Brownfield remediation and design in a developing urban context

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Title:
Brownfield remediation and design in a developing urban context
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
Sutton, Christopher H.
Publisher:
Department of Landscape Architecture, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

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Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00001572:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text









S
Browfied Rmeditio an

Desgn n aDevlopng rba


Senior Capstone Project:


Spring 2006


Christopher H. Sutton



















ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

First and foremost, I would like
to thank God, my family, and my
friends. Without you this could
not have been possible. Thank you
for your constant love, support, and
encouragement.

I would also like to thank the facul-
ty for its encouragement, patience,
and instruction. Thank you for
helping me to see this through.









pt(ablt.[K)o1114


TITLE PAGE











INTRODUCTION


chapter 01








This Capstone project is about creating a mixed-
use, mixed-residential urban village centered around
public green space and a rails-to-trails connection
while at the same time addressing the necessary
brownfield issues associated with the site's current
use as a cement plant, all within a rapidly redevelop-
ing urban context.


1 2 BACKGR














lhe state of Florida is in a condition of constant growth. The state is bombarded with new residents each day, all
looking for a place to live permanently or at least seasonally. Almost all are seeking the promise of a tropical climate, mild
winters, and all of the sunshine-filled recreational opportunities that have been drawing residents and tourists alike for at least
one hundred years. Some cities, like Sarasota, have been drawing people for longer than that.

Sarasota's downtown district, like that of many other American cities, is being rediscovered. The city, having recognized the
public's desire to live, work, and play in a vibrant downtown atmosphere, invested in the planning help of architecture and
planning firm Duany, Plater-Zyberk to develop what has become known as the 2020 Downtown Master Plan. The plan iden-
tifies all of the distinct areas and/or districts in the downtown area, delineates the limits of what is considered "downtown",
and makes recommendations on how each area should be developed over time.

The site of this Capstone project is located just outside of the limits of the 2020 Master Plan. However, as infill redevelop-
ment has occurred and the demand for downtown locations has grown, so has the interest in sites and neighborhoods around
it. Therefore, understanding the recommendations in the 2020 plan is crucial to understanding the future context and
potential of the site. The Capstone site is within walking distance to the waterfront and downtown, making it a desirable
location to say the least.

Before the site can be for redesigned, it has many issues that must be considered and dealt with, as one might expect in an
urban context. First of these is the fact that the site's current use as a cement plant may have pollution issues to deal with,
creating the need to address the site as a potential brownfield. Next, the site is located in Central-Cocoanut, one of Sarasota's
oldest neighborhoods, so redevelopment of the site must respect this in terms of scale and character. Also, the neighborhood
while recently seeing a growing community interest in its clean-up reinvestment, also has a high rate of crime, mostly in the
forms of drugs and prostitution. Creating an environment that discourages crime is a necessity. Traffic speeds are high along
Central Avenue, the site's western boundary and there is a lack of a continuous sidewalk system along Central and around the
rest of the site. Thus, walking around the site is generally not pleasing or safe for pedestrians. A successful design will be one
that reverses or at least improves this dilemma.

Another important thing to consider in a design proposal for this site is the housing needs in the area. Redevelopment trends
in the downtown area have typically been marketed towards Sarasota's ever-growing affluent population and have tended to
ignore housing needs of those with moderate incomes. As land values in the area continue to rise, much of Sarasota's down-
town workforce are seeking affordable housing further and further from where they work, requiring longer commutes and
clogging roads with more cars for longer periods. Thus, there is a growing demand for "workforce" or "attainable" housing in
the downtown vicinity. This Capstone site carries a great deal of potential to incorporate this kind housing into its design.

A final constraint in the neighborhood that has potential to become a great asset is a rail line that runs through the middle
of the Capstone site and bounds the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood on its eastern side. The rail line creates a barrier (only
two roads pass through it), lessening connectivity to an adjacent neighborhood and causing more traffic on the through roads.
The dead ends of the roads that don't pass through have become territories and havens of criminal activity. These places are
very unsafe for those that do not "belong" there. Therefore, in its existing state, the rail line is a source of blight in the neigh-
borhood. A proposal that suggests creating more through streets and increases connectivity wherever possible could eliminate
this constraint by allowing more "outsiders" through the area at more locations, creating more eyes on the street.

To conclude, this Capstone project is one that holds a great deal of potential in being able to explore a complicated mix of
opportunities and constraints, and generate a contextually sensitive solution to address them all. The design vision for this
project is one that revitalizes the area functionally, economically, socially, and aesthetically. It will be something that spurs
more investment into the area and eventually transforms the neighborhood.


I BA1C *IKGOUD













GOAL #1: Integrate the site with existing and future land uses through a design that aids in revitalizing the
Cocoanut-Central neighborhood economically, socially, and aesthetically.

Objective #la: Create a mixed-use, mixed-residential development with an emphasis on attainable work-
force housing to introduce new users and dollars to the area and spur further investment in the area.

Objective #1b: Create a design that is respectful of the character of the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood
in terms of scale while at the same time increasing density.

GOAL #2: Design for remediation of potential ground water pollution caused by cement plant.

Objective #2a: Propose to excavate the point-source pollution areas and have the contaminated soil
treated off-site to negate the possibility of further ground water pollution and limit the constraints of intended
development.

GOAL #3: Design for a high quality pedestrian environment to increase pedestrian safety and level of use
by the community.

Objective #3a: Wherever possible, create pedestrian and bicycle only connections through the site.

Objective #3b: Allow enough of a building setback for a comfortably sized (10-15 ft. wide) streetscape.

Objective #3c: Integrate the proposed rails-to-trails into the design of the site.

Objective #3d: Design an linear park-like pedestrian through way that connects the east and west sides
of the site.

GOAL #4: "Change the [negative] perception of the neighborhood by increasing the overall safety and
decreasing illegal activities" (Central-Cocoanut N.A.S.).


street".


street".


Objective #4a: Design public open space in and around full view of housing to create "eyes on the


Objective #4b: Design a highly visible plaza space to provide citizens a place to gather and "take back the


Objective #4c: Increase street connectivity in the neighborhood wherever feasible to get rid of dead ends
and bring more eyes into the neighborhood.


a 4 BACG







ProjectLocatio


Sarasota is located on the west coast of Florida.


Sarasota is located approximately 30 miles south of St. Petersburg and 60 miles
south of Tampa.


I BACGR







ProjectLocatio


The cement plant site is located in north Sarasota County (outlined in red), near
its border with Manatee County. It is approximately a half-mile from Sarasota


The cement plant site is represented by the red rectangle. Red Lines: US 41
to the west. Highway 301 to the east. Orange Line: Fruitville RD, a major
transportation artery. Blue Lines: Central AVE runs north/south. 10th ST runs
east/west.


1 6 BACK








ProjectLocatio


Primary Study Area: Cement Plant Site.
Secondary Study Area: Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood.


CEMENT PLANT SITE

Area: 26.5 acres.

Items to Note:
- The industrial character of the site
and around the site.

- Residential character to the west.

- Rundown appearance of properties
around the site.

- The rail road that runs through the
site.

-The lack of connectivity through the
site.


Iw BCRU














BACKGROUND


chapter 02:









Saaoa A reIetemn itr


Sarasota has been a settlement and vaca-
tion destination for most of the last 150 years.
The lush, tropical climate and coastal location
provide a beautiful backdrop for the area's many
recreational and cultural offerings.

"As in many places in Florida, Native Americans
were Sarasota's first inhabitants. Evidence of pre-
historic mounds and middens peppers the coast-
line and keys. Treasure-seeking explorers and
conquistadors were the first Europeans to ven-
ture into the area, including Hernando de Soto
- and legend has it Sarasota was named after his
daughter Sara.

In 1843, a young adventurer named William
Whittaker settled in the Sarasota area, and gradu-
ally the area was built up by hardy colonists, in-
cluding a ship of settlers from Scotland. Among
these was a man named John Hamilton Gillespie
- who later introduced golf to Sarasota, building
Florida's first golf course.

An influx of wealthy socialites settled the area
starting in 1910, setting the tone for Sarasota as
a winter location for the cultured crowd which
continues year-round to this day. In fact, the per-
forming and visual arts in Sarasota had been es-
tablished before most Florida cities even had post
offices.

During a real estate boom in the '20s, circus
magnate John Ringling and his wife Mable
constructed their magnificent winter residence
"Ca'd'Zan" ("House of John"), and a museum
to house their extensive art collection. The man-
sion, modeled after the Dode's Palace in Venice
reflects Ringling's interest in Italian Art & Archi-
tecture and the museum has one of the largest
Baroque collections in the world. Ringling also
made Sarasota the winter headquarters of his
world-renowned Ringling Brothers Barnum &


Baily Circus" (http://funandsun.com/ltocf/all-
gosf/Sarasota/historysar.html. 1/27/2006.)


Rinalina's Ca'd'Zan as seen from Sarasota Bay.
Source: http://funandsun.com/ltocf/allgosf/Sarasota/his-
torysar.html. Retrieved on 1/27/2006.


Sarasota Bayfront in 1924. Much of the still-existing street
grid had already been established.
Source: http://www.sarasotagov.com/Planning/NolenPlan/
NolenPlan.html. Retrieved on 1/23/2006.


1 10 B








The D


This Capstone project is being conceived
of, in some ways, as an expansion of Sarasota's
Downtown Master Plan and will thus incorpo-
rate some of the ideas and recommendations set
forth by it. It is may be useful to make a note of
the background of its development. The follow-
ing is the background information provided by
the City of Sarasota's planning department:

"City of Sarasota was first laid out in 1886 under
the direction of Colonel J. H. Gillespie. In 1924
the well known Massachusetts planner, John No-
len was hired to update and organize the City's
growth plan.

In 1986, following a 1983 report by the American
Institute of Architects' Regional Urban Design
Assistance Team (RUDAT) a downtown master
plan (also known as the Community Redevelop-
ment Area Plan) was completed and adopted by


Community Redevelopment Area


I ~I- 7 I


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S '


the City.

