Annual report of the [U.S.] Financial Adviser-General Receiver for the fiscal year… (run is from 1923/24 to 1932/33)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Annual report of the U.S. Financial Adviser-General Receiver for the fiscal year… (run is from 1923/24 to 1932/33)
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Publisher:
Wash., GPO, 1925-

Notes

General Note:
4-trUS-1923-33
General Note:
HLL-D HAI 772; Hollis 005938270

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
ILLMC
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
LLMC31885
System ID:
AA00001151:00008

Full Text
















This volume was donated to LLMC
to enrich its on-line offerings and
for purposes of long-term preservation by

Harvard Law School Library









HAITI


A ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE

FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL

RECEIVER

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR

OCTOBER 1930- SEPTEMBER 1931


SUBMITTED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FINANCE,
AND THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR COMMERCE OF
THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI, AND THE SECRETARY OF
STATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA




S. DE LA RUE
Financial Adviser-General Receiver

REX A. PIXLEY
Deputy General Receiver

J. C. CRADDOCK
Director General of Internal Revenue





Imprimerie du Service National de l'Enseignement Professionnel
Port-au-Prince, Haiti.














r\7f3













CONTENTS

Page
Foreign Commerce .............................................................................................. 3
Imports ............................................................ ............................................. 4
Exports ........................................ ........... ........... ............. ........................ 4
Balance of Trade...................................................... ..................................... 4
Origin of Imports................................................................................................. 5
Destination of Exports....................................................................... ....... 5
Ports of Entry for Imports.............................................. ............................ 5
Ports of Shipment for Exports .......................................................................... 6
Shipping ......................................................................................................... 6
Foreign Commerce by M months and by Ports................................. ................. 7
Commodities Imported ....................................................................................... 8
Commodities Exported ....................................................................................... 12
Standardization .................................................................................................... 15
Customs Administration ................................................. ............................ 18
Tariff Revision ................................................ ........................ ......... ............ 19
Customs Service ................................................................................................. 19
Internal Revenue Service ................................................................................ .... 21
Land Legislation ........................................................ .......... ...................... 22
Customs Receipts ............................................................................................... 23
Internal Revenue Receipts .................................................................................. 27
M miscellaneous Receipts .................................................... ............. .............. 30
Expenditures .................................................................................................. 30
Treasury Position .......................................................................................... 34
Public Debt .............................................................. ..................... ................ 37
Disbursements .................................................................................................... 38
Supplies ............................................................... ............................................ 38
The Budget and Financial Legislation.............................................. .............. 38
Auditing and Accounting .................................................. ........................... 40
Currency ......................................................................................................... 40
Banking and Credit .................................... ............. .................................. 41
Claims ............................................................ ............................................... 42
Personnel ....................................... ................. ..................................... ....... 42
Conclusion ......................................................... .......................................... 43
Tables .................................................... ..................................................... 49
Annex: Report of the Director General of Internal Revenue............................. 97
Receipts by Sources................................................................................ 98
Receipts by Financial Districts and Sources................................ ......... 98
Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and M onths................................... 104
Internal Revenue Receipts by Communes................................................... 104
Administrative and Operating Costs............ ............................................... 106
Personnel .................................................................................................... 112
Quarters and Equipment ............................................................................ 112
Digest of Chief Taxes Collected ............................................................... 115
Conclusion .................................................................................................. 126
Appendix: Schedules .....................................;...................................... ...... 127











