Scope of work and proposed methodology for country environmental profiles : eastern Caribbean region

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Scope of work and proposed methodology for country environmental profiles : eastern Caribbean region
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SCOPE OF WORK AND PROPOSED
METHODOLOGY FOR COUNTRY
ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILES
Eastern Caribbean Region

Robert Winterbottom
November 1986




















Environmental Planning and Management Project
International Institute for Environment and Development



























This document was produced for the Environmental
Planning and Management Project of the
International Institute for Environment and
Development under the
Resource'Assessment Contract










The Environmental Planning and Management Project is a
cooperative agreement between the International Institute
for Environment and Development and the U.S. Ac;ency for
International Development to respond to requests for
assistance from developing countries in a variety of
environmental and natural resource management problems.





Single copies of this document are available free from:

International Institute for Environment anc Development
1717 Massachusetts Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 462-0900










2016A
COUNTRY ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILES
Eastern Caribbean Region

SCOPE OF WORK AND PROPOSED METHODOLOGY

Background

Country environmental profiles (CEP) are a recognized and effective means
to insure that environmental issues are addressed in the development process.
Beginning in 1979, USAID has supported the environmental profiling process by
funding the production of profiles in 12 out of 14 USAID-assisted countries in
Central and South America region. The CEPs completed to date provide (a) a
description of the country's natural resource base, including a review of the
extent and economic importance of natural resources and changes in the quality
or productivity of those resources; (b) a review of institutions, legislation,
policies and programs for environmental planning, economic development and
natural resource management, and (c) .ientification of the major issues,
conflicts or problems in natural resource management and opportunities for
effective responses. Profiles have highlighted gaps in the existing
information base, influenced the design and funding of development programs,
pinpointed weaknesses in regulatory or planning mechanisms, and illustrated
the need for changes in policies. Most importantly, perhaps, the process of
producing profiles has in many cases served to strengthen local institutions
and improve their capacity for incorporating environmental information into
development planning.1

Objectives of the Eastern Caribbean CEPs

The usefulness of CEPs in the Eastern Caribbean region was reaffirmed
during a seminar on Industry, Environment and Development, sponsored by the
University of West Indies in August 1986. The seminar participants confirmed
the need to produce profiles for each country in the Eastern Caribbean region,
with particular attention given to a profiling process which would strengthen
existing institutions and make maximum use of qualified local personnel and
indigenous organizations. The profiles should also lead to greater advocacy
of environmental considerations in development planning, and stimulate
favorable changes in policy.

The profiling process in the Eastern Caribbean has the following primary
objectives:

1. Research, analyze and document the major issues in natural resource
management and environmental planning which can be effectively
addressed by new policies and development programs, at both the
country and regional levels.



IFor additional information on the scope and impact of CEPs, see R.
Winterbottom and D. McCaffrey, "Report of the Reconnaissance Mission for
Environmental Profiles in the Eastern Caribbean Region," IIED, Washington,
D.C., August 1986. pp. 2-6.










2. Increase the capability of local organizations and governments to
identify and respond to environmental problems, and to incorporate
environmental considerations in development planning and policies.

Additional secondary objectives include:

3. Assist in rhe review of, and increase accessibility to reports,
studies, assessments related to environmental planning and national
resource management.

4. Provide complete documentation of baseline conditions and use of
renewable natural resources and assist in the development of local
capability to monitor trends in resource condition and use.

5. Contribute to an assessment of institutional base related to
environment conservation and planning and a strengthening of selected
NGOs and government departments which are taking the lead in these
areas.

6. Increase understanding of successes and failures in environmental
planning and management with recommendations for more effective
action.

7. Increase awareness of common environmentally-linked development
problems among the OECS countries and other islands in the Eastern
Caribbean.

8. Contribute to the mobilization of public support for
environmentally-sound development policies.

9. Assist in articulating policy initiatives and changes needed to
provide for increased consideration of environmental issues in
development.

10. Identify development programs and project priorities in environmental
planning and resource management.

11. Help to strengthen the ability of the Caribbean Conservation
Association (CCA) to:

provide and disseminate publications related to environmental
conservation, resource management and planning;

act as a clearing house for data on environmental issues and
resource management activities;

play an effective, advocacy role in environmental matters,
linking people and information, and promoting constructive,
positive responses to problems;

S network with other NGOs, within the region and internationally;
and

S service the private and public sectors with information and
documents on environment and development.