The 1986 Plan provided the framework for many
downtown Sarasota projects including: the bay-
front improvements, Main Street streetscape and
storefronts, Five Points Park, Civic Center devel-
opment, Theater and Arts District (TAD) zoning
west of Five Points Park, and Commercial/Residen-
tial Transition (CRT) zoning in the Towles Court
area.

In October 1999 the City Commission moved
to update the Downtown Master Plan. Following
a year of intensive civic involvement the City of
Sarasota Downtown Master Plan 2020, prepared
by the consultant firm of Duany Plater Zyberk
was adopted on January 22, 2001" (http://www.
sarasotagov.com/Planning/DowntownPlan/Pro-
jectBackground.html. Retrieved on 11/30/2005.)


ICAPSTONE-SiT-
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Sarasota's Community Redevelopment Area and the expansion of the study area pro-
posed in 2000 by DPZ. The Capstone site is indicated in red above.
Source: http://www.sarasotagov.com/Planning/DowntownPlan/ProjectBackground.html
Retrieved on 11/30/2005.

BAKRON








Te Di


A statement of the goals and objec-
tives for the master plan given by the City of
Sarasota's Planning Department:

1) Building Forms Compatible with the City's
Vision: To create building forms of a character
and scale that achieve the City's vision of a City
of urban amenities with small town living and
feeling".

2)Attractive Public Open Spaces and Pedestrian
Ways: To create attractive public open spaces and
pedestrian ways that are complemented by adja-
cent building forms, enhanced by public art, and
connect to adjoining neighborhoods.

3)Increased Housing: To increase the proportion
of housing and provide a range of housing types
consistent with the City's vision.

4)Economic, Cultural and Governmental Cen-
ter: To facilitate economic development and
ensure that downtown remains the economic,
cultural and governmental center of the metro-
politan area.

5)Supportive Infrastructure: To provide support
facilities, including vehicular circulation, park-
ing, mass transit and signage, in a manner that is
functional, economically feasible, and supportive
of a pedestrian environment.

6)Economically Feasible: To implement the plan
within the fiscal constraints of the City.

Source: http://www.sarasotagov.com/Planning/
DowntownPlan/ProjectBackground.html. Re-
trieved on 11/30/2005.


eseC goals demonstrate that the City of
Sarasota is committed to developing its down-
town as not only a commercial center, but also
as a residential center that will help to fuel
commerce and culture, creating a more vibrant,
enjoyable and livable downtown.

Designing safe and attractive pedestrian spaces
and connections will facilitate more use of
places in the downtown area. Providing multiple
uses and destinations with reasonable walking
distances between them will lessen the need for
users to travel by car which means less traffic
and more people in public, fueling the feeling
and image of greater vibrancy that downtown
districts are known for.

As development expands northward toward
the Capstone site, the intended vibrancy and
character will hopefully come with it. It is an
intention in the planning and design of this
Capstone project to "connect" to the anticipated
development through the borrowing of the same
goals and objectives planned for the downtown
study area where they are deemed relevant and
appropriate.


1 12 BCG










Other Pr jcs DvlpetsihSuItbeC


In addition to the Downtown Master Plan,
there are some current and pending develop-
ments that will be considered in the design of the
Capstone site. They are diagrammed and identi-
fied numerically as follows:


1) Parks and Connectivity Master Plan

2) Cultural District Master Plan

3) San Marco Mixed-Use Residential Project

4) Broadway Promenade Mixed-Use Residential
Project

5) 17th Street Extension Project

6) Capstone Site

7) City Pointe Mixed-Use Center


I~ *e IRO












Ote Prjcs akInIonetvt atrPa


In 2002, EDAW proposed a plan to cre-
ate connections and recreational opportunities
between Sarasota's many green spaces and coastal
points of interest. The plan takes into account
recommendations made in the 2020 Downtown
Master Plan by DPZ. The plan also makes large
scale proposals that conceive of future use of in-
frastructure. One such future use is the proposed
rails-to-trails that can be converted from the ex-
isting railroad. It runs through the middle of the
Capstone site. It is also recommended that space
be reserved for light rail.


Other proposals include:


1) Landscaped parkways that surround the Cap-
stone site and promote comfortable pedestrian
connections.
2) A multi-use recreational trail (MURT) that
runs along the bay front.


CAPSTONE SITE




bI .' I .. I d I ii

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Parks and Connectivity Master Plan proposed by EDAW in 2002. The Capstone project area is indicated in red.
Image and text retrieved from City of Sarasota Planning Dept. website


14 BACGROUN


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n-i Cultural District Master Plan was pro-
posed by Cooper Robertson Partners in 2004.
The primary and secondary study areas are in-
dicated below. This project is important to note
because it will become a major destination and
activity center. Its proposed uses should not be
repeated in the Capstone project.


r CAPSTONE SITE


I--
Pani


Cultural
Primary Project
Study Area


Secondary Project
Study Area

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NLffl -M
.N1i= /xH \T
m i 11 jL 111 i 11 i I IrT>n I
________ F~fVIL"'\____ __ ____________ __


The primary and secondary study area for the proposed Cultural District Master Plan. The Capstone project area
is indicated in red. Image and text retrieved from City of Sarasota Planning Dept. website

BAKRON 15













C 4 GENERAL LAND USE
i-, j The land use designation in the District
1 : is a combination of cultural and mixed
Suse. This designation supports and ex-
S. tends to the Bay the urban environment
-i- of Downtown Sarasota, ensures devel-

SI day and night time activities. The plan
C 'locates predominant cultural uses on the
S' major frontages of Tamiami Trail and
3 I t the Bay with mixed use blocks extend-
t*M I $'t & ing from the 10th Street Slip through-
out the site.

-,E
,., .. : BUILDINGS
... r. _|t-& :- 1) Van Wezel
2) Symphony Hall or Museum
SA3) Museum or Symphony Hall
SI 4) Municipal Auditorium
.' 5) GWIZ
6) Cultural/Retail
6 7) Cultural/Retail
i 8) Cultural/Retail
,P 9) Cultural/Museum
J) 10) Retail


---- ------- ,------ j[ r -_3t. a ...
--Cu'.'7 vr b 11) Retail
/&12) PublicParking/Galleries/Live Work
13) Visitors' Center

'_' OPEN SPACE
I A) Cultural Park
B) Tamiami Front
'. -3 C) Mangrove Wetlands
ILui ,ve m e.. l an ta o n 6 pti-. r., D) Wetlands Plaza
E) Arts Walk
F) Arts Walk
....... G) Van Wezel Patio
....... H) 10th Street Pier
4 I) Payne Terminal







Illustrative master plan that outlines proposed land uses.
Image and text retrieved from City of Sarasota Planning Dept. website









OPc S ri sspD
SAN MARCO FEATURES & AMENITIES
1) 23 condominiums
2) Eleven unique floor plans from 1843-3324 sq.
ft.
3) Spacious 3 and 4 bedroom floor plans with 2.5
to 3.5 baths
4) Select residences include skylights, library, me-
dia room, or natural light art studio
5) 6 story building with residences on top five
floors
6) Views of Sarasota Bay, parks and downtown
7) Covered enclosed first-floor parking for two
cars per residence

Source: http://www.sanmarcosarasota.com/fea-
tures/features.cfm
Retrieved on: 4/1/2006


,Slesta Key


CAPSTONE SITE Aerial Photo of San Marco site location. Augmented with graphics to
show relative locations of other sites
Source: http://www.sanmarcosarasota.com/map/map.cfm
Retrieved on: 4/1/2006


I' e IR O


SAN
MARCO,










Other Prjcs radarmndeMxIsiet


BROADWAY PROMENADE FEATURES &
AMENITIES

1) Bayfront and park vistas
2) Underground controlled access resident
parking
3) Concierge and valet services
4) Club room
5) Fitness center
6) Library / billards room

Source: http://www.downtownsaraso-
tacondos.com/sarasota/condo_broadway_
promenada.asp
Retrieved on: 4/1/06


Perspective Rendering.
Source: http://www.downtownsarasotacon-
dos.com/sarasota/condo_broadway_prom-
enada.asp
Retrieved on: 4/1/06


Broadway Promenade site plan. The Capstone site is two block east of this
site (East is up on this map).
Source: http://www.downtownsarasotacondos.com/sarasota/condo_broad-
way_promenada.asp
Retrieved on: 4/1/06


1 18 BACGRUN


-1 r *~l











e-C 17th Street Extension Project is a pro-
posal to connect the two sides of 17th Street,
presently divided by the railroad, and create a
connection that will run from US 41 to the west
and Highway 301 to the east.

The street runs through the Central-Cocoanut
neighborhood.


Many are concerned about change in neighbor-
hood character that the project could bring.


S17th Extension Project
T CAPSTONE SITE


I' e IR O








Ot e Prjcs iyIoneMxdUsIeeomn


City Pointe is a mixed-use condominium proposal located just
south of 10th Street (the Capstone site is just north of 10th Street). The
proposal calls for 324 luxury condominium units and retail.


Citypointe site plan.
Source: http://www.profilesarasota.com/citypointe/renderings.html
Retrieved on: 1/23/06


Citypointe aerial view.
Source: http://www.profilesarasota.com/citypointe/renderings.html
Retrieved on: 1/23/06


1 20 BAKRON


,if:tl M .Y. if. :iit PLAN


citip.-ntet~i













h eC proposal and development of these
projects all within a relatively short time frame
(the last five years), point to a development
trend in the area. The city seems to be embrac-
ing the Downtown Master Plan recommenda-
tions for mixed-use projects and the idea of
creating walkable, pedestrian friendly environ-
ments with plenty of destinations, activities,
and interests.

The Capstone site is located within a five to
ten-minute walking distance of all of these
projects and will undoubtedly become an even
more strategic and desirable location once they
are completed.

