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Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean (NEH Challenge Grant Proposal)
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 Material Information
Title: Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean (NEH Challenge Grant Proposal)
Physical Description: Grant Proposal
Creator: Nemmers, John
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: May 2011
 Notes
Abstract: The University of Florida (UF) requests $500,000 in NEH Challenge Grant funds to be matched by $1.5 million in new private support for Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean. This four-year project will ensure the long-term sustainability of UF’s effort to preserve historical records relating to the built environment, and to steward these humanities resources for scholarship and education. Through UF Libraries’ leadership, in partnership with the UF Foundation; UF College of Design, Construction & Planning; and 13 regional chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), we plan to 1) endow a Architecture Archives Curator position, ensuring expert oversight of acquisition, preservation and access programs ($1.9 million) in perpetuity; and 2) acquire new holdings, and fund permanent storage and shelving ($100,000).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00001618:00001

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Office of Research
Division of <*pr)isorcd Rlccjr.. h
PO Box 115500 / 219 Grinter Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611-5500
Phone: (352) 392-1582
Fax: (352) 392-4400


LJF UNIVERSITY of


DSR-1

Sponsored Projects
Approval Form


lnpIe J n m r For Multiple PI Projects one Contact PI
Principal Investigator: John Nemmers '1uluipl PI Project: [Z Yes NO must be idenufied in the signatu block

Department: Special and Area Studies ( oulleg UF Libraries Current UPN#: (DSR Completes)

Project Title: Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
If Known:
Funding Agency: NEH
PeopleSoft Prripiidl i- _

Type: New Category: Research O UF/Dept Person to discuss Applicaton
Renewal I r.inmne (name/phone/email): PeopleSoft PrnjecI r.
Continuation ] Extension D Bess de Farber
, ,Application Deadline:
Supplemental U Clinical Trial D bdefarber@ufl.edu A poma r elRe
Revised U Other* Postmark E Receipt None
Change of PI O 273-2519
-n *(Fellowships, patient services, public service, Date: 05104711
Change Dept ID D conference, etc.) Date: 05104/11

Check all ihal applh Yes No Pending 1pplitaliin iMlailnt lnclruction ] Grants.gov
*Human Subjects (IRB) E] 0 D Mail Original and _ Copies to: D Other Electronic System
*Animal Subjects (IACUC) [] [0 N/A [ FedEx
Recombinant DNA/RNA OD M U Other Overnight
Biohazards Ui F -- First Class Mail
*(If yes, attach the IRB and/or the IACUC approval letter) ___Fax to:
(",I 'naJrmni Ifyes,completethe followin." O1 EmailPDF
Yes DO Mandatory: $ Attach the required cost share letter and agency guidelines 0 Release back to PI
No 0 Voluntary Committed: $ Attach the "Dean's Approval" Letter 0I Internal Only (no mailing)

(DSR Use) DSR Staff: Received Action Date (FedEx Account Number)

Mulnipli i'nni ipal Inrc ligailr Projects: For those projects designated as a Multiple PI Project the listed Pis share itr< r:,p'n,arnIlr tor directing and managing the project in accordance
with University and Sponsor policies and procedures, The Contact PI will be responsible for relaying communications between all of the PIs, I rn i , ir1 'Ili. .tal d tiih: Sponsor.
Principal Investigator Endorsement: By signing below you agree to perform the work and manage the project in accordance with University and Sponsor policies and procedures.
Investigators) Assurance Statement as Required by Federal H. ulatiuon Investigator (s), by , rin th, r DSR-I form, further certify that: (1) the information submitted within the
application is true, complete and accurate to the best of their knowledge; (2) that any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements or claims may subject the Investigator(s) to criminal, civil,
or administrative penalties; 3.I i t ihJ I P , Priri pal IrI. ' l ihin - i 1. ri. I1.. j.... p[ re:pon ir ir, ' Tir ti 11- - n i. ,i ,ii c .onduil .-i.I the project and to provide the required progress reports and
the final report if a grant is awarded as a result of the application.
University Endorsement: This project has been reviewed by the officials whose signatures appear below as they relate to their areas and are satisfied that all faculty involved in the
project have agreed to participate .i ar 1 l ..i , ,ii ali.,r . and commitments described herein are acceptable
Indirect Cost Distributions: Upon receipt ofDSR's Notice of Award, Principal Investigator(s) are instructed to use the Office of Research web-based F&A Manager to declare how the
indirect costs collected under the award shall be distributed. The return of indirect costs generally occurs in the Fall of each year and is based upon the indirect costs collected from grants
and contracts during the preceding fiscal year (July I - June 30).


Princial I'-.i"ili.': Check here if Contact PI L

NAMy hn Nemmers
TiTL associate University Librarian
UFi. 4048-3570 TELEPHONE #: 273-2766
DEPARTMENT l and Area St
Depar nt Ch --


DATE


NAME- Richard Bennett DATE
DEPARTMENT Special and Area Studies


/ .'k tk z

/ Judith C. Russell DATE
( LLEGE: UF Libraries


NAME Samuel Huang DATE
TITLE Associate Dean of Advancement and Develop t
UFID : I TELEPHONE #: 273-2514
DEPARTMENT: *
Other Endorsement (Wier Needed):

NAME: Cynniua Pelerson DATE
TITLE Curator, Architecture Archives
ACADEMIC UNIT" UF Libraries - Special and Area Studies
Vice President for Research:

NAME: DATE
Division of Sponsored Research


l'e ., add .ii..liolul signature sheets as needed.


DSR-1PDF ( September 3,2009)


J;1-1?-1?;V






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Table of Contents

Abstract 1

Challenge Grant Budget 1

Institutional Fact Sheet (University of Florida) 1
Institutional Fact Sheet (University of Florida Libraries) 2

Financial Summary (University of Florida) 1
Financial Summary (University of Florida Libraries) 2

Narrative
I. Significance and Intellectual Quality of Humanities Activities, Programs, and
Holdings 1
II. Long-Range Plans for Advancing and Disseminating Humanistic
Knowledge 12
III. Impact that Challenge Grant Funds Will Have on the Humanities 18
IV. Plans for Fund Raising 21
V. Conclusion: Why UF, why now, why architecture? 24
References 25

List of Board and Staff 1-2

Resumes 1-10

Letters of Commitment/Support 1-40

Appendices 1-41

Appendix A: Five Year Strategic Plan
Appendix B: Holdings
Appendix C: Exhibits
Appendix D: Publications
Appendix E: Curator of the Architecture Archives Position Description
Appendix F: Storage System Photograph
Appendix G: Storage System Cost Estimate
Appendix H: Internship Program Description
Appendix I: Photographs of Carrere and Hastings Drawings - Ponce de Leon Hotel
Appendix J: UF Foundation Report of Fundraising (2008 to 2011)
Appendix K: Promotional and Proposal Materials






University of Florida


Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives
of Florida and the Caribbean

Abstract
The University of Florida (UF) requests $500,000 in NEH Challenge Grant funds to be matched
by $1.5 million in new private support for Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture
Archives of Florida and the Caribbean. This four-year project will ensure the long-term
sustainability of UF's effort to preserve historical records relating to the built environment and to
steward these humanities resources for scholarship and education. Through UF Libraries'
leadership, in partnership with the UF Foundation; UF College of Design, Construction &
Planning; and 13 regional chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), we plan to 1)
endow the Architecture Archives Curator position, ensuring expert oversight of acquisition,
preservation and access programs ($1.9 million) in perpetuity; and 2) acquire new holdings, and
fund permanent storage and shelving ($100,000).

Humanities activities related to building the Archives, the leading repository in the state and
Caribbean for architectural resources, and disseminating humanistic knowledge from now until
2015 include: continued archival management of current and future collections, conservation
and digitization of primary resources whenever necessary through in-house conservation and
digital labs, design of physical and online exhibitions of holdings, and continued artifact loan
program to museums and academic institutions seeking items from the Archives for public
programs. Additionally, the Libraries plan to augment current stewardship to include:
completing the Florida Architecture and Design Survey Project, the first of its kind in Florida;
establishing a state Cooperative Preservation of Archival Records Committee; developing Web
technologies to support various social media formats to further explore relationships between
humanity and the built environment; and establishing an oral history program to complement the
Archives holdings.

The Libraries' fundraising plans to complete the $1.5 million matching requirement will be
carried out in partnership with the UF Foundation, College of Design, Construction and
Planning, School of Architecture, and 13 Florida Chapters of the American Institute of
Architecture (AIA). The team's targeted giving objectives will focus on 1) clients of architects
and patrons of architecture in Florida and Caribbean, 2) UF alumni and private donors, and 3)
foundations and organizations with architectural interests. To engage the architectural
community in fundraising, and to promote the importance of preserving architectural records, UF
and its partners will coordinate a series of Creator, User, Keeper - Documenting and Preserving
the Records of our Built Heritage presentations hosted by each of 13 AIA Florida Chapters. The
team goal is to identify five qualified donors at each event for further cultivation and solicitation.

Why UF, why now, why architecture? Today, there are multiple dynamics that both justify the
need for this project and validate UF's capacity to meet the goals of this campaign. 1) Never
before has there been such an urgency expressed by the architectural community and
humanities scholars for the acquisition and preservation of primary historical records. 2) UF is
uniquely positioned with local, regional and global collaborative relationships, competent and
committed professionals, and an impressive track record of establishing and funding humanities
collections and services. 3) UF Libraries have the required infrastructure to successfully execute
a project campaign of this breadth and complexity. 4) The professional design community in
Florida and the Caribbean are generally untapped sources of both historically significant
materials and private funds. 5) Recent success of the Archives in acquiring collections and
developing programs to both serve and promote those holdings. Awarding UF the challenge to
prove itself as a meritorious recipient for NEH funds is an opportunity to capitalize on the
synergy created to date.





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


Challenge Grant Budget
January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2015

Total NEH funds requested: $500,000
Year 1: $75,000
Year 2: $125,000
Year 3: $150,000
Year 4: $150,000
Total nonfederal contributions $1,500,000

Total Grant Funds (NEH plus Match) $2,000,000

Planned Expenditures:

Direct
Oral Histories (Transcripts and Oral Interview) $12,000
Fundraising -15 Regional Talks/Roundtables Travel/Honoraria $15,360
Archival Storage/Flat Files $72,640
Total Direct expenditures $100,000

Endowed
Principal $1,900,000
Rate of return to be expended 4%
Projected annual expendable income $76,000
Uses of endowment income $76,000
Curator salary $66,750
Stipend for Intern $4,100
Lecture series expenses $3,000
Oral history expenses $2,150






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Institutional Fact Sheet - University of Florida

UF History: Florida's oldest university was established in 1853 and named the University of Florida
(UF) in 1906. UF, located in Gainesville, Florida, was nationally ranked 6th (2010) in enrollment with
almost 50,000 students, 83% are Floridians. UF is home to 16 colleges and more than 150 research
centers and institutes. UF mission is to offer broad-based, inclusive public education; leading-edge
research; and service to the residents of Florida and the nation.

UF governance/administration: The UF Board of Trustees, a public body corporate and
instrumentality of the State of Florida, sets policy and provides governance. The UF Board of
Trustees holds the institution's resources in trust. Trustees include six citizen members appointed by
the Governor and five citizen members appointed by the Board of Governors. The faculty participate
in a shared governance model. The chair of the Faculty Senate and the president of the student
body are also voting members.

Accreditation: UF has received Full Accreditations from 45 entities including the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools/Commission on Colleges, National Association of Schools of
Art and Design, and National Architecture Accrediting Board.

UF Foundation (Direct Support Organization): The University of Florida Foundation, Inc. is a non-
profit, 501(c)(3) organization that receives, invests and administers private support for UF. (see letter
of commitment for details)

UF Facilities: UF's 2,000-acre main campus features 900 buildings totaling 17,587,545 sq. ft., of
which approximately 157 are used for humanities totaling 5.14 million sq. ft. The northeast corner of
campus is listed as a Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places.

Facultyl/staff/student/general audience size/composition: UF faculty numbers more than 4,000,
including 62 Eminent Scholar Chairs. There have been many honored past and present faculty
including Pulitzer Prize winners in editorial writing, photography and poetry. All UF undergrads (70%
total enrollment) are required to complete 6 to 9 credits in the humanities, depending on college.
Student body represents every state plus 3,700 international students representing 100+ countries:
22 % are graduate students; 8 % are in professional degree programs. Approximately 27% are
minorities, with 8% African-American, 12% Hispanic, and 7% Asian-American or Pacific Islander.
UF serves both national and international audiences through online resources, and Alachua county
audiences (pop. 247,336, 70% White, 20% Black, .31% Native American, 5% Asian, of which 8%
are Hispanic)

Humanities: Degrees awarded (selected majors): 2009/10: Bachelors - 1,616; Masters - 119;
Doctor of Philosophy - 87; courses: over 800; publications: 1,050 (2009); 1,015 (2010); 354 (April
2011); faculty 1,048 (2008), 1,045 (2009); and staff 952 (2008), 968 (2009).

Museums/Galleries include The Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art permanent collection of 7,000+
original works, audience 87,879 (2009) and 77,277 (2010), exhibits 16 (2009) and 17 (2010),
lectures 15 (2009) and 10 (2010). The Florida Museum of Natural History visitors 193,900 (FY
2009); 188,500 (FY 2010), 40% program budgets related to humanities, 7 exhibits plus 9 online
exhibits (FY2010). The Colleqe of Desiqn, Construction and Planning Gallery, The College of Fine
Arts School of Art and Art History three galleries, University Galleries held 23 exhibitions (FY 2010-
11).

Cost: per credit hour: undergraduate: $168.50 (FL resident rate); $910.72 (FL non-resident);
graduate: $454.83 (FL resident rate); $1179.71 (FL non-resident); most humanities events, lectures
and exhibits are free; otherwise admission to three large venues is typically $12 to $50.






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

UF Libraries Fact Sheet

The University of Florida Libraries form the largest public library service and information resource
system in the state of Florida, containing more than 5.6 million volumes, 7.9 million microfilms,
453,000 e-books, 158,695 full-text electronic journals and 1,162 electronic databases. The extensive
collections include formats ranging from manuscripts to electronic texts, distributed in eight libraries
across campus. Library collections are accessed through the online catalog. UF Libraries offer
patrons 136 databases, 9 large journal packages, and the state consortium provides UF users
access to an additional 117 databases that all support research across the Humanities.

Governance: UF Libraries are organized through shared governance; there is collaborative
participation of administrators and faculty in the decision and policy making process. Administration
and Faculty Assembly work jointly following the principles of collegiality, and transparency. Bylaws
and Standing Rules provide structure and define roles. Mission: dedicated to supporting UF's
threefold mission of teaching, research, and service.

Faculty/Staff: 96 library faculty; 189 staff; Humanities - faculty: 52; staff: 78

Collections: The UF Digital Collections include the Florida and Caribbean Newspaper Libraries.
Total number of online user views of humanities UF Digital collections: 5,832,429(2009); 8,312,288
(2010); 5,645,126 (2011 -4 months)

Facilities: The UF Libraries on campus have a total square footage of 516,433 square feet, of which
398,848.5 square feet (77.2%) are for Humanities.

Lectures / Exhibits/ Presentations/ Events: Humanities related lectures by the Libraries in 2009-
2010: Unique lectures: 154; Lecture sessions: 646; Attendees: 13,700. UF DLC Lectures/
Presentations: 24 (2009); 44(2010); 13(2011-5 months). Exhibits: 22 (2009-10); 20(2010-11);
Online exhibits: 47; Events: 5, Attendees: 4,750

Gate Counts: Library West: 1,213,619 (2009); 1,109,095 (2010); 315,236 (2011 - 3 months) Music
Library: 32,713 (2009); 27,042 (2010); 10,827 (2011 -4 months); Education Library: 112,558
(2009); 96,373 (2010); Special Collections and Area Studies: 4222 (2009/10); Journalism Library:
56,818 (2009); 57,392 (2010) ; Latin American Center: 8,900 (2008-09); 8,700 (2009-10);
Architecture and Fine Arts Library: 153,792 (2008); 161,000 (2009); 34,923 (2011 - 4 months);
Marston Science Library- Humanities related: 767,482 (2008-09), 756,882 (2009-10).

The Digital Library Center (DLC), among the largest capacity digitization facilities in the
southeastern US, manages over 6.2 million pages of digital content. The Neuharth Journalism
Library has about 1200 linear feet of books in its collection. Education Library contains 150,000
volumes, 840 print/electronic journal/serial subscriptions, 585,000 titles on microfiche, a research
collection, 10,000 children's books, a small 800 volume K-12 textbook collection, a 1,000 volume
print reference collection, a DVD/video collection of 318 items, and 25 research guides.
Government Documents Repository has 623,112 humanities-related documents. Humanities &
Social Sciences Library (the largest branch in the UF Libraries) has 1.1 million print volumes, 2.2
million volumes overall, humanities & social sciences and business collections, 80,000 volumes from
the Price Library of Judaica and an important collection of microforms with an emphasis on historical
Florida newspapers. The collections support over 128 academic programs. The Architecture and
Fine Arts Library houses 1,000 historic preservation documents and 10,000 linear feet of print/book
materials. The collections include 130,000 book volumes and 1700 video titles. The Music Library
collection consists of 33,328 monograph volumes; 13,788 scores; 230 monuments, collected works,
and historical sets; 145 current journal titles; 14,811 microforms; 22,549 sound recordings; 1,021
video cassettes/DVDs; and 1,056 vertical file pieces.

Cost: The Libraries do not charge patrons for lectures, exhibitions, services or accessibility.





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


Financial Summary
University of Florida & Direct Support Orgs
2010-11
Cash-Basis Budget
Amounts expressed in thousands 2008-09 2009-10 Data Only

OPERATING REVENUES
Earned Revenue
Student Tuition and Fees, Net of Scholarship Allowances 228,987 245,369 268,638
Sales and Services 259,872 302,754 302,018
Royalties and Licensing Fees - Component Units 54,488 28,317
Federal Grants and Contracts (2010-11 Stimulus) 333,871 381,729 581,418
State and Local Grants and Contracts 67,184 53,016 included above
Nongovernmental Grants and Contracts 573,094 571,481 403,970
Private Gifts and Donations - Component Units 136,545 92,099
Trust funds 29,770
Investment: Interest on Loans and Notes Receivable 769 1,958
Other Operating Revenues 8549 9,119 169,548

Total Operating Revenues 1,663,359 1,685,842 1,755,362

OPERATING EXPENSES
Compensation and Employee Benefits 1,456,954 1,514,455
Scholarships, Fellowships and Waivers, Net 98,459 97,324
Services and Supplies 352,375 390,442
Utilities and Communications 71,510 73,879
Depreciation 128,164 124,501
Self-Insured Claims and Expenses 21,654 23,957
Other Component Unit Operating Expenses 320,478 261,412

Total Operating Expenses 2,449,594 2,485,970 2,173,862

Operating Income (Loss) (786,235) (800,128) (418,500)

NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES)
State Appropriations & American Recovery & Reinvestment Act 620,968 593,116 432,134
Federal and State Student Financial Aid 123,949 142,184
Investment Income Gain (Loss) (47,801) 59,180
Net Increase/Decrease in the Fair Value of Investments (195,167) 135,660
Investment Expenses - (1,476)
Gain (Loss) on Disposal of Capital Assets (3,487) 2,177
Nonoperating Revenue
Other Nonoperating Expenses (8,254) (12,310)

Net Nonoperating Revenues (Expenses) 490,208 918,531 432,134

Income (Loss) Before Other Revenues, Expenses, Gains, or Losses (296,027) 118,403 13,634

Net Assets, Beginning of Year 2,095,394 3,689,196

Adjustment to Beginning Net Assets (11,412) 42,669

Adjusted Net Assets, Beginning of Year, as Restated 2,083,982 3,731,865

Net Assets, End of Year $ 1,787,955 $ 3,850,268





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


I


* Endowment income in 08-09 was in a deficit. This represents investment losses on endowments between July 1,
2008 and June 30, 2009.

** The net gains largely reflect increased endowments and deferred expenditures. The current Libraries Dean and
Associate Dean for Development were appointed in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Since that time they have focused
on building library endowments in order to supplement the library funding available through other sources.
Additionally, in the past three fiscal years, the Libraries have reduced and deferred expenditures for operations and
staffing in preparation for severe budget cuts and recalls.

*** UF Libraries have reserved for significant pending expenditures for major projects. These include State University
System (SUS) Shared Collection and the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF). In October of 2007, the Board of Governors of
the Florida State University System (SUS) approved a request to build a high density storage facility at UF to provide
space for a shared research collection for the SUS libraries. The plan called for a high density "Harvard" model storage
facility with a capacity of 4.5 to 5 million print volumes. Planning and preparation is underway, but construction of the
facility has been deferred by the state due to budget shortfalls.


Financial Summary
University of Florida Libraries
(Smathers, Health Science Center and Borland Libraries)


2010-11
2008-09 2009-10 (estimated)


INCOME
Appropriations 27,384,788 26,797,284 27,580,139
Sponsored Research 1,462,984 2,518,142 2,760,176
Auxiliary 659,445 285,180 670,764
New Gifts (Cash Only) 893,281 524,426 171,471
Endowment Income * (1,580,547) 809,664 1,603,004

Total Income 28,819,951 30,934,696 32,785,554

EXPENDITURES
Programs 22,326,836 23,196,387 24,164,282
Administration 3,847,572 3,637,634 3,193,588
Maint/Operations 2,114,122 2,074,325 1,928,528

Total Expenditures 28,288,530 28,908,346 29,286,398



Net ** 531,421 2,026,350 3,499,156



Balance Forward *** 5,024,942 7,051,292 10,550,448




% of Humanities Expenditures related to specific humanities
databases, collections and related faculty/staff 42.8% 42.6% 41.4%



ENDOWMENT
Balance at end of FY - actual cash received 9,263,584 10,360,138 11,161,640
Annual Rate of Return 4.00% 4.00% 4.14%






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

The University of Florida (UF) requests $500,000 in NEH Challenge Grant funds to be matched

by $1.5 million in new private support for Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture

Archives of Florida and the Caribbean. This four-year project will ensure the long-term

sustainability of UF's effort to preserve historical records relating to the built environment, and to

steward these humanities resources for scholarship and education. Through UF Libraries'

leadership, in partnership with the UF Foundation; UF College of Design, Construction &

Planning; and 13 regional chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), we plan to 1)

endow the Architecture Archives Curator position, ensuring expert oversight of acquisition,

preservation and access programs ($1.9 million) in perpetuity; and 2) acquire new holdings, and

fund permanent storage and shelving ($100,000). The UF Libraries have deemed the

stewardship and promotion of the Architecture Archives (the Archives) to be one of its most

timely and critical needs. Factors influencing this decision include: 1) increasing recognition of

the Archives as the preeminent collection in Florida and the Caribbean for historical records

relating to architecture, landscape architecture, planning and design; 2) the threat of permanent

loss due to weather, economic, and environmental causes that place extant built structures, as

well as documents and artifacts related to these structures, at great risk; and 3) the expressed

need by scholars and professionals for UF to serve as the regional leader in this field.

I. Significance and Intellectual Quality of Humanities Activities, Programs, and Holdings

A New Priority - The Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean

"Architecture, like the humanities, can tell us who we are and where we have been."
-Rodney Douglas Parker

John Carrere and Thomas Hastings were two of the most significant American architects of the

late-19th and early-20th centuries. Their firm designed more than 600 buildings, including the

New York Public Library (1902-11) and the House and Senate Office Buildings in D.C. (1908-

09). In 1885 railroad tycoon Henry Flagler commissioned Carrere & Hastings to design the Hotel

Ponce de Leon (1885-1887) in St. Augustine as the first hotel for his tourism empire. This






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

palatial Spanish Renaissance Revival hotel is nationally significant as America's first large cast-

in-place concrete building. The design team included Thomas Edison, Bernard Maybeck, and

Louis Comfort Tiffany. In addition to the hotel, now Flagler College (National Register 1975), the

firm designed the adjacent Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church (1889-1890). Drawings for

these structures (Appendix I) would provide historians with evidence of the extravagance of the

Gilded Age, as well as innovative design and construction techniques. Regrettably, as Janet

Parks, curator of Drawings & Archives, Columbia University, states: "Most of the archive of [the

Carrere & Hastings] office was destroyed in the 1920s." Although the Church drawings had

been preserved by the St. Augustine Historical Society, drawings for the Hotel were presumed

lost. In 2004, a treasure trove of Hotel drawings was discovered in a Flagler College boiler

room, endangered by high temperatures and humidity, and exposed to insects and rodents for

decades. In 2005, Flagler College and the Historical Society elected to entrust the Archives with

stewardship of the Church and rediscovered Hotel drawings. Although all three institutions have

archival holdings, only the Archives has the expertise to manage architecture collections, full

conservation and digitization services, a close relationship with the UF architecture and historic

preservation scholastic programs, and a geographic location in central Florida that reduces

threats posed by hurricanes and flooding. As with all collections held by the Archives, these

drawings offer significant potential to yield unique knowledge with enduring value.

