Roads Shopping Center",
"Victory Drive Shopping Plaza", and "K-Mart" and establishments on Skidaway
Rd. from 41st St. to 50th St. and on Victory Dr. from Shuptrine Ave. to
Casey Canal
MRC #2: Includes establishments in the area bounded by: Park Ave., Abercorn,
31st St, and Whitaker.

Source: U. S. Census of Business, Major Retail Centers in SMSA's, Georgia







CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT SALES AS:


Percent of City Sales Percent of County Sales
1958 1963 1967 1958 1963 1967

TOTAL 35.4 27.4 25.3 32.5 24.0 21.4

Building materials, hardware 14.3 3.9 1.6 13.1 3.3 1.6
and farm equipment dealers
General merchandise group 49.4 44.1 '33.5 48.1 39.4 32.1
stores
Food stores 13.9 (D) (D) 12.3 (D) (D)
Automotive dealers 36.3 17.0 14.9 35.7 16.0 13.4
Gasoline service stations (D) (D) 5.2 6.4 (D) 3.0
Apparel- and accessory stores (D) 72.3 66.3 74.5 67.4 64.4
Furniture, home furnishings, 62.1 45.4 45.3 58.8 44.5 41.7
and equipment stores
Eating and drinking places 44.5 28.4 29.8 22.0 34.4 24.4
Drug stores and proprietary 23.3 18.7 (D) 20.9 15.9 (D)
stores
Miscellaneous retail stores 34.9 31.6 26.7 33.1 27.3 19.5

(D) Infnrmation withheld to avoid disclosure of individual operations

Source: U. S. Census of Business, Major Retail Centers in SMSA's, Georgia



TABLE 29

PERCENT CHANGES IN SALES

CBD SAVANNAH CHATHAM COUNTY
1958-1963 1963-1967 1958-1963 1963-1967 1958-1963 1963-1967
TOTAL -15.4 13.0 9.3 27.7 14.4 26.7

Building materials, hard- -79.5 -48.5 -25.7 23.3 -18,0 6.9
ware and farm equipment
dealers
General merchandise group 1.9 20.8 13.9 59.4 24.5 18.2
stores
Food stores (D) (D) 6.7 24.5 10.3 26.4
Automotive dealers -36.9 -11.7 35.0 0.8 40.5 5.9
Gasoline service stations (D) (D) (D) 4.9 41.3 32.5
Apparel and accessory -19.7 12.2 (D) 22.4 -11.2 17.5
stores
Furniture, home furnish- -12.7 23.9 19.3 24.2 15.5 32.2
ings, and equipment
stores
Eating and drinking places -26.6 60.0 15.0 52.3 14.5 44.7
Drug stores and, proprietary -18.5 (D) 1.8 33.9 7.3 47.8
stores
Miscellaneous retail stores -22.4 -1..7 -14.3 16.6 -5.7 37.5

