Civil civilities : the electronic newsletter presented by the UF Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering

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Civil civilities : the electronic newsletter presented by the UF Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering
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Civil Civilities

The electronic newsletter presented by the
UF Department of Civil &
Coastal Engineering


Winter Edition Volume 1, Issue 1


Dr. Masters receives NSF award


The Department of Civil and
Coastal Engineering is pleased to
announce that Dr. Forrest J.
Masters has been selected to
receive a National Science
Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early
Career Development (CAREER)
Award. The CAREER Program is
the NSF's most prestigious award
in support of junior faculty who
exemplify the role of teacher-
scholars through outstanding
research, excellent education and
the integration of education and
research within the context of the
mission of their organizations.
The research objective of
Dr. Masters' project is to define
tropical cyclone surface wind,
wind-driven rain and wind load
characteristics in the built
environment. The goal is to deter-


mine how
localized,
coherent
features
occurring
in the
"rough-
wall"
turbulent


UNIVERSITY of

F I FLORIDA
"The Thing" (pictured on left) at Well Hall was
professor Duane Ellifritt's conceptual idea to assist
students learn steel design concepts. The idea has
spread worldwide and Ellifritt (pictured below with
.i' i', ,, i .I ., I as recently
,,,. .... Il_ l ., ..... i.- titute of Steel
Construction for his
life-long contribu-
tions. Dr. Ellifritt
now holds the title
of Professor Emeri-
tus since retiring
from the Depart-


u er:ra t w re civ

Students receive award... Inside this
issue:
Two civil students, one graduate and one
undergraduate were presented with the Masters receives NSF 2
award


Dr. Forrest Masters Attributes of A Gator Engineer award.
This is a new recognition program and


boundary layer and larger-scale
convective features (e.g., meso-
vortices, rainband core down-
drafts) influence surface wind
field characteristics and loading
on low-rise structures. Florida
Coastal Monitoring Program
instrumented towers retrofitted
to collect turbulence and wind-
driven profile measurements
continuedd on page 2)


Department receives significant gift to


the awards recognize the outstanding con-
tributions of our undergraduate and PhD
students towards the ideals of the attributes
to which all who us connected to Gator
Engineering aspire: Creativity, Leader-
ship, Integrity, Professional Excellence,
and Service to the Global Community. A
selection committee of 14 faculty, staff,
and students had the difficult task of evalu-
ating many excellent nominations, all de-
serving of recognition. However, the stu-
dents selected for (continued on page 2)


support our Combined Bachelors/Masters program

(4-1 program)
Neil Schopke, a former civil engineering graduate, pledged over one million dollars
to fund our 4-1 program. His inspiration came from two significant individuals in his
life, Byron Spangler one of his former geotechnical professors at the University of Virgil Ramage (on left)
Florida, and his Junior high school principal, Virgil Ramage. In Schopke's own words he and Byron Spangler
states: "I grew up very poor with very little (continued on page 2)


Kathy Caldwell
named to Structural
Engineering
2010 Power
list
Kathy Caldwell, P.E.,
member of ASCE,
has been named to
gostructural.com 's
Power List for 2010.
Kathy currently
serves as the Univer-


sity of Florida's ASCE chapter advi- structure ASCE's annual conference.


sor and she is an adjunct faculty
member. Kathy is also the current
president to the American
Society of Civil Engineers
where she represents over
140,000 civil engineers
worldwide. Her goals
within ASCE are to address
the present challenges of
civil engineers including the
slumping economy, support
The Vision for Civil Engi-
neering in 2025, and re-


Kathy earned her degrees in structural
and construction engineering and has
many years of experience in industry.
She is president of Caldwell, Cook &
Associates and is a member of Engi-
neers without Borders, the Florida
Institute of Consulting Engineers, and
the Florida Engineering Society. The
administration, faculty and staff
within our department and the univer-
sity applaud Kathy on this recogni-
tion!


Department receives
gift (continued)
Students receive
award (continued)

Highway Capacity
Software update
Vulnerability of
Resident Housing
Conference atten-
dances/presentations

CMS Updates

CCE helps nation
with storm waves

Recent Publications
& Congratulations!


Special points of interest:


* Visit
us on


Visit our Hurcane Research page at
http //www facebook corn/
UFHurrcaneResearch9ref mf


SVisit our
depart-
ment's
website


SVisitthe UF Homepage
* Visit the UF College of Enmneering



Managing Editor
Nancy E McIlrath-Glanville,
MTd MA


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Masters receives NSF Award (continued from page 1)

will be deployed in coastal suburban between the wind engineering and atmos-
communities, where the most damaging pheric science disciplines. The project spe-
winds are expected to occur. These cifically addresses the high
observational assets will be lo- priority issue, Interaction of
cated inside mobile Doppler radar Hurricanes with Engineering
networks deployed by the Diital Structures, identified by the
Hurricane Consortium to deter- National Science Board. The
mine if convective features aloft outcomes will benefit catas-
modulate the ground level wind [ trophe, wind tunnel and
structure. These data will be cou- computational modeling,
pled with pressure measurements codes and standards, cost ef-
on single-family homes to directly fective mitigation, and sus-
relate peak load conditions to the tainable design.
full spectrum of the wind effects. In the educational component
The results of this research will have a of the project, middle school teachers from
direct impact on and strengthen interactions project, middle school teachers from
direct impact on and strengthen interactions under-resourced schools located in hurricane-

Department received gift (continued from page 1)


prone areas will participate in a pilot initia-
tive, the Hurricane Hazard Immersion Pro-
gram (HHIP), which fosters 6-8th grade cur-
riculum development through annual training
and active participation in the research. The
HHIP is designed to be sustainable long be-
yond the performance date of the project,
targets underrepresented groups, and devel-
ops a culture of hazard preparedness and
proactive mitigation among the next genera-
tion of homeowners. Over 7500 students
living along the hurricane prone coast will be
exposed to curricula developed and taught by
the 25 teachers participating in the HHIP.


opportunity without the GI bill to ever get an only one arm."
college education. After completing my tour Schopke also
of duty in the Air Force overseas where I was "During my stu
privileged to participate in the U.K. football Department I h
program well enough to get a letter from my fessor Spangler
coach to bring to Coach Wood-
ruff, then head coach, at UF. "This may not sound like
He was gracious enough to let
me walk-on in the freshman class of 1958 and always would s
that is how I got to the University of Florida." but you will lat
He also stated to UF President Bernard Ma- ates who came
chen "Mr. Ramage was my junior high the time most o
school principal, graduating from the Univer- ony of course v
sity of Florida, obtaining both a bachelor and about our futun
master's degree in mathematics and shortly ever, what our
thereafter became the youngest school princi- true to me. I rec
pal in Polk County. While at the University his contribution
of Florida he also starred as a tennis player of my profession
not losing a single match his senior year. fessors were no
This may not sound like too great of an ac- because I had h
complishment except this man had other, but if I h,


speaks proudly about Spangler.
dies in the Civil Engineering
ad the opportunity to have Pro-
in several of my courses, and he


contributed most to my life while at college it
would have to be Professor Spangler." He
also stated that Professor Spangler helped him
obtain his first job and that "it was a perfect
match." Schopke believes that these two men


too great of an accomplishment except this man had only one arm."


ay "You may not like me now,
er." I heard several recent gradu-
back say the same thing but at
f us was going through the ag-
fork and really didn't care much
e feelings. As time went by how-
predecessors said became very
illy did appreciate this man and
into those early formative years
nal life. It wasn't that other pro-
t top notch, and maybe it was
im in more classes than any
ad to choose one professor that


were the most significant in his life. He
hopes that "the Ramage Spangler Fund will
inspire others as they can to help the Univer-
sity and perhaps recognize the educators most
significant in their lives." His gift, intended
to fund scholarships to encourage under-
graduates to continue their education in Civil
and Coastal Engineering at the University of
Florida, was dispersed to the first round of
recipients this past Fall 2010. Without his
generosity, many of these students would not
be able to continue their education. Our hat's
off to this dedicated Gator!