The design the site must take these projects into
account so that it not only considers its present


context, but its future one as well.

One important thing to note here is the lack
of proposals for affordable housing for those of
moderate incomes. The housing proposals all
lean to the luxury side of development. This
creates a limited dimension to the user groups
and leads to an exclusive sort of environment,
one that is not for all types of users. To have
vibrancy in the downtown area, there must be
users of all types and incomes with activities
and uses for them all.

This is why workforce housing will be part of
the Capstone proposal to balance the scales
a little and help to create a place where those
with moderate incomes can have a chance to
live, work, and play.


I' e IR O


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Cetrl-CocoaIhIuItNIIU1Ig 1b1o hoIo


lhe following pages are taken from the
City of Sarasota's Central-Cocoanut Neighbor-
hood Action Strategy (NAS). The NAS is a
program that the city has initiated to give the
city's different neighborhoods a forum to orga-
nize themselves around and establish a line of
communication with city officials concerning
issues in their respective neighborhoods and
methods for solving problems.

"W ith its close proximity to downtown
and the bay front, along with its historic char-
acter, the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood is a
diverse community beginning to realize its full
potential. As one of Sarasota's oldest neighbor-
hoods, there are over 500 residences located in
this area. Approximately half were built before
1947 and are currently listed as historic re-
S sources.


The neighborhood also encompasses three pub-
lic parks (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial
Park, Mary Dean Park, and Pioneer Park) the
Ringling School of Art and Design, and the
Action Central Association (a group of busi-
ness owners along Central Avenue committed
to revitalizing this street corridor). Community
destinations such as Centennial Park, Whita-
ker Gateway Park, the Players Theater, and Van
Wezel all border the Central-Cocoanut neigh-
borhood.

The Central-Cocoanut area, as defined by the
Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood Association
(CCA), is bound by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Way (27th Street) to the North, 10th Street to
the south, the CSX railroad (just east of Cen-
tral Avenue) to the east, and North Tamiami
Trail (US 41) to the west."


Diagram of Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood in relation to the Capstone site.


1 22 BCG










CentralCocoanu NeighboI


MAJOR CONCERNS IDENTIFIED AND
DISCUSSED BY CENTRAL-COCOANUT
RESIDENTS INCLUDED:

1) Crime and Safety
2) Infrastructure and Related Services
3) Appearance
4) Recreational Opportunities and Green
Spaces
5) Housing
6) Land Use and Economic Development

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE GOALS
AND RECOMMENDED ACTIONS THAT
RESULTED FROM THE NAS:

CRIME AND SAFETY:

GOAL:
Change the perception of the neighborhood by
increasing overall safety and decreasing illegal
activities.

RECOMMENDED ACTION
Hold neighborhood events in high crime areas
to discourage illegal activity.

Create safeways for children/pedestrians to
travel through the neighborhood.

INFRASTRUCTURE AND RELATED
SERVICES:

GOAL:
Improve the overall condition and maintenance
of infrastructure and enhance related services
within Central-Cocoanut.


Install crosswalks (raised with brick paver layer
if feasible) adjacent to parks and other active
pedestrian areas.

Priority locations include:
11th Street & Cocoanut Avenue,
12th Street & Cocoanut Avenue,
25th Street & Cocoanut Avenue,
15th Street & Central Avenue, and
16th Street & Central Avenue.

APPEARANCE:

GOAL:
Enhance the appearance and curb appeal of
Central-Cocoanut and increase community
pride through public and private investment.

RECOMMENDED ACTION:
As funding allows, install 'gateway entrances'
including brick pavers and medians where fea-
sible at:
1. Cocoanut Avenue & 11th Street (south)
2. Central Avenue & 10th Street (south)
3. Cocoanut Avenue & Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Way (north)
4. Central Avenue & Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. Way (north)
5. 19th Street & Orange Avenue (east) signage
only
6. US 41 & 18th Street (west) signage only
7. US 41 & 14th Street (west) signage only

Incorporate gateway features into design of
proposed 17th Street Extension Project at
neighborhood entrances.


RECOMMENDED ACTION:


I~ *e IRO










Cra I


RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND
GREEN SPACES:

GOAL:
Enhance public green spaces within Central-
Cocoanut.

RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Establish events at Pioneer Park to increase
positive activity and community pride (e.g.
afternoon basketball league, art festival, Green
Day, or 'Get To Know Your Neighbor Day').

Consider creating a community garden within
Pioneer Park or acquiring a non-buildable va-
cant lot for a public green space/garden.

HOUSING:

GOAL:
Provide opportunities to improve housing
structures within Central-Cocoanut.

RECOMMENDED ACTION:
None seem to directly relate to this Capstone
project.

LAND USE AND ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT:

GOAL:
Improve economic opportunities and encour-
age investment and redevelopment of dis-
tressed areas while maintaining the character of
the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood.


RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Discourage/amend the existing Community
Office/Institutional future land use designa-
tion in Central-Cocoanut to prevent the fur-
ther proliferation of social service uses. Initiate
through 2004 EAR (Evaluation and Appraisal
Report) process.

As part of 2004 EAR process, encourage the
City to establish a future land use designation
within Central-Cocoanut which allows for
mixed-use development with an emphasis on
community/workforce housing. Consider the
area west of Orange Avenue and north of 10th
Street and refer to Action Strategy 8.6 of the
Future Land Use Chapter in the 1998 Saraso-
ta City Plan to initiate this planning process.
The City will engage in discussions with the
concrete plant and other adjacent landowners
in this area to commence this recommended
action.

Promote 10th Street as a gateway to the wa-
terfront and establish connection with the
cultural district through compatible land uses.
In order to accomplish this, amend future land
use designations where necessary through the
2004 EAR process.

Ensure compatibility of residential uses in the
neighborhood Single-family in the center
and multi-family and commercial around the
periphery.

Source: City of Sarasota Central-Cocoanut
Neighborhood Action Strategy


1 24 B








S eIlntrl-CoMSISuSRIIII UNe[91 Ig SISi616



CONCLUSIONS BASED ON THE CEN-
TRAL COCOANUT NAS:

The Central-Cocoanut NAS is, as intended,
very telling of the wants and needs of the
neighborhood.

There are program elements that emerge as very
possible proposals for the Capstone project site.
These are:

1) Community Garden
2) Very visible public space that gives the com-
munity a place to gather and "take back the
street" in the high-crime area of Central Av-
enue.
3) Flexible plaza space that allows for larger
scale gatherings such as farmer's markets, art
shows or festivals, with good lighting to dis-
courage mis-use at night.
4) Traffic calming devices such as paved "gate-
way areas" with historic markers and raised
crosswalks.
5) A mixed-use development that emphasizes
workforce housing.
6) Discourage social-services
7) "Safeways" for children and other users.
8) A high quality streetscape, especially along
Central that establishes a new level of curb ap-
peal.
9) An open and flexible lawn space that gives
users (especially children) a large and safe area
to play games and hold activities on.


I' e IR O








SD nur


BROWNFIELD DEFINITION:

"Properties that are under-utilized or aban-
doned because of the presence or perception of
environmental contamination"
(Russ, Planning and Redeveloping Brownfields
V).

This Capstone site is currently used as cement
and concrete plant. This will change in the rel-
atively near future as growth and development
in the area creates a conflict of uses and cause
the site to no longer mesh with its context. The
owners will undoubtedly be approached to sell
the property as property values rise.

Pollution threats associated with cement pro-
duction are stated as follows:

S "Cement manufacturing produces a variety of
solid process wastes, air emissions, and waste-
water streams, but most of its contaminants are
released in cement kiln dusts (CKD)."

The main components in kiln dusts are:
Aluminum
Silica
Clay
Metallic Oxides

CKD may also contain trace amounts of:

Dioxins
Furans
Cadmium
Lead
Selenium
Radionucleides


"Cancer risks of concern are mainly caused by
exposure to arsenic in CKD, and there is also a
possible cancer threat in kiln dusts that contain
dioxins" (Source: www.hsrc.org/hsrc/html/
tosc/sswtosc. Retrieved on: 1/18/06)

A description of pollution associated with con-
crete production is as follows:

"Concrete manufacturing generates air particu-
late emissions from cement and aggregate dusts.
Other sources of contamination in concrete
plants are solvents used in cleaning operations
and the application of finishes to completed
products. Solvents can threaten water quality
in nearby communities when they are released
and seep into groundwater." (Source: www.
hsrc.org/hsrc/html/tosc/sswtosc. Retrieved on:
1/18/06).


1 26 B








SP n o h


For this project, it is simply not feasible
to have an environmental assessment done
to pinpoint where pollution is located on the
site. Therefore, it will be assumed that polluted
areas do exist and that they are located at the
point sources that seem oriented towards ce-
ment and/or concrete production. These areas
are diagrammed below.

These are the areas that this Capstone project
will be concerned with in terms of brownfield
clean-up and remediation.


Point source pollution diagram.


I' e IR O









Br w fi s Cla-U trtg


1h e EPA outlines a recommended process
for proceeding with a brownfield clean-up. If
an environmental consulting service were avail-
able, this is the process that could likely be fol-
lowed:

1) Select the brownfield site

2) Phase 1 Site Assessment and Due Dilignen-
ce: Obtain background information of site to
determine extent of contamination and legal
and financial risks.
If there seems to be no contamina-
tion, begin redevelopment activities.
If there is a high level of contamina-
tion, reassess the viability of the project.

3) Phase 2 Site Investigation: Sample the site
to identify the type, quantity, and extent of the
contamination.
If the contamination does not pose
health or environmental risk, begin redevelop-
ment activities.
If there is a high level of contamina-
tion, reassess the viability of the project

4) Evaluate remedial options: Compile and as-
sess possible remediation alternatives.
If the remedial options do not appear
to be feasible, determine whether the develop-
ment is a viable option.

5) Develop Remedy Implementation Plan:
Coordinate with stockholders to design a rem-
edy implementation plan.