(D) Information withheld to avoid disclosure of individual operations

Source: U. S. Census of Business, Major Retail Centers in SMSA's, Georgia









LED THE STATE IN PERCENTAGE INCREASE FOR THE YEAR OF 1969
OVER 1968; ITS INCREASE BEING 16.7%. DURING THE SECOND
QUARTER OF 1969, WHEN THE OGLETHORPE MALL OPENED, CHATHAM
COUNTY SHOWED AN ASTOUNDING 20.6% INCREASE, AGAIN ESTABLISHING
THE MAXIMUM EXTREME FOR THE STATE. THIS INCREASE IS A SOUND
INDICATOR OF A MARKET DEMAND IN THE AREA NOT ADEQUATELY
BEING SERVED, CREATING A 'HIDDEN PENT-UP DEMAND.' IN PROJECTING
FOR THE SECOND HALF OF THE 1970'S THE METROPOLITAN PLANNING
COMMISSION PREDICTS THAT THE FUTURE FOR SAVANNAH'S RETAIL TRADE
IS BRIGHT, BUT WILL HINGE ON THE NATIONAL ECONOMY. THE MPC ALSO
PREDICTS THAT SIZABLE CONSTRUCTION OF RETAIL SPACE WILL
SEVERELY CURTAIL THE OUTFLOW OF RETAIL DOLLARS TO ATLANTA,
AND OTHER MAJOR MARKETS. DUE TO THE CLOSE PROXIMITY OF
DOWNTOWN SAVANNAH TO THE COMPLEX, RETAIL TRADE IN THIS AREA WILL
BE AN IMPORTANT FACTOR TO DEAL WITH WHEN CONSIDERING THE POSSI-
BILITY OF ESTABLISHING RETAIL OUTLETS IN THE REHABILITATED
COMPLEX. MPC STATICS INDICATE THAT DOWNTOWN RETAIL BUSINESS
SHOWED A DECLINE IN GROWTH IN THE PAST YEARS. INDICATIONS ARE
THAT THE MARKET HAS NOT DECREASE BUT RATHER ADVERSE FACTORS
SUCH AS HEAVY TRAFFIC, CONGESTED CIRCULATION, POORLY LOCATED
AND INADEQUATE PARKING FACILITIES, PHYSICAL DETERIORATION OF
STRUCTURES AND INADEQUATE MAINTAINANCE PROGRAMS HAVE SEVERELY
AFFECTED THE MARKET. THESE DEFICIENCIES PROMOTE ADDITION
GROWTH IN SUBURBAN AREAS, WHICH IN TURN PERPETUATES THE PROBLEM.
DUE TO THE DECLINE IN RETAIL SALES, DOWNTOWN SAVANNAH IS
UNDERGOING A CHANGE FROM A RETAIL TO A FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRA-
TIVE CENTER, COMPLIMENTED BY TOURISM AND CONVENTION ACTIVITIES.
WITH THE SIGNIFICANT GROWTH IN MOTEL AND HOTEL FACILITIES IN
THE DOWNTOWN AREA ACCOMPANIED BY HISTORIC PRESERVATION ACTIVITIES,
AS WELL AS THE NEW CIVIC CENTER AND AUDITORIUM, IT IS BELIEVED
THAT DOWNTOWN SAVANNAH WILL BECOME A PRIME NATIONAL TOURIST
AND CONVENTION CENTER. WITH THESE PROJECTED CHANGES, DOWNTOWN
SAVANNAH WILL BE DEVOID OF MAJOR RETAIL OUTLETS. MANY OF THE
PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DECLINE IN RETAIL BUSINESS IN THE
AREA CAN BE SUCCESSFUL SOLVED WITH AN APPROPRIATELY PLANNED
PROGRAM FOR THE RAILROAD COMPLEX. THE COMPLEX'S CLOSE PROXIMITY
TO 1-95, THE ABUNDANT PARK SPACE POTENTIAL, AND DEVELOPMENT
POSSIBILITIES SHOULD MAKE IT AN IDEAL SOLUTION FOR THE RETAIL
MARKET DEMAND 0 FSAVANNAH.

B. 'SERVICES:

THE SERVICE INDUSTRY IS THE MOST DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRY IN THE


ILI -- ,


L











SELECT




Receipts: Total ($1,000)

With Payroll
($1,000)

Payroll ($1,000)

Number of Paid Employees

Number of Proprietors

Number of Establishments:

Hotels, motels, tourist
courts, camps

Personal services

Misc. business services

Auto repair, auto ser-
vices, garages

Misc. repair services

Motion pictures

Other amusements and
recreation services


ED SERVICES CHATHAM COUNTY

Percent
1958 1963 Change

24,404 28,081 15.0

22,250 25,565 14.9


7,162

3,583

882

877




375



114


7,995

3,031

873

932

72


421

97

113


11.6

-15.4

-1.0

6.3




12.2



-0.9


Source:' U. S. Census of Business, Selected Services: Georgia, 1958, 1963,
1967.


1967

35,729

33,140


11,346

3,173

622

962

70


450

125

116


128

11

62


Percent
Change

27.2

29.6


41.9

4.7

-28.8

3.2

-2.8


6.9

28.9

2.7


-16.3

22.2

-7.5


IRIII I -U I II


II |









LOCAL ECONOMY. THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THESE BUSINESSES IS
INCREASING IN TERMS OF TOTAL RECEIPTS AND TOTAL NUMBER OF
ESTABLISHMENTS. DURING THE LAST DECADE THE UNITED STATES HAS
EXPERIENCED A 30% INCREASE IN RECEIPTS, AND MORE THAN 11% INCREASE
IN THE NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES. CHATHAM COUNTY EXPERIENCED A
COMPARABLE INCREASE IN RECEIPTS, BUT EXPERIENCED LESS THAN
HALF THE RELATIVE INCREASE IN EMPLOYEES.