Architectural collections are not only works of art but they also have an ability to educate

and inspire beyond their original function. Records of our built environment have enduring

historical value for individuals, communities, students, and historians interested in studying the

built and unbuilt environment. These plans and renderings, sketch books, photographs, models,

correspondence and diaries, and business records reveal the changing ideas and perspectives

of people and cultures over time. The Archives' holdings embody myriad humanities disciplines

including history, art, philosophy, area and cultural studies, business, technology, religion, and

anthropology. These holdings are of great importance to humanities researchers internationally






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

-- they document architecture and design in Florida, the U.S. and the Caribbean Basin from the

17th century to the present. The Archives supports interdisciplinary study of humanity's ability to

design environments, as well as relationships and interactions between humans and their

environments. UF's holdings of renowned architect and historic restoration expert Herschel

Shepard, for example, document the built environment of Colonial Florida. Scholars have used

his drawings and research materials related to the reconstructed San Luis mission in

Tallahassee to learn about public interactions between indigenous and colonial populations,

construction technologies, religious beliefs, and the social history of that period.

Florida's architectural history reflects the state's unique development in U.S. history. St.

Augustine, established by Spain in 1565, is the oldest, continuously occupied European-

founded city in the continental U.S. and includes many of the oldest Colonial structures in the

country. Ruins and reconstructed buildings from Spain's mission system also exist across the

state. Architecture from the 1700s and 1800s primarily reflects Florida's territorial status at that

time, with few structures designed by professional architects. The structures of this era include

Classical Revival plantation homes, vernacular "Cracker" homes, and Gulf coast cottages

(Young 1996). Florida experienced a period of significant growth in the late 1800s, and

architects began designing buildings and landscapes intended to appeal to tourists and winter

residents. The buildings of the Gilded Age period include the Ponce de Leon Hotel, Breakers

Hotel in Palm Beach, and the Tampa Bay Hotel with its Moorish minarets. Wealthy Americans

began creating winter residences such as Thomas Edison's home in Fort Myers and Henry

Flagler's Whitehall in Palm Beach. Florida's first major boom occurred in the first few decades of

the 20th century, particularly in South Florida. Architect Addison Mizner created a Spanish

Revival style in Palm Beach in the 1920s that spread through Florida and the Caribbean. James

Deering's Vizcaya in Miami (1914) and John Ringling's Ca'D'Zan in Sarasota (1920) are two

prominent examples of mansions constructed in the popular Mediterranean Revival style. The






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Miami Beach Art Deco district includes the largest concentration of 1920s and 1930s resort

architecture in the U.S.

Florida's second major boom occurred after World War II as veterans began moving to

Florida. "Some fifty percent of the state's built environment was constructed during the three

decades following WWlII... as a result of population growth spurred in part by an influx of new

residents and the baby boom" (Hylton 2011). During the 1940s and 1950s, the so-called

Sarasota Modern architects including Paul Rudolph and Victor Lundy pioneered a style of

postwar architecture replicated around the world. In Miami, architects such as Alfred Browning

Parker and Rufus Nims, who were greatly influenced by the organic style of Frank Lloyd Wright,

produced a new style of topical architecture in Florida and the Caribbean. Florida also has the

largest collection of Wright architecture on a single site, the campus of Florida Southern College

in Lakeland, built mid-century. Florida's rapid growth in the latter half of the century is best

documented by dozens of new planned communities, including Coral Gables, Miami Lakes,

Pelican Bay and Celebration. Seaside, designed as an old-fashioned beach community and

featuring unique homes and shops designed by world-famous architects, has become an

international model for community planning in the New Urbanism style. When one considers the

impact architecture has had on shaping the social fabric and landscape of Florida, as well as its

global influence, records documenting architecture are of vital to humanities scholars.

In 2004, the Libraries recognized the immediate need to preserve and provide

professional stewardship for these records and established the Archives mission to "preserve

archival drawings and other historic materials related to architecture and design in Florida and

the Caribbean, to support and promote humanities education and scholarship, and to support

the preservation of the region's built environment." As the only formal architecture archives

program in Florida and the Caribbean, the Archives has the exceptional responsibility of

managing collections pertaining to architecture, landscape architecture, planning and design so

these materials may continue to deepen understanding of the humanities in perpetuity.






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Humanities at UF and the UF Libraries: UF is a major, public, land-grant research

university--one of only 17 public, land-grant universities that belong to the Association of

American Universities. The state's oldest and most comprehensive university, UF is among the

country's most academically diverse public universities and in 2010 ranked sixth nationally in

enrollment with over 50,000 students. According to UF's 2007 Strategic Work Plan, "No

university can aspire to recognition as one of the country's great public universities without

recognition as a leading center of research and teaching in the arts and humanities. The vitality

of the arts and the humanities, and their contribution to the intensity and seriousness of the

intellectual life of the university, are crucial to the vitality of the university as a whole." UF

demonstrates this commitment by requiring completion of six to nine credits of humanities

courses by approximately 32,000 undergraduate students, annually.

UF's commitment to the humanities is greatly enhanced by its global presence and

engagement through the various international centers across campus. UF has explicitly

supported academic Area Studies programs and international scholarly exchanges for over 80

years; UF's Center for Latin American Studies was created in 1930 (the first such research

center in the U.S. to focus on the region). Currently, three prestigious National Resource

Centers (African Studies, Latin American Studies, and European Studies) are supported by the

U.S. Dept. of Education Title VI program, along with the Center for International Business

Education and Research. These four major Centers received over $7.7 million in Dept. of

Education awards for the current grant period (2010-13). To respond to the rapidly changing

global environment, the International Center was established in 1991 to facilitate the

development of international initiatives, including Fulbright Programs. Similarly, the Center for

the Humanities in the Public Sphere facilitates and promotes research programs of humanities

scholars, provides an intellectual space for discussions of the humanities that reach across and

beyond individual disciplines, and conducts outreach to the community.






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

The UF Libraries comprise the largest information resource and public library system in

Florida, and one of the largest library systems in North America, with 8,000,000 catalogued

volumes and microforms, 1,000,000 government documents, 550,000 maps and images, and

nearly 7,000,000 digital images. The Libraries have over three million on-campus visitors

annually, providing 650 public service and programming hours per week. Holdings and services

are located at eight campus libraries and at many research centers throughout Florida. The size

and diversity of holdings reflect the size and diversity of Florida, the fourth most populous state

in the U.S. Building collections of international distinction that support the full range of

humanities education and research is a major UF Libraries' goal. The following humanities

collections exemplify successful planning for collaborative relationship building; acquisition of

new holdings, project and program funds; and digitization and outreach activities.

Latin American Collection: With Florida's close ties to the Caribbean and Latin America,

it is appropriate that one of UF's preeminent collections is the Latin American Collection (LAC)

which supports UF's Center for Latin American Studies. The LAC holds 600,000 volumes, with

particular emphasis on the Caribbean; to many scholars the Caribbean holdings are considered

the best in the field. Also, the Special Collections Dept. preserves millions of historical

documents, particularly focusing on colonial Haiti and Cuba, and the Map & Imagery Library

includes over 55,000 maps and atlases of Latin America and the Caribbean. The LAC library is

a major contributor to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), an international cooperative

digital library program funded by a U.S. Dept. of Education TICFIA grant (2005: $472,000) that

provides access to Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in

archives, libraries, and private collections. In 2009, UF and its partners were awarded a second

TICFIA grant ($440,000) to build the Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library (331,651 pages).

P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History: The P.K. Yonge Library is the state's preeminent

Floridiana collection. It includes the largest North American collection of Spanish colonial

documents (2.5 million) concerning the southeastern U.S., particularly materials from early






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Spanish exploration through 1821. Colonial holdings contain essential information on

indigenous life in Florida, and the Library has specialized in collecting materials on the

Seminoles. It is a major repository for books, maps, reports, explorer's notes and other archival

material on Florida's environment. It also includes the single most comprehensive repository of

Florida newspapers funded in part by NEH through the U.S. Newspaper Program ($967,778)

and the National Digital Newspaper Program ($320,000).

Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature: The Baldwin Library is among the

world's finest collections of children's literature with 100,000 volumes published in Great Britain

and the U.S. from the mid-1600s to the present. Its holdings of more than 800 early American

imprints is the second largest such collection in the U.S. Funding from NEH ($961,000) has

supported cataloging and creation of the Baldwin Library Digital Collection with over 6,000

volumes. The Baldwin Library contributes to the International Children's Digital Library and is a

founding partner of the Center for Children's Literature and Culture, an interdisciplinary center

based in the UF College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Price Library of Judaica: With holdings of 90,000 volumes, the Price Library is

considered the foremost Jewish studies collection in the southeastern U.S. In terms of its scarce

late 19th to early 20th century imprints, it ranks among the top 20 academic libraries in the

world; thousands of its titles in Hebrew and Yiddish are held by less than 10 libraries in the

country. UF received the first NEH Challenge Grant ($101,000) awarded to a U.S. research

library to acquire a 40,000 volume library, which in 1977 was the largest personal library of

Judaica and Hebraica in the U.S. The Price Library supports the UF Center for Jewish Studies.

The Price family established an endowment to support sustained development of the collection.

Development of the Architecture Archives: Advancing this tradition of developing and

disseminating outstanding humanities collections and programs, UF Libraries established the

Archives in 2004. Just as the Libraries' other premier collections are enriched by close

relationships with academic units and centers, the Archives was established as a collaborative






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

effort with the faculty and staff of the UF College of Design, Construction and Planning,

including the School of Architecture and the Landscape Architecture department. Through this

relationship, the Archives has expanded its network internationally as it seeks to identify and

cultivate donors, acquire and preserve holdings, provide researcher services, process archival

materials, create educational programs and exhibitions, and promote these resources.

The Libraries have collected resources related to architecture and design for almost a

century, and began actively acquiring major archival design collections of international

significance beginning in the 1990s. Between 2004 and 2011 the Libraries assigned Archives

management responsibilities to archivist John Nemmers, who focused on collection acquisition,

preservation, description, and outreach activities. Collections were arranged and described as

quickly as possible to ensure they were discoverable and accessible to humanities scholars and

other researchers. In 2005 the Archives formed an advisory and planning board, comprised of

academic faculty and practitioners, to ensure establishment of the Archives as the leading

regional research center for architecture and design and to guide collecting efforts by identifying

and prioritizing potential donors (Appendix A). The Archives grew dramatically over seven

years: In 2004 holdings consisted of 17,025 items (drawings, models, etc.) plus 200 linear feet

(records, photos, etc.); in 2011 holdings consist of 84,440 items plus 781.5 linear feet.

Remarkably, since 2004 Archives holdings have increased more than 600% and the number of

humanities exhibitions and lectures has quadrupled.

The holdings in 2004 were comprised of a small number of important collections

including: 1) modernist Miami architect Alfred Browning Parker, the only person Frank Lloyd

Wright ever recommended for the prestigious American Institute of Architects (AIA) Fellowship;

2) landscape architect and planner John 0. Simonds, whose projects included Mellon Square in

Pittsburgh, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the new towns of Miami Lakes and Pelican Bay,

Florida; and 3) Turpin C. Bannister, a leading architectural historian and first president of the

Society of Architectural Historians. Growth increased between 2005 and 2009 with acquisition of






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

drawings by: 1) Carrere & Hastings (pg. 2); 2) architect Rufus Nims, best known for designing

the iconic Howard Johnson hotels and his tropical modernism work in South Florida and the

Caribbean; 3) architect Kenneth Treister, designer of the Holocaust Memorial and Temple Israel

Gumenick Chapel in Miami; and 4) materials relating to influential Sarasota modernists Paul

Rudolph, Victor Lundy, and others. Since 2009 the Archives has acquired collections of 1)

William Morgan, architect of the U.S. Embassy in Khartoum, the Fort Lauderdale U.S.

Courthouse, the Orlando Westinghouse World Headquarters and the Florida Museum of Natural

History; 2) architect Herschel Shepard, responsible for restoring the 1902 Florida State Capitol,

the Spanish mission San Luis de Apalachee, and Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine; 3)

EDSA, Inc., one the largest landscape architecture and planning firms in the world; and 4)

Wallis Baker Associates, landscape designers of Orlando International Airport, Leu Botanical

Gardens in Orlando, and numerous projects at Sea World. (Appendix B).

As the number and size of the holdings increased at an unanticipated rate, researcher

services and educational outreach activities increased at the same dramatic rate. Unfortunately,

the Archives represented only a portion of the responsibilities assigned to Nemmers, and

administrators recognized the need for a full-time archivist. The Archives advisory board

identified long-term sustainability as a major goal and sought to secure funding to establish a

dedicated curator position. This goal was formalized in a five-year strategic plan in 2006. Simply

stated, the Archives would not be able to proactively seek opportunities to increase humanities

activities and holdings without a permanent collection curator. The Curator position was finally

realized in late 2010, and filled in January 2011. To our knowledge, the newly hired Curator,

Cynthia Peterson, is the only architecture archivist in the state. She is ideally suited for the

position; for over seven years she has worked with Florida and Caribbean collections as a

consultant, and maintains an extensive network within the architecture design profession.

Libraries Dean Judith Russell approved the position with the expectation that Peterson, along

with Nemmers and development staff, would make the position permanent using endowment






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

funds. Today the Curator's position is a faculty position funded by state appropriation. The

Libraries have sufficient resources from non-appropriated funds to secure the position and

benefits through the end of the grant period in 2015, or at the time the matching requirement

has been satisfied.

Curator Position Responsibilities: The Archives has sought to process and describe collections

expeditiously to ensure prompt and easy access for researchers. The Curator uses Archivists'

Toolkit for archival management, and employs standards such as Encoded Archival Description

(EAD) and Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) to ensure intellectual and physical

control of holdings. All collections, both processed and unprocessed, are described online and

collection guides are available to ensure wide discovery. All Archives holdings are unique,

requiring original cataloging. Catalog records are contributed to Worldcat.org, an online union

catalog comprised of descriptive information from more than 10,000 libraries worldwide.

Conservation: The Archives ensures holdings are preserved for use by future humanities

researchers. Fortunately, the UF Libraries operate one of the best equipped institutional

conservation labs in the country. The Conservation Unit is responsible for the physical condition,

in all formats, of all UF holdings, focusing on unique and rare materials held by Special

Collections. Services include repair, restoration, rebinding, deacidification, encapsulation,

constructing protective enclosures and environmental monitoring.

Digitization: To increase awareness of and access to the humanities holdings at UF, the Digital

Library Center (DLC) develops, manages, and publishes digital content from library, archival

and museum collections in support of global education and research. Currently seven million

pages have been digitized by the DLC and are freely available online in UF Digital Collections

(UFDC). The UFDC includes over 42,000 images of Archives holdings. Since 2006 there have

been 143,000 online views of Archives images. In 2010, the Archives partnered with Flagler

College and received a prestigious Save America's Treasures award to conserve the Carrere &






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Hastings drawings. The Saving St. Augustine's Architectural Treasures project is conserving

and digitizing 300 original, fragile drawings on cloth, silk and paper, and blueprints and copies.

Exhibitions: Exhibition of holdings has occurred in one of two ways: 1) temporary exhibitions in

galleries found in the Libraries and at UF; and 2) the loan of materials to other museums and

academic institutions for temporary exhibitions. The 2004-05 exhibition The Florida Home:

Modern Livinq, 1945-1965, at the Historical Museum of Southern Florida (now: History Miami)

featured numerous drawings and photographs from the Archives. The 2007 exhibition Promises

of Paradise: Staging Mid-Century Miami, received $314,695 in NEH funding, and was presented

at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, and at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL. In

2009, the Archives was featured as a tour site as part of the annual Tour Day for DOCOMOMO,

(DOcumentation and COnservation of architecture and important sites of the MOdern

Movement). In 2009, the Libraries exhibition Sarasota Modern: The Sarasota School of

Architecture, 1941-1966 was co-sponsored by the UF School of Architecture and curated by a

Department of History graduate student. In 2005-06, the Landscape Architecture Department

provided two graduate students to process the papers of internationally acclaimed landscape

architect John 0. Simonds, and to curate the exhibition, John Ormsbee Simonds Remembered:

Visionary Landscape Architect, Planner, Educator, and Environmentalist. A comprehensive list

of recent and upcoming exhibitions is available in Appendix C.

Audience for Humanities Holdings and Activities:

Like writings about architecture, drawings and models are intermediaries between
imaginary and built realities yet they are able to capture modes of thought more vividly
than reams of text. --Mark Wilson Jones


The Archives makes its holdings freely available to the widest possible audience. Its

audience for existing and planned holdings, activities, and programs includes scholars,

students, historians, architects, landscape architects, community planners, historic

preservationists, environmentalists and the general public. As a result of its cross-cultural






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

holdings and activities, the Archives serves an international, multicultural audience. Although

the majority of the audience is based in Florida and the Caribbean, the collections and services

are used by people from around the country and world. Recent international researchers have

included educators, architects and students from Africa, Switzerland, and Australia. The

audience also includes authors, documentarians, and exhibition curators. Use of the collections

has produced scholarly papers, books and articles; documentary films, and original exhibitions,

both online and physical. A list of selected products and projects is included in Appendix D. The

total number of people using Archives holdings or participating in Archives humanities activities

on the UF campus in the last five years is estimated to be 822. This count includes 299 UF and

visiting researchers, 242 graduate and undergraduate students, and 281 visitors to exhibitions

and special open house tours. Added to this total would be the thousands of visitors who viewed

Archives holdings, since 2004, both physically and online at museums in cities such as Miami,

Jacksonville, and Tallahassee. It is inevitable that the audience will increase as holdings and

exhibitions increase, and as the Curator disseminates information about the Archives to a

growing international audience.

Due to UF's multidisciplinary humanities diversity and depth, Archives' users benefit

from a holistic research experience. Many Archives researchers frequently use holdings of the

Humanities & Social Sciences library, P.K. Yonge Library, the Latin American Collection, the

Map & Imagery Library, and the Architecture & Fine Arts library, among other curatorial units.

Many of these resources are located in physical proximity, as well as online. The successful

development of the Archives as the leading historical resource of its kind in Florida and the

Caribbean continues a pattern of building and offering humanities holdings and activities of the

highest intellectual quality to the widest possible audience.

II. Long-Range Plans for Advancing and Disseminating Humanistic Knowledge

The successful implementation of many of the initiatives in the 2006 Archives five-year strategic

plan has fostered significant growth in the collections, expanded access to the collections, and






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

developed opportunities for new collaborations. The Archives' long-range plans are deeply

committed to its mission to preserve and promote the use of unique, irreplaceable collections of

historical drawings, and records pertaining to Florida and the Caribbean. Of greatest importance

is the emphasis on the 1) increased access and scholarly use to the collections, 2) acquisition of

new holdings, and 3) long-term care and preservation of these collections. These new initiatives

enable the Archives to build an accessible and sustainable program that will serve a unique role

as the preeminent architecture archives in the region.

1) Increased Access to Meet Interdisciplinary Research and Education Needs

Portal to Architectural Heritaqe Resources: The need for scholarly access to architecture and

design primary source material drives many of the long-term goals and plans for increased

access to these collections. The Archives was recently awarded an internal UF grant for the

Florida Architecture and Design Survey Pilot Project. No survey of architectural archival

collections has ever been completed in Florida and is long overdue. Preservationists,

researchers, scholars, students, and the general public interested in the design histories of their

communities have difficulty locating these historical collections -- the survey is the crucial first

step in creating a collective resource for this information. The survey will collect information on

extant archival records located in cultural heritage repositories and will aid in future publication

of the Guide to the Architecture and Design Collections of Florida. The collected information will

be maintained on the Archives website. Similar projects have been done in other states

including the Baltimore Architecture Project, Eastern Michigan University's Documenting

Michigan Architecture Project, and The Built Heritage of North Carolina. Planned as Phase 2,

the Archives also will conduct a statewide comprehensive assessment of archival design

records held by repositories, architects, firms and other individuals. This multi-year project will

conduct on-site assessments of historical records at numerous locations around Florida and the

Caribbean. Phase 2 is especially important in locating under-utilized or hidden collections, and

promoting wider access to those collections. Additionally, the Archives plans to develop a web-






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

based portal to the architectural heritage resources of Florida to connect future students and

researchers to primary resources of the past.

COPAR: To broaden the Archives' global impact, Curator Cynthia Peterson intends to introduce

the efforts and mission of COPAR, the Cooperative Preservation of Architectural Records, to

Florida for the first time to encourage collaboration among collecting institutions. COPAR is a

national effort to identify and encourage the "preservation of architectural records ..., and to

serve as a national and international clearinghouse of information on the location, preservation,

and cataloging of these documents." COPAR offers guidelines for the formation of local and

state groups otherwise known as Committees. The results of the original COPAR national

survey formed the National Union Index of Architectural Records database. The database was

later discontinued but, although out-of-date, is still frequently accessed. With UF leadership, this

effort can be revived and will be of national and international importance to scholars in the

location and access to the primary source material of our built heritage.

Diqitization, Online Exhibitions, and Website: The digitization of holdings and creation of online

exhibitions will disseminate information and increase humanities scholarship. The Archives

continually seeks new ways to engage audiences and explore the social, economic,

environmental and cultural issues that manifest in the built environment -- thereby giving voice

to the premise that architecture is a reflection of the society in which it is created. A percentage

of every collection will be digitized. The Curator and advisory board will make selection

decisions partly based on researcher demand. Long range plans focus on increasing online and

physical exhibitions. The Curator will plan exhibitions that provide context to collections giving

historical, geographical, and economic information, and offer opportunities to explore

relationships between humanity and the built environment. The evolution of an idea and the art

of the sketch portraying that idea are topics scholars have been researching and writing about

from Ancient Roman structures to present day edifices. Online exhibits are especially effective

in disseminating value-added content -- online users prefer interacting with collection materials






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

within themes similar to museum exhibits, rather than through a traditional library approach of

catalog/database searching (Fry et al. 2007). Online researchers are looking for exhibitions that

incorporate new technologies and display information in ways that facilitate deeper

understanding and appreciation of materials in their historical context (Nickerson 2003).

The Archives will further enhance digital humanities scholarship with the development of

Web technologies to support various social media formats. A redesigned website will provide

access to online exhibitions, oral history transcripts, audiovisual recordings, collection guides,

selected digital images and collections, and other research services. Information and digital

content also will be disseminated using social networking tools such as Facebook and Flickr.

The Curator will work with the digitization project team already in place-Digital Library Center

and Information Technology personnel-to ensure the Archives remains a vibrant resource for

the critical study and appreciation of humanities scholarship.

2) Increased Acquisitions

Long range plans for the Archives focus on increased acquisitions and the documentation of the

built heritage of Florida especially post-WWII. A comprehensive collection strategy must

consider the potential number of collections of our recent past. "Florida's architectural heritage

is in danger, especially its Mid-Century Modern Heritage. The sheer number of potential Mid-

Century Modern landmarks in Florida is overwhelming" (Hylton 2011). The Archives will

aggressively acquire holdings documenting this unique period of growth in American history.

The Archives also will seek to acquire institutional records such as those of the Florida

chapter of American Institute of Architects (AIA). When AIA researched its 88-year history in

2000 the Archives played a pivotal role in contributing information for this history. AIA Florida

President Keith Bailey stated, "Researching nearly 100 years of AIA history was challenging

since AIA Florida lacked good archival resources. The best source of information was the

architecture archives at the University of Florida and the national AIA archives in Washington,






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

D.C." (Bailey 2000). AIA Florida will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2012. The centenary will

mark an important milestone in the institution's history as well as the history of Florida.

