Various bills and resolutions

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Various bills and resolutions markup before the Committee on International Relations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Ninth Congress, second session, on H.R. 611, H.R. 1476, H.R. 1996, H.R. 5805. H, Res. 415, H. Res. 622, H. Res. 723, H. Res. 759, H. Res. 940, H. Res. 942, H. Res. 965, H. Res. 976, H. Res. 992, H. Con. Res. 317, H. Con. Res. 415, S. 2125, S. 3836, H.R. 6060 and H. Res. 985, September 13, 2006
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Economic assistance, American -- Haiti   ( lcsh )
Educational exchanges -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Economic assistance, American -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Coral reef conservation -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Aide économique américaine -- Haïti   ( ram )
Éducation -- Échanges internationaux -- États-Unis   ( ram )
Aide économique américaine -- Pays en voie de développement   ( ram )
Récifs coralliens -- Conservation -- Pays en voie de développement   ( ram )
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COLUMBIA LAW SCHOOL LIBRARY

IIIII 1111 Hll III llIllli ll 11 S BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS
3 5005 01308 542-




MARKUP
BEFORE THE

COMMITTEE ON

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
ONE HUNDRED NINTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
ON
H.R. 611, H.R. 1476, H.R. 1996, H.R. 5805,
H. Res. 415, H. Res. 622, H. Res. 723,
H. Res. 759, H. Res. 940, H. Res. 942,
H. Res. 965, H. Res. 976, H. Res. 992,
H. Con. Res. 317, H. Con. Res. 415,
S. 2125, S. 3836, H.R. 6060 and H. Res. 985

SEPTEMBER 13, 2006

Serial No. 109-217


Printed for the use of the Committee on International Relations






Available via the World Wide Web: http://www.house.gov/international relations

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COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois, Chairman


JAMES A. LEACH, Iowa
CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey,
Vice Chairman
DAN BURTON, Indiana
ELTON GALLEGLY, California
ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida
DANA ROHRABACHER, California
EDWARD R. ROYCE, California
PETER T. KING, New York
STEVE CHABOT, Ohio
THOMAS G. TANCREDO, Colorado
RON PAUL, Texas
DARRELL ISSA, California
JEFF FLAKE, Arizona
JO ANN DAVIS, Virginia
MARK GREEN, Wisconsin
JERRY WELLER, Illinois
MIKE PENCE, Indiana
THADDEUS G. McCOTTER, Michigan
KATHERINE HARRIS, Florida
JOE WILSON, South Carolina
JOHN BOOZMAN, Arkansas
J. GRESHAM BARRETT, South Carolina
CONNIE MACK, Florida
JEFF FORTENBERRY, Nebraska
MICHAEL McCAUL, Texas
TED POE, Texas


TOM LANTOS, California
HOWARD L. BERMAN, California
GARY L. ACKERMAN, New York
ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American
Samoa
DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
SHERROD BROWN, Ohio
BRAD SHERMAN, California
ROBERT WEXLER, Florida
ELIOT L. ENGEL, New York
WILLIAM D. DELAHUNT, Massachusetts
GREGORY W. MEEKS, New York
BARBARA LEE, California
JOSEPH CROWLEY, New York
EARL BLUMENAUER, Oregon
SHELLEY BERKLEY, Nevada
GRACE F. NAPOLITANO, California
ADAM B. SCHIFF, California
DIANE E. WATSON, California
ADAM SMITH, Washington
BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota
BEN CHANDLER, Kentucky
DENNIS A. CARDOZA, California
RUSS CARNAHAN, Missouri


THOMAS E. MOONEY, SR., Staff Director/General Counsel
ROBERT R. KING, Democratic Staff Director
DANIEL FREEMAN, Counsel/Parliamentarian
JEAN CARROLL, Full Committee Hearing Coordinator


if

(1













CONTENTS


Page

MARKUP OF
H.R. 611, To authorize the establishment of a program to provide economic
and infrastructure reconstruction assistance to the Republic of Haiti, and
for other purposes .......................................................... ............................. 5
Amendment to H.R. 611 offered by the Honorable Tom Lantos, a Represent-
ative in Congress from the State of California ......................................... 13
H.R. 1476, To amend the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990 to
authorize additional appropriations for the Eisenhower Exchange Fellow-
ship Program Trust Fund, and for other purposes ........................................ 30
Amendment to H.R. 1476 offered by the Honorable Henry J. Hyde, a
Representative in Congress from the State of Illinois, and Chairman,
Committee on International Relations ................................................... 34
H.R. 1996, To amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to provide for
debt relief to developing countries that take action to protect critical coral
reef habitats .................................................................................................... 35
H.R. 5805, To promote nuclear nonproliferation in North Korea ...................... 58
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to H.R. 5805 offered by the
Honorable Edward R. Royce, a Representative in Congress from the
State of California .......................................................................................... 61
H. Res. 415, Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that
the Socialist Republic of Vietnam needs to do more to resolve claims for
confiscated real and personal property, and for other purposes ................... 66
Amendment to H. Res. 415 .................................................. ....................... 70
H. Res. 622, To recognize and honor the Filipino World War II veterans
for their defense of democratic ideals and their important contribution
to the outcome of W orld W ar II .............................................. .................... 71
Amendment to H. Res. 622 offered by the Honorable Henry J. Hyde ............. 74
H. Res. 723, Calling on the President to take immediate steps to help improve
the security situation in Darfur, Sudan, with a specific emphasis on civilian
protection .............................................................................................................. 75
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to H. Res. 723 offered by the
Honorable Tom Lantos .................................................... ......................... 82
H. Res. 759, Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that
the Government of Japan should formally acknowledge and accept responsi-
bility for its sexual enslavement of young women, known to the world
as "comfort women", during its colonial occupation of Asia and the Pacific
Islands from the 1930s through the duration of World War II, and for
other purposes ............................................................ .................................. 87
Amendment to H. Res. 759 ................................................... ..................... 90
H. Res. 940, Recognizing the 185th anniversary of the independence of Peru
on July 28, 2006 ............................................................. .............................. 93
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to H. Res. 940 offered by the
Honorable Joseph Crowley, a Representative in Congress from the State
of N ew Y ork ................................................................................................ 96
H. Res. 942, Recognizing the centennial anniversary on August 5, 2006,
of the Iranian constitution of 1906 ............................................................. 98
H. Res. 965, Commending the people of Montenegro on the conduct of the
referendum on independence, welcoming United States recognition of the
sovereignty and independence of the Republic of Montenegro, and wel-
coming Montenegrin membership in the United Nations and other inter-
national organizations ................................................................................... 101







Page
H. Res. 976, Condemning human rights abuses by the Government of the
Islamic Republic of Iran and expressing solidarity with the Iranian people .. 105
H. Res. 992, Urging the President to appoint a Presidential Special Envoy
for Sudan ......................................................... ............................................... 109
Amendment to H. Res. 992 offered by the Honorable Henry J. Hyde ............. 115
H. Con. Res. 317, Requesting the President to issue a proclamation annually
calling upon the people of the United States to observe Global Family
Day, One Day of Peace and Sharing, and for other purposes ........................ 116
H. Con. Res. 415, Condemning the repression of the Iranian Baha'i commu-
nity and calling for the emancipation of Iranian Baha'is ............................... 119
S. 2125, To promote relief, security, and democracy in the Democratic Repub-
lic of the Congo ............................................................................................... 122
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to S. 2125 offered by the Honor-
able Tom Lantos .............................................................................................. 141
S. 3836, To reauthorize the United States Advisory Commission on Public
D iplom acy ............................................................................................................. 158
H.R. 6060, To authorize certain activities by the Department of State, and
for other purposes ............................................................................................... 160
H. Res. 985, Directing the Secretary of State to provide to the House of
Representatives certain documents in the possession of the Secretary of
State relating to the report submitted to the Committee on International
Relations of the House of Representatives on July 28, 2006, pursuant
to the Iran and Syria Nonproliferation Act .................................. ......... 189

APPENDIX
The Honorable Sherrod Brown, a Representative in Congress from the State
of Ohio: Prepared statement .............................................. ........................... 193
The Honorable Joseph Crowley, a Representative in Congress from the State
of N ew Y ork ......................................................................... ......................... 193











VARIOUS BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2006
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS,
Washington, DC.
The Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 11:45 a.m. in room
2172, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Henry J. Hyde (Chair-
man of the Committee) presiding.
Chairman HYDE. The business meeting of the Committee will
come to order.
We have a large number of noncontroversial bills on the agenda
which are candidates for consideration under suspension of the
rules. It is the intention of the Chair to consider these en bloc and
by unanimous consent authorize the Chair to seek consideration of
the bills under suspension of the rules.
All Members are given leave to insert remarks on the measures
into the record, should they choose to do so.
There are measures on the agenda upon which the Committee
wishes to file reports and those will be called up en bloc and mo-
tions made to report those by unanimous consent. Before we do
that, the Chair has been asked to recognize two Members for a
short statement and the Chair recognizes the gentleman from Cali-
fornia, Mr. Berman.
Mr. BERMAN. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
My statement pertains to H. Res. 985, a resolution of inquiry
which I introduced with Mr. Delahunt, which directs the Secretary
of State to provide information to Congress regarding the recent re-
lease of a semi-annual report required by the Iran and Syria Non-
proliferation Act; just a short background and if a reporting
quorum comes in while I am telling you that background, I will
make it even shorter.
On July 20th, Chairman Rohrabacher held a hearing on his Sub-
committee on U.S. nonproliferation goals and strategies. Acting As-
sistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Frank Record-a number of
us know him, a former staff member of this Committee-testified
that he did not recall if the overdue report under the Iran and
Syria Nonproliferation Act would include information about any In-
dian entities.
When the report was submitted to the Committee only a week
later, complete with information about two Indian arms prolifer-
ating to Iran and just 2 days after the vote on the India nuclear
deal, it seemed hard for me to believe that Mr. Record did not
know anything about this and that the timing was purely coinci-
dental.







On July 28th, Mr. Rohrabacher, Mr. Delahunt, and I sent a let-
ter to Secretary Rice expressing concern about this testimony and
requesting a detailed briefing on why this report was not shared
with Members prior to the vote.
On September 7th, only after my staff told State that I was con-
sidering a resolution of inquiry, we received a written letter in re-
sponse to our July 28th letter, but the response was totally inad-
equate. State showed no interest in accommodating our reasonable
bipartisan request for a briefing, so our only recourse was to intro-
duce this resolution of inquiry.
It was not until this morning that I received a call from Under
Secretary Nick Burns, who provided his perspective on why the re-
port was submitted late. Even if the report had come to Congress
before the vote on the India nuclear bill, I would not have changed
my vote in favor of that legislation, but the information about the
Indian entities was very relevant to the debate, particularly the
motion to recommit, which would have conditioned civilian nuclear
cooperation on India's support for United States efforts to prevent
Iran from developing nuclear weapons.
At the end of the day, this really is not about the specifics of the
India legislation, it is about a much larger issue: The right of this
Committee and the Congress as a whole to receive all relevant in-
formation when considering an extremely important piece of legis-
lation with serious implications for U.S. foreign policy and national
security.
I yield back, Mr. Chairman, and thank you for recognizing me.
Chairman HYDE. I thank the gentleman.
The Chair recognizes the gentlelady from California, Ms. Lee.
Ms. LEE. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Let me thank you and our Ranking Member for convening this
very important markup and also for listing several bills today
which I would like to talk about very briefly. First, H.R. 611, the
Haiti Economic Infrastructure Reconstruction Act. This is a bill we
have worked on in a bipartisan fashion, quite frankly, for several
years.
The Haiti Economic and Reconstruction Act is an important bill
that will bring not only hope to Haiti but present long overdue hu-
manitarian assistance and hands-on expertise through a profes-
sional exchange program. The program will establish a professional
exchange program similar to the Peace Corps for health, judiciary
and infrastructure professionals to travel to Haiti and work under
the guise of USAID, in partnership with civil society and Haitian
Government ministries.
Mr. Chairman and Members, of course we know that today in
Haiti less than 45 percent of Haitians have access to safe water
and access to sanitation. Seventy-six percent of Haiti's children
under the age of 5 are underweight or suffer from stunted growth
and 63 percent of Haitians are undernourished. Eighty percent of
the population lives in abject poverty and the unemployment rate
is estimated to be nearly 90 percent. Ninety percent of all
HIV/AIDS cases in the Caribbean are in Haiti.
As we combat global HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, maternal
and child mortality and many other life-threatening diseases, we
must address the long-term effect of dilapidated physical and