STATISTICAL EXHIBITS

TABLES

Page
1. Value of Imports and Exports, and Excess of Imports or Exports, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1930-31.................................................................. .. 51
2. Value of Imports showing Countries of Origin in Percentages, fiscal years
1916-17 to 1930-31.............................................................................. 51
3. Value of Exports showing Countries of Destination in Percentages, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1930-31................................ ......................... 52
4. Value of Total Foreign Commerce by Countries in Percentages, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1930-31............................................... ................. 53
5. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports and Total Foreign
Commerce by Countries, fiscal year 1930-31...................... ............ 54
6. Value of Imports by Ports of Entry, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31........ 55
7. Value of Exports by Ports.of Shipment, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31 55
8. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports and Total Foreign
Commerce by Ports, fiscal year 1930-31.......................... ................ 56
9. Net Tonnage of Steam and Motor Vessels in Foreign Commerce Entered
and Cleared by Registry and Months, fiscal year 1930-31.................. 57
10. Net Tonnage of Sailing Vessels in Foreign Commerce Entered and Cleared
by Registry and Months, fiscal year 1930-31............................. 5.8
11. Value of Imports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year 1930-31... 59
12. Value of Exports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year 1930-31.... 60
13. .Value of Imports by Months and Ports of Entry, fiscal year 1930-31.
compared with 1929-30............................................. .................... 61
14. Value of Exports by Months and Ports of Shipment, fiscal year 1930-31
compared with 1929-30............................................................................ 62
15. Value of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31.......... 63
16. Quantity of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31.... 64
17. Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31........ 65
18. Quantity of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31...... 65
19. Quantity and Value of Five Principal Exports by Ports, fiscal year 1930-
31 compared with 1929-30................................................................. 66
20. Percentage of Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17
to 1930-31 .................................................... ........................ 67
21. Quantity and Value of Exports by Commodities and Months, fiscal year
1930-31 ..................................... ............. ........ ............... 67
22. Receivership Fund, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31................................ 68
23. Expenses of Financial Adviser-General Receiver by Objects of Expen-
ditures, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31............................. ...... 68
24. Classification of Total Expenditures of the Financial Adviser-General
Receiver, fiscal year 1930-31.................................... ................ ...... 69
25. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditpres of the Fi-
nancial Adviser-General Repeiyer, fiscal year 1930-31................... 69
26. Distribution of Expenditures from Receivership Fund, fiscal year 1930-31 70






STATISTICAL EXHIBITS


Page
27. Cost of Customs Operations by Ports and Costs of Administration, Repairs
and Maintenance, Acquisition of Property and Fixed Charges, fiscal
years 1919-20 to 1930-31................................................................... 70
28. Total cost of Collecting each Gourde of Customs Receipts, fiscal years
1919-20 to 1930-31.............................................................................. 71
29. Operating Allowance of Internal Revenue Service, fiscal years 1923-24
to 1930-31 ......................................................... ............................. 71
30. Costs of Internal Revenue Service by Objects of Expenditures, fiscal years
1923-24 to 1930-31................................................................ ......... 72
31. Classification of Total Expenditures of Internal Revenue Service, fiscal
year 1930-31 ................................................... .............................. 73
32. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures of Internal
Revenue Service, fiscal year 1930-31............................................. 73
33. Revenue of Haiti by Sources, fiscal years 1889-90 to 1930-31............... 74
34. Relation between Import and Export Values and Customs Receipts, -fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1930-31............................................ ................... 75
35. Customs Receipts by Months, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31................ 76
36. Customs Receipts by Ports, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31............... 77
37. Customs Receipts by Sources and Ports, fiscal year 1930-31................... 78
38. Customs Receipts by Sources and by Months, fiscal year 1980-31......... 78
39. Distribution of Customs Receipts, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1930-31.......... 78
40. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources, fiscal years 1919-20 to 1930-31 79
41. Miscellaneous receipts by Sources and by Months, fiscal year 1930-31.... 80
42. Total Receipts of the Haitian Government by Sources, Months, and Ports,
fiscal year 1930-31 ................................................. .................... 81
43. Ordinary, Supplementary, and Extraordinary Appropriations from Revenue,
fiscal years 1925-26 to 1930-31..................................................... .. 82
44. Revenues and Expenditures, fiscal years 1923-24 to 1930-31................... 83
45. Functional classification of Expenditures, fiscal year 1930-31................... 84
46. Classification of Total Expenditures by Departments and Services, fiscal
year 1930-31 .................................................................................... .... 85
47. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures by Depart-
ments and Services, fiscal year 1930-31............................................... 86
48. Reimbursements to Appropriations, fiscal years 1925-26 to 1930-31........ 87
49. Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal year 1930-31..................................... 88
50. Revenues and Expenditures and Excess of Revenues or Expenditures, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1930-31................................... ............................... 89
51. Treasury Assets and Liabilities........ ......................................................... 90
52. Public D ebt .............................................................. ....................... 91
53. Expenditures from Revenue for the Public Debt and Relation of such
Expenditures to Revenue Receipts, fiscal year 1929-30 and 1930-31... 91
54. Profit and Loss Statement, Bureau of Supplies, fiscal years 1929-30 and
1930-31 ................................................................................................. 92
55. Balance Sheet, Bureau of Supplies, fiscal years 1929-30 and 1930-31...... 92
56. Notes of the Banque Nationale in Circulation by Months........................... 93
57. Loans and Deposits of Banks in Haiti by Months, fiscal year 1930-31.... 93

