Determination of a nitrogen-phosphorus budget for Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Florida

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Title:
Determination of a nitrogen-phosphorus budget for Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Florida
Series Title:
Florida Water Resources Research Center Publication Number 29
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Moshiri, Gerald A.
Brown, David
Conklin, Philip
Gilbert, Douglas
Hughes, Michael
Moore, Michael
Ray, Donald
Robinson, Linda
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University of Florida
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Gainesville, Fla.
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Abstract:
The extent of nitrogen and phosphorus inputs and their effects on algal productivity in Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, has been under investigation since June, 1971. To date results indicate that there are numerous sources of nutrients into the Bayou, of which Carpenter's Creek and storm water runoff are the major contributors. Other sources are runoff from fertilizers applied to lawns, overflow of inadequate sewer lines, and to a much lesser extent, from sources such as rainwater and encroaching Pensacola Bay waters. Ecologically, the Bayou is approaching eutrophication as is evidenced by highly fluctuating oxygen and primary productivity patterns well correlated with algal cell numbers and distribution. Recommendations made for the improvement of water quality in the Bayou include 1) Improvement of circulation by the construction of a new channel, 2) Improvement of storm water and sewage facilities, 3) Improvements in the Carpenter's Creek channel to alleviate erosion, and 4) Selected dredging in areas of heavy siltation in the Bayou in order to improve flushing and circulation.

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DETERMINATION OF A NITROGEN-PHOSPHORUS BUDGET

FOR BAYOU TEXAR, PENSACOLA, FLORIDA



By

Gerald A. Moshiri
(Principal Investigator)

and

David Brown
Philip Conklin
Douglas Gilbert
Michael Hughes
Michael Moore
Donald Ray
Linda Robinson





FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER
RESEARCH PROJECT TECHNICAL COMPLETION REPORT


OWRR Project Number B-016-FLA
and
OWRR Project Number B-019-FLA


Report Submitted July 15, 1974


The work upon which this report is based was supported in part
by funds provided by the United States Department of the
Interior, Office of Water Resources Research as
authorized under the Water Resources
Research Act of 1964.












TABLE OF CONTENTS


Item Page

Abstract 1-2

Introduction 3-4

Methods 4-6

Results and Discussion 6-10

Acknowledgments 10

Literature Cited 11

Appendix A: Tables 12-45

Appendix B: Figures 46-89













ABSTRACT


Determination of a nitrogen-phosphorus budget

for Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Florida


The extent of nitrogen and phosphorus inputs and their effects on

algal productivity in Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida,

has been under investigation since June, .1971. To date results indicate

that there are numerous sources of nutrients into the Bayou, of which

Carpenter's Creek and storm water runoff are the major contributors.

Other sources are runoff from fertilizers applied to lawns, overflow of

inadequate sewer lines, and to a much lesser extent, from sources such as

rainwater and encroaching Pensacola Bay waters. Ecologically, the Bayou

is approaching eutrophication as is evidenced by highly fluctuating oxygen

and primary productivity patterns well correlated with algal cell numbers

and distribution.

Recommendations made for the improvement of water quality in the

Bayou include 1) improvement of circulation by the construction of a new

channel, 2) Improvement of storm water and sewage facilities, 3) Improve-

ments in the Carpenter's Creek channel to alleviate erosion, and 4) Select-

ed dredging in areas of heavy siltation in the Bayou in order to improve

flushing and 'circulation.


Key words: hayou estuary, eutrophication, nutriftcation, total Kjeldahl

nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, inorganic

phosphate, phytoplankton, primary productivity, water quality, sediment,






2



heterotrophic productivity, encroachment, storm water runoff, circu-

lation, siltation, sewage, stagnancy, algal blooms, algal metabolites,

oxygen depletion, stratification.















INTRODUCTION


Justification for the work whose results are presented here has al-

ready been presented at length at the culmination of research that was

conducted from June, 1971 June, 1972 as preliminary to these proceed-

ings (See OWRR Research Project Technical Completion Report, Publication

No. 17, Florida Water Resources Research Center, Gerald A. Moshiri, Prin-

cipal Investigator. Also, R.P. Hannah, A.T. Simmons, and G.A. Moshiri,

1973). Since the presentation of the above-cited reports, the case for

conducting this and future studies have become even stronger due to the

acceleration of the pace of residential and commercial developments in

areas involving bayous and estuaries of Northwest Florida. An example

of this is the substantial increase in developments in the Bayou Texar

drainage basin, yielding threats of substantial damage to this attractive

body of water unless active measures are taken. The data provided by

our studies have resulted in a stringent moratorium on sewage hook-ups in

the Bayou Texar area until more adequate services can be provided. We

are also working with an engineering firm retained by the City of Pensa-

cola, the County of Escambia, and the State of Florida Department of

Transportation in order to resolve the storm water and drainage problems

partly responsible for the degredation of water quality in Bayou Texar.

Our efforts have been aimed primarily at the delineation of the

nutrients and their extent into the Bayou waters. Also investigated have

been the effects of nutrient enrichments on the primary productivity of

Bayou waters and associated parameters. In addition, we have undertaken

pilot studies of sediment-water-nutrient relationships, as well as









studies involving heterotrophic productivity in the water column. These

have been in part funded by modest supplemental grants from the National

Science Foundation. These studies will be pursued in detail under a new

grant from the Office of Water Resources Research, starting July 1, 1974.

Basically the work conducted involved the following:

1. Monitoring of nutrient species (including Kjeldahl, nitrate,

and ammonia nitrogen, total phosphate and orthophosphate) on a

twice-monthly basis (or more frequently if situations warranted)

the first year, and then monthly the second year, at one station

on Carpenter's Creek (the prime inflow into the Bayou ) and three

stations in the Bayou itself (Figure 1). These assays were made

from samples taken both at the surface and at the bottom.

2. Quantification of the extent of nutrient inputs from lawn

fertilizer sources.

3. Quantification of nutrients from encroaching Escambia Bay

waters (stations shown in Figure 1).

4. Quantification of nutrient inputs from storm water runoff

(stations shown in Figure 1).

5. Monthly surface and bottom water primary productivity mea-

surements at the three Bayou stations listed under 1.

6. Enumeration of phytoplankton cell numbers and genera from

samples taken for tests under 1 (Figure 1).


METHODS


All data collection has been against a background of physical-chemical

parameters measured at each collection site. These include light pene-

tration, temperature, salinity, total (to measure organic) and inorganic

carbon, pH, dissolved oxygen, and 5-day B.O.D. Light penetration mea-









surements were made with a standard Secchi disk, and a Beckman salinometer

was used to measure temperatures and salinities. Carbon measurements were

made by means of a Beckman carbon analyzer, while oxygen and B.OOD. mea-

surements were taken by means of the standard Winkler technique. Field

and laboratory pH meters were used to measure pH.

Water samples for nutrient analyses were collected from one site on

Carpenter's Creek and three sites in the Bayou at surface and bottom

depths (Figure 1). Collections were made in acid-rinsed polyethylene

bottles and kept on ice until returned to the laboratory for analysis.

These samples were filtered through membrane filters (0.45pApore size)

and analyzed for ammonia employing the method described by Solorzano

(1969); for nitrate using the techniques suggested by Kahn and Brezenski

(1967); and for phosphate the methods of Strickland and Parsons (1972).

Orthophosphate levels were determined by reaction with an acidified

molybdate solution to form a phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid, the con-

centration of whose reduced form (phosphomolybdenum blue) was then deter-

mined spectrophometrically. Organic nitrogen measurements employed the

micro-Kjeldahl method of Miller and Miller (1948), and the analysis of the

ammonia released by the method already described. Organic phosphorous was

analyzed by the oxidation of the acidified samples and the analysis of the

resulting orthophosphate as cited above.

The extent of fertilizer applications to lawns and gardens of houses

in the Bayou Texar periphery, and nitrogen contribution from this source

to the Bayou waters, was determined by tabulation of results of a written

survey conducted by the principal investigator. The leaching of the

actual nitrogen fraction was conservatively estimated using the technique

employed by Viets (1971).









The extent of nutrient inflow through tidal encroachment from Pensa-

cola Bay was determined from three samples taken from each of three sta-

tions during periods of unusually high tides or storms fostering southerly

winds (Figure 1). These were analyzed as already described.

Finally, nutrient and B.O.D. contributions from stormwater runoff

were determined from 28 samples, collected at each of five stations around

the Bayou periphery over a three month summer period (Figure 1). These

were also analyzed as cited above.

Primary productivity measurements were made from monthly samples taken

from the same three stations cited for nutrient assays (Figure 1). Water
14
samples from surface and bottom were inoculated with Spciof C as sodium

bicarbonate and incubated for 4 hours. The samples were processed and

counted according to methods described by Goldman (1960), Goldman and

Carter (1965), and Goldman, Moshiri, and de Amezaga (1972). For corre-

lative purposes, samples were also taken and treated with Lugol's iodine

solution and 5 ml aliquots allowed to settle in 5 ml settling chambers.

Counts and identifications were made by means of an inverted microscope.


RESULTS AND DISCUSSION


1. Nutrients: Results of assays for total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrate,

ammonia, total phosphate, and inorganic phosphate in Carpenter's Creek and

surface and bottom waters of Bayou Texar appear in Tables 1, 2a, 3a, 4a

and Figures 2, 3, 4, and 5. The mean nutrient contributions per sampling

site over the period of study also appear in these tables. Spatially,

trends in average nitrate and ammonia concentrations are toward a steady

decrease from Station 2 to Station 6. This trend is consistent in both

surface and bottom waters (Tables 2a, 3a, 4a, and Figures 3 5). Surface









total Kjeldahl nitrogen patterns are also rather high at Creek and number

two stations and show a general decrease toward the lower ends of the

Bayou. Bottom concentrations show a slight deviation from these patterns

in that the highest concentrations are at the extreme ends of the Bayou

with Station 4 showing the lowest levels (Tables 1, 2a, 3a, 4a; Figures

2-5).

Temporally, all nutrient species showed very erratic patterns with

high concentrations prevailing at all times, with the highest concentra-

tions generally occurring during the summer months. This is illustrated

by the total Kjeldahl nitrogen and inorganic phosphate concentrations

(Tables 2a, 3a, 4a; Figures 2-5). Of all nutrient species, ammonia

levels were the most erratic and void of pattern temporally (Tables 1,

2a, 3a, 4a; Figures 2-5).

Aside from Carpenter's Creek, the greatest contribution of nutrients

was made by storm water runoff separately or combined with runoff carrying

fertilizers used in lawns and gardens. Storm water runoff alone was found

to be a heavy contributor of nutrients, particularly organic nitrogen,

as well as B.O.D. (Table 5). Fertilizer contribution of elemental ni-

trogen to the Bayou was estimated to range from 600 to 1520 pounds

annually.

Rainwater contributions were mostly in the form of total Kjeldahl

nitrogen (mean values of 379 ppb) and ammonia nitrogen (mean values of

280 ppb). This reflects the industrial and rapid growth of the area.

Concentrations of other considered species in this source were negligible.

Encroachment of Pensacola Bay water into Bayou Texar showed surpri-

singly little contribution of nutrients (Table 6). This is most likely

due to the fact that, under present conditions, the presence of tressels

and bridges slow down tidal and current flows into Bayou Texar. This










is further evidenced by little variations in salinities in the Bayou

(Tables 2b, 3b, 4b).

Temporally, primary productivity measurements, as detected by the

radiocarbon technique, correlated strongly with the nutrient concentra-

tions, as exemplified by periods of high productivity and high nitrogen

concentrations in surface waters (best seen in total Kjeldahl nitrogen).

Effects on bottom waters were less evident, most likely due to the over-

riding effects of lesser light availability (Tables 2a, 3a, 4a and 7;

Figure 5). Spatially, the primary productivity-nutrient relationships

show an inverse trend, in that lower Bayou stations showed the highest

productivity. This lower primary productivity in the upper Bayou stations

in the presence of nutrient abundance is probably caused by lower light

availability due to greater siltation at these upper stations.

Phytoplankton counts also support the primary productivity-nutrient

correlations, although these counts show somewhat the expected lag behind

nutrients, as is also the case for carbon fixation (Figure 6).

Basically, the Bayou's ecology is that of approaching eutrophication.

It is a body of water with a pattern of hindered circulation caused by a

narrow and shallow opening to Pensacola Bay, and the presence of one

bridge and a railroad tressel which aid in the impeding of circulation

and flushing of the system. This is evidenced by the relatively low

contributions of nutrients from Pensacola Bay to the Bayou waters. The

Bayou's drainage basin of nearly 11000 acres has been under heavy develop-

ment resulting in the alteration or destruction of much of the watershed.

The effect has been most drastic in the Carpenter's Creek area resulting

in high concentrations of silt and sand and nutrients in the storm runoff

water. This factor has resulted in the shallowing of the north end of










the Bayou and creating deeper central sections (Figure 1).

Nutrient contributions are primarily from inadequate sewage and

storm water runoff facilities which funnel pollutants from these sources

into Bayou Texar via Carpenter's Creek as the primary inflow source, and

numerous large stormwater sources around the Bayou periphery, which con-

tribute substantial concentration of nutrients to its waters (Tables 1,5;

Figure 1). This nutrient abundance, coupled with the relative stagnancy

of the Bayou waters, aids in the formation of "nutrient pools" which,

when all other factors are favorable, results in algal blooms (Hannah,

Simmons, and Moshiri, 1973). If warm, clear and calm weather persists

for any lengthy period of time, these blooms soon assume massive propor-

tions, and the eventual death of the cells and subsequent decomposition

of bacteria and fungi cause a substantial depletion in the dissolved

oxygen content of the Bayou waters. It is suspected that this oxygen

depletion, coupled with algal metabolites, is responsible for the numer-

ous fish kills which have been reported from this Bayou during the past

many summers. These oxygen depletions are usually neither predictable

nor of long duration, and generally follow periods of high primary prod-

uctivity and oxygen production (Tables 3b, 4b, 5b; Figures 3-5). This

is true even in the bottom waters in the summer during which time a

steady low oxygen reading would be expected due to stratification and

stagnation if an established eutrophic condition already existed.

Therefore, although the erratic nature of the various factors stud-

ied point to a certain degree of instability characteristic of eutrophic

communities, the fleeting nature of such instabilities in the Bayou point

to a situation which, if properly and promptly attended, will eventually

yield an essentially healthy biotic community. Suggestions for steps










which must be taken in order to implement such a restoration are:

1. Improvement of circulation patterns in the Bayou by improving

tidal and current exchanges between Pensacola Bay and Bayou

Texar. This may be accomplished by the dredging of a new

and more direct entrance to the Bayou east of the present

channel.

2. Improvement of storm water and sewer facilities which now

contribute to siltation and nutrification of the Bayou.

3. Improvement of the Carpenter's Creek flow pattern to decrease

flow speed during periods of high stormwater runoff.

4. Dredging selectively to eliminate stagnancy in the areas of

the Bayou now highly silted from storm water siltation

activity.

5. A program of education aimed at a wiser and more frugal use

of artificial fertilizers in the immediate Texar area.

These recommendations have been made to the proper authorities

and are now being studied for implementation.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


We wish to acknowledge gratefully the assistance of the various

officials at The University of West Florida for providing matching funds

and services for this work. Appreciation is also extended to Dr. T.S.

Hopkins of the Faculty of Biology, The University of West Florida, for

providing solutions for needs which arose from time to time.














LITERATURE CITED


Goldman, C.R. 1960. Primary productivity and limiting factors in three
lakes of the Alaskan Peninsula. Ecol. Monogr. 30:207-270.

Goldman, C.R. and Carter, R. C. 1965. An investigation by rapid C-14
bioassay of factors affecting the cultural eutrophication of Lake
Tahoe, California-Nevada. J. Water Poll. Control Fed. 37:1044-1059.

Goldman, C.R., Moshiri, G.A., and de Amezaga 1972. Synotptic studies of
productivity in Lake Tahoe CCalifornia-Nevada). P. 1-21. In:
R. Sage Murphy and David Nyquist Ceds.) International symposium
on water pollution control in cold climates. U.S. Government Print-
ing Office. Publication #5501-0208.

Hannah, R.P., Simmons, A.T. and Moshiri, G.A. 1973. Nutrient-productivity
relationships in a bayou estuary. J. Water Poll. Control Fed.
45:208-2520.

Kahn, L. and Brezenski, F.T. 1967. Determination of nitrate in estuarine
waters. Comparison of a hydrazine reduction and a brucine procedure
and a modification of a brucine procedure. Env. Sci. Tech. 1:488-491.

Miller, F.L. and Miller, E.E. 1948. On the determination of organic
nitrogen in sea water. Anal. Chem. 20:481.

Moshiri, G.A., Hannah, R.P. Simmons, A.T., Landry, G.C. and Whiting, N.H.
1972. Determination of a nitrogen-phosphorus budget for Bayou Texar,
Pensacola, Florida. Publication #17. Florida Water Resources Research
Center, Gainesville, Florida.

Solorzano, L. 1969. Determination of ammonia in natural waters by the
phenolhypoc-lorite method. Limnol. Oceanog. 14:799-801.

Strickland, J.D.H. and Parsons, T.R. 1972. A practical handbook of
seawater analysis. Fish. Res. Bd. Canada. Bull. 167. 311 p.

Viets, Jr., F.G. 1971. Water quality tn relation to farm use of ferti-
Sizer. B science 21:460-467.

























APPENDIX A

TABLES












Sampling date


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
2-14-73
2-21-73
3-28-73
5-02-73


Total POL-P
(ppb)





4






64
176
115
94
9

25
7

0
5
5
19
3

104
15
9
0
330
73


P0L-P TKN NH -N NO -N Organic Carbon
(ppb) (ppb) (ppb) (ppm) (ppm)


15
211
115
155

60

116
61
37
153

26
4.9
180
77

57
209
219
216
194-
138
95
119

59
234
141


Inorganic Carbon
(ppm)


0.37
0.47
0.57
0.83
0.46
0.12
0.33
0.29
0.33
0.76
0.42
0.65
0.78
0.74
0.06
0.76
1.22
0.92
0.96

0.75
0.32
0.36
0.23
0.33
1.14
0.70
0.87
1.02
0.65
0.38
1.37


Table 1. Carpenter's Creek Physico-chemical Data (See Figure 2).











Sampling date


5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


Total PO -P
(ppb)

0
123
26
100
6

10
15
12
19
0
9
0
0
9
14
9
11
27


PO,-P
(ppb)

10
71
4
71
3
8
2
0
11
3
0
0

8
8

15
5
5

8


TKN NH -N NO -N
(ppb) ( pb) po)


529
408
356
856
324

348
500
309
476
372
282
431
358
670
529
408
397
309

231


80
216
89
418
54
62
57
64
37
165
133
793
175
75
122
60
267
74
99

98


0.78
0.36
0.82
0.53
0.81

0.54
0.69
0.35
0.08
1,09
0.72
0.66
0.68
0.60
0.37
0.63
0.79
0.51

0.61


Organic Carbon
(ppm)


35.25
6.82

26.20
6.50
5.87
3.13
9.32
0. 14
7.94
4.45
2.23
7.22
3.27
3.21
2.41
8.36
3.29


Inorganic Carbon
(ppm)


6.59
4.36

3.09
3.09
3.07
6.11
1.18
4.02
3.52
3.64
4.46
2. 40
2.96
1.71
3.32
2.94
3.75


36 49


Table I: (Cont.)