Creator, User, Keeper - Documentinq and Preserving the Records of our Built Heritaqe: The

creation and presentation of a series of Regional Roundtable Discussions (two) and AIA

Chapter Conversations (13) entitled Creator, User, Keeper: Documenting and Preserving the

Records of our Built Heritage will raise public awareness for the social, cultural, economic and

political value of humanistic research in architecture and its allied disciplines. Regional

Roundtable Discussions will open a discourse between architects, historians, and archivists to

educate and understand the importance of preserving these records. The traditional model of

archivists receiving documents from an architecture firm years after they have ceased to

practice is an unreliable solution for historians and humanities scholars. Proactively planning for

long-term preservation while the practice is active is increasingly essential to saving collections.

Regional Roundtable Discussions will be presented in Orlando and Miami, serving two of the

most populous and diverse regions in the state. Presenters and participants will include

architects, educators, students, archivists, scholars, and researchers. Proposed guest

presenters include C. Ford Peatross, founding director and curator for the Center for

Architecture, Design and Engineering of the Library of Congress, and Tawny Ryan Nelb, author

of Architectural Records: Managing Design and Construction Records.

The AIA Chapter Conversations will further roundtable discussions at a local chapter

level. The AIA Florida centenary is the context for these chapter presentations and venues for

stressing the importance of preserving the records of the design legacies in Florida. These

discussions, designed to support fundraising efforts for the NEH Challenge grant goal, also will

disseminate information about humanities holdings and services to a wider audience, and raise

awareness of the Archives and its activities. UF Libraries has actively led other statewide

initiatives to educate and mobilize communities of practitioners. Beginning in 2001, UF has






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

directed a statewide archives education program, Opening Archives in Florida. This program

was funded by NEH in 2009 ($32,225).

Development of Oral History Collection: The development of an oral history collection for the

Archives will document the lives of individuals who have shaped the physical environment in

Florida and the Caribbean and their impact on our social histories. In the past two years a UF

School of Architecture doctoral student has conducted oral histories with internationally-

renowned modernist Florida architects including Alfred Browning Parker and William Morgan,

and these histories are held by the Archives. Underscoring the importance of collecting oral

histories before it is too late, Parker passed away in March 2011 on the day he was to receive a

lifetime achievement award from the Miami AIA chapter and Morgan is under Hospice care. The

UF Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) provides the framework, expertise and

support needed to establish this program for the Archives. With over 4,800 interviews the

SPOHP is one of the largest and most diverse oral history repositories in the U.S. Oral histories

are accessed online through UFDC Oral History Collections. New funds will establish this

program and provide training to students to conduct these interviews. The Curator and advisory

board will oversee selection and prioritization of interview participants.

3) Long-term Care and Preservation of the Collections

Increase collections storage: Architectural collections are increasing in volume. Nicholas

Olsberg notes that Frank Lloyd Wright created 25,000 drawings in his career, but recent

architectural projects have required an increasing level of complexity, and a single project such

as the Pompidou Centre in Paris (1979) generated 200,000 drawings (Olsberg 1996). Drawings

can range from simple sketches that form the design idea, to presentation drawings for

marketing and client presentations, to working drawings that show considerable detail. In the

Carrere & Hastings drawings of the Ponce de Leon Hotel, some of the remarkably beautiful

hand drawings are over eight feet in length and show considerable detail such as the lion lights

coated in 22-karat gold leaf and the details of the carved oak maidens-caryatids that are located






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

in the elaborate Rotunda of the building. Drawings of these dimensions and variety require

specialized storage.

The Archives' current storage capacity for holdings is at 74% capacity. The storage

needs will increase dramatically with the identification and acquisition of additional collections.

The Curator will plan for future space needs by developing an appraisal process for future

collections, while balancing the issues of preservation and storage of materials, and access and

use. Because of the diversity and nature of the records that comprise architectural collections,

they present many storage and preservation challenges.

III. Impact that Challenge Grant Funds Will Have on the Humanities

The Archives is now the leading repository in the region. Despite remarkable achievements in

collecting, stewardship and programming since 2004, our ability to successfully expand

humanities education has been limited by a lack of dedicated funds for a curatorial position. The

resulting endowment will free the Curator, and other curatorial and development personnel, to

focus primarily on programming and education. The Challenge Grant enhances the Libraries'

credibility, strengthens our ability to attract new donors and collections, and creates new

opportunities for humanities activities. The most significant and far-reaching impact will be a

permanently funded Archives Curator position. Additional impacts include improved storage,

collecting, documentation, conservation, processing, digitization, and exhibitions.

Planned Challenge Grant Expenditures:

Architecture Archives Curator Position. The Curator 1) manages and develops the collections,

services, and programs of the Archives; 2) serves as collection manager, specialized research

expert, educator, and liaison to academic units; 3) oversees the appraisal, acquisition,

processing, preservation, digitization, and use of historical architectural records; 4) advances

awareness, access, scholarship, and understanding through activities and initiatives such as

publications, exhibitions, presentations, and instruction; and 5) provides leadership to cultural

heritage professionals in Florida and the Caribbean. The Curator will work with the Descriptive &






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Technical Services Archivist (Nemmers), the Head of the Conservation Unit (John Freund), and

Digital Library (Laurie Taylor) to arrange, describe, preserve, and digitize holdings. See position

description in Appendix E. NEH funds ($400,000) will be contributed to the Curator endowment.

Following successful funding of the endowment, the position will be funded permanently by

interest ($66,750, partial use of interest generated by $1.9 million at 4%).

Acquiring Oral Histories. NEH funds will be used to acquire new oral histories and build an oral

history collection. In each of the four years, $3,000 will be used ($12,000 total NEH funds) to

establish this collection and provide the necessary training to conduct interviews. Following

successful funding of the endowment, acquisition of oral histories will be funded permanently by

interest ($2,150 annually).

Regional Roundtable Discussions & AIA Chapter Conversations. NEH funds ($15,360) will

enable the Archives and its partners to host a series of presentations/fundraising events during

the grant period. The Creator, User, Keeper events will engage architects, historians, archivists,

and other stakeholders in facilitated discussions to create communities who understand and are

passionate about preserving architectural heritage. The authors believe this type of organized

and cohesive statewide effort will be the first of its kind. Funds for these events are budgeted as

direct fundraising costs (less than 10% of Challenge Grant funds). Following successful funding

of the endowment, ongoing lecture presentations will be supplemented by interest ($3,000

annually, partial use of interest generated by $1.9 million at 4%).

Archives Storage & Shelving. The acquisition of storage equipment and shelving will have a

significant impact on our ability to properly preserve and permanently store rapidly growing

holdings. Peterson has identified a desirable storage system successfully used by other

architecture archives, including North Carolina State University (Appendix F). This system

consists of "beehive" storage units (for rolled drawings) stacked atop flat file drawer units (for

flat materials). It makes the most effective use of vertical space in the Archives storage area,

ensuring preservation of drawings and easy retrieval for researchers. This stacked storage






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

approach requires custom fabrication. Peterson requested estimates to satisfy project space

needs for the next 10 years. (Appendix G) In years two and three, NEH funds will be used to

purchase permanent rolled and flat storage ($72,640 total NEH funds).

Professional Internship Positions. Following successful funding of the endowment, interest

generated ($4,100 per year) will be used to create an annual 10-week paid summer internship.

The Libraries have a long history of advancing educational and professional goals of students

by offering internships in a variety of library departments and subjects. These are promoted

through partnerships with library schools at Florida State University and University of South

Florida. This endowment presents unique opportunities for graduate students to learn about

humanities-based programming and collections, and the Archives will benefit from the creativity

and perspectives of interns. Interns will assist the Curator in all collection management and

programming activities, including planning lectures and exhibitions, assisting researchers, and

working with development, grants, and public relations personnel. (Appendix H)

Assessment: The impact of the award will be measured using multiple criteria. 1) The

number of people attending regional Creator, User, Keeper events to broaden the base support.

The project team expects to substantially increase the network and depth of stakeholders and

potential donors. Participants will complete questionnaires evaluating the program and

recommending future humanities activities. 2) The number of people attending exhibitions,

tours, and lectures. 3) The number of students and faculty interacting with the Archives in class

visits, course assignments, and individual research. 4) The number of visiting scholars and

research inquiries. 5) The number and type of publications, broadcasts, and projects

incorporating information from holdings. 6) The number and extent of holdings acquired,

preserved, processed, digitized and made available. This includes new oral histories collected.

7) Compilation and analysis of above quantitative and qualitative results in comparison with past

years of programming and service to the field. 8) The extent of permanent storage units

acquired. 9) Quarterly reports indicating number of donors, amount pledged and secured,






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

prospect meetings, foundation and donor research results, and submitted proposals to

organizations and foundations.

IV. Plans for Fund Raising

In this economic climate, fundraising requires a thorough understanding and unequivocal need

for securing new private funds for a specific initiative. Although the Libraries have determined

the priority and timeliness of this campaign to permanently fund the Curator position, letters of

commitment and support acquired for this proposal have reinforced this critical need, and

demonstrate the passion for actualizing the endowed position. Credentials and track record of

the project team validate their ability to satisfy this community and scholarly need. Project team

members include: John Nemmers, descriptive and technical services archivist, since 2003, has

been responsible for all arrangement and description activities. He has led collection

development, processing, fundraising and grants, and outreach activities for the Archives.

Nemmers leads the National Historical Publications and Records Commission-funded project

($72,650) to digitize historical Everglades collections, Save America's Treasures subcontract

with Flagler College ($32,945) and current NEH-funded project to offer statewide archival

training ($32,225). He served as president for the Society of Florida Archivists in 2009-2010.

Cynthia Peterson, the Archives Curator, is a certified archivist, records consultant, and

specialist in architectural records preservation/management. As a consulting archivist for design

professionals, historical societies, and private foundations in preservation and management of

design collections, Peterson has developed deep roots in the Florida/Caribbean architectural

community. She is a member of the Society of American Architects, Society of Florida

Architects, Sarasota Architectural Foundation, American Institute of Architects, and serves on

DOCOMOMO/Florida Board (pg. 11) and is columnist to the Florida/Caribbean Architect

magazine. Judith Russell, joined the Libraries in 2007 as the first UF Libraries' dean, and leads

eight UF Libraries, with a $27 million budget and 225 staff. Russell is the former Superintendent

of Documents at the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Russell's previous corporate






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

experience includes Information Handling Services (IHS) and its parent company, Information

Technology Group; Disclosure Information Group; Lexis-Nexis (then Mead Data Central), and

IDD Digital Alliances, a subsidiary of Investment Dealers Digest. Samuel Huang, associate

dean of advancement, previously served in this capacity at the University of Arizona Libraries

(2000-07), and raised $7 million in private funds. Prior to Arizona, he has held multiple positions

at Northern Illinois University including curator of rare books and special collections, and

assistant director for the Undergraduate Library. Huang plans and oversees major fundraising

activities, public information (Barbara Hood), and grants management (Bess de Farber). Since

joining UF in 2008 this development team has raised private contributions of $6,173,827 (UF

Foundation report includes in-kind gifts and pledges from 1,420 donors, see Appendix J.) plus

$2.97 million in mostly government grant awards for the Libraries. Huang is nationally respected

for his fundraising expertise among academic library deans and development directors. In 2005,

he was featured in an article, "Conversations with Two of the Best," by John S. Wilson for

BottomLine: Managing Library Finances, Vol. 18, no. 4, pp 191-196.

Summary of Fund-Raising Plan (in round figures)

Architecture Archives endowment funds raised to date $ 124,475

Gifts from individuals/special events $ 800,000 (2012-2015)
Grants from foundations $ 400,000 (2012-2015)
Gifts from corporations/organizations $ 300,000 (2012-2015)
National Endowment for the Humanities $ 500,000 (requested match)

The project team will raise $1.5 million in private funds in partnership with the Libraries'

Leadership Board, Architecture Archives Advisory Board, College of Design, Construction and

Planning, and UF Foundation staff through donor, corporate, and foundation relations. Together

they will facilitate research, identification, cultivation and solicitation activities to secure new gifts

targeting these giving objectives: one @ $500,000; one @ $300,000; two @ $200,000; two @

$100,000; and 30 @ $10,000. Prospective foundations and organizations-many

representatives are personally known by project team members--include: Florida AIA, Florida






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, Florida Foundation for Architecture,

Jessie Ball duPont Fund, Patterson Foundation, Selby Foundation, Graham Foundation, John

V. Volk Foundation, EDSA, Rinker Foundation, Thomas Woodell Foundation, Jim Moran

Foundation, Sarasota Architectural Foundation, Barron Collier Jr. Foundation, and the Ruth and

Vernon Taylor Foundation. In addition to UF alumni, potential donors include qualified client

families of contributors to the Archives, including Kenneth Treister, Alfred Browning Parker,

Alain Huin, Marilyn Hapsis-Hugo, and Herschel Shepard. New donor prospects include Gene

Leedy, Edward Siebert, Robert Broward, and Don Singer, and patrons of architecture David

Freund, Ina Schnell, Katherine Hutcheson, The Hosman family, among others personally known

to the project team. The prospect of long-term collection stewardship of the Archives provides a

strong case for fundraising from these individuals, foundations and organizations. The project

team will work collaboratively to identify and cultivate clients, friends and associates from

wealthy communities especially in Palm Beach County, Orlando, Sarasota, Tampa, Fort Myers,

and Miami-Dade County. Fundraising efforts will focus on clients who are enthusiasts of

particular architects and architectural styles. Further, the Archives is preparing and prioritizing a

prospect list of significant architects and firms for cultivation and solicitation. For each acquired

collection, the project team will solicit endowment funds to support the Curator position.

Partners: The project team will partner closely with the AIA Florida Chapter, the professional

association for more than 3,600 members, covering the Florida/Caribbean region including

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Thirteen outreach events, one at each Florida AIA

Chapter partner site, will introduce the Archives collections, Challenge Grant initiative, and

demonstrate the strength of the Libraries' conservation and digitization services, which have

been very appealing to past donors and should continue to attract new donors and financial

investment. Further, two roundtable discussions with nationally recognized architects or

historians, in Orlando and Miami, will present yet another method for initiating new relationships






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

with prospective donors. The team goal is to identify and cultivate a minimum of five viable

donor prospects from each of these 15 events.

Other strategies for prospect identification include: 1) establishing a Florida Committee

for the Preservation of Architectural Records (COPAR) led by UF. Universities with archival

repositories in other states, such as California and Texas, have successfully promoted their

collections and services by creating a COPAR committee. UF and its future partners on the

COPAR committee will benefit by identifying creators, collectors and organizations holding

architectural records who may be interested in donating collections and funds. 2) identifying

collections and potential collaborations through a statewide survey (completion in October 2011)

of cultural heritage repositories to collect and publish information on extant archival records.

One goal of this survey is to establish or strengthen relationships with architects, firms, and

repositories holding architectural materials for future cultivation and solicitation.

V. Conclusion: Why UF, why now, why architecture?

Today, there are multiple dynamics that both justify the need for this project and validate UF's

capacity to meet the goals of this campaign. 1) Never before has there been such an urgency

expressed by the architectural community and humanities scholars for the acquisition and

preservation of primary historical records. 2) UF is uniquely positioned with local, regional and

global collaborative relationships, competent and committed professionals, and an impressive

track record of establishing and funding humanities collections and services. 3) UF Libraries

have the required infrastructure to successfully execute a project campaign of this breadth and

complexity. 4) The professional design community in Florida and the Caribbean are generally

untapped sources of both historically significant materials and private funds. 5) Recent success

of the Archives in acquiring collections and developing programs to both serve and promote

those holdings. Awarding UF the challenge to prove itself as a meritorious recipient for NEH

funds is an opportunity to capitalize on the synergy created to date.






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

References

The Art Institute of Chicago Ryerson and Burnham Library. Chicago Architects Oral History
Project. The Art Institute of Chicago, n.d. Retrieved from


Bailey, S. Keith, Diane D. Greer, and John Howey. Florida Architecture: A Celebration : the
History of the Florida Association of Architects, AIA, 1912-2000. Florida: Florida Association of
Architects, 2000.

Flagler College Magazine. Architectural Artifacts Uncovered. Flagler College Office of Public
Information, St. Augustine, FL, Spring, 2003.

Fry, Thomas K., et al. "A Comparison of Web-Based Library Catalogs and Museum Exhibits and
their Impacts on Actual Visits: A Focus Group Evaluation for the Colorado Digitization Project."
ERIC: Education Resources Information Center. 28 Oct. 2007.

Hylton III, Morris. Saving Florida's Mid-Century Modern Past. Preservation Today: Discovering
Miami Modern. Dade Heritage Trust, Miami, Florida, 2011 issue.

Nelb, Tawny Ryan. Architectural Records Appraisal: Discussion of Problems and Strategies for
the Documenting Michigan Architecture Project. The American Archivist Vol. 59, No. 2, Spring,
1996.

Nickerson, Matthew F. "Heritage through Oral History and Archival Images." IFLA
Journal 29.1 (2003).

Olsberg, Nicholas. Documenting Twentieth-Century Architecture: Crisis and Opportunity.
The American Archivist Vol. 59, No. 2, Spring, 1996.

Soergel, Dagobert, et al. The Many Uses of Digitized Oral History Collections: Implications for
Design." Nov. 2002. MALACH: Multilingual Access to Large Spoken Archives. 28 Oct. 2007.
Retrieved from

University of Maryland University Libraries Catalogs and Databases. Closed, Archival
Databases:COPAR The National Union Index to Architectural Records. (n.d.). Retrieved from


Young, Vivian. Florida's Treasures: Celebrating Florida's Historic Architecture. Tallahassee, FL:
Florida Foundation for Architecture, 1996.




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



List of Board and Principal Staff

UF Libraries Leadership Board

Mr. B. Lester Abberger III, Senior Consultant, Kirkpatrick Pettis Investment Banking
Mr. Carlos J. Alfonso, CEO, Alfonso Architects
Mrs. Shirley Anderson, working artist (painting)
Mr. William S. Brothers, President, Big Fish FM Radio
Mrs. Dale Canellas, retired, Director of University Libraries
Mr. Richard M. Carris, Risk Management Consultant
Mr. Keith R. Douglas, retired financial advisory
Mrs. Kathy Egolf, Vice President, Panama Canal Museum
Mrs. Beverly A. English, retired school teacher
Mrs. Anne M. Haisley, President, Books Inc.
Mr. Randall W. Hanna, Bryant Miller Olive, PA
Mr. Bruce M. Harris, Attorney-at-Law, Harris, Harris, Bauerle and Sharma
Dr. John Ingram, Faculty Emeritus, Associate Dean, University Libraries
Mr. Walter G. Jewett, Jr, UF Foundation Board of Directors
Ms. Mindy LaCroix, CPA, Dana Vidussi, CPA, PA
Dr. Madelyn M. Lockhart, Faculty Emeritus, Dean of the Graduate School
Dr. Elizabeth B. Mann, Faculty Emeritus, School of Library & Information Studies,
Florida State University
Mr. W. Wesley Marston, Attorney-at-Law, Claims Professionals Associated, Inc.
Mrs. Frances E. Mayes, author
Mr. David R. Mica, CEO, Florida Petroleum Council, member of UF Foundation Board
Mr. William T. Muir, Attorney-at-Law, Dunwody, White and Landon, PA
Dr. Charlotte Porter, Faculty Emeritus, Florida Museum of Natural History
Mr. Michael J. Price, Attorney-at-Law, Price Development Group, Inc.
Mr. Ted C. Prosser, Jr., Investor and Financial Advisor, Wachovia Securities, LLC
Mr. Patrick J. Reakes, Head, UF Humanities and Social Science Library
Dr. Leah R. Rosenberg, Faculty, UF Department of English
Mr. Michael F. Slicker, President, Lighthouse Books ABAA
Mr. Bruce A. Smathers, Attorney-at-Law, Smathers & Smathers, PA
Mrs. Jane M. Wahl, Broker, State Farm Insurance
Mrs. R.J. Wiltshire, retired, CPA
Mr. Joseph J. Wood, Jr., President, Panama Canal Museum
Dr. Thomas M. Woodell II, Vice President, Woodell Family Foundation
Dr. Robert H. Zieger, Faculty Emeritus, UF Department of English

UF Libraries Staff

Samuel Huang, Associate Dean of Advancement and Development
John Nemmers, Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Cynthia Peterson, Curator, The Architecture Archives, Special and Area Studies
Judith Russell, Dean, University Libraries
Laurie Taylor, Ph.D., Interim Director, UF Digital Library Center





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



The Architecture Archives Advisory Board

John Nemmers, Associate University Librarian, UF Libraries
Martha Kohen, Professor, UF School of Architecture
Kay Williams, FASLA, Professor, UF Department of Landscape Architecture
Lynne Capece, Director of Development, College of Design Construction and Planning
Ann Lindell, Head, Architecture and Fine Arts Library, UF Libraries
Guy W. Peterson, FAIA, Architect, Ivan Smith Professor, UF School of Architecture; and
Principal, Guy W. Peterson Office for Architecture, (External Consultant)





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



John R. Nemmers
Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Associate University Librarian

Work Experience:

University of Florida
George A. Smathers Libraries, Special and Area Studies Collections
From: August 2003 To: Present
Title: Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Arranges and describes archival and manuscript collections, and supervises other
department personnel involved in the arrangement and description process. Creates
and maintains procedures and tools for the processing of archives and manuscripts.
Creates descriptive metadata for the department's archival collections, including
EAD finding aids and catalog records. Reviews finding aids and catalog records
created by other department personnel. Works with the Architecture Archives
Curator in collection development, processing, fundraising and grants, outreach,
and promotion activities for this collection. Responsible for archival collections in
specific subject areas, including Florida politics, landscape design, and
environmental history and science. Participates in research assistance, instruction
and outreach. Incorporates and interprets archival materials in exhibitions.

Florida State University
Claude Pepper Library, 636 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL
From: August 1998 To: July 2003
Title: Project Archivist
Responsible for the creation and maintenance of finding aid database for the
Claude Pepper Collection. Supervised multi-year digitization project to provide
digital surrogates of materials in the Pepper Collection and full-text search
capabilities to patrons. Processed manuscript collections, including additions to
existing collections. Assisted in developing outside funding sources for projects of
the Pepper Center and FSU Libraries Special Collections Department. Developed
and created EAD versions of guides to collections. Supervised preservation/access
reformatting projects for audiovisual and photographic materials in the collection.
Education:
BA in History Florida State University Date: 1996
MS in Library Studies Florida State University Date: 1998
Specialist in Education Florida State University Date: 1998

Selected Publications:

Refereed:
"Opening Archives: Improving Access to Hidden Archival Collections in Florida"
(with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Florida Libraries 49 no. 2 (Fall
2006): 16-19.

"Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib" (with
Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen O'Brien and Paul
Victor, Jr.). Journal of Web Librarianship v.1 no. 3 (2007): 47-66.





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University of Florida



"The Usability of Online Archival Resources: The Polaris Project Finding Aid" (with
Burt Altman). American Archivist 64 no. 1 (Spring/Summer 2001): 121-131.

Non-refereed:
Public Services in Special Collections (with Florence Turcotte). SPEC Kit 296
(Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries), 2006.

Best Practice Guidelines for the Implementation ofEAD Version 2002 in Florida
Institutions (available at: http://fclaweb.fcla.edu/Opening Archives), March 2006.

Florida's Political Past: A Guide to Manuscript Collections, Archival Records, and
Other Primary Historical Documents of Florida's Politicians. An annotated
bibliography (http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/political/flpols.htm), 2005.

Selected Grants:
2010. "Saving Carrere and Hastings' St. Augustine Architectural Treasures." National
Endowment for the Humanities/National Park Service Save America's Treasures
Program. To conserve and digitize historic architecture drawings. Amount funded:
$99,124. Funding dates: July 2010-June 2012. Role: Project Director for UF.
[Note: Flagler College is serving as lead applicant for this collaborative project.]

2010. "Florida Architecture and Design Survey." Smathers Libraries Mini-Grant. To
collect information on extant archival records in cultural heritage institutions and
to publish the Guide to the Architecture and Design Collections of Florida.
Amount funded: $4,500. Funding dates: 2010-2011. Role: Principal Investigator.

