Architectural history of Agricultural College, University of Florida

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Architectural history of Agricultural College, University of Florida
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Department of Architecure, University of Florida
Publisher:
Department of Architecure, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00001374:00022

Full Text







I. HISTORY OF SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE



Florida agriculture has taken a drastic transformation in the

last 100 years due in large part to the success of agricultural

education and research. The genesis of this movement began in October

of 1884 with the opening of the Florida Agricultural College at Lake

City under the Morrill Act the Land Grant College Act. In 1888,

only four years later, the Agricultural Experiment Station was

established under the Hatch Act as a division of the Agricultural

College. It was voted upon in 1906 by the Florida Legislature to move

the Florida Agricultural College from Lake City to Gainesville and

change its name to the University of Florida.

Since the move to Gainesville several components were added to

the Agricultural College. Eight years later, the Cooperative

Extension Service, the outreach component of the Land Grant

philosophy, was established by the Smith-Lever Act. In 1917 the

Florida Legislature recognized the need for statewide agricultural

research and education centers by the establishment of the Citrus

Experiment Station at Lake Alfred. This was only a beginning to the

22 established research and education facilities throughout the

state. In 1939 the Florida Legislature created the School of Forestry

at the University of Florida.

In April, 1964, the Florida Board of Control created IFAS the

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The purpose of this

action was to consolidate into one overall unit four previously

separated units the College of Agriculture, the Florida Agricultural

Experiment Station, the Florida Cooperative Extension Service, and the

School of Forestry. Today included within IFAS are the College of































Veterinary Medicine and the Sea Grant Extension Program.

IFAS's mission is to educate students in agriculture and related

sciences, to strengthen Florida's agricultural industry through

research, to improve the quality of life for all Floridians through

IFAS Extension programs.








II. ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY OF AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE


The University of Florida was officially founded in 1853 and

consisted of 136 students. The evolvement of this campus was a

consolidation of several state programs and the establishment of the

Buckman Act. This act founded the University of Florida in

Gainesville and replaced six state-supported colleges with three state

universities. These universities were to become known as the Florida

Female College, (now Florida State University), Florida A & M, (a

segregated black college), and the University of the State of Florida,

(University of Florida).

The University of Florida was still operating out of Lake City in

1905 when the Board of Control requested a master plan for the

University of the State of Florida in Gainesville. Edwards and

Wallace were hired to design the master plan and P.K. Yonge, Chairman

of the State Board of Controls assisted in defining the campus

character they were seeking. This master plan was adopted and

followed until 1920. There were thirteen original buildings in this

master plan, designed and built by Edwards. Twelve of these thirteen

buildings stand today representing the University of Florida's

"Historic Campus".4 One of these thirteen buildings housed the College

of Agriculture, known as Wilbur L. Floyd Hall built in 1912. Floyd

Hall was built in the style of "Collegiate Gothic" and expresses the

foundation on which the University of Florida was raised and the

accomplishments it has achieved. Historic Floyd Hall was designed for

the function of an Agricultural College and housed laboratories,

classrooms, and offices within its three floors. The first floor

contained rooms which housed farming equipment, a stock judging room




























and amphitheatre, Dairy Laboratory, and Dean's office. The second

floor was made up of an auditorium, a Soils Physics Laboratory, a

field crop room, and also a chapel. The third floor was used for

social rooms which accommodated student clubs and organizations.

The first renovations began in 1918 when rooms were needed for

military training classes. Since this time Floyd Hall has been under

constant interior renovations but the original facade remains intact.

Currently Floyd Hall is being used as a storage facility.








III. A LOOK TO THE FUTURE

A MESSAGE BY K.R. TEFERTILLER



Over the decades, teaching, research, and extension achievements

of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), together

with the ingenuity, perserverance, and foresight of industry leaders

and innovators, have enabled the Florida food and agricultural

industry to become a major economic force in the world. Just as

industry has changed to reflect emerging market trends, consumer

preferences, and societal needs, so has IFAS modified its programs to

meet the growing demands of the people of Florida.

A complex, diverse, and growing agriculture; a growing

population; and an increasing concern for natural resource use all

contribute to the growing and changing mission of IFAS.