Sampling Date



6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73


Total PO -P
(ppb)






25






45
82
25



522
18



15
18


14
8
19
5
6
3


PO -P Total K
(ppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampling Station 2 (See Figure 3).


Organic
Carbon
(ppm)


NH -N



5
3
0
2
0
15
0
3
0
21
186
0
90
17



117
45
17
161
192
44
5
41


72
27
25
80
35


NO -N



0.04
0.00
0.02
0.02
0,02
0.03
0.04
0.04
0.06
0.00
0.03
0.00
0.20
0.00



0,09
mg
0.00
0.07
0.26
0.18
0.07
0.02
0,04
0.04
0.09
0.03
0,03
0.03
0.05
0.07


Inorganic
Carbon
(ppm)








-


i

i
















15.42

10.56


Table 2a.












Sampling Date


Total P0 -P
(ppbr~


PO -P
(p Wb


1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


Total K
Nitrogen
(ppb)


95
160
58

100

229
159
413
204
282
423
484

421
529
555
724
384
348
389

410
165
296
600
319


233

41


NH -N
(ppb)


77
25
62
88
57
54
13
204
103
73
73
68
18
104
94
42
53
48
26
7
141

106
93
43
67
25


52


NO N Organic
Carbon
(ppm)


0.38
0.36
0.66
0.66
0.20
0.06
0.19
0.91
0.29
0.49
0.43
0.22
0.11

0.22
0.15
0.19
0.23
0,00
0.09
0.49

0.34
0.39
0.52
0.29
0. 10


0.23


6.53
9.07
8.81


56.78
10.56
2.59
4.23
1,55

11.73
7.59
1.42

1.42
0.49

0.81
3.29


Inorganic
Carbon
(ppm)



6,24
-

8.81
4.88
4.02
5.82
6.55
7.57

8.37
6.22
9.42
10.91
11.45
10.74
11.05
14.39
6.31
26.70
4.10
5.33
7.16
7.22
3.75


Table 2a: (Cont.)











Sampling Date



6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73


Total POI,-P
(ppb)






25






45
82
25



522
18



15
18


14
8
19
5
6
3
26
18


PO -P
(ppb)


2
3
6
2
2
6
31
6
1
3
0
2
7
1


Total K
Nitrogen
(ppb)T

76
76
76
9
122
214
158
14
22

276
380
201
199




128
197


302
99


102
195
199
209
199
204
158
221


NH_-N
(ppb)


5
3
0
2
0
15
0
3
0
21
186
0
90
17



117
45
17
161
192
44
5
41


72
27
25
80
35
50
20


NOI-N Organic
(ppm) Carbon
(ppm)


0.04
0.00
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.04
0.06
0.00
0.03
0.00
0.20
0.00



0,09
0.00
0.07
0.26
0.18
0.07
0.02


0,04
0.09
0.03
0.03
0.05
0.07
0.18
0.21


Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 2 (See Figure 3).


Inorgani c
Carbon
(ppm)


-


15.42

10.56


Table 2a.













Sampling Date


Total P0O-P
(ppb)


2-07-73
2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


PO4-P
(ppb)


5
0
0
0
19
0
7
4
7
14
2
3
3
8
5
13
0
0


3
15
8
0
2

8


Total K
Nitrogen
(ppb)

142

353


379
290
315
232
365
410

264
541
717
559
300
439
329

475
167
145
556
247

241

39


NH-N_
(ppb)


41
36
52
55
45
185
120
198
73
106
39
182
138
101
332
124
76
55
69

175
48
30
111
35

70


NO3 N
(ppm)


0.28
0.07
0,25
0,07
0.12
0.70
0,14
0,20
0.28
0.02
0.04

0.06
0.00
0.18
0.01
0.03
0.06
0.09

0.31
0.17
0.15
0.14
0.11


Organic Carbon
(ppm)







6.18
9.96
11,03
10,29

11.87
9.27
13.92
3.98
7.73

8.40
2.76




2.77
7.27
3.33


Inorganic Carbon
(ppm)


10.37


9,40
7.10
4.56
9.93
9.43
8.10

10.56
11.64
13.92
12.96
14,83

12.00
18.19
16.48
20.52
10.03
6.42
6.99
0.36
7.18


0.10


Table 2a: (Cont.)













Sampling Date


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73


Temprature
( --C)


5.2
6,8

8.1

8.4
8.2
7.2
7.9
7.9

7.9

7.4
6.9


31.5

32.0

30.0
31.9

29,0
27,0
28.0

19,6

22.3
15.6
17.0
16,5
16.0
11.9
12.9

14.8
18.2


Salinity D.O.
(o/oo) (ppm)


15.1

16.8
17.0
15.5

17.6

14.2
13.3
10,0
14.0
12,0
7.0
7,3

6.0
7.2


8.70
7.30
7.80
6.70
7.90
7.60
10.50
8.90
8.40
7.50
3.90
3.80
5.00
5.40
5.70
5.50
9.70
11,90
7.10
7.00
7.50
4.70
3.52
4.58
6.07
8,40
6.48
7.64
6.71
10.60
5.21
9.36

9.31
8.71


B.O.D.
(5 day ppm)




























6.70



6,70

7.70

4.84
6. LF4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-


-
-




6-7
-

6-7
7,7
4.8
6-4


Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampling Station 2 (See Figure 3).


Table 2b.











Sampling Date


2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


pH




6.2
7.0
6.7
7.2
7.4
7.4
7.5
5.1
5.4
5.4
6.6
5,2
5.1
6.7
6.2
6,0
7.4
7.0
6.7
7.4
6.7
7.4


Temperature
C)



16.6
17.9
23.5
26.8
31.9
29.0
31.1
30.8
27.9
30.5
31.2
28.1
29.5
27.1
23.8
22.6
16.0
17.8
22.1
18.5
21.0
23.5


Salinity
(o/oo)



8.5
2.3
0.0
1.5
2.3
3.5
4.5
6.1
4,0
7.9
8.8
7.8
8.5
9.2
14.0


4.0
2.1
4,2
8.1
4.0


DO.
(ppm)




8.90
7.86
9.07
8.70
7.70
9.27
13.36
5.61
9.45
8.93
4.48
10.56
8.37
7.16
7.59
8.22
8.17
6.73
8.62
8.42
10.85


B.O.D.
( 5 day ppm)





4.07
1.33
2.70
2.92
3.81
5,03
2.25
3.37
10.59
0.61
7.56
8.17
4.39
1.64
3.04
.93
1.37
1.42
1.68
5.94


Table 2b:


(Cont.)












Sampling Date


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73


Temperature
""TO~~c---


4.4
7.3

8.3

8.4
8.2
7.6
8.2
8.0

7.9

7.6
6.9
-

-
-

















8.0
7.9


31.0

31.5
30.6

27.0
25.5
27.5

22.0

22.2
15.6
16.0
15.5
16.0
12.9
14.2

15.2
17.5


Sal inity
0/00



















17.6

15.7
20.7
16.5

21.2

16.0
13.8
15.0
15.5
13.0
7.0
8.8

8.0
8.0


D.,O B.O.D.
(ppm) (5 day ppm)


6.40
3.80
7.10
6.10
7.50
7.80
8.80
7.90
8,60
7.40
2.32
3.16
4.40
4.21
3,21
3.40
7.50
1.80
2.21
3.88
4.20
3.60
3.15
6.40
6.07
8.60
6.05
6.71
7.17
10.40
5.20
9.45

4.78
8.52


-









-















6.50
-














2,90

7,62

2.50
3.03


Table 2b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 2 (See Figure 3).









Sampling Date


2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


pH Temperature
(OC)---


6.2
6.8
6,9
7.3
7.2
7.5
7.4
5.2
6.0
5.5
6.9
4.8
5.0
6.7
6.8
6.0
7.3
7.1
7.1
7.4
6.5
6.7


17.2
18.5
23.7
27,0
30.0
29.8
31.1
31.1
30.5
31.4
30,8
28.8
29.0
27.5
23.2
23.0
17.2
17.5
22.9
16.5
20.5
23.5


Sal inity
0/00



10.2
8.0
2.0
8.0
5.0
4.8
7.1
9.0
13.7
9.9
10.1
13.1
11.0
12.0
18.8


7.8
4.3
5.8
10.1
4.2


D.O.'
(ppm)




6,18
7.58
4.61
7.79
7,40
6.47
7.86
3.81
5.46
8.19
1.13
6.55
7.86
6.41
8.18
7.27
7.62
6.64L
8.87

9.55


B.O.D.
(5 day ppm)




3.08
0.98
2.34
3.23
3.51
5.10
6.81
3.53
4.43
12.81
0.65
7.64
7.12
0.26
3.08
3.04
2.11
2.31
3,12
3.93
4.69


Table 2b:


(Cont.)













Sampling Date


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
Table 3a.


Total PO -P
TppiF --


19






72
46
15



467
32



26
7


5
6
4
4
4
5
12
8
Bayou Texar


PO -P
pp b


3
2
5
1
3
6
2
1
34
0
0
2
5
4



0
13
8
9
0

5
4

6
1
1
1
1
2
10
6
Physico-chemical


Total K
Nitrogen
(ppb)


93
94
78
20
336
237
67
151
21

176
318
93
249




71
84


93
168


209
210
196
205
187
205
116
186
Data for Surface


NH -N



4
3
2
1
2
41
3
1
0
11
77
0
55
0



23
0
4
118
69
39
15
0

31
43
50
22
51
26
31
22
Waters


NO -N
rPPXT


0.04
0.02
0.02
0.01
0,08

0,08
0.08
0.08
0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.02
0.00







0,02
0.01
0.00
0.04
0.97


0.21
0.02


0.01
0.21
0.09
0.03
0.02
0.04
0,20
0.20
SSam020
at Samolinq


Or anic Carbon Inorganic Carbon
7PPmJR '(ppm)


13.88

11.04


Station 4


(See Figure 4).











Sampling Date



2-07-73
2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74



n


Total-PO,,-P
(ppb)


13
1
14
103
580
136
16
23
63
24
42

14
8
16
26
0
9
0
0
9
56
14
18
48

52

37


PO -P Total K
(ppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


49

113
26
100
228
266
226
221
340
526

345
531
513
576
223
202
436
442
465
102
178
694
266

207

42


NH -N
(ppb)


30
42
1
53
23
123
38
83
67
60
28
20
24
9
69
80
45
26
135
14
103
37
93
35
36

36

49


NO-N Organic Carbon Inorganic Carbon
(ppm) (7ppm) (ppm)


0.27
0.16
0.23
0.29
0.17
0.34
0.34
0.19
0.12
0.04
0.19

0.11
0.00
0.02
0.16
0.23
0.06
0.95
0.20
0.36
0.16
0.32
0.09
0.02

0. 14

51


6.40
9.50
9.26
12.44

88.67
7.56
4.23
6.23


10.33
7.78
2.53
1.77
2.08
5.67
2.43
1.22
2.20


9.97
-

8.90
4.83
4.56
6.44
7.95
8.15

8.68
7.59
10.82
10.96
-

11.42
13.58
4.71
10.94
7.64
3.70
6.22
6.98
8.16


Table 3a: (cont.)












Sampling Date Total PO -P PO -P
(ppb) (ppbT


Total -K
Nitrogen
(ppb)


NH -N NO -N ,Ora!2nic
(ppBp (ppM) Carbon
(ppm)


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
Table 3a.


3
2
3
1
21 1
1
1
0
1
4
1
72 4
131 0
14 0
-- i


97 0
70 7
9
78
0
25
4 4
3

8 4
6 1
4 2
6 1
6 3
3 1
13 13
19 3
18 5
Bayou Texar Physico-chemical


61
83
58
21
111
149
91
87
54

160
206
166
266




189
127


334
114


121
99

204
213
116
138
92
64
Data for


13 0.04
3 0.00
0 0.02
55 0.01
0 0.00
3 0.01
5 0.06
2 0.05
0 0.00
8 0.00
0 0.00
0 0.00
68 0.00
15 0.00



75 0.01
21 0.00
9 0.03
158 0.11
112 0.07
51 0.06
115 0.00
0

32
25 0.01
17 0.04
37 0.02
107 0.02
21 0.06
95 0.04
19 0.04
0 0.18
Bottom Waters at Sampling


- -





_ -
















14.04

11.61


10.53
Station 4 (See Figure 4).


Inorganic
Carbon
(ppm)












Sampling Date



2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


Total PO_-P
(ppb)


2
17
11
130
184
33
21
44
25
16

19
10
38
32

24
11
0
14
83
30
9
51


PO P Total K
(ppb) Nitrogen
(ppbF-


46
23
43
414
207
233
203
371
469

352
522
674
794
235
236
324
248
140
200
261
750
247


NH -N
-3-
(ppb)

18
46
48
12
148
35
105
66
52
28
126
63
28
294
155
30
28
91
42
95
160
0
22
36


NO N

(ppm)

0.05
0.14
0.16
0.11
0.36
0.08
0.10
0.08
0.06
0.05

0.02
0.00
0.01
0.00
0.01
0.25
0.15
0.15
0.20
0.23
0.02
0.01


Organic
Carbon
(ppm)





6.78
9.86
11.45
11.71

27.96
7.96

6.10
8.40

9.56
13.20
2.12


6.13
4.58
7.36
8.38


Inorga ni c
Carbon
(ppm)





5.06
9.20
9.33
8.38

10.93
12.54

10.84
16.40

13.99
14.04
15.51
19.62
9.11
4.41
5.18
0.54
3.34


49 0.06


Table 3a: CCont.)











Sampling Date


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73


pH_





















4.4
7.1

8.5

8.4
8.0
7.5
8.2
7.6

8.4

7.8


Temperature
(-c














31.0

32.0
30.5

27.8
27.5
27.5

21.0

22.0
15.8
16.5
13.5
15.0
10.2
12.8

13,7


Salinity D.O.
(0/007 (ppm)


17.8

18.8
18.5
15.5

17.8

14.8
14.8
15.0
15.0
12.8
7.5
8.3

7.2


8.80
8.30
7.90
7.90
8.50
6.80
9.90
9.90
9.30
7.60
4.63
4.20
5.37
5.47
9.60
10.00
9.90
5.99
9.10
6.00
5.10
3.98
8.50
6.37
9.50
6.48
6.83
7.52
10.60
5.67
9.90

9.36


B.0.D.
(5 day ppm)


























6.90



8.60

1.75

4.44


Table 3b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampling Station 4 (See Figure 4).












Samp i ng Date


2-07-73
2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


pH


7.6


6.8
7.9
7.2
7.9
8.0
7.6
8.2
5.0
5.4
6.4
7.6
5.1
6.9
7.1
7.8
7.5
7.2
7.3
7.1
7.3
7.1
8.7


Temerature
FE---

18.0


16.6
18.2
23.7
27.2
31.9
30.1
31.4
32.0
29.0
31.0
30.4
28.4
28.9
26.9
23.5
23.1
15.2
17.2
22.9
19.0
20.3
23.0


Salinity
(F/o0)

7.6


9.1
3.2
2.0
1.8
3.8
4.8
6.0
7.8
6.8
7.1
7.1
10.1
12.2
8.3
15.7


7.4
2.3
4.5
7.8
5.0


D. O.
(ppm)

9.64



10.54
7.99
5.48
9.50
8.18
10.25
12.26
7.11
9.59
11.25
6.18
13.62
10.74
9.06
9.16
9.20
9.29
8.09
9.70
9.54
10.67


B. 0. D.
(5 day ppm)

7.20



4.18
1.30
1.91
3.04
3.70
4.54
4.93
2.43
2.56
11.24
3.76
7.85
6.12
4.64
1.56
1.83
1.61
2.15
2.11
2.24
5.81


Table 3b: (Cont.)












Sampi ng Date


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
Table 3b.


pH Temperature
(cr--


7.7
7.5

8.5

8.6
8.2
8.0
8.2
8.0

8.5

7.7
7.5
Bayou Texar


30.0

30.5

30.5
30.0

26.5
26.1
27.0

22.0

28.0
17.4
16.0
15.0
16.5
12.8
12.0

14.7
16.8


Sa iniyt
cr/oo)


19.1

20.1
22.1
16.0

24.0

16.1
16.1
17.0
16.6
14.8
9.0
12.0

8.8
8.8


D.0O.
(ppm)

5.70
5.00
7.70
6.60
7.40
6.70
10.30
8.60
9.00
7.10
2.68
2.63
2.40
3.89
4.05
3.70
5.10
2.60
4.26
7.60
3.90
3.70
3.64
7.80
6.43
9.50
6.19
7.75
7.00
10.40
5.21
10.04

5.32
9.09


B.0.D.
( 5 day ppm)


-





















2.80



2.40

2.34

3.80
7.06


Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 4 (See Figure 4).












Samp ing Date


2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


pH Temperature
(C)


6.9
7.5
7.3
8.0
7.8
7.2
8.2
5.5
6.2
6.6
7.3
5.2
6.9
6.8
7.9
7.7
7.4
7.3
7.0
7.4
6.4
7.7


16.2
18.8
23.5
27.0
30.0
29.8
31.4
31.9
30.0
31.2
30.2
28.9
28.9
27.1
22.5
23.2
16.8
17.6
22.3
17.5
20.5
23.0


Salinity
(0/00)



9.3
9.0
3.0
8.5
6.0
5.0
8.1
10.8
13.8
11.0
8.0
13.9
7.2
14.0
20.0


7.9
5.0
5.0
16.7
5.0


D. O.
(ppm)




9.27
7.67
6.55
6.63
7.98
8.02
7.60
4.62
6.75
10.70
2,06
6.55
7.07
8.37
6.22
8.79
8.17
7.48
9.30
8.42
12.54


B. O. D.
( 5 day ppm)




3.08
1 .21
3.77
3.23
3.31
3.55
5.90
3.49
3.64
11.41

8.43
6.11
3.89
1.96
1.96
1.49
1.72
2.39
2.06
7.68


Table 3b:


(Cont.)












Total PO -P P04-P
(ppb) (ppb7


Total K
Nitrogen
(ppbT


NH N NO -N
ppbv -(p m)


Organic Carbon Inoranic Carbon
(ppm (ppm)


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-27-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
Table 4a.


3
2
5
2
23 0
5
I1
0
l
I1
0
72 2
68 1
44 26



448 0
81 11
13
9
0
33
10 4
5

5 6
3 2
4 2
5 1
5 0
4 1
9 1
8 4
14 3
Bayou Texar Physico-chemical


145
88
71
18
133
163
109
62
31

134
373
103
341




134
134


136
146


119
205
194
199
178
211
67
117
128
Data for


18
5
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
23
7
0
22


1

10

8
95
60
26
6


28
31
20
19
53
17
20
14
21
Surface Waters


0.02
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.01
0.00
0.08
0.03
0.00
0.01
0.00
0.03
0.00
0.00



0.07
0.00
0.04
0.63
0.18
0.07
0.00
0.03

0.02
0.04
0.05
0.04
0.02
0.06
0.15
0.15
0.22
at Sampling Station


14-58

10-83


10.31
6 (See Figure 5).
i
-
-






-
-
i
145
-08

-
-o 3
6' SeeFiure5)


Sampling Date












Sampling Date



2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


x

n


Total POI-P
(ppb)


7
16
19
150
128
42
48
68
19
22

14
17
0
26
0
10
3
0
14
97
10
9
32


39

35


PO -P Total K
pb Nitrogen
(ppbU


NH -N NO -N
(pjUbT7 T


0.08
0.14
0.07
0.06
0.30
0.02
0.05
0.03
0.00
0.20

0.01
0.00
0.01
0.11
0.11
0.03
0.16
0.55
0.16
0.13
0.15
0.00
0.02


0.08

52


Organic Carbon Inorganic Carbon
(ppmn -- (ppm-


6,78
10.38
10.18
13.78

12.36
2.73
5.04
5.28
1.66

8.84
4.28



1.10
2.00
2.45
1.28


-


5.68
7.22
8.30
8.37

8.95
8.90
11.85
10.89
14.54

10.16
14.39
15.37
24.19
9.97
7.33
7.05
9.00
9.79


Table 4a: (Cont.)