CHARTS

1. Values of Total Imports, Total Exports and Coffee Exports, fiscal years
1924-25 to 1930-31 ............................................................................... 8
2. Coffee Prices, fiscal years 1928-29 to 1930-31...................................... 13
3. Total Revenue Receipts of Haiti, fiscal years 1889-90 to 1930-31............ 24






STATISTICAL EXHIBITS


ANNEX: INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

TABLES

Page
1. Internal Revenue Receipts........................................... .......................... 97
2. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources, fiscal years 1919-20 to 1930-31.... 99
3. Internal Revenue Receipts by Collection Districts, fiscal years 1919-20 tb
1930-31 ................................................................................................ 100
4. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Districts, fiscal year 1930-31.... 101
5. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Months, fiscal year 1930-31.... 105
6. Internal Revenue Recipts by Months, fiscal year 1919-20 to 1930-31.... 106
7. Internal Revenue Receipts by Communes, fiscal year 1930-31................... 107
8. Operating Allowance of Internal Revenue Service, fiscal years 1923-24 to
1930-31 ................................................................................................ 108
9. Cost of Internal Revenue Service by Objects of Expenditure, fiscal years
1923-24 to 1930-31................................................................................ 109
10. Expenses of Internal Revenue Service by Objects of Expenditure, fiscal
years 1923-24 to 1930-31.................................... ......................... 111
11. Administration and Operation Expenditures, Classified by Objects and by
M months, fiscal year 1930-31.................................................................... 112
12. Expenses of Internal Revenue Service by Districts, fiscal years 1923-24
to 1930-31 ............................................................................................ 113
13. Expenses of Internal Revenue Service by Districts and Months, fiscal
year 1930-31 .......................................................................................... 114
14. Personnel .................................................................................................... 115
15. Emigration Statistics, fiscal years 1922-23 to 1930-31............................. 118
16. Receipts from Speculators' and Foreigners' Occupational Tax, fiscal year
1930-31 ................................................................................................. 120
17. Public Land Rentals, fiscal year 1930-31............................................... 122
18. Value of Sales and Mortgages of Real Property, fiscal year 1930-31........ 123
19. Consular Fees Accruing to the State, fiscal years 1924-25 to 1930-31...... 124
20. Receipts from Steamship Passage Tax by Ports, fiscal year 1930-31........ 125
21. Receipts from Steamship Passage Tax by Months, fiscal year 1930-31.... 125
22. Receipts from Irrigation Taxes, fiscal year 1930-31............................... 125

APPENDIX: SCHEDULES

Page
1. Quantity and Value of Imports into Haiti by Countries of Origin, October,
1930- September 1931....................................................................... 129
2. Quantity and Value of Exports from Haiti by Countries of Destination,
October, 1930-September 1931....................................................... 155
3. Customs Receipts by Sources, by Ports and by Months, fiscal year 1930-31 162
4. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources, Districts and Months, fiscal year
1930-31 .................................................................................................. 166




















HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISER-
GENERAL RECEIVER FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
OCTOBER, 1930 SEPTEMBER, 1931.









HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL
RECEIVER FOR THE FISCAL YEAR OCTOBER 1930 -
SEPTEMBER 1931



OFFICE OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, December 20, 1931.