Students receive award (continued from page 1)


I odd Davis is pictured on the tar lett and Melissa
Brinson (blue dress) is pictured fifth from the right
Additional recipients pictured are from other UF
engineering departments


Page 2


This great honor exemplifies these attributes. The two students both received the award for Integ-
rity. They were Melissa Brinson (undergraduate) and Todd Davis (doctoral student.) Brinson is
pursuing her bachelor's degree in civil and coastal engineering. Her list of activities in the College
of Engineering seems endless: Engineering Ambassadors, Engineering Day, Engineering Student
Advisory Council, Freshman Leadership Engineering Group, Gatorship 2010, Benton Engineering
Council. In both her classroom and extracurricular activities, Melissa has a reputation for not tak-
ing short cuts and for inspiring her fellow students by her honest and truthful leadership. Davis, too
has exemplified the ideals of the integrity of the engineering profession. Pursuing doctoral studies
in civil engineering, he has courageously adhered to the UF Honor Code and is described as having
the ethic of integrity and honesty permeating every aspect of his personal and academic life. His
doctoral research focuses on long-term performance of adhesive anchors in concrete. Upon gradua-
tion, he intends to continue his work in this area in collaboration with engineers in academia and the
international arena in both the private and non-profit sectors. Congratulations to these exemplary
students!


Civil Civilities


-zrre








Highway Capacity Software (HCS) McTrans Center


Work on HCS 2010 to implement the
updated procedures coming in the 2010
Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) is al-
most complete. McTrans' goal is to be
ready with the HCS upgrade to coincide
with 2010 HCM publication, scheduled
for January 2011.
This major upgrade includes a compre-
hensive module to implement the new
procedures for signalized intersections,
with further expansion to add urban
streets and interchange ramp terminals
coming this spring. This new module is
built from an entirely new program archi-
tecture to take advantage of the latest pro-
gramming techniques and has certainly
been the biggest challenge.
This completely redesigned Urban
Streets module (Streets) will include Sig-
nalized Intersections (Signals) and Inter-
change Ramp Terminals (Interchanges) in
one integrated program to implement the
common procedures prescribed in the
2010 HCM for these three applications
within HCS. The new structure will not
only make implementing these complex
new procedures much more efficient, it
will also provide maximum flexibility to
the user with
many alterna- ....
tives built-
into the inter-
face.
McTrans'
goal is to .-
blend the
familiar
screens with
new options -
to make the
transition for
users easier,
while adding new and innovative func-
tionality. Overhauled modules for
Roundabouts and Weaving provide for
the other major changes in these method-
ologies while retaining the traditional
HCS look and feel.
Classic Mode
The more familiar split screen has been
organized to permit the most common
data entry on one view without having to
scroll, while providing for detailed data


E


options below and the dynamic report in the More New Features ...
lower pane. One-touch animation for multiple sig-
nals in a street analysis


-.... -
- -'


: -. .. .. .


Quick Entry, Quick Lanes and Quick
Phases
To expand features for more efficient and
more intuitive data coding, McTrans has
added a more comprehensive preliminary
screen (Quick Entry) to establish a set of
data values to begin an analysis. Users can
even design their own set of customized
initial values and settings.
A new graphical tool (Quick Phases) pro-
vides for entering NEMA Phasing data with
a companion Sequential Phasing graphic to
help in this
S- .- transition. The
...... e. lane configura-
tion tool (Quick
Lanes) has been
retained as it
functioned in
HCS2000 and
HCS+.
Visual Mode


This new
screen facili-
tates locating
intersections (both signalized and access
points) for the urban street geographically.
It also provides a set of tabs to access data
for each intersection as it is selected from
this view. Each tab presents a different sec-
tion of the input data organized into general,
intersection, traffic, phasing, timing, seg-
ment, access points and other detailed data.
A context menu is provided to supplement
tool bar access. Delay and LOS results are
displayed by approach for any selected in-
tersection.


* One-touch optimiza-
tion using TRANSYT-
7F on an arterial

* Replication of inter-
section data to facili-
tate coding multiple
similar signals along
an urban street facility


Multiple-period
analysis for analyzing
congested conditions
for signals, interchanges and streets

* SpyGlass to view details of the proce-
dure not documented directly in the
HCM, only in engine code

* Customizable modular templates for
reusable data

* Customizable and redesigned formatted
reports

* Time-space diagram to visualize signal
coordination

Major Overhauls
Roundabouts (HCM Chapter 21)
This HCS module has been upgraded to
include the ability to analyze one-lane or
two-lane roundabouts for results that
include delay and level of service based
on US conditions. Multilane entries and
exits, as well as right-turn yielding or
non-yielding bypass lanes, are also ac-
commodated. The procedure can deal
with U-turns and estimates lane utiliza-
tion within a multilane roundabout.
Freeway Weaving Segments (HCM
Chapter 12)
Lane-changing rates as direct measures
of turbulence are now key to this analy-
sis. Weaving and non-weaving speeds
are computed for various lane configura-
tion, including one-sided and two-sided
weaving, with maximum weaving
(continued on page 4)


Volume 1, Issue 1


Page 3


T~~








UF CCE structures faculty address vulnerability of
residential housing to hurricane winds I


Field and laboratory experiments are conducted to quantify extreme
wind loads and the performance of building components in order to iden-
tify weaknesses and propose cost effective solutions. One specific pro-
ject is outlined below.
Scale model tests in boundary layer wind tunnels have been the primary
tool for the development of the design wind loads prescribed in ASCE 7.
However, questions have been raised concerning the ability of wind
tunnel methods to replicate the hurricane wind environment and to deter-
mine peak loads on low rise structures in hurricanes.
This research, titled "Full-scale
and Modeled Hurricane Wind
Loads on Residential Structures"
and sponsored by the National
Science Foundation, will address
two outstanding issues in the
development of risk consistent
construction practice in hurri-
cane prone coastal regions. First
it will quantify the precision and
accuracy of wind tunnel model-
ing of extreme wind loads on
low rise structures, and second it will develop the proper representation
of the approaching turbulent hurricane wind field. Both efforts will util-
ize an existing hurricane wind velocity and pressure load database col-
lected in-field by UF personnel (including Ph.D. candidate, Juan Antonio


Balderrama, Professors David Prevatt, Forrest Masters and Kurt Gur-
ley) during eleven hurricane seasons.
Four wind tunnel facilities will independently produce estimates of
loads on scale model houses. Results will be compared with real hurri-
cane wind load data measured on the models' full scale counterpart.
The upstream turbulence employed by the wind tunnel facilities will be
compared with turbulence data directly measured during land falling
hurricanes.
The research will produce evidence to foster the professional consen-
sus required to validate or suggest changes to current experimental
wind load evaluation methods and prescriptive wind load practice. Re-
search outcomes will improve the scientific methods used to mitigate
loss of life and property and promote coastal development consistent
with an accurate view of the wind damage risk. Reducing damage and
post-storm recovery time via risk consistent construction results in
shorter down time for coastal businesses, improving the economic sus-
tainability of hurricane prone coastal regions. Engineering students will
participate in the research, and findings will be incorporated into the
wind engineering curriculum.


Highway Capacity Software (HCS) McTrans Center (continued from page 3)

lengths determined. Capacities are produced for ideal and prevailing conditions. Level of service is based on density, except for v/c ratios over 1.0.

Other Significant Changes
Two-Lane Highways (HCM Chapter 15) A third class of two-lane highways is introduced for roadways that serve moderately developed areas
passing through small towns or developed areas. The analysis of bicycles along the two-lane roadway is also included. The two-way analysis is
eliminated in favor of a weighted average of directional results.
Basic Freeway Segments (HCM Chapter 11) New speed-flow curves are implemented with the modified module, with no interpolation between
free-flow speeds. The adjustments to base free-flow speed have also been changed to include ramp density and eliminate the adjustment for num-
ber of lanes. A permanent curve for 75 mi/h free-flow speeds has been installed.
Off-Street Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities (HCM Chapter 23) This brand new module within HCS will provide for one program to analyze
pedestrians and bicycle on off-street facilities, including the results of FHWA research. the results include capacity and level of service for walk-
ways, stairways, exclusive off-street bicycle paths and shared-use paths.
For information on additional changes to the HCS and on the McTrans Center, please visit the McTrans Center website at http://mctrans.ce.ufl.edu
for more updated information.

Sixth Annual Career Planning and Resume Workshop held

For the past six years, the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering has provided our students with the op-
portunity to meet one on one with employers. All of our students, from the first term freshman to the final term
PhD student are encouraged to attend the event in order to: form a solid network prior to graduation; apply and
compete for internships; have their resumes critiqued and reviewed; practice their interviewing skills; and actu-
ally compete for open positions within the companies represented if they will be graduating soon. Prior to the
initial event six years ago, the former department chair was approached by a few employer representatives and 2010 student participants
asked if such a forum could take place. Six years later and even during this slumping economy, the event is still
highly successful and is valued by both the employer participants and the students. This year the event took place on February 8. We were hon-
ored to have twelve companies participate and they were: Ardaman & Associates, Baskerville-Donovan, Inc. Coastal Planning & Engineering,
Inc., HNTB, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc., Parsons Brinckerhoff, PCL Constructors, Inc., R, S&H, Tensar Corporation, Walsh/Archer-
Western Contractors, The Wantman Group and WilsonMiller Stantec. Our appreciation and gratitude goes out to these companies for their dedica-
tion and support that they provide to our students and our department!