health infrastructure and abject poverty throughout the world, in-
cluding Haiti. This bill partners with Haitians and Americans to-
gether to execute an environmentally sound approach to rebuilding
Haiti. Its major provisions are aimed at developing the judicial sys-
tem and basic sanitation, water, and other health infrastructures
in Haiti.
This bill also would bring United States professionals, preferably
Haitian-Americans, down to Haiti in order to train and educate
Haitians on how to run a free and fair judiciary, how to rebuild,
pave and maintain roads to provide access to rural and urban
areas to health clinics.
It is my hope that the transfer of knowledge from U.S. profes-
sionals in these fields will in fact ensure long-term development
and guarantee the success of the program similar to the success of
the Global Fund and other international initiatives. By widening
the knowledge base of nongovernmental organizations and profes-
sionals in Haiti, the United States will take advantage of unique
opportunities and obligations toward Haiti's future.
This bill has bipartisan support. It has been a bipartisan effort.
It has been endorsed by the Congressional Black Caucus Haiti task
force and I would like to thank Congressman Foley and his staffer
Bradley Shriber; Congressman Hyde, Mr. Chairman, and your
staffer Ted Brennan; and Congressman Lantos and your staffer
Paul Oostburg; also, of course, Aisha House of my staff for their of-
tentimes very intense, yet very effective, negotiations on this bill.
I urge my colleagues to vote for this legislation today. Also, the
resolution with regard to designating a special envoy for the Darfur
region of Sudan, that is H. Res. 992, and then a final one by Con-
gressman Pitts which would allow for the United Nations and
NATO to work together as they try to achieve some peace in this
region which is quickly becoming even a greater disaster.
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Chairman HYDE. Without objection, the Chairman is authorized
to seek consideration of the following bills under suspension of the
rules and the amendments to those measures which the Members
have before them shall deemed adopted: H.R. 611, Haiti Economic
and Infrastructure Reconstruction Act, as amended; H.R. 1476, Ei-
senhower Exchange Fellowship Program Trust Fund Enhancement
Act of 2005, as amended; H.R. 1996, Coral Reef and Coastal Ma-
rine Conservation Act of 2005; H.R. 5805, North Korea Non-
proliferation Act of 2006, as amended; H. Res. 415, Expressing the
sense of the House of Representatives that the Socialist Republic
of Vietnam needs to do more to resolve claims for confiscated real
and personal property, as amended; H. Res. 622, to recognize and
honor the Filipino World War II veterans, as amended; H. Res.
723, Calling on the President to take immediate steps to help im-
prove the security situation in Darfur, Sudan, as amended; H. Res.
759, Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the
government of Japan should formally acknowledge and accept re-
sponsibility for its sexual enslavement of young women, as amend-
ed; H. Res. 940, Recognizing the 185th anniversary of the inde-
pendence of Peru, as amended; H. Res. 942, Recognizing the cen-
tennial anniversary of the Iranian constitution of 1906; H. Res.
965, Commending the people of Montenegro on the conduct of the





4

referendum on independence; H. Res. 976, Condemning human
rights abuses by the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran;
H. Res. 992, Urging the President to appoint a presidential special
envoy for Sudan, as amended; H. Con. Res. 317, Requesting the
President to issue a proclamation annually calling upon the people
of the United States to observe Global Family Day; H. Con. Res.
415, Condemning the repression of the Iranian Baha'i community
and calling office review the emancipation of Iranian Baha'is; S.
2125, Democratic Republic of the Congo Relief, Recovery, Security
and Democracy Promotion Act of 2006, as amended; and S. 3836,
United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy Reauthor-
ization Act of 2006.
It is so ordered.
Without objection, the following measures will be reported to the
House: H.R. 6060, State authorities reported favorably; H. Res.
985, Directing the Secretary of State to provide certain documents
to the House, reported without recommendations.
So ordered.
[The information referred to follows:]








I


109TH CONGRESS
1ST SESSION H.Ro611


To authorize the establishment of a program to provide economic and infra-
structure reconstruction assistance to the Republic of Haiti, and for
other purposes.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
FEBRUARY 8, 2005
Mr. FOLEY (for himself, Mr. RANGEL, and Mr. SIAW) introduced the
following bill; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations




A BILL
To authorize the establishment of a program to provide eco-
nomic and infrastructure reconstruction assistance to the
Republic of Haiti, and for other purposes.

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa-
2 ties of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
3 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
4 This Act may be cited as the "Haiti Economic and
5 Infrastructure Reconstruction Act".







2
1 SEC. 2. ECONOMIC AND INFRASTRUCTURE RECONSTRUC-

2 TION PROGRAM FOR THE REPUBLIC OF

3 HAITI.

4 (a) PROGRAM AUTIORIZED.-The President is au-

5 thorized to establish an economic and infrastructure re-

6 construction program for the Republic of Haiti, to be

7 known as the "Haiti Economic and Infrastructure Recon-

8 struction Program" (in this section referred to as the "Re-

9 construction Program"), under which individuals who are

10 recruited into the Program will be deployed to Haiti to

11 provide assistance to the Government of Haiti related to

12 economic and infrastructure reconstruction and develop-

13 meant.

14 (b) APPOINTMENT.-If the President establishes the

15 Reconstruction Program under subsection (a), the Presi-

16 dent shall appoint an officer or employee of the Bureau

17 for Latin America and the Caribbean of the United States

18 Agency for International Development to serve as the Di-

19 rector of the Reconstruction Program. The Director shall

20 possess expertise with respect to-

21 (1) Haiti; or

22 (2) economic, educational, judicial, law enforce-

23 ment, healthcare, or infrastructure reconstruction

24 and recovery efforts in developing countries.

25 (c) COORDINATION.-The Director shall coordinate

26 with appropriate officials from the Government of Haiti
*HR 611 IH







3
1 to identify ministries and agencies of the Government of

2 Haiti that require assistance concerning the reconstruc-

3 tion and development in Haiti with respect to-

4 (1) the economy, including a special emphasis

5 on the development of private and public domestic

6 and foreign business investment;

7 (2) the educational system, including a special

8 emphasis on the development of school facilities,

9 teacher training programs, and administration man-

10 agement programs;

11 (3) the judiciary and the rule of law;

12 (4) the healthcare system; and

13 (5) the infrastructure.

14 (d) RECRUITMENT OF INDIVIDUALS FOR PARTICIPA-

15 TION IN THE RECONSTRUCTION PROGRAM.-

16 (1) REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS.-The Director

17 shall recruit individuals who are citizens of the

18 United States and who possess-

19 (A) at minimum, a four-year college or

20 university degree awarded from an accredited

21 college or university located in the United

22 States; or

23 (B) such skills or expertise as the Director

24 determines to be relevant or appropriate to

25 carry out the Reconstruction Program.


*HR 611 IH







4
1 (2) HAITIAN-AMERICANS.-To the maximum

2 extent practicable, the Director shall recruit Hai-

3 tian-Americans.

4 (e) USE OF FUNDS.-The Director shall use funds

5 appropriated for the Reconstruction Program to-

6 (1) cover the costs of housing, in such amounts

7 as the Director determines to be appropriate, for in-

8 dividuals who are deployed to Haiti to carry out the

9 Reconstruction Program; and

10 (2) pay such individuals a salary, in such

11 amounts as the Director determines to be appro-

12 private, taking into consideration the expertise of an

13 individual and the position in the Reconstruction

14 Program held by such individual.

15 (f) LENGTH OF DEPLOYMENT IN HAITI.-

16 (1) ONE YEAR.-Individuals recruited under

17 subsection (d) may be deployed to Haiti under the

18 Reconstruction Program for no longer than one

19 year.

20 (2) EXCEPTION.-If the Director determines

21 that an extended period of deployment for any indi-

22 vidual is appropriate, and such individual consents

23 to such extension, the Director may extend the de-

24 ployment of such individual for no longer than two

25 additional years.


*HR 611 IH







5

1 (g) REPORTS.-

2 (1) FIRST INTERIM REPORT.-Not later than

3 six months after the date of the enactment of this

4 Act, the President shall submit to Congress a first

5 interim report regarding the Reconstruction Pro-

6 gram.

7 (2) SECOND INTERIM REPORT.-Not later than

8 12 months after the date of the enactment of this

9 Act, the President shall submit to Congress a second

10 interim report regarding the Reconstruction Pro-

11 gram.

12 (3) FINAL REPORT.-Not later than 18 months

13 after the date of the enactment of this Act, the

14 President shall submit to Congress a final report re-

15 garding the Reconstruction Program.

16 (4) CONTENTS.-The interim and final reports

17 shall include information relating to the following:

18 (A) A description and explanation of the

19 process of recruitment of individuals for partici-

20 pation in the Reconstruction Program, includ-

21 ing a description and explanation of-

22 (i) the selection criteria used; and

23 (ii) any incentives offered and the cost

24 of such incentives.


*HR 611 IH







6
1 (B) The number of individuals recruited

2 and the ministry or agency and the locality in

3 which each individual is placed.

4 (C) The potential for expansion of the Re-

5 construction Program.

6 (h) INFRASTRUCTURE DEFINED.-In this section,

7 the term "infrastructure" means a road, highway, bridge,

8 tunnel, airport, mass transportation vehicle or system,

9 intermodal transportation facility, waterway, commercial

10 port, drinking or waste water treatment facility, solid

11 waste disposal facility, pollution control system, and gas,

12 electricity, and oil utilities.

13 (i) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.-There

14 are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry

15 out this section such sums as may be necessary for each

16 of the fiscal years 2006 through 2011. It is the sense of

17 Congress that at least $3,000,000 should be made avail-

18 able for each of those fiscal years to carry out this section.

19 SEC. 3. HEALTHCARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM FOR HAITI.

20 (a) HEALTHCARE PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.-The

21 President is authorized to establish a healthcare assistance

22 program for Haiti, to be known as the "Haiti Healthcare

23 Assistance Program" (in this section referred to as the

24 "Healthcare Program"), under which grants may be made

25 to qualified nongovernmental organizations to establish


*HR 611 IH







7
1 programs in Haiti related to the prevention of infectious

2 diseases in Haiti.

3 (b) COORDINATION.-If the President establishes the

4 Healthcare Program under subsection (a), the President

5 shall seek to work with appropriate officials from the Gov-

6 ernment of Haiti and with appropriate individuals from

7 international financial institutions, civil society, non-

8 governmental organizations, and international organiza-

9 tions to work in coordination and cooperation with quali-

10 fled nongovernmental organizations.

11 (c) USE OF GRANT FUNDS.-A qualified nongovern-

12 mental organization that receives a grant through this sec-

13 tion shall use the grant to promulgate a comprehensive

14 and integrated strategy to combat and control infectious

15 diseases in Haiti through the establishment of a com-

16 prehensive healthcare infrastructure in Haiti that focuses

17 on education, prevention, care, treatment, support, capac-

18 ity development, and other related activities.

19 (d) SATISFACTION OF CRITERIA TO BE CONSIDERED

20 A QUALIFIED NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION.-The

21 Administrator of the United States Agency for Inter-

22 national Development shall promulgate criteria that shall

23 be satisfied by a nongovernmental organization in order

24 for such organization to be considered a qualified non-

25 governmental organization for purposes of this section.


*HR 611 IH







8
1 (e) HEALTHCARE INFRASTRUCTURE DEFINED.-In

2 this section, the term Healthcaree infrastructure" means

3 an inpatient or outpatient hospital, clinic, or medical facil-

4 ity and medical programs, including programs for hiring

5 physicians, nurses, or other medical personnel and pro-

6 grams for acquiring transportation and communications

7 systems for medical purposes.

8 (f) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.-There

9 are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry

10 out this section such sums as may be necessary for each

11 of the fiscal years 2006 through 2011. It is the sense of

12 Congress that at least $3,000,000 should be made avail-

13 able for each of those fiscal years to carry out this section.
0


*HR 611 IH





H.L.C.





AMENDMENT TO H.R. 611
OFFERED BY MR. LANTOS OF CALIFORNIA

Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the
following:

1 TITLE I-HAITI ECONOMIC AND
2 INFRASTRUCTURE RECON-
3 STRUCTION ACT
4 SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.
5 This title may be cited as the "Haiti Economic and
6 Infrastructure Reconstruction Act".
7 SEC. 102. ECONOMIC AND INFRASTRUCTURE RECONSTRUC-
8 TION PROGRAM FOR HAITI.
9 (a) PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.-The President, acting
10 through the Administrator of the United States Agency
11 for International Development, is authorized to establish
12 an economic and infrastructure reconstruction program
13 for the Republic of Haiti, to be known as the "Haiti Eco-
14 nomic and Infrastructure Reconstruction Program" (in
15 this section referred to as the "Reconstruction Program"),
16 under which individuals who participate in the Recon-
17 struction Program will work with ministries and agencies
18 of the Government of Haiti to assist efforts of the Govern-






H.L.C.
2
1 ment of Haiti for economic and infrastructure reconstruc-

2 tion and development in Haiti.

3 (b) COORDINATION.-In carrying out the Reconstruc-

4 tion Program, the President should seek to work with ap-

5 propriate officials from the Government of Haiti to iden-

6 tify ministries and agencies of the Government of Haiti

7 that require assistance for economic and infrastructure re-

8 construction and development with respect to-

9 (1) the economy, including a special emphasis

10 on the development of private and public domestic

11 and foreign business investment;

12 (2) the education system, including a special

13 emphasis on the development of school facilities,

14 teacher training programs, and administration man-

15 agement programs;

16 (3) the judiciary and the rule of law;

17 (4) the healthcare system; and

18 (5) the infrastructure, including a special em-

19 phasis on commercial ports to ensure that such

20 ports are secure for ships to dock to load and unload

21 goods.