THE SECRETARY OF STATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FINANCE OF THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI,
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR COMMERCE OF THE REPUBLIC OF
HAITI.

Sirs:

I have the honor to transmit herewith the'fifteenth annual report of this
office on the commerce and finances of the Republic of Haiti. The report
covers. the fiscal year 1930-31, supplementing and enlarging upon the
monthly reports required by Article VII of the Treaty of September 16,
1915, between the United States of America and the Republic of Haiti.
. The combination of exceptionally poor crops and still lower export
commodity prices produced during 1930-31 what has been the worst year
-from a commercial and financial point of view since the depression of 1921.
Both exports and.imports fell off more sharply than pessimistic predictions
made at the beginning of the year had indicated, and commercial activity
suffered a serious setback in the face of reduced purchasing power of the
people and the frequent threats during the year of discriminatory legisla-
tion directed against foreign capital and foreign labor.
Revenues from all sources were severely affected by this unexpected
turn of events which marked the fiscal year. Customs receipts followed
the downward trend of foreign commerce, while internal revenue collections,
although undoubtedly affected to a considerable extent by the unfavorable
economic situation, were to an important degree influenced by political
propaganda promising lower taxes on alcohol and tobacco and by the
apathetic attitude of public officials in some districts towards the enforce-
ment of existing internal revenue legislation.
Conditions were aggravated by heavy rains which ruined crops in several
sectiois of the, country"Airrd 'damaged private property, telegraph and
telephone lines, irrigation systems, roads and trails. Communication and
transportation also were seriously interfered with by the closing down of






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


the National Railroad of Haiti due to the failure to pass the law of sanction
of the new contract between the railroad and the government and the
difficulty of financing the operation of the railroad while awaiting legislative
action at the next session. Practically all of the several hundred railroad
employees, tie cutters, woodcutters, and others dependent on the operation
of the railroad for their living were thrown out of work. Peasants in parts
of the interior which had been served by the railroad were unable to market
much of their crops. The logwood industry in the northern part of Haiti
was particularly hard hit by the lack of transportation, which accounts in
no small measure for the decline in logwood exports from Cap Haitien
during the year.
Budgetary expenditures of the government had been cut at the beginning
of the year to a figure which was believed to be within revenue probabilities,
but the drop in revenues was so much more acute than had been expected
that in spite of efforts on the part of government departments to effect
further economies, the year ended with a large deficit. The deficit was
larger than would have been the case if unforeseen events had not necessi-
tated many extraordinary and supplementary appropriations. Funds had
to be provided for flood relief, repairs to roads, increased expense allowances
of legislators and the payment of the many claims and indemnities which
were approved during the year.
Fortunately, the treasury surplus which had been carefully accumulated
over the years of relative prosperity made it possible to meet all obligations
of the State with no strain upon the treasury or additional borrowing.
Interest and amortization requirements of the external bond issues, as
usual, were anticipated in full at the beginning of the year; salaries, rents,
subventions, and other regular obligations were paid promptly when due.
All of the important public services were maintained: Roads for the most
part were kept open in spite of torrential rains; telegraph and telephone
lines were kept in repair; the police and constabulary force was
provided for; the Public Health Service continued its valuable and much
appreciated work; and the Agricultural Service was able to report progress
in its efforts to develop a better understanding of modern methods of
cultivation. In financing these and in other respects the financial ad-
ministration has set a record of which it is proud. It is a record which has
not been duplicated this year in other Latin-American countries.
To be sure, the ambitious developmental program of recent years largely
has been given up. Funds have been insufficient to extend the system of
vocational education, to strengthen the police and constabulary, or to
construct many badly needed improvements. Nevertheless, it is greatly to
the credit of the country that in times of adversity the continuance of all
essential government services has been assured, that obligations have
been met fully and promptly, and that it has been demonstrated that the
economic life of the country eventually can be adjusted more satisfactorily
to the changed world conditions.