Page 4


Civil Civilities


~,~ ~I








Conference presentations: past, present and future


International Conference of
Chinese Transportation
Professionals
Two civil engineering faculty members,
Scott Washburn and Yafeng Yin,
attended the ICCTP conference and also





4L S-


visited the Beijing Institute of Technol-
ogy (BIT) to meet with faculty and
graduate students and give presentations.
They were in China during the week of
August 2-7, 2010.

Use of Reclaimed Asphalt
Pavement in Concrete
Professor Mang Tia has been working
with the Florida Department of Trans-
portation in investigating the feasibility
of using reclaimed asphalt pavement
(RAP) as aggregate in concrete to pro-
duce a more flexible concrete for use in
concrete pavement. Tia and Ph.D. stu-
dent Nabil Hossiney presented the re-
sults of this research in a paper entitled
"Concrete Containing RAP for Use in
Concrete Pavement" at the International
Conference on Sustainable Concrete
Pavements, September 15-17, 2010, Sac-
ramento, Calif.

Israeli Society of Civil
Engineers
Zohar Herbsman, Ph.D., professor
emeritus, civil engineering, was the key-
note speaker at the annual meeting of the
Israeli Society of Civil Engineers. Eight
hundred engineers attended the lecture
which received great reviews and
prompted an invitation to give lectures to
other organizations in Israel. Herbsman
was also invited to be a visiting profes-
sor at the Ben Gurion University in Is-
rael.


Congestion Pricing Conference
The Innovations in Pricing of Transporta-
tion Systems was held on May 13-14,
2010 at the Royal Plaza Hotel in the Walt
Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista,
Fla. The focus of the conference was to
introduce new market-based approaches
to encourage efficiency in transportation
systems and to devise better financing
schemes for improving or enhancing
these systems. The conference consisted
of plenary sessions by distinguished
speakers and more than 70 presentations
from practitioners and academics from
diverse transportation agencies, nonprofit
organizations and universities. Twelve
countries were represented among the
presenters with backgrounds in econom-
ics, transportation, civil engineering, op-
erations research, industrial engineering,
urban planning and the social sciences.
The CMS co-sponsored the conference


along with the National Science Founda-
tion, the Transportation Research Board,
the UF College of Engineering, and the
University of Florida.

Coastal Engineering Faculty In-
vited to Present at FAO Work-
shops
Amoldo Valle-Levinson, Ph.D., professor
of coastal engineering, was an invited
presenter at two workshops sponsored by
the Food & Agriculture Organization of
the United Nations (FAO.) The first was
on August 26, 2010 in Estero Real, Nica-
ragua for the workshop on carrying ca-
pacity for aquaculture. The second, held
in Stirling, Scotland on December 6,
2010, was on aquaculture site selection
and carrying capacity estimates for inland
and coastal water bodies.


Civil Engineering Professor in-
vited to present at International
Workshops
Theodor "Ted" Krauthammer, professor of
structural engineering, recently presented
at the Modeling and Behavior of Light-Weight
Protective Structures workshop held at the
SIM Lab, Norwegian University of Sci-
ence and Technology in Trondheim, Nor-
way on December 1-3, 2010. His presenta-
tion was titled "Investigations of Structur-
ally Composite Panels for Protective Sys-
tems." He also presented at the Interna-
tional Workshop on Infrastructure Systems
for Nuclear Energy (IWISNE) in Taipei,
Taiwan on Decemberl5-17, 2010. His
presentation there was titled "Blast, Shock
and Impact Hazards to Nuclear Struc-
tures." Please visit the Center for Infra-
structure Protection and Physical Security
at http://cipps.eng.ufl.edu/ website for ad-
ditional information on Krauthammer's
research.

Structures Graduate Student
Presents at 2011 NSF Engineer-
ing Research and Innovation
Conference of the Civil, Mechani-
cal and Manufacturing Innova-
tion (CMMI)
Juan Antonio Balderrama, a structures
Ph.D. student, accompanied Kurt Gurley,
Ph.D., associate professor, to this confer-
ence. Bladerram delivered a poster presen-
tation and paper in Atlanta, Ga. on January
4, 2011. His research is based upon the
NSF-sponsored research project titled
"Full-scale and Modeled Hurricane Wind
Loads in Residential Structures." This
premier National Science Foundation
(NSF) conference, sponsored by the Divi-
sion of Civil, Mechanical and Manufactur-
ing Innovation (CMMI), focuses on re-
search and education across the division's
programs. CMMI's mission is to fund fun-
damental research and education in support
of NSF's strategic goals, which are di-
rected toward advances in the civil, me-
chanical, industrial and manufacturing
engineering disciplines. More details of
this project appear on page 4 of this news-
letter.


Volume 1, Issue 1 Page 5


"'
~s -










Project Status
Now on the Web!
Final reports for the follow
jects are available at: http:
cms.ce.uifl.edu/research /c(


Center for
Multimodal
3.0 Solutions for Congestion Mitigation
i' '. UnwRsiyolFloiodo


ing pro-

omnleted


projects.php.
* Central Data Warehouse Con-
figuration, Data Analysis for Con-
gestion Mitigation Studies
(STEWARD)
* Development of Simulation Pro-
gram for Two-Lane Highway
Analysis
* Simulation-Based Robust Opti-
mization for Actuated Signal
Timing and Setting
* Characterizing the Tradeoffs and


Costs Associated with Transpor-
tation Congestion in Supply
Chains
* Multimodal Solutions for Large-
Scale Evacuations
* A Pricing Approach for Mitigat-
ing Congestion in Multimodal
Transportation Systems
* Implementation of the Statewide
Traffic Engineering Warehouse
for Regionally Archived Data
(STEWARD)
* Investigation of Freeway Capac-
ity: A) Effective Capacity of Aux-
iliary Lanes
and B) Segment Capacity as a
Function of Number of Lanes and
Merge/Diverge Activity
* Field Data Collection and Analy-
sis for Freeway Work Zone Ca-
pacity Estimation
* Travel Time Reliability Modeling
for Florida


* Multimodal Arterial LOS Modeling
and Testing
* Trip Generation Characteristics of
Special Generators
* Vehicle-Miles-of-Travel-Based
Traffic Impact Assessment
Methodology
New Projects
* Variable Speed Limit (VSL) Best
Management Practice
* Managed Lane Operations-
Adjusted Time of Day Pricing vs.
Near Real Time Dynamic Pricing
(Supplement to FDOT Match
#81551)
* Arterial Highway Capacity and
Level of Service Analysis for
Florida

SAVE the Date!

UF/TRC Workshop on CORSIM
August 11, 2011
8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress ,Orlando,
Fla.
The CMS, the Transportation Research
Center (TRC), and McTrans at the Univer-
sity of Florida have developed this work-
shop for transportation professionals with
experienced and intermediate knowledge
of CORSIM, a traffic simulation software
program. Participants will learn about:
Recently added features for CORSIM;
Lesser known features of CORSIM that
can be used to model unusual scenarios
and provide advanced analysis capabilities;
Methods for comparing CORSIM results to
HCM results and guidelines on applying
CORSIM to FDOT project analyses; Fu-
ture changes in CORSIM.
Six professional development hours
(PDHs) will be offered for attending the
workshop for transportation professionals
holding a P.E. license.
Registration fees include conference ma-
terials and food and beverage services.
Sponsorship opportunities are available!


There are various sponsorship levels that
will entitle your company to discounted
workshop registration and more. Your
generous contribution will help support
this workshop and future technology
transfer activities.
For more information, including regis-
tration, sponsorship opportunities and
hotel registration, visit Conference &
Workshops at http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/
news events/conferences.php, or contact
Ines Aviles-Spadoni at 352-392-9537,
Ext. 1409 or iavilesiZce.ufl.edu.

CMS Annual Student
Conference March 4, 2011
Save the date! The CMS's Annual Stu-
dent Conference will be held on March 4,
2011 at the Emerson Alumni Hall across
from the University of Florida campus in
Gainesville, Fla. The half-day conference
will feature student presentations and
posters related to projects funded by the
CMS and research related to transporta-
tion. Discipline areas represented at the
conference include Civil & Coastal Engi-
neering (CCE), Industrial & Systems
Engineering (ISE), Occupational Ther-
apy (OT), and Urban & Regional Plan-
ning (URP). The conference is free to UF
students, faculty and transportation pro-
fessionals. A conference program will be
posted soon at http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/
news events/conferences.php. For more
information, contact Ines Aviles-Spadoni
at iaviles@ice.ufl.edu or at 352-392-9537,
Ext. 1409.


