Handbook for beginning elementary music educators

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Material Information

Title:
Handbook for beginning elementary music educators
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Creator:
McNees, Kimberly
Hoffer, Charles
Richards, Paul
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
Teacher preparation courses cannot fully prepare students for what teaching in the field requires. These courses educate future teachers about education philosophies, techniques, and musical knowledge. The refinement of one’s teaching skill requires a great deal of time and practice. When entering into the professional world, the prospective teacher must rely on their formal training, have confidence, and work with conviction. This handbook is intended to bridge the gap between the college and the elementary classrooms by guiding new music educator through several stages, from finding their first job to succeeding in the first few years of practice. The information in this handbook is a compilation of insights from the author, veteran music teachers, and new music teachers (those with less than five years teaching experience). The content of this handbook represents information and insights that the author and other teachers wish they had when they started teaching. Many of the ideas presented are interrelated. (For example, classroom setup and classroom management.) The approach offered in this handbook is not the only way to do things; it simply presents information that is often not readily available to new educators. There is a saying in the teaching profession, “beg, borrow, and steal!” The author hopes that the reader will take what is useful and leave the rest; not all of it will be helpful to everyone.
Acquisition:
Music Education terminal project

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Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00001415:00001


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A HANDBOOK FOR BEGINNING ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS


By

KIMBERLY McNEES



SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

CHARLES OFFER, CHAIR

PAUL RICHARDS, MEMBER













A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT

OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF

MASTER OF MUSIC

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


2010









TABLE OF CONTENTS

Purpose of Handbook......................................... .. .......... ........................... .. 1


M ethodology of Inform ation C ollection......................................... ......................... .............. 2


Chapter 1- Finding a Job .......................................... .. .......... ............................ 4
P prepare a P portfolio .................................................................................................... .......... 5
In terv iew .................................................................................................................... ........... 7
In v en to ry .................................................................................................................. ........... 1 1
S e t u p ................................................................................................................. ....... . ........ 1 1
B u lletin B o ard Id eas ................................................................................................................ 12
Pictures of Classrooms Set Up and Bulletin Board Ideas................................................... 13



Chapter 3- The First D ays of School .. ................................................................... .............. 17
Rules and Procedures ..................................... ........... .......................... .. 17
Classroom Management................................. ........... .......................... .. 17
Ways to Use Class Time .................................. ........... ............................ 18
L e sso n Id ea s .............................................................................................................. ............ 19
Cultivate Relationships (with Teachers, Staff, Parents, and Students)............................... 20
S ch ed u lin g ................................................................................................................ ........... 2 1
R ecruitm ent for Special Ensem bles .................................................................. .............. 21
T o d o L ist ................................................................................................................ .......... 2 1



C chapter 4- L esson P planning ................................................................................ .............. 22
Lesson Plan Templates ................................ .. .......... ...................................... 23
L esson P lan Ideas...................................................................................................... ........... 2 3
R e fle c t ....................................................................................................................... ........... 2 5
Education Acronyms .......................................... .. .......... .................................... 25









Chapter 5- Professional D evelopm ent .................................................................. .............. 27
Join Organizations ....................................................... ........................ .. 27
Find a Mentor ..................................................... ................. 27
Orff Schulwerk ..................................................... ................. 28
K o ld a ly .. . ......... ................................................................... ............................................ 2 9
W world M music D rum m ing .......................................................................................... 31
D a lc ro z e ................................................................................................................ . ............... 3 1
B ooks/R sources .................................................................................. .. .............. 34
Record Professional D evelopm ent ...................................................................................... 34
K eep R record s for P portfolio ....................................................................................................... 3 5



C h ap ter 6 P erfo rm an ces............................................................................................................... 3 6
C concert P program s ................................................................................ .. .............. 36
Logistics................................ .. ......................... ........................ 36
C o n c e rt E tiq u ette ...................................................................................................................... 3 7
F undraising Ideals ................................................................................ .. .............. 37


B biographical Sketch ............................................................................... .. .............. 39


A p p e n d ix A ............... ................................................................. ........................................... 4 1


A p p e n d ix B ................................................................................................................. .. ........... 9 0









Purpose of Handbook

Teacher preparation courses cannot fully prepare students for what teaching in the field

requires. These courses educate future teachers about education philosophies, techniques, and

musical knowledge. The refinement of one's teaching skill requires a great deal of time and

practice. When entering into the professional world, the prospective teacher must rely on their

formal training, have confidence, and work with conviction.


This handbook is intended to bridge the gap between the college and the elementary

classrooms by guiding new music educator through several stages, from finding their first job to

succeeding in the first few years of practice. The information in this handbook is a compilation

of insights from the author, veteran music teachers, and new music teachers (those with less than

five years teaching experience). The content of this handbook represents information and

insights that the author and other teachers wish they had when they started teaching.


Many of the ideas presented are interrelated. (For example, classroom setup and

classroom management.) The approach offered in this handbook is not the only way to do

things; it simply presents information that is often not readily available to new educators. There

is a saying in the teaching profession, "[b]eg, borrow, and steal!" The author hopes that the

reader will take what is useful and leave the rest; not all of it will be helpful to everyone.









Methodology of Information Collection

The information in this handbook is a collection of ideas from the authors' personal

teaching experience as well as the result of interviews of other Florida music teachers, e-mails,

and other interactions with several contributors. There are many references to Florida standards

and resources, these are not the only resources they are just ones that the author and the

contributors use. The contributors to the handbook include the following:

o Dr. Artie Almeida is the music teacher at Bear Lake Elementary School in Apopka, FL.

Mrs. Almeida has been the Florida Music Educator of the Year as well as the Seminole

County Teacher of the Year and Teacher of the Year at the school level six times. In

addition, Mrs. Almeida teaches early childhood music classes at the University of Central

Florida and Seminole Community College.

o Laurie Foote is the music teacher at Quest Elementary in Viera, FL. Mrs. Foote is a

National Board Certified Teacher in addition to have completing Orff Level's one and

two training. Quest Elementary is a Florida Music Demonstration School.

o Charles Harris is the music teacher at Coquina Elementary in Titusville, FL. Mr. Harris

has taught elementary music for the last four years and was chosen as Coquina's teacher

of the year for the 2009-2010 school year.

o Mary Jackson is the music teacher at Oak Park Elementary in Titusville, FL. Mrs.

Jackson has been teaching music for eight years. Oak Park Elementary is a Florida

Music Demonstration School.

o Sheila King is the music teacher at Apollo Elementary in Titusville, FL. Mrs. King has

been teaching music for over forty years and has been the Apollo teacher of the year for

the 2003-2004 school year, the Brevard County Teacher of the Year as well as the 2005









FMEA Florida Music Teacher of the Year. Apollo Elementary is a Florida Music

Demonstration School. In addition, Mrs. King is the President Elect of FMEA.

o Elizabeth Whitney is the music teacher at Ralph Williams Elementary in Rockledge, FL.

She is in her first year teaching and is a recent graduate of the University of Central

Florida.

o Lisa Weikel is the music teacher at Mims Elementary in Mims, FL. Ms. Weikel has been

teaching for fifteen years and is a National Board Certified Teacher.









Chapter 1- Finding a Job

The first hurdle encountered, post-graduation is finding a job. It is the responsibility of a

recent graduate to be vigilant in networking with other music teachers and getting to know music

supervisors. Music jobs are often few and far between because there are only a limited number

of positions at elementary schools, which generally employ only one music teacher. Look for

job openings on:


District websites;
The Florida Music Educators Association (FMEA) website (http://www.flmusiced.org/).
Florida Department of Education teacher recruitment website
(http://www.teachinflorida.com/).

When the applicant finds a position that they are interested in, preparing and sending

resumes to schools as well as district music supervisors (if the county has them) is the first step.

Resumes should be one page, clear, concise, and should be accompanied by a cover letter.

Materials should be carefully checked for grammar and spelling errors. It is recommended to

have others (like family, friends and mentors) review materials before they are sent out.


The amount of influence that music supervisors have over hiring and recruitment varies

from county to county. Some principals will not hire a music teacher without a previous

interview with the music supervisor, whereas other principals prefer to make their own decisions.

If possible, it is suggested to contact teachers and administrators you know, in those counties, to

see if there is a proper protocol for submitting an application.


When looking for a job, the applicant might consider whether they would like to live in

that area and would be happy there. The following questions are helpful to consider:


1. Will you be able to adjust to the location? For example, if you enjoy spending time at the
beach and the school is landlocked, the adjustment may be difficult.









2. Do you know anyone in the area you are looking into? Being an elementary music
teacher can be very lonely because there is generally only one per school. Having friends
or family near by can be helpful during the transition from college life to the career
world.
3. Can you find a place to live that you can comfortably live in?
4. If you cannot afford to live close by, how long would a commute be? Remember when
looking for places to live keep in mind the fact that teachers' salaries do not qualify for
low-income housing. Also think about any student loan debt that you might have
incurred during your schooling.

If student loan debt is an issue, contacting lenders can provide information about monthly

payments and loan consolidation. Recognizance can be helpful; some applicants investigate the

schools before applying or interviewing. The Website greatschools.org is an excellent resource

for finding information on schools, as is the school's own website. Important questions to ask

include:

1. Could you see yourself working with that particular faculty?
2. What is the school's motto and educational philosophy?
3. Is the school's philosophy and "vibe" inline with your views?

Scouting out a school is not only helpful for the process of deciding to apply, but also in

preparing for an interview. Most principals are more interested in candidates if they know they

have done research and taken time to learn about their school. If one interviews for several

schools, a cheat sheet with information about a school (that can be reviewed before going into an

interview) can be helpful. Feel free to use the cover pages and resumes at the end of this chapter

as examples.

Prepare a Portfolio

After you send out cover letters and resumes, hopefully you will receive calls from those

schools to set up an interview; the next step is to create a portfolio. A portfolio displays items

that demonstrate that you are a viable candidate for the job. The following is an example of what

could be included in a portfolio and how it could be organized:

1. Personal information









a. Biography
b. Resume
c. Educational Philosophy
2. Professional Development
a. Goals and Accomplishments
b. In-service Records
c. Other certificates ex. Orff certification
d. Teaching Certificate if you have a copy
3. Evaluations and Letters of Recommendation
a. Internship evaluations from professors
b. Internship evaluations from cooperating teachers)
c. Letters of recommendation from previous employers
d. Letters of recommendation from an advisor
4. Artifacts
a. Sample Lesson Plans
b. Photos of Lessons
c. Videos of teaching
d. Sample units and student work
e. Photos of performances
f. Anything else you feel fits well that you would like to include

Many people have a single copy of their portfolio that they bring to all of their

interviews. If you are doing a lot of interviews, this might be the way to go. However, it is the

opinion of the author and other veteran music teachers that a portfolio should be duplicated and

presented to each school if possible. Principals are short on time and don't want to spend time

flipping through a book when they could be getting to know a candidate. A portfolio can be

constructed in a variety of ways, from folders to professional bindings. An easy way to assemble

one is to get a three ring binder and use page protectors to put the pages in; this creates a very

polished and streamlined look. If you get the three-ring binder in some sort of a color other than

white or black, it will stand out more in an office and they will be more likely to pick it up and

look through it. Otherwise it could get lost in a jumble of papers that can accumulate during the

hiring process.









Interview

Interviewing can be an intimidating time. However, if you prepare as much as you can, it

can be a pleasure. After researching the school and creating your portfolio, it is advised that

your review commonly asked questions during an interview. The following is a list of some

commonly asked questions or discussion topics:

o Tell me about yourself.
o Tell me what you know about this school.
o Tell me about any issues you've had with your previous boss.
o Tell me about your classroom management.
o Why are you looking?
o What motivates you to do a good job?
o Where else have you applied?
o What's your biggest weakness?
o What's your biggest strength?
o Has anything every irritated you about the people you work with?
o Would you like to be liked or feared?
o Why should I hire you?
o What questions would you like to ask me?

Thinking through a question carefully before answering is important. Try to avoid using

fillers like "hmm" or "umm". Formulate your answer and then begin. An answer should be

logical, clear, and address the question that was asked. For example, the first question could be

"Tell me about yourself." It is sometimes used as an icebreaker, to calm the interviewee and

give the interviewer a sense of your personality. The appropriate answer is one that is given

honestly and truthfully, (giving too much personal information is inadvisable). A good answer

can include items such as your level of education, GPA, professional affiliations, hobbies, and an

explanation of why you want to teach. Appropriate hobbies include sports, working out, reading,

crafting, art, photography, computers, etc. It is also important to remember that you do not know

much about the person interviewing you, so avoid any talk of political affiliations, religion, or









controversial topics if possible. Try to be as politically correct as possible. Remember that some

questions are more important than others and some are traps.

One of the more important questions asked by principals is about classroom management

philosophy. Successful answers to the question include: "I plan so many activities that students

do not have time to misbehave;" or, "I have clearly stated rules and procedures and consistently

hold students accountable for their actions." The questions that can be traps if not approached

carefully include those about your weaknesses, issues with previous supervisors, and issues with

co-workers. Do not fall into the trap of talking negatively about previous supervisors or co-

workers. Try to avoid discussing specifics about problems you may have had. Turn the

questions around and refocus them back on how you work for students and help your colleagues.

Prepare a list of questions to ask the principal. Some examples of questions that could be

asked are:

o What are the performing ensembles?
o What are the concert expectations?
o Are there grade level performances?
o What is the current rehearsal schedule for the ensembles?
o Are activity teachers allowed to give input into the activity schedule?
o If hired, may I come in early to start setting up things?
o Is there a school-wide behavior plan in place?
o Are there traditions (started by previous music teachers) that they would like continued?
o Is there a budget in place to purchase new equipment, music, and pay for repairs?
o May I see the music room?

After preparing a list of question, holding practice interviews with family, friends, and

trusted mentors can be helpful. Carefully consider any suggestions that they may have for you.

If all of your planned questions have been addressed, ask for additional details regarding those

topics. It is important to ask questions during the interview so as to appear engaged, inquisitive,

and intelligent. You demeanor should communicate that you are the best person for the job, but

guard against appearing conceited or self-absorbed.



















Jane Doe
4512 Jobless Ave. Apartment 111 Unemployed FL 12345
Cell: (111)222-3333 E-mail: teacher4hire@gmail.com


April 12, 2010 (Today's Date)

Mr. Prince E. Pal, Principal
Elementary School
123 Crayon Street
Anywhere, FL 98765

RE: Open music position

Dear Mr. Prince E. Pal:

I have recently learned that you will be looking for a music teacher for the next school
year. I am extremely interested in this position. I feel as though I would be an asset to
the elementary school community.

I am a creative and innovative educator that prides myself in building a positive
classroom environment. I have worked in (your experience here). I have strong
classroom management skills (List your strengths, example this sentence). I pride
myself on being a team player that often collaborates with other educators.

I hold a Bachelors Degree from A University in Music Education. As a professional I am
always looking to expand my knowledge and seek professional development. I am a
member of many professional organizations and attend workshops often. In addition I
have completed (any additional training that is relevant).

Mr. Prince E. Pal, I would like to meet with you and discuss the opening at Elementary
School. Feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

(signature here)

Jane Doe















Jane Doe
4512 Jobless Ave Apartment 111 Unemployed, FL 12345
Phone: 111-222-3333 E-' i Ii I, i. r I i'.r: i "m

Objective
To obtain a position as an elementary music teacher, in a school that understands the importance of the arts
and it's ability to help students develop a well-rounded view of the world.

Education
Master of Music Education, University, In progress, will complete Month Year.
Level 1, World Music Drumming Certification, Month Year.
Music K-12, Professional Teaching Certificate, Florida valid thru year.
Bachelor of Music Edu,.;iion. University, Month Year.

Teaching Experience
Music Teacher, School, City, State Month year to month year
List teaching responsibilities, grades, extra ensembles, etc. Ex. December 2006-
July 2007








Professional Organiiani1n.s
Florida Music Educators Association
Florida Elementary Music Educators Association
American OrffShulerwerk Association
Central Florida Orff Chapter
Sigma \lpha lnla international music fraternity for women
Collc I aleo Music Educators National Conference



Interests
I deeply enjoy being creative at work and home. My creative interests manifest themselves in several
ways, from planning lessons, to decorating my classroom with interesting bulletin boards, to learning new
ways to teach more effectively and solve problems. At home I enjoy scrapbooking, photography, cooking,
baking, as well as ohler craft projccr; like sewing and painting. include sour inmrcare

F. perience
lie kiintihs of my teaching experience are that I have taught students of many ages with a variety of
different bal.tgrouindb. I have taught students who live in extreme poverty as well as students who do not
ever have to go without what they want or need. I am able to adapt and e\,el in ditlereni sit'ualion. I am
comfortable taking on projects and completing them in a timely manner. I enjoy fixing problems and
working with 'difficult' or 'at risk' students. (use this as a space to showcase your talents and strengths.)









Chapter 2- The Classroom

Inventory

One of the first tasks is to assess what the classroom contains. This is a very important

step because you can't plan lessons without understanding what equipment you have available.

Make note of what and how many instruments there are. If there are not class sets, it's important

to anticipate having to explain the procedure for sharing equipment. It is also important to

evaluate the number of textbooks you have, not only for inventory purposes, but also to plan for

in-class use.

A simple way to keep track of one's inventory is to make an excel spreadsheet. It does

not have to be fancy or complicated. Just a simple list of what there is, the number of them, and

where they are located is sufficient. This is especially helpful with supplemental materials, such

as methods books and storybooks. From time to time, classroom teachers may ask to borrow

things from the music room, and the spreadsheet is a great place to record who borrowed what

item and when. During the end-of-the-year inventory, items belonging to the teacher must be

clearly labeled as such and items belonging to the school should be labeled with the school

name. The idea is to clearly distinguish school property from materials purchased by the

educator. Orff workshops teachers are frequently asked to bring a few instruments to share and

the best way to make sure they are returned is to have them clearly labeled.

Set up
It is important to spend time designing a layout for your classroom. Educations must

consider: How do you want to lay out the classroom? Where will the Orff instruments, non-

pitched percussion, drums, textbooks, your desk and computer, and so on, be placed? It can be

helpful for the students and teacher alike to label where the instruments will be stored. Will the

students sit on the floor, risers, or in chairs? Figures 1-1 through 1-9 at the end of this chapter









include photos from several different music rooms. There is no right or wrong way to set up a

classroom. Feel free to experiment and if something doesn't work, then change it. Will there be

a dedicated space for movement? If not, how will students move the chairs or instruments to

allow space for movement? Be prepared to explain in detail what the expectations are and

practice the correct behaviors.

Bulletin Board Ideas

Bulletin boards are a great way to decorate a classroom and they are also a great way to

convey information. The more visually appealing they are, the more effective they are. These

boards can assist in making the classroom personalized and can help the teacher express who

they are. It's important for a change to occur in the room, so the students realize that there is a

new teacher and new expectations. Decorating the classroom can also help create a positive

classroom environment.

A helpful hint for bulletin boards is to use fabric for the background instead of the large

rolls of paper. Paper can rip and crinkle, and the color will fade over time. When putting up the

fabric it is helpful to staple it on in opposing corners and to stretch the fabric over the board

being careful to smooth out any wrinkles. Educators can either use purchased borders or ribbon;

they will give the bulletin board a focused look.

Purchasing decorations for the classroom can be rather expensive. Instead of purchasing

premade posters, an educator can save money and get a similar effect using paper and markers.

It can be time consuming, but cost effective. Examples of classroom bulletin board can be seen

in Figures 1-1 through figure 1-10. This website also has many great bulletin board ideas for

music teachers: (http://www.musicbulletinboards.net/).








Pictures of Classrooms Set Up and Bulletin Board Ideas


Figure 1-1, Mims Elementary, Lisa Weikel, Music Teacher, Mims, Brevard County, Florida


Figure 1-2, Quest Elementary School Music Room, Music Teacher Laurie Foote, Viera,
Brevard County, Florida


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Figure 1-3, Quest Elementary School Music Room, Music Teacher Laurie Foote, Viera,
Brevard County, Florida


Figure 1-4, Quest Elementary School Music Room, Music Teacher Laurie Foote, Viera,
Brevard County, Florida































Figure 1-5, Quest Elementary School Music Room, Music Teacher Laurie Foote, Viera,
Brevard County, Florida


Figure 1-6, Riverview Elementary School Music Room, Music Teacher Kimberly McNees,
Titusville, Brevard County, Florida




















Figure 1-8, Riverview Elementary School Music Room, Music Teacher Kimberly McNees,
Titusville, Brevard County, Florida


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ri cAVj ;%n/ VI9 L d


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Figure 1-9, Riverview Elementary School
Titusville, Brevard County, Florida


Music Room,


Music Teacher Kimberly McNees,











Chapter 3- The First Days of School

Rules and Procedures

It is important to have clear rules and procedures for students to follow on the first day of

school. Rules should be simple to understand and clearly stated. It is advisable to have fewer

than five rules. It is also good to state them in a positive manner. For example, instead of

writing "Do not call out," state the rule as "Please raise your hand to speak." When in doubt, put

yourself in the shoes of one of your students and ask, "Will they understand?" After deciding on

the rules, post them prominently in the classroom. The same criteria should be used for

procedures. The following are the rules I use in my classroom:

1. Respect yourself.
2. Respect others.
3. Respect the property of all.
It is important that the students understand what the word "respect" means. If the rules

above are used, an explanation of the teacher's definition of respect should be provided. Try not

to assume anything, because students come to school with different backgrounds and knowledge.

It is also very important to have set in place, before the first day, to have set in place what the

procedures will be for using the restroom as well as going to the clinic. Check with other

teachers to see if there are school-wide procedures that you will be expected to follow.

Classroom Management

The best defense is a good offense. Greet students at the door and explain your

expectations of them. Idle time is one of the leading causes of misbehavior. It is advisable to

have a plan or back-up activities, so there are no blocks of time for students to become

disruptive. Learning students' names as quickly as possible is helpful. This is helpful just in

teaching and being able to call on students but also when dealing with behavior. Students are









generally more receptive to following directions and listening if the teachers know their names.

A seating chart can be used if it is difficult to learn student names. Elementary students are

wonderful at mimicking the behaviors and attitudes of their teachers. If their teacher loves music

and smiles, the students are more prone to do so as well. The teacher is responsible for

everything that happens in their classroom. If a student talks back, it is because the teacher has

left space for the student to do so. Be careful not to get into power struggles with students, they

never end well. When students act up, it's not always about you. Perhaps they had a

disagreement with another teacher or student that is causing their mood or behavior.

Aim to discipline the behavior not the student. In other words, when reprimanding a

student, tell them that talking out, or whatever the undesirable behavior is, is not appropriate,

rather than saying "Johnny is being bad." Be consistent in the application of the rules and the

consequences for breaking them. Pointing out positive behaviors in specific students that should

be emulated can be helpful. For example, "I love how Suzie is sitting criss-cross apple sauce on

the rug ready to sing." Pick a way to refocus the class if they become unfocused. Some

examples include: give me five, clapping patterns, flick the lights, and use a bell. Behavior is

tied to classroom set up; try not to turn your back, and have the classroom ready to go with books

and materials that will be used.

Ways to Use Class Time

Teachers interviewed for this document found it helpful to have a framework for class

time set up. It gives structure to the lesson and builds in different elements so that students do

not become bored and rambunctious. Ideas for time allotments include:

o 5 min. Tell students about your classroom management.
o 5 min. Singing/echo rhythms.
o 20 min. Main lesson/objectives.
o 5 minutes Movement.









o 5 minutes Review.

Try to incorporate school-wide efforts/project like "Word of the day" and/or FCAT strategies,

etc into lessons. It makes your classes more valuable to administrators and teachers and they

will be less likely to remove them from your classes for remediation if they know you support

school wide efforts.

Lesson Ideas

Play parties/mixers, name games, and rhymes are wonderful ways to learn students

names and have a positive interaction during the first days of the school year. These activities

often involve singing and moving, so they are a great informal assessment tool to figure out what

level the students are at. In addition, they help the teacher mingle with students.

I like the song/party mixer, "I let her go go" from Trinidad and Tobago. It is a very

simple movement song, with only five words in it. It is easy to sing, and is great fun for

students. It is a great activity to use to reinforce the concept of respecting others. Elementary

students often have a hard time partnering up with someone other than their best friend. This

activity provides a good segue into teaching manners and empathy. It is important to ask

students:

"How would you feel if no one wanted to be your friend" or said "eeeeeeeeew!" when
they had to touch your hands?
Do you want to make other people feel that way?

As the students sing the song, the tempo can gradually be increased to make the activity

more difficult. This particular activity is a hit. This song is available in the collection of play

parties and singing games, Down In the Valley by Andy Davis and Peter and Mary Alice

Amidon, available at (http://www.dancingmasters.com/store/Down in the Valley.html). At the

end of this chapter you will find a set of lessons developed or adapted by Sheila King to work

drumming into the elementary classroom.









Cultivate Relationships (with Teachers, Staff, Parents, and Students)

"People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care." That's an

old adage, but one that is very true in teaching. It doesn't matter how much you know about

music, if you can't relate to your co-workers, parents, and students. Spending time with other

teachers in the lounge and making a genuine effort to get to know them (by asking them

questions and showing an interest in their hobbies) can be a great way to connect with

colleagues. Being polite and respectful to everyone should be a priority. Participation in

activities before the start of the school year, such as registration, can provide a good opportunity

to get to know other teachers, staff, and administrators. Additional duties like car loop, breakfast

or lunch duty, and patrolling the campus can give new educators a chance to get to know

students and parents. The easiest way to start a positive exchange, is with a simple compliment

like: "great shirt or awesome shoes" or asking how they're doing. Positive comments can

brighten a person's day. Even simply making eye contact with someone when walking down the

hall and saying "Hello" is a good way to start building relationships. If you have a hard time

connecting with a student, their teacher (or even better the teacher they had the year before) can

provide good information about ways to connect with the student. Gathering this kind of

information can not only help you with that particular student, but will demonstrate that you are

a thoughtful educator who wants to connect with students and colleagues. The more you help

others, the more support you will generally receive for your program. For example, when you

need people to bring in baked goods for a bake sale or to stay after school to sell them at a

concert, they will be more likely to volunteer to do so. Be polite to the administrators and be

friendly. Be sure to share good news and thank volunteers for support.









Scheduling

Aim to be proactive in the creation of the activity schedule. Find out if you have input in

the schedule or if you can have a chance to comment. Speak with other teachers about their

schedules. It can be very helpful to make an easy to read version of your schedule that will be a

quick reference for you so you know what classes you have coming when. It will also be

important to take into account the schedule when you are planning lessons because if you have

classes that are going to use different equipment back to back you need to plan how the

equipment will be put away and taken out at the end of each class.

Recruitment for Special Ensembles

Sell yourself. To get students involved in ensembles that meet outside the regular class

time, the activities need to sound "cool" and exciting. Share a piece of music that you plan on

teaching to your chorus. The author is fond of saying that "chorus and strings are the best and

coolest activities at my school because I teach them." When talking about the ensembles, sound

excited. If it excites you, it will be easier to excite the students. Promote the programs as the

greatest activity ever. Pick music that will make the students successful. Not many teachers

walk into a school and can have their groups perform Handel's Messiah in the first concert. It

could be helpful to keep that in mind when picking out literature.