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


The weakness which developed during the year in the dollar bond issues
of Latin-American governments introduced an entirely new element into
the financial situation of the Republic. Due to the universal disfavor with
which the bond market regarded all such issues, rather than to an' appraisal
of their intrinsic worth, the market value of Haitian securities dropped
sharply in harmony with the prices of other issues of Latin-American
countries. In hardly more than a month the value of Haitian bonds
declined to approximately two-thirds of their par value. It must not be
understood that there was any general dumping of Haitian bonds. On the
contrary the market was as thin up as it was down. Small buying orders,
or a few bonds offered for sale, were sufficient to make several points change
in the quotations.
While the drop in -prices was of some advantage in that it permitted
amortization to proceed at a more rapid pace, at the same time-the effects
on the whole were unfortunate, first, because the decline was indicative of a
lowered credit standing, and secondly, because treasury investments of the
Republic in its own securities suffered a corresponding decline in realizable
value. The lowered credit rating of the Republic made it evident that new
capital in case of need could be obtained only in very limited amount.
The diminished market value of treasury investments meant that approxi-
mately half of the reserve funds could no longer be considered as liquid,
and that the value of the investments for use as collateral had been
impaired.
Fortunately, the unfavorable developments in the bond market caused
no immediate difficulties, and cash deposits were large enough to cover
the heavy deficit of 1930-31 and leave a balance sufficient to enable the
treasury to withstand still another year of adversity.

Foreign Commerce
.The total value of the foreign trade of the Republic during 1930-31
amounted to Gdes. 92,698,684.* This represents a decline of 31.31 per cent
from the 1929-30 figure of Gdes. 134,930,967, and a decline of 45.41 per cent
from the 1928-29 total, in which year foreign commerce was valued at
Gdes. 169,808,779.
The foreign commerce of Haiti always has been subject to wide va-
riations from year to year in total value. During the fifteen years of
the Receivership total yearly values have fluctuated from a high of
Gdes. 245,096,694 reported in 1919-20, to a low of Gdes. 87,694,856 reported
during the first fiscal year of the Receivership.
The average yearly value of foreign commerce for the period of the
Receivership amounts to Gdes. 152,596,000, from which the 1930-31 total
represents a decline of 39.25 per cent.

*One gourde equals twenty cents, United States currency, and the gourde is by law exchangeable on demand
and without expense at the fixed rate of five gourdes for one dollar. United States currency.






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


Commerce values have exceeded the 1930-31 total in all except two of
the last fifteen fiscal periods. These were the years 1916-17 and 1917-18
when the European War interfered with the normal export and import
trade of the country, and yearly commerce values fell slightly below
Gdes. 90,000,000. The post war depression also had a marked effect on
the value of Haiti's foreign trade, and in 1920-21 the total value of the
combined export and import trade fell to Gdes. 92,738,074, a figure which
slightly exceeds the 1930-31 total.
Imports
The value of all imports during the year 1930-31 was Gdes. 47,881,591,
as compared with Gdes. 64,208,132 in 1929-30, and Gdes. 86,189,612 in
1928-29, indicating declines of 25.42 per cent and 44.44 per cent respectively.
During the last fifteen years the yearly value of the import trade has
averaged Gdes. 77,000,000. Even during the year of the 1920-21 depression
imports were valued at only slightly less than Gdes. 60,000,000, and not
since the first year of the Receivership have import values reached so low
a level as in the year just ended.' Naturally, a decline of such exceptional
severity reflects a truly critical condition in business in general and par-
ticularly in the retail trade of the country.
To be sure, a large part of the decline in import values is due to the fact
that merchandise can now be purchased from abroad at lower prices than
formerly, but it is equally true that in most cases the quantity of mer-
chandise imported in 1930-31 has declined considerably as compared with
1929-30, as will be seen from an examination of Table No. 16.
Last year this office was able to report that in spite of greatly curtailed
business activity, the number of business failures was no more than normal.
This year, however, many merchants have been in difficulty and the number
of failures among the smaller and weaker .business houses has increased.
Nevertheless, only four failures of any importance have been recorded, and
in these few cases the amount of capital involgvydhas,,not been great.
Exports
The total value of all exports declined in 1930-31 to Gdes. 44,817,093
from Gdes. 70,722,835 in 1929-30 and Gdes. 83,619,167 in 1928-29. Tle
percentage declines were 36.63 per cent and 46.40 per cent respectively.
The principal export crops were small in size with the exception of
sugar. The coffee, crop in particular, constituting as it does each year
between seventy and eighty per cent of total export values, was considerably
below average in size, and that fact, combined with the continued downward
trend of export commodity prices brought the total value of all exports to
the lowest figure since 1920-21.
Balance of Trade
In years of exceptionally poor crops and declining prices of export
commodities it is to be expected that total import values would exceed the