THE PREDOMINATE TREND IN THE STATE OF GEORGIA IS CONSIS-
TENTLY ON THE UPSWING. THE AMOUNT OF SERVICE RECEIPTS HAS
SHOWN A STEADY INCREASE, AND ONLY TWO CATEGORIES OF BUSINESS
FAILED TO ILLUSTRATE A GAIN AS A PERCENTAGE OF CHANGE.

C. TOURISM:

IN ORDER TO PROPERLY PREDICT THE TOURIST POTENTIAL FOR
THE PROJECT, AN OVERVIEW OF THE MARKET MUST BE FORMULATED.
FOUR POTENTIAL MARKET AREAS, VARYING DISTANCES FROM SAVANNAH
WILL BE EXAMINED. THE PRIMARY MARKET AREA IS DEFINED AS THAT
AREA CLOSEST TOTHE SITE AND WITHIN A SHORT DRIVING TIME OF THE
SITE. FIVE COUNTIES; BRYAN, CHATHAM, AND EFFINGHAM GEORGIA
AND BEAUFORT AND JASPER COUNTIES, SOUTH CAROLINA ARE INCLUDED
IN TEH PRIMARY MARKET AREA. THE SECONDARY MARKET AREA
INCLUDES THOSE COUNTIES OUTSIDE OF THE PRIMARY MARKET WHICH
ARE WITHIN A ONE TO TWO HOUR DRIVE OF THE SITE AND INCLUDE
BULLOCK, CANDLER,'EVANS, GLYNN, LIBERTY, LONG, MCINTOSH, SCREEN,
TATTNALL, AND WAYNE COUNTIES, GEORGIA, AND ALLENDALE, COLLETON,
AND HAMPTON COUNTIES SOUTH CAROLINA. THE TERRITORIAL MARKET AREA
IS DEFINED TO INCLUDE THE REMAINING PORTIONS OF GEORGIA AND
SOUTH CAROLINA. THE FINAL MARKET COULD BE DEFINED SO AS TO
INCLUDE ALL TRAVELERS PASSING THROUGH OR COMING TO SAVANNAH
FROM OUTSIDE GEORGIA OR SOUTH CAROLINA. THIS AREA PRIMARILY
CONSIST OF RESIDENTS OF THE REMAINDER OF THE EASTERN UNITED
STATES. ANALYSIS OF POPULATION AND POPULATION CHARACTERIS-
TICS REVEALS A 10 MILLION VISITOR POTENTIAL, INCLUDING 7.5
MILLION FROM THE GEORGIA-SOUTH CAROLINA AREAS AND 2.5 MILLION
FROM THE EAST COAST. FROM THIS POTENTIAL OF 10 MILLION,
.9% TO 1.6% CAN ACTUALLY BE EXPECTED TO VISIT THE SITE. WE
ARE THUS SPEAKING OF 92,000 TO 164,000 VISITORS PER YEAR.
(SEE TABLE).


11111- -11


-- --









PROJECTED BICENTENNIAL PARK ATTENDANCE
INITIAL YEAR OF OPERATIONS/


Market Area

Primary

Secondary

Tertiary

Subtotal

Tourist Potential


Total


Market
Potential

279,000

230,000

7,036,000

7,545,000

2,500,000


10,045,000


Penetration
Rate

15.0%-25.0%

5.0%-10.0%

0.2%- 0.3%

0.9%- 1.5%

1.0%-- 2.0%


0.9%- 1.6%


1/ Does not include attendance estimates for specific Bicenten-
nial events which should be added to the above figures.

Source: Estimated by Morton Hoffman and Company, Inc.


_____1 I


Attendance

41,900- 69,800

11,500- 23,000

14,100- 21,100

67,500-113,900

25,000- 50,000


92,500-163,900


'' --









OF SIGNIFICANT IMPORTANCE IS A RECENT SURVEY OF OUT OF
STATE VISITORS TO THE GEORGIA WELCOME CENTERS. REVEALED IN
THIS SURVEY WAS THE FACT THAT THE GREATEST PROPORTION OF
GEORGIA VISITORS ENJOYING HISTORICAL AND OTHER RELATED
ATTRACTIONS VISITED SAVANNAH. THIS SIGNIFICANTLY HIGH
INTEREST IN HISTORIC ATTRACTIONS SHOWN BY SAVANNAH AREA
VISITORS IS A POSITIVE INCENTIVE FOR A TOURIST ORIENTED INPUT
INTO THE PROJECT. IN ORDER TO DETERMINE THE DIMENSIONS OF THE
TOURSIT ECONOMY POTENTIAL, UTILIZATION WAS MADE OF SURVEYS
CONDUCTED BY THE STATE OF VISITORS INCOME LEVELS. DISCOVERED
WAS THAT VISITORS TO THE SAVANNAH AREA GENERALLY HAVE A
SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER INCOME LEVEL THAN THE AVERAGE OUT OF
STATE VISITORS TO GEORGIA. APPROXIMATELY 2/3 OF THE OUT OF
STATE VISITORS TO THE SAVANNAH WELCOME CENTER HAD INCOMES IN
EXCESS OF $15,000 PER YEAR. THIS FACT DEMONSTRATES THE RELATIVE-
LY HIGH LEVEL OF FINANCIAL MARKET SUPPORT FOR ANY PROPOSED
FACILITIES IN THE SITE.