To do List:

o Get a copy of Harry Wong book, "The First Days of School."
o Inventory classroom
o Organize classroom
o Decide on your classroom discipline plan
o Plan first weeks lessons
o Locate and review curriculum guide
o If you start to feel overwhelmed make your own personalized to do list and prioritize











Chapter 4- Lesson Planning

Planning lessons is what teachers spend a lot of their non-teaching time doing. If new

teachers have a plan and goals in place for their students, it will be a lot easier to sequence and

spiral-in different concepts. Of the teachers asked about planning models, all favored the

backwards design model. It is easier to figure what you want to teach the during last weeks of

school (the product of a year of instruction under your guidance) than to just plan lessons that

seem fun or will be good to do from week to week. The backwards design model gives the

program and the curriculum a sense of balance and purpose. Most music textbook series have

built-in spiral concepts, which can complement the backward design model. If you choose to

teach strictly from the textbook, then check the guides (usually in the beginning of the book) to

make sure you will cover all the concepts you would like to. Whether you use the textbook

series, the Randy and Jeff Game Plan series, or materials you pick up at workshops, it is

important to remember that just because you have goals, it does not mean you have to meet all of

them.

It is hard to know what kind of program you are walking into and what background

knowledge the students have. There will always be a few students who know more than others,

because they take private voice or piano lessons. However, the other students may or may not

have absorbed what had been taught to them. Be prepared to work with students who have little

or no background knowledge. For example: one school's sixth-grade students could not keep a

steady beat and at another school, students did not know that they had a speaking voice and a

singing voice. This is not always the case, but it has been the experience of some of the

contributors to this handbook. During the initial stages of lesson planning, it is also a good time

to look at the inventory of the classroom. If class sets of whatever instruments you are planning









to use are not available, time must be built into the lesson to review sharing procedures for those

items. Lessons in instrument sharing must be carefully thought out.

Find out if the district has a music curriculum guide by talking with other music teachers,

the music supervisor, and the school administrator. If the district has a curriculum guide, it

should be somewhere in the classroom. Some school districts do not have curriculum guides; it

is up to individual music teachers to develop their own. In those instances, it is helpful to have

ones to model. Included in Appendix A are the following two examples:

Instructional Objectives Checklist for Brevard County Schools.
Essential skills check list for Seminole County Schools.

Lesson Plan Templates

I have provided lesson plan templates that accomplished teachers in the field have

devised in Appendix A. The most important goal of planning lessons is making sure the material

covered is consistent with state standards. If music teachers allow themselves to just fill classes

with "fun" activities, your class will be "fun" or "fluff." If other teachers at a school adopt those

attitudes, they devalue the educational merit of the class, which can be a possible negative effect,

and can lead to an increased amount of removing of students from music class for tutoring.

Another common negative consequence of an overly "fun" music class is that grade-level

teachers hold back students for misbehavior. However, if instruction is standards-based,

administrators are more supportive, because it can be demonstrated that the material fulfills

music standards and is therefore educationally relevant.

Lesson Plan Ideas

There are countless resources online for lesson plans. A few words of caution,

however, before you look them up. Not all lesson plans on the Internet (as with all

information on the Internet) are necessarily good ideas. Nor do they always contain









accurate information to be teaching with. When examining curricula from online

resources, check to see if terminology and vocabulary are used correctly and accurately.

You might be the only professional musician your students ever meet or interact with; so

be careful not to teach them something incorrectly. Appendix B gives a list of resources

including helpful websites. Many of these websites have lesson plans that have been

uploaded by music teachers from across the country and even around the world. There are

many ways to approach teaching.

Story Books That Can Be Used in the Music Classroom

Storybooks are frequently used in the music classroom in a variety of ways. They can be

read and the students can write songs about them; or the students could add sound effects, help

develop deeper comprehension and to help the story come to life. Books can also be used in

performances to unite a series of songs together. Below is a list of books used successfully with

students in real music classrooms.

o Good Night, Good Knight by Shelley Moore Thomas
o Badger's Bring Something Party by Hiawyn Oram
o Traveling to Tondo: A Tale of the Nkundo of Zaire by Verna Aardema
o Up, Up, Down! By Robert N. Munsch
o Any books by Raffi
o The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by Linda Williams
o I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie by Alison Jackson
o I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Mary Ann Hoberman
o There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat by Lucille Colandro
o The Animal Boogie by Debbie Harter
o Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault
o Doing the Animal Bop By Jan Ormerod
o I Know a Shy Fellow Who Swallowed a Cello By Barbara S. Garriel
o I'm a Little Tea Pot by Iza Trapani
o Listen to the Rain by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault
o Max Found Two Sticks Brian Pinkney
o My Aunt Came Back by John Feierabend
o My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss
o Rap a Tap, Tap, Think of That! By Leo and Diane Dillon
o Today is Monday by Eric Carle









o Very Quiet Cricket by Eric Carle
o We're Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen
o Zin, Zin a Violin by Llody Moss

Reflect

Reflecting on the completed lesson is just as important as teaching the lesson. Look at

your objectives to determine if they were met and to what degree. It is important to understand

what percentage of students was able to complete the entire objective successfully. Try to

understand what went wrong if the objectives were not met. An important question to consider:

there was a lack of comprehension on the student's part or was the presentation of the material

not clear? Go back and re-teach the fundamentals that the lesson was built on, if that is needed.

If presentation is the issue, ask other teachers how they present that information. Perhaps the

educator simply needs to try a new way of teaching the information.

Education Acronyms

The teaching profession enjoys abbreviating the names of different organizations and

educational procedures. Listed below are the more common acronyms that a music teacher

might encounter.


o MENC- Music Educators National Conference
o FMEA- Florida Music Educators Association
o FEMEA- Florida Elementary Music Educators Association
o AOSA- American Orff Schulwerk Association
o CFOC- Central Florida Orff Chapter
o HFOC- Heart of Florida Orff Chapter
o GTBAOC- Greater Tampa Bay Area Orff Chapter
o NFOC- North Florida Orff Chapter
o AYP- Adequate Yearly Progress, in regards to the grading of schools
o ESOL- English Students Other Languages
o RTI- Response to Intervention, a new Florida initiative to approach addressing students
with special needs
o CST- Child Study Team
o FBA- Florida Band Association
o ASTA- American String Teachers Association
o MDS- Music Demonstration School









o VE- Varying Exceptionalities
o FCAT- Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
o The Brevard County Schools Website Parent Portal has a website dedicated to
educational acronyms and explaining them. Visit the website at:
(http://www.brevard.kl2.fl.us/portals/parents/acronyms.html)










Chapter 5- Professional Development

Join Organizations

In some counties, the position description of music teacher requires that they join

organizations such as FMEA and MENC, as well as the appropriate component organization.

Even if membership in these organizations is not required, it is highly recommended. You will

receive a copy of the Florida Music Director, magazine and participating teachers can have their

students' tryout for all-state ensembles. In addition, membership allows for attendance at the

state conference. These events always provide a wealth of information for educators. In

addition to joining those organizations, it's a good idea to seek out Orff Chapters that are active

in your area. These organizations have meetings generally four times a year and hold

workshops, which are always a source of new ideas and ways to present material.


Perhaps even more helpful than attending those workshops are the relationships one can

build with other music teachers in those chapters. They have a wealth of information that can be

helpful. When having a problem teaching something, it is helpful to have a network of teachers

who are happy to provide guidance and share their experiences.


Find a Mentor

If you would like to find a mentor, ask administrators or the music supervisor if there are

experienced teachers in the area who would be willing to help during the initial building of a

program. It is also a good idea when you've found a few mentors, to see if you can observe them

teaching. It can be beneficial to observe someone after you have been teaching for a while. It

will help keep you focused on good teaching practices. Also, inquire whether other teachers are

willing to observe and provide feedback. Mentors are also excellent if you pursue more training









in areas such as Orff, Kodaly, World Music Drumming, or Dalcroze, A mentor can advise you

which trainers will best fit with a given personality and teaching style.


Orff Schulwerk

According to the American Orff Schulwerk Association's (AOSA) website

(http://wwww.aosa.org/):


Orff Schulwerk is a way to teach and learn music. It is based on things children
like to do: sing, chant rhymes, clap, dance, and keep a beat on anything near at
hand. These instincts are directed into learning music by hearing and making music
first, then reading and writing it later. This is the same way we all learned our
language.

Orff Schulwerk happens in a non-competitive atmosphere where one of the rewards
is the pleasure of making good music with others. When the children want to write
down what they have composed, reading and writing find their moment.

It uses poems, rhymes, games, songs, and dances as examples and basic materials.
These may be traditional or original. Spoken or sung, they may be accompanied by
clapping and stamping or by drums, sticks, and bells.

The special Orff melody instruments include wooden xylophones and metal
glockenspiels that offer good sound immediately. Played together as in a small
orchestra, their use helps children become sensitive listeners and considerate
participants.

With Orff Schulwerk, improvisation and composition start students on a lifetime of
knowledge and pleasure through personal musical experience. Learning is
meaningful only if it brings satisfaction to the learner, and satisfaction arises from
the ability to use acquired knowledge for the purpose of creating. For both teacher
and student, Orff Schulwerk is a theme with endless variation.

The title "Schulwerk" is an indication of the educational process-taking place:
Schulwerk is schooling (in music) through working, that is, through being active
and creative.

The composer Carl Orff and his associate Gunild Keetman developed the basic
texts for the Schulwerk as models for teachers worldwide. Now translated into
eighteen languages, Orff Schulwerk is based on the traditional music and folklore of
each country in which it is used. At present more than 10,000 teachers in the
United States have found the Schulwerk the ideal way to present the magic of music
to their students.











Orff teacher training consists of two week-long classes that generally take place during

the summer months and provide an in-depth study of the Orff pedagogy. The training consists of

three levels, as well as master classes available for those who want advanced training and for

those who might like to become of Orff class instructors.


Koldaly

According to the Organization of American Koldaly Educators, (http://www.oake.org) the

Kodaly Philosophy is as follows:


The Kodaly Concept

*Is a philosophy of education and a concept of teaching.
*Is a comprehensive program to train basic musical skills and teach the
reading and writing of music.
*Is an integration of many of the best ideas, techniques, and approaches to
music education.
*Is an experience-based approach to teaching.
Essential and Key Elements of the Concept
Singing
*We should first learn to love music as human sound and as an experience
that enriches life.
*The voice is the most natural instrument and one which every person
possesses.
*Kodaly called singing "the essence" of this concept.
*Singing is a powerful means of musical expression.
*What we produce by ourselves is better learned; and there is a stronger
feeling of success and accomplishment.
*Learning through singing should precede instrumental training.
*It is in the child's best interest to understand the basics of reading music
before beginning the difficult task of learning the technique of an
instrument.
*What do we sing?
o Folk songs and games of the American Culture
o Traditional children's songs and games
o Folk songs of other cultures
o Music of the masters from all ages
o Pedagogical exercises written by master composers
*Singing best develops the inner, musical ear.









"If we ourselves sing often, this provides a deep experience of happiness in
music. Through our own musical activities, we learn to know the pulsation,
rhythm, and shape of melody. The enjoyment given encourages the study
of instruments and the listening to other pieces of music as well." (Kodaly,
1964)
Folk Music
*Folk music is the music of the people. There can be no better material for
singing than the songs and games used by children for centuries.
*Folk Music has all the basic characteristics needed to teach the
foundations of music and to develop a love of music a love that will last a
life time.
*Folk music is the classical music of the people, and, as such, is a perfect
bridge leading to and working hand-in-hand with-art music.
"The compositions of every country, if original, are based on the songs of
its own people. That is why their folk songs must be constantly sung,
observed, and studied." (Kodaly, 1964)
Solfege
*Solfege is the best tool for developing the inner ear.
*It is an invaluable aid in building all musical skills:
o Sight singing
o Dictation
o Ear training
o Part hearing
o Hearing and singing harmony
o Perceiving form
o Developing memory
*The moveable do system, highly developed in English choral training, was
advocated by Kodaly as a tool for teaching musical literacy.
*Use of the pentatone (do, re, me, sol, la) was recommended by Kodaly for
early training of children because of its predominance in their folk music.
Music and Quality
*We believe that music enhances the quality of life. So that it may have the
impact it deserves, only the best music should be used for teaching:
o Folk music, which is the most representative of the culture
o The best music composed by the masters
*Quality music demands quality teaching:
o Teachers need to be as well-trained as possible
o Teachers' training must be well-rounded
o Teachers need to develop their musical and vocal skills to the highest
degree possible
"The pure soul of the child must be considered sacred; what we implant
there must stand every test, and if we plant anything bad, we poison his
soul for life." (Selected Writings, p. 141)
Development of the Complete Musician
*Kodaly training is a complete and comprehensive approach to music
education which meets the National Standards for Arts Education as









published by MENC, 1994.
*The development of all skill areas begins very early with simple tasks
required of all the students. As knowledge grows, skills are developed
further in a sequential manner.
*In addition to music reading and writing which are begun at an early stage,
the following skill areas are also developed: part-singing, part-hearing,
improvisation, intonation, listening, memory, phrasing and understanding
of form.
*An awareness and knowledge of musical styles develops as skills become
more proficient.
"The good musician understands the music without a score as well and
understands the score without the music. The ear should not need the eye
nor the eye the (outer) ear." (Kodaly quoting Schumann: Selected Writings,
p. 192)
Sequencing
*Presentation of materials, concepts, and development of skills can be done
in a meaningful way only if the curriculum is well sequenced.
*A carefully planned sequence, well taught, will result in successful
experiences for children and teacher. Success breeds success and fosters a
love of music.
*A Kodaly sequenced curriculum is an experience-based approach to
learning rather than a cognitive developmental approach.
"Music must not be approached from its intellectual, rational side, nor
should it be conveyed to the child as a system of algebraic symbols, or as a
secret writing of a language with which he has no connection. The way
should be paved for direct intuition." (Selected Writings, p. 120)

World Music Drumming

World Music Drumming is a curriculum written by Dr. Will Schmid. For more specific

information please go to the website (http://www.worldmusicdrumming.com/). This program is

configured similarly to the Orff training. It is for people who would like to incorporate multi-

cultural music (from areas such as Africa and the Caribbean) into their classrooms. It is also

stratified into three levels. There are additional classes such as "Drumming up the Fun."

Dalcroze

The Dalcroze Society of America's History is below. The following excerpt is from their

website (http://www.dalcrozeusa. org/history.html).


The Dalcroze approach to music education teaches an understanding of music -









its fundamental concepts, its expressive meanings, and its deep connections to
other arts and human activities through ground breaking techniques
incorporating rhythmic movement, aural training, and physical, vocal and
instrumental improvisation.

Since the early 1900's, the influence of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze has been felt
worldwide in the field of music as well as in dance, theatre, therapy and
education. In his own time, Dalcroze's work was considered avant-garde and it
met with some resistance, yet he continued to probe the topic of music
education reform throughout his life. Today, his basic ideas of teaching and
learning have been confirmed by contemporary research.

Dalcroze was professor of harmony and solfege at the Conservatory in Geneva
in 1892. He realized that his students could not actually hear the harmonies they
were writing. Their playing showed little sense of rhythmic vitality. In solfege,
he began to devise ear training games to develop more acute inner hearing.
These games sharpened the students' perceptions and resulted in more sensitive
responses to the musical aspects of performance: timing, articulation, tone
quality, and phrase shape. Dalcroze noticed his students would exhibit subtle,
spontaneous movements swaying, tapping a foot, a slight swinging of the
arms as they sang. The body was conscious of the life and movement of the
music.

Dalcroze capitalized on these natural, instinctive gestures. He asked his students
to walk and swing their arms, or to conduct while they sang or listened to him
improvise at the piano. He called this study of music through movement
eurhythmicss," from the Greek roots "eu" and "rythmos" meaning "good flow."

Dalcroze continued to experiment with eurhythmics, giving demonstrations of
his method throughout Switzerland and Western Europe. In 1910 he was invited
by the Dhorn brothers, wealthy German industrialists, to Hellerau, Germany
where they built a large school for him. Several hundred students lived and
studied in Hellerau, and it became a world-famous center for the arts, devoted to
the education of the complete human being. In 1913, the Gluck opera
"Orpheus" was performed at the school, with Dalcroze conducting a chorus and
soloists trained in eurhythmics. The production was a spectacular demonstration
of music, movement, lighting, and staging representing the culmination of
Dalcroze's work at Hellerau. The school closed at the onset of World War I and
Dalcroze returned to Geneva, where the Emile Jaques-Dalcroze Institute was
founded in 1915. Today, the Dalcroze Institute in Geneva continues to attract
students from around the world who wish to study this remarkable method of
music education.

In a eurhythmics class, students typically are barefoot and are moving in some
way in locomotion around the room, in gestures with hands, arms, heads,
upper bodies, either in groups or alone. Their movements are responsive to the









music that is sounding in the room. The teacher probably is improvising this
music at the piano, although sometimes recorded or composed music is used.
The task typically is to move in space using certain guidelines that are specific
to the occasion or musical piece. The teacher shapes the music not only to the
rules of the task, but to what he or she observes the students doing. The
students, in turn, shape their accomplishment of the task to the nature of the
music its tempo, dynamics, texture, phrase structure, and style.

The body is trained to be the instrument, not only of the performance of
eurhythmics, but of the perception of music. The body is understood as the
original musical instrument, the one through which everyone first realizes music
in both its senses: apprehending and creating, and the primary, personal,
trainable utensil for musical understanding and production. The movements a
student makes in a eurhythmics class do not have the essential purpose of
training the body to convey a choreographic picture to an audience. Rather, their
essential purpose is to convey information back to the mover himself. The
movements set up a circuit of information and response moving continuously
between brain and body, which, with training and experience, rise to ever higher
levels of precision, coordination, and expressive power.

The comprehensive Dalcroze approach consists of three components:
Eurhythmics, which teaches concepts of rhythm, structure, and musical
expression through movement; Solfege, which develops an understanding of
pitch, scale, and tonality through activities emphasizing aural comprehension
and vocal improvisation; and Improvisation, which develops an understanding
of form and meaning through spontaneous musical creation using movement,
voice and instruments. It was Dalcroze's intent that the three subjects be
intertwined so that the development of the inner ear, an inner muscular sense,
and creative expression can work together to form the core of basic
musicianship.

Certified Dalcroze teachers work in conservatories, universities, public and
private schools, early childhood programs, and in private studios. The Dalcroze
approach is studied by performers, teachers, dancers, actors, young children,
and senior citizens. Those wishing to pursue Dalcroze teacher training may do
so at recognized training centers throughout the United States. Due to the
intensive training process and the many sophisticated skills required to be a
Dalcroze teacher, the number of certified teachers remains small, but their
impact on music education is significant.

The continued study of Dalcroze eurhythmics, solfege and improvisation tends
to heighten concentration and focus, improve coordination and balance, enrich
hearing, and sharpen the senses. In a Dalcroze class, students are freed from the
constraints of formal performance to experience the deep musical knowledge
and feeling evoked through movement. When they have discovered themselves
as the source of their own musicality, they have much to bring to the practice










room or to the stage. Based on the philosophy that we are the instrument,
Dalcroze invites us to live what we hear.

Books/Resources

There are so many supplemental resources for teachers that it can be overwhelming. The

following list of books that has been helpful for new music teachers:


o Mallet Madness by Artie Almedia
o The Chimes of Dunkirk edited by Peter Amidon, Andy Davis and Mary Cay Brass
o Listen to the Mockingbird edited by Peter Amidon, Andy Davis and Mary Cay Brass
o Down in the Valley edited by Peter and Mary Alice Amidon and Andy Davis
o Sashay the Donut edited by Peter and Mary Alice Amidon, Andy Davis and Mary Cay
Brass
o Step Lively by Marian Rose
o Recorder Karate by Barb Philipak
o Music from Music K-8 available to purchase online at, (http://www.musick8.com/) or
through the mail. This website also has a teachers resource section that has a lot of
valuable information from other music teachers organized by category.


The following websites have great information, lesson plans, and so on.


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http://www.marthabeesmusic.com/index.html
http://www.aosa.org/
http://flmusiced.org/dnn/
http://www.worldmusicdrumming.com/
http://www.menc.org/
http://www.tmea.org/
http://www.dalcrozeusa.org/
http://www.musick8.com/
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o http://www.artiealmeida.com/
o http://www.musiceducationmadness.com/
o http://www.musicbulletinboards.net/


Record Professional Development

Keep track of the training you attend and make sure you apply to receive points for it.

This process varies from county to county. For example, members of CFOC (who teach in

Orange County) only have to fill out a form and return it to their county liaison. However,

teachers in Brevard County who attend the same in-service are required to write up and file this


.. J .. .... ... . -









information on their own. Timely reporting of this information just important for recertification,

and it also demonstrates to administrators a desire to improve oneself and one's craft. It can be

useful when putting together an updated portfolio for a future teaching position.


Keep Records for Portfolio

When possible, take pictures of lessons that go well. (Make sure, for the students

pictured to have the appropriate photo release forms in place, so that it is legal to have pictures of

those students.) Also, keep track of all your lesson plans, even if you are not required to turn

them in weekly or each nine weeks, you may be required to turn them in at the end of the year.

Being aware of this and acting proactively can save a great deal of time. You may want to reuse

lesson plans from year to year, so keeping them saved in several places on a computer is strongly

advised, to avoid having to rewrite them from scratch every year.













Chapter 6- Performances

Performances are a great way to demonstrate the results of one's teaching. It can be

difficult to produce tangible results in the elementary music classroom because so much of what

is done is experiential. Find a way for your students to perform early in the year to show what

they have learned. Veterans Day is a good day for a performance. Patriotic songs are fun to

teach and provide an opportunity to showcase of select choral groups; or even better, have the

whole school sing. It is a great way to work with teachers in a cross-curricular way. Music and

social studies easily go hand-in-hand. Making this connection is often viewed as a sign of

respect for the classroom teachers.


Concert Programs

I have presented sample programs showing different ways to pace the concert and

showing samples of how to lay out concert programs in Appendix B. Several contributors

recommend that students' names be included in the program and think it is beneficial to have

students spell-check their names before final programs are printed. Programs can be printed on

plain or colored paper as well as specialty paper appropriate for the concert theme.

Logistics

Plan, plan, plan. Think of everything that could go wrong and try to anticipate. Ask

mentors what problems can arise during and around performances. All sorts of issues can creep

up. Make sure everyone involved at the school (and even those who are not) is kept up-to-date

on the program. Check with custodians to make sure the performance space will be ready. Let

people in the administrative office know what to expect; a timeline is helpful for all involved. If









you are having performances during the day, make sure there is ample preparation time before

the performance, so the younger and smaller students can be placed closer to the front.


Concert Etiquette

Appropriate concert etiquette is taught and learned. It does not just happen. The Florida

Sunshine State Standards state, "[t]he student understands the relationship between music and

the world beyond the school setting" (MU.E.2.2) and goes on to say in strand two "[the student]

... knows and applies appropriate audience behavior in various musical settings (e.g., symphony

concerts, school concerts, and parades)."

Make sure to take time during the beginning of a concert to explain that the students have

worked hard and want to make sure appropriate concert behavior is observed. Next, go through

and review what appropriate concert behavior entails. For example, please turn off all cell

phones; please remain quiet while the performers are performing; the appropriate response when

performers do a good job is clapping not yelling or whistling; and please do not move around the

concert hall while people are performing. For more ideas on how to teach appropriate concert

etiquette, please visit the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) website

(http://www.menc.org/resources/view/rules-for-concert-etiquette).

Fundraising Ideals

A concert is a great time to have a fundraiser because there are large amounts of

supportive people around during a musical performance. Bake sales have been easy and

successful fundraiser at concerts for many of the contributors. Ask other teachers in the school

to donate items that can be sold at the concert. Then all of the money collected is pure profit!

For many more great fundraising ideas, visit the Music K-8 websites idea bank









(http://www.musick8.com/html/ideabank.php) and simply select the Fund-Raising option to find

more ideas.









Biographical Sketch

Kimberly M. McNees was born in Fort Pierce, FL, on August 10, 1983. From a young

age she was actively involved in music making, from church activities to school performing

ensembles. During her middle and high-school years she was an active member of band,

learning how to play many instruments.

Ms. McNees attended Stetson University in DeLand, FL, where she was awarded the

William E. Duckwitz talent scholarship to help offset the cost of attendance. During her time at

Stetson, Ms. McNees was an active performer in the University Orchestra, the University

Symphonic Band, Brass Ensemble, and a variety of other small ensembles. She also became a

member of many organizations such as Collegiate Music Educators National Conference

(CMENC), Sigma Alpha Iota, Student Government Association (SGA), the International Horn

Society, and the National Band Association. In addition Ms. McNees was a member of the state

executive board of the Florida Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (FCMENC)

serving one year as the advocacy chair and another year as the membership chair. She also held

chair positions in Sigma Alpha Iota, SGA and Stetson's chapter of CMENC, as well as working

as an RA (resident assistant).

Ms. McNees was released early from her senior internship and was offered a permanent

substitute position at Osteen Elementary where she taught for a week, during which she was

offered a full-time position teaching Suzuki strings at Turie T. Small Elementary. She worked

there from the end of December 2006 to May 2007, when the program was eliminated because of

budget cuts. Then Ms. McNees found a position in Brevard County at Riverview Elementary

where she has taught since August 2007.









Ms. McNees was accepted into the first class of summer masters students at the

University of Florida in Gainesville, FL where she attended class during the summers of 2008

and 2009.












Appendix A


KINDEGARTE


School Name :

Music Teacher: __________

Number in Class :


School Year :

Class :


At the conclusion of the school year the majority of the Date Evaluated % of
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
O- Observation
Skills and Techniques
MI, M2, M3, M4
sing melodic patterns and songs within a four-note
range (F-D') using sol, la, and mi.
MI, M2, M3, M4
echo simple melodic patterns, using so[, la, and mi
and maintaining the tonal center.
TCI
demonstrate healthy use of the singing, speaking,
whispering, and calling voice with appropriate
volume for the young child.
MI, M2, M3, M4
sing simple unison songs, with and without
accompaniment, with accurate pitch, accurate
rhythm, and appropriate tone quality.
S2
sing alone and with others, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures and styles (for
example, folk songs, poems, play-party games,
patriotic songs, student-created songs. nursery
rhymes).
ECI, EC2
demonstrate expressive qualities appropriate to the
music, using dynamic contrast and tempo change.
RI
perform a steady beat based on a personal and/or
group sense of pulse.
R2
echo rhythmic patterns using quarter notes. quarter
rests, and two eighth notes on simple rhythm
instruments.



























sunenits wiln:


Completed I- Informal -Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation


Skills and Techniques _______
M I. M2, M3
echo simple melodic patterns on instruments (for
example, barred instruments).
TC2
perform with appropriate posture and position to
produce a characteristic tone quality on non-pitched
instruments (for example, rhythm sticks, triangle, wood
block).
R2, TC2, TC3
perform simple rhythmic patterns and sound effects on
instruments to accompany poems, rhymes, chants, and
songs.
EC I, EC2
demonstrate expressive qualities I lor example, loud-
soft, fast-slow) while playing classroom and ethnic
instruments.
R2
recognize and perform sounds having long and short
duraii.'n in response io uajl rcprc.'.ntjtion
M2
recognize and perform high and low sounds in response
to visual representation.
M2, M3
demonstrate melodic direction
(upward, downward, and same) and regi.,tr i high and
low) through physical response and visual
representation.
R2
represent long and short sounds visually that have been
performed by someone else.


























students l Completed I Ino Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Creation and Communication
RI, R2
improvise a short rhythmic pattern in response to
a musical prompt.
MI, M2, M3, M4
improvise a short melodic pattern in response to a
musical prompt.
FI
improvise a short free-form song.
TC3
create sound effects for songs, poems, and stories.
Cultural and Historic Connections
S2
know that music is different in other places.
SI, S2
recognize musk or contrj'tiing cultures
SI, S2
understand that music can differ in various cultures.
S2
know that music is a part of celebrations and daily
life.
Aesthetic and Critical Analysis
Fl, Sl
respond to selected characteristics of music,
including fast and slow, soft and loud, high and low,
and upward and downward, through purposeful
movement.
TC
differentiate between speaking and singing voices.
TC2
identify classroom instruments by sound source.
including wood and metal.
TC3
identify a variety of environmental sound sources.
Sl
describe specific music characteristics using
appropriate vocabulary (fast-slow, loud-soft, high-
low, and upward-downward).
Sl
describe feelings communicated through music.
use simple criteria for evaluating performances (for
example, like or dislike, happy or sad).
evaluate one's own and others' performances and
describes what was successful.