6) Remedy Implementation Plan: If additional
contamination is discovered during the remedy


implementation process, return to the site as-
sessment phase to determine the extent of the
contamination.

7) Begin redevelopment activities.

The Phase 1 Site Assessment typically identi-
fies:

1) Potential contaminants that remain in and
around the site

2) Likely pathways that the contaminants may
move

3) Potential risks to the environment and hu-
man health that exist along the migration path-
ways

Source: EPA/625/R-00/009, November 2001,
"Technical Approaches to Characterizing and
Cleaning up Brownfield Sites"

For this project, the primary concern will be
with pollutants below the soil reacting with in-
filtrated storm water. Once below the soil, the
storm water tends to migrate laterally in the di-
rection of the of the topography. In the case of
this project's site that direction is towards Sara-
sota Bay. For these reasons, topography, water
table, and soil drainage characteristics will be
analyzed in terms of their relevance to clean-up
concerns.


1 28 BAKRON









Br w fi s Cla-p eholge


1h e EPA outlines the primary factors that
should influence the selection of a clean-up
technology. They are as follows:

1) Types of contamination present
2) Clean-up and land reuse goals
3) Length of time required to reach clean-up
goals
4) Post-treatment care needed
5) Budget

"The intended use of the brownfield site will
drive the level of clean-up needed to make the
site safe for redevelopment and resuse."

Source: EPA/625/R-00/009, 26.

Since the project site is intended for general
use by the public for living, working, and rec-
reation, a high level of clean-up and/or reme-
diation will be required.

Given the anticipated development in the area,
the time frame will have to be relatively short
as well.

Therefore, a clean-up technology that is highly
effective and fast is the optimum choice.


REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES THAT
WILL BE CONSIDERED FORTHIS PROJ-
ECT:

1) Containment Technologies:
This type does not remove contami-
nation, but contains it on-site.
These include:
Caps
Liners
Slurry Walls
These technologies require mainte-
nance and monitoring regularly.

2) Clean-Up Technologies (2 Categories):

- Ex Situ: Treats contaminates that have been
removed and moved to another location.

- In Situ: Treats contaminates in place.
Examples: phyto-remediation,
bio-remediation and, soil flushing, air-sparg-
ing, and treatment walls.

Source: EPA/625/R-00/009, November 2001,
"Technical Approaches to Characterizing and
Cleaning up Brownfield Sites"

CONCLUSION:

Given the high water table and likelihood of
migration of contaminants over time, leav-
ing the contaminants in place and containing
them, as well as maintaining the integrity of
the required technologies may not be feasible.

Therefore, it will be recommended that all
point sources of pollution be excavated and
treated off-site.


I~ *e IRO














INVENTORY and ANALYSIS


chapter 03:











INVENTORY:


ANALYSIS:


This map shows the different land uses around
the cement plant site, shown here inside the
black circle. Note the commercial urban core
of downtown to the south and the residential
uses the north. To the east are industrial uses.
The cement plant site is a strategic hub between
all of them.


The site is surrounded by four different land uses,
each having a different character and typical use.
Each side of the design proposal will have to ad-
dress this in some way. The south side may have
a more commercial character, the north and west,
a more residential one, and the east a more indus-
trial one. Having these four characters around
the same site may lend itself to a mixed-use de-
sign that serves as a transitional hub between all
of them.


-I

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UPLAN HARDWOOD FOREST

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INVENTORY: ANALYSIS:
The cement plant site has twenty-three parks Seeing that the cement plant site has plenty of
within an approximate two mile radius of it. parks already around it, it wouldn't make much
Eight of them are within walking distance. All sense to propose that the site be used primarily
of them have a passive character, as a park.


r b I ', {)IiqU l
EXSIGPRSAN WALKN DSANC




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1/2 MIL BUFE










11111M E l


INVENTORY:


ANALYSIS:


The cement plant site is bound on all but one
side by secondary roads and is within one mile
of the City of Sarasota's major arterial high-
ways. The rail line runs through the middle of
the site. Note the lack of connection between
the two sides of the rail line. The overall pat-
tern is a fairly regular grid.


It can be seen that the site has direct access to
Sarasota's major roads and has strong axial con-
nections to the north and south sides of Sarasota.
The scale of the roads adjacent to the site should
not be that of a highway, nor that of a quiet
residential street. They should be re-designed,
at least around the project site, as pedestrian
friendly collector streets that aid to bring users
to the site by more than just automobile. There
is the potential to propose another through street
on the northern boundary of the site, increasing
connectivity and street frontage.


MAORRAD, EONAY OAS SRETGRD ad ALRA
MAO RA
SEONAR RA


PRJCTST


Miles


a 34 I T n


'I'i II











p IEI


INVENTORY:


ANALYSIS:


The site is served well by bus and car. Bicycle
and pedestrian connections to and around the
site is relatively weak. The rail line will be con-
verted to a rails-to-trails path and possibly to a
light rail line in the much longer term. There
are three bus stops adjacent to the site on the
eastern side and three more are one street away
on Orange AVE to the west.


This diagram shows that there is plenty of op-
portunities for users to make use of a variety of
modal types. All types and of their necessary
requirements will be incorporated into the de-
sign proposal. Improvements to the pedestrian
connectivity and environment will be proposed
as well.


EXISTIN MOBILITY INVE R Y


PROJECT T "T




















lMiles
RAILROA











EIIIIIIIII E


INVENTORY:


ANALYSIS:


This map shows the project site's position in
relation to the area's overall topography and
general drainage pattern. The site rests on the
middle ground between the area's high and low
elevations. The Central-Cocoanut neighbor-
hood is located predominately on the lower
elevations to the direct north of the project
site, which would explain the area's tendency to
flood during heavy rains.


The site is likely to have a considerable amount of water
passing over it during a heavier storm event, which would
be a regular occurrence during summer months. Therefore
it would be advantageous to propose a design that mini-
mizes the amount of impervious surface that storm water
travels over during an event, capturing it incrementally
in multiple areas, minimizing the rate and volume that is
brought to bear upon any one collection point. Also, if
the site's potential below-ground pollution is excavated,
preventing it from mixing with infiltrated water will not
be an issue. In terms of flooding, incorporating basin sizes
that can accommodate larger events will help to alleviate
this issue.


.... ......O J l 1
















414
... ..


























0 0.5 1 2 3 4
i.........















INVENTORY: ANALYSIS:

The site's soil is poorly drained. The area di- This analysis shows that, because of the poorly
rectly east of the site is very poorly drained. drained soils upland, even more water could
be moving across the site during a larger storm
event.


l M;I[O] R tOAD m
mBA At'l A A t































i i Miles
WATERS














INVENTORY: ANALYSIS:

This map shows the depth to the water table This will translate into a storm water design that
during the drier months of the year. must incorporate shallow basins that cover a wid-
er area because of the greater potential of storm-
water coming from off site.


WATE TABL DETH SASOA LO





|vV111t111










5 FOOT COTU LINES















i i Miles
* S.. 5'














INVENTORY: ANALYSIS:

This map shows the depth to the water table The same general recommendations apply here
during the wetter months of the year. as did in the previous analysis.


WATE TABL DETH SASOA HIG




PR tOJECT S1 +ITE















0 ~~ -. 10253












i i Miles
S. M- 0.0 0 0 0 1













INVENTORY:


ANALYSIS:


This map shows the population density within
walking distance of the project site. The most
density is directly south of the site. There is
moderate density located to the north, with-
in the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood. The
general lack of density to the east and west is
indicative of the land uses located there. Den-
sity to the west will increase in coming years as
the San Marco and Broadway Promenade proj-
ects become established.


Most of the users of this project site will probably come
from the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood. The non-
populated area that the cement plant site is located within
could be a bridge between its north and south, invigorat-
ing the area with more users if moderate density housing
is proposed. If those users are of moderate incomes (as
desired), a socio-economic transition could also be made
between the relatively poor residents of Central-Cocoanut
and the affluent retirees living near the downtown core and
waterfront. A new type/class of user would enrich the user
mix as well as expand the range of viable commercial mar-
kets in the area.


'1--" 1111 I1 I i n I -

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0 0.5 1 2 3 4
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SYNTHESIS


chapter 04:













h iS drawing seeks to communicate the
various factors influencing the design of the
Capstone site at the overall urban scale.



LEGEND

* Dead-End

* Neighborhood Gateway

* Civic Node

Bus Stop




OVERALL URBAN STRATEGIES
SYNTHESIS DIAGRAM
t NOT TO SCALE












Sarasota Bay


U LIZc
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1 4 SYEI


Synthesis:--------------









MpMI


ThiS drawing diagrams existing factors,
potential functions, and the underlying struc-
ture that a design concept can evolve from.


LEGEND
* Potential Entry Point


1 Neighborhood Gateway
Bus Stop


I SY N TH EA














MASTER PLAN


chapter 05:











1he program has been derived from
the Goals and Objectives, Background,
Analysis, and Synthesis portions of this
study. Many of the elements are taken
from the suggestions in the Central-
Cocoanut NAS. Others are the recom-
mendations based on housing needs,
stormwater strategies, and intuitions in
regards to the creation of certain func-
tional relationships.


PROGRAM LIST:
1. Community garden
2. Open lawn space
3. Public gathering plaza
4. Rails-to-trails path and connection
5. Trail head
6. Pedestrian and bicycle-only connec-
tions
7. East-west linear park space
8. Rain gardens
9. Detention basins
10. On-street parking
11. Buffer on southern boundary of the
project site
12. A central gathering space
13. Mixed-use residential (office and
neighborhood-serving retail on the
ground floor)
14. Live-work housing
15. Rowhouses
16. Apartments buildings
17. Surface parking


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Brownfield Remediation and Design in a Developing Urban Context Senior Capstone Project: Spring 2006 Christopher H. Sutton

PAGE 4

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS First and foremost, I would like to thank God, my family, and my friends. Without you this could not have been possible. ank you for your constant love, support, and encouragement. I would also like to thank the facul ty for its encouragement, patience, and instruction. ank you for helping me to see this through.

