Survive the art room : a survival guide for new Florida art teachers

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Title:
Survive the art room : a survival guide for new Florida art teachers
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Creator:
Canfield, Laurie O'Shea ( Dissertant )
Roland, Craig ( Thesis advisor )
Tillander, Michelle ( Reviewer )
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
In Florida, as well as many other states, PreK-12 art teachers can be certified through Alternative Certification Programs (ACP). While the ACP format provides opportunities for Bachelor degree holders to earn teaching certification while working in their own classrooms, the program is designed as a "one size fits all" to cover all subject areas and grade levels. As someone with a Bachelor degree in Art who went through a ACP to become certified K-12 art teacher in Florida, I found the preparation I received less than adequate. The purpose of this project-in-lieu of thesis was to research the alternative certification process for Florida art teachers and then to create a Web-based "Survival Guide" for new program completers entering the classroom for the first time. In addition to my research on ACPs, survey responses and interviews from art educators in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process provided additional material to support the design of the Web-based guide. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Preparation, Professional Development, Technology in the Art Room, and Community Involvement.
General Note:
Art education terminal project

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Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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AA00001596:00001


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Full Text
SURVIVE THE ART ROOM: A SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR NEW FLORIDA ART TEACHERS
By
LAURIE O'SHEA CANFIELD
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: CRAIG ROLAND, CHAIR MICHELLE TILLANDER, MEMBER
A PROJECT-IN-LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS'
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
2011
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2011 Laurie O'Shea Canfield
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To My Family
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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my Supervisory Committee, Craig Roland and Michelle Tillander, for their time and effort in helping me to create this project-in-lieu-of thesis. I would also like to thank my parents, Frank and Laura O'Shea, who taught me that I could do anything I put my mind to, and my husband, Wayne, and children, Angelica, Michael, Zachary, Kimber, and Nathan, who encouraged me throughout my graduate school experience. It has always been my dream to graduate from the University of Florida. Thank you for helping me to achieve this goal.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS........................................................................4
LIST OF FIGURES...............................................................................6
ABSTRACT.........................................................................................7
INTRODUCTION.................................................................................8
LITERATURE REVIEW........................................................................14
METHODOLOGY...............................................................................23
RESULTS.........................................................................................28
QUESTIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH..............................................32
APPENDIX: Alternative Certification Art Teacher Survey Results.................33
LIST OF REFERENCES.....................................................................43
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH...................................................................45
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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure Page
2-1 FLDOE chart depicting routes to Professional Teaching Certification... 17 2-2 FLDOE chart showing subject area placement of ACP completers......18
2- 3 FLDOE chart depicting ACP completers rating of classroom management
training....................................................................................21
3- 1 Homepage of Survive the Art Room Website...................................26
3-2 Professional Development page of Survive the Art Room Website.......27
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ABSTRACT OF PROJECT-IN-LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL
FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS
SURVIVE THE ART ROOM
By
Laurie O'Shea Canfield April 2011
Chair: Craig Roland Major: Art Education
In Florida, as well as many other states, PreK-12 art teachers can be certified through Alternative Certification Programs (ACP). While the ACP format provides opportunities for Bachelor degree holders to earn teaching certification while working in their own classrooms, the program is designed as a "one size fits all" to cover all subject areas and grade levels. As someone with a Bachelor degree in Art who went through a ACP to become certified K-12 art teacher in Florida, I found the preparation I received less than adequate. The purpose of this project-in-lieu of thesis was to research the alternative certification process for Florida art teachers and then to create a Web-based "Survival Guide" for new program completers entering the classroom for the first time. In addition to my research on ACPs, survey responses and interviews from art educators in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process provided additional material to support the design of the Web-based guide. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Preparation, Professional Development, Technology in the Art Room, and Community Involvement.
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CHAPTER 1
Some people know that they want to be teachers from the time that they are young children, and others, like me, do not have this epiphany until later in life. There are many others like me though, as evidenced by the growing trend of Alternative Certification Programs (ACP). ACPs have become a popular way to gain teaching certification if you have a Bachelor's degree within a field of study. According to the report Profile of Alternative Route Teachers by The National Center for Education Information,
Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia are now implementing approximately 538 alternate route programs that produced approximately 35,000 newly certified teachers in 2004. The numbers are growing rapidly. Based on data submitted by the states, NCEI estimates that more than 250,000 persons have been licensed through alternative routes to teacher certification programs, with most of the growth occurring in the last decade (Feistritzer, 2005, p. 2).
ACPs are attracting large numbers of individuals to education from a variety of diverse
backgrounds and experiences to the classroom.
Although ACPs have gained in popularity throughout the country, there are
questions about whether they are indeed good preparation for the real world classroom.
The National Academy of Education points out
the pre-service preparation of teachers once occurred almost exclusively through state-accredited undergraduate programs in colleges and universities. That is no longer the case. A variety of programs at the undergraduate and graduate levelsrun by school districts as well as collegesnow prepare teachers for
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classrooms. More information is needed about which elements of teacher preparation programs, regardless of their institutional characteristics, contribute the most to teacher capacity to produce student learning" (Wilson, 2009, p.3). Due to the variety of preparatory routes to education careers, it is imperative to ensure that teachers are receiving quality training and preparation for the classroom.
After graduating with a Bachelor's degree in Visual Art, I went through an ACP and found it to be less than adequate preparation for taking on the responsibility of my own classroom. I began to wonder whether other art teachers were satisfied with how effectively their ACPs prepared them, and began looking for ways to improve the ACP experience for new art teachers. This became the motivation for my project.
In this paper, I will describe the certification requirements for Florida Art Teachers, including those for teachers seeking certification through an ACP. I will identify the problems within ACPs, and propose possible ways to correct them.
Statement of the Problem
I became aware of the problems that can occur in becoming an art teacher by way of the alternative certification process through personal experience. Currently, I am in my fifth year as an art teacher in Florida. I came to this position with a Bachelor's degree in visual art. In order to transition from artist to art teacher, I needed to apply for temporary certification from the state of Florida, pass the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE) as well as a subject area exam, and either take 17 hours of college classes or pass an ACP within the first three years of public school teaching. While I passed the FTCE and was given my own classroom, that still did not make me a certified art teacher. The ACP that took three years to complete required me to prove
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that I was competent in the 12 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS), but gave me little instruction in how to demonstrate them. For example, my classroom management instruction consisted of reading The First Days of School by Wong (1998). This was hardly adequate preparation for teaching a class of teenagers.
The FEAPS are used to demonstrate a variety of competence in any subject area. They do not prepare art teachers to deal with the unique circumstances that are intrinsic to the art room. As stated by Henshaw in the article Alternative Certification Programs for Art Teachers, "Alternative certification programs rarely focus on a specific subject. Instead, they focus on general teaching principles and methods" (2009). Although the FEAPS can be applied to all subject areas, ACPs do not do an adequate job of helping subject area teachers learn how to demonstrate these competencies because they are too generalized.
A key problem is that Alternative Certification Programs attempt to be a one-size-fits-all program for individuals with Bachelor's degrees who want to be teachers. ACPs have surged in popularity over the last two decades, and I do not anticipate that they will disappear anytime soon, but it is imperative that we find a way to customize, not generalize, the experience so that it is relevant and effective preparation for all teachers.
Thurber (2004) points out that there are recurring questions in the field of research about art teacher education in the last two decades. Of the 12 she lists, four are relevant to my research topic:
Where did art teachers learn to teach? In traditional or nontraditional programs? How prepared were they? (pre-service practices and policies)
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What should happen to keep them prepared?
What can art teachers teach the field about art teacher preparation? (reflective practice, teacher stories as research)
What are future directions for the preparation of teachers of art? I believe that art teacher preparation could be improved by more hands-on experiences, such as student teaching, classroom observations, and subject area mentors.
My research was guided by these questions and by my own experience with an ACP. What I discovered is that classroom management is the key to maximizing student learning, and that classroom management in the art room is different than in a traditional classroom. I also learned that since there is typically only one art teacher in a school, there is no opportunity for a mentoring experience from an art teacher. I feel that had I gone through a traditional art education undergraduate program versus an ACP, I would have been better prepared to enter the art room as a competent teacher. I feel that alternative certification wasn't adequate preparation for me, and I wondered how other Florida art teachers who went through alternative certification felt about their programs.
Significance of Project
As previously stated, ACPs are a popular way for Bachelor's degree holders to achieve teaching certification while working in their own classrooms. Essentially, it is on-the-job training for teachers. The topic of Alternative Certification Programs for art teachers is significant to the future of art education for a variety of reasons. First, it is
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a topic that has not been researched extensively, especially as applies to Florida. Secondly, the K-12 art teachers who are coming to the classroom through ACPs will have a considerable impact on the future of art education. Their training could influence their position on art advocacy, and their competence could influence whether or not administrators and government keeps art in schools. Lastly, my research could promote changes within the ACPs to aid art teachers in getting the training and support they need to be successful in the unique environment that is the art room. Sabol explains, Research focused at investigating recruitment, certification, and retention of visual arts teachers can inform the field about how visual arts teachers perceive themselves and understand their roles in the education of all students. Findings from research can provide information and guidance in making decisions and in taking actions that will affect the field. Creating a research base for art education has a great potential to provide a foundation upon which art education can be built and from which it can be judged in the future" (2004, p. 547). Training new art teachers is a difficult task, and it is important to find the best ways to prepare them for the "real world" art room.
In response to my research, I wanted to create a Web-based "Survival Guide" for new program completers entering the classroom for the first time. My research on ACPs, survey responses, and interviews from art teachers in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process informed the design of the Web-based guide. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Preparation, Professional Development, Technology in the Art Room, and
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Community Involvement. The function of the website is to fill in the gaps that ACP typically does not cover for art teachers. I was inspired by the fact that I was transitioning from high school to elementary school and created a list of questions an everything I want to know before I enter the classroom. It occurred to me that many of the questions I had were not covered in my ACP, and that it could be a beneficial resource for other new Florida art teachers.
Limitations
In order to complete this study successfully, I had to put aside the personal biases that I developed due to my personal experiences in the Florida Alternative Certification Program. Additionally, I limited my research to the state of Florida. There may be a national impact but that is outside the scope of this research project. Furthermore, there has been little research done in the area of alternative certification, especially as it applies to art education. While my survey results were small, they provided a glimpse into the experiences of other Florida art teachers who completed their certification requirements through ACP.
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CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW
The topic that I researched was the effectiveness of Alternative Certification Programs for art teachers. In this section, I provide a brief history of ACPs in the United States, and then discuss how the program is changing the face of education in recent years. Finally, I evaluate the effectiveness of ACPs for art teachers, who deal with unique circumstances within the traditional school setting. I accomplish this through a combination of literary research, surveys of Florida art teachers who are graduates of ACPs, and my personal experiences with a Florida ACP and in my classroom. The outcome of my research is a Web-based Survival Guide that will serve as a resource to fill the gaps in training that other new art teacher receive from ACPs.
Origin of Alternative Certification Program
First, we must define what we mean by "alternative certification." Mayer, Deckerman, Glazer and Silva (2003) define alternative certification as "a means for bachelor's degree holders to become the teacher of record with far less previous teacher training than that required by traditional certification programs" (Retrieved from http://www.ncrel.org/policy/pubs/html/altcert/re.htm). Miulecky, Shrodriani, and Wilner (2004) explain that
alternative teacher certification programs (ACPs) are generally geared toward aspiring teachers who already have a baccalaureate degree but who require additional education methods coursework and classroom experience. Such programs vary in requirements and sophistication and can be administered at the federal, state or district levels (p.1).
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According to the report Profile of Alternative Route Teachers by The National Center for Education Information, ACPs began in the 1980's to "ward off the prospective shortage of teachers" (Feistritzer, 2005, p. 2). Since then, "forty-seven states have adopted a pathway to teaching, alternative to the standard state certification otherwise required" (Nadler & Peterson, 2009, p.70). In the Handbook of Policy and Research in Art Education, Sabol (2004) states that as early as 1988,
the National Endowment for the Arts called for states to develop and implement flexible procedures that provide for special testing and certification of experienced practicing artists and arts professionals who can demonstrate a comprehensive background in the arts and substantial knowledge of the issues and methodologies of K-12 arts instruction" (p.539).
Alternative Certification Programs in Florida
Several Florida counties began alternative certification pilot programs in 1998. In response to Federal education legislation known as No Child Left Behind, Florida began offering a competency-based ACP beginning with the 2002-2003 academic year. Districts either offered Florida's Alternative Certification Program or a program developed by the school district and approved by the Florida Department of Education. The competency-based programs provide on-the-job training for newly hired instructional staff who qualify for a Temporary Certificate based on their knowledge of a subject but who have not yet completed a traditional university teacher preparation program. The course is taught by district resource teachers,
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not necessarily specializing in a particular field... there is no college or university involvement" (Brewer, 2006, p. 271).
Florida Certification Requirements
According to the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE), people who aspire to become teachers in Florida have three routes to certification that they can take:
Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) These programs typically terminate in a Bachelor's or Master's degree in Education. However, what distinguishes these program completers from others is that they have completed a program in one or more specific subject area(s) and may qualify for Professional Certification upon program completion. Currently there are 526 ITP programs offered by 34 Florida colleges.
Those who already hold a Bachelor's Degree but are non-education majors can enroll in one of the following programs:
Educator Preparation Institute (EPI) These programs are typically offered through a college and are done as a cohort and:
District Alternative Certification Program (DACP) These programs are offered through the applicant's school district and done as an independent study with help from mentors who may have no experience in your subject area or grade level. It provides on-the-job training for teachers.
All candidates for professional teaching certification in Florida must meet the following requirements:
Hold a Bachelor's Degree:
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Complete all application requirements:
Demonstrate subject area knowledge by passing an exam:
Demonstrate Mastery of General Knowledge by passing an exam: and
Demonstrate Professional Preparation and Educational Competence in a variety of ways, including a combination of a passing score on the Florida Professional Education Test and completion of a state-approved teacher education program, such as College, EPI or ACP.
All the scenarios in which an individual can achieve Florida Professional Teaching Certification are shown below in Figure 2.1, a visual aid obtained from FLDOE.
Pathways to a Professional Certificate in Florida
After Degree-Full Reciprocity
Must nam a vatd Standard Certflcate H By another state n a subject area
After Degree- A valid NBPTS Certificate in the Subject Area
After Degree- Two semesters of successful college full-time teaching experience
Must pass me Suaecr. Certification Exan
After Degree-Educator Preparation Institute Competency-based Program
Must pass General. Professional. 3-: c*r"x?:r iu-s
Initial Degree College Courses in Traditional Teacher Preparation Program
Must pass General, Professorial, and Gu&ect Cerrfcarjon Exams
florida professional
certificate
Valid s years
Initial and After Degree
Approved College Professional Training Option- Content Major & College Education Courses per Rule 6A-4.006
Must complete teacfuig experience.
dernonssaoor. of proressiora eouca&x competence In classroom, & pass General. Professional, ana 5jdj?ci C*rericat)or Stars
After Degree-A valid ABCTE Passport Certificate in the Subject Area
Must Dernonscraoe srofesaonal Educaion Competence in tne Classroom
After Degree- District Alternative Certification Competency -based Program
Mus: pass Genera. Professional, ana Subject Cermcaoon Exams
After Degree- Professional
Preparation College Courses per Rule 6A-4.006
Must complete ieacnrg experience, oenonsirapor of proresslona education competence in classroom, & pass Genera, sronessona and Subject Cerrcacon Exams
Figure 2-1: This chart from the FLDOE shows how to attain a Florida Professional Teaching Certificate.
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As a pathway to the classroom alternative certification has become quite popular in Florida. This following chart, obtained from a study conducted by Florida State University on the titled Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs with Results of Surveys of 2007-2008 Program Completers, shows the subject area placement of ACP completers by type of ACP. Seventy-six art teachers came through ITP or more traditional art education programs. Sixty-two came through DCAP, like I did, and 0 came from EPI. Therefore, DACPs are training almost the same amount of art teachers than traditional programs, and thus deserve greater attention and scrutiny.
Subject Area Placement by Teacher Preparation Program Type
HP DACF EP
N Percent N Percent N Percent
Elementary 923 55.0 208 19.3 211 28.4
ESE 308 18.4 170 15.8 129 17.4
Fine Arts 53 3.2 41 3.8 16 2.2
Foreign Language 20 1.2 41 3.8 12 1.6
English 87 5.2 141 13.1 68 9.2
Math 71 4.2 118 11.0 81 10.9
PE/Health 20 1.2 29 2.7 17 2.3
Reading 38 2.3 30 2.8 22 3.0
Sciences 57 3.4 136 12.6 87 11.7
Social Sciences 62 3.7 131 12.2 85 11.4
Other 39 2.3 32 3.0 15 2.0
Total 1678 100.0 1077 100.0 743 100.0
Figure 2-2: FLDOE chart showing subject area placement of ACP completers
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The Alternative Certification Experience
As someone who received certification through a District Alternative Certification Program in Florida, I was interested in studying the experiences of fellow Florida art teachers who earned certification through a DACP. Experiences could vary widely since "Section 231.17(b) of the Florida Statutes authorizes every school district to develop its own ACP to allow individuals to obtain the professional preparation for certification without earning college degrees" but "the district plan must have approval by the Florida Department of Education" (Suell and Piotrowski, 2006). The reason for variation is that some districts may be better equipped to offer ACP training by providing quality mentoring experiences, additional professional development trainings, and have more experience dealing with a variety of subject areas within ACP than others.
The unifying feature of the 67 different Florida county school districts' ACPs is that they are based on 12 competencies referred to as the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS) that were adopted by the Florida State Board of Education in November of 1996. These include (a) assessment, (b) communication, (c) continuous improvement, (d) critical thinking, (e) diversity, (f) ethics, (g) human development and learning, (h) knowledge of subject matter, (i) learning environment, (j) planning, (k) role of the teacher, and (I) technology which were assessed through the completion of a comprehensive set of tasks that includes products and performance practices (Suell and Piotrowski, 2006). The FEAPS are content specific, generic teaching competencies that all teachers, including art teachers, should be able to demonstrate.
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Although all Florida teachers have to demonstrate the FEAPS, the Florida ACP model that I went through gave little or no guidance or instruction on how to understand, demonstrate, or reflect upon these practices. I was instructed to follow the rubric at the end of the section. Directions were often ambiguous or in "teacher-ease." My mentors were a former principal, retired guidance counselor, and a retired curriculum specialist. None of them had any experience with art, and only one other art teacher has ever gone through ACP in Citrus County beside myself. Being the only art teacher in my school, I felt as though I did not have any support to complete my ACP in a way that was meaningful to becoming a good art teacher.
Florida Department of Education Findings on Alternative Certification
Programs
Each year, the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) in conjunction with Florida State University (FSU) conducts a study entitled Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs which is posted on the Florida ACP website (http://tinyurl.com/628payg). The most recent results are of Surveys of 2008-2009 Program Completers, which include me.
Overall, feedback was positive among District Alternative Certification Program (DACP) completers, "but as enthusiastic as some of the teachers were about their preparation, others felt unprepared for the classroom environment, often citing a lack of classroom management skills" (p. 25). Although 80% of ACP teachers stated that they received some kind of training in classroom management as part of their training, they were not all agreed that it was adequate. I personally received no training in classroom
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management as part of my ACP. The study went on to state that "in particular, DACP completers felt that classroom management skills came too late in their early careers. This is a concern from a program design point of view: DACP teachers are supposed to receive classroom management training early in their program. Thus, either the training is not happening early enough, or the adequacy of the training needs to be evaluated (P-30).
The graph below, obtained from the Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs study, depicts how many program completers found the classroom management training that they received very useful, somewhat useful, or not very useful.
OJ
o
03 CJ
c
CD
u
CD
How Useful was the DACP Training in Classroom Management Skills? (n=400)
80
60
40 20 0
I I
4.8
Very useful Somewhat useful Not very useful
Figure 2-3: Of the 80% of ACP completers who received classroom management training, the above graph depicts how useful they felt it was.
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My next biggest complaint about my ACP experience was that it was so general that it did not prepare me for the art room. According to the FLDOE study, I was not alone in my feelings since "the next most common negative response from DACP completers was that the program material was not applicable to their specialty. For example, some programs emphasized particular skills that were not relevant to the teacher's subject matter, or were targeted to different grade levels" (p. 29).
The survey asked teachers what improvements could be made to make the ACP a better preparatory program for the "real world" classroom, and "overall, completers of all three programs agreed that more applicable scenarios such as hands-on internships, classroom observations, or more time with their mentors would be the most beneficial adjustments to their preparation programs across the board' (p. 5).
Summary
Alternative Certification Programs (ACPs) were started in the 1980's to alleviate projected teacher shortages in different states. Since that time ACPs have enabled over 200,000 people from 47 states to become public school teachers. However, because ACPs are typically designed as one-size-fits-all programs to cover all subject areas and grade levels, it is not adequate preparation for art teachers due to the special circumstances that these teachers encounter in the unique environment that is the art room. Therefore, changes must be made to personalize the process to effectively prepare art teachers. In response to this problem, I created a web-based Survival Guide to fill the gaps that art teachers are receiving in their ACP training.
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CHAPTER 3 METHODOLGY
In this section of my paper, I will discuss the steps I took to create my Web-based resource. After conducting literature research on Florida Teacher Certification and alternative certification programs, I surveyed Florida art teachers who completed ACPs to find out how effectively they felt their ACPs prepared them for the classroom. Then I used that information in conjunction with my personal experiences with ACP and in my classroom to create a Web-based Survival Guide for new art teachers that would fill in the gaps that typically occur in ACP training.
Survey
For the first step of my research, I decided to survey other ACP completers to discover whether or not they were satisfied with how the ACP prepared them to enter the classroom. I created the survey using a website called Zoomerang (www.zoomerang.com). The survey consisted of 10 forced-choice questions and completers were anonymous. Survey completers rated how effective their ACP was in preparing them to deal with a variety of issues related specifically to art, such as stages of child's development in art, assessing student progress, alternative curriculum models, classroom management, professional development opportunities, working with special needs students in the art room, and so on. Completers also had the option of adding comments on two questions to explain their feelings about their ACP experience. Please see a copy of the survey and results in the Appendix.
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I emailed the Florida Art Education Association (FAEA) and requested that the survey be sent out through their email list-serv. I received only five responses to my survey, but 40% of respondents stated that they were dissatisfied with their ACP experience, 40% were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, and 20% were satisfied. Even with surveying such a small population, I felt that it supported my overall plan for responding to the pitfall of ACP training for Florida art teachers.
Survival Guide
The second part of the project was the Survival Guide. In the summer of 2010, when I decided to move from a high school to an elementary art teacher position, I interviewed three other art teachers to gather information and strategies that I hoped would be helpful to me in making the transition. I ask them each questions like: "How do you select age appropriate projects? Do you use a seating chart? Do you keep student portfolios for the whole year, or send projects home as they are completed?" I then sorted through the responses I received and used those that seemed to best fit my personality and began preparing my classroom and curriculum based on the advice I received. As I worked on my plans for the school year, I realized that many of the tips I received were about topics not covered in my ACP, such as classroom management, organization and distribution of art supplies, and exhibition of student work. I thought that many new art teachers entering the classroom via ACP for the first time might also have the same questions. That's why I decided to create a Survival Guide as a resource to fill the gaps that ACP training had left for me.
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I had initially intended the Survival Guide to be an article or book for publication, but I decided to create it as a website instead. I came to this conclusion for several reasons. First, art education is always changing and I learn new things everyday in my classroom. Therefore, it is easier for me to update a website with new information and keep the information on it current. I also believed that by creating a website, more people would have access to the information and resources than if it was a print document. Lastly, I am able to hyperlink to a variety of helpful websites for art teachers that would make it easier to use than a document. All the information and resources are at a new art teacher's fingertips.
I entitled my website Survive the Art Room because that is the intention of the project to help a new art teacher survive and thrive in their classroom. My main goals in creating the website were to be easily navigable, informative, and useful. The purpose of this Web-based Survival Guide was to create a resource for new ACP completers entering the classroom for the first time. In addition to my research on ACPs, survey responses and interviews from art educators in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process provided additional material to support the design of the website. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Preparation, Professional Development, Technology in the Art Room, and Community Involvement, as seen on the Home Page in Figure 3-1.
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?w Florida Art Teacher
Welcome to Survive the Art Room!
The inspiration for creating this website came from my own experiences as an art teacher and covers the topics that I felt the least prepared to deal with when I entered the classroom with a Bachelor's Degree in Visual Arts via an Alternative Certification Program (ACP). Consider it a list of "things I wish I knew before I began teaching".
1. Florida Certification Process
2. Classroom Preparation
3. Curriculum Models: DBAE, CBAE (TAB), Arts PROPEL
4. Sunshine State Standards (SSS)
5. Lesson Plans
6. Community Connections
7. Art Geek: Incorporating Technology
8. Professional Development
9. I'm a Survivor: About this Site
^* Internet | Protected Mode: On
Ja M00% -
Figure 3-1: Home page of Survive the Art Room website.
I used the free website creation tool called Weebly.com to create my website because I had no experience with website design and it offered several templates to aid in the design process. It was very easy to use and the results are very professional looking. I chose to use photographs from my classroom instead of stock photos as visual aids on the site because I wanted to give it a personal touch and let viewers see what a "real world" art room was like.
To lend more credibility to the site and give new art teachers a greater taste of what the art room is really like, I solicited advice from veteran art teachers. I posted on social networking sites such as Twitter and Art Education 2.0, as well as emailed the art teachers in Citrus County asking what advice they had for new art teachers. I sprinkled
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the responses I received throughout the site like little gems of knowledge, as seen below on the Professional Development page in Figure 3-2.
Professional Development
It can be kind of lonely being the art teacher. Because you are generally THE art teacher in your
school A new third grade teacher has a team ot other third grade teachers In the school tc ^^^^^^^^^^^^ mentor and guide them on a daily basis, but THE art teacher is an Island unto him or herself.
"My first years as an art teacher were kind of lonely, and I didn't have the
connections I have today. This year I went back to elementary school and ,
almost every single one of my lessons was at least somewhat shaped by ^
[Art Ed 2.0]".
-Tom Bremer
I started my career as THE art teacher at a science school. Talk about being the odd duck! Fortunately, I had spent a semester substitute teaching at the local high school that housed the county's art academy, which put me in touch with other art teachers who I could ask for advice.
I also decided to apply to the University of Florida to earn my MA in Art Education. Perhaps
returning to college for professional development may seem a little radical to you, but it will help |M KS
you to learn a great deal of information about how to be a teacher and provide you with a wealth
of resources such as contacts with brilliant expert professors. (And I'm not just saying that so they will pass me!)
Seeking out organizations and individuals to create a personal learning network is one of the best ways to ensure your success as a teacher. Meet other art teachers in your community and see if you can observe their classes. Join the Florida Art Education Association (FAEA) and attend the annual conference Ditto for the National Art Education Association (NAEA).
"Creating a PLC will help you learn continuously. There is not one week that I don't get a great idea from all the wonderful teachers out there. Lots of organizing techniques used by others to help you find your own way, lots of classroom management techniques, and tons of projects and lesson ideas can be found when you are connected."
-Theresa, 16 year Art Room Veteran
Q Internet | Protected Mode: On
" M00%
Figure 3-2: Professional Development Page of "Survive the Art Room".
Once survivetheartroom.weebly.com was complete, I posted on Twitter, Art Education 2.0, and emailed Citrus County art teachers sharing the site and requesting feedback. I asked questions such as "Is it easily navigable? Are there any topics I did not cover that you think should be included? Did you find the information helpful?" The responses I received were all positive. The strongest testimonial for my website was from the other Citrus County art teacher to go through ACP, Sheri DeCesare, who stated, "I was blown away by this site!!!! I wish that I had seen something like this when I was going through the ACP program."
27