THE EXISTING TOURIST MARKET HAS EXPERIENCED SIGNIFICANT
GROWTH IN RECENT YEARS. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STATISTICS
INDICATE A UPSURGE IN OVERNGITH VISITORS FROM APPROXIMATELY
744,000 IN 1971 TO 933,000 IN 1974. LIKEWISE CONVENTIONS IN
SAVANNAH EXPERIENCED AN INCREASE FROM ABOUT 400 IN 1970 WHICH
HOSTED 32,000 DELEGATES TO ABOUT 621 CONVENTIONS HOSTING 47,000
DELEGATES.

ATTENDANCE AT EXISTING HISTORIC ATTRACTION WILL OFFER SOME
INSIGHT INTO THE TOURIST POTENTIAL FOR THE SITE. FORT PULASKI
HOSTED 300,000. VISITORS WHILE THE SHIPS OF THE SEA MUSEUM,
HOSTED 30,000 VISITORS, THE TELFAIR ACADEMY 17,000, THE
OWNES-THOMAS HOUSE, 15,000 AND THE DAVENPORT HOUSE 14,000
VISITORS PER YEAR.

TRAFFIC ON THE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM WILL ALSO HAVE A
MARKED INFLUENCE ON THE TOURIST ECONOMY OF SAVANNAH. WHEN
COMPLETE 1-95 WILL LINK THE NORTH WITH FLORIDA AND BECOME ONE
OF THE MAJOR TOURIST ROUTES OF THE COUNTRY. PROJECTIONS INDICATE
THAT IN THE INITIAL YEAR OF OPERATION, 1-95 WILL
CARRY APPROXIMATELY 22,000 VEHICLES PER DAY PASS THE MAIN
EXIT TO SAVANNAH, BY 1990 THIS NUMBER IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE
TO 32,000 PER DAY. NATURALLY THIS FACTOR WILL HAVE A GREAT
EFFECT ON THE POTENTIAL TOURIST ASPECTS OF THE PROJECT.


I_ _


_I I









Finance

ONE OF PRESERVATION'S GREATEST OBSTICALS IS FINANCIAL
STABILITY. PRESERVATION ON THE SCALE OF THIS PROJECT MUST
PROVE TO BE ECONOMICALLY SOUND BEFORE IT CAN REALISTICALLY
BE UNDERTAKEN. IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE THIS REQUIREMENT,
THE FORMATION OF A CORPORATION IS PROPOSED. THIS CORPORATION
SHALL BE STRUCTURED AS A NON-PROFIT CORPORATION, WITH THE
INCUMBENT MAYOR AS THE SOLE STOCK HOLDER. A BOARD OF SEVEN
DIRECTORS SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE MAYOR, WITH THE CONCENT
AND APPROVAL OF THE COUNCIL. THE BOARD MEMBERS SHALL BE
SELECTED FROM THE PROMINENT CITIZENRY OF SAVANNAH; THEIR BACK-
GROUNDS VARYING FROM BUSINESS, ARCHITECTURE, LAW, PRESERVATION,
& ECONOMICS. THESE BOARD MEMBERS SHALL SERVE WITHOUT PAY FOR
STAGGERING TERMS OF FOUR YEARS. THE BOARD SHALL ADMINISTER,
OPERATE AND MAINTAIN THE COM PLEX WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF A
COMPEDENT PAID PROFESSIONAL STAFF AVAILABLE SPECIFICALLY FOR
THE COMPLEX. THIS CORPORATION SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL
FINANCIAL MATTERS, INCLUDING SECURING THE INTIIAL AND
OPERATING FUNDS.