L to R Heather Hammontree, Andrew Avent, Irene
Soria, Barbara Martin, Brett Fuller, and Michael
Riebe at the 2010 CMS Student Conference


~--- --


Page 6


Civil Civilities


I ~_ _








CCE helping to improve the nation's storm wave predictions


Coastal and Oceanographic Associate
Professor Alexandru Sheremet and his re-
search group are conducting comprehen-
sive theoretical, experimental, and numeri-
cal research toward improving the current
capabilities of coastal wave-forecasting
models. The research effort is funded by
Office of the Naval Research (ONR), and
the National Oceanic Partnership Program
(NOPP), a collaboration of federal agencies
(including NOAA, the US Army Corps of
Engineers, and the Navy), to provide lead-
ership and coor-
dination of na-
tional oceano-
graphic research
and education
initiatives.
The wave mod-
els targeted for
improvement are
WAVEWATCH
III, STWAVE,
SWAN, and
others, currently
used for opera-
tional purposes
by NOAA, the Navy and other federal
agencies. The main problems being ad-
dressed are lack of predictive capabilities
of current models in shallow water, where
the wave processes are dominated
by non-resonant nonlinear interac- P
tions, and strong dissipative proc-
esses due to the interaction with wa,
vegetation and the soft bed.
Experimental Work: This research thrust
is a continuation of the participation of
Sheremet's group in the large field experi-
ment on wave dissipation by soft sea-beds
(e.g, muddy beds). The problem is relevant
in any coastal marine/riverine system, be-
cause of the typical high economic value of
such areas (harbors, fishing industry, oil
industry, etc). The experiment site is the
Atchafalaya Bay and the adjacent shelf on
the Louisiana coast, Northern Gulf of Mex-
ico. The goal of the research is to study and
quantify the effective coupling between
surface waves and state of the bed. One of
the breakthroughs of the research is the
discovery of the strong coupling that exists
between soft beds and wave activity. Our


observations show that, under strong wave
forcing, soft beds liquefy and deform, re-
leasing large amounts of sediments into the
water column. This change of bed state,
and the resulting suspended sediments,
have important consequences in the evolu-
tion of nearshore waves and associated
processes, such as wave-induced currents,
inundation, etc. This work is supported by
the Coastal Geophysics Program in ONR.
Theoretical Research: There are several
directions of theoretical research, some
deriving directly from previous and
S current experimental work. The theo-
retical research is supported by both
NOPP and ONR. Pursuing the topic
of wave/soft-bed interaction, Shere-
met's group is developing a model
for forecasting the state of the bed
under storm waves. One of the chal-
lenges of understanding the coupled
evolution of the wave-bed system is
the fact that observations of bed state
S are extremely complex and difficult
to collect, especially during the inter-
S testing events (energetic storms). The
S data collected during field experi-
ments on the Atchafalaya shelf allows for
the development and testing of a model that
predicts the evolution of the bed state, and
therefore that of the wave-bed system,


based only on observations surface waves,
which are readily available, even via re-
mote sensing means (e.g., observations by
unmanned aircraft). The formulation of an
effective theoretical description of mud-
induced wave dissipation in the nearshore
is also part of the numerical modeling ef-
fort (see below). This work is supported by
the Coastal Geophysics Program in ONR;
its numerical implementation is supported
by NOPP.
The wave-bed interaction research topic is
intrinsically connected to the research into
other processes that control wave evolution
in the nearshore. In finite-depth and shal-
low water, the most important is nonlinear
three-wave interactions. This process, com-


pletely ignored in current models, domi-
nates wave evolution between 20 to 5-m
water depth, and leads to the deformation
of the wave shape leading to breaking. The
theoretical work conducted by Sheremet's
group is aimed at reformulating the prob-
lem of nonlinear, directional wave propaga-
tion over arbitrary topography. In its primi-
tive form, this problem requires solving a
system of a large number (order 108 ) cou-
pled equations. This effort is funded under
the NOPP.
Numerical Modeling: This direction of
research involves applying the results of
the research described above to improve
the numerical capabilities of a number of
major wave-forecasting systems operated
by federal agencies (NOAA, the Navy, and
the Army). Sheremet's group is tightly col-
laborating with a small group of research-
ers from these agencies, as well as other
research institutions (Naval Postgraduate
School, Monterrey; IFREMER, Brest,
France; Deltares, Delft, Netherlands, U.
New South Wales, Australia, etc) to de-
velop an effective and numerically efficient
implementations for nonlinear wave evolu-
tion in dissipative (soft bed, vegetation)
coastal environments. The goal of this ef-
fort is to develop cross-compatible, or mul-
tiple implementations of numerical mod-


ules for the additional physics that will be
incorporated at the end of the project into
the target wave models.
The research described here is done in col-
laboration with the following research
faculty: Ashish Mehta, (U. Florida, profes-
sor emeritus), Tian-Jian Hsu (U. Dela-
ware), Mead Allison (U. Texas, Austin),
and James Kaihatu (Texas A&M). Cur-
rently, this work is supporting the follow-
ing Ph.D. students: Cihan Sahin, Uriah
Gravois, and Miao Tian. It also supported
the doctoral studies of the following former
graduates: Sergio Jaramillo (currently at U.
Hawaii), Ilgar Safak (U. Virginia), and
Shih-Feng Su (Academia Sinica, Taiwan).


Volume 1, Issue 1


rsuing the topic of wave/soft-bed interaction, Sheremet's group is
reloping a model for forecasting the state of the bed under storm
ves."


T~~


Page 7









Recent and Upcoming Publications


* Professor Michael McVay's research
was featured in an article in Civil En-
gineering: The Magazine of
the American Society of Civil Engi-
neering. The article titled "New Instal-
lation Method Offers Alternative to
Driven Piles, Drilled Shafts" can be
found in the June 2010 issue on page
22 at lilp .. ., ,., r.i, /
Content.aspx?id=24739
Professor Amoldo Valle-Levinson's recent
publications include:
* Reyes, A.C. and A. Valle-Levinson,
Wind modifications to density-driven


flows in semienclosed, rotating basins, J.
Physical Oceanography, 40, 1473-1487,
2010.
* Cheng, P., A. Valle-Levinson, C.W.
Winant, A. Ponte, G. Gutierrez, K. Win-
ters, Upwelling-enhanced seasonal
stratification in a semiarid bay, Conti-
nental Shelf Research, 30,1241-1249,
2010.
* Cheng, P., A. Valle-Levinson and H.
deSwart, Residual currents induced by
asymmetric tidal mixing in weakly
stratified narrow estuaries, J.Physical
Oceanography, 40, 2135-2147, 2010.


Kudos to you!

Professor Ronald A. Cook, was appointed as a
voting member of
the American Concrete Insti-
tute' s ACI 318 "Building
Code Requirements for Struc-
tural Concrete."
This represents a major ac-
complishment and honor as
membership is by invitation
only and the percentage
of research faculty is limited by the Intema-
tional Standards Organization (ISO) require-
ments since the document developed by
the committee is used as a building code stan-
dard internationally.


Congratulations to all of our CCE Graduate student 2010 graduates!
They are:

Master's degree graduates: Andrew Avent, Phuong Bacon, Young-Ki Chang, Daniel Getter, Michael
Harris, Brett Henning, Brandon Hiers, Luis Iturralde, Kathryn Jenner, Lindsey Killian, Amanda Lavigne, e _
Michael Manolis, Brett Messner, Michael Riebe, Claribel Santana, Kristopher Shrestha, Irene Soria,
Antoinette Vaccaro, Sevcan Agdas, Jessica Alvarez, Oliver Badal, George Chrysikopoulos, Jared Easterlin,
Aashlesh Emandi, Joseph Fielden, Anand Gaikwad, Sarah Jayasekaran, Pengxiang Jiang, Vishal Jindal,
Kirandeep Kaur, Harish Manda, Shrikant Mishra, Dave Morency, Carlos Rodriguez, Yen-Wen Shao,
Anurag Singh, Durgaprasad Somisetti, Loo Tan, Mayank Thepadia, Eric
Tilden, Ping Yu, Simon Gutierrez de Pineres, Ryan Stoddard, Benjamin Cox, "
Richard Fontanilla, Scott Harvey-Lewis, Christopher Nolen, Dana Wilder,
1"-,"" n Gielow, Corey Ramstad, Miklos Berencsi, John Carlton, Bran-
.-_ J ~lf, ^ i Pictured Fall 2010 Coastal and Oceano-
S.I .! Stidham, Drew Willi, Jun Zhang, Vishal Khanapure, Qiang Li, graphic Engineering graduate Dr Allison
S! vasi Mensah, Chrisopher Gapstur, Alec Haugdahl, John McMillan, Penko
l 1.ii garet Northrop, David Presson, Matthew Reece, Ryan Renardo,
.~.~>. I. .Ik Fahey, Uriah Gravois, Tracy Martz, Stacey Miller, Carlos Palacious, Lacey Brady, Barney Burks,
.1 iI anza Campbell, Kyle Chmielewski, Kellie Clark, Joseph Donegan, Heather Hammontree, Angus
S.' ( i early, Marco Osorio, Jessica Serota, Abhay Singh, Cameron Snipes, Lauren Stockman-Puder, David
'mniers, Christopher Thompson, Barbara Barqueta Martin, Wei-Chuan Chuang, Alejandro Jimenez, Javier
pt.: ll .'ienez, Ji-Myong Kim, Ana Maria Parra, Hari Ramachandran, Javier Beteta, Thomas Emerson, James
^ 1 ,i l-.. son, Eric Kazmaier, David Mogge, Mauel Rodriguez, Ivan Marcano, Derek Gray, Brain Radakovic,
SDr Ty Hesser, Fall 2010 Coastal and James Johncock, Tianyi Liu, Jacob McBee, Miao Tian
Oceanographic Engineering graduate

