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HIS 4944 Spring Semester 2011 - Preserving History : An Internship in Historical Archives
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00001452/00001
 Material Information
Title: HIS 4944 Spring Semester 2011 - Preserving History : An Internship in Historical Archives
Physical Description: Syllabus
Language: English
Creator: Van Ness, Carl
Cusick, James G.
Nemmers, John
Turcotte, Flo
Publication Date: Spring 2011
 Notes
Abstract: Historians rely heavily on documents, maps, photographs, and audio-visual recordings to conduct research. The role of an archivist is to select and preserve these materials so that they are accessible. Archivists, usually people trained in history or literature, but increasingly now in politics or science, act as record-keepers of the present and past. This course is an internship in the world of archives. It will introduce you to the purpose and uses of archives and give you practical background in archives as a profession. Topics include: primary sources and their relation to history; an overview of the development of archives in the United States; the philosophy behind archives; and archival processing and arrangement. You will be responsible for a group project and one or more individual projects during the semester, arranging and describing the contents of a collection.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00001452:00001

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HIS 4944 Spring Semester 2011
Preserving History: An Internship in Historical Archives

Day/Time: Variable; arranged by semester. Credit: 3 credit hours
Special Collections Reading Room/Processing Area
Department of Special & Area Studies Collections, Smathers Library East

Faculty:
Carl van Ness, Head, Manuscripts Division and University Archives
James Cusick, Curator, Florida History
John Nemmers, Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Flo Turcotte, Public Services Archivist

Contact person for this course is James Cusick
Phone: (352) 273-2778; email: jgcusick@ufl.edu

Historians rely heavily on documents, maps, photographs, and audio-visual recordings to
conduct research. The role of an archivist is to select and preserve these materials so that
they are accessible. Archivists, usually people trained in history or literature, but
increasingly now in politics or science, act as record-keepers of the present and past.

This course is an internship in the world of archives. It will introduce you to the purpose
and uses of archives and give you practical background in archives as a profession.
Topics include: primary sources and their relation to history; an overview of the
development of archives in the United States; the philosophy behind archives; and
archival processing and arrangement. You will be responsible for a group project and
one or more individual projects during the semester, arranging and describing the
contents of a collection.

Format: You will meet with instructors during the first two weeks of the semester for
lecture/seminars or individual tutorials (depending on class size). After this, you will
arrange a schedule to work with an archivist each week. You will also have outside
research and assignments to do.

IMPORTANT: In arranging your class schedule, be prepared to work on your project in
the library for three hours per week throughout the semester. Faculty prefer you
schedule a three-hour block of time rather than splitting the time up.

Prerequisite:

Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator in the Department of History.









Course requirements and assignments:


Attendance in class and three hours per week at the library are required. Basic
assignments and evaluation for grades are set out as follows:

Group and Individualized Work in Arrangement and Description 25%
Write up of Finding Guide(s) 25%
Class Attendance and Participation 10%
Internet Writing Assignment and Report 15%
Additional Assignments 25%
Assignments vary by semester. They include (1) creation of Wikipedia web
entries, Facebook page, or other web documents; (2) scanning of sample materials
to be linked to finding aids; (3) transcriptions of letters to be placed on the Web.

Interns are expected to use their weekly block of in-library time to learn from archivists
and to work on their group and individual projects. Research, writing assignments, and
other assignments require additional time.

Course Objectives:

The intent of this course is to increase students' awareness of the importance of archives
as places for research, and provide some grounding in manuscripts and archival
processing for those who might wish to use their history degree to work as an archivist.

* Establishing an appreciation for the role of archives in history and historical
research
* Learning how archives operate
* Become expert in the collection you are given to process
* Gaining practical experience in the arrangement and description of a collection

Assigned Texts:

There are no assigned texts. Required readings (see below) will be provided in a
course reader.

Semester Assignments:

The group assignment for this semester will be to work on unprocessed sections of the
records of the Florida League of Women Voters. Background on the collection will be
provided. Interns, working with archivists, will assess new material for its relevance,
come to decisions about what to keep and preserve, and organize new material for use.









