Floyd Hall adaptive use : proposal for an International Student center

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Title:
Floyd Hall adaptive use : proposal for an International Student center
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English
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Department of Architecure, University of Florida
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Department of Architecure, University of Florida
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Gainesville, Fla.
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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FLOYD HALL ADAPTIVE USE

Proposal for an International Student Center
ARC 5810 Documentation

Spring 1985

Professors Reeves, Shepard, Tate



Bys Sheila M. Rowley


.4












P R 0 G R STATEMENT


The reason for proposing an International Student Center was for the

purpose of forming an umbrella organization which would coordinate the acti-

vities related to international student programs and services on the campus.

The proposed Center would house two offices the International Student

Services office (ISS) which acts as a counseling and program center for inter-

national students who come to study at the University; and the Center for In-

ternational Studies and Programs (CISP) which coordinates programs to send

Americans abroad to study. The Center would become the base for activities

and programs designed to draw international students into the University while

promoting interest about other cultures among American students. The central

location of Floyd Hall on the Plaza of the Americas combined with the scope of

the two offices housed in the Center would contribute to the development of a

vital organization with active participation by international and American stu-

dents and faculty.











Sheila M. Rowley
AHu 6853 Shepard and Tate
13 December 1985







PROPOSAL FOR AN INThRNATIONAL STUDENT CENTER


The services offered to international students at the University of

Florida are numerous. Programs are spread across the campus sponsored by

various divisions of Academic Affairs and other departments. Although it

is recognized that not all of these programs would benefit from being re-

located, the opportunities presented by the creation of an umbrella organ-

ization for international student services should not be overlooked

Four of the existing programs have been researched to determine where

common goals and needs overlap. Using the basic information a preliminary

program has been developed for an International Student Center to be housed

in Floyd Hall* Following the descriptions of each of the four programs con-

sidered is an outline of the spatial requirements for the ones which will be

included in the International Student Center (ISC).


Programs

International Student Services Office (ISS)

The ISS office is part of the Dean of Student Services Office in the Divi-

sion of Student Affairs* In general the ISS office acts as a counseling and

program center for international students. Its primary goals areas

1) To assist students and scholars in attaining their educational and

professional goals.

2) To enable students to experience American life through community vi-

sits, outings, and participation in community activities

3) To promote friendship and mutual respect among students and scho-

lars from all countries and cultures thereby broadening the hori-

sons of students from Florida.

Around 1977 the ISS office moved to its present location in a two-story

gray house at 1504 West University Avenue. Previously it had been housed in






PROPOSAL (continued)


a small one-story bungalow on Stadium Drive between the Music and Architec-

ture Buildings. The ISS office was originally located in Tigert Hall with the

other offices contained within the Student Services Office. The ISS office

works with the Admissions Office in Tigert handling approximately 1600 stu-

dents presently.

(from an interview with Jennifer Lund, Assistant Dirctor of ISS)


Center for International Studies and Programs (CISP)

The CISP is located in 168 Grinter Hall. Their main function is the coordi-

nation of programs to send Americans abroad (300-400/yr). In addition the CISP

handles exchange students from Germany, Poland, the Netherlands, and the East-

ern Block countries, and the Fullbright scholars. The people they deal with

are usually at the University on special agreements and are not registered stu-

dents. The CISP is also called upon to deal with visitors from the IFAS pro-

gram. (from an interview with Sarah Bewley, Staff Assistant)


Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)

IFAS is part of the Agriculture Department, and its International Program

has offices in McCarty Hall. The Department has overseas contracts with coun-

tries with whom they are working, and the majority of the international stu-

dents they receive as part of thecontracts come to the United States for train-

ing. Some of those stay at the University while others are sent to other uni-

versities for their training. Many are here by Agency for International Deve-

lopment (AID) funding. Because the International Program deals primarily with

faculty and as a resource for IFAS, and because theirs is a specialized service

within the Agriculture Department, this program would not be a likely candidate

to be housed in the ISO1 the ISC could act as a resource for IFAS visitors.

(from an interview with Maria Kruse, Assistant Director)







PROPOSAL (continued)


English Language Institute

The English Language Institute is part of the Program in Linguistics in

the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It offers courses to provide En-

glish language training to students whose first language is not Englisho The

courses include preparation in reading and writing as well as orientation to

university life in the United States. In general the Institute provides ser-

vices to students prior to their admission to the University. The faculty and

Graduate Assistants are all from the Linguistics Department.

(from an interview with Dr. Roger Thompson, Coordinator)


SUMMARY

After collecting the information it became clear that the ISS office and

the CISP have more similarities than the other programs. Both would benefit

from having more rooms for workshops, receptions, counseling and cultural acti-

vities. Their dealings with international students are complementary.

Due to the nature of the students arrangements through the IFAS program,

their International Program offices are best left in McCarty Hall* Similarly,

the English Language Institute offers a specialized service to a smaller group

of people. If the Institute were to be moved from its present location in Nor-

man Hall, space within the Linguistics Department would be the most desirable.

The Institute requires a great deal of space for the faculty (five positions),

ten to fifteen graduate assistants, classrooms, reading and writing labs, con-

ference and counseling rooms, and curriculum development area. It is doubtful

that these special functions could be compatible with a student center whose

goals were more broad.