2009. "Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida." National
Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Preservation and Access Education and
Training Program. To deliver a series of workshops to archivists and librarians in
Florida on a variety of archival topics. Amount funded: $34,849. Funding dates:
December 2009 - December 2010. Role: Principal Investigator.

2008. "America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project." National Historical
Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). Cost-effective digitization of
six archival collections relating to the Everglades. Amount funded: $145,477.
Funding dates: January 2009 - December 2011. Role: Principal Investigator.

Selected Exhibitions:
Sarasota Modern: The Sarasota School ofArchitecture. Smathers Library Exhibit Gallery,
University of Florida Smathers Libraries, November 2009-December 2009.

John Ormsbee Simonds Remembered: Visionary Landscape Architect, Planner, Educator,
and Environmentalist (1913-2005). Smathers Library Exhibit Gallery, University of
Florida Smathers Libraries, November 2005-February 2006.

Selected Service:
Society of American Archivists Encoded Archival Description Roundtable, Chair, 2010-11
Society of American Archivists Description Section Steering Committee, 2010-12
Society of Florida Archivists, President, 2009-2010; Past-President, 2010-2011





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



Cynthia L. Peterson, CA

Education
2007 Simmons College, Boston, MA, Master of Science in Library and Information
Science/Archives Management Concentration-Graduated with Honors

1978 Florida State University, Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice/Minor in
Business Administration

Professional Certification
2010 Academy of Certified Archivists

Professional Experience

Architecture Archives Curator, Architecture Archives, Special and Area Studies Collections,
University of Florida Smathers Libraries, 2011-present
Provide researcher assistance, instruction, and outreach to support academic programs in
architecture, landscape architecture, planning, construction and design. Oversee the appraisal, acquisition,
processing, preservation, digitization, and use of historical architecture records. Advance the scholarship
through the publication of online finding aids, selective digitization of unique holdings, lectures, and
presentations. Serves as the liaison with the School of Architecture and the College of Design,
Construction and Planning. Fundraising and development efforts including lectures, presentations,
identification of key stakeholders and potential donors.

Cynthia Peterson I Archivist (Archives and Records Management Consultant), 2006-2010
Consultant to private architectural firms, architects, design professionals, private foundations and
collectors for the preservation, access, and cataloging of their collections. I have provided initial surveys,
physical condition assessments, appraisals, processing proposals, collection inventories, archival
arrangement, and provided negotiation and location services for the disposition of their collections. I have
also conducted holdings research for historical architectural documents and have negotiated and provided
written proposals for the digitization of historic architectural records. Select representative clients include:
The Field Club Foundation, Elling 0. Eide Private Collection, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, John
Howey, FAIA, Alain Huin Designs

Volunteer, Architecture Archives, Special and Area Studies Collections, University of Florida
Smathers Libraries, 2009-2010
Processing archivist for the William N. Morgan, FAIA collection and in the promotion of the
Architecture Archives to Florida architects. I worked with John Nemmers and Sam Huang of the
Smathers Library to identify and acquire new collections and for the donation of funds to support their
processing. I secured the donation of three significant architecture and design collections and funds for
processing. As the processing archivist of the Morgan collection, I suggested and presented methodology
for the arrangement and description of the collection including appraisal decisions, development of
standard indexes for the project-based component of the material, and the identification of and
suggestions for the preservation of more than three thousand drawings.

Collections Manager/Archivist, Guy Peterson I Office for Architecture, Inc., 2004-2010
Appraisal, description, organization of architectural design and corporate archives. Collection
management of design data including print media, architectural documentation and business records.
Duties included the professional management and storage of extensive physical and digital assets
including the production of an effective digital asset management organizational structure for physical
and digital archives, and maintaining the digital asset database. Duties also included scanning, indexing,





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



reformatting, and delivery solutions for permanent and inactive records. Special emphasis was placed on
the recently completed project to arrange, describe, and reformat archival material for the recent
publication of the firm's work, "Four Florida Modems," published by W.W. Norton Publishing, 2009.

Archivist, Caribbean Genealogy Library, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2008
Preservation, organization, and inventory of the St. Thomas Graphics Collection in order to gain
intellectual and physical control of the material. The project included the initial assessment, appraisal, and
arrangement of over four thousand items including funeral books, historic event and political posters,
photographs, community and organizational printed brochures, and government publications and reports.
A presentation and a summary of findings and recommendations for access and use were presented to the
Caribbean Genealogy Library board of directors at the conclusion of the project.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute Archives and Special Collections, 2007
Completed a survey of the Institute's archives and special collections records, the first survey
ever to be completed within the department. The successful completion of the survey was achieved by
conducting numerous interviews with department members, research and development of the inventory
form, and the development of a draft retention schedule.

Chief Financial Officer, Guy Peterson I Office for Architecture, Inc., 1989-2003
Complete business management including financial planning, records management and fiscal
reporting.

Papers, Presentations, and Articles
2011 "Discovering the Design Legacies of Florida," Florida/Caribbean Architect, Spring 2011.
2010- Columnist for the quarterly, Florida/Caribbean Architect Magazine. The column is dedicated to
the best practices, current issues, and information in the preservation of architectural records.
2010 "The Proper Care and Preservation of Original Architectural Drawings," Florida/Caribbean
Architect Magazine, October 2010.
2010 "Preserving Your Architectural Legacy," Florida/Caribbean Architect Magazine, August 2010,
with John W. Nemmers, University of Florida.
2010 "Preserving Your Architectural Legacy" Presentation to Florida Gulf Coast Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects March 2010
2010 "Preserving Your Architectural Legacy" Presentation to the Florida Southwest Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects November 2010.
2007 "Issues in the Preservation of Electronic Architectural Documents" Simmons College, Boston
2007 "CAD/CAM Electronic Document Management" Simmons College, Boston, MA.
2007 "Born Digital Architectural Documents and Their Long-term Organization and Preservation"
Simmons College, Boston, MA.
2007 "Preserving our Built Environment by Preserving Architectural Records" Simmons College,

Professional and Personal Affiliations
2009-present DOCOMOMO (Documentation and Conservation of the buildings, sites, and
neighborhoods of the Modem Movement)/FL-State Board Member
2010 American Institute of Architects Associate Member
2006-present Member of the American Library Association
2006-present Member of the Florida Library Association
2006-present Member of the Society of American Archivists
2006-present Member of the Society of American Archivists Architectural Records Roundtable
2007-present Member of the Society of Florida Archivists
2007-present Beta Phi Mu Honor Society
2009-present Sarasota Architectural Foundation Advisor





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



Samuel T. Huang
University of Florida Libraies
P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611

Title: Associate Dean for Development & Advancement, University Librarian

Employment:
Associate Dean for Development & Advancement, University Librarian, February 20, 2008-
University of Florida
Associate Dean for External Relations, February, 2006 - February, 2008
University of Arizona Libraries
Assistant Dean for External Relations, May 2000 - February 2006
University of Arizona Libraries, Tucson, AZ ( Full Librarian)
University Libraries Development Director, 1994 - April 2000
Curator, Rare Books & Special Collections, September 1991-April 2000. (Rank: Professor)
Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Senior Research Librarian, October 1987 - September 1989. (Rank: Associate Professor).
Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Coordinator of Computer Reference Services, July 1985 - October 1987. (Rank: Associate
Professor) Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Coordinator of Library Services for the Physically Impaired, Coordinator of Career Collection and
References, May 1980 - June 1985 (Rank: Assistant Professor)
Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
Assistant Director, Undergraduate Library, 1978 - 1980 (Rank: Assistant Professor)
Head, Interlibrary Loan Department and Reference Librarian, 1973 - 1978 (Rank: Assistant
Professor)
Head, Interlibrary Loan, Reference and Rare Books Librarian, 1966 - 1973 (Rank: Instructor).

Education:
M.S. Degree in Education, Northern Illinois University
M.A. Degree in Library & Information Studies, Northern Illinois University
B.A. Degree in English Language & Literature, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Membership and Service to the Profession:
* Chair of the Friends of Library Committee 2009-
* Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundation Board member, 2008-
* Board director of Friends of Library, USA (FLOUSA 2003-2008)
* ALA LLAMA RFDS Committee 2005-2010, Re-elected for the second term, 2010-2012
* Academic Library Advancement and Development Network (one of eight founders), 1998-
* Braddom Scholarship Committee, Fund Raising & Financial Development Section (LAMA) 2003-
2005.
* Board Member (Member-at-Large), Fund Raising & Financial Development Section (LAMA),
2003-
* Leader, Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Library Development Discussion
Group, 2000 - 2002.
* Horatio Alger Society Board Director, 2000 - 2003.




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



* Academic Library Advancement and Development Network (ALADN) Conference Committee,
1999-.
* American Library Association member 1975 -
* Association of Fundraising Professionals member, 2004 -
* Association of College Research Libraries (ACRL) Member 1975-
* ACRL RBMS Rare Books and Manuscripts, 1975 -
* ACRL ULS University Libraries Member 1975-
* Horatio Alger Society Member 1999 -
* Library Administration and Management Association (LAMA) Member 2000-
* LAMA PRMS Publication Relations and Marketing Section 2000-
* LAMA FRFDS Fundraising and Financial Development 2000-
Selected Scholarly Presentations: (Invitations)
06/23/2010 "Things you wish to know about fundraising in Libraries but do not know where to begin:
Roadmaps to fundraising success." ALA Annual Conference, Washington, D.C. (Invited by FOLUSA)
06/16/2010 "Development Officers as Managers." 2010 DORAL Annual Meeting, Cornell University,
Ithaca, NY.
03/22/2010 "Collaborative Fundraising in Achieving the University's Mission: It is not all about the
libraries," ALADN Annual Conference (Invited by ALADN Program Committee). Santa Monica, CA
03/21/2010 "Library Development 101: Nuts & Bolts." (ALADN Pre-Conference Program). Santa
Monica, CA (Invited by ALADN Program Committee).
11/19/2009 "The Art of Fundraising" Presenter at the Art of Fundraising and Grant Writing Online
Conference,( Invited by Alliance Library System, Learning Teams, LLC.) 1000 Attendees registered
07/13.2009 "Fundraising Basics for College and University Libraries," 2009 ALA Annual Conference
(Invited by ALA LLAMA FRFDS Committee)
07/11/2009 "Nuts & Bolts for Academic Library Friends", 2009 ALA Annual Conference (Invited by
Friends of Library U.S. A.)

Selected Publications:
-Modern Library Technology and Reference Services. New York, Haworth Press, Inc., 1993 (Editor)
- Co-authored with Veer Steeg, Jennie. "Reviewing the Literature" in Introduction to Research in
Education. 6th edition, by Ary,D. & Jacobs, L. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, Summer 2001
- "Communications and Speech" and "Disabilities" in Magazines for Libraries, 8th edition, ed. By Bill
Katz, N.J, Bowker, 1992, pp. 292-296; 344-353
- "Literary Resources on the Employment of People with Disabilities" in Library Services for Career
Planning, Job S.ear, iing. and Employment Opportunities. Ed. By Byron Anderson. New York, the
Haworth Press, Inc., August 1992
- Author. "Where There's a Will, There's a Way: Fundraising for the Academic Libraries." The Bottom
Line: Managing Library Finances, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2006. Pp. 146-151


All publications include 10 Book Chapters and 27 Journal Articles.





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



Judith C. Russell
Home: Office:
516 NE 4th Street P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville FL 32601 Gainesville FL 32611-7001
(202) 262-6501 (352) 273-2505
russell@erols.com |crussell@ufl.edu

Experience:
University of Florida, Dean of University Libraries 2007 to Present
* Leads the George A. Smathers Libraries with a permanent staff of 225 and a budget of $27 million
* Responsible for research services and scholarly resources to support the diverse academic and
research interests of the University's students and faculty

U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) 2003 to 2007
Superintendent of Documents (Managing Director, Information Dissemination)
* Led agency in providing public access to information published by the U.S. government and establishing
the policy guidance and strategy for its information dissemination programs with a combined staff of 220
and income of $70 million
* Responsible for GPO's Library Services and Content Management business unit that includes the
Federal Depository Library Program, the Cataloging and Indexing Program, the International Exchange
Service and GPO Access, the agency's online public access databases and GPO's Publication and
Information Sales business unit that sells U.S. government publications and provides reimbursable
distribution services to Federal agencies
* Served as the primary spokesperson and advocate for GPO's information dissemination programs
* Collaborated/negotiated with other Federal agencies to ensure no-fee permanent public access to
published Federal information through GPO information dissemination programs
* Consulted with professional and scholarly library and information science communities on future roles of
libraries, educational requirements for future and retraining for current information professionals.

U.S. National Commission on Libraries & Information Science (NCLIS) 1998 to 2003
Deputy Director
* With Commissioners and Executive Director, responsible for development and implementation of NCLIS
policy and communication of policy recommendations to the Administration, the Congress and others.
* Responsible for NCLIS administration, including financial management, appropriations, contracts and
purchasing, personnel, publications management, and information technology
* Organized hearings on Kids and the Internet, Library and Information Services for Individuals with
Disabilities, School Librarians: Knowledge Navigators Through Troubled Times, and the proposed closing
of the National Technical Information Service (NTIS)
* Produced A Comprehensive Assessment of Public Information Dissemination; Trust and Terror: New
Demands for Crisis Information Dissemination and Management and Public Sector/Private Sector
Interaction in Providing Information Services

IDD Enterprises, L.P. 1996 to 1998
Director, Government Services Division, IDD-Digital Alliances
* Responsible for introducing IDD products and services into the Federal, state and local government
markets, including management of the sales and sales support staff and IDD responses to Requests for
Proposals (RFP)
* Provided business analysis and specification of requirements (proposals) for IDD custom webs sites
such as Smith Barney Access and Liberty Leaps

U.S. Government Printing Office 1991 to 1996
Director, Office of Electronic Information Dissemination Services (EIDS)
* Responsible for GPO Access Online information services, including implementation of the
Superintendent of Documents' Website and the design, marketing, documentation, user support and
training for all GPO electronic products





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



* Managed the sale of electronic information, including over 75 CD-ROM titles and other Federal
information in various formats

Director, Library Programs Service
* Responsible for the Federal Depository Library Program, the International Exchange Service, and the
Cataloging and Indexing Program (Monthly Catalog of USGovernment Publications)
* Performed as a dual assignment for 16 months while also serving as Director, EIDS

Director, Information Dissemination Policy
* Responsible to the Public Printer for development and implementation of internal and external
information policy objectives

Mead Data Central [Lexis-Nexis], Government Market Manager 1988 to 1991
* Responsible for coordination of activities to advance the development of federal, state and local
government markets for the LEXIS/NEXIS services, including coordination of sales and promotional
activities, development of federal, state-wide and group contracts, submission and negotiation of annual
FEDLINK contract, and development of custom pricing proposals for other customer groups

Russell Associates Management Consultant 1986 to 1988 , 1982 to 1983
* Provided strategic planning, acquisition/competition analysis, product design and enhancement, and
marketing services to information companies, trade associations, government agencies and libraries

Disclosure Information Group, Director, Special Projects, Disclosure 1984 to 1986
Director, Operations, National Standards Association

Information Industry Association, Director, Membership Development 1983

Thyssen-Bornemisza Information Technology Group 1977 to 1982

Office of Technology Assessment, Congress of the United States 1974 to 1977

Program of Policy Studies in Science & Technology, 1973 to 1974
The George Washington University

COMSAT Laboratories, Communications Satellite Corporation 1967 to 1973

Current Advisory and Editorial Boards:
* Journal of Electronic Publishing Editorial Board, 2005 - [http://www.hti.umich.edu/j/jep/]
* NFAIS Board of Directors, 2005-present, (2010-2011 President) - [http://www.nfais.org]
* University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Information and Library Science Board of Visitors,
2006 - [http://sils.unc.edu/]

Special Awards:
* Special Libraries Association's Professional Award (2005) "For outstanding contributions to the global
community of information professionals..."
* Federal Computer Week's Federal 100: The Readers' Choice Awards (1993) "In recognition of those
individuals who have made a difference over the past year in the federal information technology
community..."

Education:
* Master of Science in Library Science, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC
* Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross, Washington, DC





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
Bess de Farber, MNM, CPF
(Master of Nonprofit Management; Certified Professional Facilitator)
4300 NW 23 Ave., #36
Gainesville, FL 32606
Work: (352) 273-2519 501c3k,askbess.net


University of Florida Libraries
Grants Manager (October 2008 to present)
Responsibilities include pre and post award grants management and training. Initiated grants management program for training
and mentoring librarians and support staff in grant seeking, submission, and post award activities with emphasis on
collaborative projects within UF and beyond. In fall 2009, established a student grants training program (1000+ students to
date), for finding and preparing fellowship applications, with Grad School and I3 program cooperation. Manage all grant-
related activities from idea-stage to project completion including developing budgets, project planning and strategies,
interfacing with funders, writing, and researching. Consistently working with Division of Sponsored Research and Contracts
& Grants for pre and post award, to ensure compliance with university/funders policies, setting up contracts and revising award
budgets/project plans. hlp % � �.uflib.ufl.edu/funding/

ASK Associates, South Florida and Arizona
Principal (May 1995 to present)
Responsibilities vary according to contract, including: writing and managing grants programs, developing projects and
collaborations; facilitating planning retreats; creating feasibility studies for new programs; advising executives and board
members on management issues; networking with funders, troubleshooting within community to mend relationships, and
training staff members to perform grants and other management functions. Clients have included arts, culture, community
development, healthcare, environmental, religious, social services and funders.

University of Arizona Libraries
Grants & Revenue Manager (May 2005 to September 2008)
Responsibilities included pre and post award grants management. Initiated grants seeking program for training and mentoring
librarians and staff in grant seeking and post award activities with emphasis on collaborative projects. Managed all grant-
related activities including developing budgets, project planning and strategies, interfacing with funders, writing, and
researching. Consistently worked with Sponsored Projects Department, pre and post award, to ensure compliance with
university/funders policies, setting up contracts and revising award budgets/project plans. All processes were carried out in a
team-based environment. Developed plans for revenue generating activities. Constantly provided facilitation services for
collaborative projects, meetings and planning retreats. School of Information & Library Services professor of grant writing for
graduate course for librarians.

Nonprofit Resource Institute
Co-Founder, Interim Executive Director, Consultant (May 1998 through February 2001)
Provided comprehensive resources for improving the management and governance of nonprofit organizations in Palm Beach
and Martin Counties. Co-founded NRI utilizing asset-based model for providing technical assistance and training. Presented
three workshop series serving over 400 participants in these categories: Governance/ Operations; Funding;
Programs/Evaluation; Marketing/Communications. Provided one-on-one technical assistance and board training to more than
350 organizations/government entities. Collaborated to strengthen nonprofit grantee compliance for the Quantum Foundation,
MacArthur Foundation, Community Foundation, Lost Tree Foundation, United Way, Palm Healthcare Foundation, and
Children's Services Council.

Community Foundation for Palm Beach & Martin Counties
Program Officer (October 1994 - May 1995)
Managed two grant cycles of applications distribution of funding for Social Service, Human & Race Relations, and
Arts/Cultural programs in Palm Beach and Martin Counties; staffed Human & Race Relations planning committee with
board/community leaders.

Palm Beach County Cultural Council
Director of Grants & Organization Services (September 1989 - October 1994)
Provided grants management of $2 million in public Tourist Development Cultural Activities funds annually to 45 Palm Beach
County cultural organizations; developed/managed all government and foundation grant applications/awards for Cultural
Council programs; trained cultural organizations/ artists to prepare government, foundation, and corporate grant
applications/project proposals; provided management technical assistance to cultural organization staff/board members;
developed topics, selecting guest speakers/venues for monthly Cultural Executives Committee events; and provided consulting
services for planning and arts-in-education projects statewide.





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

Pinellas County Arts Council
Financial Manager (May 1985 - September 1989)
Full charge of all financial activity ($400,000 annual budget) of public/private local arts agency, implementing fund
accounting. Managed all grant programs including local, state and re-granting programs, and coordinating local and state
government audits. Arts in Education Programs Manager (1987- 89) Negotiated artist contracts; communicated with
professional artists for Arts-in-Education program; scheduled programs; designed curriculum and survey materials for school
system distribution; implemented new programs; provided consulting to community artists/arts organizations; guest speaker for
community functions; provided staff training/development for educational organizations; and staffed fund-raising/education
committees.

ED UCA TION/CERTIFICA TIONS
2003 Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, Master's in Nonprofit Management
1978 University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA: Bachelor of Music
1976 Rollins College, Winter Park, FL: Music and Environmental Studies
1974 Miami Senior High School, Miami, FL


International Association of Facilitators: Certified Professional Facilitator
AchieveGlobal: Certified Trainer: Frontline Leadership and Leadership for Results Modules
Raising More Money Model Training for Board Members
Drucker Foundation: Board Self-Assessment Process
National Center for Nonprofit Boards: Critical Components of Effective Governance


INSTRUCTOR/WORKSHOP PRESENTER/FEA TURED SPEAKER


2010
2010
2010
2009/2010
2009
2009
2008

2008
2007

2007 & 2008
2006
2006 & 2007
2006
2005
2004
2004
2004
2004
2004
2003
2002
2002
2002
2002
2002
2001
2001
2001
2001
2001
2001
2001


Florida State University, CoLAB Planning for Scholarly Communications Workshop for librarians statewide
University of Florida, Grant Seeking Basics for International Students
University of Florida, Collaboration Basics for Grant Seekers, Grant Writing Course, PhD candidates
University of Florida, How to Apply for NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants
University of Florida, How to Apply for National Science Foundation Graduate Assistant Fellowships
University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Session for College of Fine Arts faculty Orientation Session
University of Arizona,Transforming Libraries Through Collaborations Conference: Leader, CoLAB Planning
Session, Grant Seeking for Libraries Workshop
University of Arizona Bio5 CoLAB Planning Session for faculty
Association of College & Research Libraries Biennial Conference Workshop: "Library as Convener:
Collaborations that Build Creative Academic Communities"
Community Foundation for Broward: CoLAB Planning Workshops
CoLAB Networking Workshop for Sonoran Desert Knowledge Exchange
University of Arizona: Graduate Grant Writing Course, School of Information Resources & Library Science
CoLAB for Tucson Solo-preneurs
United Way of Martin County: CoLAB for Literacy
FAU School of the Arts/Junior League of Boca: CoLAB South County
Directors of Volunteers Association: "Thinking Sideways to Solve Volunteer Challenges"
FAU Schmidt College of Arts & Letters Faculty: Grant Writing Workshop Series (2 sessions)
Nonprofit Resource Institute/Junior League: "Roaming for Resources"
Nonprofit Resource Institute: Co-LAB Reunion
Children's Services Council: AchieveGlobal Leadership Training Modules
Community Technology Centers' Network Leadership Institute: "Strategic Planning for Nonprofits"
Mounts Botanical Gardens: "Board Basics"
National Meals on Wheels Conference: Finance 101; Advanced Grants; Creating Learning Organizations
Nonprofit Resource Institute: "Co-LAB Planning Series" (3 sessions)
Southeast Regional Educational TV Producer's Conference: "CPR for Nonprofits"
PBC Planned Giving Council: "The Greatest Nonprofit Enigma: Serving on Boards"
Association for Fundraising Professionals: "The Benefits of Combining Forces"
Southeast Museum Educators Association: "Collaboration Tools for Arts Organizations"
International Association of Facilitators: "Interactive Storytelling Program"
Nonprofit Resource Institute: "Grants 101; Grants 201; Collaborations Tools; Funders' Roundtable"
Education Foundation of PBC: "Grants Writing Workshops for Teachers"
United Way of Martin County: "Collaboration Tools for Successful Nonprofits"


2009/2003
2002
2002
2000
2000




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
TUF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA

J. Bernard Machen 22, Tigert Hall
President PO Box 113150
Gainesville, FL .:2, 11-3150
April 28, 2011 (352) 392-1311
Fax (352) 392-5275
www.ufl.edu

Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Program Ol'i c r
Office of Challenge Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Puin 1., l ini, Ax CitILe. NW
\\ .i nirl rni . DC 2' C506

Dear Dr. Johnson and Review Panelist:

This letter confirms Im- full support for the Libraries application to the National Endowment for the
Humanities ChlillLcin. Grant Program. Plans for raising $1.5 million in ilth next four years included in the
i"Butilding stLc\\iard-,hip and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and -he Caribbean" are
achievable based on my knowledge of the Libraries' development team's accomplishments in the past
three ecar,. under the new leadership of Dean Judith Russell and Associate Dean for Advancement and
Development Samuel Huang. Their combined efforts, in partnership with the University of Florida
Foundaiti,in, of building a broader donor base and elevating the awareness of the Libraries' achievements in
collection acquisition, preservation and digitization are remarkable.