Scope of the Eastern Caribbean CEP


The basic thrust of the profiling process in the Caribbean will be to make
use of available information on natural resources management and environmental
conditions to identify and analyse critical resource management issues and
environmental problems which need to be addressed in each of the countries in
the region. The data collection and analysis will lead to the development of
recommendations of the most effective means to deal with these issues and to
resolve the problems identified. It is anticipated that the actions prompted
by the profiling process will focus on (a) increased public awareness, (b)
incorporation of environmental considerations in development planning, (c)
policy dialogue between development agencies, the private sector and
government, and (d) strengthening and expansion of NGO activities. The actual
actions recommended by each CEP will vary from one country to another, and
reflect both local and regionally important issues.

At this point in time, it is difficult to cite in detail all of the issues
which are to be addressed in the profiling process. Many issues cut across
traditional sectors or disciplines and could be listed under several headings
of major issues. The following list is suggestive, however, of the breadth of
the issues to be considered in the early stages of each country profiling
process. After a broad, initial review of these issues, priorities can be
established to focus research and analysis for the CEP on the most relevant
issues in each country.

Issues to be Addressed in CEP's

Economic Development

historical context and values
socio-cultural parameters
employment, unemployment, underemployment
debt burden
foreign exchange earnings

Policies and Institutions

current environmental policies
land tenure
fiscal and other incentives to conservation practices
environmental legislation
strengths and limitation of existing government agencies and
NGO's dealing with environmental issues
training, research and extension capabilities
public education/community participation
project coordination mechanisms (in natural resource
management-related sectors)
integration of sectoral programs

Land Use Planning

access to coastline, beaches, national areas
control of urban sprawl, residential development
protection of prime agricultural land










reduction of erosion and sedimentation
protection against natural hazards
energy use transportation planning (infrastructure development)

Environmental Health

solid waste disposal
water pollution control (see also water resources, tourism, etc.)
air quality: pollution control
mitigating adverse environmental impacts of industrialization
safety and health issues in the workplace

Water Resources

water recycling/conservation
protection of water supplies
quantity, quality issues
watershed management issues related to land-use planning
hydropower development

Agriculture

promotion of gardens, orchards, windbreaks
soil erosion control and renewal of soil fertility
control of toxic substances, integrated pest management
livestock development, pasture management

Forestry and Wildlife

management of natural vegetation
development of small-scale forest industries
conservation of flora and fauna
areas of ornithological interest
areas of botanical interest
S linkages to biological diversity issues

Coastal and Marine Resources

pollution and destruction of reefs, seagrass, mangroves
sand removal and beach erosion
overfishing and fisheries management
park development and management

Biological Diversity

historical changes in biological diversity
current threat to significant biological resources
adequacy of protection and management of existing biological
reserves
strategy and actions to conserve biological diversity









Tourism

maintenance of environmental quality
enhancement of tourism/development of unique resources
(historical, cultural, natural, biological)
linkages to other sectors (marine/coastal, wildlife, land use
planning, energy, etc.)

Target Countries and Audiences

The profiling process will be launched in the Eastern Caribbean in a total
of six countries. They are: Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St.
Lucia, St. Kitts/Nevis. These countries are those that have responded
favorably, in writing, to CCA's initial proposal to produce environmental
profiles in the region. As additional funds become available, the profiling
process can be extended to the remaining countries in the region.

In order to attain the objectives of the profiling process and to research
and analyze such a broad range of issues, it will be necessary to directly or
indirectly involve a wide range of different audiences and potential users of
the information collected during the profiling process. The participation of
these individuals, groups and organizations will also be necessary to ensure a
well-balanced presentation of critical priority issues, to develop responses
which reflect a broad consensus and to build support for the recommended
actions. The targeted participants in the profiling process include, but are
not necessarily limited to:

environmental/development policy decision-makers in government,
business,

government technicians in environmental planning and natural resource
management, and the researchers, visiting consultants, specialists
and others they work with,

leadership in NGO's, private sector,

S university faculty, students, and primary/secondary school teachers,

regional organizations,

donors/development assistance agencies,

international NGO's,

primary and secondary schools,

general public,

S tourists

It will also be critically important for the CCA and the profiling staff
to liase closely with other projects and programs in the region which are
involved with development planning, natural resource management, environmental
education and institution-strengthening.










Phasing of Activities


The profiles will be completed in each country through a series of four
phases or stages:

reconnaissance

research and analysis

review and synthesis

outreach

The time needed for each stage will vary from one country to another, and be
influenced by the quality and availability of existing information on natural
resources and the environment, and the human resource capabilities and other
strengths of the institutions involved in environmental management and
developing planning, as well as geography and other actors. For this reason,
the time required to carry out each step can only be approximated at this
stage.