Ph.D. graduates: Patrick Dunn, Lili Yu, Nuvit Basdurak, Dooyong Cho, Michael Davidson, Jeongsoo Ko, Celalettin Ozdemir, Khiem
Tran, Kristopher Shrestha, Lihui Zhang, Jung Woo Lee, Ilgar Safak, Shih-Feng Su, Long Bui, Yu Chen, Michael Coffey, Raphael Crow-
ley, Peter Datin, Juan Fernandez-Diaz, Eric Forcael, Tyler Hesser, Justin Marin, Allison Penko, Bilge Tutak, Amy Waterhouse.


Where are they now? Highlighting our former grads...

Devin K. Harris, BS -1999, Geotechnical Engineering, was awarded the Howard E. Hill Award for Outstanding Faculty of the
Year by the students of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Michigan Tech. After graduating from UF,
Harris received his M.S. and Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2004 and 2007, respectively. He
joined the staff at Michigan Technological University in 2009.


Civil Civilities


Page 8


-c-- --




Full Text

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Special points of interest: Visit us on Visit our Hurricane Research page at http://www.facebook.com/ UFHurricaneResearch?ref=mf Visit our department’s website Visit the UF Homepage Visit the UF College of Engineering C i v i l Civilities The electronic newsletter presented by the UF Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering “The Thing” (pictured on left) at Weil Hall was professor Duane Ellifritt’s conceptual idea to assist students learn steel design concepts. The idea has spread worldwide and Ellifritt (pictured below with AISC President, Roger Ferch) was recently acknowledged by American Institute of Steel Construction for his life-long contributions. Dr. Ellifritt now holds the title of Professor Emeritus since retiring from the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering in 1999. Department receives significant gift to support our Combined Bachelors/Masters program (4-1 program) Neil Schopke, a former civil engineering gr aduate, pledged over one million dollars to fund our 4-1 program. His inspiration ca me from two significant individuals in his life, Byron Spangler one of his former geotechnical professors at the University of Florida, and his Junior high school principal, Virgil Ramage. In Schopke’s own words he states: “I grew up very poor with very little ( continued on page 2 ) The Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering is pleased to announce that Dr. Forrest J. Masters has been selected to receive a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. The CAREER Program is the NSF's most prestigious award in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacherscholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. The research objective of Dr. Masters’ project is to define tropical cyclone surface wind, wind-driven rain and wind load characteristics in the built environment. The goal is to determine how localized, coherent features occurring in the “roughwall” turbulent boundary layer and larger-scale convective features (e.g., mesovortices, rainband core downdrafts) influence surface wind field characteristics and loading on low-rise structures. Florida Coastal Monitoring Program instrumented towers retrofitted to collect turbulence and winddriven profile measurements (continued on page 2) Students receive award… Two civil students, one graduate and one undergraduate were presented with the Attributes of A Gator Engineer award. This is a new recognition program and the awards recognize the outstanding contributions of our undergraduate and PhD students towards the ideals of the attributes to which all who us connected to Gator Engineering aspire: Creativity, Leadership, Integrity, Professional Excellence, and Service to the Global Community. A selection committee of 14 faculty, staff, and students had the difficult task of evaluating many excellent nominations, all deserving of recognition. However, the students selected for ( continued on page 2 ) Dr. Masters receives NSF award Volume 1, Issue 1 Winter Edition Kathy Caldwell named to Structural Engineering 2010 Power list Kathy Caldwell, P.E., member of ASCE, has been named to gostructural.com’s Power List for 2010. Kathy currently serves as the University of Florida’s ASCE chapter advisor and she is an adjunct faculty member. Kathy is also the current president to the American Society of Civil Engineers where she represents over 140,000 civil engineers worldwide. Her goals within ASCE are to address the present challenges of civil engineers including the slumping economy, support The Vision for Civil Engineering in 2025, and restructure ASCE’s annual conference. Kathy earned her degrees in structural and construction engineering and has many years of experience in industry. She is president of Caldwell, Cook & Associates and is a member of Engineers without Borders, the Florida Institute of Consulting Engineers, and the Florida Engineering Society. The administration, faculty and staff within our department and the university applaud Kathy on this recognition! Masters receives NSF award 2 Department receives gift (continued) 2 Students receive award (continued) 2 Highway Capacity Software update 3 Vulnerability of Resident Housing 4 Conference attendances/presentations 5 CMS Updates 6 CCE helps nation with storm waves 7 Recent Publications & Congratulations! 8 Inside this issue: Virgil Ramage (on left) and Byron Spangler Managing Editor: Nancy E. McIlrath-Glanville, M.Ed., M.A. Dr. Forrest Masters

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This great honor exemplifies these attributes. The two students both received the award for Integrity. They were Melissa Brinson (undergraduate) and Todd Davis (doctoral student.) Brinson is pursuing her bachelor’s degree in civil and coastal e ngineering. Her list of activities in the College of Engineering seems endless: Engineering Amba ssadors, Engineering Day, Engineering Student Advisory Council, Freshman Leadership Engin eering Group, Gatorship 2010, Benton Engineering Council. In both her classroom and extracurricular activities, Melissa has a reputation for not taking short cuts and for inspiring her fellow students by her honest and truthful leadership. Davis, too has exemplified the ideals of the integrity of the engineering profession. Pursuing doctoral studies in civil engineering, he has courageously adhere d to the UF Honor Code and is described as having the ethic of integrity and honesty permeating every aspect of his personal and academic life. His doctoral research focuses on long-term performance of adhesive anchors in concrete. Upon graduation, he intends to continue his work in this area in collaboration with engineers in academia and the international arena in both the private and non-profit sectors. Congratulations to these exemplary students! Todd Davis is pictured on the far left and Melissa Brinson (blue dress) is pictured fifth from the right. Additional recipients pictured are from other UF engineering departments. Civil Civilities Page 2 will be deployed in coastal suburban communities, where the most damaging winds are expected to occur. These observational assets will be located inside mobile Doppler radar networks deployed by the Digital Hurricane Consortium to determine if convective features aloft modulate the ground level wind structure. These data will be coupled with pressure measurements on single-family homes to directly relate peak load conditions to the full spectrum of the wind effects. The results of this research will have a direct impact on and strengthen interactions between the wind engineering and atmospheric science disciplines. The project specifically addresses the high priority issue, Interaction of Hurricanes with Engineering Structures, identified by the National Science Board. The outcomes will benefit catastrophe, wind tunnel and computational modeling, codes and standards, cost effective mitigation, and sustainable design. In the educational component of the project, middle school teachers from under-resourced schools located in hurricaneprone areas will participate in a pilot initiative, the Hurricane Hazard Immersion Program (HHIP), which fosters 6-8th grade curriculum development through annual training and active participation in the research. The HHIP is designed to be sustainable long beyond the performance date of the project, targets underrepresented groups, and develops a culture of hazard preparedness and proactive mitigation among the next generation of homeowners. Over 7500 students living along the hurricane prone coast will be exposed to curricula developed and taught by the 25 teachers participating in the HHIP. Students receive award ( continued from page 1 ) Masters receives NSF Award ( continued from page 1 ) only one arm.” Schopke also speaks proudly about Spangler. “During my studies in the Civil Engineering Department I had the opportunity to have Professor Spangler in several of my courses, and he always would say "You may not like me now, but you will later." I heard several recent graduates who came back say the same thing but at the time most of us was going through the agony of course work and really didn't care much about our future feelings. As time went by however, what our predecessors said became very true to me. I really did appreciate this man and his contribution into those early formative years of my professional life. It wasn't that other professors were not top notch, and maybe it was because I had him in more classes than any other, but if I had to choose one professor that contributed most to my life while at college it would have to be Professor Spangler.” He also stated that Professor Spangler helped him obtain his first job and that “it was a perfect match.” Schopke believes that these two men were the most significant in his life. He hopes that “the Ramage Spangler Fund will inspire others as they can to help the University and perhaps recognize the educators most significant in their live s.” His gift, intended to fund scholarships to encourage undergraduates to continue their education in Civil and Coastal Engineering at the University of Florida, was dispersed to the first round of recipients this past Fall 2010. Without his generosity, many of these students would not be able to continue their education. Our hat’s off to this dedicated Gator! opportunity without the GI bill to ever get an college education. After completing my tour of duty in the Air Force overseas where I was privileged to participate in the U.K. football program well enough to get a letter from my coach to bring to Coach Woodruff, then head coach, at UF. He was gracious enough to let me walk-on in the freshman class of 1958 and that is how I got to the University of Florida.” He also stated to UF President Bernard Machen “Mr. Ramage was my junior high school principal, graduating from the University of Florida, obtaining both a bachelor and master’s degree in ma thematics and shortly thereafter became the youngest school principal in Polk County. While at the University of Florida he also starred as a tennis player not losing a single match his senior year. This may not sound like too great of an accomplishment except this man had Department received gift ( continued from page 1 ) “This may not sound like too great of an accomplishment except this man had only one arm.”

