Further reporting on United States naval embargo of Haiti

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Material Information

Title:
Further reporting on United States naval embargo of Haiti communication from the President of the United States transmitting a further report on the status of the U.S. contribution to the ongoing United Nations embargo enforcement effort of Haiti
Series Title:
House document / 103d Congress, 2d session ;
Physical Description:
1 online resource (2 p.) : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- President (1993-2001 : Clinton)
Clinton, Bill, 1946-
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Foreign Affairs
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Embargo   ( lcsh )
Economic sanctions, American -- Haiti   ( lcsh )
Embargo   ( ram )
Sanctions économiques américaines -- Haïti   ( ram )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title from PDF t.p. (LLMC Digital, viewed on Nov. 23, 2010)
General Note:
"Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs."
General Note:
"April 20, 1994."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Columbia Law Library
Holding Location:
Columbia Law Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 682904757
System ID:
AA00001231:00001


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103d Congress, 2d Session - - --- House Document 103-241


FURTHER REPORTING ON UNITED STATES NAVAL
EMBARGO OF HAITI







COMMUNICATION

FROM


THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

A FURTHER REPORT ON THE STATUS OF THE U.S. CONTRIBUTION
TO THE ONGOING UNITED NATIONS EMBARGO ENFORCEMENT
EFFORT OF HAITI


APRIL 20, 1994.-Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and
ordered to be printed


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
79-011 WASHINGTON : 1994










THE WHITE HOUSE,
Washington, April 20, 1994.
Hon. THOMAS S. FOLEY,
Speaker of the House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
DEAR MR. SPEAKER: Six months ago I provided you with my ini-
tial report on the deployment of U.S. Naval Forces in the imple-
mentation of the petroleum and arms embargo of Haiti. I am now
providing this further report, consistent with the War Powers Reso-
lution, to inform the Congress about the status of the U.S. con-
tribution to the ongoing U.N. embargo enforcement effort.
In response to the continued obstruction by the military authori-
ties of Haiti to the dispatch of the U.N. Mission in Haiti (UNMIH)
and their failure to comply with the Governors Island Agreement,
the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 875 (Octo-
ber 16, 1993). This resolution called upon Member States "to use
such measures commensurate with the specific circumstances as
may be necessary" to ensure strict implementation of the Haitian
embargo on petroleum and arms and related material imposed by
United Nations Security Council Resolutions 841 and 873 (1993).
Under U.S. command and control, and acting in concert with allied
navies and in cooperation with the legitimate Government of Haiti,
U.S. Naval Forces began maritime interception operations on Octo-
ber 18, 1993, in order to ensure compliance with the embargo
terms.
Since that time, U.S. Naval Forces have continued enforcement
operations in the waters around Haiti, including at times in the
territorial sea of that country. The Haiti maritime interception op-
erations generally have employed up to six U.S. surface naval com-
batants serving on station in the approaches to Haitian ports. The
maritime interception force has been comprised of naval units and
supporting elements from the United States, Argentina, Canada,
France, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.
The objective of these maritime interception operations is to en-
sure that merchant vessels proceeding to Haiti are in compliance
with United Nations Security Council sanctions. The enforcement
operations have been conducted in a thorough and safe manner. As
of April 18, 1994, more than 6,000 vessels had been queried, 712
boarded, and 44 diverted to other than Haitian ports due to sus-
pected violations or cargo that was inaccessible to inspection. These
operations have been generally effective in preventing the sale or
supply of embargoed items through sea trade and have specifically
deterred tanker shipments of petroleum products, as one important
aspect of the Haitian embargo enforcement effort. There have been
no U.S. personnel casualties during the conduct of these operations.
The valuable U.S. contribution to U.N. embargo enforcement op-
erations is important to U.S. goals and interests in the region and,
fundamentally, to the restoration of democracy in Haiti. I am not





2

able to indicate at this time how long the deployment of U.S. Naval
Forces in this multilateral operation will be necessary. I have con-
tinued the deployment of U.S. Armed Forces for these purposes
pursuant to my constitutional authority to conduct foreign relations
and as Commander in Chief.
I appreciate the support the Congress has provided for this im-
portant U.S. contribution to multilateral efforts to restore democ-
racy to Haiti, and I look forward to continued cooperation with you
in these matters.
Sincerely,
WILLIAM J. CLINTON.

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