22 (c) IDENTIFICATION OF INDIVIDUALS FOR PARTICI-

23 NATION IN THE RECONSTRUCTION PROGRAM.-





H.L.C.
3

1 (1) QUALIFICATIONS.-The President shall
2 identify individuals for participation in the Recon-

3 struction Program-

4 (A) who are-

5 (i) citizens of the United States or

6 lawfully admitted for permanent residence

7 in the United States; or

8 (ii) citizens of Haiti and residing in

9 Haiti; and

10 (B) who possess-

11 (i) at a minimum, a four-year college

12 or university degree awarded from an ac-

13 credited college or university located in the

14 United States or equivalent college or uni-

15 versity located outside the United States;

16 or

17 (ii) such skills or expertise as deter-

18 mined by the President to be relevant or

19 appropriate to carry out the Reconstruc-

20 tion Program.

21 (2) LIMITATION.-Not more than 30 percent of

22 the total number of individuals participating in the

23 Reconstruction Program may be individuals de-

24 scribed in paragraph (1)(A)(ii).






H.L.C.


1 (3) HAITIAN-AMERICANS.-To the maximum

2 extent practicable, the President shall identify Hai-

3 tian-Americans who meet the qualifications of para-

4 graph (1) for participation in the Reconstruction

5 Program.

6 (d) LENGTH OF SERVICE IN RECONSTRUCTION PRO-

7 GRIAM.-

8 (1) ONE YEAR.-Individuals may participate in

9 the Reconstruction Program for no longer than one

10 year.

11 (2) EXCEPTION.-If the President determines

12 that an extended period of participation in the Re-

13 construction Program for any individual is appro-

14 private, and the individual consents to such extension,

15 the President may extend the participation of the in-

16 dividual for no longer than two additional years.

17 (e) NOTICE AND CONSULTATION.-

18 (1) NOTICE.-Not later than 180 days after the

19 date on which the President establishes the Recon-

20 struction Program under subsection (a), the Presi-

21 dent shall-

22 (A) provide notice thereof to Congress; and

23 (B) transmit to Congress a report on the

24 Reconstruction Program that contains a de-

25 scription of-





H.L.C.
5
1 (i) the qualifications, demographics,

2 and other appropriate information relating

3 to individuals who are recruited to partici-

4 pate in the Reconstruction Program,

5 including-

6 (I) with respect to individuals de-

7 scribed in subsection (c)(1)(A)(i), the

8 regions of the United States from

9 which such individuals are being re-

10 cruited;

11 (II) the needs that the individ-

12 uals are expected to fill under the Re-

13 construction Program; and

14 (III) the level of education of the

15 individuals; and

16 (ii) the efficacy of the Reconstruction

17 Program.

18 (2) CONSULTATION.-The President shall con-

19 sult with Congress on a periodic basis on the imple-

20 mentation of the Reconstruction Program, including

21 as to-

22 (A) the selection of projects or activities

23 that individuals will be involved with under the

24 Reconstruction Program; and






H.L.C.
6
1 (B) the manner in which the Reconstruc-

2 tion Program will be made known to the public

3 in the United States and Haiti.

4 (f) SENSE OF CONGRESS.-It is the sense of Con-

5 gress that, to the maximum extent possible, the President

6 should work with the appropriate officials from the United

7 Nations and the Republic of Haiti to ensure that security

8 is provided at Haitian ports.

9 (g) DEFINITION.-In this section, the term "infra-
10 structure" means a road, highway, bridge, tunnel, airport,

11 mass transportation vehicle or system, intermodal trans-

12 portation facility, waterway, commercial port, school,

13 drinking or waste water treatment facility, solid waste dis-

14 posal facility, pollution control system, and gas, electricity,

15 and oil utilities.

16 (h) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.-

17 (1) IN GENERAL.-There are authorized to be

18 appropriated for each of the fiscal years 2007

19 through 2012 such sums as may be necessary to

20 carry out this section.

21 (2) SENSE OF CONGRESS.-It is the sense of

22 Congress that at least $3,000,000 should be made

23 available for each of the fiscal years described in

24 paragraph (1) to carry out this section.





H.L.C.
7
1 SEC. 103. HEALTHCARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM FOR HAITI.

2 (a) HEALTHCARE PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.-The

3 President is authorized to establish a healthcare assistance

4 program for Haiti, to be known as the "Haiti Healthcare
5 Assistance Program" (in this section referred to as the

6 "Healthcare Program"), under which funds may be pro-

7 vided, by grant or contract, to nongovernmental organiza-

8 tions that are working in coordination with the Haitian

9 Ministry of Health to establish programs in Haiti related

10 to the prevention of infectious diseases and delivery of

11 basic health care services.

12 (b) COORDINATION.-In carrying out the Healthcare

13 Program, the President should seek to work with appro-

14 private officials from the Government of Haiti and with ap-

15 propriate individuals from international financial institu-

16 tions, civil society, nongovernmental organizations, and

17 international organizations to work in coordination and

18 cooperation with nongovernmental organizations that re-

19 ceive funds under this section.

20 (c) ELIGIBILITY OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZA-

21 TIONS.-A nongovernmental organization may receive

22 funds under this section if the organization works through

23 the Administration's comprehensive strategy to combat

24 and control infectious diseases and aid in the delivery of

25 basic health care in Haiti through a comprehensive

26 healthcare infrastructure that focuses on education, pre-






H.L.C.
8
1 vention, care, treatment, support, capacity and develop-

2 ment, and other related activities.

3 (d) DEFINITION.-In this section, the term "com-

4 prehensive healthcare infrastructure" means an inpatient

5 hospital, clinic, or medical facility and medical programs,

6 including programs for hiring physicians, nurses, or other

7 medical personnel and programs for acquiring transpor-

8 station and communications systems for medical purposes.

9 (e) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.-
10 (1) IN GENERAL.-There are authorized to be

11 appropriated for each of the fiscal years 2007
12 through 2012 such sums as may be necessary to

13 carry out this section.

14 (2) SENSE OF CONGRESS.-It is the sense of

15 Congress that at least $3,000,000 should be made
16 available for each of the fiscal years described in

17 paragraph (1) to carry out this section.
18 TITLE II-HENRY J. HYDE

19 SCHOLARSHIPS FOR HAITI
20 ACT OF 2006
21 SEC. 201. SHORT TITLE.

22 This title may be cited as the "Henry J. Hyde Schol-
23 arships for Haiti Act of 2006".
24 SEC. 202. FINDINGS.

25 Congress finds the following:





H.L.C.
9
1 (1) It is in the national interest of the United

2 States to improve the range and quality of edu-

3 national alternatives for Haitian students, further

4 the development of Haiti, and build enduring rela-

5 tionships between the people of the United States

6 and the people of Haiti by providing a stable source

7 of financial support to give talented students in

8 Haiti the opportunity to study in the United States,

9 promoting the goal of basic education for all in

10 Haiti, and supporting partnerships between colleges

11 and universities in the United States and institu-

12 tions of higher learning in Haiti.

13 (2) Providing scholarships to foreign students

14 to study in the United States and forging partner-

15 ships among institutions of higher learning have

16 proven to be an effective means of creating strong

17 bonds between the United States and the future

18 leadership of developing countries and assisting

19 those countries to further substantially their devel-

20 opment objectives.

21 (3) Talented students from families of limited

22 financial means in Haiti traditionally have few, if

23 any, opportunities to continue their education in

24 their own country and are less likely to pursue high-

25 er education in the United States.






H.L.C.
10
1 (4) In 2003, 76 percent of the population in

2 Haiti earned less than the equivalent of $2.00 per

3 day, and 56 percent of the population in the country

4 in the same year earned less than the equivalent of

5 $1.00 per day.

6 (5) In 2003, the literacy rate of individuals in

7 Haiti who. are older than 15 years of age was less

8 than 52 percent. The net primary school enrollment

9 rate was 68 percent, as compared to the average of

10 approximately 78 percent for other low income coun-

11 tries, such as Afghanistan and Guinea-Bissau.

12 (6) Women in Haiti are more likely to be ad-

13 versely affected by the dire economic and social con-

14 editions in Haiti.

15 SEC. 203. STATEMENT OF PURPOSES.

16 The purposes of this title are-

17 (1) to establish an undergraduate scholarship

18 program which is designed to bring talented stu-

19 dents of limited financial means from Haiti to the

20 United States for study at United States institutions

21 of higher education-

22 (A) to improve the diversity and quality of

23 educational opportunities for such students;

24 (B) to assist the development efforts of

25 Haiti by providing training and educational as-





H.L.C.
11
1 distance to persons who can help address the

2 social and economic needs of Haiti;

3 (C) to build a well-educated middle-class in

4 Haiti which is capable and willing to provide

5 leadership in the public and private sectors to

6 help sustain the political and economic progress

7 that is sorely needed to confront the daunting

8 challenges of that country; and

9 (D) to promote positive and productive re-

10 lationships between the United States and

11 Haiti; and

12 (2) to promote the goal of basic education for

13 all and establish partnerships between colleges and

14 universities in the United States and institutions of

15 higher learning in Haiti by-

16 (A) improving the quality of primary, sec-

17 ondary, and tertiary education in Haiti;

18 (B) making such education more accessible

19 to a greater number of Haitians, particularly

20 girls and women;

21 (C) designing and supporting centers of

22 excellence for teacher training and other activi-

23 ties to enhance the pedagogical skills and mate-

24 rials of teachers;





H.L.C.
12
1 (D) creating programs to strengthen the

2 administration and management of education in

3 Haiti;

4 (E) assisting in the development efforts of

5 Haiti by strengthening the capacity of Haitian

6 educational institutions to address the country's

7 social and economic challenges;

8 (F) improving the prospects for economic

9 growth and greater foreign investment by en-

10 hancing human capital in Haiti; and

11 (G) promoting positive relationships be-

12 tween the United States and Haiti through the

13 growth of professional partnerships among edu-

14 cators and educational institutions.

15 SEC. 204. HENRY J. HYDE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR HAITI PRO-

16 GRAM.

17 (a) PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.-

18 (1) IN GENERAL.-The President, acting

19 through the Administrator of the United States

20 Agency for International Development, is authorized

21 to establish a scholarship program for the Republic

22 of Haiti, to be known as the "Henry J. Hyde Schol-

23 arships for Haiti Program" (in this section referred

24 to as the "Scholarship Program"), under which

25 scholarships (including partial assistance) are pro-





H.L.C.
13
1 vided for undergraduate study at United States in-

2 stitutions of higher education (as such term is de-

3 fined in section 101 of the Higher Education Act of

4 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001)) to citizens and nationals of

5 Haiti who have completed their secondary education

6 with distinction and who would not otherwise have

7 the opportunity to study in the United States due to

8 financial constraints.

9 (2) PREFERENCE.-The President may give

10 some preference under the Scholarship Program to

11 applicants seeking to complete associate degrees in

12 the United States.

13 (b) FORM OF SCHOLARSHIP.-To encourage Haitian

14 students to use their training and education for the benefit

15 of Haiti, each such student who receives a scholarship

16 under the Scholarship Program shall be subject to the

17 two-year foreign residency requirement for Department of

18 State-sponsored nonimmigrant visas issued in accordance
19 with subparagraph (J) of section 101(a)(15) of the Immi-

20 gration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)).

21 (c) SCHOLARSHIP GUIDELINES.-The Scholarship

22 Program shall be carried out in accordance with the perti-

23 nent guidelines of section 604 of the Foreign Relations

24 Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (22
25 U.S.C. 4704; Public Law 99-93; relating to guidelines for





H.L.C.
14
1 United States scholarship program for developing coun-

2 tries).

3 (e) GENERAL AUTHORITIES.-

4 (1) PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR CONTRIBU-

5 TIONS.-

6 (A) IN GENERAL.-The President shall en-

7 courage the public and private sectors, particu-

8 larly the Haitian-American community, in the

9 United States and in Haiti to contribute to the

10 costs of the Scholarship Program.

11 (B) MATCHING PROGRAM.-In carrying

12 out subparagraph (A), Congress strongly en-

13 courage the President to design a matching

14 program in which contributions made by the

15 public and private sectors of the United States

16 and Haiti are matched by amounts made avail-

17 able to carry out the Scholarship Program

18 under this section. Not more than 25 percent of

19 amounts made available to carry out the Schol-

20 arship Program may be dedicated to the match-

21 ing program.

22 (2) UTILIZATION OF RETURNING SCHOLARSHIP

23 RECIPIENTS.-The President should seek to engage

24 the private sector of Haiti and international private

25 enterprises that are conducting business in Haiti to





H.L.C.
15
1 maximize the opportunities for productive contribu-

2 tions to the development of Haiti by returning re-

3 cipients under the Scholarship Program.