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More New Features ... One-touch animation for multiple signals in a street analysis One-touch optimization using TRANSYT7F on an arterial Replication of intersection data to facilitate coding multiple similar signals along an urban street facility Multiple-period analysis for analyzing congested conditions for signals, interchanges and streets SpyGlass to view details of the procedure not documented directly in the HCM, only in engine code Customizable modular templates for reusable data Customizable and redesigned formatted reports Time-space diagram to visualize signal coordination Major Overhauls Roundabouts (HCM Chapter 21) This HCS module has been upgraded to include the ability to analyze one-lane or two-lane roundabouts for results that include delay and level of service based on US conditions. Multilane entries and exits, as well as right-turn yielding or non-yielding bypass lanes, are also accommodated. The procedure can deal with U-turns and estimates lane utilization within a multilane roundabout. Freeway Weaving Segments (HCM Chapter 12) Lane-changing rates as direct measures of turbulence are now key to this analysis. Weaving and non-weaving speeds are computed for various lane configuration, including one-sided and two-sided weaving, with ma ximum weaving ( continued on page 4 ) options below and the dynamic report in the lower pane. Quick Entry, Quick Lanes and Quick Phases To expand features fo r more efficient and more intuitive data coding, Mc Trans has added a more comprehensive preliminary screen (Quick Entry) to establish a set of data values to begin an analysis. Users can even design their own set of customized initial values and settings. A new graphical tool (Quick Phases) provides for entering NEMA Phasing data with a companion Sequential Phasing graphic to help in this transition. The lane configuration tool (Quick Lanes) has been retained as it functioned in HCS2000 and HCS+. Visual Mode This new screen facilitates locating intersections (both signalized and access points) for the urban street geographically. It also provides a set of tabs to access data for each intersection as it is selected from this view. Each tab presents a different section of the input data organized into general, intersection, traffic, phasing, timing, segment, access points and other detailed data. A context menu is provided to supplement tool bar access. Delay and LOS results are displayed by approach for any selected intersection. Work on HCS 2010 to implement the updated procedures coming in the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) is almost complete. Mc Trans’ goal is to be ready with the HCS upgrade to coincide with 2010 HCM publication, scheduled for January 2011. This major upgrade includes a comprehensive module to implement the new procedures for signalized intersections, with further expansion to add urban streets and interchange ramp terminals coming this spring. This new module is built from an entirely new program architecture to take advantage of the latest programming techniques and has certainly been the biggest challenge. This completely redesigned Urban Streets module (Streets) will include Signalized Intersections (Signals) and Interchange Ramp Terminals (Interchanges) in one integrated program to implement the common procedures prescribed in the 2010 HCM for these three applications within HCS The new structure will not only make implementing these complex new procedures much more efficient, it will also provide maximum flexibility to the user with many alternatives built into the interface. Mc Trans ’ goal is to blend the familiar screens with new options to make the transition for users easier, while adding new and innovative functionality. Overhauled modules for Roundabouts and Weaving provide for the other major changes in these methodologies while retaining the traditional HCS look and feel. Classic Mode The more familiar split screen has been organized to permit the most common data entry on one view without having to scroll, while providing for detailed data Volume 1, Issue 1 Page 3 Highway Capacity Software (HCS) Mc Trans Center

PAGE 4

Civil Civilities Page 4 lengths determined. Capacities are produced for ideal and prevai ling conditions. Level of servic e is based on density, except for v/c ratios over 1.0. Other Significant Changes Two-Lane Highways (HCM Chapter 15) A third class of two-lane highways is introduced fo r roadways that serve moderately developed areas passing through small towns or developed areas. The analysis of bi cycles along the two-lane roadwa y is also included. The two -way analysis is eliminated in favor of a weighted average of directional results. Basic Freeway Segments (HCM Chapter 11) New speed-flow curves are implemented with the modified module, with no interpolation between free-flow speeds. The adjustments to base free-flow speed have also been changed to include ramp density and eliminate the adj ustment for number of lanes. A permanent curve for 75 mi/h free-flow speeds has been installed. Off-Street Pedestrian and Bicycl e Facilities (HCM Chapter 23) This brand new module within HCS will provide for one program to analyze pedestrians and bicycle on off-street facil ities, including the results of FHWA resear ch. the results include capacity and lev el of service for walkways, stairways, exclusive off-street bi cycle paths and shared-use paths. For information on additional changes to the HCS and on the McTrans Center, please visit the McTrans Center website at http://mctrans.ce.ufl.edu for more updated information. Field and laboratory experiment s are conducted to quantify extreme wind loads and the performance of building components in order to identify weaknesses and propose cost effe ctive solutions. One specific project is outlined below. Scale model tests in boundary layer wind tunnels have been the primary tool for the development of the design wind loads prescribed in ASCE 7. However, questions have been rais ed concerning the ability of wind tunnel methods to replicate the hurri cane wind environment and to determine peak loads on low rise structures in hurricanes. This research, titled “Full-scale and Modeled Hurricane Wind Loads on Residential Structures” and sponsored by the National Science Foundation, will address two outstanding issues in the development of risk consistent construction practice in hurricane prone coastal regions. First it will quantify the precision and accuracy of wind tunnel modeling of extreme wind loads on low rise structures, and second it will develop the proper representation of the approaching turbulent hurricane wind field. Both efforts will utilize an existing hurricane wind velocity and pressure load database collected in-field by UF personnel (incl uding Ph.D. candidate, Juan Antonio Balderrama, Professors David Prevat t, Forrest Masters and Kurt Gurley) during eleven hurricane seasons. Four wind tunnel facilities will i ndependently produce estimates of loads on scale model houses. Results w ill be compared with real hurricane wind load data measured on th e models’ full sc ale counterpart. The upstream turbulence employed by the wind tunnel facilities will be compared with turbulence data directly measured during land falling hurricanes. The research will produce evidence to foster the professional consensus required to validate or suggest changes to current experimental wind load evaluation methods and prescriptive wind load practice. Research outcomes will improve the scie ntific methods used to mitigate loss of life and property and promot e coastal development consistent with an accurate view of the wind damage risk. Reducing damage and post-storm recovery time via risk c onsistent construction results in shorter down time for coastal busin esses, improving the economic sustainability of hurricane prone coastal regions. Engineering students will participate in the research, and findi ngs will be incorporated into the wind engineering curriculum. Highway Capacity Software (HCS) Mc Trans Center ( continued from page 3 ) UF CCE structures faculty address vulnerability of residential housing to hurricane winds For the past six years, the Department of Civil and Co astal Engineering has provided our students with the opportunity to meet one on one with empl oyers. All of our students, from the first term freshman to the final term PhD student are encouraged to attend the event in order to: form a solid network prior to graduation; apply and compete for internships; have their resumes critiqued and reviewed; practice their interviewing skills; and actually compete for open positions within the companies repres ented if they will be graduating soon. Prior to the initial event six years ago, the former department chair was approached by a few employer representatives and asked if such a forum could take place. Six years late r and even during this slumpi ng economy, the event is still highly successful and is valued by both th e employer participants and the students. This year the event took place on Febru ary 8. We were honored to have twelve companies participate and they were: Ardaman & Associates, Basker ville-Donovan, Inc. Coastal Planning & Engineering, Inc., HNTB, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc., Parsons Brinckerhoff, PCL Constructors, Inc., R, S&H, Tensar Corporation, Walsh/A rcherWestern Contractors, The Wantman Group and WilsonMiller Stantec. Our appreciation and gratitude goes out to these companies fo r their dedication and support that they provide to our students and our department! Sixth Annual Career Planning and Resume Workshop held 2010 student participants