Sampling Date



6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73


Total POI-P
(ppb






31






7
15
14



48
20



19
12


9
12
10
5
4
10
11
18
17


POL-P Total K
(ppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


67
78
8
156
178
42
117
41

187
158
159
316




91
143


346
83



186
202
195
187
109
609
213
117


NH-N NO -N Organi c
(ppb) (ppm) Carbon
(ppm


11
9
0
3
0
6
0
0
0
20
66
8
74
19




3
42
156
176
27
24
10

29
22
16
26
51
17
37
22
23


0.08
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.00
0.01
0.02
0.06
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.05
0.00
0.00



0.06
0.00
0.04
0.46
0,10
0.03
0.03


0.00
0.00
0.04
0.04
0.02
0.10
0.15
0.15
0.14


Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 6 (See Figure 5).


I norganic
Carbon
(pp-M
(~-





























14.09

11.10


10.81


Table 4a.











Sampling Date



2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


Total PO_-P
TppbT


4
13
3
120
162
0
42
55
20
12

12
10
40
28
4
11
3
0
9
37
12
11
63


POi-P Total K
(ppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


99
80
434
190
290
222
276
350
474

359
469
752
621
286
211
833
352
265
237
237
444
338


248


NH -N
(ppb)


17
34
27
5
65
51
83
39
90
10
118
86
20
324
121
73
16
128
18
59
83
0
34
44


NO -N
(ppm)


0.03
0.22
0.02
0.06
0.10
0.00
0.05
0.04
0.00
0.14

0.01
0,00
0.00
0.69
0.00
0.22
0.04
0.12
0.10
0.07
0.25
0.00
0.01


Organic
Carbon






8.13
10.54
12.02
13,37

40.76
8.59
5.49
4.27
5.40

15.54



1.10
2.87
2.83

3.43


Inorganic
Carbon
(ppmT





6.55
9.67
9.91
7.95

11.76
12.22
13.51
12.56
13.36

13.64
17.11
17.40
26.19
9.34
7.07
7.16
14.50
8.54


46 0.07


Table 4a: (Cont.)












Sampling Date


pH-


Temperature
(0C


Sal inity
ToI-07


D.,0,
(PmT


B. 0.D,
5 7day ppm)


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
Table 4b.


30.0
-

-









-30.0
30.






31.0

27.2
6.9 26.5
7.2 28.5

8.5 20.0

8,4 22.0
7.9 14.4
7.8 15.0
8.2 13.0
8.1 15.0
10.2
8.6 12.0

7.9 12.1
7.8 17.8
Bayou Texar Physico-chemical


18.0

18.6
19.2
17.0

22.0

15.0
14.3
15.0
15.0
13.5
8.5
6.0

7.1
8.0
Data for Surface


8.70
8.50
7.60
7.80
8.00
7.40
8.60
8.90
8.60
6.50
4.79
2.89
3.70
4.63
5.21
7.80
10.70
9.30
5.80
9.30
6.60
5.60
4.09
8.50
5.60
9.30
6.64
6.89
6.94
10.80
5.84
9.99

5.32
9.70
Waters at Sampl


-




-


-

















2.40



1.70

1.71

4.51
7.57
ing Station 6 (See Figure 5).











Sampling Date


2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-73
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74

Table 4b: (Cont.)


pH




6.9
8.4
7.5
8.3
8.5
7.9
8.4
6.0
7.1
6,7
7.4
5.4
6.5
7.4
7.9
8.2
7.7
7.5
7.3
7.3
8.2
7.7


Temperature
--y---



16.2
17.8
23.5
27.2
31.9
30.0
32.9
31.4
29.9
31.4
31.0
29.1
29.0
27.0
23.5
23.6
14.9
17.1
22.1
17.4
21.0
22.3


Salinity D.O, B.0.D.
'- (-ppm- T5 day ppm)


9.4
3.8
3.0
5.0
4.6
4.8
7.0
8.3
8.2
9.5
8.0
8.8
8.0
10.0
16.7


8.0
4.1
4.9
9.0
5.5


10.17
5.13
5.80
9.68
7.79
9.43
12,79
8.05
8.94
9.69
5.62
14.14
10.74
9.06
9.82
8.92
8.92
7.95
10.08
10.48
9.55


2.54
1.31
1.63
6.31
3.12
4.10
5.19
3.37
3.00
9.03
8.90
8.28
4.80
3.00
2.22

0.99
2.01
1.40
2.81
3.37











Sampling Date


pH Temperature
p-


6-15-72
6-22-72
6-29-72
7-06-72
7-13-72
7-20-72
7-27-72
8-03-72
8-10-72
8-17-72
8-24-72
8-31-72
9-11-72
9-14-72
9-15-72
9-16-72
9-18-72
9-22-72
9-29-72
10-06-72
10-14-72
10-15-72
10-20-72
10-26-72
11-03-72
11-14-72
11-18-72
11-28-72
12-01-72
12-07-72
1-10-73
1-17-73
1-24-73
1-31-73
2-07-73
Table 4b.


8.5
7.4

8.5

8.4
8.2
7.9
8.2
8.1

8.5

8.0
7.7
Texa r


-
-- -


-
-







30.0

31.0
29.5 22.6

26.0 21.4
25.9 22.1
26.5 18.0

21.2 25.0

22,0 15.6
16.3 16.5
15.0 18.0
14.0 16.5
16.5 15.0
11.5 10.9
12.3 10.1

13.3 9.0
16.3 9.0
Physico-chemical Data for


Sal inity
T370/0


D.0O.
(ppm-T


B. 0.D.
.T day)


4.90
7.10
7.70
7.30
7.40
8.60
7.60
7.60
6.70
2.68
1.47
1.90
3.47
3.21
0.50
5.30
4,20
3.86
9.10
5.00
4.40
3.75
8.80
5.60
9.30
5.90
6.83
6.71
10.60
5.56
9.99

9.62
9.51
Bottom Waters


-

-



















2.40



1.50

1.71

4.20
7.76
at Sampling Station 6 (See Figure 5).


Bayou











Sampi QU DatT


2-14-73
2-21-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-15-73
6-25-73
7-06-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
8-09-73
8-21-73
9-13-73
9-30-73
10-14-73
11-03-73
11-25-72
12-16-73
1-06-74
2-03-74
3-03-74
3-31-74
4-21-74


6.8
8.0
7.5
8.1
8.1
7.7
8.2
6.2
6.9
7.0
7.3
5.5
6.8
7.1
8.0
8.2
7.4
7.6
7.2
6.8
7.7
8.7


16.2
18.8
23.0
26.8
29.8
29.0
30.1
31.1
29.9
31.0
30.4
28.9
28.0
27.0
22.5
22.8
16.5
17.3
22.1
15.8
20.9
22.0


Table 4b: (Cont.)


9.8
9.0
4.0
10.0
7.0
5.2
10.5
11.0
14.0
11.8
11.4
15.1
13.0
14.0
20.5


8.0
7.0
7.1
7.7
6.0


9.45
4.50
6.79
7.03
7.79
6.47
10.22
4.87
6.75
9.55
1.03
9.88
8.38
8.67
8.05
8.60
8.48
6.68
9.69
8.61
9.55


1.82
.70
2.74
1.90
3.51
2.92
4.22
2.81
2.18
-
2.34
6.86
3.43
2.07
2.55
1.58
1.43
1.29
1.78
3.00
3.55


Sal i ni ty 0. B. 0. D


Lem-eeerat lre











Physico-chemical Data for Run Off Waters at Sampling Station
R1 (See Figure 1 ).


Sampling _Date



6-04-73
6-06-73(a)
6-06-73(b)
6-11-73
6-14-73(a)
6-14-73(b)
6-17-73
6-25-73(a)
6-25-73(b)
7-02-73
7-06-73(a)
7-06-73(b)
7-10-73
7-14-73
7-16-73
7-19-73
7-23-73
7-27-73(a)
7-27-73(b)
7-30-73
8-01-73
8-06-73
8-12-73(a)
8-12-73(b)
8-14-73
8-21-73
8-28-73(a)
8-28-73(b)


x
0--
n


Temp.



27.8
27.5
27.5
27.8
24.0
28.0
23.0
28.1
27.9
28.0
24.0
27.0
26.5
28.5

29.0
25.8
26.2
26.1
26.3
27.1
25.0
25.5
25.8
25.1
25.5

29.0


NO -N
(ppm)


0.89
0.16
0.22
1.21
2.06
0.44
0.41
2.76
0.84
0.99
0.33
0.08
1.24
0.449
2.51
0.42
0.97
0.08
0.08
0.65
0.63
0.98
0.01
0.00
0.11
1.33
1.19
0.60


0.77
0.72
28


NH,-N Total K
Tppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


90
138
120
13
78
106
111
87
436
36
281
117
50
21
56
168
36
47
0
69
261
81
50
30
54
70
0
725

119
151.63
28


97
197
217
306
831
708
275
778
813
448
464
373
2148
144
209
544
220
293
203
524
470
356
284
151
229
800
262
1539

496
477.26
28


PO-P Inorqan i c
(ppb) Carbon
(ppm)


95
47
50
80
23
120
42
5
78
34
66
58
2
23
1
39
2
42
75
13
13
4.
31
40
0
0
0
103


5.36
2.76
6.60
8.12
8.28
4.31
6.04
1.56
2.41
4.74
2.79
2.40
3.53
3.43
4.443
2.96
5.61
4.37
2.08
3.02
3.52
2.82
2.10
2.71
4.16
11.77
2.54
5.58


39
34.78
28


Table 5








Table-5 (Cont.) Physico-chemical Data for Run
R2 (See Figure 1 ).


Off Waters at Sampling Station


Sampling Date



6-04-73
6-06-73(a)
6-06-73(b)
6-11-73
6-14-73(a)
6-14-73(b)
6-17-73
6-25-73(a)
6-25-73(b)
7-02-73
7-06-73(a)
7-06-73(b)
7-10-73
7-14-73
7-16-73
7-19-73
7-23-73
7-27-73(a)
7-27-73(b)
7-30-73
8-01-73
8-06-73
8-12-73(a)
8-12-73(b)
8-14-73
8-21-73
8-28-73(a)
8-28-73(b)

x

n
n


T NO(ppm)-N
( c) (ppm)


25.5
29,2
28.1
26.0
30.5
29.0
23.0
29.0
28.0
28.0
23.5
26.5
30.0
29.5


28.9
28.0
28.6
28.5
28.8
28. 1
25.2
24.8
26.2
29.0

29.0


0.98
0.15
0.08
2.01
0.49
0.57
0.41
1.71
1.18
0.99
0.37
0.56
0.90
0.70
2.62
0.48
0.80
0.13
0.09
0.53
0,49
1.16
0,00
0.01
0.04
0.81
0.82
0.72

0.71
0.62
28


NH -N Total K
(ppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


128
57
111
62
71
263
111
101
517
36
226
491
0
20
37
110
25
8
13
26
409
0
42
39
13
71
0
945

140
213.03
28


208
239
186
259
533
624
275
922
1017
449
404
523
652
114
179
454
193
319
236
390
469
315
253
313
160
461
339
1765

438
338.08
28


POP jIniorganic
(ppb) Carbon
(ppm)


63
103
64
0
46
91
42
113
46
34
37
35
35
39
147
37
44
64
44
39
32
14
21
22
36
1145
88
103


5.27
4.01
3.16
4.54
5.57
6.80
6.04
2.31
10.33
4.74
1.51
5.33
4.88
5.42
8.19
3.24
4.45
5.05
4.02
4.07
3.67
6.18
2.56
3.36
6.46
11.37
6.85
4.47


208.97
28









Table 5 (Cont. )hysico-chemi cal
R3 (See Figure 1


Sam lini Date



6-04-73
6-06-73(a)
6-06-73(b)
6-11-73
6-14-73(a)
6-14-73(b)
6-17-73
6-25-73(a)
6-25-73(b)
7-02-73
7-06-73(a)
7-06-73(b)
7-10-73
7-14-73
7-16-73
7-19.73
7-23-73
7-27-73(a)
7-27-73(b)
7-30-73
8-01-73
8-06-73
8-12-73(a)
8-12-73(b)
8-14-73
8-21-73
8-28-73(a)
8-28-73(b)

x
a-
n


Run Off Waters at Sampling Station


Temp. NO N" NH -N Total K
TC) (ppm) (ppb) Nitrogen
(ppb)


31.2
28.0
30.0
30.9
27.8
29.2
26.1
31.0
28.1
37.0
24.8
26.0
30.5
31.5


33.8
28.4
28.6
33.9
32.0
32.1
24.5
24.8
31.9
30.0

29.0


0.14
0.17
0.33
0.26
0.39
0.45
0.36
0.10
1.04
0.24
0.18
0.46
0.09
0.00
0.00
0.47
0.07
0.10
0.05
0.13
0.63
0.14
0.00
0.04
0.02
0.04
0.18
0.82

0.25
0.26
28


80
126
166
141
2882
123
132
137
426
85
185
180
76
52
75
94
155
13
6
70
136
220
43
58
65
55
237
450

231
529.79
28


175
103
178
294
2732
553
282
657
1017
395
365
253
2009
161
110
619
374
240
271
421
489
389
302
249
281
400
404
1451

542
595.08
28


(ppb)


77
87
82
3
199
92
34
10
89
3
8
9
6
12
7
38
8
50
52
3
39
11
13
37
0
0
0
302


Inorgani c
Carbon
(ppm)


8.48
3.31
8.02
9.05
4.69
8.28
6.92
1.96
8.33
8.35
3.61
3.68
11.53
5.43
12.00
5.62
13.99
3.55
4.96
7.44
4.40
10.51
2.20
2.36
11.92
10.72
11.32
4.47


45
67.02
28


Data for
).









Table 5 Cont.Physico-chemical Data for Run
R4 (See Figure 1 )


Off Waters at Sampling Station


Sampling Date



6-04-73
6-06-73(a)
6-06-73(b)
6-11-73
6-14-73(a)
6-14-73(b)
6-17-73
6-25-73(a)
6-25-73(b)
7-02-73
7-06-73(a)
7-06-73(b)
7-10-73
7-14-73
7-16-73
7-19-73
7-23-73
7-27-73(a)
7-27-73(b)
7-30-73
8-01-73
8-06-73
8-12-73(a)
8-12-73(b)
8-14-73
8-21-73
8-28-73(a)
8-28-73(b)



0-
n


Te'p. NO -N NH -N Total K
(Oc) (ppm) (pFb Nitroen
(ppb)


31.8
28.8
31.1
29.0
30.5
30.2
26.3
28.9
26,8
34.0
28.0

32.0
31.5


31.6
28.0
27.1
31.1
29.3
30.0
26.8
28.5
30.9
30.2

30.5


0.08
0.22
0.14
0.16
0.54
0.24
0.22
0.31
0.66
0.04
1 .84

0,10
0.00
0.00
0.41
0.11
0.10
0.02
0.22
0.30
0.07
0.02
0.04
0.02
0.00
0.14
0.56


0.24
0.37
27


53
102
109
106
437
79
148
109
374
77
314

92
52
48
29
78
2
0
69
136
176
24
37
127
241
175
695


144
153.92
27


211
89
172
229
550
371
230
696
774
451
1513

2361
161
181
569
186
265
160
562
489
422
380
329
346
696
506
1510


533
508.66
27


POLP I organic
(ppb) Carbon
(ppm)


102
6
5
9
40
0
26
8
14
14
47

11
12
4
7
5
8
17
4
39
11
54
5
7
0
0
8


7.92
9.03
8.75
9.05
9.08
5.47
15.40
8.05
12.59
8.45
14.28

9.82
5.43
11.63
9.70
9.53
6.07
3.92
7.89
4.40
13.78
9.32
10.17
8.77
5.86
11.32
15.13


17
22.33
27








Table5 Cont. Physico-chemical Data for Run Off Waters at Sampling Station
R5 (See Figure 1 ).

Sampling Date Te NO-N NH-N Total K P-OP Inorla
_-e Carbon
-C) (ppm) (pb) Nitrogen (ppb) Carbn
(pb) (ppm)

6-04-73 31.1 0.04 67 117 98 8.48
6-06-73(a) 29.5 0.20 107 319 157 3.41
6-06-73(b) 34.4 0.30 88 372 99 7.57
6-11-73 31.5 0.10 90 144 2 7.77
6-14-73(a) 32.0 0.72 187 802 187 9.25
6-14-73(b) 32.2 0.05 69 469 6 4.36
6-17-73 26.0 0.19 310 372 116 11.01
6-25-73(a) 31.0 0.00 385 596 58 3.61
6-25-73(b) 27.9 1.17 228 1174 88 8.12
7-02-73 34.6 0.00 80 527 9 8.73
7-06-73(a) 32.5 0.00 61 348 6 11.05
7-06-73 (b) -
7-10-73 40.0 0.59 401 2635 152 4.07
7-14-73 -
7-16-73 0.00 50 177 2 11.82
7-19-73 0.61 68 923 72 4.76
7-23-73 28.0 0.16 171 296 90 12.56
7-27-73(a) 27.7 0.10 18 407 110 2.95
7-27-73(b) 28.5 0.06 8 262 88 1.06
7-30-73 33.8 0.08 43 319 6 8.62
8-01-73 -
8-06-73 27.6 0.24 95 304 18 9.05
8-12-73(a) 27.0 0.01 20 371 82 2.31
8-12-73(b) 29.8 0.01 34 611 118 3.86
8-14-73 31.9 0.01 305 592 10 3.96
8-21-73 34.0 0.00 119 561 0 3.96
8-28-73(a) 0.03 857 1337 4 17.56
8-28-73 30.0 0.06 663 1235 6 16.55

x 0.19 180 610 63
c0 0,29 209.21 536.69 58.02
n 25 25 25 25




44




Table 6 Mean Nutrient Concentrations in Pensacola Bay Water
Encroaching on Bayou Texar (Mean Data from 3 samples
collected Jan, 1973).