PAGE 5

table of contents: PAGE 1 9 31 43 47 Introduction Background Inventory & Analysis Synthesis Master Plan TITLE

PAGE 9

1 INTRODUCTION chapter 01:

PAGE 10

2 BACKGROUND Opening Statement is Capstone project is about creating a mixeduse, mixed-residential urban village centered around public green space and a rails-to-trails connection while at the same time addressing the necessary browneld issues associated with the sites current use as a cement plant, all within a rapidly redevelop ing urban context.

PAGE 11

BACKGROUND 3 About This Project e state of Florida is in a condition of constant growth. e state is bombarded with new residents each day, all looking for a place to live permanently or at least seasonally. Almost all are seeking the promise of a tropical climate, mild winters, and all of the sunshine-lled recreational opportunities that have been drawing residents and tourists alike for at least one hundred years. Some cities, like Sarasota, have been drawing people for longer than that. Sarasotas downtown district, like that of many other American cities, is being rediscovered. e city, having recognized the publics desire to live, work, and play in a vibrant downtown atmosphere, invested in the planning help of architecture and planning rm Duany, Plater-Zyberk to develop what has become known as the 2020 Downtown Master Plan. e plan iden ties all of the distinct areas and/or districts in the downtown area, delineates the limits of what is considered downtown, and makes recommendations on how each area should be developed over time. e site of this Capstone project is located just outside of the limits of the 2020 Master Plan. However, as inll redevelop ment has occurred and the demand for downtown locations has grown, so has the interest in sites and neighborhoods around it. erefore, understanding the recommendations in the 2020 plan is crucial to understanding the future context and potential of the site. e Capstone site is within walking distance to the waterfront and downtown, making it a desirable location to say the least. Before the site can be for redesigned, it has many issues that must be considered and dealt with, as one might expect in an urban context. First of these is the fact that the sites current use as a cement plant may have pollution issues to deal with, creating the need to address the site as a potential browneld. Next, the site is located in Central-Cocoanut, one of Sarasotas oldest neighborhoods, so redevelopment of the site must respect this in terms of scale and character. Also, the neighborhood while recently seeing a growing community interest in its clean-up reinvestment, also has a high rate of crime, mostly in the forms of drugs and prostitution. Creating an environment that discourages crime is a necessity. Trac speeds are high along Central Avenue, the sites western boundary and there is a lack of a continuous sidewalk system along Central and around the rest of the site. us, walking around the site is generally not pleasing or safe for pedestrians. A successful design will be one that reverses or at least improves this dilemma. Another important thing to consider in a design proposal for this site is the housing needs in the area. Redevelopment trends in the downtown area have typically been marketed towards Sarasotas ever-growing auent population and have tended to ignore housing needs of those with moderate incomes. As land values in the area continue to rise, much of Sarasotas down town workforce are seeking aordable housing further and further from where they work, requiring longer commutes and clogging roads with more cars for longer periods. us, there is a growing demand for workforce or attainable housing in the downtown vicinity. is Capstone site carries a great deal of potential to incorporate this kind housing into its design. A nal constraint in the neighborhood that has potential to become a great asset is a rail line that runs through the middle of the Capstone site and bounds the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood on its eastern side. e rail line creates a barrier (only two roads pass through it), lessening connectivity to an adjacent neighborhood and causing more trac on the through roads. e dead ends of the roads that dont pass through have become territories and havens of criminal activity. ese places are very unsafe for those that do not belong there. erefore, in its existing state, the rail line is a source of blight in the neigh borhood. A proposal that suggests creating more through streets and increases connectivity wherever possible could eliminate this constraint by allowing more outsiders through the area at more locations, creating more eyes on the street. To conclude, this Capstone project is one that holds a great deal of potential in being able to explore a complicated mix of opportunities and constraints, and generate a contextually sensitive solution to address them all. e design vision for this project is one that revitalizes the area functionally, economically, socially, and aesthetically. It will be something that spurs more investment into the area and eventually transforms the neighborhood.

PAGE 12

4 BACKGROUND Goals and Objectives GOAL #1: Integrate the site with existing and future land uses through a design that aids in revitalizing the Cocoanut-Central neighborhood economically, socially, and aesthetically. Objective #1a: Create a mixed-use, mixed-residential development with an emphasis on attainable work force housing to introduce new users and dollars to the area and spur further investment in the area. Objective #1b: Create a design that is respectful of the character of the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood in terms of scale while at the same time increasing density. GOAL #2: Design for remediation of potential ground water pollution caused by cement plant. Objective #2a: Propose to excavate the point-source pollution areas and have the contaminated soil treated o-site to negate the possibility of further ground water pollution and limit the constraints of intended development. GOAL #3: Design for a high quality pedestrian environment to increase pedestrian safety and level of use by the community. Objective #3a: Wherever possible, create pedestrian and bicycle only connections through the site. Objective #3b: Allow enough of a building setback for a comfortably sized (10-15 ft. wide) streetscape. Objective #3c: Integrate the proposed rails-to-trails into the design of the site. Objective #3d: Design an linear park-like pedestrian through way that connects the east and west sides of the site. GOAL #4: Change the [negative] perception of the neighborhood by increasing the overall safety and decreasing illegal activities (Central-Cocoanut N.A.S.). Objective #4a: Design public open space in and around full view of housing to create eyes on the street. Objective #4b : Design a highly visible plaza space to provide citizens a place to gather and take back the street. Objective #4c: Increase street connectivity in the neighborhood wherever feasible to get rid of dead ends and bring more eyes into the neighborhood.

PAGE 13

BACKGROUND 5 Project Location Sarasota is located on the west coast of Florida. Sarasota is located approximately 30 miles south of St. Petersburg and 60 miles south of Tampa.

PAGE 14

6 BACKGROUND Project Location The cement plant site is located in north Sarasota County (outlined in red), near its border with Manatee County. It is approximately a half-mile from Sarasota Bay. The cement plant site is represented by the red rectangle. Red Lines: US 41 to the west. Highway 301 to the east. Orange Line: Fruitville RD, a major transportation artery. Blue Lines: Central AVE runs north/south. 10th ST runs east/west.

PAGE 15

BACKGROUND 7 Project Location Primary Study Area: Cement Plant Site. Secondary Study Area: Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood. CEMENT PLANT SITE Area: 26.5 acres. Items to Note: The industrial character of the site and around the site. Residential character to the west. Rundown appearance of properties around the site. The rail road that runs through the site. -The lack of connectivity through the site.

PAGE 17

BACKGROUND chapter 02:

PAGE 18

10 BACKGROUND Sarasota: A Brief Settlement History Sarasota has been a settlement and vaca tion destination for most of the last 150 years. e lush, tropical climate and coastal location provide a beautiful backdrop for the areas many recreational and cultural oerings. As in many places in Florida, Native Americans were Sarasotas rst inhabitants. Evidence of pre historic mounds and middens peppers the coast line and keys. Treasure-seeking explorers and conquistadors were the rst Europeans to ven ture into the area, including Hernando de Soto and legend has it Sarasota was named after his daughter Sara. In 1843, a young adventurer named William Whittaker settled in the Sarasota area, and gradu ally the area was built up by hardy colonists, in cluding a ship of settlers from Scotland. Among these was a man named John Hamilton Gillespie who later introduced golf to Sarasota, building Floridas rst golf course. An inux of wealthy socialites settled the area starting in 1910, setting the tone for Sarasota as a winter location for the cultured crowd which continues year-round to this day. In fact, the per forming and visual arts in Sarasota had been es tablished before most Florida cities even had post oces. During a real estate boom in the s, circus magnate John Ringling and his wife Mable constructed their magnicent winter residence CadZan (House of John), and a museum to house their extensive art collection. e man sion, modeled after the Dodes Palace in Venice reects Ringlings interest in Italian Art & Archi tecture and the museum has one of the largest Baroque collections in the world. Ringling also made Sarasota the winter headquarters of his world-renowned Ringling Brothers Barnum & Baily Circus (http://funandsun.com/1tocf/all gosf/Sarasota/historysar.html. 1/27/2006.) Ringlings CadZan as seen from Sarasota Bay. Source: http://funandsun.com/1tocf/allgosf/Sarasota/his torysar.html. Retrieved on 1/27/2006. Sarasota Bayfront in 1924. Much of the still-existing street grid had already been established. Source: http://www.sarasotagov.com/Planning/NolenPlan/ NolenPlan.html. Retrieved on 1/23/2006.

PAGE 19

BACKGROUND 11 The Downtown Master Plan: Background is Capstone project is being conceived of, in some ways, as an expansion of Sarasotas Downtown Master Plan and will thus incorpo rate some of the ideas and recommendations set forth by it. It is may be useful to make a note of the background of its development. e follow ing is the background information provided by the City of Sarasotas planning department: City of Sarasota was rst laid out in 1886 under the direction of Colonel J. H. Gillespie. In 1924 the well known Massachusetts planner, John No len was hired to update and organize the Citys growth plan. In 1986, following a 1983 report by the American Institute of Architects Regional Urban Design Assistance Team (RUDAT) a downtown master plan (also known as the Community Redevelop ment Area Plan) was completed and adopted by the City. e 1986 Plan provided the framework for many downtown Sarasota projects including: the bay front improvements, Main Street streetscape and storefronts, Five Points Park, Civic Center devel opment, eater and Arts District (TAD) zoning west of Five Points Park, and Commercial/Residen tial Transition (CRT) zoning in the Towles Court area. In October 1999 the City Commission moved to update the Downtown Master Plan. Following a year of intensive civic involvement the City of Sarasota Downtown Master Plan 2020, prepared by the consultant rm of Duany Plater Zyberk was adopted on January 22, 2001 (http://www. sarasotagov.com/Planning/DowntownPlan/Pro jectBackground.html. Retrieved on 11/30/2005.) CAPSTONE SITE Sarasotas Community Redevelopment Area and the expansion of the study area pro posed in 2000 by DPZ. The Capstone site is indicated in red above. Source: http://www.sarasotagov.com/Planning/DowntownPlan/ProjectBackground.html Retrieved on 11/30/2005.