The following program assigns spaces to house the specific offices and func-

tions of ISS and GISP, as well as some shared spaces*









PROPOSAL (continued)

International Student Services Office

1) Director's office (200 sf)-- requires work area for administrative
functions and seating area for small
conferences) some book and file storage

2) Assistant Director's office (150 sf)- requires work area for admini-
strative functions and seating for inter-
viewsl some file storage

3) Immigration Clerk's office (200 sf)-receives admission notices, spon-
sor and bank letters reviews financial
papers; requires work space and seating
for four people; file storage

4) Counselor's office (120 sf)--requires seating area for private counsel-
ing and some file storage

5) Graduate Assistant's office (120 sf)- part-time work includes some
advising requires seating for one and
work space

6) Secretary's office (100 sf)-requires work space for general secreta-
rial functions and storage for files and
records used daily

7) Work/Study Interns (120 sf)-require work space for three people who
work with the secretary and one person who
works with the Immigration Clerk

8) Receptionist (100 sf)--receives visitors to the administrative offices,
provides information to visitors, and moni-
tors waiting area

9) Waiting Area (100 sf)-casual seating space adjacent to receptionist

10) Information Area (100 sf)--contains shelves and racks for literature per-
taining to ISS functions, University funo-
tions, community activities

11) Record and File Storage (200 sf)- space to hold all current and past re-
cords, close to secretary's office

12) Machine Room (120 sf)- space for computer system and xerox machine with
work tables

13) General Storage Room (50 sf)--space to store general office supplies, pa-
per products, etco





5

PROPOSAL (continued)

Center for International Studies and Programs

1) Director's office (200 sf)-requires work area for administrative
functions and seating area for small con-
ferences of five to six people

2) Staff Assistant's office (150 sf)-coordinates student programs within
CISP, deals with Admissions and Registrar's
offices, handles student financial records;
requires work space and seating for one or
two visitors

3) Student Assistants' office (150 sf)-requires desk and work spaces for
three part-time students

4) Information/Waiting Room (100 sf)- casual seating and shelves to display
information about the programs

5) Record and File Storage (150 sf)--space for files that are current and
computer to hold past records

6) General Storage Room (50 sf)-space to store general office supplies,, pa-
per products, etc*

ISS and CISP Shared Facilities

1) Staff Lounge (150 sf)-area out of public view for lunch, coffee breaks;
may include small kitchenette

2) Staff Reading Room (100 sf)--area with literature, work tables and desks
for use by staff, in-house library

3) Staff restrooms (2 100 sf each)-men's and women's toilets

4) Student Lounge (300 sf)-flexible seating area which may be used for or-
ganizational meetings, presentations

5) Vending Area (100 sf)- adjacent to student lounge

6) Conference Rooms (2 @ 200 sf each)--meeting rooms for office staff, work-
shops, and orientation sessions

7) Auditorium (750 sf)-provides gathering space for larger cultural funo-
tions and film and lecture series

8) Kitchen (50 sf)--adjacent to auditorium to handle receptions and special
food for cultural activities

9) Study/Tutor Area (150 sf)--provides cubicles, desks, and work tables for
use by students individually or in groups
10) Restrooms (2 175 sf each)-men's and women's toilets







PROPOSAL (continued)


Square Footage Allocations


Director
Asst. Director
Immigration Clerk
Counselor
Graduate Asst.
Secretary
Interns
Receptionist
Waiting
Information
Records & Files
Machines
Storage

ISS Total



Director
Staff Asst.
Student Asst.
Information
Records & Files
Storage

CISP Total


Shared Facilities


Staff Lounge
Reading Room
Restrooms
Student Lounge
Vending
Conference Rooms
Auditorium
Kitchen
Study/Tutor
Restrooms


SUB-TOTAL


+ 306 mechanical & support


TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE REQUIRED


ISS


CISP


200 sf
150 sf
200 sf
120 sf
120 sf
100 sf
120 sf
100 sf
100 sf
100 sf
200 sf
120 sf
50 sf

1680 sf



200 sf
150 sf
150 sf
100 sf
150 sf
50 sf

800 sf


150 sf
100 sf
200 sf
300 sf
100 sf
400 sf
750 sf
150 sf
150 sf
350 sf

2650 sf


5130 sf
2200 sf


7330 sf







PROPOSAL (continued)

Square Footage Allocations

The actual square footage for which there is a program is not more than

half the potential usable space in Floyd Hall. However, considering the ra-

pid rate of growth that both offices have experienced and the numbers of stu-

dents that they handle, there should be some unassigned space available to

accommodate future expansions. Some likely additions (with appropriate fund-

ing) would be graduate assistants, career counselors, currency exchange office,

activities/program director, permanent office for the editor of the Global

Gator and additional counselors and advisors. In addition no space was pro-

vided for a dining hall/cafeteria and kitchen because of the University policy

concerning the use of Servomation. A small dining facility which catered to

the various ethnic backgrounds may well be a welcome asset, but negotiations

would have to take place before it could be included.


CONCLUSION

The international student who comes to study at the University faces many

problems upon arrival. According to the ISS office roughly 98E of their stu-

dents must live off campus initially. The dorms are set up for first year stu-

dents mainly, and the international students are generally third or fourth year

transfers or graduate students. Obviously this situation makes adjustment for

them more-of an effort. Many do live in married housing or receive housing af-

ter waiting. The ISC would provide these students a base for University resouro-

es and draw them into the University activities Faculty and students alike

would benefit from the planned functions and casual interaction that the ISC

could create. The ISS office and CISP office together work with a broad cross-

section of the University faculty and students. A shared facility would en-

hance this working relationship and contribute positively to University life.







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