4 (3) DELIVERY OF ASSISTANCE THROUGH THE

5 COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION OF STATES FOR SCHOL-

6 ARSIIIPS.-It is the sense of Congress that the

7 President should carry out the purposes of the

8 Scholarship Program through existing United States

9 scholarship programs, such as the Cooperative Asso-

10 ciation of States for Scholarships program.

11 SEC. 205. BASIC EDUCATION AND UNIVERSITY PARTNER-

12 SHIP PROGRAMS FOR HAITI.

13 The President, acting through the Administrator of

14 the United States Agency for International Development,

15 is authorized to-

16 (1) provide assistance for literacy and other

17 basic education programs in Haiti; and

18 (2) support partnerships between colleges and

19 universities in the United States and institutions of

20 higher learning in Haiti so as to improve the range

21 and quality of educational alternatives for Haitian

22 students, further the development of Haiti, and

23 build enduring relationships between the people of

24 the United States and the people of Haiti.





I.L.C.
16
1 SEC. 206. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING THE PEACE

2 CORPS.

3 It is the sense of Congress that the President, acting

4 through the Director of the Peace Corps, should, as soon

5 as practicable, make available again to the Government

6 of Haiti qualified Peace Corps volunteers who would serve

7 under hardship conditions to-

8 (1) assist the people of Haiti to improve literacy

9 rates and meet other basic needs so that they can

10 become economically self-sufficient; and

11 (2) promote mutual understanding between the

12 people of the United States and the people of Haiti.

13 SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

14 (a) HENRY J. HYDE SCIIOLARSIIPS FOR HAITI PRO-

15 GRAM.-There are authorized to be appropriated to the

16 President to carry out section 204 $2,500,000 for each

17 of fiscal years 2007, 2008, and 2009.

18 (c) BASIC EDUCATION AND UNIVERSITY PARTNER-

19 SHIP PROGRAMS FOR HAITI.-Of the amounts authorized

20 to be appropriated to carry out chapter 1 of part I of the

21 Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.;

22 relating to development assistance) for each of fiscal years

23 2007, 2008, and 2009, and which are not allocated for

24 assistance for countries in Latin America and the

25 Caribbean-





H.L.C.
17
1 (1) not less than $3,000,000 for each such fis-

2 cal year is authorized to be made available to carry

3 out section 205(1); and

4 (2) $500,000 for each such fiscal year is au-

5 thorized to be made available to carry out section

6 205(2).

7 (b) ADDITIONAL AUTHORITIES.-Amounts made

8 available under this section are-

9 (1) authorized to remain available until ex-

10 pended; and

11 (2) in addition to amounts otherwise available

12 for such purposes.








I


109TH CONGRESS
1ST SESSION H 147


To amend the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990 to authorize
additional 'appropriations for the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Pro-
gram Trust Fund, and for other purposes.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
APRIL 5, 2005
Mr. TIAIIRT introduced the following bill; which was referred to the
Committee on International Relations




A BILL
To amend the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990
to authorize additional appropriations for the Eisenhower
Exchange Fellowship Program Trust Fund, and for other
purposes.

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa-

2 ties of the United States ofAmerica in Congress assembled,
3 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

4 This Act may be cited as the "Eisenhower Exchange

5 Fellowship Program Trust Fund Enhancement Act of
6 2005".
7 SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

8 Congress finds the following:







2
1 (1) 2003 marked the 50th anniversary of the

2 establishment of the Eisenhower Exchange Fellow-

3 ship program.

4 (2) The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship pro-

5 gram was founded to honor the 34th President,

6 Dwight D. Eisenhower, for his character, courage,

7 patriotism, and commitment to international under-

8 standing through exchange.

9 (3) Over the past 50 years the Eisenhower Ex-

10 change Fellowship program has exposed thousands

11 of leaders throughout the world to the values of

12 American political institutions, private sector com-

13 merce, educational opportunities, and cultural and

14 societal traditions.

15 (4) Eisenhower Exchange Fellows worldwide

16 have assumed positions of leadership in their respec-

17 tive countries, whether in the fields of government,

18 industry, or civil society, and they retain links to the

19 United States through their membership in Eisen-

20 hower Exchange Fellowships.

21 (5) The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship is de-

22 veloping a new program to broaden its geographic

23 base to emphasize the relationship of the United

24 States with the Arab world.


.HR 1476 IH





32

3
1 (6) Congress has previously recognized the im-

2 portance of the work of the Eisenhower Exchange

3 Fellowship program when it granted the program a

4 Federal Charter under section 3(a) of Public Law

5 101-454.

6 (7) The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship is one

7 of the best examples of public and private partner-

8 ships.

9 (8) Additional resources are required to achieve

10 the goals and objectives of the Eisenhower Exchange

11 Fellowship program in the 21st century.

12 SEC. 3. AUTHORIZATION OF ONE-TIME ADDITIONAL APPRO-

13 PRIATION FOR THE EISENHOWER EXCHANGE

14 FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM TRUST FUND.

15 Section 5 of the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship

16 Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-454; 20 U.S.C. 5204) is

17 amended-

18 (1) by striking "To provide" and inserting "(a)

19 INITIAL ENDOWMENT.-To provide"; and

20 (2) by adding at the end the following new sub-

21 section:

22 "(b) ENHANCED ENDOWMENT.-In addition to the

23 amount initially appropriated pursuant to the authoriza-

24 tion of appropriations under subsection (a), there is au-


*HR 1476 IH







4

1 thorized to be appropriated to the Eisenhower Exchange

2 Fellowship Program Trust Fund $12,500,000.".

O


*HR 1476 IH





34
H.L.C.





AMENDMENT TO H.R. 1476

OFFERED BY MR. HYDE OF ILLINOIS

In section 2, strike paragraphs (1), (6), and (8), and

redesignate paragraphs (2), (3), (4), (5), and (7) as

paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4), and (5), respectively.

Page 4, line 2, strike "12,500,000" and insert

"7,000,000".








I


109TH CONGRESS
1ST SESSION H. 99


To amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to provide for debt relief
to developing countries that take action to protect critical coral reef habitats.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
APRIL 28, 2005
Mr. KIRK (for himself, Mr. HASTINGS of Florida, Mr. SAXTON, Ms.
BORDALLO, Mr. EHLERS, Mr. MEEKS of New York, Mr. WELLER, and
Mr. OWENS) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Com-
mittee on International Relations




A BILL
To amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to provide
for debt relief to developing countries that take action
to protect critical coral reef habitats.

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa-

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
3 SECTION 1. DEBT REDUCTION FOR DEVELOPING COUN-
4 TRIES WITH CORAL REEFS AND OTHER

5 COASTAL MARINE RESOURCES.

6 The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151

7 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:







2
1 "PART VI-DEBT REDUCTION FOR DEVELOPING

2 COUNTRIES WITH CORAL REEFS AND OTHER

3 COASTAL MARINE RESOURCES

4 "SEC. 901. SHORT TITLE.

5 "This part may be cited as the 'Coral Reef and

6 Coastal Marine Conservation Act of 2005'.

7 "SEC. 902. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES.

8 "(a) FINDINGS.-The Congress finds the following:

9 "(1) It is the established policy of the United

10 States to support and seek the protection and res-

11 toration of natural coastal marine areas, in par-

12 ticular coral reefs and other critically imperiled

13 coastal marine resources around the world, as dem-

14 onstrated by the establishment of the United States

15 Government's Coral Reef Task Force under Execu-

16 tive Order 13089 (June 11, 1998) and by the em-

17 phasis given to coral reefs at the Conference on

18 Oceans held in Monterey, California.

19 "(2) Coral reefs and other coastal marine re-

20 sources provide a wide range of benefits to mankind

21 by-

22 "(A) harboring a major share of the

23 world's marine biological diversity, and by act-

24 ing as seed-grounds and nurseries for many

25 deep-sea species; and


*HR 1996 IH







3
1 "(B) serving as the basis for major activi-

2 ties of critical economic, social, and cultural im-

3 portance, including fishing, pharmaceutical re-

4 search, recreation, tourism, and the natural pu-

5 rification and recharge of waters.

6 "(3) International organizations and assistance

7 programs to conserve coral reefs and other coastal

8 marine resources have proliferated in recent years,

9 but the rapid destruction of these resources nonethe-

10 less continues in many countries.

11 "(4) Poverty and economic pressures on many

12 developing countries, including the burden of official

13 debts, has promoted inefficient, unsustainable over-

14 exploitation of coral reefs and other coastal marine

15 resources, while also denying necessary funds to pro-

16 tection efforts.

17 "(5) Reduction of official, government-to-gov-

18 ernment debts can help reduce economic pressures

19 for over-exploitation of coral reefs and other coastal

20 marine resources and can mobilize additional re-

21 sources for their protection.

22 "(b) PURPOSES.-The purposes of this part are-

23 "(1) to recognize the values received by United

24 States citizens from protection of coral reefs and

25 other coastal marine resources;


*HR 1996 IH







4

1 "(2) to facilitate greater protection of remain-

2 ing coral reefs and other coastal marine resources,

3 and the recovery of damaged areas, by providing for

4 the alleviation of debt in countries where these re-

5 sources are located, thus allowing for the use of ad-

6 ditional resources to protect and restore such coral

7 reefs and other coastal marine resources, and to re-

8 duce economic pressures that have led to

9 unsustainable exploitation; and

10 "(3) to ensure that resources freed from debt in

11 such countries are rechanneled to protection of coral

12 reefs and other coastal marine resources.

13 "SEC. 903. DEFINITIONS.

14 "In this part:

15 "(1) ADMINISTERING BODY.-The term 'admin-

16 istering body' means the entity provided for in sec-

17 tion 908(c).

18 "(2) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMIT-

19 TEES.-The term 'appropriate congressional com-

20 mittees' means-

21 "(A) the Committee on International Rela-

22 tions and the Committee on Appropriations of

23 the House of Representatives; and


*HR 1996 IH







5
1 "(B) the Committee on Foreign Relations

2 and the Committee on Appropriations of the

3 Senate.

4 "(3) BENEFICIARY COUNTRY.-The term 'bene-

5 ficiary country' means an eligible country with re-

6 spect to which the authority of section 906(a) or

7 paragraph (1) or (2) of section 907(a) of this part

8 is exercised.

9 "(4) BOARD.-The term 'Board' means the

10 board referred to in section 910.

11 "(5) CORAL.-The term 'coral' means species

12 of the phylum Cnidaria, including-

13 "(A) all species of the orders Antipatharia

14 (black corals), Scleractinia (stony corals),

15 Alcyonacea (soft corals), Gorgonacea (horny

16 corals), Stolonifera (organpipe corals and oth-

17 ers), and Coenothecalia (blue coral), of the class

18 Anthozoa; and

19 "(B) all species of the order

20 Hydrocorallina (fire corals and hydrocorals) of

21 the class Hydrozoa.

22 "(6) CORAL REEF.-The term 'coral reef

23 means any reef or shoal composed primarily of cor-

24 als.


.HR 1996 IH







6
1 "(7) DEVELOPING COUNTRY WITH A CORAL

2 REEF OR OTHER COASTAL MARINE RESOURCE.-The

3 term 'developing country with a coral reef or other

4 coastal marine resource' means-

5 "(A)(i) a country that has a per capital in-

6 come of $725 or less in 1994 United States dol-

7 lars. (commonly referred to as 'low-income coun-

8 try'), as determined and adjusted on an annual

9 basis by the International Bank for Reconstruc-

10 tion and Development in its World Development

11 Report; or

12 "(ii) a country that has a per capital in-

13 come of more than $725 but less than $8,956

14 in 1994 United States dollars (commonly re-

15 ferred to as 'middle-income country'), as deter-

16 mined and adjusted on an annual basis by the

17 International Bank for Reconstruction and De-

18 velopment in its World Development Report;

19 and

20 "(B) a country that contains at least one

21 coral reef or other coastal marine resource that

22 is of conservation concern.

23 "(8) ELIGIBLE COUNTRY.-The term 'eligible

24 country' means a country designated by the Presi-

25 dent in accordance with section 905.


*HR 1996 IH







7
1 "(9) CORAL REEF AND OTHER COASTAL MA-

2 RINE RESOURCES AGREEMENT.-The term 'Coral

3 Reef and Other Coastal Marine Resources Agree-

4 ment' or 'Agreement' means an Coral Reef and

5 Other Coastal Marine Resources Agreement as pro-

6 vided for in section 908.

7 "(10) CORAL REEF AND OTHER COASTAL MA-

8 RINE RESOURCES FACILITY.-The term 'Coral Reef

9 and Other Coastal Marine Resources Facility' or

10 'Facility' means the Coral Reef and Other Coastal

11 Marine Resources Facility established in the Depart-

12 ment of the Treasury by section 904.

13 "(11) CORAL REEF AND OTHER COASTAL MA-

14 RINE RESOURCES FUND.-The term 'Coral Reef and

15 Other Coastal Marine Resources Fund' or 'Fund'

16 means a Coral Reef and Other Coastal Marine Re-

17 sources Fund provided for in section 909.

18 "SEC. 904. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FACILITY.