FUNDING FOR THE REHABILITAITON SHALL BE SECURED FROM THE
FOLLOWING SOURCES

1. APPROIATIONS PROVIDED BY THE GEORGIA LEGISLATURE
FOR A SPECIAL STATE FUNDING AUTHORITY, AS HAS BEEN DONE FOR
THE STONE MOUNTAIN COMMISSION & THE LAKE LANIER ISLAND DEPEL-
OPMENT AUTHORITY.

2. AVAILABLE HISTORICAL PRESERVATION MATCHING GRANTS
FROM THE DEPT. OF INTERIOR UNDER THE PRESERVATION ACT OF 1966.

3. BLOCK GRANT FUNDS FROM THE 1974 HOUSING AND COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT ACT.

4. FUNDS RAISED BY LOCAL FUND RAISING EVENTS.

5. THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES.

6. INDIVIDUAL AND CORPORATION CONTRIBUTIONS


7. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


all I


! m 131 m










FROM THESE SOURCES FUNDS SHOULD BE SECURED TO COVER THE
ENTIRE COST OF THE PROJECT. HOWEVER SHOULD FUNDS FALL SHORT
OF THE PROJECTED COST, FUNDS SHOULD BE SECURED THROUGH REVENUE
BONDS SOLD BY THE CITY OF SAVANNAH WITH THE FULL FAITH AND
CREDIT OF THE STATE. THESE BONDS SHALL BE AMMORIZED THROUGH
CONTRACT RENTS FOR SPACE IN THE COMPLEX. RENTS SHALL BE BASED
ON A SQUARE FOOTAGE COST FACTOR PLUS A PERCENTAGE OF THEIR
GROSS REVENUE. A PERCENTAGE OF THE FUNDS ACQUIRED THROUGH
THESE CONTRACT RENTS SHALL BE PLACED IN A TRUST TO INSURE THE
ON GOING FINANCIAL STABILITY OF THE ENDEVOR AND FOR FUTURE
EXPANSION FO THE PROJECT. RENTS, LIKEWISE WILL BE USED TO
PARTIALLY FINANCE THE VISITOR ORIENTATION PORTION OF THE
COMPLEX. MAINTENANCE AND SECURITY FOR THE COMMON AREAS OF THE
COMPLEX SHALL BE FUNDED THROUGH THE RENTS ALSO.


__ I I


*--It. L









Preliminary Program

THE FOLLOWING PROPOSALS ARE MADE IN CONSIDERATION OF THE
CITY OF SAVANNAH'S PROPOSED BI CENTENIAL PARK. THE PROGRAMMING
PHASING AND FINANCING IN NO WAY IS INTENDED TO RESTRICT OR
ALTER THE PROJECTED PROGRAMMING, BUT RATHER TO REFINE COMPLIMENT
AND ENHANCE THE POTENTENCY OF THE PROJECT. HOWEVER, IN THE EVENT
THAT THE PROPOSED PARK DOES NOT MATERIALIZE AS PLANNED, THE
PROJECT CAN STILL BE UNDERTAKEN AS PROPOSED HERE.

THE PROPOSED REHABILITATION OF THIS COMPLEX IS AN HONEST
ATTEMPT TO INHANCE SAVANNAH'S ECONOMIC STRENGTH, BY HELPING
TOURISM, RETAIL SALES, SERVICES AND ENTERTAINMENT. IN ORDER
TO REDUCE THE NEED GOVERNMENTAL SPENDING FOR SUCH A LARGE
UNDERTAKING, IT IS PROPOSED THAT THE CORPORATIONS RESPONSIBILITY
LAY SOLELY IN THE RESTORATION OF THE BUILDING EXTERIORS AND
COMMON SPACES. REHABILITATION SHALL BE EXECUTED IN SUCH A
MANNER THAT THE OLD AND NEW MEET IN A HARMONIOUS COEXISTANCE.
BECAUSE THIS PROJECT IS A REHABILITATION AND NOT A RESTORATION,
COMPROMISES IN AUTHORITY CAN BE MADE BUT NEVER IN INTEGRITY.