The reconnaissance work should begin in all six countries as soon as
possible. Once the official launching of the profiling process has been
achieved in each of the 6 target countries, the profiling team should look for
opportunities to move ahead more rapidly in one or two pilot countries. These
"pilot" countries will emerge where the in-country institutions, skills and
information base, together with prior or ongoing work by other projects,
combine to permit a faster pace for the profiling process. The first three
stages should be completed in one or two pilot countries within 6 months.

In the remaining target countries, the conclusion of the reconnaissance
phase, and work on research, analysis, review and synthesis will be carried
out over an additional period of 9-12 months. The objective will be to
complete all the field work and prepare final drafts of the CEP reports in
each of the 6 countries within 20 months.

Prior to embarking on the reconnaissance steps, CCA will need 1-2 months
to organize the start-up of the profiling process. This time will be used to
establish administrative and financial management procedures which are
satisfactory to USAID, to develop a staffing plan, and to recruit and train
staff needed for the exercise. At the conclusion of this period, both CCA and
IRF core staff for the profiling team will be in place, and preliminary
information in projects, institutions and sources of information will have
been centralized at CCA.

Reconnaissance (1-3 months)

This phase will begin with visits by the team leader and assistant manager
for the profile team. The first few visits and in-country consultations will
serve to:

a) identify and brief a host organization for the profiling process, as
well as other government agencies, NGO's, projects and key
individuals;









b) assess existing sources of information;


c) evaluate major environmental problems or issues of concern at the
local and national levels;

d) develop a wcrkplan to carefully document and analyze the major
problems and issues;

At the conclusion of the second or third visit, a memorandum of understanding
(MOU) will have been drafted and approved, by CCA and the lead in-country
organization governmentt or NGO), outlining the work to be completed and the
allocation of responsibility for production of the country environmental
profile (CEP) report. The MOU should clarify the scope of the final CEP
report (relevant major issues) and specify the form and content of the CEP,
including the type of maps, graphics and other material to be included.
Provision will also be made for the appropriate level of collaboration and
interaction with ongoing projects in related areas.

Research and Analysis (3-5 months)

At this stage, a larger number of people in-country will become involved
in the data-collection and analyzing and review of issues. Their
participation will be in the form of contributions to the field research, and
in preparation of background papers for the CEP report, and through attendance
at informal working group meetings. The periodic working group meetings will
serve to review the implementation of the workplan, and to critique a
preliminary research report, issues, papers, and other material drafted for
the CEP. During this stage, a number of interim CEP reports will be produced
including an annotated listing of sources of information, and a directory of
agencies, organizations and individuals involved in environmental planning and
natural resource management.

Review and Synthesis (2-4 months)

Once the draft CEP report has been researched and prepared at the country
level, it will be reviewed and discussed within the region, as various
opportunities present themselves (e.g. the annual general meeting of CCA).
This will stimulate greater exposure of the information assembled in the
report, and increase awareness of both the need to act and possible actions
which could be taken to resolve important problems and issues. It will also
contribute toward a greater recognition of shared problems which would benefit
from regional collaboration on their solution. During this period, the CEP
reports would be finalized.

Education and Outreach (continuing)

In this stage, the CEP reports will be published, distributed and promoted
by CCA. Briefings on the key environmental problems, policy issues and
recommended actions will be organized under CCA auspices, to inform as many
audiences as possible, in the public and private sectors.

Education and outreach activities will also be incorporated into the
profiling process in advance of publishing the final CEP reports, as interim
reports and other information is utilized by the environmental education
program staff of CCA.









After the first profile has been prepared, the profiling process will be
evaluated with particular attention given to ways to improve the process in
other countries, and to further strengthen the ability of in-country
institutions to update the profile information and to implement recommended
policy changes and program activities.

Additionally, an expanded outreach program and other logical follow-on
activities should be defined, after the profiling process has advanced further
and when additional funds are available. This would include, but not be
limited to producing a regional environmental profile which synthesizes much
of the information in the CEP's and identifies actions needed at the regional
level to deal effectively with shared problems and environmental issues common
throughout the region.

It should be noted that, even before the CEP reports for the six targeted
countries are completed, CCA, in consultation with USAID, should take the lead
in securing additional funding for extending the profiling process to other
countries in the Eastern Caribbean region, notably St. Vincent, Antigua,
Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands, and others, as well as the regional
profile.

Anticipated Products of the Profiling Process

As indicated above, the information gathered during the profiling process
needs to be targeted to a variety of audiences. Different types of products
or means of communicating the information researched in the CEP's will be
appropriate for each audience.