The University of I lrida College of Design, Construction and Planning is known internationally for its
outstanding research and educational programs. In fact, the Architecture Archives of Florida and the
Caribbean was initiated by School of Architecture faculty who has long recognized the importance of
preserving li.sc documents for future generations. Many of the collections held in the Archives offer a
unique perspective on architecture of the 1950's and 60's in which Florida was attracting international
attention for innovations in what we now call sustainability. Architects like \V ill iin Morgan, Tim Siebert
and Alfred Browning Parker, all UF graduates, developed designs that were the precursor of rveponibilit:,
to the environment and 'implicit\ of means that we are ,tri\ in., for today. This collection will continue to
enhance links .' ithi collateral institutions, universities, architecture archives and historical societies at
r-i,.nal. national and international levels and help to establish UF as Ilic preeminent leader in the scholarly
documentation, preservation and dissemination of.irchliectur.l l -rit.uc in Florida and the Caribbean.

Establishing an endowment for the long-term stewardship of UF's Architecture Archives is imperative to
ensure high level humanities scholarship and research of the built environment here at UF and beyond.

Since y, /



J. Bernard Machen






7., Foundation for The Gator Nation
An Equal Opportunity Institution





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA


George A. Smathers Libraries
Office of the Dean of University Libraries


535 Library West
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000
'.�'-273-2505
352-392-7251 Fax
www.uflib.ufl.edu


May 2, 2011

Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Program Officer
Office ofChildlci-ne Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Penn.\ I anij Avenue, NW
Washington, DC '2 15116


Dear Dr. Johnson:

Please accept this letter ,..rn fiirmin L the University of Florida Libraries' commitment to raise $1.5 million in new private
funds, to match the NEH request ot ,. '." i,11" i, thus endowing the curator of architecture archives position.

Since accepting the Dean's position in 2007, I1 have witnessed the growth of and enthusiasm for the Libraries'
Architecture Archives Thro'nigh acquisition of historically important collections and the development of new relationships
with p,,ln.or'. collectors, donors and their families, and scholars. This momentum has inspired the creation of the curator
position. We are-extremely fortunate to have secured Cindy Peterson to inaugurate the position. Her credibility and depth
of relationships in architecture communities ihr.-'uLi Iu[ Florida and the Caribbean is unmatched.

The curator's position is a faculty position that is currently funded by state appropriation. The libraries have sufficient
resources from non-appropriated funds to secure the curator position and benefits thr. .,lh the end of the grant period in
2015, or at the time the matching requirement as been satisfied, whichever comes first, should that be necessary.

AJdJitio-n.il '.. I intend to fully participate on the project team by hosting attending related events, pari i ip.itin r in
individual donor cultivation activities, and providing additional support as needed to reach the fundraising goal. I am
pleased to join the Library Leadership Board, the University I-t t I. rida Fi 'undati. in. the President's Office, the C -llepe of
Design, Pln nn ing and Construction, the School of Architecture, the 13 American Institutes of Architecture Chapters in
Florida, as well as scholars and ,rher.s, in .iJ ier ini this financial commitment. Providing professional stewardship and
greater .ace..iilit to many .[I k rida's and the Caribbean's ihre.iened architectural resources for future !cnCratiioni of
students, scholars and aficionados is a high priority of the Libraries and the University.

We appreciate the opportunity to present this proposal iali i with the many letters of commitment from our partners and
supporters.

Sincerely,


dith C. Russell
Dean of University Libre


The Foundation for The Gator Nation 2
An Equal Opportunity Institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean

U FLORIDA University of Florida
U TOMORROW
THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FOUNDATION. INC
April 21, 2011


Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Program Officer
Office of Challenge Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20506

Dear Dr. Johnson and Review Panelist,

I am writing to endorse the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries application for
the National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant entitled "Building Stewardship and
Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean." The University of Florida
Foundation, Inc. will assist the Libraries to identify, cultivate and solicit appropriate donors to
raise $1.5 million to match $500,000 requested from the NEH.

The University of Florida Foundation encompasses the University's fundraising, fund
management and alumni programs. Certified as a direct support organization for the University,
it is eligible to receive charitable contributions under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue
Code.

Since 1980, the UF Foundation has provided more than $1.766 billion in direct support to the
University of Florida.

The University of Florida Foundation, Inc.

The University of Florida Foundation, Inc. (UFF) operates under the guidance of a volunteer
board of directors to manage private gifts wisely, advance University programs and provide
fundraising and alumni activities on the University's behalf.

Professional staff is led by the UFF Vice President for Development and Alumni Affairs,
Thomas J. Mitchell, who reports directly to University of Florida President J. Bernard Machen.
Under Mr. Mitchell's oversight are development officers who also report to each of the various
colleges and many of the academic units of the University, including the UF Libraries. Associate
Dean for Development Samuel T. Huang is responsible to both Mr. Mitchell and Dean of
University Libraries, Judith Russell, for directing the major fundraising activities and managing
the development, public information and grant components of the Libraries. Working
collaboratively with the library directors, chairs and librarians, he has primary responsibility for
directing library efforts that encompass major gifts, donor stewardship, development of public
support groups, fundraising event coordination and relations between the Libraries, its
development council, the University of Florida and the UF Foundation, Inc. The Libraries'
grants manager, Bess de Farber, will work together with Mr. Huang and the project team to
develop written proposals for donors and foundations.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FOUNDATION. INC.
PO BOX 14425 - GAINESVILLE, FL 32604-2425 * PHONE (352) 392-1691 * FAX (352) 846-3631 * www.FloridaTomorrow.ufI.edu
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



Supporting Mr. Huang in his fundraising efforts is the central development staff at the UFF.
Major gifts, planned giving, annual giving, real estate, and corporate and foundation relations all
assist Mr. Huang to achieve the Libraries' goals.

Using the Corporate and Foundation Relations Department as an example, the central staff will
help to identify potential donors from corporations and foundations with which the University
has a relationship, as well as cultivating those new to UF. They will seek out key contacts at
each and study the prospective donor's current giving and guidelines to design the most
successful approach for the UF Libraries. With the impetus of a challenge gift from the NEH,
they expect to leverage new and increased sources of support for the UF Libraries.

Endowments at the UFF

Our intent with the NEH gift is to build an endowment in support of the Curator of Architecture
Archives, ensuring expert oversight of acquisition, preservation and access programs in
perpetuity; and to fund public outreach, preservation, processing, and digitization of the UF
Architecture Archives to build collections and scholarship.

We anticipate that after all gifts associated with this request are received, and the challenge
period is closed, that the gift from the NEH will be held at the UFF (after federal audit
requirements are lifted, and if the NEH permits). The UFF is charged with receiving and
managing gifts for the University of Florida.

As of June 30, 2010, the UF Foundation's total assets were $1.511 billion. Most of these assets
were held in various investments - either in permanent endowed funds that produce annual
spendable income or in non-endowed, spendable funds. The vast majority of these funds are
restricted to specific purposes.

The UF Foundation gifts are invested through a management agreement with the University of
Florida Investment Corporation (UFICO). The annualized rates of return in FY 2009-10 were
10.2 percent for the endowment pool and 1.5 percent for the non-endowment pool.

Thank you for considering this request. Please contact me if I can answer any question regarding
the University of Florida Foundation and its support of the George A. Smathers Libraries.

Sincerely,



Leslie D. Bram
Associate Vice President/COO

cc: Thomas J. Mitchell





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

TUF UNIVERSITY of

UFIFLORIDA

College of Design, Construction and Planning 331 Architecture Building
Office of the Dean PO Box 115701
Gainesville, FL 32611-5701
352-392-4836
352-392-7266 Fax

April 27, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

I am most pleased to provide this letter of support for the UF Libraries' application to the National
Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant Program for the project, Building Stewardship and Access for
the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean.
As an historian and Editor of the Journal of Planning History, I can attest to the importance of these
materials in helping scholars, teachers and the general public understand the important role Florida
architecture and planning efforts have had on shaping our environment. The Archive contains a unique
concentration of architecture of the recent past that fills an educational void in our knowledge of this
important period in our Nation's history. The work of architects in the collection such as Alfred Browning
Parker were widely publicized in popular magazines like House Beautiful, during the 1950s and 60s, and
presented a modern architecture that was sensitive to the environment, used local materials, and was well
suited to postwar lifestyles.
This effort is in direct support of larger historic preservation activities in Florida which, including
the rehabilitation of historic buildings, heritage tourism, the operation of history museums and activities
generated by Florida Main Street programs contribute some $6.3 billion annually to the state. These impacts
include the creation of jobs, income to Florida residents, an increase in the gross state product, increased
state and local taxes, and increased in-state wealth. As an example, projects from the "Sarasota School of
Architecture" or "Sarasota Modern" attract visitors from around the world. Documents from this School's
activities contained in the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean are now recognized
internationally as a principal source for scholarship on this era.
The need for long-term professional stewardship of current collections and acquisition of future
important collections is most timely. Environmental threats and those posed by the economy make it
imperative to secure funding to endow the Archives' curator position. Based on our close working
relationship, I have full confidence in the Libraries' fundraising capacity to meet the objective of your $1.5
million goal.

Sincerely,



Christopher Silver, Ph.D., FAICP
Dean and Professor

The Foundation for The Gator Nation 5
An Equal Opportunity Institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
Iff| UNIVERSITY of
U IFLORIDA

College of Design, Construction and Planning 231 Architecture Building
School of Architecture PO Box 115702
Gainesville, FL 32611-5702
352-392-0205
352-392-4606 Fax


27 April 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear John,

It is my great pleasure to have this opportunity to write on behalf of the George A Smathers Libraries
Architecture Archive in support of securing permanent funding for the critical role of the Archivist Florida
and the Caribbean represent unique historic and emerging cultures representing periods of pre history,
international colonialism, American modemity and more recently globalization and responses to migrating
populations and climate change. The Architecture of this region provides the dominant artifacts from
which one might deeply understand the many layers and cultural priorities that have emerged. In fact,
researchers are still learning from studies of early settlement in St. Augustine and the Florida Keys and
only beginning to prioritize, collect, document and preserve the robust early and high modem periods
which dominate the Florida landscape.

Unfortunately, many periods, particularly the modem, are under great threat of being erased as
development shifts to redevelopment, buildings reach their natural life span and main stream culture
trends toward 'new' rather than 'reclaimed'. Florida is losing significant elements of its architectural
heritage.

The Architecture Archive is critically needed. Not to slow or stall the inevitable development trends in
Florida, but rather as the leader (and presently the only substantial facility in the state) in documenting
and archiving these important historic artifacts before they are lost This includes a robust agenda of
documenting existing buildings through photographs, 3D scanning and occupant oral histories and
accumulating, cataloging and preserving thp architectural drawings, models, writings and renderings that
represent the process of design during these culturally rich periods.

Guided by nationally recognized scholars, researchers and curators in the George A Smathers libraries
and in collaboration with noted scholars, architects, landscape architects, interior designers and builders
from the College of Design Construction and Planning, the archivist will lead this initiative. The position
has been seeded by funds from the University of Florida and an outstanding candidate - Cindy Peterson
- emerged from a nationwide search by demonstrating a thorough knowledge of both the discipline of
archiving and the architectural history of Florida and the Caribbean.

The School of Architecture is pleased to be part of the tremendous progress the Archive has made in a
very short time and the opportunities this collaboration has germinated. Our joint symposium on the work
of Al Parker, the engagement of our PhD and graduate students in collecting and cataloging the works of
noted architects and the publications that have emerged have set a full agenda for the next five years.




The Foundation for The Gator Nation 6
An Equal Opportunity institution





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida




Our PhD candidate Dereck Winning, who easily passed his qualifying exams last week, will publish his
dissertation Building with the Earth: A Conditioned Response to Forming Modem Place in Florida which is
an analysis and interpretation of the work of Architect William Morgan. As you may know, Morgan is in
poor health and a significant portion of Dereck's research included recording interviews with Mr. Morgan
who is convalescing in Jacksonville, Florida. This effort was directly supported by the Archive and could
not have been accomplished without the facility resources, expertise and willingness to collaborate.

Other Master of Architecture students have also been involved in the cataloging and preservation of
architectural documents through the Archive. School of Architecture faculty Dr. Charles Hailey and
Professor Guy Peterson are developing graduate seminar courses that would draw on the collection as a
research base for computer modeling of architecture that has been lost, was initiated as a speculative
exploration or may not have been completed but has contributed significantly to the design dialogue in the
region. The Archive is also an important resource to our design studio curriculum and to junior faculty
who are developing their research agenda. For new faculty, in a publication demanding academic
environment, the Archive is a vital resource toward the scholarly framing of regional architecture and the
evolution of architectural education.

Florida architecture has contributed to the national and international dialogue on regionally responsive
modem architecture. The body of work includes scores of talented architects operating over a period of
approximately 100 years. Many noteworthy pre-modem architects have significant projects in Florida
including and the lineage of 'Cracker' vernacular architecture that is carried through contemporary works
should be documented, represented in the archive and disseminated nationally.

The leveraging of the Archive collection requires a solid administrative and physical infrastructure which is
largely in-place as the Architecture Archive is part of the larger library system. The catalyst needed is a
highly motivated, knowledgeable archivist to coordinate the securing of work from important architects,
facilitating relationships with the academy that nurture collaborative projects and disseminating the
cataloged work in the form of publications and grant deliverables. We are lucky in this case to have such
a talented and dedicated archivist - Cindy Peterson. She has been outstanding and over a very short
period of time, has made substantial progress on the archive mission and scholarly collaborations.

Of course I support the creation and maintenance of this position through permanent funding.
Furthermore feel very strongly that given the success of the project seeding, talents of the current
archivist and importance of the project on a national and international level - the Archive of Florida
architecture and architects - that this NEH partnership will provide important recognition and stability
toward endowing the position and delivering returns far exceeding the investment.

I would be happy to speak in more detail regarding the importance of this initiative to our research
mission and the lineage of Florida's contribution to Architecture in America should I be called upon to do
so.

Sincerely,



rti rc old
Direc r




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

UNIVERSITY of

UFFLORIDA

College of Design, Construction and Planning 431 Architecture Building
School of Landscape Architecture and Planning PO Box 115704
Department of Landscape Architecture Gainesville, FL 32611-5704
352-392-6098
352-392-3308 Fax
May 3, 2011

John Nemmers
Principal Investigator
Re: UF Libraries' National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant Program Application


To whom it may concern,

I am writing this letter of support for the University of Florida Libraries' National Endowment for
the Humanities Challenge Grant Program application. This grant would allow the University of
Florida Library to continue to build its impressive archival collections of the work of prominent
Landscape Architects. Currently the collection includes the notable work of John Simonds, Jon
Seymour, Wallace Baker and Fred Stresau Sr.

The Landscape Architecture archival collection has strengthened the University of Florida's ties to
the profession in the state. Landscape Architecture practitioners have been so impressed and
excited by the collection that they have been instrumental in acquiring additional work. To share
with even more practitioners, we are planning to make a presentation on the archival collection
to the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) state conference later this year. We are
hoping to solidify a collaborative effort with the ASLA to continue to build the collection.

The preservation and access to important Landscape Architecture design legacies enhances our
mission as an educational institution. This unique and valuable resource supports research and
teaching activities of faculty and students in the Department of Landscape Architecture. This NEH
grant could greatly enhance these activities. It could provide for more public outreach, improve
curatorial and preservation activities, allow for more digitization and dissemination, and expand
the size and quality of the current Landscape Architecture archival collection.

This grant could leverage the impressive effort made to date by University of Florida Library to
create a Landscape Architecture archival collection of state and national prominence. I fully
support this UF Libraries' National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant Program
application.

Sincerely,



Tina Guruchar j
Associate Pro essor and Chair




The Foundation for The Gator Nation 8
An Equal Opportunity Institution





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida







RA/70 LPM C. H ME/ I/I G, ARCHITECT
6285 fhallowford Road m Juite 150 m Lewisville, 11C 27025 m T- 556.946.2445 m r- 5506499.4658 m* .- rch@rclhrchitect.comn

22 April 2011




Mr. John Nemmers, Principal Investigator & Associate University Librarian
GEORGE A. SMATHERS LIBRARIES
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: University of Florida NEH Challenge Grant

Dear John:

I wholeheartedly and without hesitation or equivocation fully support the University of
Florida George A. Smathers Libraries' National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge
Grant Program application. I agree and champion the expressed mission of the University
of Florida Architectural Archives to acquire, conserve, preserve, and offer for study and
research, as responsible stewards, the office archives of Florida architects. As an
architectural practitioner respecting the work of my peers and those before me, I feel
strongly that sustaining responsible depositories, such as the UF Architectural Archives, is
crucial to both understand and safeguard the work of these creative design professionals.
To that extent I continue to urge my Florida colleagues not to discard their office archives
but consider the diligent alternative of gifting them to the UF Architectural Archives. And,
as an actual user of the UF Architectural Archives' collections since the mid 1990's, while
researching the architecture of Alfred Browning Parker for a monograph intended for
publication, adequate and open access was invaluable and critical for the culmination of
that work and significantly responsible for any success in that effort.

Having the drawings, vintage photographs, project files, correspondence, writings, etc. (i.e.
the full story) at hand when studying the work of any architect allows the student, scholar,
practitioner, art and architectural historian, researcher, and the like, to understand more
fully the creative process of any built or unrealized project, or an entire career. This
material is truly a real physical part of the legacy of the practitioner and unquestionably
helps provide an improved understanding of Florida's heritage and architectural history.


Henning, AIA


www.rcharchitect 0 corn




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
University of Pittsburgh


School of Arts and Sciences 3702 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
230 South Bouquet Street
Department of History Pittsburgh, PA 15260-7403
412-648-7451
Fax: 412-648-9074
www.pitt.edu/ pitthist
April 22, 2011



John Nemmers, Principal Investigator
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000


Dear John:

I am writing in support of the UF Libraries' application to the National Endowment for
the Humanities Challenge Grant Program for the project titled, "Building Stewardship
and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and Caribbean." I am in my third
year of traveling to conduct research in the John Ormsbee Simonds Collection in the
Architecture Archives. I have grown to appreciate the excellent curatorial care of the
collection, the richness of the documentary base I am using, and the professionalism of
the staff. The excellent quality of the Architecture Archives indicates that the investment
by NEH in the form of a substantial challenge grant will have a high probability of
success, enhancing the Archives' opportunities for attracting significant additional
collections, patrons, funds, and programs. In turn, I believe the enhancement of the
Architecture Archives will have an important long term public impact.

John Ormsbee Simonds was a nationally prominent landscape architect from the 1940s to
the early 1980s. He was president of the American Society of Landscape Architects,
adviser to significant federal initiatives in the 1960s, author of several seminal books in
the field, and principal partner of a prominent landscape architecture firm. In the latter
capacity, he and his associates planned several communities around Florida, beginning in
the early 1960s. Working often with Florida's politically prominent Graham family, he
pioneered in those communities the importance of 'environmental planning', whereby
critical habitats were to be preserved and the development, though finely articulated,
would be organized in such a way as to feature the environmental attributes of the site.
These residential communities were harbingers of some of the elements of New
Urbanism that has grown to popularity in the final decades of the twentieth century.
Simonds also worked on many other projects in Florida, which together explains why the
papers of this Pittsburgh landscape architect are housed at the University of Florida.




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


I summarize Simonds' planning career to make a larger point in support of the grant
application. Unfortunately, despite the work of Simonds and others, most community
development has been, and continues to be, pedestrian in quality and harmful to the
environment. The values and plans of Simonds and other landscape architects, architects,
and planners from the past whose papers are in the Architecture Archives need to be
made even more accessible to scholars, journalists, public officials, and citizens who
want to elevate the quality of community development and design in Florida and
elsewhere. The Archives' curatorial and digital services support the educational needs of
both students and the public, while programming makes the collections and their lessons
about landscape design accessible to a broad audience via things as mundane as websites
to more complicated outreach initiatives such as themed digitally accessible materials,
symposia, and collaborative traveling exhibits. These are critical functions of archives,
ofien not understood by the general public, administrators, and public officials.

I am researching the John Ormsbee Simonds Collection currently for scholarly reasons.
However, as I understand more deeply his planning (which covered the eastern half of the
United States) and the communities that he planned (both projects in Pittsburgh and
elsewhere but especially in Florida), I hope to extend m.n writing and outreach be\ ond the
academic world. In my dependence on the University of Florida's Architecture Archives
and in my goals, I am not distinctive but one of many who appreciate a truly professional
archival operation, the broader enterprise in which it is a part, and the fundamental
significance of sustained investment in enhancing curatorial services, acquisition and
preservation of collections, digital accessibility, and dedicated personnel. The design
materials point to legacies on the land, which together are foundational for efforts at not
only achieving public appreciation and preservation of landscapes, but also elevating
development and design in the future. An innovative, ambitious, and professional
archives such as the Architecture Archives is a central partner in the larger educational
enterprise of both the university and the public as we struggle to improve the landscapes
in which we live, work, and recreate.

Sincerely,



Edward K. Muller
Professor of History
Director, Urban Studies Prog ram




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


May 1,2011

John Nemmers, Principal Investigator
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear Mr. Nemmers,

As a doctoral student, I would like to express my strong support for the University of Florida
Libraries' grant project "Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of
Florida and the Caribbean." Both the preservation and landscape architecture communities, of
which I am a part, have called for more scholarship on the context of landscape architecture.
Preservationists need this for planning and the protection of significant designed landscapes.
Landscape architects are looking for an increased understanding of past work to create better
places in the future. The University of Florida Libraries has been facilitating these efforts by
actively acquiring, preserving, and providing access to the plans, documents, and images of the
work of landscape architects. Additionally, the university's close association with landscape
architects, since it has been training them for over seventy-five years, makes them particularly
suited to these efforts.

This project is personally important to me because I utilize the architecture archives for much of
my research, and in the past four months alone, I have spent over 120 hours working with these
collections. I am currently using at least three of their collections for my dissertation, which is
examining the relationship between Modernism and regionalism in mid-century Florida
landscape architecture. Even though this work focuses on Florida landscape architecture, the
approaches for adapting universal ideologies to a region can be generalized to other areas.
Therefore, the work is applicable on the national level. My committee chairperson and I are also
planning an exhibit of Florida's mid-century landscape architects utilizing the materials held by
the archives. We intend to place the exhibit in the College of Design, Construction, and
Planning's gallery and make it available to both students and the community. This will increase
awareness of the design solutions utilized by previous generations of landscape architects and
inform people about Florida's landscape traditions.

The archives' staff is extremely dedicated and helpful, and they have done much to assist me
with my work. Yet, this grant would allow them to do so much more for researchers and the
community. While they have been adding to the collection, there are other significant landscape
architects whose work should be sought and preserved. Digitization of the collections would also




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



provide greater access while protecting the plans. On a personal level, digital images of the plans
would improve my papers and presentations. Currently, the archives can only provide a very
limited number of digital images of plans due to a scarcity of funds. The images that the archives
can produce are of a higher quality than the ones I am able to capture, and better visuals would
improve my ability to effectively share my research.

The University of Florida Libraries' are exceptionally positioned to provide an excellent
repository and research facility for the study of landscape architecture and architecture. Based on
my experiences with the archives, I feel that the staff has been working diligently to achieve that
goal, and this grant would assist them in making that a reality. I am extremely grateful for the
opportunity that the National Endowment for the Humanities is providing with this grant, and I
again strongly recommend the awarding of this grant to the University of Florida Libraries. If I
may be of any other assistance, please contact me at (352) 650-2551 or via e-mail at
bbnettles@ufl.edu.