CHAPTER 4 RESULTS
Over the last several months I have been working to complete Survive the Art Room, my project-in-lieu of thesis. I began by researching the Florida Teacher Certification Process and Alternative Certification Programs paying special attention to DACPs, which is the program that I went through to achieve my professional teaching certificate. Since my experience with ACP was less than adequate preparation for my own classroom, I conducted literary research and surveyed other ACP completers to find out whether they were satisfied with how effectively their ACPs prepared them.
While one of the limitations to my study were that only five people responded to my survey, it is still interesting to note that overall 40% were dissatisfied with their ACP, 40% were neither satisfied or dissatisfied, and 20% were satisfied with their ACP experience. Although the feedback was limited, I felt that it supported my overall plan for my responding to the inadequacies of ACP training for art teachers.
As I previously mentioned, the two biggest complaints about DCAP that were reported in Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs with Results of Surveys of 2008-2009 were that it is so generalized that it does not provide training for many of the unique situations that are intrinsic to the art room. One of the survey completers stated, "I found the ACP program to be very stressful and challenging. I was only the second art teacher to be in the program, the first was a high school art teacher with very different classroom needs and curriculum. That meant that my ACP instructors were not yet prepared for the individualized program that I needed and often we had to invent how my elementary art program would benefit from what the ACP program had to offer." Another respondent
28