They include:

o country environmental reports for Barbados, Dominica, Grenada,
Montserrat, St. Lucia, and St. Kitts/Nevis published by CCA. These
reports should review the state of knowledge about the condition and
trends of the natural resource base using the best available data,
maps, and other sources of information on natural resources and the
environment as they relate to economic development planning. It will
also provide an analysis of major environmental issues, and
recommendations for new policies and program initiatives.

o a series of interim reports derived from the profiling process
produced at the country level by CCA and the local lead institution
(government agency or NGO). These would include preliminary studies
from the research and background documentation for the CEPs; the
results of the working group meetings and review sessions, the
annotated bibliography of sources of information, and the directory
of agencies and organizations involved in environmental planning and
natural resource management.

o a range of public information, and educational materials including
maps, posters, teaching aids, video documentaries and radio/TV spots,
field guides and handbooks, which will be developed as "spin-offs"
from the profiling process by the environmental education staff of
CCA.






Io









Administration of the Profiling Project


CCA will have the primary leadership role in the profiling process,
including overall responsibility for project execution, for submission of
progress reports, financial reports and other documentation required by USAID
to monitor the pr- auctionn of the profiles.

The CCA Executive Director will serve as the Project Director and will be
assisted by a project manager/team leader and an assistant project manager.
The project manager and his/her assistant will take the lead in carrying out
the reconnaissance work in each of the six countries, and in providing
guidance and oversight for the production of the CEP reports, according to the
general scope of work and specific MOU's prepared for each country.

USAID will designate a project officer (at RDO/C) to monitor project
implementation and to assist CCA in complying with USAID regulations and
procedures. RDO/C will periodically request short-term consultancies by the
USAID regional environmental management specialist (REMS) to assist with
monitoring and technical oversight of the project.

Financial Plan and Budget

Due to funding constraints on the part of USAID, the present scope of work
and budget have been scaled back from that originally developed to include
only the first two of three phases. They are:

Phase One: approximately 8 months, to cover the start-up activities on
the part of CCA, the launching of the profiling process in 6 countries,
and the preparation of CEP reports in 1 or 2 pilot countries. To be
funded by initial allocation of $136,000 (FY 86).

Phase Two: continuation of profiling process over an additional 12
months, to complete CEP reports for each of six target countries, and to
initiate education and outreach activities. To be funded by additional
allocations totalling $250,000 (FY 87 and FY 88).

Phase Three: extension of the profiling process to include at least two
additional countries, a synthesis document for the eastern Caribbean
region, and to carry out an evaluation, seminars, development of biennial
updates and other follow-on activities outlined in original SOW and in
IIED reconnaissance report. Funding: approximately $165,000, plus funds
for countries other than St. Vincent and Antigua.

(See budget summary and financial plan.)
















Eastern Caribbean Environmental Profile

Budget Summary 20 months'


Item

Project Staff

--Project Director/CCA Exec. Dir.

--Project Manager/Team Leader (part-time, IRF)

--Assistant Project Manager (full-time, CCA)

--Projects Officer (part-time, CCA)

--Secretary (full-time, CCA)

--Other Support Staff

Subtotal


Technical Consultants

For literature reviews, document searches,
data acquisition, field consultations and
review of draft reports, re:

Marine Systems, Wildlife Parks and
Protected Areas, Land Use Planning,
Forestry, Environmental Law, Public
Health, Pollution Control, Hydrology,
Economics, Energy, Anthropology,
Agronomy, Geology, Tourism, Archeology

Subtotal


Travel and Per Diem

Project Staff air fare, in-country
travel and per diem

Consultants air fare, in-country
travel and per diem

Subtotal


SFor details, see draft budget prepared by CCA/IRF


9,000

32,000

28,000

5,000

17,000

43,000

134,000















30,000





25,400


20,000

45,400













Other Direct Costs


Documentation, office and computer
supplies, equipment leasing

Communications (telephone, telex,
postage, photocopies)

Printing and report productions

In-country working group meetings
and research and analysis support
$5,000/country

Subtotal

TOTAL DIRECT COSTS


Contingencies and Other Indirect Costs


CCA

IRF


Subtotal


BUDGET TOTAl


9,000


12,200

18,000


278,600


35,100


107,400

386,000















FINANCIAL PLAN PHASE I AND PHASE II (20 MONTHS)


Budget Total


Project Staff

Technical Consultants

Travel & Per Diems

Other Direct Costs

Contingencies and
other Indirect Costs


TOTAL


134,000

30,000

45,400

69,200


107,400


$386,000


Phase I
(8 months)

53,600

10,000

18,400

24,500


$136,000


Phase II
(12 months)

80,400

20,000

27,000

44,700


$250,000













ESTIMATED COSTS PHASE III


Project Staff

Full and part-time staff at CCA and
profiling project core staff
8 months


$ 55,000


Technical Consultants


Fo: evaluations, regional synthesis and
follow-up


$ 25,000


Travel and Per Diem

Project Staff and consultants


$ 22,000


Other Direct Costs

Documentation, office supplies

Communication

Printing-report production

In-country working group meetings (2)