Sample Site PO4-P Total P04-P Total K NH1-N NO--N
(ppb) (ppb) Nitrogen (ppb) (ppm)
(ppb)

Bay Bridge,
Surface (E3) 4 24 217 34 0.09

Bay Bridge,
Bottom (E3B) 6 27 136 29 0.03

L&N Tressel
Surface (E2) 7 4 326 215 0.37

L&N Tressel,
Bottom (E2B) 3 18 167 26 0.02

Cervantes Bridge,
Surface (El) 3 25 193 48 0.03

Cervantes Bridge,
Bottom (ElB) 3 21 227 37 0.04


Mean Concentration
All Stations, and
Dates Pooled 3 15 151 51 0.07











S amlin Date


10-14-72
10-15-72
10-26-72
11-14-72
12-07-72
1-17-73
2-07-73
2-28-73
3-28-73
5-02-73
5-30-73
6-25-73
7-30-73
8-21-73
9-30-73
11-04-73
12-16-73
2-03-74
3-31-74


Station T2B Station T4S
(BottomT -TuTface)T


Station T2S
(SurfaceTl

21.35
79.64
66.04
79.33
29.39
7.92
7.45
2.30
5.19
11.76
15.87
10.25
12.96
40.71
21.33
9.23
13.88
14.90
7.79


24.07
24.49
19


2.95
11.97
24.35
12.46
20.29
4.43
4.66
1.57
1.75
0.36
3.32
13.43
11.88

4.33
15.98
6.16
1.15
0.53


7.87
7.24
18


Station T4B
(BottomF

28.51
24.45
23.11
14.22
4.27
3.87
2.70
1.14
4.44
3.63
4.00
1.99
13.13
7.24
3.20
2.21

3.85
0.80


8.16
8.74
18


Station T6S
(Surface-

68.67
122.71
52.72
44.24
10.46
7.75
2.26
1.58
18.48
10.26
4.31
15.41
11.15
71.84
16.71
9.74

21.45
53.43


30.18
32.52
18


Station T6B
(Bottom)J

46.11
38.67
21.86
18.14
5.27
3.37
2.53
1.34
0.60
2.48
6.13
1.63
15.62
0.69
8.45
8.48
13.28
2.78
26.41


11.78
13.24
19


-3 -I
Table 7. Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in MgC- M o hr


29.04
93.75
61.16
50.05
13.18
6.14
2.41
2.34
19.36
8.27
4.45
3.86
13.13
70.18
12.77
14.34
13.88
5.39
25.62


23.91
26.90
19































APPENDIX B

FIGURES





47













69 tWATE 1 -10












Airp
Sc le = .. t .
..... ....... ........... a























. bl: c line .
COUNTY area )
'.'. . . ...' "... . .















S::::... ::::: ...-.
b "':"R














RUNOFF SAMPLING RI-I
Sc : A w RPENSACOLA







ENCROACHMENT
SAMPLING STATIONS E-3 BAY BRIDGE



Figure I. Bayou Texar and its drainage basin showing sampling sites.
RUNO"F .SAIVMPLING BAY




ENCROACHMENT
SAMPLING STATIONS SE -3 BAY BRIDGE

A.E3

Figure i. Bayou Texar and its drainage basin showing sampling sites.









CAR.PENrE.sS Cpx...


20



0





A /

5

J A0- .V __. ,
J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F MA
TI ME ( Jue '7Z April 74)
Figure 2. Nutrient distribution patterns at the Carpenter's Creek sampling station (See Table I).



















C APEm-rrs CA .ErK


i i i /\ \ A A / **

J J A S o H J F M A M J J A S ON J I M A
T I M (June'7Z-April'74)
Figure 2 (Cont.)


I-


O.
0
Q-
EL
0s
















rPCAr PF-tNES Cere-


-o
x
6- 50
A-^






-"
I-
3


WOL


J J A 5 O N D J


F M A M J


J AS 0 N D. J F M


T IM E ( June *72- Apr-i 74)


Figure 2 (Cont.)


-_I___L I-1---- ~--- ~- I---- F-_IIL-~--L L -~I~~ ----~^L----~s~-~-I-~ls~---d-- ----


70 o


~-----~








80






70



X




40
Al-


1.
40



30


~5\;CI1 r I I 1 N


J J A S O N D J FM AH J


4 A 5 0 N D


J F M A


Ti M E. ( June'?-April 74)
Figure 2 (Cont.)


CAPEa.NTE-RS CRE.EK












CARPE.-rlEIs Crejus<.


J J O


N D J


p~~~~-- ft ft p t f t 4 f f t f


F M M J A S O N D J


FMF A


Ti ME ( Jun '72 Apri '74)

Figure 2 (Cont.)


E
0Q






z4














STATION 2
*---- urfaoce
*- Bot+om


J J A S O N D F M A M A S O N D J F M A

TI ME (Jumne '7e -Apr '74)

Figure 3. Bayou Texar nutrient and dissolved oxygen distribution patterns at Station 2 (See Table 2a-b).


n
/1


t
B
I



B











150


Ii
Ii
II
SII


I I


II

II
II
I I
II
SII
SII
I I




'I


Figure 3 (Cont.)


l6O0


I'


S-rA1r(CO' 2


.--- Bottom


A S O J F A M J J A 5 0 N D J F M A

T I M E ( June '7-April'74)












STATrlo-4 2

*-- -~fc


/ \


J J A S 0 N


F M A J J A S o N

Ti ME. ( June '7Z-Arril '74)


Figure 3 (Cont.)


I\


'I
'I














STATION 2
30. surface
-- BOTTOM
Il
A.
25
0 i
x



-D I
. 20. I

I^ II I
* II /: i \ S /



I m April '74)

s I /./ I ; 1-\ i .







J J h S O N D J F M A M J J A 5 O N D J F M A
Tir i E. ( Jurne 72- April74)
Figure 3 (Cont.)








STATION 2
*---S urfac e
*--- Bottom


I'
'I
I '
I I

I




I
I

I


I.'
I'
I'
\


** I \ I ,
I'
" 1 s
- !*


I I I I I


J J A S O N D J F M A M J O A S O N D J F M A

Ti g ( JuCe '72 ,rApr;.'74)

Figure 3 (Cont.)


20



18



I6 u\(A




10 Z
0


-
w



3
K
0





4



2








STAT ( ON 2
*--- Surface
--- &ottom


,- \
\ ,/ \


J J A S O ts D


3 F M /A M J


J A S 0 M 0 J


F rM A M
CO


Fl gue (Jn 't -Ma'74

Figure 3 (Cont.)


a-





0

ti
)
0

- 6


L I L -L I







o6 S STATION 4
*---Surfkree
5\ --- BoH- om





44i







a. *
J I'
0-

0 /

I- / v


N D J F M A


Bayou Texar nutrient and dissolved oxygen distribution patterns at Station 4 (See Table 3a-b).


J J A S o N D J F M A M J J A S
ti rM (jJunc'7z-Apri8'74)


Figure 4.



















STATION 4

6-- Surface
,- 1boTTOmr


J J A S


0 N D J. F M A
Tr I m


M J J A S
E (June 'V~- April '74)


0 N D J F M A


Figure 4 (Cont.)


50




S40



Q.
I 30
30
0
O
Q.,












STAnTIO 4
*- Su rface.
0--- 130TOM


J J A


S 0 N D J


F M A M J J A s 0 N
TM r ( JuMe '72- April '74)
Figure 4 (Cont,)


D J F M


70


6o0


I1

'I




I /


401


30o


SI


I'\
I \
I \
I'


I!












STATION 4
--- Surf ace
*-- 13OTTomf


J J a 0 N D


F M A M J J A S O N D J

SM E. (Jun 72- April '74

Figure 4 (Cont.)


F MA


O
>c 20
-B
'I-

z
Z
15


E
1 0
C 10
Go


10 c
A


8 z



x



0











STATION 4
*--- Surface-
-- --Botom


JJA S


D J M A M J J A N J

Tl M E- ( Ju.,e Apri 7)

Figure 4 (Cont.)


F M A







S T-rT I O r- 4
-Sutrf-ace
- --ottom


I'

\I'


f I i
l


I
\I

*I


J ASOND


J F M A M


J J A S 0 N D J F


M AM


ITi -E (Ju. '72 Ma' 74)

Figure 4 (Cont.)


*.1


'I
'I


- --L----L -I*- _L --L---L------L-- I I _I ~ ~L- --L---_-----L- -L--~









STATION 6
---5 ruface
- B- otor


/ \


S N D J F


M J J


TI M E ( June '72- Aprl '74)


Figure 5. Bayou Texar nutrient and dissolved oxygen distribution patterns at Station 6 (See Table 4a-b).


40L


X

0.

0
Q.


O-
F-


J J


J F


49r














STAT IO N

*___ Surface.
..... 6Softorim


0 ,
0.

Zo


/r \
AI A

Ao N / 04.-L
I I, \
1o 1/ A, \ &- -
*i / *.


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Full Text

PAGE 1

-I DETERMINATION OF A NITROGEN-PHOSPHORUS BUDGET FOR BAYOU TEXAR, PENSACOLA, FLORIDA By Gerald A. Moshiri (Principal Investigator) and David Brown Philip Conklin Douglas Gilbert Michael Hughes Michael Moore Donald Ray Linda Robinson FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER RESEARCH PROJ ECT TECHNICAL COMPLETION REPORT OWRR Project Number B-016-FLA and OWRR Project Number B-019-FLA Report Submitted July 15, 1974 The work upon which this report is based was supported in part by funds provided by the United States Department of the Interior, Office of Water Resources Research as authorized under the Water Resources Research Act of 1964.

PAGE 2

ABSTRACT Determi'natton of a nitrogen-phosphorus-oudget for Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Florida The extent of nitrogen and pliospnorus inputs: and their effects on algal productivtty in Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Escamoia County, Florida, has oeen under investigation since June, .1971. To date results indicate tnat there are numerous sources of nutrtents into the Bayou, of whicn Carpenter's CreeK. and storm water runoff are the major contributors. Other sources are runoff from ferttl izers appl ied to lawns, overflow of inadequate sewer lines, and to a much lesser extent, from sources s.uch as rainwater and encroaching Pensacola Bay waters. Ecologically, the Bayou is approaching eutrophication as is evidenced by nighly fluctuating oxygen and primary productivity patterns well correlated witli algal cell numbers and distrtbution. ions made for the improvement of water qua I tty in th.e Bayou include 11 fmprovement of circulation oy tne construction of a new channel, 21 l"mprovement of storm water and sewage factl ities, 3} Improve-' ments in tne Carpenter's CreeK. channel to alleviate erosion, and 4} Select-' ed dredging tn areas: of heavy s:t1tatton in the Bayou in order to improve flushing and ,'circulation. KeyWOrds:: Eiayou estuary, eut ropntcat ton nutrtftcation, total Kjeldahl nttrogen, ni'trate nlt'rogen, ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, inorganic phosphate, phytoplankton, prtmary producttvtty, water qual tty, sediment,

PAGE 3

2 neterotropntc productivtty, encroacnment, storm water runoff, circu lation, stltation, sewage, stagnancy, algal blooms, algal metabolites, oxygen depletion, stratification.

PAGE 4

Item Abstract Introduction Methods Results and Discuss.ion Acknowledgments Literature Cited Appendix A: Tables Appendix B: figures TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1--2 3-4 46-10 10 11 12-45 46--89

PAGE 5

3 INTRODUCTION Justification for the work whose results are presented here has already been presented at length at the culmination of research that was conducted from June, 1971 -June, 1972 as prel iminary to these proceedings (See OWRR Research Project Technical Completion Report, Publ ication No. 17, Florida Water Resources Research Center, Gerald A. Moshiri, Prin cipal Investigator. Also, R.P. Hannah, A.T. Simmons, and G.A. Moshiri, 1973). Since the presentation of the above-cited reports, the case for conducting this and future studies have become even stronger due to the acceleration of the pace of residential and commercial developments in areas involving bayous and estuaries of Northwest Florida. An example of this is the substantial increase in developments in the Bayou Texar drainage basin, yielding threats of substantial damage to this attractive body of water unless active measures are taken. The data provided by our studies have resulted in a stringent moratorium on sewage hook-ups in the Bayou Texar area until more adequate services can be provided. We are also working with an engineering firm retained by the City of Pensa cola, the County of Escambia, and the State of Florida Department of Transportation in order to resolve the storm water and drainage problems partly responsible for the degredation of water qual ity in Bayou Texar. Our efforts have been aimed primarily at the del ineation of the nutrients and their extent into the Bayou waters. Also investigated have been the effects of nutrient enrichments on the primary productivity of Bayou waters and associated parameters. In addition, we have undertaken pilot studies of sediment-water-nutrient as well as

PAGE 6

4 studies involving heterotrophic productivity in the water column. These have been in part funded by modest supplemental grants from the National Science Foundation. These studies will be pursued in detail under a new grant from the Office of Water Resources Research, starting July 1, 1974. Basically the work conducted involved the following: 1. Monitoring of nutrient species (including Kjeldahl, nitrate, and ammonia nitrogen, total phosphate and orthophosphate) on a twice-monthly basis (or more frequently if situations warranted) the first year, and then monthly the second year, at one station on Carpenter's Creek (the prime inflow into the Bayou) and three stations in the Bayou itself (Figure 1). These assays were made from samples taken both at the surface and at the bottom. 2. Quantification of the extent of nutri,ent inputs from lawn fertil izer sources. 3. Quantification of nutrients from encroaching Escambia Bay waters (stations shown in Figure 1). 4. Quantification of nutrient inputs from storm water runoff (stations shown in Figure 1). 5. Monthly surface and bottom water primary productivity mea surements at the three Bayou stations I isted under 1. 6. Enumeration of phytoplankton cell numbers and genera from samples taken for tests under 1 (Figure 1). METHODS All data collection has been against a background of physical-chemical parameters measured at each collection site. These include I ight penetration, temperature, sal inity, total (to measure organic) and inorganic carbon, pH, dissolved oxygen, and 5-day B.O.D. Light penetration mea-

PAGE 7

5 surements were made with a standard Secchi disk, and a Beckman salinometer was used to measure temperatures and salinities. Carbon measurements were made by means of a Beckman carbon analyzer, while oxygen and B.OoD. measurements were taken by means of the standard Winkler technique. Field and laboratory pH meters were used to measure pH. Water samples for nutrient analyses were collected from one site on Carpenter's Creek and three sites in the Bayou at surface and bottom depths (Figure 1). Collections were made in acid-rinsed bottles and kept on ice until returned to the laboratory for analysis. These samples were filtered through membrane filters size) and analyzed for ammonia employing the method described by Solorzano (1969); for nitrate using the techniques suggested by Kahn and Brezenski (1967); and for phosphate the methods of Strickland and Parsons Orthophosphate levels were determined by reaction with an acidified molybdate solution to form a phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid, the concentration of whose reduced form (phosphomolybdenum blue) was then determined spectrophometrically. Organic nitrogen measurements employed the micro-Kjeldahl method of Miller and Miller (1948), and the analysis of the ammonia released by the method already described. Organic phosphorous was analyzed by the oxidation of the acidified samples and the analysis of the resulting orthophosphate as cited above. The extent of fertilizer applications to lawns and gardens of houses in the Bayou Texar periphery, and nitrogen contribution from this source to the Bayou waters, was determined by tabulation of results of a written survey conducted by the principal investigator. The leaching of the actual nitrogen fraction was conservatively estimated using the technique employed by Viets (1971).

PAGE 8

6 The extent of nutrient inflow through tidal encroachment from Pensacola Bay was determined from three samples taken from each of three stations during periods of unusually high tides or storms fostering southerly winds (Figure 1). These were analyzed as already described. Finally, nutrient and B.O.D. contributions from stormwater runoff were determined from 28 samples, collected at each of five statiohs around the Bayou periphery over a three month summer period (Figure 1). These were also analyzed as cited above. Primary productivity measurements were made from monthly samples taken from the same three stations cited for nutrient assays (Figure 1). Water samples from surface and bottom were inoculated with C 14 as sodium bicarbonate and incubated for 4 hours. The samples were processed and counted according to methods described by Goldman (1960), Goldman and Carter (1965), and Goldman, Moshiri, and de Amezaga (1972). For corre-lative purposes, samples were also taken and treated with Lugol's iodine solution and 5 ml al iquots allowed to settle in 5 ml settling chambers. Counts and identifications were made by means of an inverted microscope. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 1. Nutrients: Results of assays for total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrate, ammonia, total phosphate, and inorganic phosphate in Carpenter's Creek and surface and bottom waters of Bayou Texar appear in Tables 1, 2a, 3a, 4a and Figures 2, 3, 4, and 5. The mean nutrient contributions per sampl ing site over the period of study also appear in these tables. Spatially, trends in average nitrate and ammonia concentrations are toward a steady decrease from Station 2 to Station 6. This trend is consistent in both surface and bottom waters (Tables 2a, 3a, 4a, and Figures 3 -5). Surface

PAGE 9

7 total Kjeldahl nitrogen patterns are also rather high at Creek and number two stations and show a general decrease toward the lower ends of the Bayou. Bottom concentrations show a sl ight deviation from these patterns in that the highest concentrations are at the extreme ends of the Bayou with Station 4 showing the lowest levels (Tables 1, 2a, 3a, 4a; Figures 2-S). Temporally, all nutrient species showed very erratic patterns with high concentrations prevail ing at all times, with the highest concentrations generally occurring during the summer months. This is illustrated by the total Kjeldahl nitrogen and inorganic phosphate concentrations (Tables 2a, 3a, 4a; Figures 2-S). Of all nutrient species, ammonia levels were the most erratic and void of pattern temporally (Tables 1, 2a, 3a, 4a; Figures 2-S). Aside from Carpenter1s Creek, the greatest contribution of nutrients was made by storm water runoff separately or combined with runoff cClrrying fertil izers used in lawns and gardens. Storm water runoff alone was found to be a heavy contributor of nutrients, particularly organic nitrogen, as well as B.O.D. (TableS). Fertilizer contribution of elemental nitrogen to the Bayou was estimated to range from 600 to 1S20 pounds annually. Rainwater contributions were mostly in the form of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (mean values of 379 ppb) and ammonia nitrogen (mean values of 280 ppb). This reflects the industrial and rapid growth of the area. Concentrations of other considered species in this source were negl igible. Encroachment of Pensacola Bay water into Bayou Texar showed surprisingly 1 ittle contribution of nutrients (Table 6). This is most 1 ikely due to the fact that, under present conditions, the presence of tressels and bridges slow down tidal and current flows into Bayou Texar. This

PAGE 10

is further evidenced by I ittle variations in sal inities in the Bayou (Tables 2b, 3b, 4b). 8 Temporally, primary productivity measurements, as detected by the radiocarbon technique, correlated strongly with the nutrient concentrations, as exempl ified by periods of high productivity and high nitrogen concentrations in surface waters (best seen in total Kjeldahl nitrogen). Effects on bottom waters were less evident, most I ikely due to the overriding effects of lesser light availabil ity (Tables 2a, 3a, 4a and 7; Figure 5). Spatially, the primary relationships show an inverse trend, in that lower Bayou stations showed the highest productivity. This lower primary productivity in the upper Bayou stations in the presence of nutrient abundance is probably caused by lower light availabil ity due to greater siltation at these upper stations. Phytopl ankton counts al SO support the primary product ivity-nutrient correlations, although these counts show somewhat the expected lag behind nutrients, as is also the case for carbon fixation (Figure 6). Basically, the Bayou's ecology is that of approaching eutrophication. It is a body of water with a pattern of hindered circulation caused by a narrow and shallow opening to Pensacola Bay, and the presence of one bridge and a railroad tressel which aid in the impeding of circulation and flushing of the system. This is evidenced by the relatively low contributions of nutrients from Pensacola Bay to the Bayou waters. The Bayou's drainage basin of nearly 11000 acres has been under heavy development resulting in the alteration or destruction of much of the watershed. The effect has been most drastic in the Carpenter's Creek area resulting in high concentrations of silt and sand and nutrients in the storm runoff water. This factor has resulted in the shallowing of the north end of

PAGE 11

9 the Bayou and creating deeper central sections (Figure 1). Nutrient contributions are primarily from inadequate sewage and storm water runoff facil ities which funnel pollutants from these sources into Bayou Texar via Carpenter's Creek as the primary inflow source, and numerous large stormwater sources around the Bayou periphery, which contribute substantial concentration of nutrients to its waters (Tables 1,5; Figure 1). This nutrient abundance, coupled with the relative stagnancy of the Bayou waters, aids in the formation of "nutrient pools" which, when all other factors are favorable, results in algal blooms (Hannah, Simmons, and Moshiri, 1973). If warm, clear and calm weather persists for any lengthy period of time, these blooms soon assume massive proportions, and the eventual death of the cells and subsequent decomposition of bacteria and fungi cause a substantial depletion in the dissolved oxygen content of the Bayou waters. It is suspected that th is oxygen depletion, coupled with algal metabolites, is responsible for the numer ous fish kills which have been reported from this Bayou during the past many summers. These oxygen depletions are usually neither predictable nor of long duration, and generally follow periods of high primary productivity and oxygen production (tables 3b, 4b, 5b; Figures 3-5). This is true even in the bottom waters in the summer during which time a steady low oxygen reading would be expected due to stratification and stagnation if an establ ished eutrophi.c condition al ready existed. Therefore, although the erratic nature of the various factors studied point to a certain degree of instabil ity characteristic of eutrophic communities, the fleeting nature of such instabil ities in the Bayou point to a situation which, if properly and promptly attended, will eventually yield an essentially healthy biotic community. Suggestions for steps

PAGE 12

10 which must be taken in order to implement such a restoration are: 1. Improvement of circulation patterns in the Bayou by improving tidal and current exchanges between Pensacola Bay and Bayou Texar. This may be accompl ished by the dredging of a new and more direct entrance to the Bayou east of the present channe I. 2. Improvement of storm water and sewer facil ities which now contribute to siltation and nutrification of the Bayou. 3. Improvement of the Carpenter1s Creek flow pattern to decrease flow speed during periods of high stormwater runoff. 4. Dredging selectively to el iminate stagnancy in the areas of the Bayou now highly silted from storm water siltation activity. 5. A program of education aimed at a wiser and more frugal use of artificial fertil izers in the immediate Texar area. These recommendations have been made to the proper authorities and are now being studied for implementation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We wish to acknowledge gratefully the assistance of the various officials at The University of West Florida for providing matching funds and services for this work. Appreciation is also extended to Dr. T.S. Hopkins of the Faculty of Biology, The University of West Florida, for providing solutions for needs which arose from time to time.