The Florida food and agricultural industry is growing, doubling

in the last 10 years with a present gross sales impact of over $16

billion annually. The industry is also diverse. Florida farmers and

growers produce more than 90 commodities; forty-two of these account

for retail sales in access of $5 million annually. The growth and

diversity, along with the fact that there are six different regions of

Florida agriculture, each with its own special problems relating to

production, population growth and natural resource demands, mean that

Florida must utilize an extremely high level of technological

ingenuity and efficiency to maintain present levels of food and

agricultural production.

A growing population intensifies competition for the state's

natural resources, creates new demands for more and more diverse food

production, and requires increased research and education programs to















develop and extend technology and information to keep Florida's food

and agricultural industry competitive and to insure it remains

compatible with urban Florida.

Therefore, IFAS has become a vital, statewide resource ready to

contribute to solutions for the many economic, environmental, and

cultural problems we all face together as Floridians. Our goals are

threefold:

1: Improving the competitive production and market position for

the Florida food and agricultural industry in an international setting

through the development, management, and application of appropriate

technology.

2: Contributing to the solution of special problems of urban

Florida through IFAS-based technology.

3: Enhancing and assessing Florida's natural resources.



Our ability within IFAS to respond to a changing world and to

effectively interpret the needs of our people will in large part

determine our success in the future. To merely point to our past

accomplishemtns and underscore our successes will not merely be

enough. We must use our intellect, ingenuity, and innovation to

effectively serve this state and its people.







V. SPACE SUMMARY


A. Administration

1. V.P. for Agricultural Affairs

2. Executive Asst. for Agricultural Affairs

3. Director of IFAS Information

4. Secretarial Pool

5. Conference

6. Reproduction and Supply Room

7. Director of Planning and Business Affairs

8. Assc. Director of Planning and Bus. Affairs

9. Secretarial Pool

10. Director of IFAS Gov't. Relations

11. Office of Federal Affairs

12. Secretarial Pool

13. Director of IFAS Personnel

14. Labor Relations Advisor

15. Employees Relations Advisor

16. Secretarial Pool

17. Director of Sponsored Programs

18. Director of Development, SHARE

19. Director of Development, SHARE, 4-H

20. Director of IFAS Grants

21. Grants Development Coordinator

22. Secretarial Pool

23. Director of International Programs

24. Assc. Director of Internation Programs

25. Asst. Director of International Programs


250 NASF

150

150

400

150

150

200

150

300

200

200

300

180

150

150

450

180

180

150

150

150

700

200

150

150








26. Secretarial Pool 400

27. Director of Center for Env./Natural Resources 150

28. Director of Biomass Energy Systems 150-

29. Secretarial Pool 250

30. (2) Conference rooms 600





B. Budget and Accounting


State

Federal

Accounting Manager

Accounts Payable

Director of Accounts Payable

Contract and Grants Acct.

Properties

Travel

Reproduction and Supply Room


4300 NASF

300

150

300

200

300

300

150

150

t\


C. College of Agriculture


1. Dean for Resident Instruction

2. Asst. Dean for Resident Instruction (grad)

3. Asst. Dean for Resident Instruction (ungrad.)

4. Asst. in Resident Instruction

5. Pre-Vet Advisor

6. Secretarial Pool


300 NASF

200

200

150

150

700








Conference Room

Reproduction and Supply Room

Data Retrieval


D. Laboratory


Agronomy

Nutrition

Research Support

Seed Reproduction

Soybean

Microbiology


1500 NASF

1000

1200

1000

1200

1200


E. Classrooms


1. Miscellaneous classrooms

breeding

nutrition

physiology

computer


5000 NASF


Editorial


1. Director

2. Audio-Visual Section


200 NASF

1000


200

150

100


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.
















3. Graphics

4. News

5. Publications

6. Radio/TV



G. Faculty


1. Offices (20 @ 120 NASF ea.)


2400 NASF


H. Special Purpose Space


Open Plaza/Cafe

Vending Area

Student Lounge

Faculty Lounge


2500 NASF

350

500

350


3/-7


500

1200

1200.

1800


pc I


"^ Aoc9