Subtotal

TOTAL DIRECT COSTS

Contingencies and indirect costs (25%)


$ 5,000

$ 6,000

$ 9,000

$ 10,000



$132,000

33,000


$165,000


TOTAL PHASE III




Full Text

PAGE 1

SCOPE OF WORK AND PROPOSED METHODOLOGY FOR COUNTRY ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILES Eastern Caribbean Region Robert Winterbottom November 1986 Environmental Planning and Management Project International Institute for Environment and Development

PAGE 2

This document was produced for the Environmental Planning and Management Project of the International Institute for Environment and Development under the Resource'Assessment Contract The Environmental Planning and Management Project is a cooperative agreement between the International Institute for Environment and Development and the U.S. A;ency for International Development to respond to requests for assistance from developing countries in a variety of environmental and natural resource management problems. Single copies of this document are available free from: International Institute for Environment ane Development 1717 Massachusetts Ave. N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 462-0900

PAGE 3

2016A COUNTRY ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILES Eastern Caribbean Region SCOPE OF WORK AND PROPOSED METHODOLOGY Background Country environmental profiles (CEP) are a recognized and effective means to insure that environmental issues are addressed in the development process.Beginning in 1979, USAID has supported the environmental profiling process byfunding the production of profiles in 12 out of 14 USAID-assisted countries in Central and South America region. The CEPs completed to date provide (a) a description of the country's natural resource base, including a review of the extent and economic importance of natural resources and changes in the quality or productivity of those resources; (b) a review of institutions, legislation, policies and programs for environmental planning, economic development and natural resource management, and (c) Jcentification of the major issues, conflicts or problems in natural resource management and opportunities for effective responses. Profiles have highlighted gaps in the existinginformation base, influenced the design and funding of development programs, pinpointed weaknesses in regulatory or planning mechanisms, and illustrated the need for changes in policies. Most importantly, perhaps, the process of producing profiles has in many cases served to strengthen local institutions and improve their capacity for incorporating environmental information into 1development planning. Objectives of the Eastern Caribbean CEPs The usefulness of CEPs in the Eastern Caribbean region was reaffirmed during a seminar on Industry, Environment and Development, sponsored by the University of West Indies in August 1986. The seminar participants confirmed the need to produce profiles for each country in the Eastern Caribbean region, with particular attention given to a profiling process which would strengthen existing institutions and make maximum use of qualified local personnel and indigenous organizations. The profiles should also lead to greater advocacy of environmental considerations in development planning, and stimulate favorable changes in policy. The profiling process in the Eastern Caribbean has the following primary objectives: 1. Research, analyze and document the major issues in natural resource management and environmental planning which can be effectively addressed by new policies and development programs, at both the country and regional levels. 'For additional information on the scope and impact of CEPs, see R. Winterbottom and D. McCaffrey, "Report of the Reconnaissance Mission for Environmental Profiles in the Eastern Caribbean Region," IIED, Washington, D.C., August 1986. pp. 2-6.

PAGE 4

2. Increase the capability of local organizations and governments to identify and respond to environmental problems, and to incorporate environmental considerations in development planning and policies. Additional secondary objectives include: 3. Assist in rhe review of, and increase accessibility to reports, studies, assessments related to environmental planning and national resourc e management. 4. Provide complete documentation of baseline conditions and use of renewable natural resources and assist in the development of local capability to monitor trends in resource condition and use. 5. Contribute to an assessment of institutional base related to environment conservation and planning and a strengthening of selected NGOs and government departments which are taking the lead in these areas. 6. Increase understanding of successes and failures in environmental planning and management with recommendations for more effective action. 7. Increase awareness of common environmentally-linked development problems among the OECS countries and other islands in the Eastern Caribbean. 8. Contribute to the mobilization of public support for environmentally-sound development policies. 9. Assist in articulating policy initiatives and changes needed to provide for increased consideration of environmental issues in development. 10. Identify development programs and project priorities in environmental planning and resource management. 11. Help to strengthen the ability of the Caribbean Conservation Association (CCA) to: -provide and disseminate publications related to environmental conservation, resource management and planning; -act as a clearing house for data on environmental issues and resource management activities; -play an effective, advocacy role in environmental matters, linking people and information, and promoting constructive, positive responses to problems; -network with other NGOs, within the region and internationally; and -service the private and public sectors with information and documents on envir. iment and development.