said, "I was one of the first art teachers to go through the ACP in Hillsborough county about 10 years ago. Most of what was taught in the ACP classes was geared toward either an [a general] elementary classroom teacher or a [core subject] high school teacher." Therefore, there is a gap training provided by ACPs for subject specific needs relative to classroom management, child development in art, and alternative curriculum models in art, and the actual information that an art teacher needs prior to taking on the responsibility of his or her own classroom.
Next, I used this information to create a web-based Survival Guide for these art teachers and others like them. I chose to create a website because it is easy to keep the information current, and it is easily accessible to new art teachers. In an effort to give these teachers a look at a "real world" art room, I included photos from my classroom and advice from veteran art teachers. I solicited this advice using social networking sites such as Twitter and Art Education 2.0 as well as emailing other art teachers in Citrus County.
Once my website, entitled Survive the Art Room was complete, I reached out into my professional learning network and posted an invitation to visit the site on Twitter and Art Education 2.0 as well as emailing it to my fellow Citrus County art teachers requesting feedback. Although I only received feedback from the art teachers in my county, it was all positive. They found the site easily navigable, informative, and useful, which were the three goals I had for it.
Discussion
At the beginning of my project-in-lieu of thesis, I thought I could write a paper that would compel the FLDOE to make sweeping changes in the ACP, and create a product
29


that would help all the art teachers who are new to the classroom via ACP. However, I have learned that training new art teachers is a complicated and difficult process.
As stated previously within the FLDOE study, Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs with Results of Surveys of 2008-2009, ACP could be greatly improved by more hands-on internships, classroom observations, and mentors who are in the same field. I feel that I would have benefitted greatly by participating in classroom management training prior to taking on a classroom full of teenagers as well. Each art teacher works in a unique environment filled with children who are unique individuals. There is no one-size-fits-all training that can prepare a teacher for that. Most of one's education in how to be a teacher is done experientially in one's own classroom. I have learned more about teaching from my students than any textbook could provide. Learning to teach is definitely a trial and error process, but there could be fewer errors made if beginning art teachers have preemptive classroom management training and a strong support system with a mentor in the field of art education.
Additionally, I realize that my website is a resource for these teachers and functions to fill in the gaps of their training. I think it will help new art teachers, both from ACPs and traditional art education programs because of the practical advice and links to additional resources, and I wish that I had a resource like that when I was entering my classroom for the first time. In that regard, I feel that the website is successful.
Another thing that I learned both through this project and the hard way through experience is the importance of developing a personal learning network (PLN) and taking charge of one's own professional development. ACPs may not be perfect, but like
30


any program it can only be as successful as the people who participate in it. If the training is not adequate within the program, seek elsewhere for the support and training that is required.
I cannot overstate the importance of connecting with other art teachers both in the same school district and throughout the world for getting support and sharing ideas. Below is a list of ways new art teachers can get linked in with other art teachers and develop their PLN:
Join professional organizations such as the National Art Education (NAEA) and Florida Art Education Association (FAEA) and attend conferences.
Join Art Education 2.0, a social networking site which functions like Facebook for art teachers. There are over 100 different groups to join to meet the needs of all art educators.
Sign up for a Twitter account and begin following other art teachers. I began using Twitter in January to build a PLN. I learn something new every time I log in. Lesson plans, classroom management tips, project ideas, and resources are just a tweet away.
31


CHAPTER 5 FURTHER QUESTIONS
Upon final reflection of this project, further questions arose:
After researching how art teachers are trained and certified, I am wondering if there is any way to truly prepare an art teacher for the "real world" of public education today? Each art teacher must deal with a unique working environment and a classroom full of unique individuals. Some teachers must provide students "art on a cart" and have no classroom to call their own. There are a variety of scenarios that new art teachers might find themselves in. Can they really be prepared for everything they might encounter?
In regards to ACPs, would subject-specific mentors enable ACPs to prepare new art teachers and other subject area teachers in a more satisfactory way? This would certainly personalize the process, and it was one of the improvements suggested by completers in the FLDOE study. However, with Florida taking away the mentoring bonus from National Board Certified Teachers, where will these mentors come from? How many individuals will be willing to mentor without compensation?
Also, what support systems could be created for new art teachers to ensure success in the classroom? For instance, would it be feasible for districts to offer special training for art teachers that would provide professional development opportunities in areas such as classroom management, or curriculum design aligned with the Sunshine State Standards?
32


APPENDIX
ALTERNATIVE CERTIFICATION ART TEACHER SURVEY CREATED ON ZOOMERANG INDIVIDUAL RESPONSES
Zoomerang Individual Responses Page 1 of 2
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Exclude all blank responscsiearn More 1 am a graduate student in Art Education at the University of Florida 1 am conducting research for my thesis about the effectiveness of Alternative Certification Programs for Florida art teachers 1 am very interested in your feedback about your experience with ACP- Please take this brief survey to provide your candid opinions about the effectiveness of your ACP in preparing you for the unique challendes of being an art teacher based on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Your responses will remain anonymous.

1 Overall, how satisfied are you with your ACP experience?
Satisfied

2. Please tell us why you feel that way.
I feel that the program has been fairly smooth I have had a couple of issues with sending in transcripts and the quickness of the response, as well as descrepenc.es In what dasses are approved for certain criteria, but overall it has been OK.

3 Now we would like your feedback on some specific aspects of how well your ACP prepared you to take on your own art room Please rate your level of satisfaction with each of the following items below. If an item does not apply to you. please select "N/A."
How effective was your ACP In teaching you about the stages of a child's development In art? 5 Very satisfied I did not take any courses through the ACP. I completed my Masters from UF in Art Education, and that is where I learned about theories and practices in art education. This applies to subsequent questions regarding ACP
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to assess student progress In art? 4 Satisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to develop your art curriculum? 4 Satisfied
How effective was your ACP in exposing you to alternative curriculum models In art education? 3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you with strategies for classroom managemen In the art room? 5 Very satisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to order, organize, and distribute materials? 4 Satisfied
How effective was your ACP in providing you with resources for professional development opportunities specific to art eduction? 5 Very satisfied
How effective was your ACP in providing you with an art teacher mentor? 3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to deal with diversity In the art room? 5 Very satisfied
How effective was your ACP In preparing you to work with special needs students In the art room? 2 Dissatisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to use technology in the art room? 5 Very satisfied

4. Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about your level of satisfaction with your educational experience?
As previously mentioned, I have not completed and will not complete ITP, EPI. or DACP I hold a temporary teaching certificate that was achieved through course credits
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
Page 2 of 2
5. Please indicate which ACP you completed: ITP (Initial Teacher Preparation), EPI (Educator Preperation Institute), or DACP (District Alternative Certification Program).
6. Please indicate when you completed your ACP program. NA
These last few questions will help us analyze the survey responses.
7. Please select your year of graduation. 2010
8. What was your major? Other
9. What is your gender? Female
10. Are you still teaching in Florida? Yes
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Deployment Type: Web
Completion Time: Oct 21, 2010 6:30AM
Exclude This Response
I am a graduate student in Art Education at the University of Florida. I am conducting research for my thesis about the effectiveness of Alternative Certification Programs for Florida art teachers. I am very interested in your feedback about your experience with ACP. Please take this brief survey to provide your candid opinions about the effectiveness of your ACP in preparing you for the unique challenges of being an art teacher based on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Your responses will remain anonymous.
1. Overall, how satisfied are you with your ACP experience? Dissatisfied
2. Please tell us why you feel that way.
This program was new when I entered. A lot had to be tweaked to make it less stressful and more productive, i felt that there were so many parts to the program that were redundant and unnecessary.
3. Now we would like your feedback on some specific aspects of how well your ACP prepared you to take on your own art room. Please rate your level of satisfaction with each of the following items below. If an item does not apply to you. please select "N/A."
How effective was your ACP In teaching you about the stages of a child's development in art?
1 Very dissatisfied
There was no mention of a students development specifically for art.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to assess student progress in art?
1 Very dissatisfied
Again, nothing was focused on an art curriculum.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to develop your art curriculum?
2 Dissatisfied
The program helped me to develop lesson plans in general, but nothing specific to developmental art lesson plans.
How effective was your ACP in exposing you to alternative curriculum models in art education?
1 Very dissatisfied There were none.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you with strategies for classroom managemen in the art room?
4 Satisfied
The program helped me to develop my own classroom management plan and helped me to understand what was expected of me once I got into the classroom.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to order, organize, and distribute materials?
1 Very dissatisfied
There was no help for organization of the abundant supplies found in an art room.
How effective was your ACP in providing you with resources for professional development opportunities specific to art eduction?
1 Very dissatisfied It was not.
How effective was your ACP in providing you with an art teacher mentor?
1 Very dissatisfied
I had no mentors except for the art teachers that I knew prior to my entering the ACP program. This program was no help in providing me a mentor.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to deal with diversity in the art room? 4 Satisfied
The program helped me to become aware of the diversity of students and so that helped me to deal with students in general.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to work with special needs students in the art room? 4 Satisfied
Again, it helped to to be aware of students with special needs and that helped me to plan accordingly, but there were never any "specific" tools for an art room.
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
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How effective was your ACP in preparing you to use technology in the art room?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
By the time I finished the ACP program, the county had already replaced so much of the technology for all classrooms that I had to releam anything I may have come across in the ACP. But this is to be expected with the advancement and speed with which technology changes.
4. Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about your level of satisfaction with your educational experience?
I found the ACP program to be very stressful and challenging. I was only the second art teacher to be in the program, the first was a high school art teacher with very different classroom needs and curriculum. That meant that my ACP instructors were not yet prepared for the individualized program that I needed and often we had to invent how my elementary art program would benefit from what the ACP program had to offer.
5. Please indicate which ACP you completed: ITP (Initial Teacher Preparation), EPI (Educator Preparation Institute), or DACP (District Alternative Certification Program).
I have no idea.
6. Please indicate when you completed your ACP program. April/May 2006.
These last few questions will help us analyze the survey responses
7. Please select your year of graduation. 2008
8. What was your major? Art and Design
9. What is your gender? Female
10. Are you still teaching in Florida? Yes
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Deployment Type: Web Completion Time: Nov 9, 2010 5:11PM
Exclude This Response
I am a graduate student in Art Education at the University of Florida. I am conducting research for my thesis about the effectiveness of Alternative Certification Programs for Florida art teachers. I am very interested in your feedback about your experience with ACP. Please take this brief survey to provide your candid opinions about the effectiveness of your ACP in preparing you for the unique challenges of being an art teacher based on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Your responses will remain anonymous.
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? Exclude all blank responsesLeam More
1. Overall, how satisfied are you with your ACP experience? Dissatisfied
2. Please tell us why you feel that way.
The reason I am dissatisfied is that I do not feel that I have the training that I should have to teach art. I taught in elementary education and my certification out of college was Elementary Ed k-6.1 took the art certification test because I had been asked to cover art on the elementary level because of a grant, I had art appreciation in college and knew art history, the test was not hard to pass. Teaching art in elementary was fine, but now I am at the middle school and high school level and I have had to work hard to prepare my lessons to make sure that I am giving the students the training they need. After five years in high school art I am just now feeling confident. I am thankful that I could go the alternative route and have my art certification, but I always feel that I am playing catch up trying to do what would come second nature to someone that had been trained to teach art.
3. Now we would like your feedback on some specific aspects of how well your ACP prepared you to take on your own art room. Please rate your level of satisfaction with each of the following items below. If an item does not apply to you, please select "N/A."
How effective was your ACP in teaching you about the stages of a child's development in art?
N/A
No one trained me, I have read and researched to train my self
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to assess student progress in art?
N/A
See above comment
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to develop your art curriculum?
N/A
Other art teachers that I have met through the FAEA have helped me the most.
How effective was your ACP in exposing you to alternative curriculum models in art education?
N/A
Once again, on my own.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you with strategies for classroom managemen In the art room?
N/A
Classroom management was part of my elementary ed training.
How effective was your ACP In preparing you to order, organize, and distribute materials?
N/A
How effective was your ACP in providing you with resources for professional development opportunities specific to art eduction?
N/A
FAEA was the resource that helped me.
How effective was your ACP in providing you with an art teacher mentor?
N/A
FAEA once again allowed me to meet other teachers and they have mentored me by email.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to deal with diversity In the art room?
N/A
Elementary ed taught me this.
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
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How effective was your ACP in preparing you to work with special needs students in the art room?
N/A
Once again my elementary education training prepared me for this.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to use technology in the art room?
N/A
My schools professional development prepared me for this.
4. Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about your level of satisfaction with your educational experience?
5. Please indicate which ACP you completed: ITP (Initial Teacher Preparation). EPI (Educator Preparation Institute), or DACP (District Alternative Certification Program).
My process was offered by the state that any certified teacher could take a certification test to become certified in another area
6. Please indicate when you completed your ACP program. I took the art K-12 certification test in 2002.
These last few questions will help us analyze the survey responses.
7. Please select your year of graduation.
8. What was your major? Teacher Education
9. What is your gender? Femaie
10. Are you still teaching in Florida? Yes
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
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Create Survey My Surveys
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Alternative Certification Program (ACP) Survey for Florida Art Teachers
Edit ft Review Invite ft Deploy Analyze Results
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You may page through each respondent's answers by clicking the arrow buttons below, or to view a specific respondent's answers, type in a number and click Go. To exclude a respondent from all reports, click Exclude This Response. Learn More
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; !< 1 M/5 > j >' j 4 co I
Deployment Type: Web
Completion Time: Nov 10, 2010 7:54AM
Exclude This Response
I am a graduate student in Art Education at the University of Florida. I am conducting research for my thesis about Hie effectiveness of Alternative Certification Programs for Florida art teachers. I am very interested in your feedback about your experience with ACP. Please take this brief survey to provide your candid opinions about the effectiveness of your ACP in preparing you for the unique challenges of being an art teacher based on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Your responses will remain anonymous.
1. Overall, how satisfied are you with your ACP experience? Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
2. Please tell us why you feel that way.
My goal was to become certified to teach art after a career in an art related field. I was able to accomplish this goal through the course worx outlined for me.
3. Now we would like your feedback on some specific aspects of how well your ACP prepared you to take on your own art room. Please rate your level of satisfaction with each of the following items below, If an item does not apply to you, please select "N/A."
How effective was your ACP in teaching you about the stages of a child's development in art?
4 Satisfied
1 would have liked to see a little more information on this subject, but, I also feel that stages don't always relate true to individuals
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to assess student progress in art?
2 Dissatisfied
Assessment in art seems to be something very difficult to master. I've found through experience that Ruberics are one of the best methods.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to develop your art curriculum?
4 Satisfied
How effective was your ACP in exposing you to alternative curriculum models in art education?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
I'm not sure what is meant by alternative curriculum models
How effective was your ACP in preparing you with strategies for classroom managemen in the art room?
2 Dissatisfied
This seems to be a hands on learning experience. The best management advice has come from other teachers/mentors.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to order, organize, and distribute materials?
4 Satisfied
How effective was your ACP in providing you with resources for professional development opportunities specific to art eduction?
1 Very dissatisfied
1 have a VERY difficult time finding professional development opportunities, especially because I teach in a private school.
How effective was your ACP in providing you with an art teacher mentor?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to deal with diversity In the art room?
4 Satisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to work with special needs students in the art room?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to use technology in the art room?
2 Dissatisfied
I don't think this was really covered in classes that I took.
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
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4. Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about your level of satisfaction with your educational experience?
I would like to pursue additional education of a Master in Art Education, but cost is a huge issue Working in a private school does not afford me the same salary as public school. Public schools in my area have cut their Arts programs It does not seem beneficial to pursue an advanced program.
5. Please indicate which ACP you completed: ITP (Initial Teacher Preparation), EPI (Educator Preperation Institute), or DACP (District Alternative Certification Program).
I believe it would be considered a District Alternative Certification Program. I received this through the Dioces of Venice in conjunction with the FL Dept. of Education.
6. Please indicate when you completed your ACP program. 2001
These last few questions will help us analyze the survey responses. 7. Please select your year of graduation.
8 What was your major? Art and Design
9. What is your gender? Female
10. Are you still teaching in Florida? Yes
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
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Create Survey My Surveys
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Support/Help I My Account i Log Out
Alternative Certification Program (ACP) Survey for Florida Art Teachers
Edit ft Review Invite & Deploy Analyze Results
Results individual Responses Data Export
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You may page through each respondent's answers by clicking the arrow burtons below, or to view a specific respondent's answers, type in a number
and click Go. To exclude a respondent from all reports, click Exclude This Response. Learn More
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Included (5 responses) j Show deployment type Show respondent email
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responsesLearn More
Deployment Type: Web
Completion Time: Nov 10, 2010 4:57PM
Exclude This Response
I am a graduate student in Art Education at the University of Florida-1 am conducting research for my thesis about the effectiveness of Alternative Certification Programs for Florida art teachers. I am very interested in your feedback about your experience with ACP. Please take this brief survey to provide your candid opinions about the effectiveness of your ACP in preparing you for the unique challendes of being an art teacher based on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Your responses will remain anonymous.
1. Overall, how satisfied are you with your ACP experience? Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
2. Please tell us why you feel that way.
1 was one of the first art teachers to go through the ACP in Hillsborough county about 10 years ago. Most of what was taught in the ACP classes was geared toward either an elementary classroom teacher or a highschool teacher.
3. Now we would like your feedback on some specific aspects of how well your ACP prepared you to take on your own art room. Please rate your level of satisfaction with each of the following items below. If an item does not apply to you. please select "N/A."
How effective was your ACP in teaching you about the stages of a child's development in art?
2 Dissatisfied
This I had to learn about from my own personal learning network. From joining the local, state and national art educator organisations.
How effective was your ACP In preparing you to assess student progress in art?
2 Dissatisfied
Nothing in my ACP was focused on art
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to develop your art curriculum?
2 Dissatisfied See above
How effective was your ACP in exposing you to alternative curriculum models in art education?
2 Dissatisfied See above.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you with strategies for classroom managemen in the art room?
4 Satisfied
In this respect I had many opportunities to study and learn about different classroom management models.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to order, organize, and distribute materials?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
From the classroom management lessons I was able to transfer the skills to material management.
How effective was your ACP in providing you with resources for professional development opportunities specific to art eduction?
4 Satisfied
Hillsborough County has a very robust professional development department. Classes are promoted online to the teachers and staff. During the ACP course this resource was explained to us.
How effective was your ACP In providing you with an art teacher mentor?
2 Dissatisfied
I had to find my own.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to deal with diversity in the art room?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
Only in the general overview of a generic classroom.
How effective was your ACP in preparing you to work with special needs students in the art room?
3 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
We did go over how to find information on childrens special needs.
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Zoomerang Individual Responses
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How effective was your ACP In preparing you to use technology in the art room?
2 Dissatisfied
10 years ago technology was not being pushed.
4. Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about your level of satisfaction with your educational experience?
Well after taking the ACP coursed I was able to pass all of my State tests and receive my Professional Educator's Certificate.
5. Please indicate which ACP you completed: ITP (Initial Teacher Preparation), EPI (Educator Preperation Institute), or DACP (District Alternative Certification Program).
I only knew it as ACP.
6. Please indicate when you completed your ACP program. June 2001
These last few questions will help us analyze the survey responses.
7. Please select your year of graduation.
8. What was your major? Art and Design
9. What is your gender? Male
10. Are you still teaching in Florida? Yes
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LIST OF REFERENCES
Brewer, T. (2006). Teacher preparation solutions: rumbling for quality just won't do. Studies in Art Education, 47(3), 269-285.
Feistritzer, C. (2005). Alternative routes to teacher certification: an overview. Retrieved from http://www.ncei.com/PART.pdf
Henshaw, A. (2009, October 11). Alternative certification programs for art teachers. Retrieved from
http://www.ehow.com/way_5515866_alternative-certification-prog rams-art-teachers.html
Mayer, D, Decker, P, Glazerman, S, & Silva T. United States Department of Education, (2003). Identifying alternative certification programs for an impact evaluation of teacher preparation (ED-01-CO-0039/0003). Cambridge, MA: Mathematica Policy Research. Retrieved from http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/pdfs/identify.pdf
Milton, Curva, & Milton. Florida Department of Education, Florida State University College of Education. (2011). Teachers from Florida teacher preparation programs Retrieved from http://www.altcertflorida.org/pdf/Teachers%20from%20Florida%20T eacher%20Preparation%20Programs%20January%20201 1 .pdf
Mikulecky, M, Shkodriani, G, & Wilner, A. (2005). A growing trend to address teacher shortage. Education Commission to the States Policy Brief: Alternative Certification, Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED484845.pdf
Nadler, D, & Peterson, P. (2009). What happens when states have genuine alternative certification. Education Next, 9(1), 70-75. Retrieved from http://educationnext.org/what-happens-when-states-have-genuine-alternative-certification/
Sabol, F. (2004). An overview of art teacher recruitment, certification, and retention. In E. Eisner (Ed.), Handbook of research and policy in art edcuation (pp. 523-551). Mahwah, NJ: National Art Education Association.
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Suell, J, & Piotrowski, C. (2006). Efficacy of alternative teacher certification programs: a study of the Florida model. Education, Retrieved from http://findarticles.eom/p/articles/mi_qa3673/is_2_127/ai_
Thurber, F. (2004). Teacher education as a field of study in art education: a comprehensive overview of methodology and methods used in research about art teacher education. In E Eisner (Ed.), Handbook research and policy in art education (pp. 487-521). Mahwah, NJ: National Art Education Association.
Wilson, S. (2009, November 12). National academy of education teacher quality education quality white paper. Retrieved from http://www.naeducation.org/Teacher_Quality_White_Paper
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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
Laurie O'Shea Canfield's desire to be the best art teacher she could led her to become a graduate student at the University of Florida. She began her studies in Art Education in 2007 and served as a Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching the lab portion of "Teaching Art in Elementary School" to elementary education majors. After a brief hiatus to raise her family, she joined the inaugural class of the online Master's program in 2010 and will be the first student to graduate from that program.
Laurie received her Bachelor's degree in Visual Arts from Eckerd College in 2005. She began teaching art in Citrus County in 2006 and is currently employed at Pleasant Grove Elementary School in Inverness. Her current research involves teacher preparation and professional development.
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Full Text