Sincerely,



Belinda B. Nettles

Ph.D. Student
Historic Preservation & Landscape Architecture
College of Design, Construction, and Planning
University of Florida


- r






Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

HEfWSC1IL L SHMPAKR) M5 EACH AVEN E ATLANTIC lEACHL. LIDPA 3K33 M C9iMO49-*

Apil 14, 211

Joh Namms, Projwt Lwid
AstciMu Ulivwiimy Liawuie
GCwge A. Smathlers Lferlel
Unlwlty of Floride
FOBo" 11700
Giinesvilk, FL 326I-7000

RE: UP A*teekine Arihs AppikAlicon - NEH Challti Grimtt TProan

Dow Idm:

I a played to enthinclkally s9on0 tiM rePftenced pmoel to ubamliallty enhani ti UF
Aitiaaunit Acless. sa wame an b et i actrnaimtay .bi1ccltnl hsntril In lh UniverBity collection
th is relied o m dh motm pt as w*ell as other hi4Wric peiodh impotent 1o FlrWida Id fk CWibs.
Thil manterW is of gra v luw no hilrim. rlchavtogtosl. sodc3s. and desigp pofesuikomh. including
thOae n an c eppd In historic puratki.L Whtm ouled wtlh othr hitooul snd ahnwologjial smute
the manid amidcazes mchlthsceal lbMny, p iaks wactuan emtattik ofdieo muutult ad po
vYi Usnpus cautrdion inAf'iaWin to duipn prefeaionith nowvian older builinm. Arthikeciul
dnfw oftbulhkit miuncd alter bth Civil War io t pect wilL become inam'iny impo nma
sixcan ofdaimis building tdmpologie. In adidlon, mil rhitealt - tedd. scet It- chasing Bspect
ttfursocisy. and many amchhcnia rcords ate also works ofan. They desrv the premttiVion, cn-
ent, ad awkhiltyn poasd by this appt i lSin.

Althohu pesmiwedon olftltesl" docinmeb ian all pwtriod a d ame la to em hmb malhys
been of importneml smn tweo m t hot H doceumefnls eltid loI the meamunMl d ch" im tleutrl
prwkecals d philsophy wi haww feared sMice Wot Wer w will condime to be of perticuibr an to
holas, audcMa a ip fgenokasisa mld the geaIti public isec os u I th ie Walk cnvirfemRL The
atlity so pmrcs anAd dtil the documm elznmiiodly ism I lhaaml altm of II p( scllo and
duplmtlon ofbh ric nords, aid cani pty a subtandtid ml Icin prvkig publk oumteWaLk A the smc
1ime, 11 nehtltology it hating * pukuni d dRint pIa the ely Inw hkh the visual ats amnd tEeni mu
c 0ed. In ctchictrs thins hmped Afhtim beciiulogy ia teAM tat Stalurely �4h tho pillecapihcl impact
gf the MdaN MoNi] eaa follW Weld W Two. The coWi.A ul is bmm � a e mr4c 41 k .I.
dmlIa. 6t towing', and 1e consimuctmioM oftbildl. Maiy med bmuimitntg coaMi mI hew wbeen C-
aeulad wilham the, mlahcllc.i dili is o lhe compular. aid stochis, remcrnhs. and co sinamti
diungpaw sild- s completed by had toky.

I bcwclb the fdlng ofyur pnipal will preidw tttnor stip tomd bulkltbgt collections
land pnmit gttn CutdI. not ily b In thie karcilee*atl rnteS td tOl O1N of the dith piL, hbut
at theie eimrof rthe pa. IWat d its tM, ound dange My appr bHt ftr pm sring
wrk ofr the recent pat em cEm ibc knowlk4p "hi the retoni of many Bnmis my booms vaitab for
the Pa mime becusl the Cnims Be avat tiht tIr Unkrmaslw of fleslME r E Mk The pant pnoides
- qfcaimaty so tke advailg ofthils vituiiou

I tromgly mwpofrt is giraU pmposal ad mM 0St i will bhe ftvobly icomedl




HoKhel B. Shepit.d,FAIA Entmrltdue
Ptmlf Emmeilus. UF School ofARliitectut





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI Allan T. Shulman
SCHOOL of Assistant Professor
ARCHITECTURE Ph: 305-284-3120
Fax: 305-284-2999
ashulman@miami.edu



April 27, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

Please accept this letter of support for the University of Florida Architecture Archive's NEH
Challenge Grant application. I wholeheartedly support and applaud the intent of the project to
create a dedicated Curator of Architecture Archives position and to expand outreach to the
architecture community, as well as access to its collections.

Florida has been a laboratory of 20th century design, yet accessible archives of its architectural
heritage are limited. As a Florida-based architect and educator who studies regional
architectural themes, my work has been made possible in part by the availability of archival
material -- much of it in the collections of the Smathers Libraries. However, many architects
have not considered the value of their drawings and project records; several known archives
have been lost to oversight or neglect. Others have been sold piecemeal, or are kept for that
purpose. It is important to start broadcasting the importance of archival collections for future
scholarship.

This project is particularly important because its outreach component will educate architects
about the value and the role archives play in scholarship. It will help instill an ethic of
conservatorship within Florida's architectural community. Ultimately it will enable me, as well as
other students, scholars and lay people, to investigate new areas of design and expand our
understanding of Florida's communities. I believe this will have local as well as national and
international impact, as Florida is increasingly relevant to scholarship on a wide variety of topics.

I personally plan to support the initiative by working with the Miami chapter of the American
Institute of Architects (AIA) to help facilitate these discussions, and by coordinating
collaboration with the University of Miami community.

Warm regards,



Allan T. Shu lman FA EED P
Assistant Professor
University of Miami School of Architecture





1223 Dickinson Drive, Suite 309
Coral Gables, FL 33146
www.arc.miami.edu 15




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
U UNIVERSITY of

UF IFLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries 535 Library West
Office of the Dean for Development & Advancement PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000
352-273-2505
352-392-7251 Fax
www.uflib.ufl.edu


May 3, 2011

Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Proraum Officer
Office of Challenge Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Penn,\ h nia Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20506

Dear Dr. Johnlson,

This letter confirms my strong commitment to work collaboratively with the project team, the
University of Florida Foundation, College of Design, Planning and Construction, and partners to
achieve the endowment goal of raising $1.5 million in new private cash contributions prior and
during the grant period.

I have held the position of associate dean of advancement and development at the Libraries since
February 2008. It has been a productive environment for raising funds in partnership with faculty
who are knowledgeable in their respective fields and have extensive networks throughout Florida
and other regions where alumni reside.

I believe that the assets described in this proposal will be more than sufficient to meet the matching
requirement. Cindy Peterson's expertise, reputation and personal relationships in the architectural
community present the perfect opportunity for securing endowment gifts. Previously, I have
cInjo ed working in partnership with John Nemmers to secure architecture collections and cash
contributions when his time permitted. Now that Cindy has joined the Libraries as a fulltime
faculty member, we will be able to concentrate on this endeavor.

People here in the state of Florida are passionate about architecture, preserving architecture and
archival records. It's an art-form that inspires patronage and. devotion by the professional
community and those enthusiasts who support the work of specific architects and designers.
Together, we plan to continue tapping into this community using quality presentations and
solicitation materials, ident if ing qualified individuals and alumni for face-to-face cultivation at
hometown and regional Gator Club meet ing-, and processing of all gifts and follow-up
correspondence/documentation. We will cultivate and solicit family and private foundIat i.ons, and
corporations as well. My development team, including Grants Manager Bess de Farber and Public
Information Officer Barbara Hood have access to expertise and resources necessary to support this
effort at a very high level.


Thei Foundation for I h, Gator Nation 16
An Equal Opportunity Institution





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
May 3, 2011
Page 2

Although this is challenging work, I onji >, communicating my passion for the UF Libraries, our
capable faculty, staff and Leadership Board members to prospective donors. A (l'illenge Grant
award will give the project team additional credibility and impetus for inspiring private sector
contributions.My expertise is friend-raising and the world of architecture and design is an excellent
place to find more friends.

This pr ,ject is near and dear to my heart. Thank you for this wonderful opportunity to make a
difference in this state!

Since rely,



Samuel T. Huang
Associate Dean for Ad'.. j n cnl and Development




































The Foundation for The Gator Nation 17
An Equal Opportunity Institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
UF UNIVERSITY of

UFIFLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries 208 Smathers Library
Department of Special and Area Studies Collections PO Box 117007
Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
352-392-9075
www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec


May 1, 2011

Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Program Officer
Office of Challenge Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20506

Dr. Johnson:

For over six years one of my responsibilities as an archivist in the Department of Special and
Area Studies Collections at UF has been management of the Architecture Archives, and I know
that UF has competently served as steward for the historical drawings and other records
documenting humanity's design heritage in Florida and the Caribbean. In that time, the holdings
increased six-fold and the number of outreach activities such as exhibitions, lectures, tours and
classes increased at nearly the same pace. Unfortunately, the truth is that UF needs to be far
more proactive in our collecting and outreach activities if we are going to effectively respond to
the significant need voiced by historians, architects, designers, educators and others in the
region. The Archives can only achieve its potential if a full-time curator is in place to oversee
the collections, develop and maintain donor relations, and create educational and outreach
programs.

As early as 2004, when I first began working closely with faculty in the School of Architecture
and Department of Landscape Architecture here at UF, we recognized the need for a curator. In
2006, an Archives advisory board comprised of practitioners, educators, historians and librarians
agreed with this assessment and decided that the hiring of a curator should be a priority goal.
We were fortunate that the administration recognized the significance of this endeavor and
decided to hire a curator earlier this year. Cynthia Peterson is ideal for this position: she is a
lifelong Floridian educated as an archivist and with many years of experience working for
architectural firms and as an architectural archives consultant. She has developed a broad
network that includes educators, historians, architects, landscape architects, planners, and other
professionals, and she quickly determined that we also should approach clients and individuals
who are passionate about architecture in order to generate support for the collections and
activities of the Archives.

This letter confirms my role in the proposed campaign to partner with Cynthia Peterson in all
collecting activities, donor relations and humanities activities. Specifically, I will lead efforts to
process holdings, select materials for digitization, create online descriptions and exhibitions,


The Foundation for The Gator Nation 18
An Equal Opportunity Institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
UF UNIVERSITY of
UFIFLORIDA
serve on the Advisory Board, participate in creating oral histories, and assist in coordinating all
public events. I enjoy and look forward to future face-to-face meetings with prospective donors.

I have no doubt that we will be successful in our campaign to create an endowment to support
this position and the related humanities activities. We have a long track record of building
world-class collections sustained by endowments. We have the right personnel and the right
infrastructure. We also have the expertise to continue to develop the Archives as a leading
architecture and design repository in the U.S. As the letters of support and commitment included
with this proposal demonstrate, there already exists a significant community of supporters who
believe in the mission of the Archives and feel that the Archives can satisfy their needs. This
NEH Challenge Grant will assist UF in achieving its long-term goals, and I am committed to
ensuring that we succeed.


Sincerely,


J^\K JP/AAl^


John R. Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
Special and Area Studies Collections


The Foundation for The Gator Nation
An Equal Opportunity Institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
UF j UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries 208 Smathers Library
Department of Special and Area Studies Collections PO Box 117005
S...... ll. , FL 32611-7005
-'- 273-2755
352-846-2746 Fax
www.uflib.ufLedu/spec/


29 April 2011


Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Program Officer
Office of Challenge Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20506

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant application: "Building
Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the
Caribbean."

Dear Dr. Johnson:

It is with great enthusiasm and commitment that I write this letter in support of our
application for the NEH Challenge Grant: "Building Stewardship and Access for the
Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean."

The architecture of Florida is unique and increasingly a palimpsest where layer upon
layer of architectural influence and history can be read, deciphered, and rediscovered.
Florida's layered architectural influences range from the native populations who settled
in Florida and developed an indigenous architecture that reacted to the prevailing
environment; the explorers and conquerors who laid claim to a new and undiscovered
world and brought their own European vocabulary and traditions; to contemporary
architects who are exploring new technologies and innovative materials with
environmentally sensitive possibilities. Each layer of architectural history in Florida
provides an opportunity for study not only of the structures themselves but the parallel
influences on those structures including the social, political and technological histories.
Thus the study of architecture, like the humanities, can tell us who we are, where we
have been, and where we are going.







The Foundation for The Gator Nation 20
An Fqual Opportunity institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
FI UNIVERSITY of

UI FLORIDA



The Architecture Archives of the University Florida Smathers Libraries is a valuable
cultural resource that advances the study and appreciation of the history of our built
environment in order to help secure its future. In a relatively short period of time the
Archives has collected some of the most important collections of our built environment
from the most influential architects and landscape architects to date in Florida including
the Carrere and Hastings drawings of Ponce de Leon Hotel in St. Augustine, FL; the
postwar modern collection of the Sarasota School of Architecture; the collection of
renowned preservationist Herschel Shepard who studied, educated the public, and
preserved the Capitol building of the State of Florida; and the "Father" of landscape
architecture in Florida, Frederic B. Stresau, Sr.; to name a few.

The letters of commitment and support supplied in our grant application speak to the
overwhelming need and importance of the preservation of the documents of our built
heritage and the collective enthusiasm for the Archives mission and goals. In addition to
the support within the University of Florida academic community including the
President of the University of Florida, the Dean of the College of Design, Construction,
and Planning; the Director of the School of Architecture and the Director of the
Landscape Architecture program, the support of the practitioners and scholars in Florida
is unparalleled. Thirteen Chapters of the Florida American Institute of Architects
representing over 3,600 practitioners, the President of the Florida Association of the
Landscape Architects, the Territorial Archivist of the Virgin Islands, the President of the
Florida chapter of the Documentation and Conservation of building sites and
neighborhoods of the Modern Movement (DOCOMOMO), highly acclaimed authors and
lecturers all commit to our programs and fundraising efforts as defined in our grant
application to ensure the success and long-term sustainability of the Architecture
Archives of the University of Florida.

I am honored to be working with such a historically and socially important collection
that is available at the UF Architecture Archives and am especially excited about the
potential that the NEH Challenge grant funding will provide to advance and expand the
humanistic studies of architecture in Florida and the Caribbean.

Thank you for your consideration,



Cynthia L. elterson
Architecture Archives Curator
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries




The Foundation for The Gator Nation
An Equal Opportunity Institution





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

TUF UNIVERSITY of

UF IFLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries 200 Smathers Library
Technology & Support Services Division PO Box 117003
Digital Library Center/Digital Services Gainesville, FL 32611-7003
352-273-2900 (Phone)
352-846-3702 (Fax)
digital.uflib.ufl.edu
ufdc.ufl.edu



May 2, 2011

Dr. Brandon L. Johnson
Senior Program Officer
Office of Challenge Grants
National Endowment for the Humanities
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20506

Dear Dr. Johnson:

Please accept this letter confirming the University of Florida Libraries' commitment to supporting digital
humanities research with architectural archives. I and the Digital Library Center staff are committed to
continuing the work necessary to expand the digital work in service of the architectural archives during the
NEH Challenge grant period.

The Architectural Archives Digital Collections are part of the many collections that comprise the University
of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC). UFDC began in 2006, and since that time, these open access
collections have grown to over 6.8 million pages of unique manuscripts and letters, antique maps, rare
children's literature books, newspapers, historic photographs, oral histories, architectural models, audio and
video files, and more. UFDC enables users to find unique and rare digitized materials held at the University
of Florida and over 90 partner institutions.

By providing open source tools and a centralized preservation repository, UFDC is the primary technology
serving resources to users and enabling additional collaboration. The underlying technology powering
UFDC supports the full attribution and branding necessary to support moral rights, a critical element in
international collaboration. Further, the technology is fully supported by policy where partners grant
permissions to allow their materials to be shared openly online and archived for long-term preservation
while retaining all rights to their materials. The strong technological infrastructure with partner tools
coupled with the permissions based model has allowed the digital collections to flourish with contributions
of materials digitized from galleries, libraries, archives, museums, herbaria, historical societies, corporate
collections, and private collections.

This same core infrastructure also enables new collaborative opportunities, as with digital humanities
projects to enrich the existing materials through enhanced interfaces and the development of contextual
materials. UFDC has become a place where resources are both found and connected, and a community of
active scholars and researchers is developing across the many projects.

The Architectural Archives Digital Collection already includes architectural models, blueprints, large format
maps and drawings, scholarly journals, photographs, scholarly projects, theses and dissertations, slides,
technical reports, books, and videos. The curator of the physical and digital collections is actively developing
the digital collections from the University of Florida and partner holdings. Part of this development includes
The Foundation for The Gator Nation 22
An Equal Opportunity Institution




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
TUF UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA

building the digital collections by digitizing materials and curating born digital materials and this is
alongside work to enhance the digital resources by finding new ways of working with these materials in
terms of making them both accessible and meaningful.

We appreciate the opportunity to present this proposal along with the many letters of commitment from our
partners and supporters.


Best Regards,





Laurie N. Taylor, PhD
Interim Director, Digital Services
University of Florida
PO Box 117003
Gainesville, FL 32611
352.273.2902
352.843.3702
Laurien@ufl.edu





























The Foundation for The Gator Nation 23
An Equal Opportunity Institution





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

AHERN & ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS, P.A.



April 28, 2011


Mr. John Nemmers, Principal Investigator
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000


RE: University of Florida NEH Challenge Grant -Hosting a Presentation


Dear Mr. Nemmers,
It would be a pleasure and an honor for the Treasure Coast Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects to support Ms. Peterson's Project - "Building Stewardship and Access for
the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean.", and to host her presentation - "Creator,
User, Keeper: Preserving the Design Legacies of Florida" on the Treasure Coast on a mutually
agreed upon future date and time.
Having been through recent natural tribulations, hurricanes Francis, Jeanne and Wilma,
we are well aware of the irreparable destruction that can occur to our current environment. The
Treasure Coast community has many groups actively pursuing the preservation of our local built
heritage. The AIA is one such group that currently is involved with local governments to foster
the documentation of our significant buildings and public art before a future catastrophe renders
the task impossible.
The Treasure Coast of Florida has a rich and storied past of indigenous peoples and
courageous settlers, of natural resources and explosive development. Chronicles of the past
should be preserved and readily disseminated to the populous, to educate all interested in their
own legacy for a better future. This program would go a long way in accomplishing these ends.
Should you have any questions or need clarifications pertaining to the future presentation
location and time, please do not hesitate to contact me.


Thank You.
Sincerely,




John M. Ahern, AIA
President of Treasure Coast Chapter, AIA Florida








2674 S.E. Willoughby Boulevard, Stuart, Florida 34994 (772) 220-8907
Peterson-UF+AIA.DOC 1/1





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
AIA Tampa Bay University of Florida
A Chapter of the American Institute of Architects


April 24, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Program

AIA Tampa Bay commends the leadership at the University of Florida Libraries for leading
the effort to preserve our state's architectural history and we are very pleased to partner
with them on this effort.

We have witnessed first hand the potential for destruction of documents that are
important to preserving the legacy of our state's built environment. Without a place to
archive documents, they are often stored in attics, garages and eventually tossed. The
establishment of "Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of
Florida and the Caribbean" will ensure that this historical data is available for
preservationists, historians, architects, students, scholars, authors and others in their
work and studies.

Initially to support this project, our chapter is committed to hosting and promoting the
presentation "Creator, User, Keeper: Preserving the Design Legacies of Florida". The
presentation will include a roundtable discussion with architects, archivists, and
researchers on the importance and identification of design legacies in Florida.

Florida is home to world-renowned architecture - The Sarasota School, Miami's Art Deco
architecture, the Frank Lloyd Wright Campus at Florida Southern to name a few. As
these buildings are changed or are destroyed, the best documentation to explain the
original design intent are the original architectural drawings which contain detailed
information that cannot be conveyed in photographs.

We urge you to support their grant request for this important endeavor.

Respectfully,






Antonio J. Amadeo, AIA, IIDA, LEED AP, EDAC
President

200 N. Tampa Street, Suite 100
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-3411 / (813) 229-1762 25














* ASLA
FLORIDA CHAPTER
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS
5123 Kernwood Court, Suite 100
Palm Harbor, FL 34685
Tel 727-938-6752
Fax 727-942-4570
www flasla org

SUE FERN
Association Manager


FLORIDA CHAPTER
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
KENN BATES
President
EMILY O'MAHONEY
President-Elect
EJ BOLDUC III
Past President
JONATHAN HIGH
Secretary
MIKE MILLER
Treasurer
DANA K WORTHINGTON
Trustee
ADAM McGUIRE
Broward
JAN STERN
Daytona Beach
BUFORD DAVIS
Gainesville
CHRIS FLAGG
Jacksonville
VACANT
Miami
MICHAEL EKBLAD
Naples/Ft Myers
DERICK TAYLOR
Orlando
JEFF BROPHY
Palm Beach/Treasure Coast
IVY CLINTON
Tampa Bay
J DAVID MALCOLM
Tallahassee
MATHEW POWERS
Florida A&M University
GIANNO FEOLI
Florida International
University
BOB GRIST, FASLA
University of Florida
MARY BATES
Member at Large
Education and Research
MICHAEL PAPE
Member at Large
Public Relationships and
Marketing
KEVIN CAVAIOLI, FASLA
Member at Large
Leadership and
Membership
PATRICK HODGES
Member at Large
Advocacy and Licensure


Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida








April 29, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000



Dear Mr. Nemmers,

I am writing to inform you of my support of the UF Libraries' National Endowment for the
Humanities Challenge Grant Program application titled "Building Stewardship and Access for the
Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean." If approved, the proposal will be a significant
step in archiving the design history of not just Florida Landscape Architects, but design professionals
across Florida, many of whom have also worked throughout the Caribbean.

The UF Architecture Archives recently acquired and preserved the papers and works of notable
Landscape Architect Frederic B. Stresau, considered by many in our profession to be the father of
landscape architecture in Florida. The appropriate preservation of these documents is critical in
protecting the profession's body of knowledge now and for future generations of designers. During
his legendary career, Mr. Stresau trained many of today's practicing Landscape Architects in Florida.
His legacy is an important part of Florida history and I am thankful that the UF Architecture Archives
has the means to protect his papers and make them available to researchers and the public.

Few repositories exist dedicated to the proper handling of historic works of design professionals. Too
often, works of notable designers are relegated to a box in a dark storage unit or garage unavailable
to all but a few people, or oftentimes forgotten altogether. Time, humidity and pests take their toll
and irreparable damage causes these works to be lost forever. A grant such as this would provide the
means for a broader expansion of preserving these works.

Historic Preservation is among the many areas of practice for Landscape Architects. Through the
Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS), Landscape Architects work in cooperation with the
National Park Service to identify and document significant historic landscapes at the national,
regional and local levels. The basis for documentation begins with the use of preserved drawings,
written papers and existing photographs when available. However, as time passes, documentation
becomes more challenging. Landscape Architects in Florida are currently working to identify and
document outstanding historic landscapes. The resources available at the UF Architecture Archives
are vital to the success of these efforts.

I extend my best wishes to the University of Florida in seeking this grant. If successful, the Florida
Chapter ASLA would welcome an opportunity to work with the UF Architecture Archives in
identifying suitable individuals, firms and places to consider for inclusion into the collection.

Sincerely,




Kenn Bates, ASLA
President
Florida Chapter ASLA

Cc: Bess de Farber
Cynthia Peterson 26
Bob Grist, FASLA





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
AIA Miami University of Florida

A Chapter of The American Institute of Architects









SApril 29, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Program

AIA Miami whole heartedly supports the effort to preserve our state's
architectural history and we are very proud to assist the University of Florida
Libraries with this effort.

We as a profession need to impress on the public the value of the art of our
designs and the built environment. I have had the privilege to have seen and
worked with the original drawings of several historic landmark buildings. These
prints are as impressive and the building themselves, and they provide true
insight into the design intent and the mastery of our profession. Without a place
to archive documents, they are often stored in boxes or rolls in some garage and
eventually tossed out. The establishment of "Building Stewardship and Access
for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean" will ensure this
valuable resource for students, scholars, authors, preservationists, historians,
architects, and others will always be available.

We at AIA Miami will offer all our support to assist in this effort. We will be
honored to host any educational presentations to help inform the public and
our members. AIA Miami urge you to support this grant request as an
important and noble effort.