PAGE 5

Scope of the Eastern Caribbean CEP The basic thrust of the profiling process in the Caribbean will be to make available on anduse of information natural resources management environmental conditions to identify and analyse critical resource management issues and environmental problems which need to be addressed in each of the countries in the region. The data collection and analysis will lead to the development of recommendations of the most effective means to deal with these issues and to resolve the problems identified. It is anticipated that the actions prompted by the profiling process will focus on (a) increased public awareness, (b) incorporation of environmental considerations in development planning, (c)policy dialogue between development agencies, the private sector and government, and (d) strengthening and expansion of NGO activities. The actual actions recommended by each CEP will vary from one country to another, and reflect both local and regionally important issues. At this point in time, it is difficult to cite in detail all of the issues which are to be addressed in the profiling process. Many issues cut across traditional sectors or disciplines and could be listed under severnl headings of major issues. The following list is suggestive, however, of the breadth of the issues to be considered in the early stages of each country profiling process. After a broad, initial review of these issues, priorities can be established to focus research and analysis for the CEP on the most relevant issues in each country. Issues to be Addressed in CEP's Economic Development -historical context and values -socio-cultural parameters -employment, unemployment, underemployment -debt burden -foreign exchange earnings Policies and Institutions -current environmental policies -land tenure -fiscal and other incentives to conservation practices environmental legislation -strengths and limitation of existing government agencies and NGO's dealing with environmental issues -training, research and extension capabilities -public education/community participation -project coordination mechanisms (in natural resource management-related sectors) -integration of sectoral programs Land Use Planning -access to coastline, beaches, national areas -control of urban sprawl, residential development -protection of prime agricultural land

PAGE 6

-reduction of erosion and sedimentation -protection against natural hazards -energy use -transportation planning (infrastructure development) Environmental Health -solid waste disposal -water pollution control (see also water resources, tourism, etc.) -air quality: pollution control -mitigating adverse environmental impacts of industrialization -safety and health issues in the workplace Water Resources -water recycling/conservation -protection of water supplies -quantity, quality issues -watershed management issues related to land-use planning -hydropower development Agricult uru -promotion of gardens, orchards, windbreaks -soil erosion control and renewal of soil fertility -control of toxic substances, integrated pest management -livestock development, pasture management Forestry and Wildlife -management of natural vegetation -development of small-scale forest industries conservation of flora and fauna areas of ornithological interest areas of botanical interest linkages to biological diversity issues Coastal and Marine Resources -pollution and destruction of reefs, seagrass, mangroves -sand removal and beach erosion -overfishing and fisheries management -park development and management Biological Diversity -historical changes in biological diversity -current threat to significant biological resources -adequacy of protection and management of existing biological reserves -strategy and actions to conserve biological diversity y

PAGE 7

Tourism -maintenance of environmental quality enhancement of tourism/development of unique resources (historical, cultural, natural, biological) linkages to other sectors (marine/coastal, wildlife, land use planning, energy, etc.) Target Countries and Audiences The profiling process will be launched in the Eastern Caribbean in a total of six countries. They are: Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Kitts/Nevis. These countries are those that have respondedfavorably, in writing, to CCA's initial proposal to produce environmental profiles in the region. As additional funds become available, the profiling process can be extended to the remaining countries in the region. In order to attain the objectives of the profiling process and to research and analyze such a broad range of issues, it will be necessary to directly or indirectly iuvolve a wide range of different audiences and potential users of the information collected during the profiling process. The participation of these individuals, groups and organizations will also be necessary to ensure a well-balanced presentation of critical priority issues, to develop responseswhich reflect a broad consensus and to build support for the recommended actions. The targetted participants in the profiling process include, but are not necessarily limited to: -environmental/development policy decision-makers in government, business, -government technicians in environmental planning and natural resource management, and the researchers, visiting consultants, specialists and others they work with, -leadership in NGO's, private sector, -university faculty, students, and primary/secondary school teachers, -regional organizations, -donors/development assistance agencies, -international NGO's, -primary and secondary schools, -general public, tourists It will also be critically important for the CCA and the profiling staff to liase closely with other projects and programs in the region which are involved with development planning, natural resource management, environmental education and institution-strengthening.