At the conclusion
the students will:


e school year the majority of


Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation


Applications To Life
demonstrate basic understanding of concepts in
music and the visual arts that are similar (for
example, repetition).
identify ways in which language arts relates to
music (for example, rhyming words, song
storybooks).
understand the use of music in daily life (for
example, birthday parties, holidays).
demonstrate appropriate audience behavior in
such settings as classroom and school
performances (for example, listening quietly
during a performance, clapping at the end of a
performance).
identify a personal preference for a specific song.
identify musicians in the school and community.



























48


________ I _____________ I-


-~ .1. 1


-I + I





















FIS RD
GRAD LEVL EXECTAION


School Name :

Music Teacher:

Number in Class :


School Year :


At the conclusion of the school year the majority of Date Evaluated % of
the students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
O- Observation
Skills and Techniques
MI, M2, M3, M4
sing melodic patterns and songs, matching pitch,
within a four- to six-note range (F-D')
using sol. la, mi. re, and do.
MI, M2, M3, M4
echo simple melodic patterns, using sol, la, mi, re,
and do accurately and maintaining the tonal
center.
demonstrate use of healthy singing techniques,
including head innc. pnliurc. .ind diction
MI, M2, M3, M4
sing simple unison songs, with and without
accompaniment, with accurate pitch, accurate
rhythm, and appropriate tone quality.
S2
sing, alone and with others, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures and styles (for
example, folk songs, poems, play-party games,
parriolic .onLt,. itdcnrl-criatcIJ omon:;. rh m!ycm_)
ECI, EC2
demonstrate expressive qualities appropriate to
the music, using phrasing, dynamic contrast, and
tnipo changCe.
RI
perform a steady beat based on a common group
pulse.
R2
echo rhythmic patterns using quarter notes,
quarter rests, and two eighth notes on simple
rhythm instruments.






























kills and lechnilues
Ml, M2, M3
perform two- and three-note melodic patterns on
instruments I for example, barred instruments).
TC2
perform with appropriate posture and position to
produce a characteristic tone quality on non-
pitched instruments (for example, rhythm sticks,
triangle, wood block, jingle bells, maracas) and
pitched instruments (for example, xylophones,
metallophones, resonator bells).
R2, TC2, TC3
perform simple rhythmic and melodic patterns and
sound effects on instruments to accompany poems,
rhymes, chants, and sones


_____I __ __ _ _


I .i~ I


EC 1. EC2
demonstrate expressive qualities of dynamics and
tempo, appropriate to the music, while playing
classroom and ethnic instruments,
R2
read and perform simple rhythmic patterns (quarter
notes, quarter rests, and two eighth notes) in
response to traditional and nontraditional notation.
MI, M2, M3, M4
read and perform simple melodic patterns from
traditional and nontraditional notation (for
example, sol, la, and mi on a three-line staff).
MI, M2, M3, M4
write notation, using manipulatives and visual
representation, for simple melodic patterns, using
sol and mi on a three-line staff.
R2
notate rhythmic patterns (quarter notes. quarter
rests, and two eighth notes), using manipulative,
that have been perfl'n'med h\ snieonc else.


At the conclusion of the school year the majority of the Date | Evaluated ,, % of
frudems nill: Completed *- Informal -.- .Stunt
-: .... .-. ......- ... F-.-Formal ....- Succss
O0- Observation
























Ia Ie aalualRca e7 ol
Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Suecess
0- Observation


Creation and Communication


RI, R2
improvise a four-beat rhythmic pattern in
response to a musical prompt.
MI, M2, M3, M4
improvise a four-beat melodic pattern in response
to a musical prompt.
HI, H2
improvise simple rhythmic and melodic patterns
to accompany songs, poems, or stories.
HI, H2
create rhythmic and melodic patterns using
classroom instruments for songs, poems, and
stories.
Cultural and Historic Connections
S2
know that music is different in other places and
times.
SI, 52
recognizes music of contrasting cultures.
TC1, TC2, TC3
compare timbres of contrasting examples of world
music.
Sl, S2
identify selected songs associated with celebrations
in varied cultures.
SI, S2
identify selected songs that reflect daily life in
varied cultures.
SI, S2
identify music that reflects the cultural heritage of
the community.














54


I __ [ ___ I _


fu ieu CUnciu1iuon
the students will:
























uIiM EvaluVSIU 70 UI
Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation


Aesthetic and Critical Analysis


FI, F2, SI
respond to selected characteristics of music,
including tempo, dynamics, melodic contour, and
same and different patterns, through purposeful
movement.
TC1
differentiate between the child voice and adult
voice.
HI, H2, TCI
differentiate between solo and group performance
(for example, vocal solo and choir).
TC2
classify classroom instruments by sound source
(wood, metal, shaker, or membrane).
TC3
idcniil\ a ar;el. of environnienl:il soiLrid 'oldrccs.
TC2
identify selected instruments when presented
visually and aurally.
Sl
describe specific music characteristics using
appropriate vocabulary (tempo, dynamics,
melodic contour, and same and different patterns).
describe feelings and images communicated
through music.
use teacher-specified criteria for evaluating
compositions and performances (for example, Did
we follow the dynamics? Did we maintain a steady
beat?).
evaluate one's own and others' performances and
describe what was successful.















55


I __ I ___ I _


+ 4 +


the students will:


























RI UIC clUIQlIU
students will:


Completed


I- Informal Student
F- Forinal Success
0- Observation


Applications To Life
demonstrate basic undecri nding of how concepts
in music, visual arts, and dance are similar (for
example,
shape, line, pattern).
identify ways in which language arts and
mathematics relate to music (for example,
groupings, sets, patterns).
understand the use of music in daily life (for
example, parades, sporting events).
demonstrate appropriate audience behavior in such
settings as classroom and school performances (for
example, listening quietly during a performance,
clapping at the end of a performance).
identify a personal preference for a specific type of
music.
identify the role of musicians in schools and the
community.



























School Name : School Year :

Music Teacher : Class _

Number in Class :

At the conclusion of the school year the majority of Date Evaluated % of
the students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
O- Observation
Skills and Techniques
Ml1, M2, M3, M4
sing melodic patterns and songs, alone and with
others and matching pitch, within a five- to
seven-note range (E-D'). ___ ______ ___
Ml, M2. M3, M4
echo simple melodic patterns, using sol, la, mi, re,
and do accurately and maintaining the tonal
center.
demonstrate use of healthy singing techniques,
including head tone, posture, diction, and breath
support.
MI, M2, M3, M4
sing simple unison songs, with and without
accompaniment, with accurate pitch, accurate
rhythm, and appropriate tone quality.
S2
sing, alone and with others, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures and styles (for
example, folk songs, poems, play-party games,
patriotic songs. student-created songs, rhymes).
ECI, EC2
demonstrate expressive qualities appropriate to
the music, using phrasing, dynamic contrast, and
tempo change.
RI
maintain a steady beat independently within
simple rhythmic and melodic patterns.











60


























At the conclusion of the school year the majority c
students will:


Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
O- Observation


Skills and, Techniques
R2
echo rhythmic patterns using quarter notes, quarter
rests, two eighth notes, half notes, and half rests on
rhythm instruments.
MI, M2, M3
perform melodies and melodic patterns within the
pentatonic scale on instruments
rl'uF example, barred instruments).
TC2
perform with appropriate posture and position to
produce a characteristic tone quality on non-
pitched instruments (for example, wood block,
jingle bells, maracas, tambourines, hand drums.
guiro) and pitched instruments (for example,
xylophones, metallophones, glockenspiels,
resonator bells).
R2, R3, TC2, TC3
maintain a simple rhythmic or melodic pattern on
instruments, in combination with other patterns, to
accompany poems, rhymes, chants, and songs.
ECI, EC2
demonstrate expressive qualities of dynamics and
tempo, appropriate to the music, while playing
classroom and ethnic instruments.
R2
read and perform rhythmic patterns (quarter notes,
quarter rests, two eighth notes, and half notes) in
response to traditional and nontraditional notation.
Ml, M2, M3, M4
read and perform simple melodic patterns from
traditional and nontraditional notation (for
example, sol, la, mi, re. and do on a five-line staff).
Ml, M2, M3, M4
write notation, using manipulative and visual
representation, for simple melodic patterns, using
sol, la, and mi on a five-line staff.
R2
notate rhythmic patterns (quarter notes. quarter
rests, two eighth notes, and half notes) that have
been performed by someone else.


























students will:


Imi FvilURNIC 1 7o0 U
Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation


Creation and Communication
RI, R2
improvise rhythmic "answer phrases" in the same
style as given "question phrases".
Ml, M2, M3, M4
improvise melodic "answer phrases" in the same
style as given "question phrases."
HI, H2
improvise rhythmic and melodic pentatonic
patterns to accompany songs, poems. or stories.
HI, H2
create simple accompaniments using classroom
instruments for songs, poems, and stories.
Cultural and Historic Connections
52
understand that music is different in other places
and times around the world.
SI, S2
identify vocal and instrumental music from
different cultures (for example, Latin, Asian,
African).
TCI, TC2, TC3, S2
compare rhythm and timbres of contrasting
examples of world music.
Sl, S2
identify selected songs associated with historical
events ind celcbr.ijt.n- in :,ri ldtl chlitre,.
SI, S2
identify selected songs that reflect daily life in
varied cultures.
SI, S2
identify music that reflects the cultural heritage of
the community.
Sl, S2
identify selected patriotic songs associated with the
United States.






























Aesthetic and Critical Analysis
FI, F2, SI
respond to selected characteristics of music,
including tempo, dynamics, melodic contour, and
form, through purposeful movement.
TCI
differentiate between child singing in head tone
and child ,niing in chcn %oit:ce.
HI, H2, TCI, TC2
differentiate between solo and group performance
(for example, vocal solo and choir, instrumental
solo and band).
TC2
classify classroom instruments by sound source
(wood, metal, shaker, or membrane) when
presented visually and aurally.
TC2
classify instruments by family when presented
%isuall and aurall'..
TC2
identify selected instruments when presented
visually and aurally.
Sl
describe specific music characteristics using
appropriate vocabulary (tempo, dynamics, melodic
contour, and form).
describe how expressive qualities are used to
convey feelings, images, moods, and events
through music.
select one or two specific characteristics to
evaluate within a composition or performance (for
example, starting together, performing correct
pitches).
evaluate one's own and others' performances,
describe what was successful and what should be
changed, and adjust performance accordingly.












63


I Y


4 4 +


1 4 +


J ______ .1 ________ ____


IAt the inclusion of tile school year the majority of the Date Evaluated %of
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
; F- Formal Success
| O- Observation

























At the conclusion of the school year the majority of Date Evaluated % of
the students will: Completed 1- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Applcations To Life
demonstrate basic understanding of how concepts
within and among music, theatre, visual arts, and
dance are similar (for example, improvisation in
sound, words, and movement).
identify ways in which language arts,
mathematics, social studies, and science relate to
music(for example, vibrations in science and
musical sounds, patterns in mathematics and
music).
understand the use of music in daily life (for
example,
worship, patriotic events, background music),
demonstrate appropriate audience behavior in
such settings as classroom and school and public
performances (for example, listening quieil\,
during a performance, clapping at the end of a
performance).
explain a personal preference for a specific type
of music in relation to his/her own experiences.
identify the role of musicians (for example, Afro-
Cuban drummer, gospel singer) in schools, the
media, the community, and specific cultures.

























School Name : School Year _

Music Teacher : Class _

Number in Class :

At the conclusion of the school year the majority of Date Evaluated % of
the students will: Compileld I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Skills and Techniques
MI, M2, M3, M4, MS
sing melodic patterns and songs, matching pitch,
with an extended range (E-E').
Ml, M2, M3, M4, MS
echo simple melodic patterns using do, re, mi, fa,
sol. la. ti, and do'.
demonstrate healthy singing techniques, including
posture, breath support, voice placement, and
unified vowels.
H2
sing unison songs and ostinati, with and without
accompaniment, using accurate pitch and rhythm.
S2, S3
sing, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods,
and genres. _____ _
ECI, EC2, EC3, SI, S2, S3
sing with expression and style appropriate to the
music performed.
EC1, TCI
sing with others, blending vocal timbres and
matching dynamic levels.
R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS
perform a song independently on a melodic
instrument within a three-note range with tonal
and rhillmic 3accuil.a












68

























the students will:


Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
O- Observation


Skills and Techniqgues ____


R1, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, HI, H2
perform rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic
instrumental accompaniments.
TC2
produce a characteristic instrumental tone using
appropriate performance techniques nor example,
breath support, posture, hand position).
SI, S2, S3
perform on pitched and non-pitched instruments,
with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods,
and genres.
ECI, EC2, EC3, SI, S2, S3
perform on classroom and ethnic instruments with
expression and style appropriate to the music.
RI, ECI, TC2
perform on instruments in an ensemble,
maintaining a common tempo, hlendir'g
instrumental timbres, and matching dynamic
levels.
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M5
echo short rhythmic and melodic phrases on
pitched and non-pitched instruments.
R2, R3
sight read rhythm patterns, including quarter
notes, quarter rests, half notes, half rests, eighth
notes, whole notes, whole rests, and dotted half
notes, in duple and triple meter.
M5
sight read short melodic patterns using steps,
repeated tones, and skips based on a triad.
ECI, EC2, EC3
interpret music symbols and terms in repertoire
that refer to dynamics, tempo, articulation, and
expression (for example, piano, allegro, staccato)
when performing.










69


I I _


4


4 4


























the students will:


Date Evaluated % of
Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation


Skills and Techniques ___
R2, R3
write notation for simple rhythmic patterns,
including quarter notes, quarter rests, two ei;hrh
notes, and half notes that have been performed by
someone else.
MI, M2, M3, M4, M5
write notation for simple melodic patterns
presented aur.lly. using sol, la, mi, re, and do
within the pentatonic scale.
Creation and Communication
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS
improvise short rhMthmic and melodic "answer
phrases" in the same style as given "question
phrases."
HI, H2
improvise rhythmic and melodic patterns and
ostinati to accompany songs or poems.
ECI, EC2, TC2
arrange short songs for classroom performance
(for example, changing dynamics and timbre).
TCI, TC2, TC3
create original vocal and instrumental melodic
phrases using traditional and nontraditional sound
sources.
EC1, EC2, EC3, TCI, TC2, TC3, Sl
identify musical characteristics of a selection (for
example, dynamics, timbre, tempo) that
communicate an idea or emotion.



























students will: .


Cultural and Historic Connections
S2, 53
classify selected exemplary works by selected genre
1lor example, folk song), style (for example,
popular, jazz), and composer.
SI, S2
compare rhythm. timbre, and expressive devices of
contrasting exjnmplec -,f worldd niluic
S3
identify examples of music that represent various
historical periods and events.
S2, S3
identify important composers who influenced
various genres of American music (for example,
Gershwin, Armstrong. Guthrie).
Aesthetic and Critical A analysis
R3, FI, F2
listen to and analyze a composition to identify
meter (duple or triple) or form (for example,
verse-refrain, call-and-response. AB. ABA).
TCI
identify solo voices (for example, soprano, bass).
TC2
identify string, brass, woodwind. percussion, and
keyboard instruments and classifies them by family.
SI
describe a variety of world music using appropriate
vocabulary (for example, vocal qutiili
instrumentation, rhythmic and melodic patterns).
create and apply criteria for evaluating one's own
and others' performances and compositions.
evaluate one's own and others' performances,
describes what was successful and what should be
changed, and adjusts performance accordingly.














71


MRW MPM a a IILW LIM M MR! M
Date Evaluated % of
Completred I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation

























A hdescrie conclusion or thechool year the majority of othe ate Erauted % of
disciplidents is rlatComd to mupletedsic (fI- Informalr xampl,
F- Formal Sueces$
O- Observation
Applicadtons, To Life
identify common vocabulary and elements within
and among dance, theatre, music, and the visual
arts (for example, movement, form).
describe ways in which the subject matter of other
disciplines is related to music (for example,
rhythmic and numeric patterns in music and
mathematics).
describe various uses of music in daily experiences
(for example, cartoons).
demonstrate audience behavior appropriate to the
context, setting, and style of the music performed
(for example, pep band performance at a sporting
event).
explain how musical preferences reflect one's
personal experiences.
respect differing values and tastes in music.

identify the roles and importance of musicians in
various settings and cultures.




























72





















FOURT GRAD


School Name :


Music Teacher :

Number in Class :


School Year _

Class :


At the conclusion of the school year the majority of the Date Evaluated % of
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Skills and Techniques
MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6
sing melodic patterns and songs. matching pitch,
* ilh an extended ranue ii-1*-
Ml. M2. M3. M4. MS. M6
echo simple melodic patterns using sol, do, re, mi,
fa. sol, la. ti. and do'.
demonstrate healthy singing techniques, including
posture, breath support, voice placement, unified
vowels, and articulated consonants.
H2
sing unison songs, partner songs, rounds, ostinati,
and other songs with two independently moving
lines, with and without accompaniment, using
accurate pitch and rhythm.
S2, S3
sings, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods, and
genres.
ECI, EC2, EC3, SI, S2, S3
sing with expression and style appropriate to the
music performed.
ECI, TC1
sing with others, blending vocal timbres, matching
dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of a
conductor.
R2, R3, Ml, M2, M3. M4, M5, M6
perform a song independently on a melodic
instrument within the pentalonic scale with tonal
and rhythmic accuracy.
R1, R2, R3, MI, M2. M3, M4, M5, M6, HI, H2
perform rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic
instrumental accompaniments


























students wilpefomnc Completed Informal(for example,
F- FormalS2, S3
O- Observation
performSkills and Techniques
TC2
produce a characteristic instrumental tone using
appropriate performance techniques (for example,
breath support, posture, hand positionistorical periods, and
Sl, S2, S3
perform on pitched and non-pitched instruments,
with stylistic and stccuracy, app diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods, and
genres.
ECI, EC2, EC3, S1, S2, S3
perform on classroom and ethnic instruments with
expression and style appropriate to the music.
RI, ECI, TC2
perform on instruments in an ensemble,
maintaining a common tempo, blending
instrumental timbres, and matching dvaamik letcl',
ECI, EC2
respond to the tempo and dynamics cues of a
conductor.
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6
echo rhythmic and melodic phrases on pitched and
non-pitched instruments
R2, R3
sight read rhythm patterns, including quarter notes,
quarter rests, half notes, half rests, eighth notes,
whole notes, whole rests, dotted half notes, dotted
quarter notes, and simple syncopated patterns, in
duple and triple meter.
Ml, M2. M3, M4, MS, M6
sight read short patterns and melodies within the
pentatonic scale.
ECI, EC2, EC3
interpret music symbols and terms in repertoire
that refer to dynamics, tempo, articulation, and
expression f'i example, crescendo, fermata,
andante, legato) when performing.


























At the conclusion or the school year the majority of include Evaluatedig
the students will: Completed I- Infrmalotted half notes
F- Formal Success
O- Observation
Skills and TechniVies
R2, R3
write notation for melodic patterns, including
quarter notes, quarter rests, half notes, half rests,
eighth notes, whole notes, and dotted half notes
that have been performed by someone else.
MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6
write notation for melodic patterns presented
aurally, using steps, repeated tones, and skips based
triads using do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, and do within
the diatonic scale.
Creation and Communication
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5. M6
improvise short rhythmic and melodic "answer
phrases" in the same style as given "question
phrases."
HI, H2
improvise rhythmic and melodic patterns and
create simple varnhlionr oi fon um1liaar mcldiii _______ __
ECI, EC2, TC3
arrange short songs for classroom performance
(for example, changing dynamics, timbre, and
form).
TCI, TC2, TC3
creates short vocal and instrumental works
containing contrasting musical ideas (for example,
unity, repetition) using traditional and
nontraditional sound sources.
ECI, EC2, EC3, TCI, TC2, TC3, Sl
identify musical characteristics of a selection (for
example, dynamics. timbre, tempo) that enhance
lyrics and communicate an idea or emotion.
Cultural and Historic Connections
S2, S3
classify selected exemplary works from various
historical periods by genre, style, and composer.
Sl, S2
explain how use of specific musical elements (for
example, rhythm, melody, timbre, expressive
devices) is characteristic of music from various
world cultures.

























t the conctify fusion thae schoolrepr earsents the history an e Date Evaluated
students will: Completed I- Informal Stdent
F- Formal Success

Cultural and Historic Connections
S2, S3
identify music that represents the history and
diverse cultures of Florida.
S2, S3
identify important composers and performers who
influenced various genres of American music (for
example, Foster, Copland, Estefan).
Aesthetic and Critical Analysis
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, Fl, F2
listen to and analyze a composition to identify
meter (duple, triple, or compound), rhythmic and
melodic elements (for example, syncopation,
melodic contour), and form (for example, ABA,
rondo, theme and variation).
TCI
identify solo voices (for example, soprano, alto,
tenor, bass).
TC2
identify and classify instruments, instrumental
families, and ensembles (for example, orchestra,
band).
Sl, S2, S3
describe diverse styles of music found in Florida
using appropriate vocabulary (for example, vocal
quahly, instrumentation, rhythmic and melodic
patterns, form).
create and apply criteria for evaluating one's own
and others' pcrformianccs and compo-. itions.
evaluate one's own and others' performances,
describe what was successful and what should be
changed. and aijtiai perftrmnance actordingl%




























Applications To Life
identify and describe elements within and among
dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts (for
example, movement, form, repetition).
describe ways in which the subject matter of other
disciplines is related to music (for example, folk
songs and connections to history). __________
describe the usi of music in the media (for

example, television commercials). ______ _____________
demonstrate audience behavior appropriate to the

context, setting, and style of the music performed
(for example, appropriate times to enter or leave
*i ,onccrl i'ilin applii.s .,c jfcr iaiu ,'l;,i.
explain how musical preferences reflect one's
personal experienesFormal Success
identify and respect differing values and tastes in
music. theatre, music, and the visual arts (for
describe wayroles in whd ich the subject musatter ofn in
various settings and cultures .h m__________ ____d
various settings and cultures,




















FITHGRD
GRD EE EPCAIN


School Name:


School Year :


Music Teacher: ______


Class :


Number in Class :


Al the conclusion of the school year the majority of Date Evaluated % of
the students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Skills and Techniques
Ml, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7
sing melodic patterns, intervals, and songs.
nmatclhin: piLch. vhll all ec endedd ianie (C-F i.
MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7
echo melodic patterns using soil lat ti, do, re,
mi, fa, sol. la, ti, and do1.
demonstrate healthy singing techniques, including
posture, breath support, voice placement, unified
vowels, and articulated consonants.
H2
sing unison songs, partner songs, rounds, ostinati.
descants, and other songs with two and three
independently moving lines, with and without
accompaniment, using accurate pitch and rhythm.
S2, S3
sing, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods,
and genres.
ECI, EC2, EC3, SI, S2, S3,
sing with expression and style appropriate to the
music performed.
ECI, TCI
sing with others, blending vocal timbres, matching
dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of a
conductor.
R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7, M8
perform a song independently on a melodic
instrument within the diatonic scale with tonal and
rhythmic accuracy.


























^tu U Uauawn V U us I asI U ws UU C lunI a "I J 1 vi R n usnumr /o us
the students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Skills and Techniques
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7,
HI, H2
perform rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic
instrumental accompaniments.
TC2
produce a characteristic instrumental tone using
appropriate performance techniques (for
example, breath support, posture, hand
position).
Sl, S2, S3
perform on pitched and non-pitched
instruments, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse
repertoire representing various cultures,
historical periods, and genres.
ECI, EC2, EC3, S1, S2, 53
perform on classroom and ethnic instruments
with expression and style appropriate to the
music.
RI, EC 1. TC2
perform on instruments in an ensemble,
maintaining a common tempo, blending
instrumental timbres, and matching dynamic
levels.
ECI, EC2. EC3
respond to the tempo, dynamics, and expressive
cues of a conductor.
Ri. R2. R3. Ml. M2. M3. 1M4, MS. M16, .1M7
echo extended rhythmic and melodic phrases on
pilchcd and non-pitched in.rirrLmentb.
R2, R3
sight read rhythm patterns, including quarter
notes, quarter rests, half notes, half rests, eighth
notes, whole notes, whole rests, dotted half
notes, dotted quarter notes, triplets, and
syncopated patterns, in duple and triple meter.
MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7, M8
sight read short melodies within the diatonic
scale of two or more major keys.
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7,
MS
sight read a simple song with tonal and rhythmic
accuracy.

























Al the conclusion of the school year ticulhe majority of Date Evaluated
the stdens will: exampleCompleted Informalzo-forte, adagio,
F- Formal Success
O- Observation
Skills and Techniques
ECM, EC2, EC3
interpret music symbols and terms in repertoire
that refer to dynamics, tempo, articulation, and
expression (for example, mezzo-forte, adagio,
ritard, accent, pizzicato) when performing.
R2, R3
write notation for rhythmic patterns, including
quarter notes, quarter rests, half notes, half rests,
eighth notes, whole notes, whole rests, dotted half
notes, and dotted quarter notes that have been
performed by someone else.
Ml, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, MS
write notation for melodic patterns presented
aurally, using steps, repeated tones, and skips
based on triads using do, re, mi, fa. sot, la, ti, and
do' within the diatonic scale.
Creation and Communication
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7
improvise rhvihmic and melodic "answer phrases"
in the sanmc sllc .,' ien questionn phrases."
HI, H2
improvise rhythmic and melodic patterns and
creates variations on familiar melodies.
EC1, EC2, F3, TCI, TC2
arrange short songs for classroom performance
(for example, changing dynamics, timbre, and
form; varying rhythm and melody).
TCI, TC2, TC3
compose vocal and instrumental music to express
a poem, story, idea. or feeling using
traditional and nontraditional sound sources.
ECI, EC2, EC3, TCi, TC2, TC3, Sl
identify musical characteristics of a selection (for
example, dynamics, timbre, tempo) that enhance
lyrics and communicate ideas, meanings, or
emotion.





















the students will:


Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation


Cultural and Historic Connections


S2, S3
classify selected exemplary works from various
historical periods and cultures by genre, style, and
composer.
SI, S2
explain how use of specific musical elements (for
example, rh) thm. melody, timbre, expressive
devices, texture) is characteristic of music from
various world cultures.
S2, S3
describe the impact of regional traditions and
historical events on generating various types of
music.
S2, S3
identify important composers, songwriters, and
performers who generated or influenced various
genres of American music (for example,
Bernstein, Sousa, Ellington. Presley).
Aesthetic and Critical Analysis
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7, FI,
F2, F3, F4
listen to and analyze a composition to identify
meter (duple, triple, or compound), rhythmic and
melodic elements (ilor example, syncopation,
melodic contour), form (for example, ABA.
rondo, theme and variation, through-composed),
and tonality (major or minor).
TCI, TC4
identify solo voices (for example, soprano, alto,
tenor, bass) and vocal ensembles (for example,
choir, quartet).
TC2, TC4
identify and classify electronic, orchestral, and
wind instruments, their families, and ensembles
(for example, string quartet, jazz ensemble).