19 "There is established in the Department of the

20 Treasury an entity to be known as the 'Coral Reef and

21 Other Coastal Marine Resources Facility' for the purpose

22 of providing for the administration of debt reduction in

23 accordance with this part.


HR 1996 IH







8
1 "SEC. 905. ELIGIBILITY FOR BENEFITS.

2 "(a) IN GENERAL.-To be eligible for benefits from

3 the Facility under this part, a country shall be a devel-

4 oping country with a coral reef or other coastal marine

5 resource-

6 "(1) the government of which meets the re-

7 quirements applicable to Latin American or Carib-

8 bean countries under paragraphs (1) through (5)

9 and (7) of section 703(a) of this Act; and

10 "(2) that has established investment reforms,

11 as evidenced by the conclusion of a bilateral invest-

12 ment treaty with the United States, implementation

13 of an investment sector loan with the Inter-Amer-

14 ican Development Bank, World Bank-supported in-

15 vestment reforms, or other measures, as appropriate.

16 "(b) ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATIONS.-

17 "(1) IN GENERAL.-Consistent with subsection

18 (a), the President shall determine whether a country

19 is eligible to receive benefits under this part.

20 "(2) CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION.-The

21 President shall notify the appropriate congressional

22 committees of the intention of the President to des-

23 ignate a country as an eligible country at least 15

24 days in advance of any formal determination.


*HR 1996 I







9
1 "SEC. 906. REDUCTION OF DEBT OWED TO THE UNITED

2 STATES AS A RESULT OF CONCESSIONAL

3 LOANS UNDER THIS ACT.

4 "(a) AUTHORITY TO REDUCE DEBT.-

5 "(1) AUTIIORITY.-The President may reduce

6 the amount owed to the United States (or any agen-

7 cy of the United States) that is outstanding as of

8 January 1, 2005, as a result of concessional loans

9 made to an eligible country by the United States

10 under this Act or predecessor foreign economic as-

11 distance legislation.

12 "(2) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.-

13 For the cost (as defined in section 502(5) of the

14 Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990) for the reduc-

15 tion of any debt pursuant to this section, there are

16 authorized to be appropriated to the President

17 $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2006

18 through 2009.

19 "(3) CERTAIN PROHIBITIONS INAPPLICABLE.-

20 "(A) IN GENERAL.-A reduction of debt

21 pursuant to this section shall not be considered

22 assistance for purposes of any provision of law

23 limiting assistance to a country.

24 "(B) ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT.-The

25 authority of this section may be exercised not-

26 withstanding section 620(r) of this Act or sec-
.HR 1996 IH







10
1 tion 321 of the International Development and

2 Food Assistance Act of 1975.

3 "(b) IMPLEMENTATION OF DEBT REDUCTION.-

4 "(1) IN GENERAL.-Any debt reduction pursu-

5 ant to subsection (a) shall be accomplished at the di-

6 reaction of the Facility by the exchange of a new obli-

7 gation for obligations of the type referred to in sub-

8 section (a) outstanding as of the date specified in

9 subsection (a)(1).

10 "(2) EXCHANGE OF OBLIGATIONS.-

11 "(A) IN GENERAL.-The Facility shall no-

12 tify the United States Agency for International

13 Development of an agreement entered into

14 under paragraph (1) with an eligible country to

15 exchange a new obligation for outstanding obli-

16 gations.

17 "(B) ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT.-At the

18 direction of the Facility, the old obligations that

19 are the subject of the agreement shall be can-

20 celed and a new debt obligation for the country

21 shall be established relating to the agreement,

22 and the United States Agency for International

23 Development shall make an adjustment in its
24 accounts to reflect the debt reduction.


*HR 1996 IH







11
1 "(c) ADDITIONAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS.-The

2 following additional terms and conditions shall apply to

3 the reduction of debt under subsection (a)(1) in the same

4 manner as such terms and conditions apply to the reduc-

5 tion of debt under section 704(a)(1) of this Act:

6 "(1) The provisions relating to repayment of

7 principal under section 705 of this Act.

8 "(2) The provisions relating to interest on new

9 obligations under section 706 of this Act.

10 "SEC. 907. AUTHORITY TO ENGAGE IN DEBT-FOR-NATURE

11 SWAPS AND DEBT BUYBACKS.

12 "(a) LOANS AND CREDITS ELIGIBLE FOR SALE, RE-

13 DUCTION,-OR CANCELLATION.-

14 "(1) DEBT-FOR-NATURE SWAPS.-

15 "(A) IN GENERAL.-Notwithstanding any

16 other provision of law, the President may, in

17 accordance with this section, sell to any eligible

18 purchaser described in subparagraph (B) any

19 concessional loans described in section

20 906(a)(l), or on receipt of payment from an eli-

21 gible purchaser described in subparagraph (B),

22 reduce or cancel such loans or portion thereof,

23 only for the purpose of facilitating a debt-for-

24 nature swap to support eligible activities de-

25 scribed in section 908(d).


*HR 1996 IH







12
1 "(B) ELIGIBLE PURCHASER DESCRIBED.-

2 A loan may be sold, reduced, or canceled under

3 subparagraph (A) only to a purchaser who pre-

4 sents plans satisfactory to the President for

5 using the loan for the purpose of engaging in

6 debt-for-nature swaps to support eligible activi-

7 ties described in section 908(d).

8 "(C) CONSULTATION REQUIREMENT.-Be-

9 fore the sale under subparagraph (A) to any eli-

10 gible purchaser described in subparagraph (B),

11 or any reduction or cancellation under such

12 subparagraph (A), of any loan made to an eligi-

13 ble country, the President shall consult with the

14 country concerning the amount of loans to be

15 sold, reduced, or canceled and their uses for

16 debt-for-nature swaps to support eligible activi-

17 ties described in section 908(d).

18 "(D) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIA-

19 TIONS.-For the cost (as defined in section

20 502(5) of the Federal Credit Reform Act of

21 1990) for the reduction of any debt pursuant to

22 subparagraph (A), amounts authorized to be

23 appropriated under section 906(a)(2) shall be

24 made available for such reduction of debt pur-

25 suant to subparagraph (A).


*HR 1996 IH







13
1 "(2) DEBT BUYBACKS.-Notwithstanding any

2 other provision of law, the President may, in accord-

3 ance with this section, sell to any eligible country

4 any concessional loans described in section

5 906(a)(1), or on receipt of payment from an eligible

6 purchaser described in paragraph (1)(B), reduce or

7 cancel such loans or portion thereof, only for the

8 purpose of facilitating a debt buyback by an eligible

9 country of its own qualified debt, only if the eligible

10 country uses an additional amount of the local cur-

11 rency of the eligible country, equal to not less than

12 the lessor of 40 percent of the price paid for such

13 debt by such eligible country, or the difference be-
14 tween the price paid for such debt and the face value

15 of such debt, to support eligible activities described
16 in section 908(d).

17 "(3) LLMITATION.-The authority provided by

18 paragraphs (1) and (2) shall be available only to the

19 extent that appropriations for the cost (as defined in
20 section 502(5) of the Federal Credit Reform Act of
21 1990) of the modification of any debt pursuant to

22 such paragraphs are made in advance.
23 "(4) TERMS AND CONDITIONS.-Notwith-

24 standing any other provision of law, the President
25 shall, in accordance with this section, establish the


.HR 1996 IH








14
1 terms and conditions under which loans may be sold,

2 reduced, or canceled pursuant to this section.

3 "(5) ADMINISTRATION.-

4 "(A) IN GENERAL.-The Facility shall no-

5 tify the Administrator of the United States

6 Agency for International Development of eligi-

7 ble purchasers described in paragraph (1)(B)

8 that the President has determined to be eligible

9 under paragraph (1), and shall direct such

10 agency to carry out the sale, reduction, or can-

11 cellation of a loan pursuant to such paragraph.

12 "(B) ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT.-Such

13 agency shall make an adjustment in its ac-

14 counts to reflect the sale, reduction, or cancella-

15 tion of such a loan.

16 "(b) DEPOSIT OF PROCEEDS.-The proceeds from

17 the sale, reduction, or cancellation of any loan sold, re-

18 duced or canceled pursuant to this section shall be depos-

19 ited in the United States Government account or accounts

20 established for the repayment of such loan.

21 "SEC. 908. CORAL REEF AND OTHER COASTAL MARINE RE-

22 SOURCES AGREEMENT.

23 "(a) AUTHORITY.-

24 "(1) IN GENERAL.-The Secretary of State is

25 authorized, in consultation with other appropriate


*HR 1996 H







15
1 officials of the Federal Government, to enter into a

2 Coral Reef and Other Coastal Marine Resources

3 Agreement with any eligible country concerning the

4 operation and use of the Fund for that country.

5 "(2) CONSULTATION.-In the negotiation of

6 such an Agreement, the Secretary shall consult with

7 the Board in accordance with section 910.

8 "(b) CONTENTS OF AGREEMENT.-The requirements

9 contained in section 708(b) of this Act (relating to con-

10 tents of an agreement) shall apply to an Agreement in

11 the same manner as such requirements apply to an Amer-

12 icas Framework Agreement.

13 "(c) ADMINISTERING BODY.-

14 "(1) IN GENERAL.--Amounts disbursed from

15 the Fund in each beneficiary country shall be admin-

16 istered by a body constituted under the laws of that

17 country.

18 "(2) COMPOSITION.-

19 "(A) IN GENERAL.-The administering

20 body shall consist of-

21 "(i) one or more individuals appointed

22 by the United States Government;

23 "(ii) one or more individuals ap-

24 pointed by the government of the bene-

25 ficiary country; and


*HR 1996 IH







16
1 "(iii) individuals who represent a

2 broad range of-

3 "(I) environmental non-govern-

4 mental organizations of, or active in,

5 the beneficiary country;

6 "(II) local community develop-

7 ment non-governmental organizations

8 of the beneficiary country; and

9 "(III) scientific, academic, or for-

10 estry organizations of the beneficiary

11 country.

12 "(B) ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT.-A ma-

13 jority of the members of the administering body

14 shall be individuals described in subparagraph

15 (A)(iii).
16 "(3) RESPONSIBILITIES.-The requirements

17 contained in section 708(c)(3) of this Act (relating

18 to responsibilities of the administering body) shall

19 apply to an administering body described in para-

20 graph (1) in the same manner as such requirements

21 apply to an administering body described in section

22 708(c)(1) of this Act.

23 "(d) ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES.-Amounts deposited in a

24 Fund shall be used only to provide grants to conserve,

25 maintain, and restore the coral reefs and other coastal ma-


*HR 1996 IH







17
1 rine resources in the beneficiary country, through one or

2 more of the following activities:

3 "(1) Establishment, restoration, protection, and

4 maintenance of parks, protected areas, and reserves.

5 "(2) Development and implementation of sci-

6 entifically sound systems of natural resource man-

7 agement, including 'ridgeline to reef and ecosystem

8 management practices.

9 "(3) Training programs to increase the sci-

10 entific, technical, and managerial capacities of indi-

11 viduals and organizations involved in conservation

12 efforts.

13 "(4) Restoration, protection, or sustainable use

14 of diverse marine animal and plant species.

15 "(5) Development and support of the livelihoods

16 of individuals living near a coral reef or other coast-

17 al marine resource, in a manner consistent with pro-

18 testing those resources.

19 "(e) GRANT RECIPIENTS.-

20 "(1) IN GENERAL.-Grants made from a Fund

21 shall be made to-

22 "(A) nongovernmental environmental, for-

23 estry, conservation, and indigenous peoples or-

24 ganizations of, or active in, the beneficiary

25 country;


*HR 1996 IH








18
1 "(B) other appropriate local or regional

2 entities of, or active in, the beneficiary country;

3 or

4 "(C) in exceptional circumstances, the gov-

5 ernment of the beneficiary country.

6 "(2) PRIORITY.-In providing grants under

7 paragraph (1), priority shall be given to projects

8 that are run by nongovernmental organizations and

9 other private entities and that involve local commu-

10 nities in their planning and execution.

11 "(f) REVIEW OF LARGER GRANTS.-Any grant of

12 more than $100,000 from a Fund shall be subject to veto

13 by the Government of the United States or the govern-

14 ment of the beneficiary country.

15 "(g) ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA.-In the event that a

16 country ceases to meet the eligibility requirements set

17 forth in section 905(a), as determined by the President

18 pursuant to section 905(b), then grants from the Fund

19 for that country may only be made to nongovernmental

20 organizations until such time as the President determines

21 that such country meets the eligibility requirements set

22 forth in section 905(a).


*HR 1996 IH







19
1 "SEC. 909. CORAL REEF AND OTHER COASTAL MARINE RE-

2 SOURCES FUND.

3 "(a) ESTABLISHMENT.-Each beneficiary country

4 that enters into a Coral Reef and Other Coastal Marine

5 Resources Agreement under section 908 shall be required

6 to establish a Coral Reef and Other Coastal Marine Re-

7 sources Fund to receive payments of interest on new obli-

8 gations undertaken by the beneficiary country under this

9 part.