PAGE 13

11 LlTERATURE ClTED Goldman, C.R. 1960. Primary productivity and limiting factors in tnree lakes of tEte Alaskan Peninsula. Ecol. Monogr. 30:207-270. Goldman, C.R. and Carter, R. C. 1965. An investigation by' rapid C-14 bioassay of factors affecting the cultural eutropnication of Lake Tanoe, Caltfornia-Nevada.J. Water Poll. Control Fed. 37:1044-1059. Goldman, C.R., Mosniri, G.A., and de Amezaga 1972. Synotptic studies of productivity in Lake TaEi.oe (California-Nevada}. P. 1-. In: R. Sage Murpfiy and David Nyquist (eds.l rnternaHonal symposium on water pollution control in cold climates. U.S. Government Printing Office. Publication #5501-0208. Hannan, R.P., Simmons, A.T. and Mosliiri, G.A. 1973. Nutrient-productivity relationsliips in a bayou estuary. J. Water Poll. Control Fed. 45:208-2520. Kahn, L. and Brezenski, F.T. 1967. Determination of nitrate in estuarine waters. Comparison of a reduction and a brucine procedure and a modification of a Iiruclne procedure. Env. Sci. Tecn. 1 :488-491. Miller, F.L. and Miller, LE. 1948. On the determination of organic nit rogen in sea water. Ana 1. Cnem. 20: 481. Mosniri, G.A., Hannan, R.P. SFmmons, A.T., Landry, G.C. and WbJting, N.H. 1972. Determination of a nitrogen-pnospliorus hudget for Bayou Texar, Pensacola, Florida. Pufilication #17. Florida Water Resources Research Center, Gainesville, Florida. Solorzano, L. 1969. Determination of ammonia in natural waters by the pnenolliypoclilorite metnod. Limnol. Oceanog. 14:799-801. Strickland, J.D.H. and Parsons, T.R. 1972. A practical nandbook of seawater analysts. Pisli. Res. Bd. Canada. Bull. 167. 311 p. Viets, Jr., F.G. 1971. Water quality in relation to farm use of ferti1 izer. B ioscrence 21: 460 ... 467.

PAGE 14

APPENDIX A TABLES 12

PAGE 15

Sameling date Total POLl,-P TKN NH3-N NO -N Organic Carbon Inorsanic Carbon (ppb) (ppb) (ppb) (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) 6-15-72 10 0.37 6-22-72 3 87 0.47 6-29-72 4 88 0.57 7-06-72 3 15 69 0.83 7-13-72 4 1 211 64 0.46 7-20-72 8 115 58 O. 12 7-27-72 3 155 6 0.33 8-03-72 1 69 0.29 8-10-72 2 60 32 0.33 8-17-72 1 78 0.76 8-24-72 0 116 97 0.42 8-31-72 64 1 61 6 0.65 9-11-72 176 2 37 57 0.78 9-14-72 115 0 153 51 0.74 9-22-72 94 6 62 0.06 9-29-72 9 9 26 45 0.76 10-06-72 8 49 46 1.22 10-20-72 25 180 78 0.92 10-26-72 7 6 77 87 0.96 11-03-72 9 90 11-18-72 0 6 57 53 0.75 11-28-72 5 3 209 58 12-01-72 5 3 219 79 0.36 1-10-73 19 6 216 66 0.23 1-17-73 3 1 194 29 0.33 1-24-73 10 138 45 1. 14 1-31-73 104 5 95 40 0.70 2-07-73 15 2 119 53 0.87 2-14-73 9 5 36 1.02 2-21-73 0 2 59 61 0.65 3-28-73 330 13 234 48 0.38 5-02-73 73 0 141 -93 1. 37 VI Table I. Carpenter's Creek Physico-chemical Data (See Figure 2).

PAGE 16

Sameling date Tota 1 P011-P PO!I-P TKN NH -N NO -N Orsanic Carbon Inorganic Carbon (ppb) (ppb) (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) 5-30-73 0 10 529 80 0.78 6-15-73 123 71 408 216 0.36 35.25 6.59 6-25-73 26 4 356 89 0.82 6.82 4.36 7-06-73 100 71 856 418 0.53 7-13-73 6 3 324 54 0.81 26.20 3.09 7-30-73 8 62 6.50 3.09 8-09-73 10 2 348 57 0.54 5.87 3.07 8-21-73 15 0 500 64 0.69 3.13 6. 11 9-13-73 12 11 309 37 0.35 9.32 1. 18 9-30-73 19 3 476 165 0.08 0.14 4.02 10-14-73 0 0 372 133 1. 09 7.94 3.52 11-03-73 9 0 282 793 0.72 4.45 3.64 11-25-73 0 431 175 0.66 2.23 4.46 12-16-73 0 8 358 75 0.68 7.22 2.40 1-06-74 9 8 670 122 0.60 3.27 2.96 2-03-74 14 529 60 0.37 3.21 1.71 3-03-74 9 15 408 267 0.63 2.41 3.32 3-31-74 11 5 397 74 0.79 8.36 2.94 27 5 309 99 0.51 3.29 3.75 x 42 8 231 98 0.61 n 33 46 36 49 48 Tabl e I: (Cant.)

PAGE 17

Sampling Date Total P0q,-P PO,+-P Total K (Hr) (Or) Or9anic Inorganic (ppb) (ppb) Nitrosen ppb ppm Ca rbon Carbon (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) 6-15-72 2 5 0.04 6-22-72 3 76 3 0.00 6-29-]2 6 76 0 0.02 7-06-]2 2 9 2 0.02 7-13-]2 25 2 122 0 0.02 7-20-]2 6 214 15 0.03 7-27-72 31 158 0 0.04 8-03-72 6 14 3 0.04 8-10-72 1 22 0 0.06 8-17-]2 3 21 0.00 8-24-72 0 276 186 0.03 8-31-72 45 2 380 0 0.00 9-11-72 82 7 201 90 0.20 9-14-72 25 1 199 17 0.00 9-15-72 9-16-72 9-18-72 9-22-]2 522 0 117 0.09 9-29-72 18 2 128 45 0.00 10-06-]2 9 197 17 0.07 10-14-]2 6 161 0.26 10-15-]2 7 192 o. 18 10-20-]2 15 7 302 44 0.07 10-26-72 18 8 99 5 0.02 11-03-72 0 41 11-14-]2 11-18-]2 14 154 102 0.04 11-28-72 8 1 195 72 0.09 19 2 199 27 0.03 12-07-72 5 2 209 25 0.03 15.42 1-10-73 6 199 80 0.05 1-17-73 3 204 35 0.07 10.56 \Jl Table 2a. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampl ing Station 2 (See Figure 3).

PAGE 18

Sampling Date Total (Olt) Total K NH3-N (Or) Organic Inorganic (ppb ppb Nitrogen (ppb) ppm Carbon Carbon (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) 1-24-73 12 10 95 77 0.38 1-31-73 15 1 160 25 0.36 2-07-73 15 3 58 62 0.66 6.24 2-14-73 5 2 88 0.66 2-21-73 17 2 100 57 0.20 2-28-73 5 2 54 0.06 8.81 3-28-73 100 13 229 13 o. 19 4.88 5-02-73 129 0 159 204 0.91 6.53 4.02 5-30-73 8 8 413 103 0.29 9.07 5.82 6-15-73 19 7 204 73 0.49 8.81 6.55 6-25-73 46 0 282 73 0.43 7.57 7-06-73 22 15 423 68 0.22 7-13-73 13 3 484 18 O. 11 56.78 8.37 7-30-73 7 104 10.56 6.22 8-09-73 15 10 lj 94 0.22 2.59 9.42 8-21-73 10 10 529 42 o. 15 4.23 10.91 9-13-73 30 35 555 53 0.19 1.55 11 .45 9-30-73 73 8 724 48 0.23 10.74 10-14-73 2 6 384 26 0.00 11.73 11.05 11-03;"73 21 0 348 7 0.09 7.59 14.39 11-25-73 31 389 141 0.49 1.42 6.31 12-16-73 26.70 1-06-74 17 8 410 106 0.34 1.42 4. 10 2-03-74 58 18 165 93 0.39 0.49 5.33 3-03-74 41 8 296 43 0.52 7. 16 3-31-74 7 0 600 67 0.29 0.81 7.22 4-21-74 13 2 319 25 0.10 3.29 3.75 x 29 5 233 52 0 .. 23 0\ .n 35 52 41 52 50 Tab I e 2a:

PAGE 19

1 ins Date Total POI1-P POI1-) Total K NH3-N N03-N Organic I norgan i c (ppb) (ppb Nitrogen (ppb) (ppm) Carbon Carbon (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) 6-15-72 2 5 0.04 6-22-72 3 76 3 0.00 6-29-72 6 76 0 0.02 7-06-72 2 9 2 0.02 7-13-72 25 2 122 0 0.02 7-20-72 6 214 15 0.03 7-27-72 31 158 0 0.04 8-03-72 6 14 3 0.04 8-10-72 1 22 0 0.06 8-17-72 3 21 0.00 8-24-72 0 276 186 0.03 8-31-72 45 2 380 0 0.00 9-11-72 82 7 201 90 0.20 9-14-72 25 1 199 17 0.00 9-15-72 9-16-72 9-18-72 9-22-72 522 0 117 0.09 9-29-72 18 2 128 45 0.00 10-06-72 9 197 17 0.07 10-14-72 6 161 0.26 10-15-72 7 192 o. 18 10-20-72 15 7 302 44 0.07 10-26-72 18 8 99 5 0.02 11-03-72 0 41 11-14-]2 11-18-72 14 154 102 0.04 11-28-72 8 1 195 72 0.09 12-01-72 19 2 199 27 0.03 12-07-72 5 2 209 25 0.03 15.42 1-10-73 6 199 80 0.05 1-17-73 3 1 204 35 0.07 10.56 -.J 1-24-73 26 11 158 50 o. 18 1-31-73 18 1 221 20 0.21 Tab Ie 2a. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampl ing Station 2 (See Figure 3). ?) ;: 'r

PAGE 20

Sameling Date Total POLl,-P POl.!,-P Total K NH:rN NOr N Or9anic Carbon Inorganic Carbon (ppbl (ppb) Nitrogen (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) (ppm) (ppb) 2-07-73 15 5 142 41 0.28 10.37 2-14-73 11 a 36 0.07 2-21-73 23 a 353 52 0.25 2-28-73 6 a 55 0.07 9.40 3-28-73 110 19 45 0.12 7.10 5-02-73 140 a 379 185 0.70 6. 18 4.56 5-30-73 183 7 290 120 0.14 9.96 9.93 6-15-73 34 4 315 198 0.20 11. 03 9.43 6-25-73 49 7 232 73 0.28 10.29 8. 10 7-06-73 29 14 365 106 0.02 7-13-73 8 2 410 39 0.04 11.87 10.56 7-30-73 3 182 9.27 11.64 8-09-73 75 3 264 138 0.06 13.92 13.92 8-21-73 14 8 541 101 0.00 3.98 12.96 9-13-73 a 5 717 332 o. 18 7.73 14.83 9-30-73 28 13 559 124 0.01 10-14-73 a a 300 76 0.03 8.40 12.00 11-03-73 12 a 439 55 0.06 2.76 18. 19 11-25-73 14 329 69 0.09 '16.48 12-16-73 20.52 1-06-74 17 3 475 175 0.31 10.03 2-03-74 64 15 167 48 o. 17 6.42 3-03-:-74 20 8 145 30 o. 15 2.77 6.99 3-31-74 18 a 556 111 o. 14 7.27 0.36 4-21-74 23 2 247 35 O. 11 3.33 7. 18 K 46 8 2.4l 70 o. 10 n 35 53 39 51 50 -co Tab Ie 2a: (Cont. )

PAGE 21

sampling Date .P!i Temperature Sal in i D.O. B.O.D. (8C ) (0/00) (ppm) (5 day ppm) 6-15-72 8.70 6-22-72 7.30 6-29-72 7.80 7-06-72 6.70 7-13-72 7.90 7-20-72 7.60 7-27-72 10.50 8-03-72 8.90 8-10-72 8.40 8-17-72 7.50 8-24-72 3.90 8-31-72 3.80 9-11-72 31.5 5.00 9-14-72 5.40 9-15-72 32.0 5.70 9-16-72 5.50 9-18-72 30.0 9.70 9-22-72 31.9 15. 1 11.90 9-29-72 7.10 10-06-72 29.0 16.8 7.00 10-14-72 5.2 27.0 17.0 7.50 10-15-72 6.8 28.0 15.5 4.70 10-20-72 3.52 10-26-72 8. 1 19.6 17.6 4.58 11-03-72 6.07 11-14-72 8.4 22.3 14.2 8.40 6.70 11-18-72 8.2 15.6 13.3 6.48 11-28-72 7.2 17.0 10.0 7.64 12-01-72 7.9 16.5 14.0 6.71 12-07-72 7.9 16.0 12.0 10.60 6.70 1-10-73 11.9 7.0 5.21 -1-17-73 7.9 12.9 7.3 9.36 7.70 \.0 1-24-73 1-31-73 7.4 14.8 6.0 9.31 4.84 2-07-73 6.9 18.2 7.2 8.71 6.44 Table 2b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampl ing Station 2 (See Figure 3).

PAGE 22

Same 1 i n9 Date !! Temeerature (oC) 2-14-73 2-21-73 2-28-73 6.2 16.6 3-28-73 7.0 17.9 5-02-73 6.7 23.5 5-30-73 7.2 26.8 6-15-73 7.4 31.9 6-25-73 7.4 29.0 7-06-73 7.5 31.1 7-13-73 5. 1 30.8 7-30-73 5.4 27.9 8-09-73 5.4 30.5 8-21-73 6.6 31.2 9-13-73 5.2 28. 1 9-30-73 5. 1 29.5 10-14-73 6.7 27. 1 11-03-73 6.2 23.8 11-25-73 6.0 22.6 12-16-73 7.4 16.0 1-06-74 7.0 17.8 2-03-74 6.7 22. 1 3-03-74 7.4 18.5 3-31-74 6.7 21.0 7.4 23.5 Table 2b: (Cont. ) 000. (0/00) (ppm) 8.5 2.3 8.90 0.0 7.86 1.5 9.07 2.3 8.70 3.5 7.70 4.5 9.27 6. 1 13.36 4.0 5.61 7.9 9.45 8.8 8.93 7.8 4.48 8.5 10.56 9.2 8.37 14.0 7. 16 7.59 8.22 4.0 8.17 2. 1 6.73 4.2 8.62 8. 1 8.42 4.0 10.85 B.O.D. ( 5 day ppm) 4.07 1. 33 2.70 2.92 3.81 5.03 2.25 3.37 10.59 0.61 7.56 8. 17 4.39 1.64 3.04 .93 1. 37 1.42 1.68 5.94 N o

PAGE 23

SamE1ins Date ...E.!:L Temgerature Sa1initl D.O. B.O.D. C C) 0/00 (ppm) (5 day ppm) 6-15-72 6.40 6-22-72 3.80 6-29-72 7.10 7-06-72 6.10 7-13-72 7.50 7-20-72 7.80 7-27-72 8.80 8-03-72 7.90 8-10-72 8.60 8-17-72 7.40 8-24-72 2.32 8-31-72 3. 16 9-11-72 4.40 9-14-72 4.21 9-15-72 31.0 3.21 9-16-72 3.40 9-18-72 31.5 7.50 9-22-72 30.6 17.6 1.80 9-29-72 2.21 10-06-72 27.0 15.7 3.88 10-14-72 4.4 25.5 20.7 4.20 10-15-72 7.3 27.5 16.5 3.60 10-20-72 3. 15 10-26-72 8.3 22.0 21.2 6.40 11-03-72 6.07 11-14-72 8.4 22.2 16.0 8.60 6.50 11-18-72 8.2 15.6 13.8 6.05 11-28-72 7.6 16.0 15.0 6.71 12-01-72 8.2 15.5 15.5 7. 17 12-07-72 8.0 16.0 13.0 10.40 2.90 1-10-73 12.9 7.0 5.20 1-17-73 7.9 14.2 8.8 9.45 7.62 N -1-24-73 1-31-73 7.6 15.2 8.0 4.78 2.50 2-07-73 6.9 17.5 8.0 8.52 3.03 Table 2b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 2 (See Figure 3).