90


I I _


I I _


























S'Completed I- Informal .o .
..... F- Formal
0- Observation


Student
Success


Aesthetic and Critical Analysiv
SI, S2, S3
describe diverse styles of popular, folk, classical,
and world music using appropriate vocabulary
(for example, vocal quality, instrumentation,
rhythmic and melodic patterns, form).
create, apply, and explain criteria for evaluating
one's own and others' performances and
compositions.
evaluate one's own and others' performances,
describe what was successful and what should be
changed, and adjust performance accordingly.
Applications To Life
compare and contrast elements within and among
dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts (for
example, movement, form, repetition, texture,
contour).
compare and contrast the subject matter of other
disciplines with music (for example, jazz, blues.
and connections to American history; acoustics in
music arid science) __
.mal)zc multiple ues of muMic in Ihe mr.edia t'or
example, film scores, instructional media).
describe characteristics that make music suitable
for specific purposes.
demonstrate audience behavior appropriate to the
context, setting, and style of the music performed
(for example, holding applause between
movements of a major work, turning off watches
and other electronic devices for concerts).
explain how musical preferences reflect one's
personal experiences.
identify and respect diikrmin values and tastes in
music.
analyze the roles and importance of musicians in
various settings and cultures.

























*Due to the absence of sixth grade GLE's from DOE, these are derived from fifth grade.

School Name : School Year :

Music Teacher : Class :

Number in Class :

At the conclusion of the school year tIh mujuriry of Dale Esaluaird % of
the students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
O- Observation
Skills and Techniques 0__________
Ml, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7
sing melodic patterns, intervals, and songs,
matching pitch, with an extended range (Bh -F').
Ml, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7
echo melodic patterns using sol[ la, ti, do, re,
mi, fa, sol, la. ti, and do'. _
demonstrate healthy singing techniques, including
posture, breath support, voice placement, unified
vowels, and articulated consonants.
H2
sing unison songs, partner songs, rounds, ostinati,
descants, and other songs with two and three
independently moving lines, with and without
accompaniment, using accurate pitch and rhythm.
;2, S3
sing, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods,
and aenres.
EC1. EC2. EC3. SI, S2. S3.
sing with expression and style appropriate to the
music performed,
EC1, TCI
sing with others, blending vocal timbres, matching
dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of a
conductor.
R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7, M8
perform a song independently on a melodic
instrument within the diatonic scale with tonal and
rhythmic accuracy.








98


























*Due to the absence of sixth grade GLE's from DOE, these are derived from fifth grade.

At the conclusion of the school year the majority of the Date Evaluated % or
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Skills and Techniques____________
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, HI,
H2
perform rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic
instrumental accompaniments.
TC2
produce a characteristic instrumental tone using
appropriate performance techniques ifor example,
breath support, posture, hand position).
SI, S2, S3
perform on pitched and non-pitched instruments,
with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire
representing various cultures, historical periods, and
genres.
ECi, EC2, EC3, SI, S2, S3
perform on classroom and ethnic instruments with
expression and style appropriate to the music.
Rl, ECI, TC2
perform on instruments in an ensemble,
maintaining a common tempo, blending
instrumental timbres, and matching dynamic levels.
EC1, EC2, EC3
respond to the tempo, dynamics, and expressive
cues of a conductor.
R2, R3
sight read rhythm patterns, including quarter notes,
quarter rests, half notes, half rests, eighth notes,
eighth rests, whole notes, whole rests, dotted half
notes, dotted quarter notes, triplets, tied notes,
sixteenth notes, sixteenth rests, and syncopated
patterns, in duple and triple meter.
M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M8, M9
sight read short melodies within the diatonic scale
of two or more major keys.


























*Due to the absence of sixth grade GLE's from DOE, these are derived from fifth grade.

At the conclusion of the school year the majority of the Date Evaluated % of
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Obsernation
Skills and Techniques
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M8,
M9
sight read a simple song with tonal and rhythmic
accuracy.
ECI, EC2, EC3
interpret music symbols and terms in repertoire
that refer to dynamics, tempo, articulation, and
expression (for example, fortissimo, pianissimo,
vivace, lento, accelerando) when performing.
R2, R3
write notation for rhythmic patterns, including
quarter notes, quarter rests, half notes, half rests,
eighth notes, whole notes, whole rests, dotted half
notes, and dotted quarter notes that have been
performed by someone else.
MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, MS
write notation for melodic patterns presented
auraill., using steps, repeated tones, and skips based
on triads using do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, and do'
within the diatonic scale.
Creadian and Communication
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7
improvise rhythmic and melodic "answer phrases"
in the 'ame *i'lc gi'i en "'qielion phr: ie __
HI, H2
improvise rhythmic and melodic patterns and
create variations on familiar melodies.
ECI, EC2, F3. TCI, TC2
arrange short songs for classroom performance (for
example, changing dynamics, timbre, and form;
varying rhythm and melody).
TCI, TC2, TC3
compose vocal and instrumental music to express a
poem, story, idea, or feeling using
traditional and nontraditional oiind source. __
EC1. EC2, EC3, TC1, TC2, TC3, SI
identify musical characteristics of a selection (for
example, dynamics, timbre, tempo)that enhance
lyrics and communicate ideas, meanings, or
emotion.




100

























*Due to the absence of sixth grade GLE's from DOE, these are derived from fifth grade.

At thr conclusion of the school )car the majority of the Date Evaluated % of
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Cultural and Historic Connections
S2, 53
classify selected exemplary works from various
historical periods and cultures by genre, style, and
composer.
SI, S2
explain how use of specific musical elements (for
example, rhythm, melody, timbre, expressive
devices, texture) is characteristic of music from
various world cultures.
S2, S3
describe the impact of regional traditions and
historical events on generating various types of
music. ___________
S2, S3
identify important composers, songwriters, and
performers who generated or influenced various
genre of American music (lbr c\.implc. Ives,
.uplin. Willijumi. D._ni_
Aesthetic and Critical Analysis__
RI, R2, R3, MI, M2, M3, M4, MS, M6, M7, FI,
F2, F3, F4, F5
listen to and analyze a composition to identify
meter (duple, triple, or compound), rhythmic and
melodic elements (for example, syncopation,
melodic contour), form (for example, ABA, rondo,
theme and variation, through-composed. 12-bar
blues), and tonality (major or minor).
TCI, TC4
identify solo voices (for example, soprano, alto,
tenor, bass) and vocal ensembles (for example,
choir, quartet)._

























*Due to the absence of sixth grade GLE'sfrom DOE, these are derived from fifth grade.

At the conclusion of the school year the majority of the Date Evaluated % of
students will: Completed I- Informal Student
F- Formal Success
0- Observation
Aesthetic and Critical Analysis ____IIIIIIIII__III__II _____I
TC2, TC4
identify and classify electronic, orchestral, and wind
instruments, their families, and ensembles (for
example, string quartet, jazz ensemble).
SI, S2, S3
describe diverse styles of popular, folk, classical, and
world music using appropriate vocabulary
(for example, vocal quality, instrumentation,
rhythmic and melodic patterns, form).
create, apply, and explain criteria for evaluating
one's own and others' performances and
compositions.
evaluate one's own and others' performances,
describe what was successful and what should be
changed, and adjust performance accordingly.
Applications To Life
compare and contrast elements within and among
dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts (for
example, movement, form, repetition, texture,
contour).
compare and contrast the subject matter of other
disciplines with music (for example, jazz, blues, and
connections to American history; acoustics in music
and science).
analyze multiple uses of music in the media (tor
example, film scores, instructional media).
describe characteristics that make music suitable for
specific purposes.
demonstrate audience behavior appropriate to the
context, setting, and style of the music performed
(for example, holding applause between movements
of a major work, turning off watches and other
electronic devices for concerts).
explain how musical preferences reflect one's
personal experiences.
identify and respect differing values and tastes in
music.
analyze the roles and importance of musicians in
various settings and cultures.





















Kindergarten Grade Level Expectations


Skdcs and Techi, .qe
1. sings melodic patterns and songs within a four-note range (F- D,) using
sol, a, and mi.
2. echoes simple melodic patterns, using sot. Ia, and mi and maintaining tie
lonal center.
3. demonstrates healty use of the singing, speaking, whispering, and
calling voice with appropriate volume for the young child
4. sings simple unison songs, with andwithout accompaniment, with
accurate pitch, accurate rhythm, and appropriate tone quality.
5. sings, alone and with others, a diverse repertoire representing various
cultures and styles (for example, fkfo songs, poems, play-party games,
patrionc songs, utdent-creaSted songs. nursy rhymess.
6. demonstrates expressive qualities appropriate to the music, using
dynamic contrast and tempo change.
7. performs a steady beat based on a personal endcor group sense of pulse.
8. echoes rhythmic patterns using quarter notes, quarter rests, and two
eighth notes on simple rhythm instruments.
9. echoes simple melodic patterns on instruments (for example, barred
instruments_________ _________ _________
10. performs with appropriate posture and position to produce a characteristic
tole quality on nonpitched instruments (for example, rhythm sticks,
triangle, wood block).
11. performs simple rhythmic patterns and sound effects on instruments to
accompany poems, rhymes, chants, and songs,
12. demonstrates expressive quallies (for example, loud-soft, fast-slow) while
playing classroom and ethnic instruments.
13. recognizes and performs sounds having long and short duration in
response to visual representation.
14. recognizes and performs high and low sounds in response to visual
representation.
15. demonstrates melodic direction (upward, downward, and same) and
register (high and lowl} physical response and visual representation.
16, represents long and short sounds visually that have been performed by
someone else.

Creation and Communmication
17, improvises a short rhythmic pattern in response to a musical prompt.
18. improvises a short melodic pattern in response to a musical prompt.
19. improvises a short free-form song.
20. creates sound effects for songs, poemn s, and stories.


Cultural and f fit toa Connectiomn
21. knows that music is different in other places.
22. recognizes mu sic of contrasting cultures.
23. understands that music can differ in various cultures.
24. knows that music is a part of celebrations and daily ife.

Aeathatic and Crftical Anewyia
25. responds to selected characterstcs ofr music, inducing fast and slow, soft
and loud, high and low, and upward and downward, through purposeful
movement,
26. differentiates between speaking and singing voices,
27, identiies classroom instruments by sound source, including wood and
metal.
28, identifies a variety of environmental sound sources,
29, describes specific music characteristics using appropriate vocabulary
(fast-slow, loud-sot. highilow, and upward-downward)-
30. describes feelings communicated through music.
i1 r r.i -,.r'nple critufli lar .5r.iuiiL'.rj f r-il arirnan. i "' -r.nrpiPe le or
dislike, happy or sad)-I
32. evaluates one's own and others' performances and describes what was
success f

Appbcutione to Life
33, demonstrates basic understanding of concepts in music and the visual
arts that are similar (far example, reptition).
34. identifies ways in which language arts relates to music (far example,
tryming words soin storybooks).
35. understands the use of music in daily life (for example, birthday parties
holidays).
36. demonstrates appropriate audience behavior in such settings as
classroom and school performances (for example, listening quietly during a
penorminc4 :,ippirg 4i lhe en:, oi a pIr iorr.r,,,ae.
.u. i:,roriies a ipe ronai prelmaence or a pecairc rong
1er fian.ri"~ c arr i- 'F t ih-a-,o aid o:i.-Tr..r.rr
























Grade One Grade Level Expectations



Skils and Technitques
sings melodic patterns and songs, matching pitch, within a four- to six.note range (F-D1) using sd,
Ia. mi, re, and do.
2. echoes simple melodic patterns, using s&d, Ia, mi, re, and do accurately and maintaining ithe tonal
center.
3. demonstrates use ofthealthy singing techniques, including head tone, posture, and diction.
4. sings simple unison songs, with and without accompaniment, with accurate pitch, accurate rhythm,
and appropriate tone quality.
5. sings, alone and with others, a diverse repertoire representing various cultures and styles (for
example, folk sons., poems, play-party games, patriotic songs, student-created songs, rhymes).
6. demonsbates expressive qualities appropriate to the music, using phrasing, dynamic contrast, and
tempo chance.
7. performs a steady beat based on a common group pulse.
8. echoes rhythmic patterns using quarter notes, quarter rests, and two eighth notes on simple
rhythm instruments.
9. performs two- and ttree-note melodic pattems on instruments (for example, barred instruments).
10. performs with appropriate posture and position to produce a characteristic tone quality on
nonpitched instruments (for example, rhythm sticks, triangle, wood block, jingle bells, maracas) and
pitched instruments (for example, xylophones, metallophones, resonator bells).
11. performs simple rhythmic and melodic patterns and sound effects on instruments to accompany
poems, rhymes, chants, and songs.
12. demonstrates expressive qualities of dynamics and tempo, appropriate to the music, while playing
clasri.on, anr s t-n:c: mnbumrnnts
1 3 .e- I cI p brer .. I.T.I: i .r-,-.,.r..T i:allu r -. -1 e I.:r.ir- q S1i. E e. ar. sr-.t Ei .r -u es, .r.
ret,por.s ic ri idjacnai ana rnar. id.tonal not icr.r,
14 ri-i is san pirornr.i umpr merrd r parein', from haditornial na nont ,drr.,.i norarion -,mi
e..rn-pia xol i d-i 3 n it..e-ir..' -Ini
15 wrinlr. nouisnn is-ng maniculiu.es ind 'i. Lu ipiwa'nlala-r, u irnple irdr.idi prmr. n, ir.ng
sol and mi on a threeline stallff
16. notates rhythmic palterns (quarter notes, quarter rests, and two eighth notes), using manipulatives,
that have been performed by someone else.

Creation and Conemaication
17. improvises a four-beat rhythmic pattern in response to a musical prompt
18. improvises a faur-beat melodic pattern in response to a musical prompt.
19. improvises simple rhythmic and melodic patterns to accompany songs, poems, or stories.
20. creates rhythmic and melodic patterns using classroom insituments for songs, poems, aid stories

Cuaur land Hflrdacal Connections
21. -knows that music is different in other places and times.
22. recognizes music of contrasting cultures.
23 camreawe'. T.Dreofnconritlnringe-ample' r eswridmusc.
24 ,ris. r.rr. ',eloid -ang,a.. .alPd .-It cew-Iecil.::. ,r- armir ialr.ari.,
25. identifies selected songs that reflect daily life in varied cultures.
26. identifies music that rollects the cultural heritage ofthe community.

Aestheticf and Crrical Analysis
27. responds to selected characteristics of music, icludng taernp. dynamics. melodic contour, and
'.anie anrd ,.rTe'nr panae, itroign pbrpoli I.i .iri-onisi
29. birern, ais Derwuer. 'he &h.id 4iai:e ond a uil .1i :e
29. diffarentates between solo and group performance (for example, vocal sdo and choir).
30. classifies classroom instruments by sound source (wood, metal, shaker, or membrane).
31. identifies a variety of environmental sound sources.
32. identifies selected instruments whian presented visually and aurally.
33. describes specific music characteristics using appropriate vocabulary (tempo. dynamics, melodic
contour, and same and different patterns).
34. describes feelings and images c"nmunicated through music.
35. uses teacher-specified criteria for evaluating composilions and performances (for example, Did
we follow the dynamics? Did we maintain a steady beat?).
36. evaluates one's own and others performances and describes what was successful.


Appiltcetions to L-e
37. demonstrates basic understanding of how concepts in music, visual aits, and dance are similar
(for example, siape, line, pattern).
39. identifies ways in which language arts and mathematics relate to music (for example, groupings,
sets. pattems).
39. understands the use of music in daily life (for example, parades, sporting events).
40. demonstrates appropriate audience behavior in such settings as classroom and school
performances (for example, listening quietly during a performance, clapping at the end ofa
performance).
41. identifies a personal preference for a specific type of music.
42. identifies the role of musicians in schools and the community,






















Grade Two Grade Level Expectations


Skfs and Techniqes
1. 'sings melodic patterns and songs, alone and with others and matching pitch, within a five-to
seven-note range (E-Di).
2. echoes simple melodic patterns, using sal Ia, mi, re, and do accurately and maintaining the
twnal center.
3. demonstrates use of healthy singing techniques, including head tone, posture, diction, and
breath support.
4. sings simple unison songs, wMh andwithout accompaniment, with accurate pitch, accurate
rhythm. and appropriate tone quality.
5. sings, alone and with others, a diverse repertoire representing various cultures and styles (for
example, faui songs, poems, play-partty gmes, patriotic songs, sudent-catoled songs, rhymes).
6. demonstrates expressive qualies appropriate to the music, using phrasing, dynamic contrast,
and tempo change.
7. maintains a steady beat independently within simple rhythmic and melodic patterns.
8. echoes rhythmic patterns using quarter notes, quarter rests, two eighth notes, half notes, and
half rests on rhythm instruments.
9. performs melodies and melodic patterns within the pentatonic scale on instruments (for
example, barred instruments).
10. performs with appropriate posture and position to produce a characteristic tone quality on
nonpitched instruments (for example, wood block, jingle bells, maracas, tambourines, hand
drums, guiro) and pitched instruments (for example, xylophones, metallophtones, glockenspiels,
resonator bells).
11. maintains a simple rhythmic or melodic paltem on instruments, in combination with other
patterns, to accompany poems, rhymes, chants, and songs.
12. demonstrates eXpressive qualities of dynamics and tempo, appropriate to the music, while
playing classroom and ethnic instruments.
13. reads and performs rhythmic patterns (quarter notes, quarter rests, two eighth notes, and half
notes) in response to bradilmonal and norlntraritiial notation
14. reads and performs simple melodic patterns from traditional and nontraditional notation (for
example, sol, la, mi. re, and do on a five-line steff)
15. writes notation, using manipuiatives and visual representation, for simple melodic patterns,
using sl., la, and mi an a five-line staff.
16, notates rhythmic patterns (quarter notes, quarter rests, two eighth notes, and half notes) that
have been performed by someone else.

Creation andi Commnsaution
57 implies rP irivo .mrnssusi panra s in ite same &tpde a% ia&n iqusr.:ir piuneis
i implm ioii a dn ixhloa 'Ar. phlral'. i r. the ',.rnp 1r.rl a. l1r.u n.cn pia.9m
19. improvises rhythmic and melodic pentatonio pattems to accompany songs, poems, or stories.
20. creates simple accompaniments using classroom instruments for songs, poems, and stories.

Cutforal and Hidocmal Connedmtt
21. understands that music is different in other places and tunes around the world.
22. identities vocal and instrumental music from different culures (for example, Latin, Asian,
urni.4n5,.
:? OT .l i t.-ty i i l lrtimes a coIl.a s ij. n i. rple i : ai ri :
2N iorrnit iihagad -.oro-. nsclxilau W-c hrJUdr*.CsII aeer ar-43 nufocarmoo n IeF pd cuhiurec
2 -. miero'l .Ilidedsi-S r1al Re: dIo lle.i ai.i :ul1E.
2 iprofiet.rnh lnu ih- raieleuc;. 15m iulturial hibnrago ol no comnieaniry
27, identifies selected patriotic songs associated with the United States.

Aeathetic and CrticalAnalys
28 responds to selected characteriscs ofrinusic, including tempo, dynamics, melodic contour, and
form, through purposeful movement-
29. differentiates between child singing in head tone and child singing in chest voice.
30. differentiates between solo and group performance (for example, vocal solo arid choir,
inustmrmental solo and band).
31. classifies classroom instruments by sound source (wood, metal, shaker, or membrane) when
presented visually and surely.
32. classifies instruments by family when presented visually and aurally
33. identifies selected instruments when presented visually and aurally.
34. describes specific music characteristics using appropriate vocabulary (tempo dynamics.
melodic contour, and form).
35. describes how expressive qualities are used to convey feelings, images, moods, and events
through music.
36. selects one or two specific characteriatics to evaluate within a composition or performance (for
example, starting together. performing correct pitches.
37. evaluates one's own and others performances, describes what was successful and what
should be changed. and adjust performance according.

Appkatiow to Life
39. demonstrates basic understanding of how concepts within and among music, theatre, visual
arts, and dance are similar (for example, improvisation in sound, words, and movement),
39, moentises way in uncn language arts mawemancs rocl salOsran and sCarce relate to mnus
1n, ,aenple, ,-brafbons -n st.er.:. end s .nca icur-d; pallems ir. rnmlaneoresn:t nd Admu.,
40, understands the use of music in daily life (for example, worship, patriotic events. background
music).
41. demonstrates appropriate audience behavior in such settings as classroom, school, and public
performances (for example. listening quietly during a performance, clappig at the end of a
performance.
42. explains a personal preference for a specie type of music in relation to histher own
experiences.
43. identifies the rote of musicians (for example, Afro-Cuban drummer, gospel singer) in schools,
the media, the community, and specific cultures.






















Grade Three Grade Level Expectations


Shitfr end Techique
sings melodic pattams and sngs, matching pitch, with an extended range (E-E1).
2. .cae.s simple melodic patters using do, re, mi fa, sadl. I, ti, and dol.
3. demonstrates healthy singing techniques, including posture, breath support, voice
placement, and unified vowels.
4. sings unison songs and oslinati, with and without accompaniment, using accurate
pitch and rhythm.
5. sings, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire representing various cultures,
historical periods, and genres.
6. sings with expression and style appropriate to the music performed.
7. sins with others, blendin vocal imbroes and matching dynamic levels,
8. performs a song independently on a melodic instrument within a three-note range
with tonal and rhythmic accuracy.
9. performs rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic instrumental accompaniments.
10. produces a characteristic instrumental tone using appropriate performance
techniques (for exarmple, breath support posture, hand position).
11. performs on pitched and non-pitched instruments, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse
repertoire representing various cultures historical periods, and ures.
12- performs on classroom and ethnic instruments with expression and style
appropriate to the music.
13. performs on instruments in an ensemble, maintaining a common tempo, blending
instrumental timbres, and matching dynamic levels
14. echoes short rhythmic and melodic phrases on pitched and non-pitched
instruments.
15. sight reads rhythm patterns, including quarter nates, quarter rests, half notes, half
rests, eighth notes, whole notes, whole rests, and dotted half notes, in duple and
triple meter
16. sight reads short melodic patterns using steps, repeated tones, and skips based
on a triad.
17. interprets music symbols and terms in repertoire that refer to dynamics, tempo.
articulation, and expression (for example, piano, allegro, staccato) when
performing.
19 o.ines n:' l.ntr r SFir le n -I .T- : pp'ne, .r.:lu 3r.i lt i arler r arf Y J-ari r*'lnM
two eighth notes, and half notes that have been performed by someone else.
19. txiew. niitl.inr f:x Ainhcie rnei::diL pmrru n', pie nenfd 'lursl, iJrjng i ld I. nei r',
or J oJstr.n ii-e etl,:ni: Iate

Creatrin and Commnniration
20. improvises short rhythmic and melodic "answer phrases" in te same style as
given "question phrases.'
21. improvises mhyti mic and melodic patterns and ostinati to accompany songs or
poems.
22. arranges short songs for classroom performance (for example, changing dynamics
and timbre).
c l23 l ni la ignqarl o.,ll r, j ,Iranienslt me,':d, p sld e s Us. g hlot isana
noi.. rs,.:ral .ur I ,r :eus
24. identities musical characteristic of a selection (for example, dynamics, timbre,
tempo) that communicate an idea an emotion.

Cultural and Histoncel Connections
25. classifies selected exemplary works by selected genre (for example, filt song),
style (for example, popular, S .z), and composer.
26. compares rhythm, timbre, and expressive devices of contrasting examples of
world music.
27. identifies examples of music that representvarious historical periods nd events.
29. identities important composers who influenced various genres of American music
(for example, Gershwin. Armstrong, Guthrie).

Aesthetic and Crical Anae lysis
29. listens to and analyzes a composition to identify meter (duple or triple) of form (for
example, verse-refrain, catlkand*response, AB, ABA)
30. identifies solo voices (for example, soprano. bass).
31. identities string, brass, woodwind, percussion, and keyboard instruments and
classifies them by family
32. describes a variety of warld music using appropriate vocabulary (for example,
vocal quality, instrumentation, rhythmic and melodic patterns)
33. creates and applies criteria for evaluating one's own and others' performances and
compositaons,
34. evaluates one's own and others' performances, describes what was successful
and what should be changed, and adusts performance accordingly.

Appcetaons to Life
35. identities common vocabulary and elements within and among dance, theatre,
music, and the visual arts (for example, movement form).
36. describes ways in which the subject matter of other diciplines is related to music
(for example, rhythmic and numedc patterns in music and mathemates).
37. describes various uses of music in daily experiences (for example, cartoons).
39. demonstrates audience behavior appropriate to the context, setting and style of
the music performed (for example, pep band performance at a sporting event),
39. explains how musical preferences reflect one's personal experiences.
40. respects differing values and tastes in music.
41. identities the roles and importance of municiians in various settings and cultures.























Grade Four Grade Level Expectations


Skils and Techiquex
1, sings melodic pattems and songs, matching pitch, with n extended range (D-F),
2. echoes simple melodic pattems using soil do r mli fatr sol. INa h, and dotl.
3. demonstrates healthy singing techniques, including posture, breath support, voice placement, unified vowels,
and articulated consonants.
4. sings unison songs, partner songs, rounds, ostinati, and other songs with two independently moving lines,
with and without accompaniment, using accurate pitch and rhythm.
5. sings, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire representing various cultures, historical periods, and genres.
6, sings with expression and stye appropriate to the music performed.
7. sings with others, blending vocal timbres, matching dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of a
conductor.
S. performs a song independently on a melodic instrument within the pentatonic scale with tonal and rhythmic
accuracy.
9. performs rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic instrumental accompaniments.
10. produces a characteristic instrumental tone using appropriate performance techniques (for example, breath
support, posture, hand position).
11 performs on pitched and non-pitched in ruments, with styaisc accuracy, a diverse repertoire representing
various cultures, historical periods, and genres.
12. performs on classroom and ethnic instruments with expression and style appropriate to the music.
13 performs on instruments in an ensemble, maintaining a common tempo, blending in srumental timbres, and
matching dynamic levels
14 responds to the tlmpo and dynamics ou es of a conductor
15 echoes rhythmic and melodic phrases on pitched and non-pitched instruments.
16. sight reeds rhythm patterns, including quarter notes, quarter rests half nts, hal rests, eighth notes, wtale
notes, wh ole rests, dotted half notes, dotted quarter notes, and simple syncopated patterns, in duple and trple
meter.
17. sight reads short patterns and melodies within the pentatonic scale.
18. interprets music symbols and terms in repertoire that refer to dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression
tfor ea, mpe, cresceniJo formto andante, legoto, uhen perfaring
19 a. In' ..osi3.i ii imhyin.T.: paSeer. .'I i rd j a. r 'ar.ias, ipu1e. c*v SiIl N I les i l .e i I-tN G B. r- Ife
whole notes, and dotted half notes that have been performed by someone else-
20. ar.tes roteton 1m iriod.% partems Oirsenteu Nural/ useng Ateps repeated tvne aroa sps oain r.o eds.
u'rtgd:, Ie, r i ri ol, Is b andd:I arniii ihe I la i,: M:ale

Creation and Communication
21 *nIM I Wi's nIlr ibi'hri!: inld re'od.: *n!rs r pnissesd*. n I Pn i sri i le ai gI r.a "q'j*,r or. phr -e ,
2 -. TFi st %e. +-Jtri : aid n i.: ple i% ar j : waes. rrpin e anat.:rl rr fe t ero eF b T s
23. arransas short songs for classroom performance (for example, changing dynamics, timbre, and form).
24. creates short vocal and instrumental works containing contrasting -muiscal ideas (or example, unity,
reperison, .uing trad-tonal and nonrraditoinal aou souice..
.6 je tr J1al cn at :er C e:I :- 1 3 e:bhon! t11 enTp le djr srr:I. i-1b B re-,:o iFal i- 1r,:elrn:I ard
communicate an idaa or emotion,

CuSuraif and Historal/ Connections
26 classfne eltuaeo eserrnplnor v.oKus from '.*arai b ,storcalpeinoos t,, gsrre. Stf i aora .ogmposel.
't ipl' r i .oA o*.t: pncnit 'n. i-i :eren f.i r a.p nrapf lia Iarr -.lotr I irbn, a. tess. oerit',:' n.
ctiradt.1r.-srL 01a r.iC "tin toar,. A,% tOruS culftrev
28 sntlr.e' rr,,J'.c It,.I rpprei ,i t e h- I lori and d '..-r culture i ol FliliOae
19 eernet .ramport arltomposer. Ord perforimers'. e 'nihnced aiious q Oe risoFanercer mrusc ifor
example, Foster, Copland, Estafan),

Aesthetic and Crtical Anali a
30. listens to and analyzes a composition to identify meter (duple, triple, or compound), rhythmic and melodic
elements (for example, syncopation, melodic contour), and form (for example, ABA, rondo, theme and
variation).
31. identlies solo voices (for eamtple, soprano, alto, tenor, bass)
32. -denries and classifies instruments, instrumental families and ensembles (for example, orchestra, band),
33. describes diverse styles of music found in Florida using appropriate vocabulary (fxr example, vocal quality,
instrumentation, rhythmic and melodic pattems, form).
34. creates and applies criteria for evaluating ones own and others' performances and composition s.
35. evaluates ana's own and others performances, describes what was successful and what should be changed,
and adusts performance accordingly.