Respectfully,





Virgilio Campaneria, AIA, NCARB
President, AIA Miami




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida





lPAIA Florida Northwest
P.O. Box 16025 Pensacola, FL 32507 - (850) 723-7707 - aianwfl@cox.net
www.aianwfl.com


April 24, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

RE: National Endowment for Humanities Challenge Grant

The NW Florida Chapter of the American Institute of Architects strongly endorses The
University of Florida's application entitled: "Building Stewardship and Access for the
Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean."

The State of Florida has long been a leader and trend setter in the world of architecture from the
Art Deco hotels of South Miami, to the new urbanism of Sea Side and on to places like Disney
World and Epcot Center. Preservation of the architectural records and heritage will be a valuable
contribution to the preservation of the documents and history behind the design of these places
and the unique and cutting edge designs that created them.

Students, researchers and the public from Florida, and the nation as a whole, would benefit from
having access to these documents and records in such a facility as the University of Florida's
George A Smathers Libraries.

These records will help in preservation of the cultural history and in restoration efforts as these
buildings and places eventually reach the end of their useful lives and fall victim to the bulldozer.
Not only will architectural scholars be able to benefit from such a record but historians, film
makers and other visual artists would also be well served to have access to such a wealth of
material.

In closing, we urge you to award this grant to the University of Florida George A. Smathers
Library where I'm sure excellent work will be done in gathering and preserving the architectural
heritage of Florida and the Caribbean for future generations.

Sincerely,




Mark Essert,
President AI Florida Northwest





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida




April 27, 2011

Mr. John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Program

The leadership being shown by the University of Florida Libraries for leading the effort to
preserve our state's architectural history is commendable, and leadership from AIA Palm Beach
applauds your efforts.

It is unfathomable that the potential for destruction of documents that are important to preserving
the legacy of our state's built environment could ever be possible. The establishment of "Building
Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean" will ensure
that this historical data is available for preservationists, historians, architects, students, scholars,
authors and others in their work and studies.

Florida is home to world-renowned architecture - The Sarasota School, Miami's Art Deco
architecture, the Frank Lloyd Wright Campus at Florida Southern to name a few. As these
buildings are changed or are destroyed, the best documentation to explain the original design
intent are the original architectural drawings which contain detailed information that cannot be
conveyed in photographs.

The opportunity to participate in and learn from the proposed series of presentations to each of
the Florida Chapters of the American Institute of Architects on the importance of the preservation
of these documents of our built heritage in Florida, is invaluable.

We urge you to support their grant request for this important endeavor, focusing on focus on the
creators of the records, the users of the records such as historians, students, and preservationists;
and the long-term preservation and care of these important archives.

Respectfully,








Jose F. Jamarillo, AIA, LEED AP
AIA Palm Beach, President

200 N. Tampa Street, Suite 100
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-3411 / (813) 229-1762 29




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
AIA Jacksonville University of Florida
A Chapter of the American Institute of Architects


April 24, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Program

AIA Jacksonville is pleased to collaborate with the University of Florida Libraries for
leading the effort to preserve our state's architectural history. We commend them for
providing leadership for this important endeavor.

We have witnessed first hand the potential for destruction of documents that are
important to preserving the legacy of our state's built environment. Without a place to
archive documents, they are often stored in inappropriate spaces or thrown away. The
establishment of "Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of
Florida and the Caribbean" will ensure that this historical data is available for
preservationists, historians, architects, students, scholars, authors and others in their
work and studies.

Initially to support this project, our chapter is committed to hosting and promoting the
presentation "Creator, User, Keeper: Preserving the Design Legacies of Florida". The
presentation will include a roundtable discussion with architects, archivists, and
researchers on the importance and identification of design legacies in Florida.

Florida is home to world-renowned architecture - The Sarasota School, Miami's Art Deco
architecture, the Frank Lloyd Wright Campus at Florida Southern to name a few. As
these buildings are changed or are destroyed, the best documentation to explain the
original design intent are the original architectural drawings which contain detailed
information that cannot be conveyed in photographs.

We hope that you will support their grant request for this important endeavor.

Respectfully,



Holly M. g, AIA, LEED AP6 '
President





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida









AIA Tallahassee

April 22, 2011

Re: UF Libraries' National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant Program, "Building Stewardship and
Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean" application



To John Nemmers, Principal Investigator,

The Tallahassee Chapter of the American Institute of Architects is proud to be a partner is support of the University
of Florida Smathers Libraries Architecture Archives in their current efforts to preserve the design legacies of
Florida. Their proposal "Creator, User, Keeper: Preserving the Design Legacies of Florida" will help broaden the
impact of architecture and design as an important humanities discipline throughout the state and nation.

Our AIA Tallahassee chapter, being located in our historical state capital city surrounded by 3 colleges and
universities and comprised of many registered architects who serve the state, realize the important part the legacy
of both our built and un-built environment has on our lives and cultural heritage. We came very close to losing our
historic Florida State Capitol Building not too many years ago. If it had been lost, as so many of our historic cultural
and architectural treasures have in Florida, then we would have hopefully had a preserved documented history of
the design, construction and life of the building. If we had neither then we would have lost a large part of our
cultural identity here in Tallahassee. What we save as a collective society of our built and cultural heritage is as
important as how we build and what we built. This applies to all types of buildings, parks and monuments as well
as our natural environment. This documentation demands an urgent vigilance.

Architects are keenly aware that examples of good design matters for the both for the practice of architecture and
for the education of our student architects and their teachers. Documentation is the key to preserving the
important educational dialogue and the challenging lessons we need to continue to learn in our future design
process.

AIA Tallahassee Chapter members are looking forward to participating in the current efforts being undertaken by
the University of Florida Smathers Libraries Architecture Archives to preserve the cultural legacies of our built
environment.

Regar s,



Beth Lewis, AIA, LEED AP
AIA Tallahassee President 2011
Associate Professor of Architecture
Florida A&M University School of Architecture
1938 S. Martin Luther King Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32307-4200
elizabeth.lewis@famu.edu 850-599-3244




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



.^ AIA Fort Lauderdale
nmm A Chapter ofThe American Institute of Architects


April 27, 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Program

AIA Fort Lauderdale is proud to offer its support for the University of Florida Libraries in is efforts in
preserving Florida's architectural history.

The importance of document preservation and archiving is irrefutable, especially in a state that faces the
challenges of natural disasters. After witnessing the devastation of Hurricane Andrew to the South
Florida area, and in lieu of the other recent natural disasters in the past two years, we feel the importance
of this cause is obvious more now than ever before.

With the diverse and rich architectural landscape of Florida apparent in every region, it would be
devastating to the community if the materials documenting such architectural icons such as the
Stranahan House, the original Riverside Hotel, Himmarshee district, just to name a few, were destroyed
and unavailable to fellow architects, students, historians and the community.

The Fort Lauderdale chapter of the American Institute of Architects is in complete commitment to and
will enthusiastically host and promote the presentation "Creator, User, Keeper: Preserving the Design
Legacies of Florida" to our membership and community. We believe the presentation, including a
roundtable discussion with architects, archivists, and researchers, will be an engaging and important
topic for our membership, students and community at large to participate in. Most importantly, this
presentation will educate all on the importance of long term care and archiving of these documents-
something that often does not get discussed until its too late.

We hope that you will value the importance of this endeavor of document archiving, preservation and
education, by supporting the University of Florida Libraries grant request.

Sincerely,



vette V. London, AIA
AIA Fort Lauderdale President, 2011


3201 W Commercial Blvd, S 225 * Ft Lauderdale, FL 33309 * 954.486 7910 * aiafllaud@gmail.com





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


Susan Laura Lugo, C.A.

P.O. Box 717, St. Thomas, VI 00804-0717
340-690-0531 -* susdanlauraluoo@ gmail.com


John Nemmers, Principal Investigator
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32511-7000

Re: National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant Program
University of Florida Application

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

I am pleased to be given the opportunity to convey my wholehearted support for the University of Florida's
project proposal for "Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean."
This project is exceedingly worthy of consideration by the National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant
Program not only for its regional inclusiveness, but also for its recognition of the importance of built heritage in our
often fragile and challenging tropical environments.

As a member of the Executive Council of the Caribbean Regional Branch of the International Council on
Archives (CARBICA), in my professional role as the Territorial Coordinator for Archives for the Government of the
Virgin Islands, and as a former president of the St. Thomas Historical Trust, I am particularly sensitive to the
importance of history, representations of societies and the display of cultural traditions as manifested through
architecture in the Caribbean and as reflected in the arts, literature, beliefs and languages of a diverse and mobile
population.

As a Caribbean government archivist, I also understand too well the importance of documentation for our
built heritage which spans from the late 1500s to the present day. The facades of our government buildings and the
arrangement of our public spaces are as much a reflection of the colonized as the colonizer, and these visual
influences were articulated and reverberate to this day throughout the islands as well as the southern U.S., Central
and South America.

The challenges to identify, establish and preserve legacy-based and digital architectural collections for
Florida and the Caribbean will be well-placed in the hands of the University of Florida. UF has long demonstrated
informed and enlightened institutional support for its architectural holdings and, under the present NEH application,
its vision for expanding public outreach, preservation, processing and digitization of its Floridian collections is a
logical first step in fostering broader regional interest and support for architectural scholarship and information
access in the wider Caribbean.

I trust that you will let me know how I may be of further assistance to you and your project in the
Caribbean and I sincerely hope that I and my colleagues will have an opportunity to contribute to, participate in and
be the welcome beneficiaries of the UF project's collaborative educational opportunities and curatorial service skill
building in the not too distant future.

Sincerely,



Susan Laura Lugo, C.A.
Territorial Coordinator for Archives
Government of the United States Virgin Islands





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida




THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
PO Box 410671, Melbourne, FL 32940
www.aiaspacecoast.com


Date: April 26, 2011


John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainseville, FL 32611-7000

Reference: University of Florida NEH Challenge Grant

Dear Mr. Nemmers,

The Space Coast Chapter of the Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects is proud to say that we support your efforts in obtaining the "Building
Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the
Caribbean" Grant.

The work that the University of Florida Architectural Library is doing is
extremely important for our state for many reasons. Florida has always had
diverse architectural styles when compared to other states. We have projects that
range from historic Colonial style buildings in Pensacola, Cracker style on Merritt
Island, to Art Nouveau in Miami to the largest collection of Frank Lloyd Wright
buildings at Florida Southern. Records of projects in St. Augustine are also
important as it is the oldest occupied city in the United States. Archival
documentation of these projects and designers are crucial.

The State of Florida AIA is celebrating their 100 year anniversary in 2012.
Part of their celebration is looking back at the past one hundred years of
architecture that has been built in the state of Florida. Documentation of
architects, projects and built construction is key to this celebration of Florida's
history. Archiving our rich diversity of built environment will only get more
important as time goes on.

A third point to remember is that there are many firms that are not
weathering the economic downturn of the last few years. As a result, there are
probably many documents that are ending up in recycling bins or worse, the
landfills of Florida. Offices are having to cut back on staff, space and even closing
their doors as to the limited amounts of commissions during these times. Original
drawings, renderings and text are poised for destruction at an alarming rate. This
project grant will help rescue what remains.




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


Obviously, students and faculty will comprise the primary users of this
archive collection. Future architectural students will be able to research these
projects of the past to understand core ideas of how buildings work with Florida's
unique environment. Through the study of the details of the past, new architects
will understand how to incorporate these regional materials and styles into modern
projects.

For others, the University of Florida is centrally located in the state for
those who wish to look at the documents in person instead of online access.
Historians, authors and educators will be able to access and use this information to
further their discussion of architecture through their discourse.

The Space Coast Chapter of the Florida American Institute of Architects will
support this project by helping the University of Florida obtain the grant. Our
chapter will host and support the promotion of the presentation: '"Creator, User,
Keeper: Preserving the Design Legacies of Floridd'at one of our upcoming chapter
meetings.


Sincerely,




frey M. Phillips, AIA LEED AP
. Space Coast AIA Chapter President
Project Manager/Project Architect
BRPH Architects-Engineers, Inc.





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida
AIA Orlando
A Chapter of the American Institute of Architects


28 April 2011

John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Re: 2011 National Endowment for the Humanities Grant Application
AIA Orlando Letter of Support

Mr. Nemmers,

AIA Orlando proudly supports the Smathers Libraries' application for a National Endowment for the
Humanities Grant to preserve and protect architectural archives. This grant will provide critical
assistance to preserve Florida's contribution to our society's artistic and cultural heritage.

This project will have immediate and ongoing value to our region, for AIA Orlando's strategic plan
includes a Regional Center for Architecture. One of the biggest components of this Center's
mission is to be a repository of architectural knowledge and records. Towards this end, our Center
will be an intake conduit for source documents, as well as a portal for interested parties to study
and use them.

Integrating this mission with the Smathers' Libraries preservation of architectural archives will be an
important focus of this Center. Without this grant, archive preservation and access will be
diminished. The responsibility and cost of archival presentation must be a shared responsibility
under the direction of an institution such as the Library.

Central Florida is home to world-class architecture, having established itself as an international
travel destination. This architecture blends with the local milieu to create a rich, vibrant
architectural community across many generations, and this community deserves archival
preservation of its documents like perhaps few others.

This project will also tie closely with our strategic plan to increase awareness of architectural and
design in the region's educational system. With this project, we will have a valuable tool to help
educate citizens while still in school about the importance of design issues, and increasing the care
with which we treat the built environment.

Sincerely,



Richard T. Reep, AIA Y
President AIA Orlando 2011



930 Woodcock Road, Suite 226
Orlando, Florida 32803
(407) 898-7006
Fax (407) 898-3399




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida

AIAGainesville #AIA








April 25,2011




John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear Mr. Nemmers,

As President of the Gainesville Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it is
my pleasure to support the project "Building Stewardship and Access for the
Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean."

All practicing architects form part of a long tradition, and our work responds to the work
of the architects that went before us. While our profession is future oriented and
dedicated to serving our clients, we can only do this responsibly and coherently in
reference to the work that has been done before. We refer both to the nearby built
environment, and to the history and character of the places.
We learn from the successes of our predecessors, and from the solutions they found to
architectural problems.

The University of Florida Smathers Library Architecture Archive is a very important tool
for the conservation and preservation of our architecture legacy. It contributes greatly to
the education of the next generation of architects and historians. In our architecture
practice we are constantly referring to earlier built environment. Having access to the
details of some of the most significant building will improve our ability to project for the
future. This will be especially useful when we need to renovate or add to a significant
building.




1





Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



The state wide nature of the collection makes this collection even more important.
Having access to information on buildings throughout the state is especially important
for firms, which design throughout the state, the US and even internationally. The
availability of such resources will add to our competitive edge.

I take this opportunity to invite you to give a presentation to our chapter on your project
so that our members learn more about its details, and in the ways our chapter and its
members can contribute to its success. I am sure our members will be very interested
in it.

We are looking forward to having you at our chapter.




14,-.os--,,- LN_ ,.'.,.



Maria-Luisa Riviere, AIA
President AIA Gainesville
3300SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608


























2




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida



VAIA Florida Gulf Coast


April 26, 2011


John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
PO Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

RE: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant Program

We are pleased to confirm that AIA Florida Gulf Coast Chapter supports the efforts at
University of Florida and the project "Building Stewardship and Access for the
Architectural Archives of Florida" in the essential process of preserving Florida's
Architectural records.

A huge amount of paperwork is generated by offices each year. That means storage
space can become an issue. With proper archival of these pertinent documents, it
allows to maintain history and ensure that documents are stored safely and easily
recovered when they are needed.

A document's importance or potential usefulness may not be revealed for an extended
period and, as time passes, new uses for old records may emerge. It is always a
challenge for the Architects to manage their drawings as a treasure. It is helpful to have
a reliable system in place for maintaining and safeguarding our Architectural drawings.
This subject is important to the AIA Gulf Coast in order to keep history alive and to help
people develop a deeper understanding of Florida and appreciation for its building
preservation.

To support this project, the Gulf Coast Chapter is committed to hosting and endorsing
the presentation "Creator, User, Keeper: Preserving the Design Legacies of Florida" at
our chapter meetings. We are eager to help strengthen this venture and encourage
others to as well.

Regards,



Mark Sulta A,NCARB
President




Building Stewardship and Access for the Architecture Archives of Florida and the Caribbean
University of Florida


1468 Edgewood Circle
Jacksonville, FL 32205
26 April 2012

Mr. John Nemmers
Associate University Librarian
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida
P.O. Box 117000
Gainesville, FL 32611-7000

Dear John:

As president of the Florida Chapter of DOCOMOMO US, I'd like to communicate our
organization's interest in preserving archival material and the critical importance of providing
appropriate funding for di iti,atlirn, including related staffing.

DOCOMOMO is an international organization for the Documentation and Conservation of the
Modem Movement. Much of Florida's architectural history follows the Second World War. The
most prominent architects who shaped that history are now perishing at a rapid rate. \\ith 'uT
proper funding to secure and preserve these resources, future work to document thrce works and
properly understand Florida's architectural history will be imperiled.

We are at a unique crossroads. A generation of architects is disappearing, and with the expected
spike in archival material, it is important that the state's most important archive be appropriately
funded to handle the additional required effort. As researchers and preservationists, it is crucial
that these resources are properly preserved and made available.

In a short time, the Architectural Archive at the University of Florida has achieved a position of
prominence among such facilities in the State of Florida. This is simultaneously a good thing and
it is a bad thing. As the UF Archive has become the principal site for architectural collections, it
effectively becomes a more attractive home for architectural resources. That increase in demand
translates into an increased need for labor, materials, and tools for conservation -- all of which
point to an increased need for grant funding for the Archive.

Man\ thanks.

Sincerely,



Richard Shieldhouse
President, DOCOMOMO L S 'Florida





Appendix A: Five Year Strategic Plan


Architecture Archives Strategic Plan, 2006-2011

Overview
The mission of the Architecture Archives is to preserve archival drawings and other historic
materials related to architecture and design in Florida and the Caribbean, to support and promote
education and scholarship, and to support the preservation of the region's built environment. The
Archives is the preeminent repository for archival records pertaining to the architecture and
landscape architecture of Florida and the Caribbean. Although there have been increased efforts
in recent decades to preserve the region's built heritage, little has been done to identify and
preserve the historical drawings and other records that document that heritage. Since its founding
in 2004, the Architecture Archives has sought to rectify this problem by systematically collecting
records with enduring research value.

The Archives intends to be the largest and most comprehensive collection of architecture and
design records documenting Florida and the Caribbean. As such, the focus of the collection is on
the architecture and landscape architecture of the region, as well as the professionals and firms
based in the region or with significant regional connections. Initial collecting activities have
focused on a handful of important collections, including the archives of prominent architects and
landscape architects Alfred Browning Parker, John Ormsbee Simonds, Kenneth Treister, Rufus
Nims, the firms of Carrere & Hastings and EDSA, Inc.

The Archives collects all archival materials including drawings, photographic materials,
documents, audio-visual materials, objects, and electronic files. Monographs, serials and other
published resources will not be collected (although they may be acquired and transferred to other
curatorial units within the University of Florida Libraries upon donor approval).

Leadership and Planning
To establish the Architecture Archives as the leading regional research center for the study of
architecture and landscape architecture, the Archives established the following leadership and
planning group:
* John Nemmers, Archivist, UF Smathers Libraries Department of Special & Areas Studies
Collections (Architecture Archives collection manager)
* Martha Kohen, Director, UF School of Architecture
* Kay Williams, FASLA, Professor, UF Department of Landscape Architecture
* Marcia Bourdon, Director of Development, UF College of Design, Construction and
Planning
* Sandra Fox Melching, Director of Development, UF Smathers Libraries
* Ann Lindell, Head, UF Smathers Libraries Architecture and Fine Arts Library
* Claude Armstrong, Architect (external consultant)
* Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA, Architect (external consultant)





Appendix A: Five Year Strategic Plan


Strategic Goals

I. The Archives will identify and collect records of historical value.

Activities:
1. We will establish a "Friends of the Archives" group to serve as an advisory/advocacy
group. Several individuals have agreed to serve, including: Roy Graham, FAIA, Director
of Historic Preservation, UF College of Design, Construction & Planning; Harold
Barrand, Associate Director of UF Physical Plant Architecture & Engineering; John
Ingram, Director of UF Smathers Libraries; Kay Williams, FASLA, Professor of the UF
Department of Landscape Architecture. Additional members should consist of prominent
practitioners who could direct collecting efforts by identifying collections we should seek
to acquire.
2. We will create and prioritize a list of potential acquisitions. Several collections have been
identified already: John Volk, Gene Leedy, William Morgan, and Bob Broward, among
others.
3. We will continue to maintain a collection development policy. We will examine the
possibility of broadening our collecting scope to include other states such as Georgia,
Alabama, and South Carolina.


II. The Archives will preserve and process collections as soon as possible to ensure prompt and
easy access for researchers.

Activities:
1. We will establish intellectual and physical control over all newly acquired collections.
2. We will process collections as quickly as possible to ensure timely access.
3. We will publish descriptions of the collections using standard archives and library
methods, including catalog records and online finding aids.
4. We will identify, prioritize and address preservation and conservation needs.
5. We will digitize selected materials and provide access online.


III. The Archives will ensure collections are maintained in appropriate and secure storage and
display space.

Activities:
1. We will conduct a space needs assessment and prepare recommendations for space in the
Smathers Library building. Martha Kohen and Claude Armstrong will lead this effort.
Their proposal should include exhibition, processing and storage space.
2. We will create a storage space for the drawings, models and large format materials. Some
materials may be stored in an off campus storage facility.


IV. The Archives will promote awareness of collections and services through exhibitions,
education and outreach programs.





Appendix A: Five Year Strategic Plan


Activities:
1. We will continue to support faculty and students, emphasizing the use of primary
resources in education.
2. We will create exhibitions that promote the collections and raise awareness and
understanding of the records.
3. We will loan materials to other institutions and museums for display in exhibitions.
4. We will promote the activities and collections online and in newsletters and other
publications.
5. We will hold lectures and talks focusing on our collections and services.
6. We will conduct outreach to the professions and to humanities scholars (e.g., open house
events, tours, etc.)


V. The Archives will seek funds to support collections and services and to ensure its long-term
sustainability as the premier archival program in the region.

1. We will raise funds to endow a full time architectural archivist position.
2. We will identify and cultivate donors who can establish or contribute to a general
endowment to support the acquisition, preservation, processing, and storage of the
collections.
3. We will identify and promote naming opportunities that can be used to raise funds (e.g.,
the Archives, the spaces) in which the collections are housed, assistantships, fellowships,
etc.).
4. Unless a collection is of such significance that we can not pass it up, we will require that
all donors also donate funds in addition to their collections. These funds will be used for
processing, supplies, digitization, etc.





Appendix B: Holdings


Architecture Archives Holdings

The collections of the Architecture Archives support scholarly research, historic preservation, and
the education of students. Access to these collections is provided by guides, which are freely
available online: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/architecture/collections.htm. In addition, the UF
Digital Collections (UFDC) provides access to digital reproductions of selected drawings, photos
and other items held by the Architecture Archives.


Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA
Establishing his practice in the 1940s, Parker
quickly gained fame for his visionary
architecture and craftsmanship. Renowned for
his environmentally friendly designs in the
Modernist style, he designed and built thousands
of residential and commercial projects
throughout his lifetime and won numerous
awards. House Beautiful, the primary
architecture magazine during the 1950s and 60s,
named four of Parker's residences as "Pace
Setter" houses, more than any other architect. In
1959 Frank Lloyd Wright recommended Parker
as an American Institute of Architects (AIA) Fellow. An AIA Fellowship recognizes architects
who have made a significant contribution to both architecture and the greater society, achieving a
standard of excellence in architecture at both a local and national level. Parker was the only
architect Wright recommended for the Fellowship. This collection currently is being processed
but has been available to researchers for over ten years and is the collection most frequently used
by researchers and students.