PAGE 24

samelins Date ....E.!L Temgerature C C) 2-14-73 2-21-73 2-28-73 6.2 17.2 3-28-73 6.8 18.5 5-02-73 6.9 23.7 5-30-73 7.3 27.0 6-15-73 7.2 30.0 6-25-73 7.5 29.8 7-06-73 7.4 31.1 7-13-73 5.2 31.1 7-30-73 6.0 30.5 8-09-73 5.5 31.4 8-21-73 6.9 30.8 9-13-73 4.8 28.8 9-30-73 5.0 29.0 10-14-73 6.7 27.5 11-03-73 6.8 23.2 11-25-73 6.0 23.0 12-16-73 7.3 17.2 1-06-74 7. 1 17.5 2-03-74 7. 1 22.9 3-03-74 7.4 16.5 3-31-74 6.5 20.5 4-21-74 6.7 23.5 Table 2b: (Cont.) i ni 0.0.' 0/00 (ppm) 10.2 8.0 6. 18 2.0 7.58 8.0 4.61 5.0 7.79 4.6 7.40 7. 1 6.47 9.0 7.86 13.7 3.81 9.9 5.46 10. 1 8. 19 13. 1 1. 13 11.0 6.55 12.0 7.86 18.8 6.41 8. 18 7.27 7.8 7.62 4.3 6.64 5.8 8.87 10. 1 4.2 9.55 B.O.D. (5 day ppm) 3.08 0.98 2.34 3.23 3.51 5.10 6.81 3.53 4.43 12.81 0.65 7.64 7. 12 0.26 3.08 3.04 2. 11 2.31 3. 12 3.93 4.69 N N

PAGE 25

Date Total PO,,-P PO _P Total K NH -N NO -N Org,anic Carbon Inor9anic Carbon {ppb) Nitrogen {ppm) (ppm) (ppb) 6-15-72 3 93 4 0.04 6-22-72 2 94 3 0.02 6-29-72 5 78 2 0.02 7-06-72 1 20 1 0.01 7-13-72 19 3 336 2 0.02 7-20-72 6 237 41 0.08 7-27-72 2 67 3 0.08 8-03-72 1 151 1 0.04 8-10-72 34 21 0 0.00 8-17-72 0 11 0.00 8-24-72 0 176 77 0.00 8-31-72 72 2 318 a 0.00 9-11-72 46 5 93 55 0.02 9-14-72 15 4 249 0 0.00 9-15-72 9-16-72 9-18-72 9-22-72 467 0 23 0.01 9-29-72 32 13 71 0 0.00 10-06-72 8 84 4 0.04 10-14-72 9 118 0.97 10-15-72 0 69 0.25 10-20-72 26 93 39 0.08 10-26-72 7 5 168 15 0.02 11-03-72 4 0 11-14-72 11-18-72 5 6 209 31 0.01 11-28-72 6 1 210 43 0.21 12-01-72 4 1 196 50 0.09 12-07-72 4 1 205 22 0.03 13.88 N VI 1-10-73 4 1 187 51 0.02 1-17-73 5 2 205 26 0.04 11.04 1-24-73 12 10 116 31 0.20 1-31-73 8 6 186 22 0.20 -Table 3a. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampl inq Station 4 (See Figure 4)

PAGE 26

SamE1ins Date Tota I-PO Lt-P rOII-) Total K NH3-j Organic Carbon InorSClnic Carbon (ppb) ppb Nitrosen (ppb (ppm) (ppm) (ppm) (ppb) 2-07-73 13 3 49 30 0.27 9.97 2-14-73 1 1 42 o. 16 2-21-73 14 3 113 1 0.23 2-28-73 103 3 26 53 0.29 8.90 3-28-73 580 17 100 23 o. 17 4.83 5-02-73 136 10 228 123 0.34 6.40 4.56 5-30-73 16 8 266 38 0.34 9.50 6.44 6-15-73 23 8 226 83 0.19 9.26 7.95 6-25-73 63 9 221 67 O. 12 12.44 8. 15 7-06-73 24 15 340 60 0.04 7-13-73 42 12 526 28 o. 19 88.67 8.68 7-30-73 4 20 ...; 7.56 7.59 8-09-73 14 0 345 24 O. 11 4.23 10.82 8-21-73 8 10 531 9 0.00 6.23 10.96 9-13-73 16 9 513 69 0.02 9-30-73 26 7 576 80 o. 16 10-14-73 0 2 223 45 0.23 10.33 11.42 11-03-73 9 0 202 26 0.06 7.1/8 13.58 11-25-73 0 436 135 0.95 2.53 4.71 12-16-73 0 8 442 14 0.20 1.77 10.94 1-06-74 9 0 465 103 0.36 2.08 7.64 2-03-74 56 14 102 37 o. 16 5.67 3.70 3-03-74 14 32 178 93 0.32 2.43 6.22 3-31-74 18 0 694 35 0.09 1.22 6.98 4-21-74 48 2 266 36 0.02 2.20 8. 16 -52 6 207 36 0.11.j x n 37 52 42 49 51 Table 3a: (cont. ) N +0>

PAGE 27

Samel ins Date Total PO,+-P PO,+-P Total-K NH -N NO -N Organi I norgani c (ppb) (ppb) Nitrogen (pp9) Carbon Carbon (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) 6-15-72 3 61 13 0.04 6-22-72 2 83 3 0.00 6-29-72 3 58 0 0.02 7-06-72 1 21 55 0.01 7-13-72 21 1 111 0 0.00 7-20-72 1 149 3 0.01 7-27-72 1 91 5 0.06 8-03-72 0 87 2 0.05 8-10-72 1 54 0 0.00 8-17-72 4 8 0.00 8-24-72 1 160 0 0.00 8-31-72 72 4 206 0 0.00 9-11-72 131 0 166 68 0.00 9-14-72 14 0 266 15 0.00 9-15-72 9-16-72 9-18-72 9-22-72 97 0 75 0.01 9-29-72 70 7 189 21 0.00 10-06-72 9 127 9 0.03 10-14-72 78 158 O. 11 10-15-72 0 112 0.07 10-20-72 25 334 51 0.06 10-26-72 4 4 114 lJ5 0.00 11-03-72 3 0 11-14-72 11-18-72 8 4 121 32 11-28-72 6 1 99 25 0.01 12-01-72 4 2 17 0.04 12-07-72 6 1 204 37 0.02 14.04 N 1-10-73 6 3 213 107 0.02 \J1 1-17-73 3 1 116 21 0.06 11. 61 1-24-73 13 13 138 95 0.04 1-31-73 19 3 92 19 0.04 2-07-73 18 5 64 0 0.18 10.53 Table 3a. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampl ing Station 4 (See Fig u re 4).

PAGE 28

Same 1 i Date Total P0bl.-P P011-) Total K NH3-N !'J-N Orsan i c Inorganic (ppb) (ppb Nitrogen Carbon Carbon (ppb) (ppb) (ppm) -(ppm) (ppm) 2-14-73 2 4 18 0.05 2-21-73 17 0 46 46 o. 14 2-28-73 11 2 23 48 0.16 3-28-73 130 17 43 12 O. 11 5-02-73 184 0 414 148 0.36 6.78 5.06 5-30-73 33 4 207 35 0.08 9.86 9.20 6-15-73 21 12 233 105 0.10 11.45 9.33 6-25-73 44 12 203 66 0.08 11 71 8.38 7-06-73 25 8 371 52 0.06 7-13-73 16 5 469 28 0.05 27.96 10.93 7-30-73 3 126 7.96 12.54 8-09-73 19 3 352 63 0.02 8-21-73 10 2 522 28 0.00 6.10 10.84 9-13-73 38 12 674 294 0.02 8.40 16.40 9-30-73 32 7 794 155 0.01 10-14-73 0 235 30 0.00 9.56 13.99 11-03-73 24 0 236 28 0.01 13.20 14.04 11-25-73 11 324 91 0.25 2. 12 15.51 12-16-73 0 6 248 42 0.15 19.62 1-06-74 14 2 140 95 0.15 9. 11 2-03-74 83 15 200 1:60 0.20 6.13 4.41 3.,.03-74 30 31 261 0 0.23 4.58 5.18 3-31-74 9 11 750 22 0.02 7.36 0.54 4-21-74 51 0 247 36 0.01 8.38 3.34 -x 32 6 206 49 0.06 n 36 52 42 54 50 Table 3a: (Cont. ) N 0'1

PAGE 29

Samp 1 i ng Date Temperature Sal i ni!y' D.O. B. O. D. ( 0 C) (0/00) (ppm) (5 day ppm) 6-15-72 8.80 6-22-72 8.30 6-29-72 7.90 7-06-72 7.90 7-13-72 8.50 7-20-72 6.80 7-27-]2 9.90 8-03-72 9.90 8-10-72 9.30 8-17-72 7.60 8-24-72 4.63 9-11-72 4.20 9-14-72 5.37 9-15-72 31.0 5.47 9-16-72 9.60 9-18-72 32.0 10.00 9-22-72 30.5 17.8 9.90 9-29-72 5.99 10-06-72 27.8 18.8 9.10 10-14-72 4.4 27.5 18.5 6.00 10-15-72 7.1 27 .5 15.5 5.10 10-20-72 3.98 10-26-72 8.5 21. 0 17.8 8.50 11-03-72 6.37 11-14-]2 8.4 22.0 14.8 9.50 6.90 11-18-72 8.0 15.8 14.8 6.48 11-28-72 7.5 16.5 15.0 6.83 12-01-72 8.2 13.5 15.0 7.52 12-07-72 7.6 15.0 12.8 10.60 8.60 1-10..,73 10.2 7.5 5.67 1-17-73 8.4 12.8 8.3 9.90 1. 75 1-24 .. 73 N 1-31..,73 7.8 13.7 7.2 9.36 4.44 -.J Table 3b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampl ing Station 4 (See Figure 4).

PAGE 30

Samp 1 i ng Date Temeerature (Oe) -2-07-73 7.6 18.0 2-14-73 2-21-73 2-28-73 6.8 16.6 3-28-73 7.9 18.2 5-02-73 7.2 23.7 5-3,0-73 7.9 27.2 6-15-73 8.0 31. 9 6-25-73 7.6 30. 1 7-06-73 8.2 31.4 7.,.13-73 5;0 32.0 7-30-73 5.4 29.0 8-09-73 6.4 31. 0 8-21-73 7.6 30.4 9-13-73 5. 1 28.4 9-30-73 6.9 28.9 10-14-73 7. 1 26.9 11-03-73 7.8 23.5 11-25-73 7.5 23.1 12-16-73 7.2 15.2 1-06-74 7.3 17.2 2-03-74 7. 1 22.9 3-03-74 7.3 19.0 3-31-74 7. 1 20.3 4-21-74 8.7 23.0 Table 3b: (Cont. ) Sal D. O. (/00) (ppm) 7.6 9.64 9.1 "3.2 10.54 2.0 7.99 1.8 5.48 3.8 9.50 4.8 8.18 6.0 10.25 7.8 12.26 6.8 7. 11 7. 1 9.59 7.1 11.25 10. 1 6.18 12.2 13.62 8.3 10.74 15.7 9.06 9.16 9.20 7.4 9.29 2.3 8.09 4.5 9.70 7.8 9.54 5.0 10.67 B. O. D. (5day ppm) 7.20 4.18 1. 30 1. 91 3.04 3.70 4.54 4.93 2.43 2.56 11.24 3.76 7.85 6.12 4.64 1. 56 1. 83 1.61 2.15 2. 11 2.24 5.81 N OJ

PAGE 31

Sampl ing Date Temperature Sal inity, D. O. B. O. D. (Oc) (0 /00) Tppm) ( 5 day ppm) 6-15-72 5.70 6-22-72 5.00 6-29-72 7.70 7-06-72 6.60 7-13-72 7.40 7-20-72 6.70 7-27-72 10.30 8-03-72 8.60 8-10-72 9.00 8-17-72 7.10 8-24-72 2.68 8-31-72 2.63 9-11-72 30.0 2.40 9-14.,.72 3.89 9-15-72 30.5 4.05 9-16-72 3.70 9-18-72 30.5 5.10 9-22-72 30.0 19. 1 2.60 9-29-72 4.26 10-06-72 26.5 20. 1 7.60 10-14-72 7.7 26. 1 22. 1 3.90 10-15-72 7.5 27.0 16.0 3.70 10-20-72 3.64 10-26-72 8.5 22.0 24.0 7.80 11-03-72 6.43 11-14-72 8.6 28.0 16. 1 9.50 2.80 11-18-72 8.2 17.4 16. 1 6.19 11'-28-72 8.0 16.0 17.0 7.75 12-01-72 8.2 15.0 16.6 7.00 12-07-72 8.0 16.5 14.8 10.40 2.40 1-10-73 12.8 9.0 5.21 N \0 1-17-73 8.5 12.0 12.0 10.04 2.34 1-24-73 ... '1-31-73 7.7 14.7 8.8 5.32 3.80 2-07-73 7.5 16.8 8.8 9.09 7.06 Table 3b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 4 (See Figure 4).

PAGE 32

Sam21 ins Date .Ii Tem2erature (Oc) 2-14-73 2-21-73 2-28-73 6.9 16.2 3-28-73 7.5 18.8 5-02-73 7.3 23.5 5-30-73 8.0 27.0 6-15-73 7.8 30.0 6-25-73 7.2 29.8 7-06-73 8.2 31.4 7-13-73 5.5 31. 9 7-30-73 6.2 30.0 8-09-73 6.6 31. 2 8-21-73 7.3 30.2 9-13-73 5.2 28.9 9-30-73 6.9 28.9 10-14-73 6.8 27.1 11-03-73 7.9 22.5 11-25-73 7.7 23.2 12-16-73 7.4 16.8 1-06-74 7.3 17.6 2-03-74 7.0 22.3 3-03-74 7.4 17.5 3-31-74 6.4 20.5 4-21-74 7.7 23.0 Table 3b: (Cont.) Sal inity D. O. (0 /00) (ppm) 9.3 9.0 9.27 3.0 7.67 8.5 6.55 6.0 6.63 5.0 7.98 8. 1 8.02 10.8 7.60 13.8 4.62 11.0 6.75 8.0 10.70 13.9 2.06 7.2 6.55 14.0 7.07 20.0 8.37 6.22 8.79 7.9 8.17 5.0 7.48 5.0 9.30 16.7 8.42 5.0 12.54 B. O. D. ( 5 day ppm) 3.08 1. 21 3.77 3.23 3.31 3.55 5.90 3.49 3.64 11. 41 8.43 6. 11 3.89 1.96 1. 96 1.49 1. 72 2.39 2.06 7.68 LN o

PAGE 33

Samel ins Date Total POl.i,-P -aTTotal K NHrN NO -N Orsanic Carbon Inorsanic Carbon (ppb) (ppb Nitroyen (ppb) (ppm) (ppm) (ppb 6-15-72 3 145 18 0.02 6-22-72 2 88 5 0.00 6-29-72 5 71 0 0.00 7-06-72 2 18 6 0.01 7-13-72 23 0 133 0 0.01 7-20-72 5 163 0 0.00 7-27-72 1 109 0 0.08 8-03-72 0 62 0 0.03 8-10-72 1 31 0 0.00 8-27-72 1 23 0.01 8-24-72 0 134 7 0.00 8-31-72 72 2 373 0 0.03 9-11-72 68 1 103 22 0.00 9-14-72 44 26 341 1 0.00 9-15-72 9-16-72 9-18-72 9-22-72 448 0 10 0.07 9-29-72 81 11 134 1 0.00 10-06-72 13 134 8 0.04 10-14-72 9 95 0.63 10-15-72 0 60 0.18 10-20-72 33 136 26 0.07 10-26-72 10 4 146 6 0.00 11-03-72 5 0.03 11-14-72 11-18-72 5 6 119 28 0.02 11-28-72 3 2 205 31 0.04 12-01-72 4 2 194 20 0.05 12-07-72 5 1 199 19 0.04 14.58 1-10-73 5 0 178 53 0.02 LN 1-17-73 4 1 211 17 0.06 10.83 1-24-73 9 11 67 20 0.15 1-31-73 8 4 117 14 0.15 2-07-73 14 3 128 21 0.22 10.31 Table 4a. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampl ing Station 6 I (See Figure 5).

PAGE 34

Same1 ing Date Tota 1 PO'I-P (0'1-) Total K NH -N NO -N Organic Carbon Carbon (ppb) ppb N itroren TP1mJ (ppm) ppm) (ppb 2-14-73 7 0 12 0.08 2-21-73 16 2 46 27 0.14 2-28-73 19 2 98 29 0.07 3-28-73 150 16 123 2 0.06 5-02-73 128 1 248 113 0.30 6.78 5.68 5-30-73 42 9 173 36 0.02 10.38 7.22 6-15-73 48 10 242 42 0.05 10. 18 8.30 6-25-73 68 0 138 78 0.0-) 13.78 8.37 7-06-73 19 9 285 32 0.00 7-13-73 22 5 538 17 0.20 12.36 8.95 7-30-73 4 17 2.73 8.90 8-09-73 14 3 296 23 0.01 5.04 11.85 8-21-73 17 7 355 12 0.00 5 .. 28 10.89 9-13-73 0 6 532 123 0.01 1.66 14.54 9-30-73 26 3 571 18 O. 11 10-14-73 0 3 316 80 O. 11 8.84 10. 16 11 -03-73 10 0 191 25 0.03 4.28 14.39 11-25-73 3 421 115 0.16 15.37 12-16-73 0 6 155 23 0.55 24.19 1-06-74 14 12 100 63 0.16 9.97 2-03-74 97 18 238 9 o. 13 1. 1 0 7.33 3-03-74 10 31 126 0.15 2.00 7.05 3-31-74 9 44 750 44 0.00 2.45 9.00 4-21-74 32 3 347 64 0.02 1. 28 9.79 -x 39 15 199 26 0.08 n 35 48 43 51 52 Table 4a: (Cant. ) VJ N

PAGE 35

.Sampl i ng Date Jotal P04-P P04-P Total K NH3-ri N03";'ri_ p-rsanic Inorsanic (ppb) (ppb) ,N it royen (ppb) (ppm) Carbon Carbon (ppb (ppm)-(ppm) 6-15-72 3 11 0.08 6-22-72 1 67 9 0.00 6-29-72 4 78 0 0.00 7-06-72 2 8 3 0.01 7-13-72 31 1 156 0 0.00 7-20-72 5 178 6 0.01 7-27-72 7 42 0 0.02 8-03-72 1 117 0 0.06 8-10-72 1 41 0 0.00 8-17-72 5 .., 20 0.00 8-24-72 0 187 66 0.00 8-31-72 7 1 158 8 0.05 9-11-72 15 5 159 74 0.00 9-14-72 14 5 316 19 0.00 9-15-72 9-16-72 9-18-72 9-22-72 48 0 .., 0.06 9-29-72 20 1 91 3 0.00 10-06-72 11 143 42 0.04 10-14-72 0 156 0.46 10-15-72 0 176 0.10 10-20-72 19 346 27 0.03 10-26-72 12 3 83 24 0.03 11-03-72 13 10 11-14-72 11-18-72 9 22 29 0.00 11-28-72 12 1 186 22 0.00 12-01-72 10 2 202 16 0.04 12-07-72 5 1 195 26 0.04 14.09 1-10-73 4 1 187 51 0.02 \J.I 10 1 109 17 0.10 11. 10 \J.I 1-17-73 1-24-73 11 14 609 37 0.15 1-31-73 18 0 213 22 0.15 2-07-73 17 5 117 23 0.14 10.81 Table 4a. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampling Station 6 (See Figure 5).