Applications to Life
3. idenblies and describes elements within and among dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts (for example,
movement form, repetition).
37. describes ways in which the subject matter of other disciplines is related to music (for example, folk songs
and connections to history).
38. describes the use of music in the media (for example television commercials).
?9 aemoGnshain audience betd.;i ap.plOlc i iti ; itcrhe nirwlt tIgrig and style stite music cemfcsiirred trr,





















Grade Five Grade Level Expectations


Skift and Techniques
1. sings melodic patterns, intervals, and songs, matching pitch, with an extended range (C-Fr).
2. echoes melodic patterns using sol, Ia ti., do, re, nmi, fa sol, la, ti and do,.
3. demonstrates healthy singng techniques, including posture, breath support, voice placement, unified vowels,
end articulated consonants.
4. sings unison songs, partner songs, rounds, ostinato, descants, and other songs with two and three independently
moving lines, with and without accompaniment, using accurate pitch and rhythm.
5. sins, wth sylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire representing various cultures, historical periods, and genres.
6. sings with expression and style appropriate to the music performed.
7. s- ings with others, blending vocal limbes, matching dynamic levels, and respondin to the cues of a conductor.
8. performs a song independently on a melodic instrument within the diatonic scale with tonal and rhythmic
accuracy.
9. performs rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic instrumental accompaniments,
10. produces a characteristic instrumental tone using appropriate performance techniques (for example, breath
support, posture, hand position).
11. performs on pitched and non-pitched instruments, with stylistic accuracy, a diverse repertoire representing
various cultures, historical periods, and genres.
12- performs on classroom and ethnic instruments with expression and style appropriate to the music.
13. performs on instruments in an nisenmble, maintaining a common tempo, blending instrumental timbres, and
matching dynamic levels-
14. responds to the tempo, dynamics, and expressive cues of a conductor.
15. echoes extended rhythmic and melodic phrases on pitched and non-pitched instruments
16. sight reads rhythm pattems, including quarter notes, quarter rests, half notes, hal rests, eighth notes, whole
notes, whole rests, dotted half notes, dotted quarter notes, triplets, and syncopated patterns, in duple and triple
mater.
17. sight rends short melodies within the diatonic scale of two or more major keys.
18. sight reads a simple song with tonal and rhyt mic accuracy.
19. infverfrel Iv'imic i, oisdnd % tfrlm ir. rrpertuirfe ir. rf Io aIr,, r.ric s. tempo, articulation, an expression (for
.n-aple frbad o .0 ag. iii a:: pj.i r s .el.e.: :. .1, .r-.ir
20. writes notation for rhythmic patterns including quarter notes, quarter rests, half notes half rests, eighth notes.
whole notes, whole rests, dotted hailnotes, and dotted quarter notes that have been performed by someone else.
21- writes notation for melodic patterns presented aurally, using steps, repeated tones, and skips based on triads
using do, re, mi, fa, sol, Ia, tl, and dowithin the diatonic scale.

Creation and Cornmuninflon
22- improvises rhythmic and melode "answer phrases" in the same style as given "question phrases."
23 irrnpro 's6s i. rit.mc and mcl.d. ptferns arid cre-ates urgahrts on. rgmiinr meao .es
24 ea..ar,4e "snol s' .gs ,o :I ns'o :r pe rhnaiceir-i EarTpl caingrJgd /r rI.,:r ,l'lire arI-,' s'T ..inj
rhythm and melody).
25. composes vacal and instirmental music to express a poem, story, idea, or feeling using tradiional and
noriu Jrr::nai sjcur'a so-ir sm 1
2' ideptines m jascal characrertse:s t a eolecuT l ifor a.naplse avnara to umre tramp trnai eOnanrca rr,c.s an
camrminicate ideas, meanings, on emotro.


2" classes eleCeQ enem-la .o fio-i n aa, ouWK i, r stinJ l er, ds a, or. ultlureo bj guera et- e ar d .miposei.
'29 explirs" J'eois. .:l- T 'm r :a leale.'lcr ,ii-r c T.ple lhy un Trel,, T 1 I l-b .e Bpre'- dt .il:e
texture) is characteristic of music from various world cultures
29. describes the impact of regional traditions and historical events on generating various types of music.
30. identifies important composers, sncrigwriers and performers who generated or influenced various genres of
American music (for example. Bemstein, Sousa, llington, Presly).

Aestheic and Cnfical Anelois
31. Irslori loa ario rv a r .k9mpus,.I:n lo oder'iP rm'li ,dalJte Irnpl* o1 c;mp:und. II'flhmra dnudmklodc
EileTrr*, 1ur enam.-rllle c.,,ic,:p-pal,:f r. l ',.: co, ,L-r ,lban lo. -.ample -"13A 1ll-di 1-ar- e a.-d manaro ,
through-composed), and tonally (major or minor).
32. identiafies solo voices (for example, soprano, alto. tenr.r bess) and vocal ensembles (for example, choir. quartet),
33. identiaes and classifies electronic, orchestral, and wind instruments. their families, and ensembles (for example,
string quartet, jazz ensemble)
34. describes diverse styles of popular, folk, classical, and world music using appropriate vocabulary (for example,
vocal quality, ienstrumentatoni rhythmic and melodic patterns, form),
35. creates, applies and explains criteria for evaluating one's own and others' peramances and compositions
36. evaluates one's own and others' performances, describes what was successful and what should be changed,
and adjusts performance accordingly.

App"ftioins to Lle
37. compares and contrasts elements within and among dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts (for example.
movement, form, repetition, texture, contour).
38. compares and contrasts the subject matter of other disciplines with music (for example jazz, blues, and
connections to American history; acoustics in music and science).
39. analyzes multiple uses of music in the media (for example, film sces, instructional media).
40. describes characteristics that make music suitable for specific purposes.
41. demonstrates audience behavior appropriate to the context, setting, and style ofthe music performed (for
example, holding applause between movements of a major work, turning off watches and other electronic devices
for concerts .
42. explains how musical preferences rollect one's personal experiences.
43. identifites and respects differing values and tastes in music.
44. analyzes the roles and importance of musicians in various settings and cultures.















80




















Music Lesson Plan
Grade: K 12345 Quarter: 1234 Week: 123456789
Focus: Concept & SIs Emphasized Classroom 0 Stra tegirs:
o 1'jthni o V:'ojbulais o Kagan
o Melody o Singing o Group activity Ensemble
o Harmony o Movement a Hands on problem solving
o Tone Color o Ie1J inp o Learning Centers
o Form o Listening o ke,ilinng \\ rilir2ng te"
o Expressive Qualities o Instruments a Technology
0 ('Teailing TImpro.,'ingri

National Music Standards: Integration:
o The student sings, alone and with others, a varied repertoire o Language Arts Reading Components:
ofmusic. o Math a Fluency
o The student performs on instruments, alone and with others, o Science o Phonics
av FiCrd riCprlCFi'ur Crn riL o Social Studies o Vocabulary
o The student reads and notates music, o Art o Phonemic Awareness
o The student listens to, analyzes, and describes music, o PE. o Comprehension
o The student composes and arranges music within specific a Technology
guidelines. Materials/Equipment:
o The student improvises melodies, variations, and I
accompaniments.
o The student understands the relationship between music, the
other arts, and other disciplines outside the arts.
o The student improvises melodies, variations, and
accompaniments.
o The student evaluates music and music performance.

FSE/ESOTL Accommodations:
o Adult Tutoring o Thematic Unit o Patter Drill Practice
o Cooperative Learning o Word Banks/Wall o Preferential Seating
Techniques o Computer Learning Instruction o Semantic Webs/Mapping
o Directed Reading/Listening o Dialogues/Repetition/Memorization o Use Realiz
o Modeling o Group Proiects o Other
o Peer Tutoring
o Simplify Directions

Teaching Procedure:
1.

















Start date:


Objectives
The student will:







Process:
ft


Materials:


Evaluation:
I


Vocabulary:
Chant, create, echo, fast, high, listen, long, loud, low,
lullaby, march, match, metal, music, I alterr, piano, play,
scrapers, shakers, short, speak, skin, slow, soft, sol-mi,
speak, steady beat, triangle, woodblock, woods

MCAT Skills
Sin K- Demonstrates use of singing and speaking voice Sings and agnsm soar
Play K- Demonstrates steady beat based on a personal andfor group pulse.
Read & Notate K Responds to nontraditional symbols for long and short or high
and law sounds.
Experence- but no required io assess
Improvise and Compose K Improvises vocally using speakising and high/low.
Listen. Analyze & Evaluate K- Identifies specific music characteristics using
appropriate music vocabulary: hig I low.
Culture & History all grades K-5
Knows America, The Star Spangled Banner and other patriotic son gs and
understands their historical signiIcance through varied experiences. (singing,
playing. moving, listening etc.)
Knows about eomposera and their music through age-appropriate listening
use e"6ri,:e'F,:.' ii,_ r,; ". .epailo..e rr.a. ,:luira. t..,r '"a.m. c.a '- She



ESEBEfOLstrales: buddies, wait time, intonation, visuals, individual help
ReadfliCrednsh fluency, vocabulary, print orientation, comprehension,
expression
OhBwrcrediens math-pattems, social studies, science, movement/PE


Sunshine State Standards/ OCPS Benchmarks
Benchmarks K 2: SING
MU.A.1.1.1: The student sings songs within a five-to-seven note
range alone and maintains the tonal center.
MU.A.1.1.2: The student sings simple songs (e.g., folk, patriotic,
nursery rhymes, rounds, and singing games) with appropriate
tone. pitch, and rhythm. with and without accompaniment.
MU.A.1.1.3: The student sings a culturally diverse repertoire of
songs (some from memory) with appropriate expression,
dynamics, and phrasing.
Benchmarks K-2: PLAY
MU.A.2.1.1. The student performs independently simple patterns
and melodies on rhythmic and melodic classroom instruments
? g r-'r':usion irrumerts and barred instruments) and
rna,,,tlains a tlrJ/ ter'ipo
MU.A.2.1.2. The student performs expressively with appropriate
dynamics and tempos on classroom and ethnic instruments.
Benchmarks K 2: READ & NOTATE
MU.A.3.1.1. The student reads simple rhythmic and melodic
notation, using traditional and nontraditional symbols.
MU A 3.1 2. The student demonstrates pitch direction by using
visual representation(e.g., steps and line drawings).
MU.A.3.1.3 The student writes the notation for simple rhythmic
pattems that have been performed by someone else.
Benchmarks K 2: CREATE
MU.B,.11.1. The student improvises appropriate "musical answers"
(e.g., simple rhythmic variations) in the same style to given
rhythmic phrases.
MU B 1.1 2. The student improvises simple rhythmic and melodic
patterns and accompaniments.
MU.B.2.1.1 The student creates simple accompaniments with
classroom instruments
Benchmarks K 2: CULTURE & HISTORY
MU C.1. 1.1 The student knows music from several different
genres and cultures (e.g., vocal and instrumental, African and
Latin American).
MU C.1 1.2. The student understands how rhythm and tone color
are used in different types of music around the world.
MU.C.1.1.3 The student knows the general cultural and/or
historical settings of various types of music (e.g songs related to
American celebrations and daily life).
Benchmarks K 2: LISTEN /EVALUATE
MU D.11.1 The student knows how to respond to selected
characteristics of music (e g., the melodic phrase is the same or
different, the tempo is fast or slow, and the volume is loud or soft)
through appropriate movement.
MU D.I 1 2. The student identifies, upon hearing, familiar
instruments and voice types (e g., trumpet, piano, child, or adult)
MUD.1 1 3 The student uses a simple music vocabulary (e.g .
fast, slow, loud and soft) to describe what is heard in a variety of
musical styles.
MU.D.1.1 4 The student understands how music can
communicate ideas suggesting events, feelings, moods and
images.
MU D.2.1 1 The student identifies simple criteria for the evaluation
of performances and compositions
MU.D-2,1.2 The student knows how to offer simple, constructive
suggestions for the improvement of his or her own and others'
performances
Benchmarks K 2: APPLICATIONS TO LIFE
MU.E.1.1.1. The student understands how concepts within and
between art forms are related (e.g.. shape and line in music and
art; and sequence and meter in music, theatre, and dance).
MU.E.1.1.2. The student understands how music is related to
other subjects (e.g., how vibrations, which are studied in science.
produce musical sounds).
MU E.2.1.1 The student knows how music is used in daily life
(eg.. for entertainment or relaxation).
MU.E2,1.2 The student knows appropriate audience behavior in
a given music setting (e.g., religious service, symphony concert,
and folk or pop concert).
MU.E.2.1.3 The student understands that music performance
reflect one's own experiences.
MU.E.2.1.4 The student understands the role of musicians (e.g.,
song leader, conductor, composer, and performer) in various
music settings and/or cultures.
















Start date:

Objectives
The student will:






Process:





See next page...


Materials:


Evaluation:
_0J T observes S
.j T observes S
.0 T observes S
.t T observes S

Vocabulary:
Band, bow, choir, clarinet, composer, different, downward, drum,
fermata, flute, folk song, french horn, introduction, line note,
melody, phrase, pitch, repeat, rest, rhythm, same, shape, sol-la
mi, solo, song, space note, ta, ti-ti, trumpet, upward, violin, voice


MCAT Skills
Sin 1st Si ng so-mt-so-m melodic pattern, maintains tonal center in
personal range
Play 1st Plays rhythmic patterns using quarter notes and rests and paired eighth
notes. Plays upward and downward melodic patterns.
Read & Notate 1st Reads and notates rhythmic patterns using quarter note and
rests and paired eighth notes. Reads and nolates melodic patterns from a three-line
staff using solAm
Experenc bu not required to assess
Imorovse and Comnse. 1st Improvises a rhythmic phrase of four or more
beats using quarter and eighth notes and quarter rests Improvises a melodic phrase
of four or more beats using soF-mi.
Listen Analyze & Evaluate 1 st Identifies specific music characteristics using
appropriate music vocabulary: upward downward.
See Culture and History I Relate & Apply grades K 5
Culture & History all grades K-5
rnoorT 4merf-a i"n f ra '7egr Caeny arrerain aimrr parronec '.ngs and
uindo vsants it.e. nili. :al ia.r.T ; ar.:> it..f ajn ,ai'd e.pener:d e i.snging.
playing, moving, listening, etc.)
Knows. abovu composers nd lni.r mr.jiic c[rrough age afleronrie Isiening
.e-,.er,,:e'.F,. J-ies K epeito..e r.a ir,,:Juni .ai,'r ,aeam Ch.a,:s7aa-9 c
a, i.ars Tcr.a.s '.%k... ,,j(nC- e, SAr u -i? PF.ci& > PeIei No thie it ni

ESBESOLgsrdede buddies, wait time, intonation, visuals, individual help
RtoadingCoonnadIl fluency, vocabulary, print orientation, comprehension,
expression
Othrcunriectiis math-pattems, social studies, science. movement/PE


Sunshine State Standards/ OCPS Benchmarks
Benchmarks K 2: SING
MU.A.1.1.1: The student sings songs within a five-to-seven note
range alone and maintains the tonal center.
MU.A.1.1.2: The student sings simple songs (e.g., folk, patriotic,
nursery rhymes, rounds, and singing games) with appropriate
tone, pitch, and rhythm, with and without accompaniment.
MU,A,1.1,3: The student sings a culturally diverse repertoire of
songs (some from memory) with appropriate expression,
dynamics, and phrasing.
Benchmarks K 2: fLAY
MU.A.2.1.1. The student performs independently simple patterns
and melodies on rhythmic and melodic classroom instruments
(e.g., percussion instruments and barred instruments) and
maintains a steady tempo.
MU,A,2.1.2. The student performs expressively with appropriate
dynamics and tempos on classroom and ethnic instruments.
Benchmarks K 2: READ & NOTATE
MU A 3.1 1. The student reads simple rhythmic and melodic
notation, using traditional and nontraditional symbols.
MU A 3 1 2. The student demonstrates pitch direction by using
visual representation g., steps and line drawings).
MU.A.3.1.3 The student writes the notation for simple rhythmic
patterns that have been performed by someone else.
Benchmarks K -2: CREATE
MU.B..1.1 The student improvises appropriate 'musical answers"
(e.g., simple rhythmic variations) in the same style to given
rhythmic phrases,
MU.B.1. ,.2 The student improvises simple rhythmic and melodic
patterns and accompaniments.
MU.B.2.1.1 The student creates simple accompaniments with
classroom instruments.
Benchmarks K 2: CULTURE & HISTORY
MU.C-. 1.1. The student knows music from several different
genres and cultures (e.g., vocal and instrumental, African and
Latin American).
MU C.1. 12. The student understands how rhythm and tone color
are used in different types of music around the world
MU.C.1.1.3 The student knows the general cultural and/or
historical settings of various types of music (e.g songs related to
American celebrations and daily life).
Benchmarks K 2: LISTEN /EVALUATE
MU D-1 11 The student knows how to respond to selected
characteristics of music (e.g., the melodic phrase is the same or
different, the tempo is fast or slow, and the volume is loud or soft)
through appropriate movement.
MU D.1 1-2. The student identifies, upon hearing, familiar
instruments and voice types (e g., trumpet, piano, child, or adult)
MU D.1. 13 The student uses a simple music vocabulary (e g ,
fast, slow, loud and soft) to describe what is heard in a variety of
musical styles.
MU.D.1 14 The student understands how music can
communicate ideas suggesting events, feelings, moods and
images.
MU.D.2.1.1 The student identifies simple criteria for the evaluation
of performances and compositions
MU.D.2.1 2 The student knows how to offer simple, constructive
suggestions for the improvement of his or her own and others'
performances
Benchmarks K 2: APPLICATIONS TO LIFE
MU.E.1.1.1. The student understands how concepts within and
between art forms are related (e.g.. shape and line in music and
art; and sequence and meter in music, theatre, and dance).
MU.E.1.1.2. The student understands how music is related to
other subjects (e.g., how vibrations, which are studied in science.
produce musical sounds).
MU.E.2.1.1 The student knows how music is used in daily life
(e.g., for entertainment or relaxation)
MU.E.2.1.2 The student knows appropriate audience behavior in
a given music setting (e.g,. religious service, symphony concert,
and folk or pop concert).
MU.E.2.1.3 The student understands that music performance
reflect one's own experiences.
MU.E.2.1.4 The student understands the role of musicians (e.g.,
song leader, conductor, composer. and performer) in various
music settings and/or cultures.

















Start date:
Music Vocabulary:

Objectives
The student will:
.1


Process:


C"
C)


0D



^1

0M














a-
o)


Evaluation:
ft


Vocabulary:
Applause, audience, ballet, bravo, call and response, coda, cymbals,
double bar line. duet, eighth note, form, guitar, half note, harmony,
harp. keyboard, mallet, notate, pas de deux, patriotic song, percussion,
posture, quarter note, repeat sign, skip, solfege, sol-mi-do, staff, step,
tempo, tie, trombone, xylophone

MCAT Skills
SinM 2nd Sings triad outline (sof-mi-do) ascending and descending, sings mo-
re-do.
Play 2d Plays diLdminc patterns using quarter notes and rests, paired eighth
notes, half notes and rests. Plays short melodic patterns (eoe-,m-ia) and hasrmnic
patterns {octaves, simple borduns, one-chord songs),
Read & Notate 2nd Reads ad notates t mil patterns using quarter notes
and rests, paired eighth notes, half notes and rests. Reads and notates melodic
patterns from s thrae-hne staIf using sd-.nisa.
Experience but not required to assess
Imnroelse & Comnose 2nd- Improvises/Composesa oj ilbalh using
quarter and eighth notes, quarter rests and mlodically using so. fa-mi (Creating
rhythms and melodies as separate sifs.,)
Listen, Analyze, Evaluate 2nd- Identifies pattern, phrase, same and
different phrases, and contrasting tempo.
Culture & History all grades K-5
Knows America. The Star Spangled Banner and other patriotic songs and
understands their historical significance through varied experiences. (singing,
playing, moving, listening, etc.)
Knows about composers and their music through age-appropriate listening
experiences. For grades K-2, repertoire may include Saint-Saens' Camivalofthe
Animals, Tchaikovsky's NutcrackerSuie and Prokodv's Peter and the Wolf.

BSSBESLsrte9ales buddies, wait time, intonation, visuals, individual
help
ReadinCriecionsr fluency. vocabulary, print orientation.
comprehension, expression


Sunshine State Standards/ OCPS Benchmarks

Benchmarks K 2: SING
MU.A.1.1.1: The student sings songs within a five-to-seven note
range alone and maintains the tonal center.
MU.A.1.1.2: The student sings simple songs (e.g., folk, patriotic,
nursery rhymes, rounds, and singing games) with appropriate
tone, pitch, and rhythm, with and without accompaniment.
MU.A.1.1.3: The student sings a culturally diverse repertoire of
songs (some from memory) with appropriate expression,
dynamics, and phrasing.
Benchmarks K- 2: PLAY
MU.A,2.1,1. The student performs independently simple patterns
and melodies on rhythmic and melodic classroom instruments
(e g., percussion instruments and barred instruments) and
maintains a steady tempo,
MU A.2.1 2. The student performs expressively with appropriate
dynamics and tempos on classroom and ethnic instruments.
Benchmarks K 2: READ & NOTATE
MUA.3.1 1. The student reads simple rhythmic and melodic
notation, using traditional and nontraditional symbols.
MU.A.3.1.2. The student demonstrates pitch direction by using
visual representation(e g., steps and line drawings).
MU.A.3.1.3 The student writes the notation for simple rhythmic
patterns that have been performed by someone else.
Benchmarks K 2: CREATE
MU B 1.1 1. The student improvises appropriate "musical answers"
(e.g., simple rhythmic variations) in the same style to given
rhythmic phrases.
MU B.I.1.2. The student improvises simple rhythmic and melodic
patterns and accompaniments.
MU.B.2,1.1 The student creates simple accompaniments with
classroom instruments.
Benchmarks K 2: CULTURE & HISTORY
MU C.1 1.1. The student knows music from several different
genres and cultures (e.g., vocal and instrumental, African and
Latin American).
MU C.1 1.2. The student understands how rhythm and tone color
are used in different types of music around the world-
MU C.1 13 The student knows the general cultural and/or
historical settings of various types of music (e.g songs related to
American celebrations and daily life).
Benchmarks K 2; LISTEN /EVALUATE
MU.D.1.1.1 The student knows how to respond to selected
characteristics of music (e.g., the melodic phrase is the same or
different, the tempo is fast or slow. and the volume is loud or soft)
through appropriate movement.
MU D.1.1-2. The student identifies, upon hearing, familiar
instruments and voice types (e.g., trumpet, piano, child, or adult).
MU D. 1 1 3 The student uses a simple music vocabulary (e g ,
fast, slow, loud and soft) to describe what is heard in a variety of
musical styles.
MU D.1 1 4 The student understands how music can
communicate ideas suggesting events, feelings, moods and
images.
MU.D.2.1.1 The student identifies simple criteria for the evaluation
of performances and compositions.
MU.D.2,1.2 The student knows how to offer simple, constructive
suggestions for the improvement of his or her own and others'
performances.
Benchmarks K 2: APPLICATIONS TO LIFE
MU.E.1. 1. The student understands how concepts within and
between art forms are related (e.g.. shape and line in music and
art; and sequence and meter in music, theatre, and dance)
MU E 1.1 2. The student understands how music is related to
other subjects (e.g., how vibrations, which are studied in science.
produce musical sounds).
MU.E.2.1.1 The student knows how music is used in daily life
(e.g., for entertainment or relaxation).
MU.E.2.1.2 The student knows appropriate audience behavior in
a given music setting (e.g., religious service, symphony concert,
and folk or pop concert).
MU.E.2.1.3 The student understands that music performance
reflect one's own experiences.
MU.E,2.1.4 The student understands the role of musicians (e.g
song leader, conductor, composer, and performer) in various
music settings and/or cultures.