List of potential individual projects:


Rollins College, Winter Park
Newspaper clippings and correspondence, 1951 dismissal of faculty by Pres. P.A.
Wagner. (1 small box).
Call Number:99,012 Misc. Manuscripts

Dartmouth, 2ndEarl of 1731-1801
Manuscript papers (photocopies), 4 folders. Correspondence, 1766-1782, Folders I-II;
DeBrahm. Florida, 1772, An Account of its history, climate, Folder IV.
Call Number:99,027 Misc. Manuscripts

Charles Arnade Papers
2 boxes, 1 unprocessed
Small collection of papers of the USF professor of history and noted author on Florida
and Latin America, Charles Arnade. Materials about colonial period donated by Prof.
Arnade.
Call Number: 99,031 Misc. Manuscripts

Yonge, Chandler Cox.
Papers, 4 boxes, 1828-1886.
Lawyer, politician, and soldier, of Florida. Miscellaneous material relating to Yonge, who
was secretary of the Florida Constitutional Convention at St. Joseph (1838); member of
Florida Senate (1843-1844); U.S. district attorney; district attorney for Florida under the
Confederacy; and in the Confederate military service (1863-1865). Gift of Julien
Chandler Yonge.

Samuel Darwin McConnell Family Papers?
1 box, 1/2 linear foot
Family papers and letters of Samuel D., his wife, Mary Eloise Brumby, and his father-in-
law. J.T. Brumby. Originals, 1859-1876. Includes extensive correspondence from the
Civil War.
Call Number, 00,907 Misc. Manuscripts

O'Neill, James T.
Papers, 2 boxes, 1812-1887.
Plantation owner, of Woodstock, St. Marys, Georgia, and New Hope, Fernandina,
Florida. Business and legal documents and correspondence relating to plantation life and
cotton cultivation. 2 ln.ft.

Hendricks, Joseph Edward
Papers, 11 boxes, 1931-1948.
Lawyer, businessman, and U.S. representative from Florida (1937-1949). Legislative
correspondence.









Gleason Family
Papers, 11 boxes, 10 letterbooks, 1869-1946.
Correspondence files, financial and legal documents, subject files, and letter books. The
Gleason Family came to Florida from Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in the post-Civil War
period. The family played a significant role in the development of Florida's agricultural,
commercial, and residential lands. The collection consists primarily of the papers of
William H. H. Gleason and records of Gleason Brothers. The collection also contains
papers of William Henry Gleason, George G. Gleason, and W. Lansing Gleason. 5.2 In.ft.

Spanish American War Photo Collection
16 folders
Series of captioned photos of troops, places, action during the Spanish American War.
Photographer undocumented.


WEEK 1: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5 TO FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS. INTRODUCTION AND ORIENTATION

CLASS AGENDA
* Course orientation and major expectations
* Explanation of assignments
Group Project
Internet Assignment
Individual Work
Wikipedia and Web Assignments
* Overview of the department and its major collections
* Concepts: archivess, manuscripts, records
* Examples of manuscripts, archives and records
* Explanation of Internet Assignment

WEEK 2: JANUARY 10 TO JANUARY 14, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS. ARCHIVAL DESCRIPTION AND PROCESSING (JOHN NEMMERS, FLO
TURCOTTE, CARL VAN NESS, JAMES CUSICK)

READINGS
"Introduction to Archival Organization and Description, An Online Tool."
liip " " �.getty.edu/research/conducting research/standards/introarchives/homepage.html

"Organizing Archival Records: A Practical Method of Arrangement and Description
for Small Archives," Second Ed., David W. Carmicheal. AltaMira Press, 2004, pp.1-
17.

CLASS AGENDA
* Review maj or concepts: respect desfonds/provenance, principle of original
order
* Examples of processing/evaluation









* Hands-on exercise
o Exercise D in Carmicheal's "Organizing Archival Records"
o Other

WEEK 3: MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY (MONDAY) / JAN. 18 TO JAN 21, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA, GROUP PROJECT

* Assessment and Processing of League of Women Voters records

WEEK 4: JANUARY 24 TO JANUARY 28,2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA, GROUP PROJECT

* Assessment and Processing of League of Women Voters records

WEEK 5: JANUARY 31 TO FEBRUARY 4, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA, GROUP PROJECT

* Assessment and Processing of League of Women Voters records

WEEK 6: FEBRUARY 7 TO FEBRUARY 11,2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA, INDIVIDUAL WORK

READINGS
"Archives, Manuscripts, and Personal Papers, A Processing Manual," Tomaro
Taylor, University of South Florida Tampa Library, October 2007, pp. 7-9