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER---GENERAL RECEIVER


total value of all exports. The year under review was no exception to the
rule, and import values exceeded exports by Gdes. 3,064,498.
This figure, it must be admitted, is perhaps larger than it should be, for
it developed during the year that the 1931-32 crops would be small. The
prices of export commodities did not rise sufficiently to warrant the im-
portations made by merchants in anticipation of increased purchasing
power.
Nevertheless, it is encouraging to note that in recent years import values
have been much more closely adjusted to changes in the value of the export
trade than was the case in the early years of the Receivership. In 1919-20,
for example, the excess of imports over exports amounted to no less than
Gdes. 28,887,416.
Origin of Imports
The United States supplied 68.69 per cent of the total import trade
during 1930-31, compared with 70.09 per cent during the previous year.
Thus, the percentage of import values received from the United States has
continued the downward trend noted since the beginning of the Re-
ceivership.
The United Kingdom still holds second place, although the percentage
declined from 7.30 per cent in 1929-30 to 6.96 per cent in 1930-31, or only
slightly above the. 6.88 per cent supplied by France during 1930-31.
Germany continued in fourth place, but .it increased its proportion of total
import values from 4.31 per cent in 1929-30 to 4.78 in 1930-31.

Destination of Exports
France was the destination of 50.75 per cent of total export values during
1930-31. Thus, the 'share of the export trade taken by France increased
slightly from the 49.72 per cent recorded in the previous year.
Denmark increased its share of the export trade from 6.91 per cent in
1929-30 to 9.11 per cent in 1930-31, thereby putting that country in second
place. Italy was third, with 9.00 per cent, followed by Belgium (8.71 per
cent), the United Kingdom (8.50 per cent), the United States (8.11 per
cent), and Germany (3.11 per cent).

Ports of Entry for Imports
Out of total imports during 1930-31, valued at Gdes. 47,881,591, Port-au-
Prince received Gdes 30,687,961, or 64.09 per cent. During the previous
year the share of the import trade handled by Port-au-Prince was 62.77 per
cent. The chief city of the Republic therefore increased its lead as a dis-
tributing center of imported merchandise, following a trend which has
been in evidence for a number of years.
Cap Ilaitien remained the second city of importance so far as concerns
import values. Its share in 1930-31 was 10.90 per cent, a decline from the
11.89 per cent recorded in 1929-30.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


The other leading ports retained the same relative positions of importance
which they held in 1929-30.

Ports of Shipment for Exports
Port-au-Prince is also getting an increasingly larger share of the export
trade. Of total export values in 1930-31, amounting to Gdes. 44,817,093, the
value of exports shipped from Port-au-Prince was Gdes. 9,719,095, or
21.69 per cent of the total. In 1929-30 the corresponding percentage was
19.64 per cent.
Jacmel handled 13.54 per cent of the 1930-31 export trade and retained
its place as the second most important port of shipment. Petit Goave
displaced Cap Haitien as third in importance.
The export trade at Cap Haitien has been particularly hard hit. The
usual heavy logwood shipments from that port have ceased almost
completely due to the suspension of operations on the line of the National
Railroad running from Bahon to Cap Haitien, and export values for
1930-31 declined to Gdes. 3,902,384, or less than half the average yearly
value of commodities shipped from that port.