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1 SURVIVE THE ART ROOM: A SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR NEW FLORIDA ART TEACHERS By SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: CRAIG ROLAND, CHAIR MICHELLE TILLANDER, MEMBER A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE AR TS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS` UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2011

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2

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3 To My Family

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my Supervisory Commit tee, Craig Roland and Michelle Tillander, for their time and effort in helping me to create this project in lieu of thesis. could do anything I put my mind to, and my husb and, Wayne, and children, Angelica, Michael, Zachary, Kimber, and Nathan, who encouraged me throughout my graduate school experience. It has always been my dream to graduate from the University of Florida. Thank you for helping me to achieve this goal.

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS 8 2 3 3 BIOGRAP 5

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6 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 2 1 2 2 F 2 3 FLDOE chart depicting ACP completers rating of classroom management 3 1 Homepage of Survive the Art Room 3 2 Professional De velopment page of Survive the Art Room

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7 ABSTRACT OF PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESE NTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS SUR VIVE THE ART ROOM By April 2011 Chair: Craig Roland Major: Art Education In Florida, as well as many other states, PreK 12 art teachers can be certified through Alternative Certification Programs (ACP). While the ACP format provid es opportunities for Bachelor degree holders to earn teaching certification while working in their own and grade levels. As someone with a Bachelor degree in Art who w ent through a ACP to become certified K 12 art teacher in Florida, I found the preparation I received less than adequate. The purpose of this project in lieu of thesis was to research the alternative certification process for Florida art teachers and then to create a Web based addition to my research on ACPs, survey responses and interviews from art educators in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process provided additional material to support the design of the Web based guide. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Prepa ration, Professional Development, Technology in the Art Room, and Community Involvement.

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8 CHAPTER 1 Some people know that they want to be teachers from the time that they are young children, and others, like me, do not have this epiphany until later in l ife. There are many others like me though, as evidenced by the growing trend of Alternative Certification Programs (ACP). ACPs have become a popular way to gain teaching According to th e report Profile of Alternative Route Teachers by The National Center for Education Information, Forty seven states and the District of Columbia are now implementing approximately 538 alternate route programs that produced approximately 35,000 newly certi fied teachers in 2004. The numbers are growing rapidly. Based on data submitted by the states, NCEI estimates that more than 250,000 persons have been licensed through alternative routes to teacher certification programs, with most of the growth occurring in the last decade (Feistritzer, 2005, p. 2). ACPs are attracting large numbers of individuals to education from a variety of diverse backgrounds and experiences to the classroom. Although ACPs have gained in popularity throughout the country, there are questions about whether they are indeed good preparation for the real world classroom. The National Academy of Education points out t he pre service preparation of teachers once occurred almost exclusively through state accredited undergraduate programs i n colleges and universities. That is no longer the case. A variety of programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels run by school districts as well as colleges now prepare teachers for

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9 classrooms. More information is needed about which elements of teac her preparation programs, regardless of their institutional characteristics, contribute Due to the variety of preparatory routes to education careers, it is imperative to ensure that teachers are receiving quality training and preparation for the classroom. and found it to be less than adequate preparation for taking on the responsibility of my own cl assroom. I began to wonder whether other art teachers were satisfied with how effectively their ACPs prepared them, and began looking for ways to improve the ACP experience for new art teachers. This became the motivation for my project. In this paper, I will describe the certification requirements for Florida Art Teachers, including those for teachers seeking certification through an ACP. I will identify the problems within ACPs, and propose possible ways to correct them. Statement of the Problem I bec ame aware of the problems that can occur in becoming an art teacher by way of the alternative certification process through personal experience. Currently, I am degree in visual art. In order to transition from artist to art teacher, I needed to apply for temporary certification from the state of Florida, pass the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE) as well as a subject area exam, and either take 17 hours of colle ge classes or pass an ACP within the first three years of public school teaching. While I passed the FTCE and was given my own classroom, that still did not make me a certified art teacher. The ACP that took three years to complete required me to prove

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10 tha t I was competent in the 12 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS), but gave me little instruction in how to demonstrate them. For example, my classroom management instruction consisted of reading The First Days of School by Wong (1998). This was hardly adequate preparation for teaching a class of teenagers. The FEAPS are used to demonstrate a variety of competence in any subject area. They do not prepare art teachers to deal with the unique circumstances that are intrinsic to the art room. As sta ted by Henshaw in the article Alternative Certification Programs for Art Teachers, Alternative certification programs rarely focus on a specific Although the FEAPS can be ap plied to all subject areas, ACPs do not do an adequate job of helping subject area teachers learn how to demonstrate these competencies because they are too generalized. A key problem is that Alternative Certification Programs attempt to be a one size f its have surged in popularity over the last two decades, and I do not anticipate that they will disappear anytime soon, but it is imperative that we find a way to customize, not generalize, the experience so that it is relevant and effective preparation for all teachers. Thurber (2004) points out that there are recurring questions in the field of research about art teacher education in the last two decades. Of the 12 she list s, four are relevant to my research topic: Where did art teachers learn to teach? In traditional or nontraditional programs? How prepared were they? (pre service practices and policies)

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11 What should happen to keep them prepared? What can art teachers teach the field about art teacher preparation? (reflective practice, teacher stories as research) What are future directions for the preparation of teachers of art? I believe that art teacher preparation could be improved by more hands on experiences, such a s student teaching, classroom observations, and subject area mentors. My research was guided by these questions and by my own experience with an ACP. What I discovered is that classroom management is the key to maximizing student learning, and that classr oom management in the art room is different than in a traditional classroom. I also learned that since there is typically only one art teacher in a school, there is no opportunity for a mentoring experience from an art teacher. I feel that had I gone thro ugh a traditional art education undergraduate program versus an ACP, I would have been better prepared to enter the art room as a competent teacher. how other Florida art teachers who went through alternative certification felt about their programs. Significance of Project achieve teaching certification while working in their own classrooms Essentially, it is on the job training for teachers. The topic of Alternative Certification Programs for art teachers is significant to the future of art education for a variety of reasons. First, it is

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12 a topic that has not been researched extensively, especially as applies to Florida. Secondly, the K 12 art teachers who are coming to the classroom through ACPs will have a considerable impact on the future of art education. Their training could influence their position on art advocacy, and their compete nce could influence whether or not administrators and government keeps art in schools. Lastly, my research could promote changes within the ACPs to aid art teachers in getting the training and support they need to be successful in the unique environment th at is the art room. Sabol explains, Research focused at investigating recruitment, certification, and retention of visual arts teachers can inform the field about how visual arts teachers perceive themselves and understand their roles in the education of all students. Findings from research can provide information and guidance in making decisions and in taking actions that will affect the field. Creating a research base for art education has a great potential to provide a foundation upon whic h art education can be Training new art teachers is a difficult task, and it is important to find the best ways to In response to my research I wanted to create a Web new program completers entering the classroom for the first time. My research on ACPs, survey responses, and interviews from art teachers in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process informed the design of the Web based guide. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Preparation, Professional Development, Te chnology in the Art Room, and

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13 Community Involvement. The function of the website is to fill in the gaps that ACP typically does not cover for art teachers. I was inspired by the fact that I was transitioning from high school to elementary school and create d a list of questions an everything I want to know before I enter the classroom It occurred to me that many of the questions I had were not covered in my ACP, and that it could be a beneficial resource for other new Florida art teachers. Limitations I n order to complete this study successfully, I had to put aside the personal biases that I developed due to my personal experiences in the Florida Alternative Certification Program. Additionally, I limited my research to the state of Florida. There may be a national impact but that is outside the scope of this research project. Furthermore, there has been little research done in the area of alternative certification, especially as it applies to art education. While my survey results were small, they provide d a glimpse into the experiences of other Florida art teachers who completed their certification requirements through ACP.