Materials:


















Start date:


Objectives
The student will:
p:


Process:
ft


Materials:


Evaluation:
jA


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a)












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Sunshine state osandaroas u cro encnmarks

Benchmarks 3 5: SING
MU.A.1.2.1: The student sings songs (e.g., descants, rounds, partner
songs tio- ara ciliee-partl ongs. maintan.rIr, oar. parn ana us.ng propel
.realtring recn.aues anrd a cliOS.lnghone arIl era 'nrirhuI
accompaniments.
MU.A.1.2.2: The student sings music (some from memory) representing
Srioui cirtures genres e g marcn work song, and lullaby), and styles
Sg aT ,s riusi cusiues ans ctomOscers.
MU.A.1.2.3: The student uses appropriate expressive and stylistic devices
(e.g., dynamics, tone quality, phrasing, articulation, interpretation).
MU,A,l ,2.4: The student blends vocal timbres, matches dynamic levels.
and responds to the cues of a conductor when singing as part of a group.
Benchmarks 3 5: PLAY
MU.A.2.2.1: The student independently performs melodies and patterns
with various rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic classroom instruments (e.g.,
recorders, keyboards, barred instruments, and autoharps) with appropriate
instrumental techniques
MU.A.2.2.2: The student performs a variety of music genres and styles
expressively on classroom and ethnic instruments (e g pop, folk,
Caribbean, Polynesian, and classical).
MU A 2 2.3: The student performs on classroom instruments
(independently and in groups) and responds to tempo, balance, and blend
cues of a conductor.
MUA,2,2A4: The student performs simple music phrases by ear.
Benchmarks 3 5: READ & NOTATE
MU.A.3.2.1; The student sight reads simple melodies from standard
notation on the treble cleft 214, 3/4, and 4/4 meters: and various miaor keys.
MU.A.3.2.2: The student accurately interprets music symbols and terms for
dynamics, tempos, articulation, and expression when performing,
MU.A.3.2.3 The student writes notation for simple melodic patterns Ihat
have been performed by someone else
Benchmarks 3 5: IMPROVISE/COMPOSE
MU.B.I.2,11: The student imprornses "musical answers" (e.g, rhythmic
variations and melodic embellishments) in the same style to given rhythmic
and melodic phrases.
MU B 1 2.2: The student improvises through singing and playing simple
rhythmic and meloiic ostinato (e .9, repetitbve short music patterns) and
variations on familiar melodies
MU B 2.2.1: The student knows how to compose short songs and
instrumental pieces within specified guidelines and with a variety of
traditional and nontraditional sound sources (e.g, voices, instruments, drum
machine, paper tearing. foot tapping, and finger snapping) to express an
idea or feeling
MU B 2 2.2: The student understands how composed music communicates
text, ideas, meanings, and emotion.
Benchmarks 3 5: CULTURE & HISTORY
MU.C-1 2 1 The student knows music and composers that represent
various historical periods and cultures (e.g., orchestral and band Baroque
and Handal, Villa- Lobos and mariachi .
MU C.1.22 The student descnbes how basic elements of music (e.g.,
rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, and dynamics) are used in different types of
music around the world.
MU C.1 2 3' The student understands the roles that regions, events, and
historical contexts have in generating various types of music (e g.,
Appalachian, zydeco, and salsa).
MU.C.1.2.4; The student knows representative composers and well-known
musicians (e.g., Sousa, Foster, Copland, and Louis Armstrong) who
in Ruenced various types of American music.
Benchmarks 3 5: LISTEN & EVALUATE
MUD.1 2.1. The student knows how to analye simple songs in regard to
rhythm, melodic movement, and basic forms (e.g.. ABA, verse, and refrain).
MU0.D.1.2.2 The student identifies instruments and their familiess (e.g,
violin as a string instrument, Mute as a woodwind) and performance groups
(e.g. band, chorus, or sing quartet).
MU.D.1.2.3: The student uses perceptual skills and appropriate terminology
to describe aural examples of diverse music.
MU.D.2.2.1. The student knows how to devise simple criteria to evaluate
performances and compositions.
MU.D.2.2.2: The student uses specific criteria to identify strengths and
weaknesses and to make suggestions for changes in his or her own and in
others' performances.
Benchmarks 3 5: APPLICATION TO LIFE
MU.E 1.2.1: The student knows similarities and differences in arlislic
vocabulary.
MU.E. 1.2.2: The student understands the relationship between music and
5lt. er ,iut.j %11 E: I Ti,a6 s ude.il Ir.-: r T. lplI ,, aie r.,jusi ... Ie r, e.a i2.a e ;
create a dramatic atmosphere or for advertising or entertainment).
MilI E Tiae raes &r, :h r rd aptel pp .o,-i.sale uder.:e be s. iu.
r. a.r:u r-ui:al s "i'.r r g frr.pnorn ;r)nie- ;h, l.;t-r.:e t and
parades).
MU E Trie udnl ulrl.Jerilr an hal rmui Fc reFetence irteci one
nr person 1 e.pa rces u sid lesc s d.ilpl.r, .i ai a iessad I le ..i r-,us ii
MU E : -i TiE sure.sn .i.der-lar i, i. .les of r.- .:.a.sii ..- ei
importance in various musical settings and cultures (e.g., a singing story
teller and a concertmaster).


Vocabulary;
Alto, ballad, bar line, bass, baton, brass, chord, conductor,
dotted half note, downbeat, dynamics, improvise, measure,
meter, mi-re-do, opera, orchestra, ostinato, pentatonic,
recorder, soprano, spiritual, strings, tenor, tone
color/timbre, treble, trio, verse and refrain, whole note

MCAT Skills
SIno 3rd- Si ngs m-r-do stepwise melodic pattam, sof-mido patterns.
Play 3rd Piat, imnIni patsrris'l usr.c uarto nuten andr ist n-ghrn noia. sail
notes and rests Ionot rior. s vrnd-.lrPJno ts ir rti- s l rI,*lFa .: ni-rr.* .nr o
note range and plays harmonic pattems (alternate borduns, one-chord songs).
Rhad & Notate 3rd Rnn. ',s rcirals 4t-.1 1nihenos p T i 'ir. s 2..cin-,
indiori e99r'in so i-, c.i\ ,. n.irpoi. In-t I c a`r0et und.jltrtt n riic -.:. '
Reads and notates melodic patterns from a five-line staef that move by step (m-re-
do) and skip (sof-mi-do).
Experience but not required to assess
Improvise & Compose 3rd Improvises/Composes a phrase combining quarter
and eighth notes and quarter rests with so-rmr-do. (Creating music that combines
rhythm and melody skills)
Listen. Analyze, Evaluate 3rd Identifies contracting sections of a song or
compostion us-.g approgreaie m,Js.c oacauiar.
Culture 8 Historn all grades K.-
Knows America, The Star Spangled Banner end other patriotic son gs and
understands their historical signifcance through varied experiences. (singing.
playing, moving, listening etc.)
K.so i ala.i .- r.. se a.sdlhe .-.si.Jrj oi..t sl e- ippir. p.iaielsie-sir.
' so-e. u.en Fugra"icei w. re sene ome1 rpi,,cde &a.cri auIe, Curualof the
Animals. Tchaikovsky's Ntrecker Sute and Prokiofev's Peter and the Wolf

SEB OLsI.drdws: buddies, wait time. intonation, visuals, individual help
Realingo0mi aionsc fluency, vocabulary, print orientation, comprehension,
expression
0heraaocdmebns math- patterns. social studies, science, movement




















Start date


Objectives
Tne sI.id rii will
-IT


Process:
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Materials:


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VocaDulary
Ad3'c 3IIir erc. r- 1' I hb-iccri rarncri e canr dc re n'r i ra
7%1 Pr'.Pnirtie tJar trTre ,lIrckcrnsr', l It-, trer Irrerli,,e parr
le int- ril?` Ji: <:itout 1)JerFLC 0i1 iC iPi 4il30.JU ^ fte
.harp IC ,.Cl sring tu-s tile "rn,.palorti ThiTrre luba
ur rii.. irctio .CI.j vhiole STrp

MCAT Skills
BLrM4h '.rr ore cn scc' .acolrru i'r'n.d.rg ,... dr':nid.ag
3411h PaIS U itnmc oflrr, u.rr gua rer rules undiiso esignti r.nes naill
rl es. a ra r hcle h ol e s T aIrte a igrrn Vores and TraoraT.on
In jrialI: p rlernr..r. a 1 5 noi r'n ..a cli -. t.iEn -l-ri: cjlneins :r: .ern

Read 6 Nalate 4th Featd and rorales inmrrc prTeinis us.r Quearlei nores and
ret iariin rnoes raiT sarer aer resrt whaie races dclrea ruirter r oes ra
syn, opal on F ad'. a.idr.:ralas ,:-re a ..-r m a e': a ;,:e.,Tii,-' ard '.: e.-l.d. g -r.
ine uienle a ar
E oar.enre ort rf reorea re arrasnr
improris & Comnoseth Iic.oseC esrrcor s e a. tiise ccrr.b.n ilr q, riner
e.gr. hliI irl d-iir l r.aii r.ilea i-1a JI.1 *e. set r. .4c. r- Listen. Analyze. Evaluate eh i eoufnts rwe nueales ar, o.r.,as.rng eierr,,r,
.t &ir fredoaI --iosM e- esM1eo1toseo reire'f. cirlbu eisaor 'u"n ama srnle
la serledia r np Culture and histo,-y R elaele & Apply grades M -
Culture 4, HIor all graces K
Krioas amem-,a r. isrt Spaigrea ar-,irsa .asr pair.oric s as ,ad
,lduu ,rar.ds It., .i r elo. :l .",,r., :at,:e I h. in ar ed e pa enerrc Ei i. g,
lapi-. rm ..n; Il'iEr.,.ng -1.:

ESSEE9L uacd. e cuadie r e.aurTrr.e lnrf!aToiCn indr.lunI neir.
RtadCleCQ n .nurs fluerC, ocarDuiary .:orr.iEner, .,on e.pr scr
Chigromakclr .s sc.ence ,,.emr nr


Sunshine State Standards/ OCPS Benchmarks

Benchmarks 3 5: SING
MuL l 1 2 1 i sr.udre.mr rr. .:.r.' .. ,a i de.,: ar. nia. s i: iar...
ri.y, rnrc- aJr. rnsc pan i;c r.qgi n riir,r[r.g cwr p in ra iro.ng proper
breathing techniques and a pleasing tone. with and without
accompaniments.
MU.A.1.2.2: The student sings music (some from memory) representing
various cultures, genres (e.g., march, work song, and lullaby), and styles
(e.g., ofvarious cultures and composers).
MUA,1,2 3: The student uses appropriate expressive and stylistic devices
(e.g., dynamics, tone quality, phrasing articuleaton, interpretation).
MU,A,1 2.4: The student blends vocal timbres, matches dynamic levels.
and responds to the cues of a conductor when singing as part of a group.
Benchmarks 3 5: PLAY
MUIl 1 T'. I n e nir inerrenri ri l cr llnnr. mn : ir, a c leir.,
.rn .in: r ii-' ,r nI .nTi: .T.el,:l ,. ar.] -rr.:r.,: lassi n:cm .r.*sr,.T.r.r rs eg
,e: o.d he rb :a,1. haired i.'.'tri.T.errs ar. 3 iJIlor. irpa's '..rr. ipp.op.iaie
instrumental techniques,
MU.A.2.2.2: The student performs a variety of music genres and styles
icicles it-r c'I a. cS r:oi' coand:1 shrii *nr.n runia, .l i Qg ;:rp riak
CallLuear P.l..e..ur. u-a ia.rul,
MU A 2 2 3: The student performs on classroom instruments
(independently and in groups) and responds to tempo, balance, and blend
cues of a conductor-
MU.A.22-4: The student performs simple music phrases by ear.
Benchmarks 3-5: READ & NOTATE
MU.A.3.2.1; The student sight reads simple melodies from standard
notation on the treble clef 24, 3/4, and 4/4 meters: and various major keys.
MU A 3 2.2: The student accurately interprets music symbols and terms For
dynamics, tempos, articulation, and expression when performing,
MU.A.3.2.3 The student writes notation for simple melodic patterns tat
have been performed by someone else.
Benchmarks 3 5: IMPROVISEFCOMPOSE
MU B 1 2.1: The student improvises "musical answers' (e g rhythmic
variations and melodic embellishments) in he same style to given rhythmic
and melodic phrases.
MU B 1 2.2: The student improvises through singing and playing simple
rhythmic and melodic osinalto (eg., repetitive short music patterns) and
variations on familiar melodies
MU.B.2.2.1; The student knows how to compose short songs and
instrumental pieces within specified guidelines and with a variety of
tradrbonal and nontraditional sound soumes (e.a-9, voices, instruments, drum
machine, paper tearing, foot tapping, and finger snapping) to express an
idea or feeling
MU B 2 2.2: The student understands how composed music communicates
text, ideas, meanings, and emotion
Benchmarks 3 5: CULTURE & HISTORY
MU C1 -2 1 The student knows music and composers that represent
various historical periods and cultures (e.g., orchestral and band, Baroque
and Handel, Villa-Lobos and mariachi)
MU C.1.2 2 The student descn bes how basic elements of music (e.g.
rhythm, meoody, timbre, texture, and dynamics) are used in different types of
music around the world
MJU C I Tire d'dEkr, iJr sle idiad ii ier. lr- o-. e,s r- ir
i-l1'.,rr. i a::n it.i r ir h, g ner, eng a:u rco. :: u1 n s. o** g
Appalechian, zydeca, and asala).
MUC.1.2 4: The student knows representative composers and well-known
musicians (e.g, Sousa, Foster, Copland, and Louis Armstrong) who
in luenced various types of Amen can music.
Benchmarks 3 5: LISTEN & EVALUATE
MU D.1.2 1 The student knows how to analyze simple songs in regard to
rhythm, melodic movement, and basic forms (e.g., ABA. verse, and refrain).
MU.D.1.2.2: The student idenbfies instruments and their familiess' (e.g.,
violin as a string instrument, lute as awoodwind) and performance groups
(e.g., band, chorus, or sting quartet).
MU.D.1.2.3: The student uses perceptual skills and appropriate terminology
to describe aural examples of diverse music.
MUD.2.2 1 The student knows how to devise simple critena to evaluate
performances and compositions.
MU.D 2 2.22: The student uses speelfic criteria to identify strengths and
weaknesses and to make suggestions for changes in his or her own and in
others' performances
Benchmarks 3 5: APPLICATION TO LIFE
MU.E.1.2.1: The student knows similarities and differences in artistic
vocabulary.
MU.E. .2.2: The student udersteands the relationship between music and
-It.p. -ubjeco ierg laew ar ,-1k 'gno .'N h., ...d :cl eie. r'.i
Mi I Tie ie deltr hr. :1 s. ,Tu ple ,e cr ja( ,-, lire r,,e.3a ie no
create a dramatic atmosphere or for advertising or anteartainmert).
MU.E.2.2.2: The student knows and applies appropriate audience behavior
in various musical settings (e.g., symphony concerts, school concerts, and
parades).
MU.E.2.2.3: The student understands that music preferences reflect one's

Mi an .e s inctings E du i carr. a
importance in various musical settings and cultures (e.g., a singing story
teller and a concertmaster).


Evaluation:
.J




















Start date:


Objectives
The iTiJdenil W.vill
J.


Process:
A


Materials:


Evaluation:
-d T listens
1 ~ T observes


4*

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W
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*i-


Sunshine State Standards/ OCPS Benchmarks

Beinchlinarks 3 5:51
"u.l f I ? 1 Tr.I srsie.ir urg.s s,.:,r,.. au dae.,: ar-. as r : rsr.ir.
dy rnc rr.c- J mara mc par ;ir.gqi r nrn ir,[r.i g cwr. p in r.o iJ,.ng propel
breathing techniques and a pleasing tone. with and without
accompaniments.
MU.A.1.2.2: The student sings music (some from memory) representing
various cultures, genres (e.g., march, work song, and lullaby), and styles
(e.g., ofvarious cultures and composers).
MU.A.1.2 3: The student uses appropriate expressive and stylistic devices
(e.g., dynamics, tone quality, phrasing articulation, interpretation).
MU,A,1,2.4: The student blends vocal timbres, matches dynamic levels.
and responds to the cues of a conductor when singing as part of a group.
Benchmarks3 5: PLAY
MU i 1 Tner -irjui infinerenier ll plierrn., r rti.i r, 1 ciisavirs.
e.rri rl:s' ,i IIIT.i: .T lE.E : .. ard air.:r,: ila si ;n1 .r. r,.T.r.rv s eg
: u.d : ho b-a,1' airedri.ce ti .T.ere arn 3 ii lotr. irpr s..ri ipp.op.1 i-r
instrumental techniques.
MU.A.2.2.2: The student performs a variety of music genres and styles
e-cle tsJ.Ir a s rp:'oaii ani d ihrilr .n5 rii i',,r i ia s g c:;p rhlk
Calllbear, Pl. j ,,ar. a-.a i.ai,, l,
MU A 2 2 3: The student performs on classroom instruments
(independently and in groups) and responds to tempo, balance, and blend
cues of a conductor.
MU.A.2.2-4: The student performs simple music phrases by earr
Renchmarks3 5: READ&NOTATE
MU.A.3.2.1; The student sight reads simple melodies from standard
notation on the treble clef 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meters: and various major keys.
MU A 3 2.2: The student accurately interprets music symbols and terms for
dynamics, tempos, articulation, and expression when performing.
MU.A.3.2.3 The student writes notation for simple melodic patterns that
have been performed by someone else.
Benclhmarks3 5: IMPROVISE/COMPOSE
MU B 1 2.1: The student improvises "musical answers"' (e g rhythmic
variations and melodic embellishments) in the same style to given rhythmic
and melodic phrases.
MU B 1 2.2: The student improvises through singing and playing simple
rhythmic and melodic ostnato (e.g., repetitive short music patterns) and
variations on familiar melodies
MU.B.2.2,1; The student knows how to compose short songs and
instrumental pieces within specified guidelines and with a variety of
traditional and nontraditional sound sources (e.g, voices, instruments, drum
machine, paper tearing, foot tapping, and finger snapping) to express an
idea or feeling
MU B 2 2.2: The student understands how composed music communicates
text, ideas, meanings, and emotion
Benchmarks3 5: CULTURE& HISTORY
MU C.1.2 1 The student knows music and composers that represent
various historical periods and cultures (e.g., orchestral and band, Baroque
and Handel, Villa-Lobs and mariachi)
MU C.1.2 2 The student descnbes how basic elements of music (e.g,
rhythm, melody, ,re, ture, and dynamics) are used in different types of
music around the world
MIJ C 1 3 Tire dtJkriirii sididle .i ft. r rio-. e er,'v, ird
ilir.. Ci ::nl i;..i 5a.. ir, :ji- ng 4>iI: it rice. ::1 nus o; .4 g
Appalachian, zydec, and sala).
MU.C.1i2 4: The student knows representative composers and well-known
musicians (e.g, Sousa, Foster, Copland, and Louis Armstrong) who
inlRuenced various types of American music.
Ienelmarks 3 5: IST EN & EVALLIATIE
MU D.1. 2 1 The student knows how to analyze simple songs in regard to
rhythm, melodic movement, and basic forms (e.g.. ABA, verse, and refrain).
MUD.12.2: The student idenbtfies instruments and their families" e.g.,
violin as a string instrument, lute as a woodwind) and performance groups
(e.g., band, chorus, or string quartet).
MU.D.1,2.3: The student uses perceptual skills and appropriate terminology
to describe aural examples of diverse music.
MU D22 1 The student knows how to devise simple criena to evaluate
performances and compositions.
MU. D2.2.2: The student uses specl fic criteria to identify strengths and
weaknesses and to make suggeshons for changes in his or her own and in
others' performances
Benchmarks3 5: APPLICATION TO LIFE
MU.E.f.2.1: The student knows similarities and differences in artistic
vocabulary.
MU.E.I .2.2: The student understands the relationship between music and
-itp. utbjecis ,ei betosar i,-lk sn,,s aiid i',i,:.., 11 eii e.,'t
MI r I T"e risa delr f tr, :es. .T.ultpie ,se tr.Tjas( ,-, i-,e re.3.a e .g ti
create a dramatic atmosphere or for advertising or enlertainment).
MU.E.2.2.2: The student knows and applies appropriate audience behavior
in various musical settings (e.g., symphony concerts, school concerts, and
parades).
MU.E.2.2.3: The student understands that music preferences reflect one's
M rE i o ,' ale e u np r ui r ie er elr r alus a ,- d laslus ru i.:
Mi.I E ": ine ;usrels ul-.ierilur, Trs ia ,,es .ci mr-u l i 'ia nr,
importance in various musical settings and cultures (e.g., a singing story
teller and a concertmaster)


Vocabulary:
Arpeggio, chord progression, conga, crescendo, decrescendo,
djembe, major scale, doumbek, fortissimo, grand staff, interval,
koto, leading tone, leger line, major scale, mezzo forte, mezzo
piano, musical theatre, octave, pianissimrr, piccolo, saxophone,
score, sitar, sixteenth note, slur, synthesizer, timpani,
transpose, world music

MCATSkills
Sing 5th- Sings doe-ri-fa-aol-t-tido'stapwioe, asceandngand descending,
and identifies major scale.
Pi a 5th- Plays rhythmic patterns using quarter nates and rests, eighth nates,
half notes and rests, whole notes, dotted notes, syncopation and sixteenth notes.
Plays melodic patterns in a 5-note range and plays harmonic pattams (layered
ostinati, I-V chord progression).
Read & Ntate 5th Reeds and notates rhitmi patterns using quarter notes
and rests, eighth notes, half notes and rests, whole notes, dotted notes,
t/r.:E.i[.r ari riieteemh notes k.u:;asa ri,,Fi'.rc ir-r tei- 'cc,
ia:s r, 3r ard se: ier 3r 4 i,, lI'e E Experience but not required to assess
Immroise & ComDeD St Improvisesl/Camposes a phrase combining so-fa-
nmi-re-do and high do using known rhythms.
Listen, Analyze, Evaluate 5th Identities how repeated and contrasting
elements contribute to the distinctive musical style of various world cultures and
historical periods.
Culture & Hlstorv al grades K-5
Knows America, The StaerSpangled Benner and other patriotic songs and
understands their historical significance through varied experiences. (singing,
playing, moving, isteng, Istn, tc.)
Ynr.s'.r, aoii ,:on .1: o-.., 1i iea f'o, mru.c r d,:iJgr. .i e-apii ,ti:r ilr I. ftrr.rq

provided to prepare students for the Orlando Philharmonic Young People's
Concert.

EESgE9I.Airdeces: buddies, wait time, intonation, individual help
RaadnCormrdbnsw fluency, vocabulary comprehension, expression
Oherarmacr-nidbns science















SONANDO
With
Monkey Monkey Moo

Teaching Steps:
1. Using Tubano and Hand Drums Explain Bass (B) and Tone (T) hand positions.

2. Demonstrate "A" to the students and then practice the rhythm together Several times.

3. Demonstrate "B" to the students and then practice together Several times.

4. Discover the pattern and perform! Use the CD accomp!
FORM
FORM 4 Making Music Grade 4
B-4 M-2 CD 1 Track 35

A-2 M4 2 SONANDO
B-4 2 with
A-2 M-4
B-2 4 Monkey Monkey Moo
A-4 4 arr. S. King
B-4 M-2
A-2 2
B-4 M-2
A-2
B-2
A-2 Tu.a, Bn I T

SB T B T B


Mon key maon key moo,
T T T T B Slap!
4


Shall we name a few?
T T T T B Slap!



Yel low mon keys, pur pie mon keys,
T T T T T T T T



Mon keys red and blue.
T T T T B Slap!










World Music Drumming Warm-Up Techniques Will Schmid


1. Teacher (T) asks 2-beat question
Student (S) answers with 2-beat response


2. T asks 2-beat question
S answers with 2-beat response
T repeats 2-beat question
Class echoes the 2-beat answer


Examples:






Extension:


What's Your Name?
What's Their Name?
What's For Dinner?
What's For Lunch?
What's For Snack?
What's For Breakfast?

T asks 2-beat question
S improvises own 2-beat response (not using specific syllables / words)


**Reading Connection: This activity is very effective for increasing syllable recognition














'Sursday (Beginning !andifeIsi
Nicole Blair Z"iakfya Taircloth Nathan Watson
rianna (Buri Scott wogue AMeha i4nstead
Hannah Caivweff 1Kcey Landers Gypsy Wnhft
Sta Coity gfdys Lima Caitlyn Wood
oodsCbeston BrSokF Smith


A.C. Jenkns
Tay/orLewis
Sydney Major
faige Martin
RacherMartin
9VcklfMDanie(

Chorus


ikfee Faris
(assufey faukoner
Tierra fleming
Jamie Thyd
E4jaih afford
Lmily GentiyV
Sarei gowd'i
Mi/ae"a greenhafgh
Madison HfalT
Tiffany Harvey
AngefHepSurn
Mia Irizarry
Emily Juarez
Bryant Justice
(Kara Kennedy
Tayfor Lewis
gfalys Lima
Sydney Major
Maria Marti


McQKnee Quinn
Kiatlyn lipse
Zhane Skanes
Samantha Vogt


Pagqe Martin
RaciedMartin
Deanna Matfey
Stephanie McCartney
Jacquefyn McCray
JficdlMcDaniet
Jeremy McNaughton
Orieana Morrison
Audrey Mosdefl
wisma Patef
Emify Patterson
opdi y /hifips
Jessica Powers
lkema sn/tz
Sarah Pinghiam
Car(Wqvera
Ktlynn Rose
Tanner Sazama
Zoe Scfmiid


-Tiffany Shactkfford
Zhane Skanes
Lauren Stolys
Cfryanne Stoneback
Katie Strickfland
Brandi Tayfor
Jameisha Taylor
BreAnna Thomas
gary Thomas
Joanna Thompson
Henry Tremain
Lesfie Vincent
Samantha Voyt
Nathan Watson
gypsy Wright


7pecif ZfTan4,
I woudftiie to thankthefoifowing people for hieping ma/y this concert
season special
OatkParkTeacher Volunteers- Mrs, gross, Mr. Juarez

*Parent Vofunteers-Ms. Burris, Ms. Combs, Ms. Faulconer, Ms. Floyd', Mrs. Hogue, Ms.
Marti, Mrs. Martin, Ms. Me-Danief Ms. McLea, Ms. Moaside Ms. Muffins, Ms. P&nvers,
Mrs. Quinn, Ms. Rsushi, Mss. hamas, s. 'Tomas, Vazquez, Ms. 'fison

70 '(oiunmteers-5Mrs. Stofes anditrs. lames


Oa c trfScnementay Ac icf









~aturinw
cc/
U'vu~fc cefartmnent 66 rentv




Yfofi(day- in ODur XJww





Z~ecin njw M~nc[Eeff~s


iceff/aires


a~ejining strings


fntenrmedate and6cfxfvancedtrtring's






triny 'Con sustant: iwnee Jiertran&a
o~ccompanzst: JaniefKJintsrortK
&nnctJaf cn lecfsn
Assistant ftrincjipa/ C'yntdia aom as
decembEn otc4 ac
a* toe:po.nt. andt7:oo.w in a


Sara Barnes
AbbiSurn
Emma Cafdweff
iatale Curtis
AngeWepburn
M9a Irizarry


cDaniefeAustin

Sara Barnes
Victoria Bernier
Arcofe 'Bair

7Kpthfn ,Brown
Absbiurris
Brianna Burt
Emma Cafiweff
Cheyenne Chase
gregoay Chicoine
Carolyn Ciurca
Tayjana Cobbs
*Tiffany (01oms
Natahe Curtis
Jefrev De,;
Brittany 'Enow
Zhalya TaircrotIh

















6:00 Concert
Monday Beginning Kandbetfs
french Cradle Song Frenchi FolkSo' ig Arr. 'I n ,A'Be ry
iBnng a Torch, Jeanette, Isabetfa French CarofArr. rThompson

'Thursday (Beginning Hfandbeffs
On Christmas 5igfit Air Christians Sing Engfi/i (aroArr. Thompson
'We three Kings John Hoptins, Jr. Atr. 'Wadrop

Chorus


Winter fantasy
In Our Town in (December
JiHotiay Lights


Jiffgaffina
Nancy Oliver
SaTy Albrecht Arr. Althouse


7:00 Concert
Beflaires


ProcessionalJubi/ee
Christmas lEaltation


Beginning Strings
Jreide/
Jingle Befs or GoodKing Wencestas


Anna Laura (Page
MichaeA (,Ars


Israeli FolkSong
Pierpont or Welsh Fol(Song


Advanced and Intermediate Strings
odest 'Ye Merreny Gentleman
SmallEnsem6be
Tihe Infant King
Advanced and Intermediate Strings
Up on the Yfousetop