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12 BACKGROUND The Downtown Master Plan: Goals and Objectives A statement of the goals and objec tives for the master plan given by the City of Sarasotas Planning Department: 1) Building Forms Compatible with the Citys Vision: To create building forms of a character and scale that achieve the Citys vision of a City of urban amenities with small town living and feeling. 2)Attractive Public Open Spaces and Pedestrian Ways: To create attractive public open spaces and pedestrian ways that are complemented by adja cent building forms, enhanced by public art, and connect to adjoining neighborhoods. 3)Increased Housing: To increase the proportion of housing and provide a range of housing types consistent with the Citys vision. 4)Economic, Cultural and Governmental Cen ter: To facilitate economic development and ensure that downtown remains the economic, cultural and governmental center of the metro politan area. 5)Supportive Infrastructure: To provide support facilities, including vehicular circulation, park ing, mass transit and signage, in a manner that is functional, economically feasible, and supportive of a pedestrian environment. 6)Economically Feasible: To implement the plan within the scal constraints of the City. Source: http://www.sarasotagov.com/Planning/ DowntownPlan/ProjectBackground.html. Re trieved on 11/30/2005. ese goals demonstrate that the City of Sarasota is committed to developing its down town as not only a commercial center, but also as a residential center that will help to fuel commerce and culture, creating a more vibrant, enjoyable and livable downtown. Designing safe and attractive pedestrian spaces and connections will facilitate more use of places in the downtown area. Providing multiple uses and destinations with reasonable walking distances between them will lessen the need for users to travel by car which means less trac and more people in public, fueling the feeling and image of greater vibrancy that downtown districts are known for. As development expands northward toward the Capstone site, the intended vibrancy and character will hopefully come with it. It is an intention in the planning and design of this Capstone project to connect to the anticipated development through the borrowing of the same goals and objectives planned for the downtown study area where they are deemed relevant and appropriate.

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BACKGROUND 13 Other Projects: Developments in the Study Area to be Considered In addition to the Downtown Master Plan, there are some current and pending develop ments that will be considered in the design of the Capstone site. ey are diagrammed and identi ed numerically as follows: 1) Parks and Connectivity Master Plan 2) Cultural District Master Plan 3) San Marco Mixed-Use Residential Project 4) Broadway Promenade Mixed-Use Residential Project 5) 17th Street Extension Project 6) Capstone Site 7) City Pointe Mixed-Use Center 1 4 5 2 6 3 7

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14 BACKGROUND Other Projects: Parks and Connectivity Master Plan In 2002, EDAW proposed a plan to cre ate connections and recreational opportunities between Sarasotas many green spaces and coastal points of interest. e plan takes into account recommendations made in the 2020 Downtown Master Plan by DPZ. e plan also makes large scale proposals that conceive of future use of in frastructure. One such future use is the proposed rails-to-trails that can be converted from the ex isting railroad. It runs through the middle of the Capstone site. It is also recommended that space be reserved for light rail. Other proposals include: 1) Landscaped parkways that surround the Cap stone site and promote comfortable pedestrian connections. 2) A multi-use recreational trail (MURT) that runs along the bay front. CAPSTONE SITE Parks and Connectivity Master Plan proposed by EDAW in 2002. The Capstone project area is indicated in red. Image and text retrieved from City of Sarasota Planning Dept. website

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BACKGROUND 15 Other Projects: Cultural District Master Plan e Cultural District Master Plan was pro posed by Cooper Robertson Partners in 2004. e primary and secondary study areas are in dicated below. is project is important to note because it will become a major destination and activity center. Its proposed uses should not be repeated in the Capstone project. CAPSTONE SITE The primary and secondary study area for the proposed Cultural District Master Plan. The Capstone project area is indicated in red. Image and text retrieved from City of Sarasota Planning Dept. website

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16 BACKGROUND Other Projects: Cultural District Master Plan GENERAL LAND USE e land use designation in the District is a combination of cultural and mixed use. is designation supports and ex tends to the Bay the urban environment of Downtown Sarasota, ensures devel opment exibility, and encourages both day and night time activities. e plan locates predominant cultural uses on the major frontages of Tamiami Trail and the Bay with mixed use blocks extend ing from the 10th Street Slip through out the site. BUILDINGS 1) Van Wezel 2) Symphony Hall or Museum 3) Museum or Symphony Hall 4) Municipal Auditorium 5) GWIZ 6) Cultural/Retail 7) Cultural/Retail 8) Cultural/Retail 9) Cultural/Museum 10) Retail 11) Retail 12) PublicParking/Galleries/Live Work 13) Visitors Center OPEN SPACE A) Cultural Park B) Tamiami Front C) Mangrove Wetlands D) Wetlands Plaza E) Arts Walk F) Arts Walk G) Van Wezel Patio H) 10th Street Pier I) Payne Terminal Illustrative master plan that outlines proposed land uses. Image and text retrieved from City of Sarasota Planning Dept. website 10 I H 11 11 12 12 3 10 10 10 9 8 7 4 5 F 13 A B C D E E

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BACKGROUND 17 Other Projects: San Marco Mixed-Use Residential Project SAN MARCO FEATURES & AMENITIES 1) 23 condominiums 2) Eleven unique oor plans from 1843-3324 sq. ft. 3) Spacious 3 and 4 bedroom oor plans with 2.5 to 3.5 baths 4) Select residences include skylights, library, me dia room, or natural light art studio 5) 6 story building with residences on top ve oors 6) Views of Sarasota Bay, parks and downtown 7) Covered enclosed rst-oor parking for two cars per residence Source: http://www.sanmarcosarasota.com/fea tures/features.cfm Retrieved on: 4/1/2006 CAPSTONE SITE Cultural District Aerial Photo of San Marco site location. Augmented with graphics to show relative locations of other sites Source: http://www.sanmarcosarasota.com/map/map.cfm Retrieved on: 4/1/2006

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18 BACKGROUND Other Projects: Broadway Promenade Mixed-Use Residential Project BROADWAY PROMENADE FEATURES & AMENITIES 1) Bayfront and park vistas 2) Underground controlled access resident parking 3) Concierge and valet services 4) Club room 5) Fitness center 6) Library / billards room Source:http://www.downtownsaraso tacondos.com/sarasota/condo_broadway_ promenada.asp Retrieved on: 4/1/06 Broadway Promenade site plan. The Capstone site is two block east of this site (East is up on this map). Source: http://www.downtownsarasotacondos.com/sarasota/condo_broad way_promenada.asp Retrieved on: 4/1/06 Perspective Rendering. Source: http://www.downtownsarasotacon dos.com/sarasota/condo_broadway_prom enada.asp Retrieved on: 4/1/06

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BACKGROUND 19 Other Projects: 17th Street Extension Project e 17th Street Extension Project is a pro posal to connect the two sides of 17th Street, presently divided by the railroad, and create a connection that will run from US 41 to the west and Highway 301 to the east. e street runs through the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood. Many are concerned about change in neighbor hood character that the project could bring. CAPSTONE SITE 17th Extension Project

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20 BACKGROUND Other Projects: City Pointe Mixed-Use Development City Pointe is a mixed-use condominium proposal located just south of 10th Street (the Capstone site is just north of 10th Street). e proposal calls for 324 luxury condominium units and retail. Citypointe aerial view. Retrieved on: 1/23/06 Citypointe site plan. Retrieved on: 1/23/06

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BACKGROUND 21 Other Projects: Conclusions e proposal and development of these projects all within a relatively short time frame (the last ve years), point to a development trend in the area. e city seems to be embrac ing the Downtown Master Plan recommenda tions for mixed-use projects and the idea of creating walkable, pedestrian friendly environ ments with plenty of destinations, activities, and interests. e Capstone site is located within a ve to ten-minute walking distance of all of these projects and will undoubtedly become an even more strategic and desirable location once they are completed. e design the site must take these projects into account so that it not only considers its present context, but its future one as well. One important thing to note here is the lack of proposals for aordable housing for those of moderate incomes. e housing proposals all lean to the luxury side of development. is creates a limited dimension to the user groups and leads to an exclusive sort of environment, one that is not for all types of users. To have vibrancy in the downtown area, there must be users of all types and incomes with activities and uses for them all. is is why workforce housing will be part of the Capstone proposal to balance the scales a little and help to create a place where those with moderate incomes can have a chance to live, work, and play.

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22 BACKGROUND Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood With its close proximity to downtown and the bay front, along with its historic char acter, the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood is a diverse community beginning to realize its full potential. As one of Sarasotas oldest neighbor hoods, there are over 500 residences located in this area. Approximately half were built before 1947 and are currently listed as historic re sources. e following pages are taken from the City of Sarasotas Central-Cocoanut Neighbor hood Action Strategy (NAS). e NAS is a program that the city has initiated to give the citys dierent neighborhoods a forum to orga nize themselves around and establish a line of communication with city ocials concerning issues in their respective neighborhoods and methods for solving problems. e neighborhood also encompasses three pub lic parks (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, Mary Dean Park, and Pioneer Park) the Ringling School of Art and Design, and the Action Central Association (a group of busi ness owners along Central Avenue committed to revitalizing this street corridor). Community destinations such as Centennial Park, Whita ker Gateway Park, the Players eater, and Van Wezel all border the Central-Cocoanut neigh borhood. e Central-Cocoanut area, as dened by the Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood Association (CCA), is bound by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Way (27th Street) to the North, 10th Street to the south, the CSX railroad (just east of Cen tral Avenue) to the east, and North Tamiami Trail (US 41) to the west. Diagram of Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood in relation to the Capstone site.

