Status on Haiti

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Status on Haiti communication from the President of the United States transmitting a report regarding action to support multilateral efforts to restore democracy in Haiti and to protect democracy in our hemisphere
Series Title:
House document / 103d Congress, 2d session ;
Physical Description:
1 online resource (2 p.) : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- President (1993-2001 : Clinton)
Clinton, Bill, 1946-
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Foreign Affairs
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Democracy -- Haiti   ( lcsh )
Démocratie -- Haïti   ( ram )
Politics and government -- Haiti -- 1986-   ( lcsh )
Politique et gouvernement -- Haïti -- 1986-   ( ram )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title from PDF t.p. (LLMC Digital, viewed on Nov. 23, 2010)
General Note:
"Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs."
General Note:
"September 21, 1994."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Columbia Law Library
Holding Location:
Columbia Law Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 682910297
System ID:
AA00001236:00001


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103d Congress, 2d Session - - House Document 103-313


STATUS ON HAITI





COMMUNICATION

FROM


THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

A REPORT REGARDING ACTION TO SUPPORT MULTILATERAL EF-
FORTS TO RESTORE DEMOCRACY IN HAITI AND TO PROTECT
DEMOCRACY IN OUR HEMISPHERE


SEPTEMBER 21, 1994.-Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and
ordered to be printed September 21, 1994


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
79-011 WASHINGTON : 1994











THE WHITE HOUSE,
Washington, September 21, 1994.
Hon. THOMAS S. FOLEY,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
DEAR MR. SPEAKER: On September 18, I reported to the Congress
that an agreement was successfully concluded by former President
Jimmy Carter, Senator Sam Nunn, and General Colin Powell re-
garding the transition between the de facto government and the
elected government in Haiti. On September 18, I also directed the
deployment of U.S. Armed Forces to Haiti as part of the multi-
national coalition provided for by U.N. Security Council Resolution
940 of July 31, 1994. I am providing this report, consistent with
the War Powers Resolution, to ensure that the Congress is kept
fully informed regarding this action to support multilateral efforts
to restore democracy in Haiti and to protect democracy in our
hemisphere.
On September 19, at approximately 9:25 a.m. e.d.t., units under
the command of the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command,
were introduced into Haitian territory, including its territorial wa-
ters and airspace. United States Armed Forces participating in the
deployment include forces from the U.S. Army's 18th Airborne
Corps, including the 10th Mountain Division; U.S. Naval Forces
from the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, including the U.S. Second Fleet and
U.S. Marine Forces and amphibious ships; U.S. Air Forces, includ-
ing the 12th Air Force; and various units from U.S. Special Forces.
Air-landed and seaborne U.S. forces successfully secured initial
entry points at Port-au-Prince International Airport and the Port-
au-Prince port facilities. Approximately 1,500 troops were involved
in these initial efforts. No resistance was encountered and there
were no U.S. casualties. Over the next several days, it is antici-
pated that U.S. troop strength in Haiti will increase by several
thousand in order to ensure the establishment and maintenance of
a secure and stable environment.
As to the duration of the mission, our presence in Haiti will not
be open-ended. As I indicated on September 18, the coalition will
be replaced after a period of months by a U.N. peacekeeping force,
the U.N. Mission in Haiti (UNMIH). By that time, the bulk of U.S.
forces will have departed. Some U.S. forces will make up a portion
of the UNMIH and will be present in Haiti for the duration of the
U.N. mission. The entire U.N. mission will withdraw from Haiti
after elections are held next year and a new Haitian government
takes office in early 1996, consistent with U.N. Security Council
Resolution 940.
The military operations I have directed are conducted under U.S.
command and control. As I reported to the Congress on September
18, the departure from power of the coup leaders will substantially





2

decrease the likelihood of armed resistance. There has not been
armed resistance to the deployment. However, the forces are
equipped for combat and ready to accomplish their mission and to
defend themselves, as well as to ensure the safety of U.S. nationals
in Haiti.
I have taken these measures to further the national security in-
terests of the United States: to stop the brutal atrocities that
threaten tens of thousands of Haitians; to secure our borders; to
preserve stability and promote democracy in our hemisphere; and
to uphold the reliability of the commitments we make, and the
commitments others make to us, including the Governors Island
Agreement and the agreement concluded on September 18 in Haiti.
I have ordered this deployment of U.S. Armed Forces pursuant
to my constitutional authority to conduct foreign relations and as
Commander in Chief and Chief Executive.
Finally, I remain committed to consulting closely with the Con-
gress, and I will continue to keep the Congress fully informed re-
garding this important deployment of our Armed Forces.
Sincerely,
WILLIAM J. CLINTON.

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