* Notify us of your selection for your Internet assignment
* Begin work on selected collection

WEEK 7: FEBRUARY 14 TO FEBRUARY 18, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA

* Work on Individual Projects

WEEK 8: FEBRUARY 21 TO FEBRUARY 25, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA (HOMECOMING, OCT. 14-15)

* Continue Individual Work

WEEK 9: FEBRUARY 28 TO MARCH 4,2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA

* Continue Individual Work
*
WEEK 10: MARCH 5 TO MARCH 13,2011 SPRING BREAK NO CLASS









WEEK 11: MARCH 14 TO MARCH 18, 2011


* Continue Individual Work
* TURN IN INTERNET ASSIGNMENT WRITE UP
* Discussion and selection of other projects
o Scanning projects
o Web-based projects
o Letter transcription projects

WEEK 12: MARCH 21 TO MARCH 25, 2011
LIBRARY EAST FIRST FLOOR CONFERENCE ROOM

* Presentation and discussion of Internet Assignments

WEEK 13: MARCH 27 TO APRIL 1, 2011
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS PROCESSING AREA

* Individual work and other assignments

WEEK 14: APRIL 4 TO APRIL 8, 2011

* Individual work and other assignments

WEEK 15: APRIL 11 TO APRIL 15, 2011

* Finish up individual work

WEEK 16: APRIL 18 TO APRIL 20, 2011

* Web, scanning, or transcription assignments all due

Course Requirement Descriptions:
All project work for the course must be done in electronic format (preferably Microsoft
Word). You should provide both an electronic and paper copy.

Attendance is mandatory. Failure to come to class prepared and to put in the required
hours on project work will result in the termination of the internship with a failing grade.

Internet Writing Assignment: You will write up a short profile of an archive, presidential
library, or a graduate program in archives/public history. See handout for instructions.
You will submit a 750 word essay on your findings, and will be prepared to present your
findings in class during Week 6. The purpose of this assignment is to work on writing
and research skills, and to gain familiarity with a functioning repository or a graduate
program in the field.









Group Projects: This semester we will be working on unprocessed material from the
Florida League of Women Voters. We will need to sort material, make decisions about
what we need to keep, look at conservation issues, and get the material organized. The
purpose of this project is to give you hands on experience with making basic decisions
about how to treat a collection, what needs to be saved and what can be discarded, and
how to organize records.

Individualized Work in Collection and Description: You will complete your own project
in arrangement and description of a collection. The archival arrangement project requires
that you work with an instructor to correctly process the contents of a collection and that
you do the background research and writing/composition necessary to create the
descriptive aid for your collection. Besides arranging the collection, it is expected that
you will: (1) research and write an annotated biography of the person who created the
collection or an annotated history of the institution that created it; (2) provide historical
context for the collection and specify its importance; and (3) describe the contents of the
collection in sufficient detail to be of use to researchers. The descriptive aid you produce
will be converted to a Web document and placed online, with the department's other
finding aids, with you as author (see http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/sascfas.htm).

Additional Assignments: Over the course of the semester, you will be creating either
Wikipedia or Facebook entries associated with Special Collections, scanning materials to
put online, or transcribing Civil War Letters for our "Florida and the Civil War" website.
You must choose and complete an assignment in at least one of these areas.

All writing assignments, including this descriptive aid, should follow the Chicago
Manual of Style and should be appropriately footnoted for source material.

Other Business:
Plagiarism is a form of theft: it means you took someone else's words, ideas, or
conclusions and tried to pass them off as your own, without giving any credit to the
person or persons who came up with them. To avoid plagiarism, be certain to give proper
credit whenever you use someone else's work. Failure to give credit by quoting and/or
footnoting is PLAGIARISM and is unacceptable under the university's policy for
academic conduct. Please review the University's honesty policy at
http://www.dso.ufl.edu/judicial/academic.htm.

Classroom Assistance:
Please do not hesitate to contact the instructor during the semester if you have any
individual concerns or issues that need to be discussed. Students requesting classroom
accommodation must first register with the Dean of Students Office
{http://www.dso.ufl.edu/drp/}. The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation
to the student who must then provide that documentation to the instructor when
requesting accommodation.