10 "(b) REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO OPERATION OF

11 FuND.-The following terms and conditions shall apply

12 to the Fund in the same manner as such terms as condi-

13 tions apply to an Enterprise for the Americas Fund under

14 section 707 of this Act:

15 "(1) The provision relating to deposits under

16 subsection (b) of such section.

17 "(2) The provision relating to investments

18 under subsection (c) of such section.

19 "(3) The provision relating to disbursements

20 under subsection (d) of such section.

21 "SEC. 910. BOARD.

22 "(a) ENTERPRISE FOR THE AMERICAS BOARD.-The

23 Enterprise for the Americas Board established under sec-

24 tion 610(a) of the Agricultural Trade Development and

25 Assistance Act of 1954 (7 U.S.C. 1738i(a)) shall, in addi-

26 tion to carrying out the responsibilities of the Board under
*HR 1996 IH







20
1 section 610(c) of such Act, carry out the duties described

2 in subsection (c) of this section for the purposes of this

3 part.

4 "(b) MEMBERSHIP.-

5 "(1) INITIAL MEMBERSHIP.-Of the six mem-

6 bers of the Enterprise for the Americas Board ap-

7 pointed by the President under section 610(b)(1)(A)

8 of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assist-

9 ance Act of 1954 (7 U.S.C. 1738i(b)(1)(A)), at least

10 one shall be a representative of the Department of

11 State, at least one shall be a representative of the

12 Department of the Treasury, and at least one shall

13 be a representative of the Inter-American Founda-

14 tion.

15 "(2) ADDITIONAL MEMBERSHIP.-The Enter-

16 prise for the Americas Board shall be composed of

17 an additional four members appointed by the Presi-

18 dent as follows:

19 "(A) Two representatives from the United

20 States Government, including a representative

21 of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric

22 Administration (NOAA) and a representative of

23 the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

24 "(B) Two representatives from private

25 nongovernmental environmental, scientific, for-


.HR 1996 IH







21
1 estry, or academic organizations with experience

2 and expertise in preservation, maintenance, sus-

3 tainable uses, and restoration of coral reefs and

4 other coastal marine resources.

5 "(c) DUTIEs.-The duties described in this sub-

6 section are as follows:

7 "(1) Advise the Secretary of State on the nego-

8 tiations of Coral Reef and Other Coastal Marine Re-

9 sources Agreements.

10 "(2) Ensure, in consultation with-

11 "(A) the government of the beneficiary

12 country;

13 "(B) nongovernmental organizations of the

14 beneficiary country;

15 "(C) nongovernmental organizations of the

16 region (if appropriate);

17 "(D) environmental, scientific, oceano-

18 graphic, and academic leaders of the beneficiary

19 country; and

20 "(E) environmental, scientific, oceano-

21 graphic, and academic leaders of the region (as

22 appropriate),

23 that a suitable administering body is identified for

24 each Fund.


*HR 1996 IH







22
1 "(3) Review the programs, operations, and fis-

2 cal audits of each administering body.

3 "SEC. 911. CONSULTATIONS WITH THE CONGRESS.

4 "The President shall consult with the appropriate

5 congressional committees on a periodic basis to review the

6 operation of the Facility under this part and the eligibility

7 of countries for benefits from the Facility under this part.

8 "SEC. 912. ANNUAL REPORTS TO THE CONGRESS.

9 "(a) IN GENERAL.-Not later than December 31 of

10 each year, the President shall prepare and transmit to the

11 Congress an annual report concerning the operation of the

12 Facility for the prior fiscal year. Such report shall

13 include-

14 "(1) a description of the activities undertaken

15 by the Facility during the previous fiscal year;

16 "(2) a description of any Agreement entered

17 into under this part;

18 "(3) a report on any Funds that have been es-

19 tablished under this part and on the operations of

20 such Funds; and

21 "(4) a description of any grants that have been

22 provided by administering bodies pursuant to Agree-

23 ments under this part.

24 "(b) SUPPLEMENTAL VIEWS IN ANNUAL REPORT.-

25 Not later than December 15 of each year, each member


1HR 1996 IH





57

23

1 of the Board shall be entitled to receive a copy of the re-

2 port required under subsection (a). Each member of the

3 Board may prepare and submit supplemental views to the

4 President on the implementation of this part by December

5 31 for inclusion in the annual report when it is trans-

6 mitted to Congress pursuant to this section.".
O


* HR 1996












109TH CONGRESS
2D SESSION


H. R. 5805


To promote nuclear nonproliferation in North Korea.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
JULY 13, 2006
Mr. ROYCE (for himself, Mr. SHERMAN, Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN, Mr. MCCOTTER,
Mr. CARDOZA, Ms. WATSON, Mr. BURTON of Indiana, Ms. McCOLLUM
of Minnesota, Mr. ISSA, and Mr. BERMAN) introduced the following bill;
which was referred to the Committee on International Relations, and in
addition to the Committee on Science, for a period to be subsequently de-
termined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions
as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned




A BILL
To promote nuclear nonproliferation in North Korea.

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa-

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
3 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
4 This Act may be cited as the "North Korea Non-

5 proliferation Act of 2006".
6 SEC. 2. STATEMENT OF POLICY.

7 In view of North Korea's manifest determination to

8 proliferate missiles, nuclear weapons, and other weapons

9 of mass destruction in violation of international norms and







2
1 expectations, it should be the policy of the United States

2 to impose sanctions on persons who transfer such weap-

3 ons, and goods and technology related to such weapons,

4 to and from North Korea in the same manner as persons

5 who transfer such items to and from Iran and Syria cur-

6 rently are sanctioned under United States law.

7 SEC. 3. AMENDMENTS TO IRAN AND SYRIA NONPROLIFERA-

8 TION ACT.

9 (a) REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.-Section 2 of the

10 Iran and Syria Nonproliferation Act (Public Law 106-

11 178; 50 U.S.C. 1701 note) is amended-

12 (1) in the heading, by inserting ", NORTH

13 KOREA," after "IRAN"; and

14 (2) in subsection (a)-

15 (A) in the matter preceding paragraph

16 (1)-

17 (i) by striking "Iran, or" and insert-

18 ing "Iran,"; and

19 (ii) by inserting after "Syria" the fol-

20 lowing: ", or on or after January 1, 2006,

21 transferred to or acquired from North

22 Korea" after "Iran"; and

23 (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting ",

24 North Korea," after "Iran".


*HR 5805 IH







3
1 (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.-Such Act is fur-

2 their amended-

3 (1) in section 1, by inserting ", NORTH

4 KOREA," after "IRAN";

5 (2) in section 5(a), by inserting ", North

6 Korea," after "Iran" both places it appears; and

7 (3) in section 6(b)-

8 (A) in the heading, by inserting ", NORTH

9 KOREA," after "IRAN"; and

10 (B) by inserting ", North Korea," after

11 "Iran" each place it appears.

12 SEC. 4. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON INTERNATIONAL CO-

13 OPERATION.

14 Congress urges all governments concerned about the

15 threat of proliferation involving North Korea to impose

16 measures on persons involved in such proliferation that

17 are similar to those imposed by the United States Govern-

18 ment pursuant to the Iran, North Korea, and Syria Non-

19 proliferation Act, as amended by this Act.
0


.HR 5805 IH





H.L.C.






AMENDMENT IN THE NATURE OF A SUBSTITUTE

TO H.R. 5805

OFFERED BY MR. ROYCE OF CALIFORNIA

Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the

following:

1 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

2 This Act may be cited as the "North Korea Non-

3 proliferation Act of 2006".

4 SEC. 2. STATEMENT OF POLICY.

5 In view of-

6 (1) North Korea's manifest determination to

7 proliferate missiles, nuclear weapons, and other

8 weapons of mass destruction in violation of inter-

9 national norms and expectations, and

10 (2) United Nations Security Council Resolution

11 1695, adopted unanimously on July 15, 2006, which

12 condemned the multiple launches by North Korea of

13 ballistic missiles on July 4, 2006, and requires all

14 Member States, in accordance with their national

15 legal authorities and consistent with international

16 law, to exercise vigilance and prevent-

17 (A) missile and missile-related items, mate-

18 rials, goods, and technology from being trans-





62
H.L.C.
2
1 ferred to North Korea's missile or weapons of

2 mass destruction programs, and

3 (B) the procurement of missiles or missile-

4 related items, materials, goods, and technology

5 from North Korea, and the transfer of any fi-

6 nancial resources in relation to North Korea's

7 missile or weapons of mass destruction pro-

8 grams,

9 it should be the policy of the United States to im-

10 pose sanctions on persons who transfer such weap-

11 ons, and goods and technology related to such weap-

12 ons, to and from North Korea in the same manner

13 as persons who transfer such items to and from Iran

14 and Syria currently are sanctioned under United

15 States law.

16 SEC. 3. AMENDMENTS TO IRAN AND SYRIA NONPROLIFERA-

17 TION ACT.

18 (a) REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.-Section 2 of the

19 Iran and Syria Nonproliferation Act (Public Law 106-

20 178; 50 U.S.C. 1701 note) is amended-

21 (1) in the heading, by inserting ", NORTH

22 KOREA," after "IRAN"; and

23 (2) in subsection (a)-

24 (A) in the matter preceding paragraph

25 (1)-





H.L.C.
3
1 (i) by striking "Iran, or" and insert-

2 ing "Iran,"; and

3 (ii) by inserting after "Syria" the fol-

4 lowing: ", or on or after January 1, 2006,

5 transferred to or acquired from North

6 Korea" after "Iran"; and

7 (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting ",

8 North Korea," after "Iran".

9 (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.-Such Act is fur-

10 their amended-

11 (1) in section 1, by inserting ", North Korea,"

12 after "Iran";

13 (2) in section 5(a), by inserting ", North

14 Korea," after "Iran" both places it appears; and

15 (3) in section 6(b)-

16 (A) in the heading, by inserting ", North

17 Korea," after "Iran"; and

18 (B) by inserting ", North Korea," after

19 "Iran" each place it appears.

20 SEC. 4. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON INTERNATIONAL CO-

21 OPERATION.

22 Given the threat to international peace and security

23 by North Korea's pursuit of nuclear, chemical and biologi-

24 cal weapons, as well as their means of delivery, Congress

25 urges all governments to comply promptly with United





64
H.L.C.
4
1 Nations Security Council Resolution 1695 and to impose

2 measures on persons involved in such proliferation that

3 are similar to those imposed by the United States Govern-

4 ment pursuant to the Iran, North Korea, and Syria Non-

5 proliferation Act, as amended by this Act.





65
H.L.C.

5

Amend the title so as to read: "A Bill to promote
nuclear nonproliferation in North Korea.".








IV


109TH CONGRESS
1ST SESSION H. RIS. 415


Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the Socialist
Republic of Vietnam needs to do more to resolve claims for confiscated
real and personal property, and for other purposes.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
JULY 28, 2005
Ms. LORETTA SANCHEZ of California (for herself and Mr. BURTON of Indi-
ana) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Com-
mittee on International Relations




RESOLUTION
Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that
the Socialist Republic of Vietnam needs to do more to
resolve claims for confiscated real and personal property,
and for other purposes.

Whereas during the establishment of the Socialist Republic of
Vietnam as a 1-party state ruled and controlled by the
Vietnamese Communist Party, uncompensated confisca-
tion of real and personal property from Vietnamese citi-
zens was a widespread occurrence;
Whereas the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam
continues to use the confiscation of land as a tool of re-
pression against certain ethnic minorities, such as the
Montagnards of the Central Highlands region;







2
Whereas Article 23 of the Constitution of the Socialist Re-
public of Vietnam provides that "[t]he lawful property of
individuals and organizations shall not be nationalized";

Whereas according to the Department of State, more work is
necessary to adequately protect property rights in Viet-
nam; and

Whereas the people of the United States are firmly com-
mitted to freedom, democracy, and basic human rights
for the citizens of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam:
Now, therefore, be it

1 Resolved, That-

2 (1) The House of Representatives-

3 (A) welcomes recent attempts by the Gov-

4 ernment of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to

5 establish private land use rights for some of its

6 citizens, and hopes that these rights are quickly

7 expanded to encompass all Vietnamese citizens;

8 (B) calls on the Government of the Social-

9 ist Republic of Vietnam to more fully recognize

10 its responsibility to provide equitable, prompt,

11 and fair restitution of property that was con-

12 fiscated by the government;

13 (C) calls on the Government of the Social-

14 ist Republic of Vietnam to direct local officials,

15 particularly in the Central Highlands region, to

16 promptly investigate and resolve complaints


*HRES 415 IH







3
1 about discriminatory and uncompensated con-

2 fiscation of land;

3 (D) urges the Government of the Socialist

4 Republic of Vietnam to form a national com-

5 mission for processing restitution claims, and to

6 obligate local government officials, bodies, and

7 agencies to provide all necessary documentation

8 and cooperation to facilitate the implementation

9 of decisions issued by the national commission;

10 and

11 (E) strongly urges the Government of the

12 Socialist Republic of Vietnam-

13 (i) to ensure that implementation of

14 land use reforms by local officials does not

15 result in increased inequity in access to

16 land, particularly for the poor and for

17 those out of favor with the Communist

18 Party; and

19 (ii) to ensure that the government

20 provides fair, prompt, and equitable res-

21 titution to former landowners for the prop-

22 erty rights of all confiscated lands; and

23 (2) it is the sense of the House of Representa-

24 tives that-


*HRES 415 IH







4
1 (A) the President should specifically con-

2 sider land use rights for individuals in deter-

3 mining whether the Socialist Republic of Viet-

4 nam is a country of particular concern for reli-

5 gious freedom under section 402(b)(1)(A) of

6 the International Religious Freedom Act of

7 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6442(b)(1)(A)); and

8 (B) the President should direct the Sec-

9 retary of State to include, in the Secretary of

10 State's annual Country Reports on Human

11 Rights Practices submitted to the Congress

12 under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the

13 status of land use rights and restitution claims

14 in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
O


*HRES 415 IH





70
H.L.C.






AMENDMENT TO H. RES. 415

OFFERED BY M_ .