THE ORIGINAL PROPOSAL BY THE CITY ANTICIPATES THE DEMOLI-
TION OF THREE STRUCTURES OF THE COMPLEX AND NbTHING TO REPLACE
THEM. THIS PROPOSAL IS SERIOUSLY QUESTIONED HERE. FIRST OF
ALL THE COMPLEX IS THE ONLY PRE CIVIL WAR COMPLEX STILL IN
EXISTENCE AND AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE SHOULD BE PRESERVED,
SECONDLY EXECUTION OF THERE PLANS WILL SERIOUSLY JEPARDIZE THE









SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE REMAINING BUILDINGS. THE DIALOGUE
CARRIED ON BY THE STRUCTURES IN THEIR PRESENT CONFIGURATION
IS A VERY STRONG ASSET OF THE COMPLEX. THE PROPOSED DIVORCE
WILL BEGIN TO UNRAVEL THE FABRIC OF THE COMPLEX PLACING
BUILDINGS IN A SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP WHICH WAS NEVER INTENDED.
SINCE THE COMPLEX HAS NO RELATIONSHIP TO A FIXED ARCHITEC-
TURAL ENVIRONMENT, THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE COMPLEX TO ITSELF
IS VERY IMPORTANT TO MAINTAIN.

BASED ON A STRUCTURAL EXAMINATION OF THE COMPLEX, THE
MACHINE SHOP IS BEYOND UTILIZATION. THE BUILDING IS IMPORTANT,
SPECIALLY, HOWEVER, IN THAT IT DEFINES CLEARLY TWO SEPARATE
RESOLVANT SPACES. THIS SPACIAL DEFINITION IS IMPORTANT TO
MAINTAIN EITHER THROUGH RECONSTRUCTION OR BY HARMONIOUS NEW
CONSTRUCTION. ENGINEERING REPORTS INDICATE THAT THE REMAINING
BUILDINGS ARE ALL PRESERVALBE. HOWEVER THE AMOUNT OF REHABILITA-
TION WILL VARY GREATLY AMONG THE BUILDINGS.

THE RECOMMENDED APPROACH FOR THE COMPLEX, IN CONCEPT IS
TO PROVIDE A COMMUNITY CENTER WITH A WIDE VARIETY OF FUNCTIONS
AND SERVICES, FOR THE CITY AND A ORIENTATION/FOCAL POINT FOR
THE VISITOR. THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE COMPLEX SHOULD BE SUCH
THAT THE RESIDENTS OF SAVANNAH AND THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES
WILL WANT TO FREQUENTLY VISIT FOR SHOPPING, BUSINESS, ENTER-
TAINMENT OR TO ATTEND CRAFT DISPLAYS, BAZAARS AND FLEE MARKETS
IN ADDITION, THE STRATEGIC LOCATION OF THE SITE TO THE ENTRANCE
OF THE CITY, AND TO THE VISITORS CENTER, MAKES THE COMPLEX
AN IDEAL LOCATION FOR A VISITORS ORIENTATION POINT TO THE
HISTORIC ASPECTS OF SAVANNAH. IN DOING THIS THE BUSINESS
POTENTIAL OF THE COMPLEX IS FURTHER INCREASED BY ADDING THE
POTENTIAL SALES OF THE VISITOR TOTHE COMMUNITY SALES. THE
ORIENTATION ASPECTS OF THE COMPLEX CAN FURTHER BE USED AS
EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES FOR GEORGIA SCHOOL CHILDREN IN
INFORMING THEM ON THEIR STATES HERITAGE.

THE ACTUAL USES OF THE BUILDINGS SHALL STRIKE A BALANCE
BETWEEN TOURISM, RETAIL SALES, ENTERTAINMENT AND SERVICES, AS
DICTATED BY THE MARKET. RENTAL SPACES SHALL ALSO REFLECT THE
CHANGING MARKET AND BE VERY FLEXABLE, SO AS TO ACCOMMODATE
NUMEROUS FACILITIES.


SUGGESTED USES INCLUDE: SPECIALITY SHOPPS; SUCH AS


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BOOK, CAMERAS, LEATHERGOODS, JEWELRY, CANDLES, LINEN, PERFUME,
GLASS, POTTERY, GOURMET, KITES, TOBACCO, BAKERY, ANTIQUES,
BRASS,GIFT, PLANT AND CLOTHES SHOPS, ENTERTAINMENT; SUCH AS
BARS, DISCOS, RESTAURANTS AND QUICK FOOD CONCESSIONS; SMALL
BOOTHS FOR ARTISTS, ARTISANS, FLEE MARKET TYPE SALES, FLOWERS,
CANDY AND OTHER QUICK TYPE FOOD; TOURIST ORIENTATION AREA,
DISPLAY AND THEATER; AND SERVICES SUCH AS TRAVEL AGENCIES,
LAWYER, ARCHITECT, AND ACCOUNTANT OFFICES AND OFFICES FOR THE
ADMINISTRATION OF THE COMPLEX.


III I


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