PAGE 8

Phasing of Activities The profiles will be completed in each country through a series of four phases or stages: -reconnaissance -research and analysis -review and synthesis -outreach The time needed for each stage will vary from one country to another, and be influenced by the quality and availability of existing information on natural resources and the environment, and the hunan resource capabilities and other strengths of the institutions involved in environmental management and developing planning, as well as geography and other tactors. For this reason, the time required to carry out each step can only be approximated at this stage. The reconnaissance work should begin in all six countries as soon as possible. Once the official launching of the profiling process has been achieved in each of the 6 target countries, the profiling team should look for opportunities to move ahead more rapidly in one or two pilot countrier. These"pilot" countries will emerge where the in-country institutions, skills and information base, together with prior or ongoing work by other projects, combine to permit a faster pace for the profiling process. The first three stages should be completed in one or two pilot countries within 6 months. In the remaining target countries, the conclusion of the reconnaissance phase, and work on research, analysis, review and synthesis will be carried out over an additional period of 9-12 months. The objective will be to complete all the field work and prepare final drafts of the CEP reports in each of the 6 countries within 20 months. Prior to embarking on the ieconnaissance steps, CCA will need 1-2 months to organize the start-up of the profiling process. This time will be used to establish administrative and financial management procedures which are satisfactory to USAID, to develop a ctaffing plan, and to recruit and train staff needed for the exercise. At the conclusion of this period, both CCA and IRF core staff for the profiling team will be in place, and preliminary information in projects, institutions and sources of-information will have been centralized at CCA. Reconnaissance (1-3 months) This phase will begin with visits by th2 team leader and assistant manager for the profile team. The first few visits and in-country consultations will serve to: a) identify and brief a host organization for the profiling process, as well as other government agencies, NGO's, projects and key individuals;

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b) assess existing sources of information; c) evaluate major environmental problems or issues of concern at the local and national levels; d) develop a wcrkplan to carefully document and analyze the major problems and issues; At the conclusion of the second or third visit, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) will have been drafted and approved, by CCA and the lead in-country organization (goverment or NGO), outlining the work to be completed and the allocation of responsibility for production of the country environmental profile (CEP) report. The MOU should clarify the scope of the final CEP report (relevant major issues) and specify the form and content of the CEP, including the type of maps, graphics and other material to be included. Provision will also be made for the appropriate level of collaboration and interaction with ongoing projects in related areas. Research and Analysis (3-5 months) At this stage, a larger number of people in-country will become involved in the data-collection and analyzing and review of issues. Their participation will be in the form of contributions to the field research, and in preparation of background papers for the CEP report, and through attendance at informal working group meetings. The periodic working group meetings will serve to review the implementation of the workplan, and to critique a preliminary research report, issues, papers, and other material drafted for the CEP. During this stage, a number of interim CE? reports will be produced including an annotated listing of sources of information, and a directory of agencies, organizations and individuals involved in environmental planning and natural resource management. Review and Synthesis (2-4 months) Once the draft CEP report has been researched and prepared at the country level, it will be reviewed and discussed within the region, as various opportunities present themselves (e.g. the annual general meeting of CCA).This will stimulate greater exposure of the information assembled in the report, and increase awareness of both the need to act and possible actions which could be taken to resolve important problems and issues. It will also contribute toward a greater recognition of shared problems which would benefit from regional collaboration on their solution. During this period, the CEP reports would be finalized. Education and Outreach (continuing) In this stage, the CEP reports will be published, distributed and promoted by CCA. Briefings on the key envircnmental problems, policy issues and recommended actions will be organized under CCA auspices, to inform as many audiences as possible, in the public and private sectors. Education and outreach activities will also be incorporated into the profiling process in advance of publishing the final CEP reports, as interim reports and other information is utilized by the environmental education program staff of CCA.

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After the first profile has been prepared, the profiling process will be evaluated with particular attention given to ways to improve the process in other countries, and to further strengthen the ability of in-country institutions to update the profile information and to implement recommended policy changes and program activities. Additionally, an expanded outreach program and other logical follow-on activities should be defined, after the profiling process has advanced further and when additional funds are available. This would include, but not be limited to producing a regional environmental profile which synthesizes much of the information in the CEP's and identifies actions needed at the regionallevel to deal effectively with shared problems and environmental issues common throughout the region. 't should be noted that, even before the CEP reports for the six targetted countries are completed, CCA, in consultation with USAID, should take the lead in securing additional funding for extending the profiling process to other countries in the Eastern Caribbean region, notably St. Vincent, Antigua,Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands, and others, as well as the regional profile. Anticipated Products of the Profiling Process As indicated above, the information gathered during the profiling process needs to be targetted to a variety of audiences. Different types of products or means of communicating the information researched in the CEP's will be appropriate for each audience. They include: o country environmental reports for Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Lucia, and St. Kitts/Nevis published by CCA. These reports should ;review the state of knowledge about the condition and trends of the natural resource base using the best available data, maps, and other sources of information on natural resources and the environment as they relate to economic development planning. It will also provide an analysis of major environmental issues, and recommendations for new policies and program initiatives. o a series of interim reports derived from the profiling process produced at the country level by CCA and the local lead institution (government agency or NGO). These would include preliminary studies from the research and background documentation for the CEPs; the results of the working group meetings and review sessions, the annotated bibliography of sources of information, and the directory of agencies and organizations involved in environmental planning and natural resource management. a range of public information, and educational materials including maps, posters, teaching aids, video documentaries and radio/TV spots,field guides and handbooks, which will be developed as "spin-offs" from the profiling process by the environmental education staff of CCA. I'