9^^


English Carol

Polish Carol


Violin
Samantha Aflut
Austin Brantley
9Megan Berry
Cheyenne Chase
TyferCoy
MichaeflDecostanza
Spencer TFtcher
KristopherHelfdrethi


Violin
'Kathtyn Brown
Brianna Burt
pRonadfDavis
K(alee 'aris
sierra Tfeming
Migaefa Greenhaulgh
Gladys Lima
Shae Luna
TPaige Martin
Jacquelyn McCray
TredeiMumblow


Samantha Alvut
Brianna Diem
A 66i (Dohmfo
'Emily Juarez


Ember Kperner
Leanna Lowery
James Matthews
Meaglhan 9Mufins
'' tihaznw(fRRdngue:z
Daflas Thomas

Viola
9icore Stair
(Brian (Bass
Advanced Strings
Ctayton Ofson
Morgan (Padrick
XKaitynn Rose
Afeta Ut1instead
Caittyn Wood

Viola
Mtia Irizarry
Zfhane Sanes
BreAnna Thiomas


Leanna Lowery
Wariah Marti
(Kassaudra Martin
Ryeleigh Nit


Oaniefe Marino
Manafi Scireiber
Luna Vazquez
Cello
gregory Chicione
Carolyn Ciurca
Nathan Watson

Bass



Cello
Sara Barnes
'Elijah afford
sochet(Martin
Kpt ieStrick(and
Nathtan Watson

Bass
Nataie Curtis


Mariah Schrei6er
5Morgan (Padric(
Josie Waldron


SMonday Beginning Hfandbels











Riverview Elementary Presents:


A Spring Concert

Thursday, April 23rd, 2009, 12:55 PM and 6:00PM
Tuesday, April 28th, 2009, 8:55 AM


Miss Kimberly McNees, Music Teacher
Mrs. Marcey Sperr, String Consultant
Mrs. Vicki Sacco, Principal
Mrs. Vicky Cross, Assistant Principal
Funwa Alaphia
A Folk Song from West Africa, English Words by Donald Sacfuri Chorus and Strings
featuring Orff and Drums


Bohemian Folk Song
A round by Gerald E. Anderson and Robert S. Frost
Lift Every Voice And Sing
by James Weldon/J. Rosamond Johnson arr. Paul Jennings


Strings

Chorus


Strings

Chorus
Featuring Dancers and Soloists


Two Terrific Tunes
Traditional songs arr. Albert Stoutamire and Kenneth Henderson
When We Give, We Receive
By Teresa Jennings
Mountain William
By Albert Stoutamire and Kenneth Henderson
An Old Irish Blessing
By Teresa Jennings Chorus


Featuring Sign

T


Language and String Soloists

01 4


U U


of Ode to Joy
By Ludwig van Beethoven
SWe Share The Rainbow
By Teresa Jennings


Strings

Chorus

Strings JU

and Strings













Ghorus
Alexis Bailey
Jasmine Bailey
Anisha Bing
Dominique Chambliss
Azeda Dark
Treasure Dix
Austin Farrell
Monica Fisher
Raymond Gray
Teressa Henderson
Jasmine Hernandez
Ilana Jackson
Jessica James
Kiara Kitchen
Gwendolyn Lacey
Takiyah Lewis
Jose Lopez
Doli Modha
Dakota Parker
Sierra Thomas
Jennalee Toney
Madison Yates


Strings

Dinah Ansell
Chris Asbury
Kayla Asbury
Dominique Chambliss
Tiana Croker
Andia Dark
Clancy Ellis
Terry Ellis
Vincent Genova
Folade Hart
Jasmine Hernandez
Jamar Hillery
liana Jackson
Jordan MacDonald
Cassidy Michonski
Deandre Mitchell
Jonathan Moore
Skyler Ozuna
Dakota Parker
Jordan Robinson
Gabryel Wheeler


gThe Spring Concert
Meets the following Sunshine State Standards:
MU.A.1.2- Student sings, alone and with others a varied repertoire of music.
MU.A.2.2-Student performs on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire
of music.
MU.C.1.2- Student understands music in relation to culture and history.
MU.D.2.2-Student evaluates music and music performance.
MU.E.1.2- Student understands the relationship between music, other arts & disciplines outside the arts.
MU.E.2.2- Student understands the relationship between music & the world beyond the school setting.

Special Thanks to...
Riverview Administration, Mrs. Terry Stefanovic, Front Office Staff, Custodial Staff, Fourth
Grade Teachers, Fifth Grade Teachers, Sixth Grade Teachers, Mrs. Ellis, Mr. Eric Jarvis, Mrs.
Tammy Michonski, Mr. and Mrs. Black and
IBM- for donating $1000.00 to purchase new instruments!

Tune into Brighthouse digital cable channel 198 on Tuesdag. April 28th at 5 PM to
see our performance at the school board meeting or online at
www.brevardschools.org I


II












jq.

T t Apollo Elementary School Music Department, Directed by Mrs. Sheila King
presents

SING, STRING, & SWING!

Florida Music Demonstration School
Dr. Pamella R. O'Kell, Principal Lorna Kesner, Assistant Principal
April 27, 2009 7:00 P.M. and April 28, 2009 9:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M. __

Entrance Royal Rondo -arr. King
5th Grade Chorus The Not-So-Boring Minuet -Wolfe ,
Beginning Strings March Andantino Suzuki
Can-Can -Offenbach
6th Grade Recorders Island in the Sun -Belafonte/arr. King
Friends Forever -arr. King
Intermediate Strings Celtic Dance -Williams
In the Hall of the Mountain King -Grieg
Good News Blues -Strommen
I Got Rhythml -arr. Story
5th Grade Chorus Cooking Lightl -arr. King
Dona Nobis Pacem for My America -arr. King
LEAN ON ME!I



40.fCVUy Of Lnewa's
















Beainnina Strinas


Jacob Butler
Kyla Dannels
Victoria Eastberg
Kylie Faulkner
Brandon Hayner


Ryan Duffey
Jared McCain
Sean Lee
David Miller


Dylan Bollinger
Jacob Butler
Rabecca Connors
Crystal Courtney
Kyla Dannels
Kalil Diaz
Victoria Eastberg
Kylie Faulkner
Logan Folger
Leah Hamilton
Brandon Hayner
Madison Hooper
Zachary Kenalou


Aracely Abreu
Danielle Baker
Dylan Beitel
Robyn Boyd
Nathan Hulse
Stephen Budesheim
Karlos Diaz
Michael Greenwell
Chase Hoffman
Elizabeth Hooper
Rashad Jefferson
Ryan King
Sean Lee
Maya Mastrolanni
David Miller
Latarius Daughtry


Kenion Brown
Steven Heinbockel
Jacob Hudgins
Jordan Hughtey
Kyle Lawson


Cheyenne Harper
Kaley Stevenson
Logan Gourd
Chase Hoffman


Monica Woernley
Dominique Wolfrey
Logan Burnett
Jessica Collins
Alisha Ewing
Brandi Fayson
Libby Grimard
Heather Gumieny
Aaron Malsam
Daniel Bolinger
Alexus Brewer
Kenlon Brown
Ethan Davis


Logan Powell
Dakota Reaves
Jonathan Robinson
Kaley Stevenson
Noah Stoeckel
Aaron Reed
Shawn Bates
Quentin Bessent
Kristyn Coleman
Jamie Comeaux
Taylor Force
Logan Gourd
Nicholas Guarino
Dalton Hitchcock
Ameriah Hunley
Katie Rodriguez


Jeremiah Seale
Jessica Collins
Allen Anjal
Sarah Carlson
Mercedes Daughtry


Shreya Raman
Rachel VanSlyke
Rosie Wagner
Jasmine Dollard
Hannah Johns


Intermediate Strings
Robyn Boyd Dakota Reaves
Latarius Daughtry Noah Stoeckel
Kristyn Coleman China Nunley
Laura Knott Jonathan Robinson

Fifth Grade Chorus


Jordan Leighton
Caleb Moreland
Devin Vessenmeyer
Jeremiah Seale
Chloe Berry
Dillon Carter
Nicholas Conboy
Maegan Didden
Kazari Dixon
Jasmine Dollard
Jenny Jarrell
Hannah Jones


Travis Stevenson
Micah Stoeckel
Christian Tyree
Allen Anjal
Savanna Campbell
Sarah Carlson
Garrett Csonka
Mercedes Daughtry
Morgen Derby
Jordan Hughley
Brian Gladwish
Ulysses Harris


Sixth Grade Recorders


David Lubas
Jared McCain
Jason Norris
China Nunley
Emily Pesante
Kennedy Rankin
Kyle Stanga
Austin Turner
Elizabeth Watkins
Zachary Wilson
Sean Zeitlin
Tabitha Demar
Nicholas Freire
Anika Glick
Nicholas Herron
Daniel Rowe


Kurt Koenig
Angel Lewis
Asad Mirza
Todd Plourde
Marisa Pouponneau
Nykholas Quinones
Walker Roberts
Paul Solomon
Christopher Taylor
Susanna Turner
Abby Wells
Tramane Williams
Evan Williamson
Kayla Zimpleman
Tyler Zimmerman


Nathan Roop
Micah Stoeckel
Brandon Thomton
Christian Tyree
Nicholas Conboy


Nicholas Guarino
Logan Powell
Zak Wilson
Justice Dollard


Alexis Roberts
Ambrosia Smith
Evan Tatro
Rachel VanSlyke
Rosie Wagner
Hans Nielsen
Preet Patel
Bryan Ralph
McKenze Shaw
Leah Shamey
Kendall Steiger
Anna Voll



Justice Dollard
Summer Duchesneau
Ryan Duffey
Ciera Geyer
Garnet Gladwish
Hailee Haller
Cheyenne Harper
James Hassell
Robynn Ingram
Kara Leidner
Jacob McMullen
Diamond Mitchell
Rahi Patel
Justin Piclor
Miranda Rink


Monica Woernley
Caleb Moreland
Morgen Derby
Neil Patel



Madison Jones
Tyler Perez
Asad Mirza
Susanna Turner


Lynn Miller
Kevin Simonsen
Hannah Elder
Zachary Holcomb
Deni Primmer
Nathan Roop
Nil Patel
Shreya Raman
Ashley Watson
Shelby Winters
Bryce Mauzy
Steven Maffe



Jullesa Negron
Lance O'Sullivan
Jessica Osborne
Tyler Perez
Rebekah Kohon
Dallas Krinop
Michaela Lee
Starr Lewis
Kristie Hill
Madison Jones
Laura Knott
Adrianna Blais
Brett Adkins
Jamisyn Ball
Tommy Cobb




Full Text

PAGE 1

A HANDBOOK FOR BEGINNING ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS By KIMBERLY McNEES SUPERVISORY COMMITEE CHARLES HOFFER, CHAIR PAUL RICHARDS, MEMBER A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010

PAGE 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS Purpose of Handbook......................................................................................................................1 Methodology of Information Collection.........................................................................................2 Chapter 1Finding a Job.................................................................................................................4 Prepare a Portfolio......................................................................................................................5 Interview.....................................................................................................................................7 Inventory...................................................................................................................................11 Set up........................................................................................................................................11 Bulletin Board Ideas.................................................................................................................12 Pictures of Classrooms Set Up and Bulletin Board Ideas.........................................................13 Chapter 3The First Days of School............................................................................................17 Rules and Procedures................................................................................................................17 Classroom Management............................................................................................................17 Ways to Use Class Time...........................................................................................................18 Lesson Ideas..............................................................................................................................19 Cultivate Relationships (with Teachers, Staff, Parents, and Students).....................................20 Scheduling.................................................................................................................................21 Recruitment for Special Ensembles..........................................................................................21 To do List..................................................................................................................................21 Chapter 4Lesson Planning..........................................................................................................22 Lesson Plan Templates.............................................................................................................23 Lesson Plan Ideas......................................................................................................................23 Reflect.......................................................................................................................................25 Education Acronyms.................................................................................................................25

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Chapter 5Professional Development..........................................................................................27 Join Organizations....................................................................................................................27 Find a Mentor............................................................................................................................27 Orff Schulwerk..........................................................................................................................28 Koldaly......................................................................................................................................29 World Music Drumming...........................................................................................................31 Dalcroze....................................................................................................................................31 Books/Resources.......................................................................................................................34 Record Professional Development............................................................................................34 Keep Records for Portfolio.......................................................................................................35 Chapter 6Performances...............................................................................................................36 Concert Programs......................................................................................................................36 Logistics....................................................................................................................................36 Concert Etiquette......................................................................................................................37 Fundraising Ideals.....................................................................................................................37 Biographical Sketch......................................................................................................................39 Appendix A...................................................................................................................................41 Appendix B...................................................................................................................................90

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Purpose of Handbook Teacher preparation courses cannot fully prepare students for what teaching in the field requires. These courses educate future teachers about education philosophies, techniques, and musical knowledge. The refinement of ones teaching skill requires a great deal of time and practice. When entering into the professional world, the prospective teacher must rely on their formal training, have confidence, and work with conviction. This handbook is intended to bridge the gap between the college and the elementary classrooms by guiding new music educator through several stages, from finding their first job to succeeding in the first few years of practice. The information in this handbook is a compilation of insights from the author, veteran music teachers, and new music teachers (those with less than five years teaching experience). The content of this handbook represents information and insights that the author and other teachers wish they had when they started teaching. Many of the ideas presented are interrelated. (For example, classroom setup and classroom management.) The approach offered in this handbook is not the only way to do things; it simply presents information that is often not readily available to new educators. There is a saying in the teaching profession, [b]eg, borrow, and steal! The author hopes that the reader will take what is useful and leave the rest; not all of it will be helpful to everyone.

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Methodology of Information Collection The information in this handbook is a collection of ideas from the authors personal teaching experience as well as the result of interviews of other Florida music teachers, e-mails, and other interactions with several contributors. There are many references to Florida standards and resources, these are not the only resources they are just ones that the author and the contributors use. The contributors to the handbook include the following: o Dr. Artie Almeida is the music teacher at Bear Lake Elementary School in Apopka, FL. Mrs. Almeida has been the Florida Music Educator of the Year as well as the Seminole County Teacher of the Year and Teacher of the Year at the school level six times. In addition, Mrs. Almeida teaches early childhood music classes at the University of Central Florida and Seminole Community College. o Laurie Foote is the music teacher at Quest Elementary in Viera, FL. Mrs. Foote is a National Board Certified Teacher in addition to have completing Orff Levels one and two training. Quest Elementary is a Florida Music Demonstration School. o Charles Harris is the music teacher at Coquina Elementary in Titusville, FL. Mr. Harris has taught elementary music for the last four years and was chosen as Coquinas teacher of the year for the 2009-2010 school year. o Mary Jackson is the music teacher at Oak Park Elementary in Titusville, FL. Mrs. Jackson has been teaching music for eight years. Oak Park Elementary is a Florida Music Demonstration School. o Sheila King is the music teacher at Apollo Elementary in Titusville, FL. Mrs. King has been teaching music for over forty years and has been the Apollo teacher of the year for the 2003-2004 school year, the Brevard County Teacher of the Year as well as the 2005

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FMEA Florida Music Teacher of the Year. Apollo Elementary is a Florida Music Demonstration School. In addition, Mrs. King is the President Elect of FMEA. o Elizabeth Whitney is the music teacher at Ralph Williams Elementary in Rockledge, FL. She is in her first year teaching and is a recent graduate of the University of Central Florida. o Lisa Weikel is the music teacher at Mims Elementary in Mims, FL. Ms. Weikel has been teaching for fifteen years and is a National Board Certified Teacher.

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C C h h a a p p t t e e r r 1 1 F F i i n n d d i i n n g g a a J J o o b b The first hurdle encountered, post-graduation is finding a job. It is the responsibility of a recent graduate to be vigilant in networking with other music teachers and getting to know music supervisors. Music jobs are often few and far between because there are only a limited number of positions at elementary schools, which generally employ only one music teacher. Look for jo b openings on: District websites; The Florida Music Educators Association (FMEA) website (http://www.flmusiced.org/). Florida Department of Education teacher recruitment website (http://www.teachinflorida.com/). When the applicant finds a position that they are interested in, preparing and sending resumes to schools as well as district music supervisors (if the county has them) is the first step. Resumes should be one page, clear, concise, and should be accompanied by a cover letter. Materials should be carefully checked for grammar and spelling errors. It is recommended to have others (like family, friends and mentors) review materials before they are sent out. The amount of influence that music supervisors have over hiring and recruitment varies from county to county. Some principals will not hire a music teacher without a previous interview with the music supervisor, whereas other principals prefer to make their own decisions. If possible, it is suggested to contact teachers and administrators you know, in those counties, to see if there is a proper protocol for submitting an application. When looking for a job, the applicant might consider whether they would like to live in that area and would be happy there. The following questions are helpful to consider: 1. Will you be able to adjust to the location? For example, if you enjoy spending time at the beach and the school is landlocked, the adjustment may be difficult.

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2. Do you know anyone in the area you are looking into? Being an elementary music teacher can be very lonely because there is generally only one per school. Having friends or family near by can be helpful during the transition from college life to the career world. 3. Can you find a place to live that you can comfortably live in? 4. If you cannot afford to live close by, how long would a commute be? Remember when looking for places to live keep in mind the fact that teachers salaries do not qualify for low-income housing. Also think about any student loan debt that you might have incurred during your schooling. If student loan debt is an issue, contacting lenders can provide information about monthly payments and loan consolidation. Recognizance can be helpful; some applicants investigate the schools before applying or interviewing. The Website greatschools.org is an excellent resource for finding information on schools, as is the schools own website. Important questions to ask include: 1. Could you see yourself working with that particular faculty? 2. What is the schools motto and educational philosophy? 3. Is the schools philosophy and vibe inline with your views? Scouting out a school is not only helpful for the process of deciding to apply, but also in preparing for an interview. Most principals are more interested in candidates if they know they have done research and taken time to learn about their school. If one interviews for several schools, a cheat sheet with information about a school (that can be reviewed before going into an interview) can be helpful. Feel free to use the cover pages and resumes at the end of this chapter as examples. Prepare a Portfolio After you send out cover letters and resumes, hopefully you will receive calls from those schools to set up an interview; the next step is to create a portfolio. A portfolio displays items that demonstrate that you are a viable candidate for the job. The following is an example of what could be included in a portfolio and how it could be organized: 1. Personal information

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a. Biography b. Resume c. Educational Philosophy 2. Professional Development a. Goals and Accomplishments b. In-service Records c. Other certificates ex. Orff certification d. Teaching Certificate if you have a copy 3. Evaluations and Letters of Recommendation a. Internship evaluations from professors b. Internship evaluations from cooperating teacher(s) c. Letters of recommendation from previous employers d. Letters of recommendation from an advisor 4. Artifacts a. Sample Lesson Plans b. Photos of Lessons c. Videos of teaching d. Sample units and student work e. Photos of performances f. Anything else you feel fits well that you would like to include Many people have a single copy of their portfolio that they bring to all of their interviews. If you are doing a lot of interviews, this might be the way to go. However, it is the opinion of the author and other veteran music teachers that a portfolio should be duplicated and presented to each school if possible. Principals are short on time and dont want to spend time flipping through a book when they could be getting to know a candidate. A portfolio can be constructed in a variety of ways, from folders to professional bindings. An easy way to assemble one is to get a three ring binder and use page protectors to put the pages in; this creates a very polished and streamlined look. If you get the three-ring binder in some sort of a color other than white or black, it will stand out more in an office and they will be more likely to pick it up and look through it. Otherwise it could get lost in a jumble of papers that can accumulate during the hiring process.

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I I n n t t e e r r v v i i e e w w Interviewing can be an intimidating time. However, if you prepare as much as you can, it can be a pleasure. After researching the school and creating your portfolio, it is advised that your review commonly asked questions during an interview. The following is a list of some commonly asked questions or discussion topics: o Tell me about yourself. o Tell me what you know about this school. o Tell me about any issues youve had with your previous boss. o Tell me about your classroom management. o Why are you looking? o What motivates you to do a good job? o Where else have you applied? o Whats your biggest weakness? o Whats your biggest strength? o Has anything every irritated you about the people you work with? o Would you like to be liked or feared? o Why should I hire you? o What questions would you like to ask me? Thinking through a question carefully before answering is important. Try to avoid using fillers like hmm or umm. Formulate your answer and then begin. An answer should be logical, clear, and address the question that was asked. For example, the first question could be Tell me about yourself. It is sometimes used as an icebreaker, to calm the interviewee and give the interviewer a sense of your personality. The appropriate answer is one that is given honestly and truthfully, (giving too much personal information is inadvisable). A good answer can include items such as your level of education, GPA, professional affiliations, hobbies, and an explanation of why you want to teach. Appropriate hobbies include sports, working out, reading, crafting, art, photography, computers, etc. It is also important to remember that you do not know much about the person interviewing you, so avoid any talk of political affiliations, religion, or

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controversial topics if possible. Try to be as politically correct as possible. Remember that some questions are more important than others and some are traps. One of the more important questions asked by principals is about classroom management philosophy. Successful answers to the question include: I plan so many activities that students do not have time to misbehave; or, I have clearly stated rules and procedures and consistently hold students accountable for their actions. The questions that can be traps if not approached carefully include those about your weaknesses, issues with previous supervisors, and issues with co-workers. Do not fall into the trap of talking negatively about previous supervisors or coworkers. Try to avoid discussing specifics about problems you may have had. Turn the questions around and refocus them back on how you work for students and help your colleagues. Prepare a list of questions to ask the principal. Some examples of questions that could be asked are: o What are the performing ensembles? o What are the concert expectations? o Are there grade level performances? o What is the current rehearsal schedule for the ensembles? o Are activity teachers allowed to give input into the activity schedule? o If hired, may I come in early to start setting up things? o Is there a school-wide behavior plan in place? o Are there traditions (started by previous music teachers) that they would like continued? o Is there a budget in place to purchase new equipment, music, and pay for repairs? o May I see the music room? After preparing a list of question, holding practice interviews with family, friends, and trusted mentors can be helpful. Carefully consider any suggestions that they may have for you. If all of your planned questions have been addressed, ask for additional details regarding those topics. It is important to ask questions during the interview so as to appear engaged, inquisitive, and intelligent. You demeanor should communicate that you are the best person for the job, but guard against appearing conceited or self-absorbed.

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Chapter 2The ClassroomInventory One of the first tasks is to assess what the classroom contains. This is a very important step because you cant plan lessons without understanding what equipment you have available. Make note of what and how many instruments there are. If there are not class sets, its important to anticipate having to explain the procedure for sharing equipment. It is also important to evaluate the number of textbooks you have, not only for inventory purposes, but also to plan for in-class use. A simple way to keep track of ones inventory is to make an excel spreadsheet. It does not have to be fancy or complicated. Just a simple list of what there is, the number of them, and where they are located is sufficient. This is especially helpful with supplemental materials, such as methods books and storybooks. From time to time, classroom teachers may ask to borrow things from the music room, and the spreadsheet is a great place to record who borrowed what item and when. During the end-of-the-year inventory, items belonging to the teacher must be clearly labeled as such and items belonging to the school should be labeled with the school name. The idea is to clearly distinguish school property from materials purchased by the educator. Orff workshops teachers are frequently asked to bring a few instruments to share and the best way to make sure they are returned is to have them clearly labeled. Set up It is important to spend time designing a layout for your classroom. Educations must consider: How do you want to lay out the classroom? Where will the Orff instruments, nonpitched percussion, drums, textbooks, your desk and computer, and so on, be placed? It can be helpful for the students and teacher alike to label where the instruments will be stored. Will the students sit on the floor, risers, or in chairs? Figures 1-1 through 1-9 at the end of this chapter

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include photos from several different music rooms. There is no right or wrong way to set up a classroom. Feel free to experiment and if something doesnt work, then change it. Will there be a dedicated space for movement? If not, how will students move the chairs or instruments to allow space for movement? Be prepared to explain in detail what the expectations are and practice the correct behaviors. Bulletin Board Ideas Bulletin boards are a great way to decorate a classroom and they are also a great way to convey information. The more visually appealing they are, the more effective they are. These boards can assist in making the classroom personalized and can help the teacher express who they are. Its important for a change to occur in the room, so the students realize that there is a new teacher and new expectations. Decorating the classroom can also help create a positive classroom environment. A helpful hint for bulletin boards is to use fabric fo r the background instead of the large rolls of paper. Paper can rip and crinkle, and the color will fade over time. When putting up the fabric it is helpful to staple it on in opposing corners and to stretch the fabric over the board being careful to smooth out any wrinkles. Educators can either use purchased borders or ribbon; they will give the bulletin board a focused look. Purchasing decorations for the classroom can be rather expensive. Instead of purchasing premade posters, an educator can save money and get a similar effect using paper and markers. It can be time consuming, but cost effective. Examples of classroom bulletin board can be seen in Figures 1-1 through figure 1-10. This website also has many great bulletin board ideas for music teachers: (http://www.musicbulletinboards.net/

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Pictures of Classrooms Set Up and Bulletin Board Ideas Figure 1-2,

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Figure 1-3, Figure 1-4,

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Figure 1-5, Figure 1-6,

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Figure 1-8, Figure 1-9,

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C C h h a a p p t t e e r r 3 3 T T h h e e F F i i r r s s t t D D a a y y s s o o f f S S c c h h o o o o l l R R u u l l e e s s a a n n d d P P r r o o c c e e d d u u r r e e s s It is important to have clear rules and procedures for students to follow on the first day of school. Rules should be simple to understand and clearly stated. It is advisable to have fewer than five rules. It is also good to state them in a positive manner. For example, instead of writing Do not call out, state the rule as Please raise your hand to speak. When in doubt, put yourself in the shoes of one of your students and ask, Will they understand? After deciding on the rules, post them prominently in the classroom. The same criteria should be used for procedures. The following are the rules I use in my classroom: 1. Respect yourself. 2. Respect others. 3. Respect the property of all. It is important that the students understand what the word respect means. If the rules above are used, an explanation of the teachers definition of respect should be provided. Try not to assume anything, because students come to school with different backgrounds and knowledge. It is also very important to have set in place, before the first day, to have set in place what the procedures will be for using the restroom as well as going to the clinic. Check with other teachers to see if there are school-wide procedures that you will be expected to follow. Classroom Management The best defense is a good offense. Greet students at the door and explain your expectations of them. Idle time is one of the leading causes of misbehavior. It is advisable to have a plan or back-up activities, so there are no blocks of time for students to become disruptive. Learning students names as quickly as possible is helpful. This is helpful just in teaching and being able to call on students but also when dealing with behavior. Students are

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generally more receptive to following directions and listening if the teachers know their names. A seating chart can be used if it is difficult to learn student names. Elementary students are wonderful at mimicking the behaviors and attitudes of their teachers. If their teacher loves music and smiles, the students are more prone to do so as well. The teacher is responsible for everything that happens in their classroom. If a student talks back, it is because the teacher has left space for the student to do so. Be careful not to get into power struggles with students, they never end well. When students act up, its not always about you. Perhaps they had a disagreement with another teacher or student that is causing their mood or behavior. Aim to discipline the behavior not the student. In other words, when reprimanding a student, tell them that talking out, or whatever the undesirable behavior is, is not appropriate, rather than saying Johnny is being bad. Be consistent in the application of the rules and the consequences for breaking them. Pointing out positive behaviors in specific students that should be emulated can be helpful. For example, I love how Suzie is sitting criss-cross apple sauce on the rug ready to sing. Pick a way to refocus the class if they become unfocused. Some examples include: give me five, clapping patterns, flick the lights, and use a bell. Behavior is tied to classroom set up; try not to turn your back, and have the classroom ready to go with books and materials that will be used. Ways to Use Class Time Teachers interviewed for this document found it helpful to have a framework for class time set up. It gives structure to the lesson and builds in different elements so that students do not become bored and rambunctious. Ideas for time allotments include: o 5 min. Tell students about your classroom management. o 5 min. Singing/echo rhythms. o 20 min. Main lesson/objectives. o 5 minutes Movement.