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14 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW The topic that I researched was the effectiveness of Alternative Certification Prog rams for art teachers. In this section, I provide a brief history of ACPs in the United States, and then discuss how the program is changing the face of education in recent years. Finally, I evaluate the effectiveness of ACPs for art teachers, who deal wit h unique circumstances within the traditional school setting. I accomplish this through a combination of literary research, surveys of Florida art teachers who are graduates of ACPs, and my personal experiences with a Florida ACP and in my classroom. The o utcome of my research is a Web based Survival Guide that will serve as a resource to fill the gaps in training that other new art teacher receive from ACPs. Origin of Alternative Certification Program Deckerman, Glazer and Silva (2003) define alternative certification a means for teacher training than that required by traditional certification prog http://www.ncrel.org/policy/pubs/html/altcert/re.htm). Mi ulecky, Shrodriani, and Wilner (2004) explain that alternative teacher certification programs (ACPs) are generally geared toward aspiring teachers who already have a baccalaur eate degree but who require additional education methods coursework and classroom experience. Such programs vary in requirements and sophistication and can be administered at the federal, state or district levels (p.1).

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15 According to the report Profile of Alternative Route Teachers by The National Center for Education Information, orty seven states have adopted a pathway to teaching, altern ative to the standard state certification otherwise In the Handbook of Policy and Research in Art Education, Sabol (2004) states that as early as 1988, the National Endowment for the Arts called for states to dev elop and implement flexible procedures that provide for special testing and certification of experienced practicing artists and arts professionals who can demonstrate a comprehensive background in the arts and substantial knowledge of the issues and method ologies of K Alternative Certification Programs in Florida Several Florida counties began alternative certification pilot programs in 1998. In response to Federal education legislation known as No Child Left Behind, Florida b egan offering a competency based ACP beginning with the 2002 2003 academic year. developed by the school district and approved by the Florida Department of Education. The c ompetency based programs provide on the job training for newly hired instructional staff who qualify for a Temporary Certificate based on their knowledge of a subject but who have not yet completed a traditional university teacher preparation program. The course is taught by district resource teachers,

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16 Florida Certification Requirements According to the Florida Department of Education ( FLDOE), people who aspire to become teachers in Florida have three routes to certification that they can take: Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) These programs typically terminate in a es these program completers from others is that they have completed a program in one or more specific subject area(s) and may qualify for Professional Certification upon program completion. Currently there are 526 ITP programs offered by 34 Florida college s. education majors can enroll in one of the following programs: Educator Preparation Institute (EPI) These programs are typically offered through a college and are done as a cohort and: District Alt ernative Certification Program (DACP) These programs are study with help from mentors who may have no experience in your subject area or grade level. It provides on the job traini ng for teachers. All candidates for professional teaching certification in Florida must meet the following requirements:

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17 Complete all application requirements: Demonstrate subject area knowledge by passing an exam: Demonstrate Mastery of General Knowledge by passing an exam: and Demonstrate Professional Preparation and Educational Competence in a variety of ways, including a combination of a passing score on the Florida Professional Education Test and completion of a state appro ved teacher education program, such as College, EPI or ACP. All the scenarios in which an individual can achieve Florida Professional Teaching Certification are shown below in Figure 2.1, a visual aid obtained from FLDOE. Figure 2 1: This chart from the FLDOE shows how to attain a Florida Professional Teaching Certificate.

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18 As a pathway to the classroom alternative certification has become quite popular in Florida. This following chart, obtained from a study conducted by Florida State University on the titled Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs with Results of Surveys of 2007 2008 Program Completers shows the subject area placement of ACP completers by type of ACP. Seventy six a rt teachers came through ITP or more traditional art education programs. Sixty two came through DCAP, like I did, and 0 came from EPI. Therefore, DACPs are training almost the same amount of art teachers than traditional programs, and thus deserve greater attention and scrutiny. Figure 2 2: FLDOE chart showing subject area placement of ACP completers

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19 The Alternative Certification Experience As someone who received certification through a District Alternative Certification Program in Florida, I was interested in studying the experiences of fellow Florida art teachers who earned certification through a DACP. Experiences could vary widely since own ACP to allow individuals to obtain the professional preparation for certification 2006 ). The reason for variation is that som e districts may be better equipped to offer ACP training by providing quality mentoring experiences, additional professional development trainings, and have more experience dealing with a variety of subject areas within ACP than others. The unifying featu that they are based on 12 competencies referred to as the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS) that were adopted by the Florida State Board of Education in November of 1996. These i nclude (a) assessment, (b) communication, (c) continuous improvement, (d) critical thinking, (e) diversity, (f) ethics, (g) human development and learning, (h) knowledge of subject matter, (i) learning environment, (j) planning, (k) role of the teacher, an d (l) technology which were assessed through the completion of a comprehensive set of tasks that includes products and performance practices (Suell and Piotrowski, 2006). The FEAPS are content specific, generic teaching competencies that all teachers, incl uding art teachers, should be able to demonstrate.

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20 Although all Florida teachers have to demonstrate the FEAPS, the Florida ACP model that I went through gave little or no guidance or instruction on how to understand, demonstrate, or reflect upon these pr actices. I was instructed to follow the rubric at the were a former principal, retired guidance counselor, and a retired curriculum specialist. None of them had any experi ence with art, and only one other art teacher has ever gone through ACP in Citrus County beside myself. Being the only art teacher in my school, I felt as though I did not have any support to complete my ACP in a way that was meaningful to becoming a good art teacher. Florida Department of Education Findings on Alternative Certification Programs Each year, the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) in conjunction with Florida State University (FSU) conducts a study entitled Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs which is posted on the Florida ACP website ( http://tinyurl.com/628payg) The most recent results are of Surveys of 2008 2009 Program Completers, which include me. Overall, feed back was positive among District Alternative Certification Program preparation, others felt unprepared for the classroom environment, often citing a lack of classroom manageme received some kind of training in classroom management as part of their training, they were not all agreed that it was adequate. I personally received no training in classroom

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21 management as completers felt that classroom management skills came too late in their early careers. This is a concern from a program design point of view: DACP teachers are supposed to receive classro om management training early in their program. Thus, either the training is not happening early enough, or the adequacy of the training needs to be evaluated (p.30). The graph below, obtained from the Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A R eport on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs study, depicts how many program completers found the classroom management training that they received very useful, somewhat useful, or not very useful Figure 2 3: Of the 80% of ACP completers who re ceived classroom management training, the above graph depicts how useful they felt it was.

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22 My next biggest complaint about my ACP experience was that it was so general that it did not prepare me for the art room. According to the FLDOE study, I was not completers was that the program material was not applicable to their specialty. For example, some programs emphasized particular skills that were not relevant to the The survey asked teachers what improvements could be made to make the ACP all three programs ag reed that more applicable scenarios such as hands on internships, classroom observations, or more time with their mentors would be the most beneficial adjustments to their preparation programs Summary Alternative Certification projected teacher shortages in different states. Since that time ACPs have enabled over 200,000 people from 47 states to become public school teachers. However, because ACPs are typically designed as one size fits all programs to cover all subject areas and grade levels, it is not adequate preparation for art teachers due to the special circumstances that these teachers encounter in the unique environment that is the art room. Therefore, changes must b e made to personalize the process to effectively prepare art teachers. In response to this problem, I created a web based Survival Guide to fill the gaps that art teachers are receiving in their ACP training.

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23 CHAPTER 3 METHODOLGY In this section of my paper, I will discuss the steps I took to create my Web based resource. After conducting literature research on Florida Teacher Certification and alternative ce rtification programs, I surveyed Florida art teachers who completed ACPs to find out how effectively they felt their ACPs prepared them for the classroom. Then I used that information in conjunction with my personal experiences with ACP and in my classroom to create a Web based Survival Guide for new art teachers that would fill in the gaps that typically occur in ACP training. Survey For the first step of my research, I decided to survey other ACP comple ters to discover whether or not they were satisfied with how the ACP prepared them to enter the classroom. I created the survey using a website called Zoomerang (www.zoomerang.com). The survey consisted of 10 forced choice questions and completers were ano nymous. Survey completers rated how effective their ACP was in preparing them to deal with a variety of issues related specifically to art, such as stages classroom m anagement, professional development opportunities, working with special needs students in the art room, and so on. Completers also had the option of adding comments on two questions to explain their feelings about their ACP experience. Please see a copy of the survey and results in the Appendix.

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24 I emailed the Florida Art Education Association (FAEA) and requested that the survey be sent out through their email list serv. I received only five responses to my survey, but 40% of respondents stated that they w ere dissatisfied with their ACP experience, 40% were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, and 20% were satisfied. Even with surveying such a small population, I felt that it supported my overall plan for responding to the pitfall of ACP training for Florida art teachers. Survival Guide The second part of the project was the Survival Guide In the summer of 2010, when I decided to move from a high school to an elementary art teacher position, I interviewed three o ther art teachers to gather information and strategies that I hoped would be portfolios sorted through the responses I received and used those that seemed to best fit my personality and began preparing my classroom and curriculum based on the advice I received. As I wor ked on my plans for the school year, I realized that many of the tips I received were about topics not covered in my ACP, such as classroom management, organization and distribution of art supplies, and exhibition of student work. I thought that many new a rt teachers entering the classroom via ACP for the first time might also have the same questions. Survival Guide as a resource to fill the gaps that ACP training had left for me.