PAGE 5

International Conference of Chinese Transportation Professionals Two civil engineering faculty members, Scott Washburn and Yafeng Yin attended the ICCTP conference and also visited the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) to meet with faculty and graduate students and give presentations. They were in China during the week of August 2-7, 2010. Congestion Pricing Conference The Innovations in Pricing of Transportation Systems was held on May 13-14, 2010 at the Royal Pl aza Hotel in the Walt Disney World Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Fla. The focus of the conference was to introduce new market-based approaches to encourage efficiency in transportation systems and to devise better financing schemes for improving or enhancing these systems. The conference consisted of plenary sessions by distinguished speakers and more than 70 presentations from practitioners and academics from diverse transportation agencies, nonprofit organizations and universities. Twelve countries were represented among the presenters with backgrounds in economics, transportation, civil engineering, operations research, industrial engineering, urban planning and the social sciences. The CMS co-sponsored the conference along with the National Science Foundation, the Transportatio n Research Board, the UF College of Engineering, and the University of Florida. Coastal Engineering Faculty Invited to Present at FAO Workshops Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, Ph.D., professor of coastal engineering, was an invited presenter at two workshops sponsored by the Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO.) The first was on August 26, 2010 in Estero Real, Nicaragua for the workshop on carrying capacity for aquaculture. The second, held in Stirling, Scotland on December 6, 2010, was on aquaculture site selection and carrying capacity estimates for inland and coastal water bodies. Professor Mang Tia has been working with the Florida Department of Transportation in investigating the feasibility of using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) as aggregate in concrete to produce a more flexible concrete for use in concrete pavement. Tia and Ph.D. student Nabil Hossiney presented the results of this research in a paper entitled “Concrete Containing RAP for Use in Concrete Pavement” at the International Conference on Sustainable Concrete Pavements, September 15-17, 2010, Sacramento, Calif. Use of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement in Concrete Volume 1, Issue 1 Page 5 Israeli Society of Civil Engineers Zohar Herbsman, Ph.D., professor emeritus, civil engin eering, was the keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the Israeli Society of Civ il Engineers. Eight hundred engineers attended the lecture which received great reviews and prompted an invitation to give lectures to other organizations in Israel. Herbsman was also invited to be a visiting professor at the Ben Gurion University in Israel. Civil Engineering Professor invited to present at International Workshops Theodor “Ted” Krauthammer, professor of structural engineering, recently presented at the Modeling and Behavior of Light-Weight Protective Structures workshop held at the SIM Lab, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway on December 1-3, 2010. His presentation was titled “Investigations of Structurally Composite Panels for Protective Systems.” He also presented at the International Workshop on Infrastructure Systems for Nuclear Energy (IWISNE) in Taipei, Taiwan on December15-17, 2010. His presentation there was titled “Blast, Shock and Impact Hazards to Nuclear Structures.” Please visit the Center for Infrastructure Protection and Physical Security at http://cipps.eng.ufl.edu/ website for additional information on Krauthammer’s research. Structures Graduate Student Presents at 2011 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference of the Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) Juan Antonio Balderrama, a structures Ph.D. student, accompanied Kurt Gurley, Ph.D., associate profes sor, to this conference. Bladerram delivered a poster presentation and paper in Atlanta, Ga. on January 4, 2011. His research is based upon the NSF-sponsored research project titled “Full-scale and Mode led Hurricane Wind Loads in Residential Structures.” This premier National Science Foundation (NSF) conference, sponsored by the Division of Civil, Mechan ical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI), focuses on research and education across the division's programs. CMMI’s mission is to fund fundamental research and education in support of NSF’s strategic goals, which are directed toward advances in the civil, mechanical, industrial and manufacturing engineering disciplines. More details of this project appear on page 4 of this newsletter. Conference presentations: past, present and future

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Civil Civilities Page 6 Project Status Now on the Web! Final reports for the following projects are available at: http:// cms.ce.ufl.edu/research/completed projects.php Central Data Warehouse Configuration, Data Analysis for Congestion Mitigation Studies (STEWARD) Development of Simulation Program for Two-Lane Highway Analysis Simulation-Based Robust Optimization for Actuated Signal Timing and Setting Characterizing the Tradeoffs and Costs Associated with Transportation Congestion in Supply Chains Multimodal Solutions for LargeScale Evacuations A Pricing Approach for Mitigating Congestion in Multimodal Transportation Systems Implementation of the Statewide Traffic Engineering Warehouse for Regionally Archived Data (STEWARD) Investigation of Freeway Capacity: A) Effective Capacity of Auxiliary Lanes and B) Segment Capacity as a Function of Number of Lanes and Merge/Diverge Activity Field Data Collection and Analysis for Freeway Work Zone Capacity Estimation Travel Time Reliability Modeling for Florida Multimodal Arterial LOS Modeling and Testing Trip Generation Characteristics of Special Generators Vehicle-Miles-of-Travel-Based Traffic Impact Assessment Methodology New Projects Variable Speed Limit (VSL) Best Management Practice Managed Lane OperationsAdjusted Time of Day Pricing vs. Near Real Time Dynamic Pricing (Supplement to FDOT Match #81551) Arterial Highway Capacity and Level of Service Analysis for Florida SAVE the Date! UF/TRC Workshop on CORSIM August 11, 2011 8:30 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress ,Orlando, Fla. The CMS, the Transportation Research Center (TRC), and Mc Trans at the University of Florida have developed this workshop for transportation professionals with experienced and intermediate knowledge of CORSIM, a traffic simulation software program. Participants will learn about:Recently added features for CORSIM; Lesser known features of CORSIM that can be used to model unusual scenarios and provide advanced analysis capabilities; Methods for comparing CORSIM results to HCM results and guidelines on applying CORSIM to FDOT project analyses; Future changes in CORSIM. Six professional development hours (PDHs) will be offered for attending the workshop for transportation professionals holding a P.E. license. Registration fees include conference materials and food and beverage services. Sponsorship opportunities are available! There are various sponsorship levels that will entitle your company to discounted workshop registration and more. Your generous contribution will help support this workshop and future technology transfer activities. For more information, including registration, sponsorship opportunities and hotel registration, visit Conference & Workshops at http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/ news_events/conferences.php or contact Ines Aviles-Spadoni at 352-392-9537, Ext. 1409 or iaviles@ce.ufl.edu CMS Annual Student Conference – March 4, 2011 Save the date! The CMS’s Annual Student Conference will be held on March 4, 2011 at the Emerson Alumni Hall across from the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Fla. The half-day conference will feature student presentations and posters related to projects funded by the CMS and research related to transportation. Discipline areas represented at the conference include Civil & Coastal Engineering (CCE), Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISE), Occupational Therapy (OT), and Urban & Regional Planning (URP). The conference is free to UF students, faculty and transportation professionals. A confer ence program will be posted soon at http://cms.ce.ufl.edu/ news_events/conferences.php For more information, contact Ines Aviles-Spadoni at iaviles@ce.ufl.edu or at 352-392-9537, Ext. 1409. L to R: Heather Hammontree, Andrew Avent, Irene Soria, Barbara Martin, Brett Fuller, and Michael Riebe at the 2010 CMS Student Conference