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Administration of the Profiling Project CCA will have the primary leadership role in the profiling process, including overall responsibility for project execution, for submission of progress reports, financial reports and other documentation required by USAID to monitor the pr. :uction of the profiles. The CCA Executive Director will serve as the Project Director and will be assisted by a project manager/team leader and an assistant project manager.The project manager and his/her assistant will take the lead in carrying out the reconnaissance work in each of the six countries, and in providing guidance and oversight for the production of the CEP reports, according to the general scope of work and specific MOU's prepared for each country. USAID will designate a project officer (at RDO/C) to monitor project implementation and to assist CCA in complying with USAID regulations and procedures. RDO/C will periodically request short-term consultancies by the USAID regional environmental management specialist (REMS) to assist with monitoring and technical oversight of the project. Financial Plan and Budget Due to funding constraints on the part of USAID, the present scope of work and budget have been scaled back from that originally developed to include only the first two of three phases. They are: Phase One: approximately 8 months, to cover the start-up activities on the part of CCA, the launching of the profiling process in 6 cotntries, and the preparation of CEP reports in 1 or 2 pilot countries. To be funded by initial allocation of tl36,000 (FY 86). Phase Two: continuation of profiling process over an additional 12 months, to complete CEP reports for each of six target countries, and to initiate education and outreach activities. To be funded by additional allocations totalling t250,000 (FY 87 and FY 88). Phase Three: extension of the profiling process to include at least two additional countries, synthesis for the easterna document Caribbean region, and to carry out an evaluation, seminars, development of biennial updates and other follow-on activities otulined in original SOW and in IIED reconnaissance report. Funding: approximately t165,000, plus funds for countries other than St. Vincent and Antigua. (See budget summary and financial plan.) 9

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Eastern Caribbean Environmental Profile Budget Summary -20 months1 Item Cost Project Staff --Project Director/CCA Exec. Dir. 9,000 --Project Manager/Team Leader (part-time, IRF) 32,000 -Assistant Project Manager (full-time, CCA) 28,000 --Projects Officer (part-time, CCA) 5,000 --Secretary (full-time, CCA) 17,000 --Other Support Staff 43,000 Subtotal 134,000 Technical Consultants For literature reviews, document searches, data acquisition, field consultations and review of draft reports, re: Marine Systems, Wildlife -Parks and Protected Areas, Land Use Planning, Forestry, Environmental Law, Public Health, Pollution Control, Hydrology, Economics, Energy, Anthropology, Agronomy, Geology, Tourism, Archeology Subtotal 30,000 Travel and Per Diem Project Staff -air fare, in-country travel and per diem 25,400 Consultants -air fare, in-country travel and per diem 20,000 Subtotal 45,400 For details, see draft budget prepared by CCA/IRF

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Other Direct Costs Documentation, office and computer supplies, equipment leasing 9,000 Communications (telephone, telex, postage, photocopies) 12,200 Printing and report productions 18,000 In-country working group meetings and research and analysis support $5,000/country 30OO0 Subtotal 69,20Q TOTAL -DIRECT COSTS 278,600 Contingencies and Other Indirect Costs CCA 35,100 IRF 72,300 Subtotal 107,402 BUDGET TOTAl 386,000

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FINANCIAL PLAN -Project Staff Technical Consultants Travel & Per Diems Other Direct Costs Contingencies and other Indirect Costs TOTAL PHASE I AND PHASE II (20 MONTHS) Budget Total Rhase I Phase II (8 months) (12 months) 134,000 53,600 80,400 30,000 10,000 20,000 45,400 18,400 27,000 69,200 24,500 44,700 107,400 29,500 77,900 $386,000 $136,000 $250,000

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________ ESTIMATED COSTS -PHASE III Project Staff Full and part-time staff at CCA and profiling project core staff 8 months Technical Consultants Fo: evaluations, regional synthesis and follow-up Travel and Per Diem Project Staff and consultants Other Direct Costs Documentation, office supplies Communication Printing-report production In-country working group meetings (2) Subtotal TOTAL DIRECT COSTS Contingencies and indirect costs (25%) TOTAL PHASE III $ 55,000 $ 25,000 $ 22,000 $ 5,000 $ 6,000 $ 9,000 $ 10,000 $132,000 3-3,000 $165,000