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o 5 minutes Review. Try to incorporate school-wide efforts/project like Word of the day and/or FCAT strategies, etc into lessons. It makes your classes more valuable to administrators and teachers and they will be less likely to remove them from your classes for remediation if they know you support school wide efforts. Lesson Ideas Play parties/mixers, name games, and rhymes are wonderful ways to learn students names and have a positive interaction during the first days of the school year. These activities often involve singing and moving, so they are a great informal assessment tool to figure out what level the students are at. In addition, they help the teacher mingle with students. I like the song/party mixer, I let her go go from Trinidad and Tobago. It is a very simple movement song, with only five words in it. It is easy to sing, and is great fun for students. It is a great activity to use to reinforce the concept of respecting others. Elementary students often have a hard time partnering up with someone other than their best friend. This activity provides a good segue into teaching manners and empathy. It is important to ask students: How would you feel if no one wanted to be your friend or said eeeeeeeeew! when they had to touch your hands? Do you want to make other people feel that way? As the students sing the song, the tempo can gradually be increased to make the activity more difficult. This particular activity is a hit. This song is available in the collection of play parties and singing games, Down In the Valley by Andy Davis and Peter and Mary Alice Amidon, available at (http://www.dancingmasters.com/store/Down_in_the_Valley.html). At the end of this chapter you will find a set of lessons developed or adapted by Sheila King to work drumming into the elementary classroom.

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Cultivate Relationships (with Teachers, Staff, Parents, and Students) People dont care how much you know until they know how much you care. Thats an old adage, but one that is very true in teaching. It doesnt matter how much you know about music, if you cant relate to your co-workers, parents, and students. Spending time with other teachers in the lounge and making a genuine effort to get to know them (by asking them questions and showing an interest in their hobbies) can be a great way to connect with colleagues. Being polite and respectful to everyone should be a priority. Participation in activities before the start of the school year, such as registration, can provide a good opportunity to get to know other teachers, staff, and administrators. Additional duties like car loop, breakfast or lunch duty, and patrolling the campus can give new educators a chance to get to know students and parents. The easiest way to start a positive exchange, is with a simple compliment like: great shirt or awesome shoes or asking how theyre doing. Positive comments can brighten a persons day. Even simply making eye contact with someone when walking down the hall and saying Hello is a good way to start building relationships. If you have a hard time connecting with a student, their teacher (or even better the teacher they had the year before) can provide good information about ways to connect with the student. Gathering this kind of information can not only help you with that particular student, but will demonstrate that you are a thoughtful educator who wants to connect with students and colleagues. The more you help others, the more support you will generally receive for your program. For example, when you need people to bring in baked goods for a bake sale or to stay after school to sell them at a concert, they will be more likely to volunteer to do so. Be polite to the administrators and be friendly. Be sure to share good news and thank volunteers for support.

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Scheduling Aim to be proactive in the creation of the activity schedule. Find out if you have input in the schedule or if you can have a chance to comment. Speak with other teachers about their schedules. It can be very helpful to make an easy to read version of your schedule that will be a quick reference for you so you know what classes you have coming when. It will also be important to take into account the schedule when you are planning lessons because if you have classes that are going to use different equipment back to back you need to plan how the equipment will be put away and taken out at the end of each class. Recruitment for Special Ensembles Sell yourself. To get students involved in ensembles that meet outside the regular class time, the activities need to sound cool and exciting. Share a piece of music that you plan on teaching to your chorus. The author is fond of saying that chorus and strings are the best and coolest activities at my school because I teach them. When talking about the ensembles, sound excited. If it excites you, it will be easier to excite the students. Promote the programs as the greatest activity ever. Pick music that will make the students successful. Not many teachers walk into a school and can have their groups perform Handels Messiah in the first concert. It could be helpful to keep that in mind when picking out literature. To do List: o Get a copy of Harry Wong book, The First Days of School. o Inventory classroom o Organize classroom o Decide on your classroom discipline plan o Plan first weeks lessons o Locate and review curriculum guide o If you start to feel overwhelmed make your own personalized to do list and prioritize

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Chapter 4Lesson Planning Planning lessons is what teachers spend a lot of their non-teaching time doing. If new teachers have a plan and goals in place for their students, it will be a lot easier to sequence and spiral-in different concepts. Of the teachers asked about planning models, all favored the backwards design model. It is easier to figure what you want to teach the during last weeks of school (the product of a year of instruction under your guidance) than to just plan lessons that seem fun or will be good to do from week to week. The backwards design model gives the program and the curriculum a sense of balance and purpose. Most music textbook series have built-in spiral concepts, which can complement the backward design model. If you choose to teach strictly from the textbook, then check the guides (usually in the beginning of the book) to make sure you will cover all the concepts you would like to. Whether you use the textbook series, the Randy and Jeff Game Plan series, or materials you pick up at workshops, it is important to remember that just because you have goals, it does not mean you have to meet all of them. It is hard to know what kind of program you are walking into and what background knowledge the students have. There will always be a few students who know more than others, because they take private voice or piano lessons. However, the other students may or may not have absorbed what had been taught to them. Be prepared to work with students who have little or no background knowledge. For example: one schools sixth-grade students could not keep a steady beat and at another school, students did not know that they had a speaking voice and a singing voice. This is not always the case, but it has been the experience of some of the contributors to this handbook. During the initial stages of lesson planning, it is also a good time to look at the inventory of the classroom. If class sets of whatever instruments you are planning

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to use are not available, time must be built into the lesson to review sharing procedures for those items. Lessons in instrument sharing must be carefully thought out. Find out if the district has a music curriculum guide by talking with other music teachers, the music supervisor, and the school administrator. If the district has a curriculum guide, it should be somewhere in the classroom. Some school districts do not have curriculum guides; it is up to individual music teachers to develop their own. In those instances, it is helpful to have ones to model. Included in Appendix A are the following two examples: Instructional Objectives Checklist for Brevard County Schools. Essential skills check list for Seminole County Schools. Lesson Plan Templates I have provided lesson plan templates that accomplished teachers in the field have devised in Appendix A. The most important goal of planning lessons is making sure the material covered is consistent with state standards. If music teachers allow themselves to just fill classes with fun activities, your class will be fun or fluff. If other teachers at a school adopt those attitudes, they devalue the educational merit of the class, which can be a possible negative effect, and can lead to an increased amount of removing of students from music class for tutoring. Another common negative consequence of an overly fun music class is that grade-level teachers hold back students for misbehavior. However, if instruction is standards-based, administrators are more supportive, because it can be demonstrated that the material fulfills music standards and is therefore educationally relevant. Lesson Plan Ideas

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Story Books That Can Be Used in the Music Classroom Storybooks are frequently used in the music classroom in a variety of ways. They can be read and the students can write songs about them; or the students could add sound effects, help develop deeper comprehension and to help the story come to life. Books can also be used in performances to unite a series of songs together. Below is a list of books used successfully with students in real music classrooms. o Good Night, Good Knight by Shelley Moore Thomas o Badger's Bring Something Party by Hiawyn Oram o Traveling to Tondo: A Tale of the Nkundo of Zaire by Verna Aardema o Up, Up, Down! By Robert N. Munsch o Any books by Raffi o The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by Linda Williams o I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie by Alison Jackson o I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Mary Ann Hoberman o There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat by Lucille Colandro o The Animal Boogie by Debbie Harter o Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault o Doing the Animal Bop By Jan Ormerod o I Know a Shy Fellow Who Swallowed a Cello By Barbara S. Garriel o Im a Little Tea Pot by Iza Trapani o Listen to the Rain by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault o Max Found Two Sticks Brian Pinkney o My Aunt Came Back by John Feierabend o My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss o Rap a Tap, Tap, Think of That! By Leo and Diane Dillon o Today is Monday by Eric Carle

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o Very Quiet Cricket by Eric Carle o Were Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen o Zin, Zin a Violin by Llody Moss Reflect Reflecting on the completed lesson is just as important as teaching the lesson. Look at your objectives to determine if they were met and to what degree. It is important to understand what percentage of students was able to complete the entire objective successfully. Try to understand what went wrong if the objectives were not met. An important question to consider: there was a lack of comprehension on the students part or was the presentation of the material not clear? Go back and re-teach the fundamentals that the lesson was built on, if that is needed. If presentation is the issue, ask other teachers how they present that information. Perhaps the educator simply needs to try a new way of teaching the information. E E d d u u c c a a t t i i o o n n A A c c r r o o n n y y m m s s The teaching profession enjoys abbreviating the names of different organizations and educational procedures. Listed below are the more common acronyms that a music teacher might encounter. o MENCMusic Educators National Conference o FMEAFlorida Music Educators Association o FEMEAFlorida Elementary Music Educators Association o AOSAAmerican Orff Schulwerk Association o CFOCCentral Florida Orff Chapter o HFOCHeart of Florida Orff Chapter o GTBAOCGreater Tampa Bay Area Orff Chapter o NFOCNorth Florida Orff Chapter o AYPAdequate Yearly Progress, in regards to the grading of schools o ESOLEnglish Students Other Languages o RTIResponse to Intervention, a new Florida initiative to approach addressing students with special needs o CSTChild Study Team o FBAFlorida Band Association o ASTAAmerican String Teachers Association o MDSMusic Demonstration School

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o VEVarying Exceptionalities o FCATFlorida Comprehensive Assessment Test o The Brevard County Schools Website Parent Portal has a website dedicated to educational acronyms and explaining them. Visit the website at: (http://www.brevard.k12.fl.us/portals/parents/acronyms.html)

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Chapter 5Professional Development Join Organizations In some counties, the position description of music teacher requires that they join organizations such as FMEA and MENC, as well as the appropriate component organization. Even if membership in these organizations is not required, it is highly recommended. You will receive a copy of the Florida Music Director, magazine and participating teachers can have their students tryout for all-state ensembles. In addition, membership allows for attendance at the state conference. These events always provide a wealth of information for educators. In addition to joining those organizations, its a good idea to seek out Orff Chapters that are active in your area. These organizations have meetings generally four times a year and hold workshops, which are always a source of new ideas and ways to present material. Perhaps even more helpful than attending those workshops are the relationships one can build with other music teachers in those chapters. They have a wealth of information that can be helpful. When having a problem teaching something, it is helpful to have a network of teachers who are happy to provide guidance and share their experiences. Find a Mentor If you would like to find a mentor, ask administrators or the music supervisor if there are experienced teachers in the area who would be willing to help during the initial building of a program. It is also a good idea when youve found a few mentors, to see if you can observe them teaching. It can be beneficial to observe someone after you have been teaching for a while. It will help keep you focused on good teaching practices. Also, inquire whether other teachers are willing to observe and provide feedback. Mentors are also excellent if you pursue more training

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in areas such as Orff, Kodaly, World Music Drumming, or Dalcroze, A mentor can advise you which trainers will best fit with a given personality and teaching style. Orff Schulwerk According to the American Orff Schulwerk Associations (AOSA) website (http://wwww.aosa.org/): Orff Schulwerk is a way to teach and learn music. It is based on things children like to do: sing, chant rhymes, clap, dance, and keep a beat on anything near at hand. These instincts are directed into learning music by hearing and making music first, then reading and writing it later. This is the same way we all learned our language. Orff Schulwerk happens in a non-competitive atmosphere where one of the rewards is the pleasure of making good music with others. When the children want to write down what they have composed, reading and writing find their moment. It uses poems, rhymes, games, songs, and dances as examples and basic materials. These may be traditional or original. Spoken or sung, they may be accompanied by clapping and stamping or by drums, sticks, and bells. The special Orff melody instruments include wooden xylophones and metal glockenspiels that offer good sound immediately. Played together as in a small orchestra, their use helps children become sensitive listeners and considerate participants. With Orff Schulwerk, improvisation and composition start students on a lifetime of knowledge and pleasure through personal musical experience. Learning is meaningful only if it brings satisfaction to the learner, and satisfaction arises from the ability to use acquired knowledge for the purpose of creating. For both teacher and student, Orff Schulwerk is a theme with endless variation. The title "Schulwerk" is an indication of the educational process-taking place: Schulwerk is schooling (in music) through working, that is, through being active and creative. The composer Carl Orff and his associate Gunild Keetman developed the basic texts for the Schulwerk as models for teachers worldwide. Now translated into eighteen languages, Orff Schulwerk is based on the traditional music and folklore of each country in which it is used. At present more than 10,000 teachers in the United States have found the Schulwerk the ideal way to present the magic of music to their students.

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Orff teacher training consists of two week-long classes that generally take place during the summer months and provide an in-depth study of the Orff pedagogy. The training consists of three levels, as well as master classes available for those who want advanced training and for those who might like to become of Orff class instructors. Koldaly According to the Organization of American Koldaly Educators, (http://www.oake.org) the Kodaly Philosophy is as follows: The Kodly Concept Is a philosophy of education and a concept of teaching. Is a comprehensive program to train basic musical skills and teach the reading and writing of music. Is an integration of many of the best ideas, techniques, and approaches to music education. Is an experience-based approach to teaching. Essential and Key Elements of the Concept Singing We should first learn to love music as human sound and as an experience that enriches life. The voice is the most natural instrument and one which every person possesses. Kodly called singing "the essence" of this concept. Singing is a powerful means of musical expression. What we produce by ourselves is better learned; and there is a stronger feeling of success and accomplishment. Learning through singing should precede instrumental training. It is in the child's best interest to understand the basics of reading music before beginning the difficult task of learning the technique of an instrument. What do we sing? Folk songs and games of the American Culture Traditional children's songs and games Folk songs of other cultures Music of the masters from all ages Pedagogical exercises written by master composers Singing best develops the inner, musical ear.

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"If we ourselves sing often, this provides a deep experience of happiness in music. Through our own musical activities, we learn to know the pulsation, rhythm, and shape of melody. The enjoyment given encourages the study of instruments and the listening to other pieces of music as well." (Kodly, 1964) Folk Music Folk music is the music of the people. There can be no better material for singing than the songs and games used by children for centuries. Folk Music has all the basic characteristics needed to teach the foundations of music and to develop a love of music a love that will last a life time. Folk music is the classical music of the people, and, as such, is a perfect bridge leading to and working hand-in-hand with-art music. "The compositions of every country, if original, are based on the songs of its own people. That is why their folk songs must be constantly sung, observed, and studied." (Kodly, 1964) Solfge Solfge is the best tool for developing the inner ear. It is an invaluable aid in building all musical skills: Sight singing Dictation Ear training Part hearing Hearing and singing harmony Perceiving form Developing memory The moveable do system, highly developed in English choral training, was advocated by Kodly as a tool for teaching musical literacy. Use of the pentatone (do, re, me, sol, la) was recommended by Kodly for early training of children because of its predominance in their folk music. Music and Quality We believe that music enhances the quality of life. So that it may have the impact it deserves, only the best music should be used for teaching: Folk music, which is the most representative of the culture The best music composed by the masters Quality music demands quality teaching: Teachers need to be as well-trained as possible Teachers' training must be well-rounded Teachers need to develop their musical and vocal skills to the highest degree possible "The pure soul of the child must be considered sacred; what we implant there must stand every test, and if we plant anything bad, we poison his soul for life." (Selected Writings, p. 141) Development of the Complete Musician Kodly training is a complete and comprehensive approach to music education which meets the National Standards for Arts Education as

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published by MENC, 1994. The development of all skill areas begins very early with simple tasks required of all the students. As knowledge grows, skills are developed further in a sequential manner. In addition to music reading and writing which are begun at an early stage, the following skill areas are also developed: part-singing, part-hearing, improvisation, intonation, listening, memory, phrasing and understanding of form. An awareness and knowledge of musical styles develops as skills become more proficient. "The good musician understands the music without a score as well and understands the score without the music. The ear should not need the eye nor the eye the (outer) ear." (Kodly quoting Schumann: Selected Writings, p. 192) Sequencing Presentation of materials, concepts, and development of skills can be done in a meaningful way only if the curriculum is well sequenced. A carefully planned sequence, well taught, will result in successful experiences for children and teacher. Success breeds success and fosters a love of music. A Kodly sequenced curriculum is an experience -based approach to learning rather than a cognitive developmental approach. "Music must not be approached from its intellectual, rational side, nor should it be conveyed to the child as a system of algebraic symbols, or as a secret writing of a language with which he has no conn ection. The way should be paved for direct intuition." (Selected Writings, p. 120) World Music Drumming World Music Drumming is a curriculum written by Dr. Will Schmid. For more specific information please go to the website (http://www.worldmusicdrumming.com /). This program is configured similarly to the Orff training. It is for people who would like to incorporate multicultural music (from areas such as Africa and the Caribbean) into their classrooms. It is also stratified into three levels. There are additional classes such as Drumming up the Fun. Dalcroze The Dalcroze Society of Americas History is below. The following excerpt is from their website (http://www.dalcrozeusa.org/history.html). The Dalcroze approach to music education teaches an understanding of music

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its fundamental concepts, its expressive meanings, and its deep connections to other arts and human activities through ground breaking techniques incorporating rhythmic movement, aural training, and physical, vocal and instrumental improvisation. Since the early 1900s, the influence of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze has been felt worldwide in the field of music as well as in dance, the atre, therapy and education. In his own time, Dalcrozes work was considered avant-garde and it met with some resistance, yet he continued to probe the topic of music education reform throughout his life. Today, his basic ideas of teaching and learning have been confirmed by contemporary research. Dalcroze was professor of harmony and solfge at the Conservatory in Geneva in 1892. He realized that his students could not actually hear the harmonies they were writing. Their playing showed little sense of rhythmic vitality. In solfge, he began to devise ear training games to develop more acute inner hearing. These games sharpened the students perceptions and resulted in more sensitive responses to the musical aspects of performance: timing, articulation, tone quality, and phrase shape. Dalcroze noticed his students would exhibit subtle, spontaneous movements swaying, tapping a foot, a slight swinging of the arms as they sang. The body was conscious of the life and movement of the music. Dalcroze capitalized on these natural, instinctive ge stures. He asked his students to walk and swing their arms, or to conduct while they sang or listened to him improvise at the piano. He called this study of music through movement eurhythmics, from the Greek roots eu and rythmos meaning good flow. Dalcroze continued to experiment with eurhythmics, giving demonstrations of his method throughout Switzerland and Western Europe. In 1910 he was invited by the Dhorn brothers, wealthy German industrialists, to Hellerau, Germany where they built a large school for him. Several hundred students lived and studied in Hellerau, and it became a world -famous center for the arts, devoted to the education of the complete human being. In 1913, the Gluck opera Orpheus was performed at the school, with Dalcroze conducting a chorus and soloists trained in eurhythmics. The production was a spectacular demonstration of music, movement, lighting, and staging representing the culmination of Dalcrozes work at Hellerau. The school closed at the onset of World War I and Dalcroze returned to Geneva, where the Emile Jaques -Dalcroze Institute was founded in 1915. Today, the Dalcroze Institute in Geneva continues to attract students from around the world who wish to study this remarkable method of music education. In a eurhythmics class, students typically are barefoot and are moving in some way in locomotion around the room, in gestures with hands, arms, heads, upper bodies, either in groups or alone. Their movements are responsive to the

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music that is sounding in the room. The teacher probably is improvising this music at the piano, although sometimes recorded or composed music is used. The task typically is to move in space using certain guidelines that are specific to the occasion or musical piece. The teacher shapes the music not only to the rules of the task, but to what he or she observes the students doing. The students, in turn, shape their accomplishment of the task to the nature of the music its tempo, dynamics, texture, phrase structure, and style. The body is trained to be the instrument, not only of the performance of eurhythmics, but of the perception of music. The body is understood as the original musical instrument, the one through which everyone first realizes music in both its senses: apprehending and creating, and the primary, personal, trainable utensil for musical understanding and prod uction. The movements a student makes in a eurhythmics class do not have the essential purpose of training the body to convey a choreographic picture to an audience. Rather, their essential purpose is to convey information back to the mover h imself. The movements set up a circuit of information and response moving continuously between brain and body, which, with training and experience, rise to ever higher levels of precision, coordination, and expressive power. The comprehensive Dalcroze approach consists of three components: Eurhythmics, which teaches concepts of rhythm, structure, and musical expression through movement; Solfge, which develops an understanding of pitch, scale, and tonality through activities emphasizing aural comprehension and vocal improvisation; and Improvisation, which develops an understanding of form and meaning through spontaneous musical creation using movement, voice and instruments. It was Dalcrozes intent that the three subjects be intertwined so that the development of the inner ear, an inner muscular sense, and creative expression can work together to form the core of basic musicianship. Certified Dalcroze teachers work in conservatories, universities, public an d private schools, early childhood programs, and in private studios. The Dalcroze approach is studied by performers, teachers, dancers, actors, young children, and senior citizens. Those wishing to pursue Dalcroze teacher training may do so at recognized training centers throughout the United States. Due to the intensive training process and the many sophisticated skills required to be a Dalcroze teacher, the number of certified teachers remains small, but their impact on music education is significant. The continued study of Dalcroze eurhythmics, solfge and improvisation tends to heighten concentration and focus, improve coordination and balance, enrich hearing, and sharpen the senses. In a Dalcroze class, students are freed from the constraints of formal performance to experience the deep musical knowledge and feeling evoked through movement. When they have discovered themselves as the source of their own musicality, they have much to bring to the practice

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room or to the stage. Based on the philosophy that we are the instrument, Dalcroze invites us to live what we hear. Books/Resources There are so many supplemental resources for teachers that it can be overwhelming. The following list of books that has been helpful for new music teachers: o Mallet Madness by Artie Almedia o The Chimes of Dunkirk edited by Peter Amidon, Andy Davis and Mary Cay Brass o Listen to the Mockingbird edited by Peter Amidon, Andy Davis and Mary Cay Brass o Down in the Valley edited by Peter and Mary Alice Amidon and Andy Davis o Sashay the Donut edited by Peter and Mary Alice Amidon, Andy Davis and Mary Cay Brass o Step Lively by Marian Rose o Recorder Karate by Barb Philipak o Music from Music K-8 available to purchase online at, ( http://www.musick8.com/ ) or through the mail. This website also has a teachers resource section that has a lot of valuable information from other music teachers organized by category. The following websites have great information, lesson plans, and so on. o o o o o o o o o o o o Record Professional Development Keep track of the training you attend and make sure you apply to receive points for it. This process varies from county to county. For example, members of CFOC (who teach in Orange County) only have to fill out a form and return it to their county liaison. However, teachers in Brevard County who attend the same in-service are required to write up and file this

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information on their own. Timely reporting of this information just important for recertification, and it also demonstrates to administrators a desire to improve oneself and ones craft. It can be useful when putting together an updated portfolio for a future teaching position. Keep Records for Portfolio When possible, take pictures of lessons that go well. (Make sure, for the students pictured to have the appropriate photo release forms in place, so that it is legal to have pictures of those students.) Also, keep track of all your lesson plans, even if you are not required to turn them in weekly or each nine weeks, you may be required to turn them in at the end of the year. Being aware of this and acting proactively can save a great deal of time. You may want to reuse lesson plans from year to year, so keeping them saved in several places on a computer is strongly advised, to avoid having to rewrite them from scratch every year.

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Chapter 6Performances Performances are a great way to demonstrate the results of ones teaching. It can be difficult to produce tangible results in the elementary music classroom because so much of what is done is experiential. Find a way for your students to perform early in the year to show what they have learned. Veterans Day is a good day for a performance. Patriotic songs are fun to teach and provide an opportunity to showcase of select choral groups; or even better, have the whole school sing. It is a great way to work with teachers in a cross-curricular way. Music and social studies easily go hand-in-hand. Making this connection is often viewed as a sign of respect for the classroom teachers. Concert Programs I have presented sample programs showing different ways to pace the concert and showing samples of how to lay out concert programs in Appendix B. Several contributors recommend that students names be included in the program and think it is beneficial to have students spell-check their names before final programs are printed. Programs can be printed on plain or colored paper as well as specialty paper appropriate for the concert theme. Logistics Plan, plan, plan. Think of everything that could go wrong and try to anticipate. Ask mentors what problems can arise during and around performances. All sorts of issues can creep up. Make sure everyone involved at the school (and even those who are not) is kept up-to-date on the program. Check with custodians to make sure the performance space will be ready. Let people in the administrative office know what to expect; a timeline is helpful for all involved. If

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you are having performances during the day, make sure there is ample preparation time before the performance, so the younger and smaller students can be placed closer to the front. Concert Etiquette Appropriate concert etiquette is taught and learned. It does not just happen. The Florida Sunshine State Standards state, [t]he student understands the relationship between music and the world beyond the school setting (MU.E.2.2) and goes on to say in strand two [the student] knows and applies appropriate audience behavior in various musical settings (e.g., symphony concerts, school concerts, and parades). Make sure to take time during the beginning of a concert to explain that the students have worked hard and want to make sure appropriate concert behavior is observed. Next, go through and review what appropriate concert behavior entails. For example, please turn off all cell phones; please remain quiet while the performers are performing; the appropriate response when performers do a good job is clapping not yelling or whistling; and please do not move around the concert hall while people are performing. For more ideas on how to teach appropriate concert etiquette, please visit the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) website (http://www.menc.org/resources/view/rules-for-concert-etiquette ). Fundraising Ideals A concert is a great time to have a fundraiser because there are large amounts of supportive people around during a musical performance. Bake sales have been easy and successful fundraiser at concerts for many of the contributors. Ask other teachers in the school to donate items that can be sold at the concert. Then all of the money collected is pure profit! For many more great fundraising ideas, visit the Music K-8 websites idea bank

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(http://www.musick8.com/html/ideabank.php ) and simply select the Fund-Raising option to find more ideas.

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Biographical Sketch Kimberly M. McNees was born in Fort Pierce, FL, on August 10, 1983. From a young age she was actively involved in music making, from church activities to school performing ensembles. During her middle and high-school years she was an active member of band, learning how to play many instruments. Ms. McNees attended Stetson University in DeLand, FL, where she was awarded the William E. Duckwitz talent scholarship to help offset the cost of attendance. During her time at Stetson, Ms. McNees was an active performer in the University Orchestra, the University Symphonic Band, Brass Ensemble, and a variety of other small ensembles. She also became a member of many organizations such as Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (CMENC), Sigma Alpha Iota, Student Government Association (SGA), the International Horn Society, and the National Band Association. In addition Ms. McNees was a member of the state executive board of the Florida Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (FCMENC) serving one year as the advocacy chair and another year as the membership chair. She also held chair positions in Sigma Alpha Iota, SGA and Stetsons chapter of CMENC, as well as working as an RA (resident assistant). Ms. McNees was released early from her senior internship and was offered a permanent substitute position at Osteen Elementary where she taught for a week, during which she was offered a full-time position teaching Suzuki strings at Turie T. Small Elementary. She worked there from the end of December 2006 to May 2007, when the program was eliminated because of budget cuts. Then Ms. McNees found a position in Brevard County at Riverview Elementary where she has taught since August 2007.

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Ms. McNees was accepted into the first class of summer masters students at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL where she attended class during the summers of 2008 and 2009.

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Appendix A

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Appendix B