PAGE 36

Samp 1 i ng Date Total POl:!,-P "(04-) Tota1K NH3-N NO -N Organic Inorganic (ppb) ppb Nitrosen (ppb) ". Carbon Carbon (ppb) .. (ppm) (ppm) 2-14-73 4 6 17 0.03 2-21-73 13 0 99 34 0.22 2-28-73 3 2 80 27 0.02 3-28-73 120 19 434 5 0.06 5-02-73 162 0 190 65 0.10 8.13 6.55 5-30-73 0 5 290 51 0.00 10.54 9.67 6-15-73 42 14 222 83 0.05 12.02 9.91 6-25-73 55 8 276 39 0.04 13.37 7.95 7-06-73 4 350 90 0.00 7-13-73 12 3 474 10 0.14 40.76 11.76 7-30-73 3 118 8.59 12.22 8-09-73 12 1 359 86 0.01 5.49 13.51 8-21-73 10 5 469 20 0.00 4.27 12.56 9-13-73 40 8 752 324 0.00 5.40 13.36 9-30-73 28 6 621 121 0.69 10-14-73 4 4 286 73 0.00 15.54 13.64 11-03-73 11 0 211 16 0.22 17. 11 11-25-73 3 833 128 0.04 17.40 12-16-73 0 5 352 18 0.12 26.19 1-06-74 9 2 265 59 0.10 1. 10 9.34 2-03-74 37 14 237 83 0.07 2.87 7.07 3-03-74 12 31 237 0 0.25 2.83 7. 16 3-31-74 11 14 444 34 0.00 14.50 4-21-74 63 3 338 44 0.01 3.43 8.54 -23 5 248 46 x 0.07 n 36 53 41 53 51 Table 4a: (Cont.) VI ..".

PAGE 37

Sampl ing Date yJi.. Temperature Sal inity D. O. B. O. D. (OC) (%0 ) (ppmr (5 day ppm) 6-15-72 8.70 6-22-72 8.50 6-29-72 7.60 7-06-72 7.80 7-13-72 8.00 7-20-72 7.40 7-27-72 8.60 8-03-72 8.90 8-10-72 8.60 8-17-72 6.50 8-24-72 4.79 8-31-72 2.89 9-11-72 3.70 9-14-72 4.63 9-15-72 30.0 5.21 9-16-72 7.80 9-18-72 30.0 10.70 9-22-72 31. 0 18.0 9.30 9-29-72 5.80 10-06-72 27.2 18.6 9.30 10-14-72 6.9 26.5 19.2 6.60 10-15-72 7.2 28.5 17.0 5.60 10-20-72 4.09 10-26-72 8.5 20.0 22.0 8.50 11-03-72 5.60 11-14-72 8.4 22.0 15.0 9.30 2.40 11-18-72 7.9 14.4 14.3 6.64 11-28-72 7.8 15.0 15.0 6.89 12-01-72 8.2 13.0 15.0 6.94 12-07-72 8.1 15.0 13.5 10.80 1. 70 1-10-73 10.2 8.5 5.84 \.J-I \.Jl 1-17-73 8.6 12.0 6.0 9.99 1. 71 1-24-73 1-31-73 7.9 1 2. 1 7. 1 5.32 4.51 2-07-73 7.8 17.8 8.0 9.70 7.57 Table 4b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Surface Waters at Sampl ing Station 6 (See Figure 5).

PAGE 38

Sampl ing Date pH Temp eratu re Sal inity D. O. B. O. D. (Oc) (%0 ) (ppm) (5 day ppm) 2-14-73 2-21-73 2-28-73 6.9 16.2 9.4 3-28-73 8.4 17.8 3.8 10. 17 2.54 5-02-73 7.5 23.5 3.0 5.13 1. 31 5-30-73 8.3 27.2 5.0 5.80 1.63 6-15-73 8.5 31. 9 4.6 9.68 6.31 6-25-73 7.9 30.0 4.8 7.79 3.12 7-06-73 8.4 32.9 7.0 9.43 4.10 7-13-73 6.0 31.4 8.3 12.79 5.19 7-30-73 7.1 29.9 8.2 8.05 3.37 8-09-73 6.7 31.4 9.5 8.94 3.00 8-21-73 7.4 31. 0 8.0 9.69 9.03 9-13-73 5.4 29.1 8.8 5.62 8.90 9-30-73 6.5 29.0 8.0 14.14 8.28 10-14-73 7.4 27.0 10.0 10.74 4.80 11-03-73 7.9 23.5 16.7 9.06 3.00 11-25-73 8.2 23.6 9.82 2.22 12-16-73 7.7 14.9 8.92 1-06-74 7.5 17. 1 8.0 8.92 0.99 2-03-74 7.3 22. 1 4.1 7.95 2.01 3-03-74 7.3 17.4 4.9 10.08 1.40 3-31-74 8.2 21. 0 9.0 10.48 2.81 4-21-74 7.7 22.3 5.5 9.55 3.37 Table 4b: (Cont. )

PAGE 39

Sampl i ng Date pH Temperature Sa I i ni!y' D. O. B. O. D. (oe) (%0 ) (ppm) (5 day) 6-15-72 6-22-72 4.90 6-29-72 7.10 7-06-72 7.70 7-13-72 7.30 7-20-72 7.40 7-27-72 8.60 8-03-72 7.60 8-10-72 7.60 8-17-72 6.70 8-24-72 2.68 8-31-72 1.47 9-11-72 1. 90 9-14-72 3.47 9-15-72 30.0 3.21 9-16-72 0.50 9-18-72 31.0 5.30 9-22-72 29.S 22.6 4.20 9-29-72 3.86 10-06-72 26.0 21.4 9.10 10-14-72 8.5 25.9 22.1 5.00 10-15-72 7.4 26.5 18.0 4.40 10-20-72 3.75 10-26-72 8.5 21. 2 25.0 8.80 11-03-72 5.60 11-14-72 8.4 22.0 15.6 9.30 2.40 11-18-72 8.2 16.3 16.5 5.90 11-28-72 7.9 15.0 18.0 6.83 VI 12-01-72 8.2 14.0 16.5 6.71 -..J 12-07-72 8. 1 16.5 15.0 10.60 1.50 1-10-73 11.5 10.9 5.56 1-17-73 8.5 12.3 10. 1 9.99 1.71 1-24-73 1-31-73 8.0 13.3 9.0 9.62 4.20 2-07-73 7.7 16.3 9.0 9.51 7.76 Table 4b. Bayou Texar Physico-chemical Data for Bottom Waters at Sampl ing Station 6 (See Figure 5).

PAGE 40

Sampl ing Date !:!. Temperature Sal i nit):: D. O. B. O. D. 2-14-73 2-21-73 2-28-73 6.8 16.2 9.8 3-28-73 8.0 18.8 9.0 9.45 1.82 5-02-73 7.5 23.0 4.0 4.50 .70 5-30-73 8. 1 26.8 10.0 6.79 2.74 6-15-73 8.1 29.8 7.0 7.03 1. 90 6-25-73 7.7 29.0 5.2 7.79 3.51 7-06-73 8.2 30.1 10.5 6.47 2.92 7-13-73 6.2 31.1 11.0 10.22 4.22 7-30-73 6.9 29.9 14.0 4.87 2.81 8-09-73 7.0 31. 0 11.8 6.75 2.18 8-21-73 7.3 30.4 11. 4 9.55 9-13-73 5.5 28.9 15. 1 1. 03 2.34 9-30-73 6.8 28.0 13.0 9.88 6.86 10-14-73 7. 1 27.0 14.0 8.38 3.43 11-03-73 8.0 22.5 20.5 8.67 2.07 11-25-72 8.2 22.8 8.05 2.55 12-16-73 7.4 16.5 8.60 1.58 1-06-74 7.6 17.3 8.0 8.48 1.43 2-03-74 7.2 22.1 7.0 6.68 1. 29 3-03-74 6.8 15.8 7.1 9.69 1.78 3-31-74 7.7 20.9 7.7 8.61 3.00 4-21-74 8.7 6.0 9.55 3.55 Table 4b: (Cont. )

PAGE 41

39 Table 5 Physico-chemical Data for Run Off Waters Rl (See Figure 1 ). at Sampling Station Same 1 i n9 Date Teme NO -N NH -N Total K P011-P Inorganic (DC) Nitrogen (ppb) Carbon (ppb) (ppm) 6-04-73 27.8 0.89 90 97 95 5.36 6-06-73(a) 27.5 o. 16 138 197 47 2.76 6-06-73 (b) 27.5 0.22 120 217 50 6.60 6-11-73 27.8 1. 21 13 306 80 8. 12 6-14-73(a) 24.0 2.06 78 831 23 8.28 6-14-73(b) 28.0 0.44 106 708 120 4.31 6-17-73 23.0 0.41 11 1 275 42 6.04 6-25-73(a) 28. 1 2.76 87 778 5 1.56 6-25-73(b) 27.9 0.84 436 813 78 2.41 7-02-73 28.0 0.99 36 448 34 4.74 7-06-73 (a) 24.0 0.33 281 464 66 2.79 7-06-73 (b) 27.0 0.08 117 373 58 2.40 7-10-73 26.5 1.24 50 2148 2 3.53 7-14-73 28.5 0.49 21 144 23 3.43 7-16-73 2.51 56 209 1 4.43 7-19-73 29.0 0.42 168 544 39 2.96 7-23-73 25.8 0.97 36 220 2 5.61 7-27-73(a) 26.2 0.08 47 293 42 4.37 7-27-73 (b) 26. 1 0.08 0 203 75 2.08 7-30-73 26.3 0.65 69 524 13 3.02 8-01-73 27.1 0.63 261 470 13 3.52 8-06-73 25.0 0.98 81 356 4 2.82 8-12-73(a) 25.5 0.01 50 284 31 2.10 8-12-73(b) 25.8 0.00 30 151 40 2.71 8-14-73 25. 1 O. 11 54 229 0 4. 16 8-21-73 25.5 1.33 70 800 0 11. 77 8-28-73(a) 1. 19 0 262 0 2.54 8-28-73 (b) 29.0 0.60 725 1539 103 5.58 0.77 119 496 39 x a-0.72 151.63 477.26 34.78 n 28 28 28 28

PAGE 42

40 ,(Cont;Jphysico-chemical Data for Run Off Waters at Sampling Station R2 (See Figure 1 ) Date Total K P04-P Inor9.anic (oC) (ppm) (ppb) Nitrogen (ppb) Carbon (ppb) (ppm) 6-04-73 25.5 0.98 128 208 63 5.27 6-06-73 (a) 29.2 O. 15 57 239 103 4.01 6-06-73 (b) 28. 1 0.08 III 186 64 3. 16 6-11-73 26.0 2.01 62 259 0 4.54 6-14-73 (a) 30.5 0.49 71 533 46 5.57 6-14-73(b) 29.0 0.57 263 624 91 6.80 6-17-73 23.0 0.41 111 275 42 6.04 6-25-73(a) 29.0 1. 71 101 922 113 2.31 6-25-73(b) 28.0 1 18 517 1017 46 10.33 7-02-73 28.0 0.99 36 449 34 4.74 7-06-73 (a) 23.5 0.37 226 404 37 1. 51 7-06-73(b) 26.5 0.56 491 523 35 5.33 7-10-73 30.0 0.90 0 652 35 4.88 7-14-73 29.5 0.70 20 114 39 5.42 7-16-73 2.62 37 179 147 8. 19 7-19-73 0.48 110 454 37 3.24 7-23-73 28.9 0.80 25 193 44 4.45 7-27-73 (a) 28.0 O. 13 8 319 64 5.05 7-27-73 (b) 28.6 0.09 13 236 44 4.02 7-30-73 28.5 0.53 26 390 39 4.07 8-01-73 28.8 0.49 409 469 32 3.67 8-06-73 28. 1 1. 16 0 315 14 6.18 8-12-73(a) 25.2 0.00 42 253 21 2.56 8-12-73(b) 24.8 0.01 39 313 22 3.36 8-14-73 26.2 0.04 13 160 36 6.46 8-21-73 29.0 0.81 71 461 1145 11.37 8-28-73 (a) 0.82 0 339 88 6.85 8-28-73(b) 29.0 0.72 945 1765 103 4.47 x 0.71 140 438 92 cr 0.62 213.03 338.08 208.97 n 28 28 28 28

PAGE 43

41 Table 5 Data for Run Off Waters at Sampling Station R3 (See F i gu re 1 ). SamElins Date TgmE' NHr) Total K Inorganic ( C) (ppm (ppb Nitrogen (ppb) (ppb) (ppm) 6-04-73 31.2 o. 14 80 175 77 8.48 6-06-73 (a) 28.0 o. 17 126 103 87 3.31 6-06-73 (b) 30.0 0.33 166 178 82 8.02 6-11-73 30.9 0.26 141 294 3 9.05 6-14-73 (a) 27.8 0.39 2882 2732 199 4.69 6-14-73(b) 29.2 0.45 123 553 92 8.28 6-17-73 26. 1 0.36 132 282 34 6.92 6-25-73 (a) 31.0 0.10 137 657 10 1.96 6-25-73 (b) 28. 1 1.04 426 1017 89 8.33 7-02-73 37.0 0.24 85 395 3 8.35 7-06-73 (a) 24.8 O. 18 185 365 8 3.61 7-06-73 (b) 26.0 0.46 180 253 9 3.68 7-10-73 30.5 0.09 76 2009 6 11.53 7-14-73 31.5 0.00 52 161 12 5.43 7-16-73 0.00 75 110 7 12.00 7-19.73 0.47 94 619 38 5.62 7-23-73 33.8 0.07 155 374 8 13.99 7-27-73 (a) 28.4 0.10 13 240 50 3.55 7-27-73 (b) 28.6 0.05 6 271 52 4.96 7-30-73 33.9 0.13 70 421 3 7.44' 8-01-73 32.0 0.63 136 489 39 4.40 8-06-73 32. 1 0.14 220 389 11 10.51 8-12-73(a) 24.5 0.00 43 302 13 2.20 8-12-73(b) 24.8 0.04 58 249 37 2.36 8-14-73 31.9 0.02 65 281 0 11.92 8-21-73 30.0 0.04 55 400 0 10.72 8-28-73 (a) o. 18 237 404 0 11. 32 8-28-73 (b) 29.0 0.82 450 1451 302 4.47 x 0.25 231 542 45 cr 0.26 529.79 595.08 67.02 n 28 28 28 28

PAGE 44

42 Table 5 Cont. Physico-chemical Data for Run Off Waters at Sampling Station R4 (See Figure 1 ) Samelins Date Teme NOr N NH -N Total K PO!J,-P Inorsanic (OC) (ppm) Nitrosen (ppb) Carbon (ppb) (ppm) 6-04-73 31.8 0.08 53 211 102 7.92 6-06-73(a) 28.8 0.22 102 89 6 9.03 6-06-73 (b) 31.1 o. 14 109 172 5 8.75 6-11-73 29.0 O. 16 106 229 9 9.05 6-14-73(a) 30.5 0.54 437 550 40 9.08 6-14-73(b) 30.2 0.24 79 371 0 5.47 6-17-73 26.3 0.22 148 230 26 15.40 6-25-73 (a) 28.9 0.31 109 696 8 8.05 6-25-73(b) 26.8 0.66 374 774 14 12.59 7-02-73 34.0 0.04 77 451 14 8.45 7-06-73 (a) 28.0 1.84 314 1513 47 14.28 7-06-73(b) 7-10-73 32.0 0.10 92 2361 11 9.82 7-14-73 31.5 0.00 52 161 12 5.43 7-16-73 0.00 48 181 4 11.63 7-19-73 0.41 29 569 7 9.70 7-23-73 31.6 O. 11 78 186 5 9.53 7-27-73(a) 28.0 0.10 2 265 8 6.07 7-27-73(b) 27. 1 0.02 0 160 17 3.92 7-30-73 31.1 0.22 69 562 4 7.89 8-01-73 29.3 0.30 136 489 39 4.40 8-06-73 30.0 0.07 176 422 11 13.78 8-12-73(a) 26.8 0.02 24 380 54 9.32 8-12-73(b) 28.5 0.04 37 329 5 10. 17 8-14-73 30.9 0.02 127 346 7 8.77 8-21-73 30.2 .00 241 696 0 5.86 8-28-73(a) o. 14 175 506 0 11.32 8-28-73(b) 30.5 0.56 695 1510 8 15. 13 -0.24 144 533 17 x cr 0.37 153.92 508.66 22.33 n 27 27 27 27

PAGE 45

43 Table 5 Cont. Physico-chemical Data for Run Off Waters at Sampling Station R5 (See Figure 1 ). SamEling Date TemE' NO,-N NH -N Total K PO -P I norgani c (DC) (ppm) Nitrogen Carbon (ppb) (ppm) 6-04-73 31 1 0.04 67 117' 98 8.48 6-06-73{a) 29.5 0.20 107 319 157 3.41 6-06-73{b) 34.4 0.30 88 372 99 7.57 6-11-73 31.5 0.10 90 144 2 7.77 6-14-73{a) 32.0 0.72 187 802 187 9.25 6 -1 47 3 (b) 32.2 0.05 69 469 6 4.36 6-17-73 26.0 o. 19 310 372 116 11.01 6-25-73 (a) 31.0 0.00 385 596 58 3.61 6-25-73(b) 27.9 1. 17 228 1174 88 8. 12 7-02-73 34.6 0.00 80 527 9 8.73 7-06-73{a) 32.5 0.00 61 348 6 11.05 7-06-73 (b) 7-10-73 40.0 0.59 401 2635 152 4.07 7-14-73 7-16-73 0.00 50 177 2 11.82 7-19-73 0.61 68 923 72 4.76 7-23-73 28.0 o. 16 ,171 296 90 12.56 7-27-73 (a) 27.7 0.10 18 407 110 2.95 7-27-73 (b) 28.5 0.06 8 262 88 1.06 7-30-73 33.8 0.08 43 319 6 8.62 8-01-73 8-06-73 27.6 0.24 95 304 18 9.05 8-12-73(a) 27.0 0.01 20 371 82 2.31 8-12-73{b) 29.8 0.01 34 611 118 3.86 8-14-73 31.9 0.01 305 592 10 3.96 8-21-73 34.0 0.00 119 561 0 3.96 8-28-73 (a) 0.03 857 1337 4 17.56 8-28-73 30.0 0.06 663 1235 6 16.55 x 0.19 180 610 63 (j 0.29 209.21 536.69 58.02 n 25 25 25 25

PAGE 46

44 Table 6 Mean Nutrient Concentrations in Pensacola Bay Water Encroaching on Bayou Texar (Mean Data from 3 samples collected Jan. 1973) Samele Site P04-P Total PO!-P Total K NH3-N NOrN (ppb) (ppb) Nitrogen (ppb) (ppm) (ppb) Bay Bridge, Su rface (E3) 4 24 217 34 0.09 Bay Bridge, Bottom (E3B) 6 27 136 29 0.03 L&N Tressel) Surface (E2 7 4 326 215 0.37 L&N Tresse 1, Bottom (E2B) 3 18 167 26 0.02 Cervantes Bridge, Surface (!1) 3 25 193 48 0.03 Cervantes Bridge, Bottom (E1 B) 3 2.1 227 37 0.04 Mean Concentration All Stations, and Dates Pooled 3 15 151 51 0.07

PAGE 47

Sampl ing Date Station T2S Station T2B Station T4s Station T4B Station T6s Station T6B (Surface) (Bottom) (Surface) (Bottom) (Surface) (Bottom) 10-14-72 21. 35 2.95 29.04 28.51 68.67 46.11 10-15-72 79.64 11.97 98.75 24.45 122.71 38.67 10-26-72 66.04 24.35 61.16 23.11 52.72 21.86 11-14-72 79.33 12.46 50.05 14.22 44.24 18.14 12-07-72 29.39 20.29 13. 18 4.27 10.46 5.27 1-17-73 7.92 4.43 6.14 3.87 7.75 3.37 2-07-73 7.45 4.66 2.41 2.70 2.26 2.53 2-28-73 2.30 1. 57 2.34 1. 14 1.58 1. 34 3-28-73 5.19 1. 75 19.36 4.44 18.48 0.60 5-02-73 11.76 0.36 8.27 3.63 10.26 2.48 5-30-73 15.87 3.32 4.45 4.00 4.31 6.13 6-25-73 10.25 13.43 3.86 1. 99 15.41 1. 63 7-30-73 12.96 11.88 13.13 13. 13 11. 15 15.62 8-21-73 40.71 70.18 7.24 71.84 0.69 9-30-73 21.33 4.33 12.77 3.20 16.71 8.45 11-04-73 9.23 15.98 14.34 2.21 9.74 8.48 12-16-73 13.88 6.16 13.88 13.28 2-03-74 14.90 1. 15 5.39 3.85 21.45 2.78 3-31-74 7.79 0.53 25.62 0.80 53.43 26.41 .. 24.07 7.87 23.91 8.16 30.18 11.78 x cr 24.49 7.24 26.90 8.74 32.52 13.24 n 19 18 19 18 18 19 -3 -I Table 7. Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in MgC M hr

PAGE 48

APPENDlX a FtGURES 46

PAGE 49

!t r a Pensacola,Escambia County, Fla. Scale: ....... = 1000 DRAINAGE BASIN (heavy block line COU NTY (shatted area) CITY (unshaded area STORM DRAINAGE PIPES RUNOFF SAMPLING STATfONS NTER'S CREEK ING SITE BAYOU SAMPLI NG SITES R J-!1 A ENCROAd .. iMENT-------SAMPLING STATIONS .6EI-3 47 I -10 N PENSACOLA BAY --, BAY BRIDGE igure t. Bayou Texar and its basin sampling sites.