William Morgan, FAIA
Educated at Harvard under Walter Gropius and
Jose Luis Sert and trained in the Cambridge office
of Paul Rudolph, Morgan established his
architectural practice in Jacksonville, Florida, in
the 1960s. Well known for excellence in
architectural design, his works range from modest
residences to such major projects as the Florida
State Museum of Natural History in Gainesville,
the U.S. Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan; the U.S.
Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Westinghouse
World Headquarters in Orlando, Pyramid
Condominium in Ocean City, Maryland; Bloomingdale's store in Miami and Neiman Marcus in
Ft. Lauderdale. He has received numerous design awards and is the author of several articles and
books on architecture, including Earth Architecture: From Ancient to Modern. This collection
was acquired in 2009 and currently is being processed.

Carrere and Hastings.
An irreplaceable collection of the earliest architectural drawings of John Carrere (1858-1911) and
Thomas Hastings (1860-1929), two of the most significant American architects of the late-19th
and early-20th centuries. Their firm designed more than 600 buildings, including the New York
Public Library (1902-11) and the House and Senate Office Buildings in D.C. (1908-09). Created





Appendix B: Holdings


for Henry Flagler in St. Augustine, Florida, these drawings had been "lost" for decades. The few
people who knew of their existence were unaware of their historical significance. Stored in a
boiler room under high Florida temperatures and humidity, and exposed to insects and rodents,
i' ' this treasure trove remained unknown and
v ' endangered until its rediscovery in 2004.
- The newly discovered St. Augustine
S" - collection offers significant potential to
Shield unique information with enduring
,- value.
Comprised of over 300 original, fragile
drawings on cloth, silk and paper, as well as
S ' blueprints and copies, the collection is the
S " " -^' largest known archives documenting the
firm's earliest work, particularly the Flagler
Memorial Presbyterian Church (1889-1890)
S'i H I (NR 1983) and Hotel Ponce de Leon (1885-
1887), now Ponce de Leon Hall at Flagler
College (NR 1975), which was the first and
the flagship of Flagler's resort empire. This palatial Spanish Renaissance Revival hotel, with
Italian, French and Moorish influences, was the first major commission for Carrere and Hastings.
Nationally significant for both its architecture and engineering, the building is America's first
large cast-in-place concrete building. The drawings for this resort offer ample evidence of the
wealth and extravagance of the upper-class during the Gilded Age. Members of the design team
included Bernard Maybeck, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Thomas Edison, George Willoughby
Maynard, and Pottier and Stymus. Conservation, digitization and processing of the Flagler
College Hotel Ponce de Leon Architectural Collection and the Memorial Presbyterian
Church Architectural Collection is currently underway, supported in part by a federal Save
America's Treasures grant administered by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

John Ormsbee Simonds, FASLA. Collection, 1912-2005.
Drawings, project files, correspondence, writings, speeches,
and other papers of landscape architect and planner John
Ormsbee Simonds. Beginning in 1940 when he founded his
first partnership, Simonds and Simonds, his firms were
responsible for planning over 500 projects, including more
than 80 planned communities and new towns. In 1970, he
was a co-founder of The Environmental Planning and
Design Partnership (EPD), with offices in Pittsburgh, Miami -
Lakes, and Michigan. Notable projects include Mellon
Square in Pittsburgh, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the
new towns of Miami Lakes and Pelican Bay in Florida.
Simonds served as President of the American Society of
Landscape Architects (ASLA) in 1963-1965, and was
awarded the ASLA Medal in 1973. Not only by his practice I
and service to the profession, but also by his role as educator and author, Simonds significantly
affected the field of landscape architecture. In 1961 Simonds authored the premier major textbook
used in landscape architecture and planning education during the latter half of the 20th Century,
Landscape Architecture: The s\hopig ofMan's Natural Environment. This publication was
revised twice under the title Landscape Architecture: A Manual of Site Planning and Design
(1983 and 1998), and Simonds was working on a fourth edition at the time of his death in 2005.
John and Marjorie Simonds donated the collection to UF in 1990, at the request of Herrick Smith,





Appendix B: Holdings


former chair of the Landscape Architecture department. In 2004-2005, the Landscape
Architecture department provided funding for two graduate students to complete processing
activities under the supervision of Prof. Kay Williams. This collection has been available to
researchers since 2006.

EDSA, Inc.
EDSA, Inc. was founded in 1960 by Edward Durrell
Stone, Jr. in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. EDSA's early
projects were primarily undertaken in Florida and the
U.S., but by the 1970s the firm had expanded to take
on numerous international projects. Today EDSA is
one the largest landscape architecture and planning
firms in the world. The firm is widely recognized for
its work in attractions and entertainment, campus and
cultural planning, community planning, environmental
planning and ecotourism, hotels and resorts and urban
design. Representative projects include: El
Conquistador Resort and Country Club, Puerto Rico;
Collier's Reserve, Naples; Crosswaters Ecolodge,
China; Nova Southeastern University, Florida; Wolong Panda Reserve, China; Pont Royal, Aix-
en-Provence, France; Tierra Del Sol, Aruba; Madinat Jumeirah, Dubai; Faria Lima Financial
Center, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Fairmont Mayakoba, Quintana Roo, Mexico; John F. Kennedy Center
for the Performing Arts, Washington, D.C.; PepsiCo World Headquarters, New York; and
Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas. The Records of EDSA, Inc. were donated to the University of
Florida in 2010 and are a cornerstone of the landscape architecture and planning collections in the
Archives. The collection documents the significant contributions made by EDSA, Inc., and
represents important styles and patterns within the field of landscape architecture, planning and
design over the past five decades. Students, historians, preservationists and others from a variety
of disciplines will use the collection to gain an understanding and appreciation of the firm's
approach to design, as well as the history and culture of the time period. In 2010 the Libraries
presented EDSA, Inc. with a proposal to support the processing of the collection with funding for
student assistants, preservation and digitization.

Herschel E. Shepard, Jr., FAIA
A substantial amount of Shepard's architectural
practice has been in historic preservation and includes
the restoration of the Historic 1902 Florida Capitol.
The Shepard Collection, which was donated to UF in
2010, documents Shepard's expertise in Florida's
historic architecture and his many contributions to
preservation and restoration in the state. Shepard's
work covers the entire range of Florida's architectural
past, including restoration of landmark buildings such
as the 1902 Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee and
reconstruction of such historically significant sites as
the Second Seminole War era Fort Foster and the
Spanish mission site of San Luis de Apalachee. The
total collection of hundreds of original drawings and
thousands of documents and photographs includes all of Shepard's works on the colonial
buildings of St. Augustine. Shepard has worked in architectural restoration and reconstruction of
St. Augustine buildings since 1970. These buildings include the Ximenez-Fatio House, de Mesa-





Appendix B: Holdings


Sanchez House, Tovar House, Government House, Castillo de San Marcos and Fort Matanzas.
He has also served on the Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board and the City of St. Augustine
Historic Preservation Commission. In 2010, the Libraries submitted a grant proposal entitled
ol h ,l,, g St. A, 11g, ,11 ' 's Colonial Heritage: An Interactive Digital Collection for the Nation's
Oldest City to the National Endowment for the Humanities to support digitization of drawings
from this collection.

Robert C. Broward, FAIA
Broward began his career as an architect in Jacksonville, Florida in the early 1950s. He worked
under Frank Lloyd Wright in the construction of the Florida Southern College campus in
Lakeland, and he subsequently received fellowships from Wright to study at Taliesin East in
Wisconsin and Taliesin West in Arizona. Broward designed a number of projects in Florida,
including the Unitarian Universalist Church of Jacksonville in Arlington, the Wesley Woods on
Julington Creek retirement facility in Fruit Cove, several private riverfront homes in Mandarin,
and the Southeast Toyota headquarters campus in Deerfield Beach. Broward wrote The
Architecture of Henry John Klutho: The Prairie School of Jacksonville, and also served as
historic consultant in the 1990s restoration of Klutho's St. James Building as the new Jacksonville
City Hall. This collection was acquired in 2011 and has not been processed.

John Howey's Sarasota School of Architecture Collection, 1926-2001.
Photographs, drawings, models and research materials
collected or created by John Howey during the
creation of the book and exhibition entitled, The
Sarasota School ofArchitecture, 1941-1966.
Alternatively known as the "Sarasota School of
Architecture" or "Sarasota Modem," the style was
popularized by a group of architects that included Carl
Abbott, Bert Brosmith, Joseph Farrell, Mark Hampton,
Philip Hiss, Gene Leedy, Victor Lundy, Paul Rudolph,
William Rupp, Tim Seibert, Frank Folsom Smith,
Ralph Twitchell, Jack West and Ralph and William
Zimmerman, among others. The Howey collection, which spans from 1926 to 2001, includes a
variety of materials on these Sarasota architects and their works. Although the focus is on
Sarasota and Florida, the collection also includes photos and documents pertaining to buildings
around the world. The collection was acquired and processed in 2009.


Kenneth Treister, FAIA
Treister is an architect, sculptor, photographer,
artist, author, and lecturer. A longtime resident of
Miami, primarily Coconut Grove, he is perhaps
best known for his design and planning work in
South Florida and the Caribbean. The hundreds of
drawings and project files document numerous
important architectural and design projects,
including Mayfair, the up-scale retail and mixed-
use development in Coconut Grove; Temple
Emanu-El of Greater Miami; Yacht Harbour Condominiums in Coconut Grove; Gumenick
Chapel of the Temple Israel in Miami; the Holocaust Memorial in Miami Beach; Elizabeth
Virrick Park in Miami; Out Island Inn in the Bahamas; Office in the Grove, a Coconut Grove
high-rise office building; and several residential projects in South Florida. In addition to his





Appendix B: Holdings


architectural records and related material, the collection contains over 50,000 photographic slides
documenting Treister's extensive travels around the world. The images focus particularly on
architecture, design, and urban planning in Europe, North and South America, Asia, and northern
Africa. There are slides of his own work as well as the works of notable architects such as
Antonio Gaudi, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The collection also
includes manuscripts and photographs used to create books on topics such as Temple Israel, the
Holocaust Memorial, and Havana. This collection currently is being processed, but has been
available to researchers for over five years.

Rufus Nims. Architectural Drawings, 1950-1992.
Nims is best known for his work with the Howard Johnson hotels and restaurants and his
residential work in South Florida and the Caribbean. Nims was one of a handful of architects who
defined the modem tropical house following World War II, before the widespread use of central
air-conditioning. The collection includes plans for residences and buildings in Florida, Louisiana,
New York, Costa Rica, and several countries in the Caribbean.

Turpin Chambers Bannister. Papers, 1939-1982.
Bannister (1904-1982) was a leading architectural historian in the mid-20th Century, the first
president of the Society of Architectural Historians, and a professor of architecture at the
University of Illinois and the University of Florida.

Architecture Educational Collection, 1930-2010.
This collection of architectural drawings was assembled to support education and research needs
at UF. Many of the designs and plans were created or collected as part of the Historic American
Building Survey (HABS) in the 1960s and 1970s. Numerous cities and counties in Florida are
well represented, including St. Augustine, Pensacola, Key West, Tampa, etc. The drawings
represent a large number of architects and firms, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph,
Alfred Browning Parker, Hershel Shepard, and many others. Ms Group 273.

Wallis Baker Associates
The landscape architecture and site planning firm | ""
Wallis Baker Associates was founded in Winter Park
in 1961 by Thomas H. Wallis, Jr., FASLA. The firm
was originally founded as Wallis-Stresau &
Associates, along with Frederic B. Stresau of Fort N, NotL
Lauderdale. In 1970 William H. Baker, FASLA,
joined the firm as an associate and soon became a. AC
principal and executive vice president. Between 1970
and 2001, Wallis Baker Associates completed a
hundreds of projects throughout Florida, the United
States and the Caribbean. Representative projects in
the Orlando region include the Harry P. Leu Botanical Gardens, the Orlando International
Airport, the Orange County Convention Center, Woodlawn Memorial Park, and numerous
projects at Sea World. The firm also completed several projects for Service Corporation
International around the U.S., beach resorts in the Bahamas and Jamaica, Stetson University in
DeLand, Flagler Memorial Church in St. Augustine, and numerous residential projects in Vero
Beach, John's Island, Orchid Island, and Windsor, Florida. The Records of Wallis Baker
Associates were donated in 2010 by Tom Wallis and Bill Baker. The collection includes plans,
photographic slides, reports, and CAD drawings for over 150 of the firm's projects. Meredith
Leigh, a Ph.D. student in the Landscape Architecture department, has completed principal





Appendix B: Holdings


processing of the collection and it will be made available to researchers and students in the very
near future.

F. Blair Reeves, FAIA. Papers, ca 1967-1974.
Reeves was a professor of architecture at the University of Florida from 1949 to 1987, and he was
a leader in historical architectural preservation both in teaching and in professional organizations.
The collection includes his significant work with the Historic American Building Survey
(HABS).

Guy Chandler Fulton. Papers and plans, circa 1930-1948.
Fulton was the State of Florida Architect to the Board of Control from 1945 until 1956. In this
position he had the responsibility both designing and supervising the construction of buildings at
state education institutions during the post-World War II boom. This collection includes plans for
private residences and commercial buildings in Florida. See also the Building Program Records
of the Architect for the Board of Control, part of the University of Florida Archives.

Rudolph Weaver, FAIA. Architectural records, circa 1920-1940.
Weaver was the State of Florida Architect to the Florida Board of Control as well as the first
director of the School of Architecture at the University of Florida. Includes technical drawings,
plans, photographs, and sketches of academic buildings, private residences and commercial
structures. See also the Building Program Records of the Architect for the Board of Control, part
of the University of Florida Archives.

Jefferson M. Hamilton. Architectural Drawings and Photographs, 1926-1947.
For the majority of his career Hamilton lived and worked in Florida, particularly in Tampa and
Gainesville. He served as consulting architect for various building projects at the University of
Florida, including the Medical Center building in the 1950s. He also designed buildings for
college campuses across the southern United States. The collection includes plans, renderings,
and photographs related to the architecture of Hamilton in Tampa, Florida.

Edward T. Potter, FAIA Architectural drawings, ca. early 1870s.
An ecclesiastical specialist, Potter
designed churches, particularly -
Episcopalian churches, in New York, New
England, Florida, and other regions of the .
country. Among his important churches
were the First Dutch Reformed Church in
Schenectady, the Harvard Street -.. .
Congregational Church in Boston, the .
Church of the Good Shepherd in Hartford, /
and St. John's Church in Yonkers, New
York. Other well-known projects include
the Union College's Nott Memorial
(Graduates' Hall) in Schenectady, the Colt .
Parish House in Hartford, and Mark
Twain's residence in Hartford. Potter retired in 1877, but resumed work in order to design the
Colt Parish House. This collection includes water color and pen and ink drawings of Potter's
design for St. John's Church, Jacksonville, Florida.






Appendix B: Holdings


Newly Acquired and Unprocessed Collections
These collections have been acquired by the Architecture Archives, but the processing of the
materials has not been completed. Once all preservation, arrangement and description activities
are finished, guides to the collections will be made available online. In the meantime, Archives
personnel can answer questions related to these holdings.

* Darrel Fleeger
* Alain Huin
* Jonathon Seymour, FASLA
* Marilyn Hapsis-Hugo






Appendix C: Exhibits


Selected exhibitions featuring materials from the UF Architecture Archives:

The Florida Home: Modern Living, 1945-1965
http://www.hmsf.org/exhibits/florida_home/exhibit.htm
Historical Museum of Southern Florida (now: History Miami)
2004-2005
[This exhibition was also on display at the Museum of Florida History, Tallahassee, 2005-2006]

John Ormsbee Simonds Remembered: Visionary Landscape Architect, Planner, Educator, and
Environmentalist
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/exhibits/simonds.pdf
University of Florida Smathers Library Gallery
2005-2006
[Co-sponsored by the UF Department of Landscape Architecture and co-curated by two graduate
students.]

Promises of Paradise: Staging Mid-Century Miami
http://www.bassmuseum.org/
Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach
2007-2008
[This exhibition was funded in part by NEH. The exhibition also was on display at the Ham
Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL, 2008-2009]

Of a Master's Hand: Alfred Browning Parker
http://www.alfredbparker.com/
University of Florida Reitz Union Gallery, Gainesville, FL
2008
[This exhibition was curated by UF School of Architecture graduate student, Dereck Winning]

Architecture and Landscape Architecture Collections at the University of Florida
University of Florida Smathers Library Grand Reading Room
2009
[Co-sponsored by DOCOMOMO/FL as part of the national DOCOMOMO Annual Tour Day:
http://www.docomomo-us.org/north america tour day_2009+]

Sarasota Modern: The Sarasota School ofArchitecture, 1941-1966
http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/exhibits/sarasota.htm
University of Florida Smathers Library Gallery
2009
[Co-sponsored by the UF School of Architecture and curated by Department of History graduate
student, Timothy Fritz]

Morgan and Morgan: A Retrospective
http://www.beachesareahistoricalsociety.com/
Beaches Museum & History Center, Jacksonville, FL
2010

Sarasota Modern: The Architecture of a Region
http://www.tampamuseum.org/exhibitions/sarasota-modem-architecture-region
Tampa Museum of Art
2011-2012





Appendix C: Exhibits


[This exhibition is expected to open in October 2011.]



The Preservation Conversation: Exploring Historic Preservation Processes in Florida
University of Florida Smathers Library Gallery
[Exhibition designed in April 2011 by three graduate students in the UF Museum Studies
program for display in 2012.]



Selected humanities exhibitions displayed in the Department of Special & Area Studies Collections:
(http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/exhibits.htm)

2011

* Looking Forward, Looking Back: Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American Studies (co-sponsored
by the UF Center for Latin American Studies)

* 30 Years of the Price Library ofJudaica (co-sponsored by the UF Center for Jewish Studies)

* James Haskins: Author, Teacher and Social Activist (co-sponsored by Smathers Libraries and UF
Center for African American Studies).

2010

* ARTBOUND - Book arts exhibition (co-sponsored by the UF Smathers Libraries and the UF
School of Art and Art History) http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/artbound/

* The Broadway Melody: Musical Theatre Highlights from the Great White Way 1900-1950

* Efrain Barradas Collection of Mexican and Cuban Film Posters
* http ://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/belknap/barradas.htm

2009

* Banned and C /hl/l I / Children's Books, 1990-2008

* Orchids: Worldwide Wonders Through the Ages

* Smathers Libraries ( hl,, ,' Artifacts - Literary and Otherwise

* Alternative UF: Counterculture Through the Decades (Curated by four Department of History
undergraduate students)
* http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/exhibits/altemativeUF.htm

* For This Is An Enchanted Land: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and Florida

* Reflecting on African Americans: History and Culture






Appendix C: Exhibits


* Cuba: Past, Present and Future

2008

* Buttons, Badges, and Bumper Stickers: 160 Years ofPresidential Campaigns (co-sponsored by
the Stewards of Florida History and the UF Department of Political Science)

* Pop-up, Spin, Pull, Fold: Toy Books from the Baldwin Library

* The Passing Parade: A Baby Boomer Collection

* Lebanon ~ Israel ~ Egypt: A Magic Lantern Ride from the 1920s to the Modern Era

* National Obsessions: Twentieth Century Pop Culture, Comics and Cross-promotional
Merchandizing

2005-2007

* The Afterlife of Alice in Wonderland

* Views of Padre Cicero and Brazil's Northeast Region in the Ralph Della Cava Gift

* (Re)Collecting British Women Writers: Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Women
Writers

* 75 Years ofBlondie: 1930-2005 (Curated by two English Department graduate students)

* Caribbean Collections in Special Collections

* Help is on the Way! Comic Books and Superheroes in Special Collections






Appendix D: Publications


Selected Publications and Creative Efforts Featuring Archives Holdings

Du Rivage, Holly. For Use & Beauty: The Architecture ofAlfred Browning Parker. [Documentary film
currently in production.]

Eternity, Max. William Morgan's Architectural Odyssey. 2010 (http://maxetemity.com/2010/12/14/50-
years-of-architecture-william-morgans-architectural-odyssey/; Last accessed: April 22, 2011).

Guilbert, Juliette. "The Master of Coconut Grove: At 91, Architect Alfred Browning Parker Looks Back
... and Forward." Modernism, v. 11 no. 2 (Summer 2008), p. 48-57.

Henning, Randolph C. The Architecture ofAlfred Browning Parker: Miami's Maverick Modernist.
University Press of Florida, 2011.

Hine, Thomas. "Miami Swank and Its Opposite." Humanities v. 28 no. 6 (November/December 2007), p.
10-15.

Jost, Daniel. "Back from the Beach: In the 1970s, Florida's Pelican Bay was a Model of Environmental
Planning - What Lessons Does It Offer Designers Today?" Landscape Architecture, v.100 no. 6
(June 2010), p.74-89.

Muller, Edward K. "Urban Blueways: John Ormsbee Simonds and Riverfront Planning." [Forthcoming
article.]

Penick, Monica. "Integrated Design: Alfred Browning Parker and the Pace Setter House Textiles."
Studies in the Decorative Arts, v. 16 no. 2 (Spring-Summer 2009), p. 91-114.

Peterson, Cynthia. "Discovering the Design Legacies of Florida," Florida Caribbean Architect Magazine
(Spring 2011).

Peterson, Cynthia, and John Nemmers. "Influence and Legacy Preserving the Records of Your
Architectural Heritage" Florida Caribbean Architect Magazine (Summer 2010).

Peterson, Cynthia. "The Proper Care and Preservation of Original Architectural Drawings,"
Florida/Caribbean Architect Magazine (Winter 2010).

Shulman, Allan T. Miami Modern Metropolis: Paradise and Paradox in Midcentury Architecture and
Planning. Balcony Press, 2009.

Slade, Nancy. "Simonds, John Ormsbee (1913-2005): Landscape Architect, Author." In: Birnbaum,
Charles A. ho, qpiiig the American Landscape, University of Virginia Press, 2009.

Starke, B. W., et. al., "One Life, Many Lessons: Remembrances and Appreciations of John Ormsbee
Simonds (1913-2005)." Landscape Architecture v. 95 no. 9 (September 2005), p. 100-113.

Treister, Kenneth, Felipe J. Prestamo, Raul B. Garcia. Havana Forever: A Pictorial and Cultural History
of an Unforgettable City. University Press of Florida, 2009.

"Tropical Form: Windsong House." Wallpaper n.78 (May 2009), p.62-66.





Appendix E: Curator of the Architecture Archives Position Description
UF UNIVERSITY of
UFIFLORIDA

George A. Smathers Libraries 422 Library West
Library Financial and Human Resources PO Box 117024
Human Resources Gainesville, FL 32611-7024
352-273-2595
352-392-4538 Fax
www.uflib.ufl.edu/pers/


POSITION: Architecture Archives Curator

RANK: Assistant or Associate University Librarian (Tenure Accruing Faculty
Ranks)

REPORTS TO: Head, Archives & Manuscripts, Department of Special and Area Studies
Collections

SALARY: Minimum Salary $52,000.
Actual salary and appointment rank will reflect the selected
professional's experience and credentials.

JOB SUMMARY:
The Architecture Archives Curator is a tenure accruing library faculty position which manages
and develops the Architecture Archives in the Department of Special and Area Studies
Collections. The Architecture Archives collects and preserves important historical records
pertaining to architecture, landscape architecture, construction, planning and design in Florida
and the Caribbean. The Architecture Archives Curator works closely with faculty and students to
support academic programs in the College of Design, Construction and Planning. The Curator
provides research assistance, instruction, and outreach to promote scholarship and education in
diverse disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, including history, historic preservation,
and area studies. The Curator collaborates with archivists and librarians in the Department of
Special and Area Studies Collections, librarians in the Architecture and Fine Arts Library, and
with digital and technical services personnel to improve services for users. The Curator
facilitates successful fundraising activities and other appropriate library development efforts:
working closely with the Smathers Libraries Development Office, maintaining excellent
relations with existing donors, and identifying and cultivating relationships with potential
donors. The Curator pursues professional development opportunities, including research,
publication, and professional association activities incumbent upon library faculty.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. Manage and develop the collections, services, and programs of the Architecture Archives.
2. Oversee the appraisal, acquisition, processing, preservation, digitization, and use of
historical architectural records. Advance access and scholarship through the publication
of online finding aids, selective digitization of unique holdings, and other initiatives.
3. Facilitate successful fundraising activities and other appropriate library development
efforts. Working closely with the Smathers Libraries Development Office, maintain
excellent relations with existing donors and identify and cultivate relationships with
potential donors.
The Foundation for The Gator Nation 15
An Equal Opportunity Institution