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BACKGROUND 23 Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood MAJOR CONCERNS IDENTIFIED AND DISCUSSED BY CENTRAL-COCOANUT RESIDENTS INCLUDED: 1) Crime and Safety 2) Infrastructure and Related Services 3) Appearance 4) Recreational Opportunities and Green Spaces 5) Housing 6) Land Use and Economic Development THE FOLLOWING ARE THE GOALS AND RECOMMENDED ACTIONS THAT RESULTED FROM THE NAS: CRIME AND SAFETY: GOAL: Change the perception of the neighborhood by increasing overall safety and decreasing illegal activities. RECOMMENDED ACTION Hold neighborhood events in high crime areas to discourage illegal activity. Create safeways for children/pedestrians to travel through the neighborhood. INFRASTRUCTURE AND RELATED SERVICES: GOAL: Improve the overall condition and maintenance of infrastructure and enhance related services within Central-Cocoanut. RECOMMENDED ACTION: Install crosswalks (raised with brick paver layer if feasible) adjacent to parks and other active pedestrian areas. Priority locations include: 11th Street & Cocoanut Avenue, 12th Street & Cocoanut Avenue, 25th Street & Cocoanut Avenue, 15th Street & Central Avenue, and 16th Street & Central Avenue. APPEARANCE: GOAL: Enhance the appearance and curb appeal of Central-Cocoanut and increase community pride through public and private investment. RECOMMENDED ACTION: As funding allows, install gateway entrances including brick pavers and medians where fea sible at: 1. Cocoanut Avenue & 11th Street (south) 2. Central Avenue & 10th Street (south) 3. Cocoanut Avenue & Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Way (north) 4. Central Avenue & Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Way (north) 5. 19th Street & Orange Avenue (east) signage only 6. US 41 & 18th Street (west) signage only 7. US 41 & 14th Street (west) signage only Incorporate gateway features into design of proposed 17th Street Extension Project at neighborhood entrances.

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24 BACKGROUND Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND GREEN SPACES: GOAL: Enhance public green spaces within CentralCocoanut. RECOMMENDED ACTION: Establish events at Pioneer Park to increase positive activity and community pride (e.g. afternoon basketball league, art festival, Green Day, or Get To Know Your Neighbor Day) Consider creating a community garden within Pioneer Park or acquiring a non-buildable va cant lot for a public green space/garden. HOUSING: GOAL: Provide opportunities to improve housing structures within Central-Cocoanut. RECOMMENDED ACTION: None seem to directly relate to this Capstone project. LAND USE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: GOAL: Improve economic opportunities and encour age investment and redevelopment of dis tressed areas while maintaining the character of the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood. RECOMMENDED ACTION: Discourage/amend the existing Community Oce/Institutional future land use designa tion in Central-Cocoanut to prevent the fur ther proliferation of social service uses. Initiate through 2004 EAR (Evaluation and Appraisal Report) process. As part of 2004 EAR process, encourage the City to establish a future land use designation within Central-Cocoanut which allows for mixed-use development with an emphasis on community/workforce housing. Consider the area west of Orange Avenue and north of 10th Street and refer to Action Strategy 8.6 of the Future Land Use Chapter in the 1998 Saraso ta City Plan to initiate this planning process. e City will engage in discussions with the concrete plant and other adjacent landowners in this area to commence this recommended action. Promote 10th Street as a gateway to the wa terfront and establish connection with the cultural district through compatible land uses. In order to accomplish this, amend future land use designations where necessary through the 2004 EAR process. Ensure compatibility of residential uses in the neighborhood Single-family in the center and multi-family and commercial around the periphery. Source: City of Sarasota Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood Action Strategy

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BACKGROUND 25 Central-Cocoanut Neighborhood CONCLUSIONS BASED ON THE CEN TRAL COCOANUT NAS: e Central-Cocoanut NAS is, as intended, very telling of the wants and needs of the neighborhood. ere are program elements that emerge as very possible proposals for the Capstone project site. ese are: 1) Community Garden 2) Very visible public space that gives the com munity a place to gather and take back the street in the high-crime area of Central Av enue. 3) Flexible plaza space that allows for larger scale gatherings such as farmers markets, art shows or festivals, with good lighting to dis courage mis-use at night. 4) Trac calming devices such as paved gate way areas with historic markers and raised crosswalks. 5) A mixed-use development that emphasizes workforce housing. 6) Discourage social-services 7) Safeways for children and other users. 8) A high quality streetscape, especially along Central that establishes a new level of curb ap peal. 9) An open and exible lawn space that gives users (especially children) a large and safe area to play games and hold activities on.

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26 BACKGROUND Brownfields: Definition and Issues Concerning Capstone Site BROWNFIELD DEFINITION: Properties that are under-utilized or aban doned because of the presence or perception of environmental contamination (Russ, Planning and Redeveloping Brownelds V). is Capstone site is currently used as cement and concrete plant. is will change in the rel atively near future as growth and development in the area creates a conict of uses and cause the site to no longer mesh with its context. e owners will undoubtedly be approached to sell the property as property values rise. Pollution threats associated with cement pro duction are stated as follows: Cement manufacturing produces a variety of solid process wastes, air emissions, and waste water streams, but most of its contaminants are released in cement kiln dusts (CKD). e main components in kiln dusts are: Aluminum Silica Clay Metallic Oxides CKD may also contain trace amounts of: Dioxins Furans Cadmium Lead Selenium Radionucleides Cancer risks of concern are mainly caused by exposure to arsenic in CKD, and there is also a possible cancer threat in kiln dusts that contain dioxins (Source: www.hsrc.org/hsrc/html/ tosc/sswtosc. Retrieved on: 1/18/06) A description of pollution associated with con crete production is as follows: Concrete manufacturing generates air particu late emissions from cement and aggregate dusts. Other sources of contamination in concrete plants are solvents used in cleaning operations and the application of nishes to completed products. Solvents can threaten water quality in nearby communities when they are released and seep into groundwater. (Source: www. hsrc.org/hsrc/html/tosc/sswtosc. Retrieved on: 1/18/06).

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BACKGROUND 27 Brownfields: Pollution Locations on the Capstone Site For this project, it is simply not feasible to have an environmental assessment done to pinpoint where pollution is located on the site. erefore, it will be assumed that polluted areas do exist and that they are located at the point sources that seem oriented towards ce ment and/or concrete production. ese areas are diagrammed below. ese are the areas that this Capstone project will be concerned with in terms of browneld clean-up and remediation. Point source pollution diagram.

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28 BACKGROUND Brownfields: Clean-Up Strategy e EPA outlines a recommended process for proceeding with a browneld clean-up. If an environmental consulting service were avail able, this is the process that could likely be fol lowed: 1) Select the browneld site 2) Phase 1 Site Assessment and Due Dilignen ce: Obtain background information of site to determine extent of contamination and legal and nancial risks. If there seems to be no contamina tion, begin redevelopment activities. If there is a high level of contamina tion, reassess the viability of the project. 3) Phase 2 Site Investigation: Sample the site to identify the type, quantity, and extent of the contamination. If the contamination does not pose health or environmental risk, begin redevelop ment activities. If there is a high level of contamina tion, reassess the viability of the project 4) Evaluate remedial options: Compile and as sess possible remediation alternatives. If the remedial options do not appear to be feasible, determine whether the develop ment is a viable option. 5) Develop Remedy Implementation Plan: Coordinate with stockholders to design a rem edy implementation plan. 6) Remedy Implementation Plan: If additional contamination is discovered during the remedy implementation process, return to the site as sessment phase to determine the extent of the contamination. 7) Begin redevelopment activities. e Phase 1 Site Assessment typically identi es: 1) Potential contaminants that remain in and around the site 2) Likely pathways that the contaminants may move 3) Potential risks to the environment and hu man health that exist along the migration path ways Source: EPA/625/R-00/009, November 2001, Technical Approaches to Characterizing and Cleaning up Browneld Sites For this project, the primary concern will be with pollutants below the soil reacting with in ltrated storm water. Once below the soil, the storm water tends to migrate laterally in the di rection of the of the topography. In the case of this projects site that direction is towards Sara sota Bay. For these reasons, topography, water table, and soil drainage characteristics will be analyzed in terms of their relevance to clean-up concerns.

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BACKGROUND 29 Brownfields: Clean-Up Technologies e EPA outlines the primary factors that should inuence the selection of a clean-up technology. ey are as follows: 1) Types of contamination present 2) Clean-up and land reuse goals 3) Length of time required to reach clean-up goals 4) Post-treatment care needed 5) Budget e intended use of the browneld site will drive the level of clean-up needed to make the site safe for redevelopment and resuse. Source: EPA/625/R-00/009, 26. Since the project site is intended for general use by the public for living, working, and rec reation, a high level of clean-up and/or reme diation will be required. Given the anticipated development in the area, the time frame will have to be relatively short as well. erefore, a clean-up technology that is highly eective and fast is the optimum choice. REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES THAT WILL BE CONSIDERED FOR THIS PROJ ECT: 1) Containment Technologies: is type does not remove contami nation, but contains it on-site. ese include: Caps Liners Slurry Walls ese technologies require mainte nance and monitoring regularly. 2) Clean-Up Technologies (2 Categories): Ex Situ: Treats contaminates that have been removed and moved to another location. In Situ: Treats contaminates in place. Examples: phyto-remediation, bio-remediation and, soil ushing, air-sparg ing, and treatment walls. Source: EPA/625/R-00/009, November 2001, Technical Approaches to Characterizing and Cleaning up Browneld Sites CONCLUSION: Given the high water table and likelihood of migration of contaminants over time, leav ing the contaminants in place and containing them, as well as maintaining the integrity of the required technologies may not be feasible. erefore, it will be recommended that all point sources of pollution be excavated and treated o-site.