Strike the second clause of the preamble.

Page 2, line 5, strike "some of".









IV


109TH CONGRESS
1ST SESSION H 622


To recognize and honor the Filipino World War II veterans for their defense
of democratic ideals and their important contribution to the outcome
of World War II.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
DECEMBER 16, 2005
Mr. ISSA (for himself, Mr. FILNER, Mr. BERMAN, Ms. BORDALLO, and Mr.
HUNTER) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the
Committee on International Relations




RESOLUTION
To recognize and honor the Filipino World War II veterans
for their defense of democratic ideals and their important
contribution to the outcome of World War II.

Whereas in 1898, the Philippines Archipelago was acquired
by the United States, became an organized United States
territory in 1902, and, in preparation for independence,
became a self-governing commonwealth in 1935;

Whereas the people of the Philippines and of the United
States developed strong ties throughout the decades-long
democratic transition of the island, compelling the United
States to assume the responsibilities of defending the ar-
chipelago and protecting the people of the Philippines;







2
Whereas on July 26, 1941, anticipating the aggression of
Japanese invasion forces in the Asia Pacific region, as
well as the imminent conflict between the United States
and Japan, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a
military order, calling the organized military forces of the
Government of the Commonwealth of the Philippines into
armed service under the command of United States Army
officers led by General Douglas MacArthur;

Whereas on December 7, 1941, the Japanese Government
began a devastating four-year war with the United States
with their stealth bombing attacks of Pearl Harbor, Ha-
waii, and Clark Air Field, Philippines, and led to the loss
of tens of thousands of American and Filipino soldiers
and countless civilian casualties;

Whereas on February 20, 1946, President Harry Truman
stated, "Philippine Army veterans are nationals of the
United States and will continue in that status until July
4, 1946. They fought, as American nationals, under the
American flag, and under the direction of our military
leaders. They fought with gallantry and courage under
most difficult conditions. I consider it a moral obligation
of the United States to look after the welfare of the Phil-
ippine Army veterans.";

Whereas on October 17, 1996, President William J. Clinton
issued a proclamation on the anniversary of the 1944 re-
turn of United States forces under General MacArthur to
liberate the Philippines and said, "I urge all Americans
to recall the courage, sacrifice, and loyalty of Filipino
Veterans of World War II and honor them for their con-
tribution to our freedom.";

Whereas on July 26, 2001, President George W. Bush, in his
greetings to the Filipino World War II veterans said,


*HRES 622 IH







3
"More than 120,000 Filipinos fought with unwavering
loyalty and great gallantry under the command of Gen-
eral Douglas MacArthur. The combined United States-
Philippine forces distinguished themselves by their valor
and heroism in defense of freedom and democracy. Thou-
sands of Filipino soldiers gave their lives in the battles
of Bataan and Corregidor. These soldiers won for the
United States the precious time needed to disrupt the en-
emy's plan for conquest in the Pacific. During the three
long years following these battles, the Filipino people val-
iantly resisted a brutal Japanese occupation with an in-
domitable spirit and steadfast loyalty to America."; and

Whereas the contributions of the Filipino people, and the sac-
rifices of their soldiers in World War II, have not been
fully recognized: Now, therefore, be it

1 Resolved, That the House of Representatives reaf-

2 firms, recognizes, and honors the Filipino World War II

3 veterans for their defense of American democracy and

4 their important contribution to the victorious outcome of

5 World War II.
0


*HRES 622 IH





74
H.L.C.





AMENDMENT TO H. RES. 622

OFFERED BY MR. HYDE OF ILLINOIS

Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the

following: "That the House of Representatives recognizes

and honors Filipino World War II veterans for their im-

portant contributions to the victorious outcome of World

War II, including their valiant fight for the liberation of

their homeland and their defense of democratic ideals.".









IV


109TH CONGRESS
2D SESSION S 723


Calling on the President to take immediate steps to help improve the security
situation in Darfur, Sudan, with a specific emphasis on civilian protection.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
MARCH 14, 2006
Mr. LANTOS (for himself, Mr. PITTS, Mr. TANCREDO, Mr. PAYNE, Mr. RAN-
GEL, Mr. BERMAN, Mr. BURTON of Indiana, Mrs. MALONEY, Mr.
McGOVERN, Mr. MCCOTTER, Ms. LEE, Mr. RYAN of Ohio, Mr.
ADERHOLT, Mr. McNuLTY, Mr. GORDON, Mr. BROWN of Ohio, Ms.
LINDA T. SANCHEZ of California, Mr. KILDEE, Mr. WAXMAN, Mr. CROW-
LEY, Ms. NORTON, Mr. RUSH, Ms. WATSON, Mr. CARDOZA, Mr. NEAL,
of Massachusetts, Mr. OWENS, Mr. ENGEL, Mr. CLAY, Mr. ACKERMAN,
Mr. VAN HOLLEN, Mr. VISCLOSKY, Mr. WEXLER, and Mr. CONYERS)
submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee
on International Relations




RESOLUTION

Calling on the President to take immediate steps to help
improve the security situation in Darfur, Sudan, with
a specific emphasis on civilian protection.

Whereas the United States Congress and Administration are
on record as declaring that the atrocities being com-
mitted in Darfur, Sudan are genocide;

Whereas the April 8, 2004, N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement,
calling for an end to hostilities in Darfur has been fla-
grantly violated by the Government of Sudan and its







2
proxies, the Janjaweed militias, which have continued to
engage in acts of genocide against innocent civilians;

Whereas the African Union (AU) deployed the African Union
Mission in Sudan (AMIS) to Darfur to monitor the vio-
lence and, in spite of attacks on AMIS observers that has
resulted in kidnapping and deaths, AMIS has protected
civilians from further violence and, according to Human
Rights Watch, while the mandate of AMIS does not allow
for proactive protection of civilians, AMIS has been suc-
cessful in creating pockets of security for displaced per-
sons simply through its presence;

Whereas rebel movements known as the Sudanese Liberation
Army (SLA) and the Justice and Empowerment Move-
ment (JEM) have violated the N'Djamena Ceasefire
Agreement and such violations have contributed to grow-
ing instability;

Whereas the Government of Sudan and its armed militia
groups continue to commit crimes against humanity and
engage in genocidal acts in Darfur, in spite of the pres-
ence of AMIS forces, and, as of February 22, 2006,
Janjaweed militias were still attacking innocent villagers
in retaliation for encounters with rebel forces;

Whereas subsequent to the signing of the Comprehensive
Peace Agreement between the Government of Sudan and
the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Sudan People's
Liberation Army (SPLM/SPLA) on January 9, 2005, the
Government of Sudan refused a proposal from the Sudan
People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) to send joint
troops to protect civilians and disarm the government-
supported militia;


*HRES 723 IH







3
Whereas United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan has
indicated that, "People in many parts of Darfur continue
to be killed, raped, and driven from their homes by the
thousands.";

Whereas it has been reported that an estimated 300,000 to
400,000 people have died in the conflict-affected area of
Darfur and eastern Chad, and due to the number of
areas that cannot be accounted for, the total number of
deaths may be higher;

Whereas nearly 2,000,000 people have been internally dis-
placed, 3,000,000 people are dependant on international
assistance to survive, and more than 200,000 people are
refugees in neighboring Chad due to the conflict in
Darfur;

Whereas Human Rights Watch reported on February 16,
2006, that Janjaweed militias and Chadian rebel groups
with support from the Sudanese Government were
launching deadly cross-border raids on villages in eastern
Chad, further escalating the humanitarian crisis for the
people of Darfur;

Whereas Salim Ahmed Salim, the AU Special Envoy for the
Darfur Talks and Chief Mediator at the ongoing talks in
Abuja, Nigeria, indicated that all parties to existing
ceasefire agreements were increasingly resorting to mili-
tary attacks in contravention of such agreements and im-
peding the distribution of humanitarian aid to millions of
people in need and that, in each month since October
2005, the violence in Darfur has worsened;

Whereas the ongoing assault on civilians by Sudanese Gov-
ernment forces and Janjaweed militias requires forces
larger than the current AMIS forces and with a stronger


*HRES 723 IH







4
mandate than such AMIS forces in order to adequately
protect civilians in Darfur;

Whereas the United States has demonstrated leadership on
the Sudan issue for years by mediating Sudan's North-
South Peace Agreement, by declaring genocide in Darfur,
by providing nearly $1 billion in humanitarian assistance
over time, and by having United States Permanent Rep-
resentative to the United Nations John Bolton, in his
first action as President of the United Nations Security
Council, request in February 2006 that Secretary-Gen-
eral Annan initiate contingency planning for a transition
from AMIS to a United Nations peacekeeping operation;

Whereas, although the United Nations Security Council has
concurred with this recommendation and taken steps to-
ward establishing a United Nations peacekeeping mission
for Darfur, reports have concluded that it could take up
to a year for such a mission to deploy fully;

Whereas, as the deteriorating security situation in Darfur in-
dicates, the people of Darfur cannot wait that long for
security to be reestablished;

Whereas the international community currently has no plan
to address the immediate security needs of the people of
Darfur; and

Whereas all members of the international community must
participate in efforts to stop genocide, war crimes, and
crimes against humanity in Darfur: Now, therefore, be it

1 Resolved, That the House of Representatives-

2 (1) commends the Africa Union Mission in

3 Sudan (AMIS) for its actions in monitoring the


*HRES 723 IH







5
1 N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement in Darfur and its

2 role in diminishing some acts of violence;

3 (2) strongly condemns-

4 (A) the continued genocide against civil-

5 ians in Darfur by the Government of Sudan

6 and government-sponsored militias; and

7 (B) the continued violations of the

8 N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement by both par-

9 ties to the agreement;

10 (3) calls upon both parties to the N'Djamena

11 Ceasefire Agreement-

12 (A) to abide by the terms of the

13 N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement; and

14 (B) to engage in good-faith negotiations to

15 end the conflict in Darfur;

16 (4) calls upon the Government of Sudan

17 immediately-
18 (A) to withdraw all military aircraft from

19 the region;
20 (B) to cease all support for Janjaweed mi-

21 litias and rebels from Chad; and
22 (C) to disarm all Janjaweed militias;

23 (5) calls on the African Union to work closely

24 with the United Nations and the North Atlantic

25 Treaty Organization (NATO) to strengthen its ca-


*HRES 723 IH







6
1 pacity to deter violence and instability until a United

2 Nations peacekeeping force is fully deployed in

3 Darfur;

4 (6) calls on NATO to extend its current mission

5 of advisors to the African Union, as requested by the

6 leadership of the African Union;

7 (7) calls upon the United Nations. Security

8 Council to approve as soon as possible, pursuant to

9 Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

10 a peacekeeping force for Darfur that is well trained

11 and equipped and has adequate troop strength;

12 (8) urges the President to take steps imme-

13 diately to help improve the security situation in

14 Darfur, including by-

15 (A) proposing that NATO-

16 (i) implement an interim civilian pro-

17 tection force using ground and air assets

18 under centralized planning, direction, and

19 control, to protect civilians until a United

20 Nations peacekeeping force is fully de-

21 played in Darfur; and

22 (B) requesting supplemental funding to

23 support AMIS and a NATO mission in Darfur;

24 (9) calls upon NATO allies to support such a

25 NATO mission; and


*HRES 723 IH







7

1 (10) calls upon NATO headquarters staff to

2 begin prudent planning in advance of such a NATO

3 mission.

0


.HRES 723 IH






H.L.C.