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Volume 1, Issue 1 Page 7 Coastal and Oceanographic Associate Professor Alexandru Sheremet and his research group are conducting comprehensive theoretical, experimental, and numerical research toward improving the current capabilities of coastal wave-forecasting models. The research effort is funded by Office of the Naval Research (ONR), and the National Oceanic Partnership Program (NOPP), a collaboration of federal agencies (including NOAA, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the Navy), to provide leadership and coordination of national oceanographic research and education initiatives. The wave models targeted for improvement are WAVEWATCH III, STWAVE, SWAN, and others, currently used for operational purposes by NOAA, the Navy and other federal agencies. The main problems being addressed are lack of predictive capabilities of current models in shallow water, where the wave processes are dominated by non-resonant nonlinear interactions, and strong dissipative processes due to the interaction with vegetation and the soft bed. Experimental Work: This research thrust is a continuation of the participation of Sheremet's group in the large field experiment on wave dissipation by soft sea-beds (e.g, muddy beds). The problem is relevant in any coastal marine/riverine system, because of the typical high economic value of such areas (harbors, fishing industry, oil industry, etc). The experiment site is the Atchafalaya Bay and the adjacent shelf on the Louisiana coast, Northern Gulf of Mexico. The goal of the research is to study and quantify the effective coupling between surface waves and state of the bed. One of the breakthroughs of the research is the discovery of the strong coupling that exists between soft beds and wave activity. Our observations show that, under strong wave forcing, soft beds liquefy and deform, releasing large amounts of sediments into the water column. This change of bed state, and the resulting suspended sediments, have important consequences in the evolution of nearshore waves and associated processes, such as wave-induced currents, inundation, etc. This work is supported by the Coastal Geophysics Program in ONR. Theoretical Research: There are several directions of theoretical research, some deriving directly from previous and current experimental work. The theoretical research is supported by both NOPP and ONR. Pursuing the topic of wave/soft-bed interaction, Sheremet's group is developing a model for forecasting the state of the bed under storm waves. One of the challenges of understanding the coupled evolution of the wave-bed system is the fact that observations of bed state are extremely complex and difficult to collect, especially during the interesting events (energetic storms). The data collected during field experiments on the Atchafalaya shelf allows for the development and testing of a model that predicts the evolution of the bed state, and therefore that of the wave-bed system, based only on observations surface waves, which are readily available, even via remote sensing means (e.g., observations by unmanned aircraft). The formulation of an effective theoretical description of mudinduced wave dissipation in the nearshore is also part of the numerical modeling effort (see below). This work is supported by the Coastal Geophysics Program in ONR; its numerical implementation is supported by NOPP. The wave-bed interaction research topic is intrinsically connected to the research into other processes that control wave evolution in the nearshore. In finite-depth and shallow water, the most important is nonlinear three-wave interactions. This process, completely ignored in current models, dominates wave evolution between 20 to 5-m water depth, and leads to the deformation of the wave shape leading to breaking. The theoretical work conducted by Sheremet's group is aimed at reformulating the problem of nonlinear, directional wave propagation over arbitrary topography. In its primitive form, this problem requires solving a system of a large number (order 108 ) coupled equations. This effort is funded under the NOPP. Numerical Modeling: This direction of research involves applying the results of the research described above to improve the numerical capabilities of a number of major wave-forecasting systems operated by federal agencies (NOAA, the Navy, and the Army). Sheremet's group is tightly collaborating with a small group of researchers from these agencies, as well as other research institutions (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterrey; IFREMER, Brest, France; Deltares, Delft, Netherlands, U. New South Wales, Australia, etc) to develop an effective and numerically efficient implementations for nonlinear wave evolution in dissipative (soft bed, vegetation) coastal environments. The goal of this effort is to develop cross-compatible, or multiple implementations of numerical modules for the additional physics that will be incorporated at the end of the project into the target wave models. The research described here is done in collaboration with the following research faculty: Ashish Mehta, (U. Florida, professor emeritus), Tian-Jian Hsu (U. Delaware), Mead Allison (U. Texas, Austin), and James Kaihatu (Texas A&M). Currently, this work is supporting the following Ph.D. students: Cihan Sahin, Uriah Gravois, and Miao Tian. It also supported the doctoral studies of the following former graduates: Sergio Jaramillo (currently at U. Hawaii), Ilgar Safak (U. Virginia), and Shih-Feng Su (Academia Sinica, Taiwan). CCE helping to improve the nation's storm wave predictions “Pursuing the topic of wave/soft-bed interaction, Sheremet's group is developing a model for forecasting the state of the bed under storm waves.”

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Where are they now? Highligh ting our former grads... Devin K. Harris, BS –1999, Geotechnical Engineering, was awarded the Howard E. Hill Award for Outstanding Faculty of the Year by the students of the Civil and Environmental Engineerin g Department at Michigan Tech. After graduating from UF, Harris received his M.S. and Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic Inst itute and State University in 2004 and 2007, respectively. He joined the staff at Michigan Te chnological University in 2009. Civil Civilities Page 8 flows in semienclosed, rotating basins, J. Physical Oceanography, 40, 1473-1487, 2010. Cheng, P., A. Valle-Levinson, C.W. Winant, A. Ponte, G. Gutierrez, K. Winters, Upwelling-enhanced seasonal stratification in a semiarid bay, Continental Shelf Research, 30,1241-1249, 2010. Cheng, P., A. Valle-Levinson and H. deSwart, Residual currents induced by asymmetric tidal mixing in weakly stratified narrow estuaries, J.Physical Oceanography, 40, 2135-2147, 2010. Congratulations to all of our CCE Graduate student 2010 graduates! They are : Master’s degree graduates : Andrew Avent, Phuong Bacon, Young-Ki Chang, Daniel Getter, Michael Harris, Brett Henning, Brandon Hiers, Luis Iturralde, Kathryn Jenner, Lindsey Killian, Amanda Lavigne, Michael Manolis, Brett Messner, Michael Riebe, Claribel Santana, Kristopher Shrestha, Irene Soria, Antoinette Vaccaro, Sevcan Agdas, Jessica Alvarez, Oliver Badal, George Chrysikopoulos, Jared Easterlin, Aashlesh Emandi, Joseph Fielden, Anand Gaikwad, Sarah Jayasekaran, Pengxiang Jiang, Vishal Jindal, Kirandeep Kaur, Harish Manda, Shrikant Mishra, Da ve Morency, Carlos Rodriguez, Yen-Wen Shao, Anurag Singh, Durgaprasad Somisetti, Loo Tan, Mayank Thepadia, Eric Tilden, Ping Yu, Simon Gutierrez de Pineres, Ryan Stoddard, Benjamin Cox, Richard Fontanilla, Scott Harvey-Lewis, Christopher Nolen, Dana Wilder, Ryan Gielow, Corey Ramstad, Miklos Berencsi, John Carlton, Brandon Stidham, Drew Willi, Jun Zhang, Vishal Khanapure, Qiang Li, Akwasi Mensah, Chrisopher Gapstur, Alec Haugdahl, John McMillan, Margaret Northrop, David Presson, Matthew Reece, Ryan Renardo, Mark Fahey, Uriah Gravois, Tracy Martz, Stacey Miller Carlos Palacious, Lacey Brady, Barney Burks, Juwanza Campbell, Kyle Chmielewski, Kellie Clark, Joseph Donegan, Heather Hammontree, Angus O’Leary, Marco Osorio, Jessica Serota, Abhay Singh, Cameron Snipes, Lauren Stockman-Puder, David Summers, Christopher Thompson, Barbara Barqueta Mart in, Wei-Chuan Chuang, Alejandro Jimenez, Javier Jimenez, Ji-Myong Kim, Ana Maria Parra, Hari Ramachandran, Javier Beteta, Thomas Emerson, James Jackson, Eric Kazmaier, David Mogge, Mauel Rodri guez, Ivan Marcano, Derek Gray, Brain Radakovic, James Johncock, Tianyi Liu, Jacob McBee, Miao Tian Ph.D. graduates: Patrick Dunn, Lili Yu, Nuvit Basdurak, Dooyong Cho, Mich ael Davidson, Jeongsoo Ko, Celalettin Ozdemir, Khiem Tran, Kristopher Shrestha, Lihui Zhang, J ung Woo Lee, Ilgar Safak, Shih-Feng Su, Long Bui, Yu Chen, Michael Coffey, Raphael Cr owley, Peter Datin, Juan Fernandez-Diaz, Eric Forcael, Tyler Hesser, Justin Marin, Allison Penko, Bilge Tutak, Amy Waterhouse. Professor Ronald A. Cook was appointed as a voting member of the American Concrete Institute' s ACI 318 "Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete." This represents a major accomplishment and honor as membership is by invitation only and the percentage of research faculty is limited by the International Standards Organization (ISO) requirements since the document developed by the committee is used as a building code standard internationally. Recent and Upcoming Publications Professor Michael McVay's research was featured in an article in Civil Engineering: The Magazine of the American Society of Civil Engineering. The article titled "New Installation Method Offers Alternative to Driven Piles, Drilled Shafts" can be found in the June 2010 issue on page 22 at http://www.asce.org/ Content.aspx?id=24739 Professor Arnoldo Valle-Levinson’s recent publications include: Reyes, A.C. and A. Valle-Levinson, Wind modifications to density-driven Kudos to you! Pictured: Fall 2010 Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering graduate Dr. Allison Penko Dr. Ty Hesser, Fall 2010 Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering graduate