PAGE 50

25 0' x ... ... 20 L V ... 16 .J -4 .. \ / /. \ J J A-S 0 ."' N 0 J F M A TIME "' M J J A S (JuKe '7Z April '74) ,/1-----._./ o J F M A Fiqure 2. Nutrient distribution patterns attheCarpenter's Creek sampling station (See Table I), ..

PAGE 51

y. II III tl V 49 ,. '< \, --./ .----:>. -, I .. .-_. .,

PAGE 52

0' )C. .Jt 1'0 ,I" I:: so '-' "Z I ."", 'i. .. 4( .. o (-30 ft 10 C4 III P&..HTER5 .. e.K ./-\ ./.\ \ ._\ -- '-., \ .\ \\ / J J A 50 N D J F M 1.1 M .J .) AS 0 N D.l F fVl4, T r M E. (Ju ..... '7Z-'74) F i gu re 2 (Cant. ) \Jl o

PAGE 53

\ /. 51 ." -===============-. 7' o 10 ----; \ I .----------------------\ .-=:::::::::= ._-----. / 0,\ / ....... ..... .-I ..... .....,.. t", ",. a __ __ e .-::::=-. Zl
PAGE 54

i u -=:. ---=====-==. ----------. -----. .-==w::g: -.:-:=::.. --=========-----7" .:." ----. ...... --._----------===========_. N ..... ""'. .... c-----_ --=.. -==:::::::z:-.. e -e __ e __ 52
PAGE 55

'2' )( ... I: v o a. 55 5 15 10 5 I :1 -;{ II II 11 II I I I I I I I I I Ii f I f\ 1\ r\ ) I ",'" I '" ." I e_ ./\!. __ ............. --.J J A 5 0 N D J I I I \ I \ \ \ \ \ 2 Swj'&ce -8oH'om /. \ ,;. /\ 11\ II \ .. :,t / '\ /. \L-. .,k., \ .,,,, \ ... / ........ \. !J \ .-..... F M A M J J A SON D J F M A Tl ME. (J .... C '7t. -A"ril '14) Figure 3. Bayou Texar nutrient and dissolved oxygen distribution patterns at Station 2 (See Table 2a-b).

PAGE 56

c& < l't If I E 0 G I-1ft Cl ( I I l-I II' 1 r -----.-1: -"""'I I r u. .,.., -= = =i' ,-----------------:J1-i a -------.... _-;-I ,i, 0 0 '! 0 It) 'If 2 (.,JJ) d-Od .--= .... --.... '\ -. 0 .... 0 54 t. OJ; ... I ... .... c .i-J :. c;: "") 0 u -(V\ III ()) L t ::J en I.l... f-

PAGE 57

- ---------------. -/ / ./ ./ ./ '7 I I I ""_------=:0:-=-::-::-:::-=:-:::-:= '.::::::-. -----4._. _-::::--..:::_:..:-.... --- ----.:;:, =-. \ ---.... ----=:..::::. --/. ::;-;::. N r 0 o j 0 \I) II) I i \I) --. ...:: ...... '" ., ""'-'-,/ .... ............ -:::..:.. --::.-.-. .---,r1: ... <'.L --"'v a==:.-:... -:. .;. ,. _______ .w: ...... __ ---.... ____________ ...... --. / \ __ e c::::::c ___ ._ 55 I t&. Q Z 0 \1\ .., .., I
PAGE 58

o 35 30 25 x ... CL. L 20 '-' z I z 10 5 I n II STATION 2 ._ 5wrfac.c .---BOTT" I I I I I I I ./ I .,. \ /\ .\ "J,\! 11 I I I I 1 I I 1 I 1 !t I /' :\ I '\ J\ I 1 /\ I' \, ,\ I 1 1 \. \ .' \1 '\ / \ I ;I.t" / ''\. /\ I \ \. J \\ j/' ./ ........ \ ". \ I '. J J SON D ,J F M A M oJ oJ A SON D J F M A Tl Me. (J", .. e '12.-A,-ril '74) Figure 3 (Cant.)

PAGE 59

l\I Z o r lll) E o t o 10 I I 1 57 I """. _.\",! \ "'7-" e---., ...... -. ... ------. ./ ...... ,,\, > ... c:::: -"..----..::. -;,cC_ .::-.::: ------....... ------, .. \' ('t) (1_01 )( &.tIeld) N _EO N
PAGE 60

N \ / / \ 'x' -. ----........ --. ----------::----=------------"",-.:' --=-----............ ---. ---_. -.---,. .... -e_ == =-,.. -------. .
PAGE 61

5 'g' x ...a 2' Q.. L-V 0.. J .. ZO o a. ..I 10 J \ I \ / \ .. \ t \ I \ ,I / \ I \ : I \ \ / \ I f \ .. /I<";\/,1 .. STATION 4 ---Surf&cc .--SOTt-om J A o o J F M A Tl Me: M J J AS 0 N (JuKe '7%-1.1.1',.""4) F M A Figure 4. Bayou Texar nutrient and dissolved oxygen distribution patterns at Station 4 (See Table 3a-b). Vl \.0

PAGE 62

" i u 0 c!t ... ... .. :s 0 \#ltD 1 1 60 ...... --.....; ./ \. I .... ., Q 'Z 0 In ., '"') 1: < I U. .., 0 Z ..-...-.a:=r.=: -:..----_ .... -----------------... --------------.....: .. _---.. ---'--;c=i,e 0 .... ,.. ... -:::>--.. ". fA < ... .. < .. .... 1 ., .<:; .' .., ""'"' l! .. L < I t\I t-V c :) .., '-' .....-. +-' III c 0 1 u ..::t l-CIJ L :J 0'1 '-'-

PAGE 63

30 70 )( 5. ... :: '-" "Z .-, y. 30 STATION 4----SurfCLce. .--i301TOM 1\ 1\ I \ I \ /'. I \ I \ / I ." I /1 I' / I I I I I r / I I I *' 1 /1 '. I I I I I I t '1 I: I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I f I j I. // '/ / J J A SON 0 .J F !VI A M ..J .J A sON 0 J F M A-T I M tit (Julfle '7Z. April '74) Figure 4 (Cont.)

PAGE 64

35 30 z J5 :r Z I e 10 m 5! l Il .. I, r. I ST ... TIO ........ swrfac.& .--l&oTTom -I ,-'\ / \ I I J \ I \ I \ I f /1 ." I! 1\ I \ I \ i 1 \ 1\ ,\l I \.\ ./ /\\: \\ i', I \ I \ ,I I \ I \ I "". 1\,1 I' I I \1 \. \ I \ I V \ \ I I -r \,. .t \1 '\/ '. ---. ,.,.' ,I I 1 J J AS 0 N D J F M AM J J AS 0 NO J F M A II M IE. (June. '7% Apra '74) Figure 4 (Cont.) 14 12. U\ lOt: n l' 8 Z r .... 4z I Z 0\ N

PAGE 65

63 /-/__ J -x ---lL .., t I I 0 -' .......... \ ......... \ .. _---Z 0 .-------...,.. U) +' .. \ .t--I
PAGE 66

--. ----., ..... ...... ...... ...... .. ---...-. -----==--------------------------== -. N 64 I '
PAGE 67

0 )( ..a t: a. I .... 0 a.. ...I 4' 10 J I /.\ .',./ \ ;''''' \ ;' \ : \ I \ I \ STATION CO Surface --130t+o," I \ /,... I,. I ". ... "\ .. "..... .-...... 1 ........ / ..... .' '._ ..... ,... .-0,0--. 110-,,"Vi\, .........-.. \ J AS 0 NO J F M A M J J A. TIM E (J","C '7t. Ar .. il '74-) OJ E=' MA Figure 5. Bayou Texar nutrient and dissolved oxygen distribution patterns at Statton 6 (See Table 4a-b).

PAGE 68

66 ?'" 4( ----' -I. ---'" ., '"", ..... 11 Q z 0 "'"' /1 ",,1/. \1\ "t ',/, L ... < """" ...... I l' &: Ii' .., !'" 0 .---.,' U Z a. t 1 .. ,/' C l e 0 fI) t u:::--., .., ... -i-.... .. 4: 1: c ... ul 0 u t Lr\ Q) L I J-::J -...;: m LL. .... I&. "';1..:::-.::a.e:-., I 0 Z 0 L .,. o

PAGE 69

..... -,.. .....-.::::.-------. I I I ... -------------------------------, eC---------.. ---. __ e .... .............. -:----.... -.. _. ,---we:::: ..... /. >< .... .... ---.. ..:-----------.. --. -----------------.---:;::;;.----'" ------------... --...... -:. I ., J\ \ .-Je <:: -. y .......... ........ ----_ .... -_. --.. -_ I = --, .... ::=2. -c: --....... 67 .., 0 z 0 U\ .., ..,
PAGE 70

35 "Z .,. :x: Z E .. 10 o /I) 5 STATION G _SUrfClc.e ----BOTTOM .. Ii I I I I I I I I I I I I J I .. \ /. \ /\ I \ I / \ '\ I \ I / .......... / \' I .\ / -f..1 / 1/ .. / .. .. n '\ \ I \ \ : \ 0, .. I \ \ I \" I \ I \ / ,I \/ .. / .. .--. / .. J J SON 0 J F M A fill J .J A 5 0 ,... 0 .J F M A TIM &: (J ,ute!: '7Z A,.,.;j'1tf.) Figure 5 (Cont.) 12 .0 (f1 p -8 t'\ I :4 2 .... ... X -o '-" 0\ co

PAGE 71

o 00 69 --"\-. -. / ,/ ::----/-'-.----1-_-'::::::::r -----------.-----=-----------------------" E l o :s Q In cO 1 1 .:& o (,_0/ )( lAl.leI) u. a *' to-'l ""') J N I:""' .., i 1: ""') +J '-..../ c 0 u III Lf\ I Q) I I... ::l I-Oi lJ.. u.. .., Q

PAGE 72

\ \ ..... ...... \ \ ........ ... -------- ---::-0-.... -. -. -.... ---=-. --------. ------. ::. -;; '. ... ---=--> .. .-_ :: ,& *-_== ____ __ e_:-O:':;' ___ =: ;-:... ....... .--e_ ..e.-=. ::_, o .......... -----_. .... ....... ----=== ..:==--.... .... =--... ,.,-... -..; .... ", __ e ____ __ .,I' 70 I
PAGE 73

I ... ..s ",' I I \J be) 30 10 J J /\ \ I \ \ / \/ J r r /\ CAltaOf'( FVCATJON STATIO,,", Z Surface. 60"'to".. \ \ ./\>:,/ \ / /. \ / \ .-. / \ // \.-.\ /. /! './ ,:--------- \ \ .,X: \ ., ....... ....... A 5 0 N 0 J M A M J J A SON D J TI ME:. (JCJ.M& '7Z.-Marck '74) ....... Figure 6. Spatial and temporal patterns in primary productivity in Bayou Texar (See Table 7). -------

PAGE 74

o a 'Z g T 1 1 + X 0 0 11 V) to I I I I 2 Ul 1 U ,.. .' :"1 72 I LJ.. I / I "") I I I Q \ I \ l \ \ \ 0 \ \ \ \ Ul
PAGE 75

73 .... "-" 1: "-....... ....... lL -"") Q \ \ /:' 0 e.::=-------------------------------------__ 1 ", JJ: 0 /-" "' "") I ........ I "---)' I 1 \ 4 6 _____ : J I ./,i lL/ \"--' ---' .".,."""" ."".,. ___ .---1/ ----_.' o

PAGE 76

1 19t { 4 2 STATION 2 P"'YTOPLANIC.TON (liweer" ])i"+o"'$ .. ...J. ,su .. facc. : f'," -- .+tOM I I I \ I / \ I \ II! J ./. \ ""/' .---. A \.. I I \ /\ I \ / \ I \ I \1 ... J '7 ... I 1" \ -J_\__ I \ -j-r-I \ I \ I \ I V \ \ I \ I. \ I ". \ I I I I I o N 0 J F' M A. M J cJ A S 0 No J) J F M A M Ti ME. (Oc.,.ob ..... '72Mar '74) Figure 7. Spatial and temporal patterns in phytoplankton distribution in Bayou Texar. '< 37 3J '4 7 3 z

PAGE 77

IJ = ... :s (f) .J .J '-' III (\J '" J Z u. 0 0 'Z \-A < --.., z o "'_'\ (ft --__ .. _0 .1 .., : .",.--, -.. I l\& to--" it :$ ,...... '") V c 0 u W r---. I Q) L.. ::l til LL

PAGE 78

76 --.; I I -. ------"...... 1ft l \If ttl oJ ..J '-' III j III N I Z ... 0 0 0 1 --f-0 0 1 I I (f) L '-, .-----::::.. -.. -::'.----------------------"='. &. ,-=--. -. "" ................ .-..,...-'...... ................ --, ..... -...-... ---------. ---: :---:"--=--=..--=-.. --. ... -.-::::.==---. ----.......... u= __________ ----.----. ... ----..... ------. e ________ -----........ ------------------.-----. -....... ------. -" A o t, """)!"" 1: '" 8 Wr---.. <1 I OJ L I g, lL.. o i ...,...-'. Ul \ \ \ __ ______ __ __J i ..,

PAGE 79

37 32 18 11 I E fA" I .2 (4-v ; 13 ., IZ :J Z II .J ... II u ., 4 3 D J 77 STATlON 4-PHYTOPLANKTON (Other -fa .. oi .. +o""s ."e1 0\ I't.f' .. .. u ..... c.s ) _surface .... --Sotto'" 1 I \ II I ...... ........ .. \ .... \ \ .I t / -,*":. -\ \ \ \ I \ J, \ I I \1 I I I I I I I I ,) J I I I I I I \ 1 \ 1 I t \ \ \ , I I A M J J A SON D ..J F M A M T, IV! IlL (Oc:.J-o .Cot" 72 fV1_y '74) Figure-7 (Cant.)

PAGE 80

? u cI U"\ ;I 't 1 0 I-4 I-(() (It III 0' Ut j I II. 0 o F-z -ir --= 78 -- I I I -Y ---. .... o --_. -., -a _________ :::::-... -=+ .., ./ ./ \ \ \ Y _e --..e I I ---.!a. .---. "'-\ .-c::: ---.... ------fI ...... ........ as .. --. __ I --. ..-....... .. .... ----_-.-<",--e ----.., z o e __ '. .(-til \ .. "".-- =::.. ... ...
PAGE 81

" 14 -, E IZ ....... If 9 )( '-J 01 10 '" 1 :) Z 8 .J ..J U (Q 4 z 1 .. ", --... --, ... ..... 1' I \ I : \ I I I I \ I I I \ I \ ,\ I \ I I I I I I" I I I 1 I \ I I I \ I \ \ \ -j: \ I \ I I \ I J I I \ I I I \: I 1 \ I \ I I \ I \1 ... '\ \ I, .:. I \ ",I I \ I ,.', I \ I I "I A ., \ /' I '\ 1 \ 1 1 1 I, I \11; I \ I ", I \, tI I I \ 1 \ I I \ I '/'.-. I \ I I 5 TAT ION -4-(&O'tfOPt) D 'NO F&'A.GEi.L..t-ATES --DIATo ...... S /' I 1 \ I I \ I \ \ I I I I I \' 1 ,\ I \// \ J \ I \1 '" ..... "<.! I /. .) J A SON I> J F M A M J J A SON pJ F M A M T, Me:. _(Jt*tte '72May '74 ) Figure 7 (Cont.)

PAGE 82

Bo++o ... 80 NON --...... -r I --------------. ... / .... .,-""'" ..... ..... 'A _______ s' --a =====::= ::-:-:-:--:. -:-:-=-=. 4 4'l ''"'' __ \\ zwe --. u--__________ _-. ..,.--__ --------u ...... I / / .::::.:'-----.-. I / /\ !.>-!.. ..... ... \., \ ".,.. !! ,," N 2 Q) \8 .. ns W (.0' X 1) s ..... wnN "".,:)z "'"" '" en .r--t I ... .... -'-\1 ..D .2 '") v ,g, I III
PAGE 83

22' "j IE X 'J 12!5 III dJ I i 100 J J dI U 7' e ,I' i );':tr 'l : \ II J I I I : \ d i\ / \ I \ II / \ I I J I,., I \ I \ ; \ I, /' I I \ 1 I \ I \ -\-, \ I / \ I \ I / e_. I .. : "". ,.1 l. \' \ J r II \ I I I \ .................... I / \ r' \ \ _. -OII'(OFLAGILLL.ATIE.S --DIATOMS -\ \ '\ I \ I \ I 2'\/, l \ I, I r-:, I \ ,.-.\c-=-_ \1, V I .,......----. \ I /' \" "". \ .., I .",... --............ / 1 I .-. \)-J J A S 0 N 0 J F M A fVC J J A-S o to( D J F" M A M Figure 7 (Cont.)

PAGE 84

82 \ l: \ J / u. \f ., /-.j' II Ie <:-.:,:::y' --. -==-- % .... -::: ...... --------. _== ______ --::.-=:-e=---a/ --------. -;, I I / I / I I I ."" ", I&. ..... _.1.___ .==-C _. -a...... -. --'. ----j -'"') 0 ___ -__ o----::::-A..;.---.. ---e_ ...."..--------------!.... ',. -Z __ -------. 0 -- --=='"-----.., I N r---E :s .., '-' III I l= .f-J C 0 u r-... Q) 1-::J OJ lL.