AMENDMENT IN THE NATURE OF A SUBSTITUTE

TO H. RES. 723

OFFERED BY MR. LANTOS OF CALIFORNIA

Strike the preamble and insert the following:

Whereas the United States Congress and the President are
on record as declaring that the atrocities being com-
mitted in Darfur, Sudan are genocide;

Whereas the United States has demonstrated leadership on
the Sudan issue for years, including by mediating Su-
dan's North-South Peace Agreement, by declaring geno-
cide in Darfur, by providing nearly $1 billion in humani-
tarian assistance over time, and by having United States
Permanent Representative to the United Nations John
Bolton, in his first action as President of the United Na-
tions Security Council, request in February 2006 that
United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan initiate
contingency planning for a transition from the African
Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) to a United Nations
peacekeeping force;

Whereas the African Union deployed AMIS to Darfur to
monitor the violence and, in spite of attacks on AMIS ob-
servers and the fact that the recently improved AMIS
mandate still does not provide sufficiently for proactive
protection of civilians, AMIS has been successful in cre-
ating pockets of security for displaced persons simply
through its presence;

Whereas the N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement of April 8,
2004, the Abuja Protocols of November 9, 2004, and the





H.L.C.
2
Darfur Peace Agreement of May 5, 2006, have not re-
sulted in a cessation of hostilities in Darfur;

Whereas the Government of Sudan and its armed militia
groups continue to commit crimes against humanity and
engage in genocidal acts in Darfur, in spite of the pres-
ence of AMIS forces, and, in early September 2006,
launched a major offensive in Darfur, in direct violation
of the Darfur Peace Agreement;

Whereas United Nations Secretary-General Annan has indi-
cated that, "People in many parts of Darfur continue to
be killed, raped, and driven from their homes by the
thousands.";

Whereas it has been reported that an estimated 300,000 to
400,000 people have died in the conflict-affected area of
Darfur and eastern Chad, and due to the number of
areas that cannot be accounted for, the total number of
deaths may be higher;

Whereas the ongoing assault against civilians by Sudanese
Government forces, Janjaweed militias, and rebels neces-
sitates the deployment of a larger, more capable inter-
national peacekeeping force with a strong mandate to
protect civilians in Darfur;

Whereas, although the United Nations Security Council ap-
proved Security Council Resolution 1706 (August 31,
2006) which provides for the deployment of a United Na-
tions peacekeeping mission in Darfur to include up to
22,500 personnel, the Government of Sudan has rejected
the terms of such Resolution and alternatively issued an
ultimatum to AMIS to extend its current mission beyond
September 2006 without transitioning to a United Na-
tions peacekeeping force; and






H.L.C.

3

Whereas on the same day on which the Government of Sudan
issued its ultimatum, the African Union stated that it
would quit the war-ravaged Darfur region if the Govern-
ment of Sudan did not allow a United Nations peace-
keeping force to take over AMIS: Now, therefore, be it

Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the

following:

1 That the House of Representatives-

2 (1) commends the Africa Union Mission in

3 Sudan (AMIS) for its actions in monitoring the

4 N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement in Darfur and its

5 role in diminishing some acts of violence;

6 (2) strongly condemns the continued genocide

7 and violence directed against civilians in Darfur by

8 the Government of Sudan and government-sponsored

9 militias, as well as attacks perpetrated against civil-

10 ians by rebels in Darfur;

11 (3) calls upon all parties to the N'Djamena

12 Ceasefire Agreement-

13 (A) to abide by the terms of the

14 N'Djamena Ceasefire Agreement and the

15 Darfur Peace Agreement; and

16 (B) to engage in good-faith negotiations to

17 end the conflict in Darfur;

18 (4) calls upon the Government of Sudan

19 immediately-






H.L.C.
4
1 (A) to comply with United Nations Secu-

2 rity Council Resolution 1706 (August 31,

3 2006), support the transition of AMIS to a

4 United Nations peacekeeping mission, and fa-

5 cilitate the deployment of United Nations

6 peacekeepers throughout Sudan toward that

7 end;

8 (B) to withdraw all offensive military air-

9 craft and personnel from the region;

10 (C) to cease all support for Janjaweed mi-
11 litias and rebels from Chad; and

12 (D) to disarm all Janjaweed militias;

13 (5) calls upon the international community to
14 provide sufficient funding to support the AMIS mis-

15 sion as it transitions to a United Nations peace-
16 keeping mission;

17 (6) calls on the African Union to work closely
18 with the United Nations and the North Atlantic

19 Treaty Organization (NATO) to strengthen its ca-

20 pacity to deter violence and instability until a United
21 Nations peacekeeping force is fully deployed in

22 Darfur;

23 (7) calls on NATO to extend its current mission

24 of advisors to the African Union, as requested by the
25 leadership of the African Union;






H.L.C.

5
1 (8) urges the President to take steps imme-

2 diately to help improve the security situation in

3 Darfur, including by-

4 (A) proposing that NATO support an in-

5 terim civilian protection force with sufficient

6 ground and air assets under centralized plan-

7 ning, direction, and control, to protect civilians

8 and facilitate the deployment of United Nations

9 peacekeepers in Darfur; and

10 (B) requesting supplemental funding, as

11 necessary, to support AMIS and a NATO sup-

12 port mission in Darfur;

13 (9) calls upon NATO allies to support such a

14 NATO mission;

15 (10) calls upon NATO headquarters staff to

16 begin prudent planning in advance of such a NATO

17 mission; and

18 (11) urges the President to take immediate

19 steps to work through diplomatic channels to obtain

20 the support of the People's Republic of China, the

21 Russian Federation, and United States allies in the

22 Arab League to secure the compliance of the Gov-

23 eminent of Sudan with United Nations Security

24 Council Resolution 1706 and support full funding

25 for the United Nations peacekeeping force in Sudan.









IV


109TH CONGRESS R
2D SESSION


Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the Government
of Japan should formally acknowledge and accept responsibility for its
sexual enslavement of young women, known to the world as "comfort
women", during its colonial occupation of Asia and the Pacific Islands
from the 1930s through the duration of World War II, and for other
purposes.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
APRIL 4, 2006
Mr. EVANS (for himself and Mr. SMITH of New Jersey) submitted the fol-
lowing resolution; which was referred to the Committee on International
Relations





RESOLUTION
Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that
the Government of Japan should formally acknowledge
and accept responsibility for its sexual enslavement of
young women, known to the world as "comfort women",
during its colonial occupation of Asia and the Pacific
Islands from the 1930s through the duration of World
War II, and for other purposes.

Whereas the Government of Japan, during its colonial occu-
pation of Asia and the Pacific Islands from the 1930s
through the duration of World War II, organized the sub-
jugation and kidnapping, for the sole purpose of sexual







2
servitude, of young women, who became known to the
world as "comfort women";

Whereas the "comfort women" tragedy was one of the largest
cases of human trafficking in the 20th century;

Whereas the enslavement of comfort women was officially
commissioned and orchestrated by the Government of
Japan to include gang rape, forced abortions, sexual vio-
lence, human trafficking, and numerous other crimes
against humanity;

Whereas the comfort women included girls as young as 13
years of age and women separated from their own chil-
dren;

Whereas the comfort women were either abducted from their
homes or lured into sexual servitude under false pre-
tenses;

Whereas many comfort women were eventually killed or driv-
en to commit suicide when the hostilities ceased;

Whereas the use of "comfort women" is considered a current
as well as past human rights issue;

Whereas the shame connected to their ordeal caused many
comfort women to conceal it and caused many others to
come forward about their experiences only in recent
years;

Whereas historians conclude that as many as 200,000 women
were enslaved, but very few of them survive today;

Whereas the Government of Japan did not fully disclose these
war crimes during negotiations for reparations with its
former enemies and occupied countries;

Whereas some textbooks used in Japanese schools minimize
the "comfort women" tragedy and other atrocities, and


.HRES 759 IH







3
distort the Japanese role in war crimes during World
War II; and

Whereas Japanese Government officials, both elected and ca-
reer, as recently as June 2005, praised the removal of
the term "comfort women" from Japanese textbooks:
Now, therefore, be it

1 Resolved, That it is the sense of the House of Rep-

2 resentatives that the Government of Japan-

3 (1) should formally acknowledge and accept re-

4 sponsibility for its sexual enslavement of young

5 women, known to the world as "comfort women",

6 during its colonial occupation of Asia and the Pacific

7 Islands from the 1930s through the duration of

8 World War II;

9 (2) should educate current and future genera-

10 tions about this horrible crime against humanity;

11 (3) should publicly, strongly, and repeatedly re-

12 fute any claims that the subjugation and enslave-

13 ment of comfort women never occurred; and

14 (4) should follow the recommendations of the

15 United Nations and Amnesty International with re-

16 spect to the "comfort women".
0


*HRES 759 MI





H.L.C.






AMENDMENT TO H. RES. 759

OFFERED BY M_.

Amend the first clause of the preamble to read as

follows:

Whereas the Government of Japan, during its colonial occu-
pation of Asia and the Pacific Islands from the 1930s
through the duration of World War II, permitted the Im-
perial Japanese Army to organize, directly and indirectly,
the subjugation, and in some cases, the kidnapping of
young women for the sole purpose of sexual servitude,
who became known to the world as "comfort women";

In the third clause of the preamble-

(1) strike "to include" and insert "and was ac-

companied by"; and

(2) strike "human trafficking" and all that fol-

lows and insert "and human trafficking;".

Amend the tenth clause of the preamble to read as

follows:

Whereas these war crimes were not adequately addressed
during negotiations for reparations with Japan's former
enemies and occupied countries;

After the tenth clause of the preamble, insert the

following new clauses:





H.L.C.
2
Whereas in 1993 the Government of Japan first expressed its
"sincere apologies and remorse" to the former wartime
comfort women and in July 1995 established the Asian
Women's Fund in order to extend "atonement" from the
Japanese people to the comfort women;

Whereas the Asian Women's Fund is scheduled to cease oper-
ations in March 2007, having issued $5.7 million, raised
from private Japanese contributions, in atonement pay-
ments and an accompanying letter of apology from the
Japanese Prime Minister to 285 former comfort women,
and over $13 million of official government funds in med-
ical and welfare support programs for former comfort
women in South Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Indo-
nesia, and the Netherlands;

In the 13th clause of the preamble (as redesig-

nated)-

(1) strike "some textbooks" and insert "in re-

cent years, however, some new textbooks"; and

(2) strike "distort" and insert "seek to down-

play".

In the 14th clause of the preamble (as redesig-

nated)-

(1) insert "some" before "Japanese Govern-

ment officials"; and

(2) strike "praised" and insert "have publicly

advocated".





H.L.C.
3
Page 3, beginning on line 3, strike "formally ac-

knowledge and accept responsibility" and insert "unam-

biguously acknowledge and accept historical responsi-

bility".

Page 3, line 10, strike "against humanity".

Page 3, strike lines 14 through 16 and insert the

following new paragraph:

1 (4) should seriously consider the recommenda-

2 tions of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on

3 Violence Against Women and of international human

4 rights nongovernmental organizations, such as Am-

5 nesty International, in determining what additional

6 forms of redress for comfort women may be nec-

7 essary or appropriate.

Amend the title so as to read: "Resolution express-

ing the sense of the House of Representatives that the

Government of Japan should unambiguously acknowledge

and accept historical responsibility for its sexual enslave-

ment of young women, known to the world as 'comfort

women', during its colonial occupation of Asia and the

Pacific Islands from the 1930s through the duration of

World War II, and for other purposes.".








IV


109TH CONGRESS 4
2D SESSION H. 9


Recognizing the 185th anniversary of the independence of Peru on July
28, 2006.




IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
JULY 24, 2006
Mr. CROWLEY submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the
Committee on International Relations




RESOLUTION
Recognizing the 185th anniversary of the independence of
Peru on July 28, 2006.

Whereas Peru gained independence from Spain on July 28,
1821, when the Republic of Peru was established as a
sovereign and independent country;
Whereas the people of Peru have established a unique, plural-
istic democracy which includes the freedoms cherished by
the people of the United States, including freedom of
speech, freedom of religion, freedom of association, free-
dom of the press, and government by the consent of the
governed;

Whereas Peru continues to serve as a shining model of demo-
cratic values by regularly holding free and fair elections
and promoting the free exchange of ideas;







2
Whereas since Peru became an independent country, the in-
terests of Peru and the United States have been closely
aligned;

Whereas the people of the United States share affinity with
the people of Peru and view Peru as a strong and trusted
ally;

Whereas Peru is a supporter of the United States in the
Global War on Terror, and joins the United States in
promoting political and economic freedoms, combating
poverty, crime, disease, and drugs, and promoting secu-
rity, stability, and prosperity;

Whereas the bonds of association and friendship between the
peoples of the two countries have been strengthened by
the large number of Peruvians who have migrated to the
United States, where they make significant contributions
to both the United States and Peru;

Whereas Peru is an integral member of the Latin American
region and a constructive partner of the United States in
fulfilling the agenda of the Western Hemisphere; and

Whereas the Peruvians and Peruvian-Americans residing in
the United States have enriched and added to the United
States way of life in the social, economic, and political
arenas and Peru's rich identity and heritage have become
an integral part of the cultural tapestry of the United
States: Now, therefore, be it

1 Resolved, That the House of Representatives-

2 (1) recognizes the 185th anniversary of the

3 independence of Peru;


*HRES 940 III





95

3
1 (2) extends warm congratulations and best

2 wishes to Peru for peace and further progress, devel-

3 opment, and prosperity; and

4 (3) extends best wishes to Peruvians and Peru-

5 vian-Americans residing in the United States as they

6 celebrate the 185th anniversary of Peru's independ-

7 ence.
0


*HRES 940 IH