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25 I had initially intended the Survival Guide to be an article or book for publication, but I decided to create it as a website instead. I came to this conclusion for several reasons. First, art education is always changing and I learn new things everyday in my classroom. Therefore, it is easier for me to update a website with new information and keep the information on it current. I also believed that by creating a website, more people would have access to the information and resources than if it was a print document. Lastly, I am able to hyperlink t o a variety of helpful websites for art teachers that would make it easier to use than a document. All the information and resources are I entitled my website Survive the Art Room because that is the intention of the pro ject to help a new art teacher survive and thrive in their classroom. My main goals in creating the website were to be easily navigable, informative, and useful. The purpose of this Web based Survival Guide was to create a resource for new ACP completers entering the classroom for the first time. In addition to my research on ACPs, survey responses and interviews from art educators in the field as well as my own experience going through the ACP process provided additional material to support the design of the website. The site includes information about the Florida Teacher Certification Process, Sunshine State Standards, Curriculum Models, Lesson Plans, Classroom Management and Preparation, Professional Development, Technology in the Art Room, and Communit y Involvement, as seen on the Home Page in Figure 3 1.

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26 Figure 3 1: Home page of Survive the Art Room website. I used the free website creation tool called Weebly.com to create my website because I had no experience with website design and it offered sev eral templates to aid in the design process. It was very easy to use and the results are very professional looking. I chose to use photographs from my classroom instead of stock photos as visual aids on the site because I wanted to give it a personal touc h and let viewers see To lend more credibility to the site and give new art teachers a greater taste of what the art room is really like, I solicited advice from veteran art teachers. I posted on social networking s ites such as Twitter and Art Education 2.0, as well as emailed the art teachers in Citrus County asking what advice they had for new art teachers. I sprinkled

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27 the responses I received throughout the site like little gems of knowledge, as seen below on the Professional Development page in Figure 3 2. Figure 3 Once survivetheartroom.weebly.com was complete, I posted on Twitter, Art Education 2.0, and emailed Citrus County art teachers sharing the site and requesting r esponses I received were all positive. The strongest testimonial for my website was from the other Citrus County art teacher to go through ACP, Sheri DeCesare, who I wish that I had seen something like this when

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28 CHAPTER 4 RESULTS Over the last several months I have been working to complete Survive the Art Room my project in lieu of thesis. I began by researching the Florida Teacher Certification Process and Al ternative Certification Programs paying special attention to DACPs, which is the program that I went through to achieve my professional teaching certificate. Since my experience with ACP was less than adequate preparation for my own classroom, I conducted literary research and surveyed other ACP completers to find out whether they were satisfied with how effectively their ACPs prepared them. While one of the limitations to my study were that only five people responded to my survey, it is still interesting to note that overall 40% were dissatisfied with their ACP, 40% were neither satisfied or dissatisfied, and 20% were satisfied with their ACP experience. Although the feedback was limited, I felt that it supported my overall plan for my responding to the in adequacies of ACP training for art teachers. As I previously mentioned, the two biggest complaints about DCAP that were reported in Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs: A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs with Results of Surveys of 2008 2009 were that it is so generalized that it does not provide training for many of the unique situations program to be very stressful and challenging. I was only the second art teacher to be in the program, the first was a high school art teacher with very different classroom needs and curriculum. That meant that my ACP instructors were not yet prepared for the individualized program that I needed and o ften we had to invent how my elementary art

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29 about 10 years ago. Most of what was taugh t in the ACP classes was geared toward either an [a general] elementary classroom teacher or a [core subject] high school relative to classroom management, child devel opment in art, and alternative curriculum models in art, and the actual information that an art teacher needs prior to taking on the responsibility of his or her own classroom. Next, I used this information to create a web based Survival Guide for these a rt teachers and others like them. I chose to create a website because it is easy to keep the information current, and it is easily accessible to new art teachers. In an effort to my classroom and advice from veteran art teachers. I solicited this advice using social networking sites such as Twitter and Art Education 2.0 as well as emailing other art teachers in Citrus County. Once my website, entitled Survive the Art Room was com plete, I reached out into my professional learning network and posted an invitation to visit the site on Twitter and Art Education 2.0 as well as emailing it to my fellow Citrus County art teachers requesting feedback. Although I only received feedback fro m the art teachers in my county, it was all positive. They found the site easily navigable, informative, and useful, which were the three goals I had for it. Discussion At the beginning of my project in lieu of thesis, I thought I could write a paper tha t would compel the FLDOE to make sweeping changes in the ACP, and create a product

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30 that would help all the art teachers who are new to the classroom via ACP. However, I have learned that training new art teachers is a complicated and difficult process. As stated previously within the FLDOE study, Teachers from Florida Teacher Preparation Programs A Report on State Approved Teacher Preparation Programs with Results of Surveys of 2008 2009, ACP could be greatly improved by more hands on internships, classroo m observations, and mentors who are in the same field. I feel that I would have benefitted greatly by participating in classroom management training prior to taking on a classroom full of teenagers as well. Each art teacher works in a unique environment fi lled with children who are unique individuals. There is no one size fits all teaching from my students than any textbook could provide. Learning to teach is definitely a trial and error process, but there could be fewer errors made if beginning art teachers have preemptive classroom management training and a strong support system with a mentor in the field of art education. Additionally, I realize that my website is a resource for these teachers and functions to fill in the gaps of their training. I think it will help new art teachers, both from ACPs and traditional art education programs becau se of the practical advice and links to additional resources, and I wish that I had a resource like that when I was entering my classroom for the first time. In that regard, I feel that the website is successful. Another thing that I learned both through this project and the hard way through experience is the importance of developing a personal learning network (PLN) and

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31 any program it can only be as successful as the pe ople who participate in it. If the training is not adequate within the program, seek elsewhere for the support and training that is required. I cannot overstate the importance of connecting with other art teachers both in the same school district and thro ughout the world for getting support and sharing ideas. Below is a list of ways new art teachers can get linked in with other art teachers and develop their PLN: Join professional organizations such as the National Art Education (NAEA) and Florida Art Edu cation Association (FAEA) and attend conferences. Join Art Education 2.0, a social networking site which functions like Facebook for art teachers. There are over 100 different groups to join to meet the needs of all art educators. Sign up for a Twitter acc ount and begin following other art teachers. I began using Twitter in January to build a PLN. I learn something new every time I log in. Lesson plans, classroom management tips, project ideas, and resources are just a tweet away.

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32 CHAPTER 5 FURTHER QUES TIONS Upon final reflection of this project, further questions arose: After researching how art teachers are trained and certified, I am wondering public education today? Each art teacher must deal with a unique working environment and a classroom full of unique individuals. Some teachers own. There are a variety of scenarios that new art teachers might find themselves in. Can they really be prepared for everything they might encounter? In regards to ACPs, would subject specific mentors enable ACPs to prepare new art teachers and other subject area teachers in a more satisfactory way? This would certainly per sonalize the process, and it was one of the improvements suggested by completers in the FLDOE study. However, with Florida taking away the mentoring bonus from National Board Certified Teachers, where will these mentors come from? How many individuals will be willing to mentor without compensation? Also, what support systems could be created for new art teachers to ensure success in the classroom? For instance, would it be feasible for districts to offer special training for art teachers that would provide professional development opportunities in areas such as classroom management, or curriculum design aligned with the Sunshine State Standards?

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33 APPENDIX ALTERNATIVE CERTIFIC ATION ART TEACHER SU RVEY CREATED ON ZOOMERANG INDIVIDUAL RESPONSES

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43 LIST OF REFERENCES Brewer, T. (2006). Teacher preparation solutions: rumbling for quality just won't do. Studies in Art Education, 47 (3), 269 285. Feistritzer, C. (2005). Alternative routes to teacher certification: an overview Retrieved from http ://www.ncei.com/PART.pdf Henshaw, A. (2009, October 11). Alternative certification programs for art teachers Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/way_5515866_alternative certification programs art teachers.html Mayer, D, Decker, P, Glazerman, S, & Silva T. United States Department of Education, (2003). Identifying alternative certification programs for an impact evaluation of teacher preparation (ED 01 CO 0039/0003). Cambridge, MA: Mathematica Policy Research. Retrieved from http://www.mathematica mpr.c om/pdfs/identify.pdf Milton, Curva, & Milton. Florida Department of Education, Florida State University College of Education. (2011). Teachers from Florida teacher preparation programs Retrieved from http://www.altcertflorida.org/pdf/Teachers%20from%20Flo rida%20T eacher%20Preparation%20Programs%20January%202011.pdf Mikulecky, M, Shkodriani, G, & Wilner, A. (2005). A growing trend to address teacher shortage. Education Commission to the States Policy Brief: Alternative Certification Retrieved from http://w ww.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED484845.pdf Nadler, D, & Peterson, P. (2009). What happens when states have genuine alternative certification. Education Next 9 (1), 70 75. Retrieved from http://educationnext.org/what happens when states have genuine alternative cert ification/ Sabol, F. (2004). An overview of art teacher recruitment, certification, and retention. In E. Eisner (Ed.), Handbook of research and policy in art edcuation (pp. 523 551). Mahwah, NJ: National Art Education Association.

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44 Suell, J, & Piotrowski, C. (2006). Efficacy of alternative teacher certification programs: a study of the Florida model. Education Retrieved from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3673/is_2_127/ai_ Thurber, F. (2004). Teacher education as a field of study in art educatio n: a comprehensive overview of methodology and methods used in research about art teacher education. In E Eisner (Ed.), Handbook research and policy in art education (pp. 487 521). Mahwah, NJ: National Art Education Association. Wilson, S. (2009, November 12). National academy of education teacher quality education quality white paper Retrieved from http://www.naeducation.org/Teacher_Quality_White_Paper

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45 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH become a graduate student at the University of Florida. She began her studies in Art Education in 2007 and served as a Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching the lab brief program in 2010 and will be the first student to graduate from that program. She began tea ching art in Citrus County in 2006 and is currently employed at Pleasant Grove Elementary School in Inverness. Her current research involves teacher preparation and professional development.