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31 INVENTORY and ANALYSIS chapter 03:

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32 INVENTORY and ANALYSIS ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Land Use: Existing Types is map shows the dierent land uses around the cement plant site, shown here inside the black circle. Note the commercial urban core of downtown to the south and the residential uses the north. To the east are industrial uses. e cement plant site is a strategic hub between all of them. e site is surrounded by four dierent land uses, each having a dierent character and typical use. Each side of the design proposal will have to ad dress this in some way. e south side may have a more commercial character, the north and west, a more residential one, and the east a more indus trial one. Having these four characters around the same site may lend itself to a mixed-use de sign that serves as a transitional hub between all of them. E X I S T I N G L A N D U S E S P R O J E C T S I T E R A I L R O A D W A T E R M A J O R R O A D P A R K C O M M E R C I A L & S E R V I C E U P L A N D H A R D W O O D F O R E S T W E T L A N D C O N I F E R O U S F O R E S T F R E S H W A T E R M A R S H E S O P E N L A N D C O M M U N I C A T I O N S H A R D W O O D C O N I F E R O U S M I X E D W E T L A N D F O R E S T M I X E D U T I L I T I E S R E S I D E N T I A L L O W D E N S I T Y R E S I D E N T I A L M E D D E N S I T Y R E S I D E N T I A L H I G H D E N S I T Y R E C R E A T I O N A L I N S T I T U T I O N A L I N D U S T R I A L S C H O O L 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s

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INVENTORY and ANALYSIS 33 ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Land Use: Parks e cement plant site has twenty-three parks within an approximate two mile radius of it. Eight of them are within walking distance. All of them have a passive character. Seeing that the cement plant site has plenty of parks already around it, it wouldnt make much sense to propose that the site be used primarily as a park. E X I S T I N G P A R K S A N D W A L K I N G D I S T A N C E P A R K C e n t r a l P o i n t P R O J E C T S I T E P R O P O S E D R A I L S T O T R A I L S P A R K 1 / 4 M i l e R a d i u s 1 / 2 M I L E B U F F E R 1 / 4 M I L E B U F F E R W A T E R M A J O R R O A D S E C O N D A R Y R O A D P A R C E L S 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s

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34 INVENTORY and ANALYSIS ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Transportation Structure e cement plant site is bound on all but one side by secondary roads and is within one mile of the City of Sarasotas major arterial high ways. e rail line runs through the middle of the site. Note the lack of connection between the two sides of the rail line. e overall pat tern is a fairly regular grid. It can be seen that the site has direct access to Sarasotas major roads and has strong axial con nections to the north and south sides of Sarasota. e scale of the roads adjacent to the site should not be that of a highway, nor that of a quiet residential street. ey should be re-designed, at least around the project site, as pedestrian friendly collector streets that aid to bring users to the site by more than just automobile. ere is the potential to propose another through street on the northern boundary of the site, increasing connectivity and street frontage. M A J O R R O A D S S E C O N D A R Y R O A D S S T R E E T G R I D a n d R A I L R O A D M A J O R R O A D S E C O N D A R Y R O A D P R O J E C T S I T E W A T E R S T R E E T G R I D R A I L R O A D 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s

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INVENTORY and ANALYSIS 35 ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Transportation Structure e site is served well by bus and car. Bicycle and pedestrian connections to and around the site is relatively weak. e rail line will be con verted to a rails-to-trails path and possibly to a light rail line in the much longer term. ere are three bus stops adjacent to the site on the eastern side and three more are one street away on Orange AVE to the west. is diagram shows that there is plenty of op portunities for users to make use of a variety of modal types. All types and of their necessary requirements will be incorporated into the de sign proposal. Improvements to the pedestrian connectivity and environment will be proposed as well. E X I S T I N G M O B I L I T Y I N V E N T O R Y P R O J E C T S I T E R A I L R O A D W A T E R M A J O R R O A D S E C O N D A R Y R O A D S T R E E T G R I D ( B U S S T O P B I C Y C L E L A N E ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s

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36 INVENTORY and ANALYSIS ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Natural Conditions is map shows the project sites position in relation to the areas overall topography and general drainage pattern. e site rests on the middle ground between the areas high and low elevations. e Central-Cocoanut neighbor hood is located predominately on the lower elevations to the direct north of the project site, which would explain the areas tendency to ood during heavy rains. e site is likely to have a considerable amount of water passing over it during a heavier storm event, which would be a regular occurrence during summer months. erefore it would be advantageous to propose a design that mini mizes the amount of impervious surface that storm water travels over during an event, capturing it incrementally in multiple areas, minimizing the rate and volume that is brought to bear upon any one collection point. Also, if the sites potential below-ground pollution is excavated, preventing it from mixing with inltrated water will not be an issue. In terms of ooding, incorporating basin sizes that can accommodate larger events will help to alleviate this issue. D I G I T A L E L E V A T I O N M O D E L W A T E R P R O J E C T S I T E 5 F O O T C O N T O U R L I N E S T o p o g r a p h y V a l u e H i g h : 4 0 L o w : 0 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s

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INVENTORY and ANALYSIS 37 ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Natural Conditions e sites soil is poorly drained. e area di rectly east of the site is very poorly drained. is analysis shows that, because of the poorly drained soils upland, even more water could be moving across the site during a larger storm event. S O I L D R A I N A G E C L A S S I F I C A T I O N 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s R A I L R O A D 5 F O O T C O N T O U R L I N E S M A J O R R O A D W A T E R P R O J E C T S I T E P O O R V E R Y P O O R M O D E R A T E L Y W E L L S O M E W H A T P O O R N O R A T I N G G I V E N S O M E W H A T P O O R / M O D W E L L M I X

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38 INVENTORY and ANALYSIS ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Natural Conditions is map shows the depth to the water table during the drier months of the year. is will translate into a storm water design that must incorporate shallow basins that cover a wid er area because of the greater potential of storm water coming from o site. W A T E R T A B L E D E P T H : S E A S O N A L L O W 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s R A I L R O A D 5 F O O T C O N T O U R L I N E S M A J O R R O A D W A T E R P R O J E C T S I T E W A T E R T A B L E D E P T H 0 5 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 5 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

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INVENTORY and ANALYSIS 39 ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Natural Conditions is map shows the depth to the water table during the wetter months of the year. e same general recommendations apply here as did in the previous analysis. W A T E R T A B L E D E P T H : S E A S O N A L H I G H 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s R A I L R O A D 5 F O O T C O N T O U R L I N E S M A J O R R O A D W A T E R P R O J E C T S I T E W A T E R T A B L E D E P T H 2 1 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 0 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

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40 INVENTORY and ANALYSIS ANALYSIS: INVENTORY: Users is map shows the population density within walking distance of the project site. e most density is directly south of the site. ere is moderate density located to the north, with in the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood. e general lack of density to the east and west is indicative of the land uses located there. Den sity to the west will increase in coming years as the San Marco and Broadway Promenade proj ects become established. Most of the users of this project site will probably come from the Central-Cocoanut neighborhood. e nonpopulated area that the cement plant site is located within could be a bridge between its north and south, invigorat ing the area with more users if moderate density housing is proposed. If those users are of moderate incomes (as desired), a socio-economic transition could also be made between the relatively poor residents of Central-Cocoanut and the auent retirees living near the downtown core and waterfront. A new type/class of user would enrich the user mix as well as expand the range of viable commercial mar kets in the area. P O P U L A T I O N D E N S I T Y W I T H I N W A L K I N G D I S T A N C E P R O J E C T S I T E V a l u e H i g h : 1 1 5 8 8 7 0 0 1 L o w : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 / 4 M I L E B U F F E R 1 / 2 M I L E B U F F E R M A J O R R O A D W A T E R S T R E E T G R I D 0 1 2 3 4 0 5 M i l e s

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43 SYNTHESIS chapter 04:

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44 SYNTHESIS Synthesis: Overall Scale is drawing seeks to communicate the various factors inuencing the design of the Capstone site at the overall urban scale. LEGEND Dead-End Neighborhood Gateway Civic Node Bus Stop Sarasota Bay OVERALL URBAN STRATEGIES SYNTHESIS DIAGRAM NOT TO SCALE Fruitville RD BLVD of the Arts M.L.K. Memorial Way 17th ST 12th ST 10th ST HWY 301 US 41 / Tamiami Trail Central AVE Cocoanut AVE Orange AVE Osprey AVE

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SYNTHESIS 45 Synthesis: Site Scale is drawing diagrams existing factors, potential functions, and the underlying struc ture that a design concept can evolve from. LEGEND Potential Entry Point Neighborhood Gateway Bus Stop

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MASTER PLAN chapter 05:

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48 MASTER PLAN Program e program has been derived from the Goals and Objectives, Background, Analysis, and Synthesis portions of this study. Many of the elements are taken from the suggestions in the CentralCocoanut NAS. Others are the recom mendations based on housing needs, stormwater strategies, and intuitions in regards to the creation of certain func tional relationships. PROGRAM LIST: 1. Community garden 2. Open lawn space 3. Public gathering plaza 4. Rails-to-trails path and connection 5. Trail head 6. Pedestrian and bicycle-only connec tions 7. East-west linear park space 8. Rain gardens 9. Detention basins 10. On-street parking 11. Buer on southern boundary of the project site 12. A central gathering space 13. Mixed-use residential (oce and neighborhood-serving retail on the ground oor) 14. Live-work housing 15. Rowhouses 16. Apartments buildings 17. Surface parking

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MASTER PLAN 49 Concept One

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50 MASTER PLAN Concept Two

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MASTER PLAN 51 Concept Three

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52 MASTER PLAN Final Concept

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MASTER PLAN 53 Master Plan

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54 MASTER PLAN Master Plan Components: Building Types 3-Story Mixed-Use 2-Story Rowhouses 2-Story Live/Work 2-Story Rowhouses 3-Story Apartments Community Center Shade Structure Garden Shed

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MASTER PLAN 55 Master Plan Components: Pedestrian Circulation

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56 MASTER PLAN Master Plan Components: Trees

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MASTER PLAN 57 Master Plan Components: Storm Water Basins

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58 MASTER PLAN Master Plan Enlargement