Shipping
The number of ocean going steam and motor vessels calling at Haitian
ports has not diminished greatly in spite of the decline in the export and
import trade. A total of 551 ships with a combined tonnage of 1,313,725 tons
entered Haitian ports in 1930-31 compared with 605 ships registering
1,364,524 tons in the previous year.
Part of the decline is due to the fact that tourist ships called less
frequently at Port-au-Prince in 1930-31 than the previous year. Fifteen
tourist ships with a total of 193,223 tons visited Port-au-Prince during the
last season compared with 20 ships registering 211,307 tons the previous
year.
Ships of American registry constituted 46.19 per cent of the total tonnage
which entered Haitian ports in 1930-31, compared with 47.60 per cent the
previous year. Ships of Dutch registry were still second in importance with
tonnage constituting 16.30 per cent of the total in 1930-31 compared with
16.22 per cent in 1929-30. In third place, German ships in 1930-31 took the
place of British ships with 189,379 tons and 14.41 per cent of the total,
compared with 143,399 tons and 10.51 per cent of the total in 1929-30.
Although the total tonnage of British ships which entered Haitian ports
in 1930-31 was slightly less than in the previous year, the share of the
total increased from 12.54 per cent in 1929-30 to 12.95 per cent in 1930-31.
Ships calling at Haitian ports flying the French flag totalled 74,285 tons
compared with 72,194 tons in 1929-30. The percentage share of the total
at the same time increased from 5.29 per cent to 5.66 per cent.






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


The number of sailing vessels calling at Haitian ports increased from
107 in 1929-30 to 132 in 1930-31. The sailing vessels arriving in 1930-31
had a total tonnage of 18,641 compared with a tonnage of 12,882 for, the
107 sailing vessels which entered in the previous year.
The share of the total import trade carried in American bottoms increased
from 47.02 per cent in 1929-30 to 49.95 per cent in 1930-31. Ships under
German, Norwegian and French registry also increased their share of the
import trade. Dutch and British ships, on the other hand, carried a smaller
proportion of the import trade in the year 1930-31 than in 1929-30.
Imports from the United States in 1930-31 were valued at Gdes.32,887,970.
of this amount, Gdes. 20,660,404, or 62.82 per cent, were carried in ships of
American registry. The corresponding percentage in 1929-30 was 59.06 per
cent, and in 1928-29, 65.15 per cent.
As usual, a greater share of total exports in 1930-31 was carried in ships
flying the Dutch flag than in vessels of any other nation. The share carried
in Dutch ships increased from 34.93 per cent in 1929-30 to 35.39 per cent
in 1930-31. German ships remained second in importance in the export
trade, but they increased their share of the total from 20.67 per cent to
28.37 per cent over the same period. French ships increased their share of
the export trade from 11.96 per cent to 12.50 per cent and thereby took
the place of the United States as third in importance in the export trade.
The share of total exports shipped in American vessels declined from
17.65 per cent to 11.41 per cent.
The year which has just ended found the airplane transport service
provided by Pan American Airways, Inc., becoming increasingly more
important. Although the number of commercial airplanes entering and
leaving Haiti has not increased, the volume of mail and number of pas-
sengers carried have increased steadily. Planes arrive from and depart
for Cuba and Miami thrice weekly, and a similar service is provided from
Port-au-Prince to Porto Rico and to South America.

Foreign Commerce by Months and by Ports
A seasonal increase in monthly import values occurred as usual in
October, 1930, at the beginning of the period when heavy shipments of
the new coffee crop commenced. Imports in that month were valued at
Gdes. 6,107,870, or only Gdes. 654,220 less than the value of total imports
in October 1929.-
From the October figure, monthly import values declined steadily to
the low figure of Gdes. 2,991,619 in May, 1931. During the balance of the
year, monthly import values increased slightly until for the month of
September they reached the level of Gdes. 3,644,259.
Of the major ports, Gonaives lost most heavily in the value of its import
trade. Import values in 1930-31 at that port were Gdes. 921,948, or 32.98 per
cent, less than those recorded the previous year. Import values at Cap





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


Haitien dropped 31.66 per cent, at Cayes, 30.05 per cent, at Port-de-Paix
28.89 per cent, and at Jacmel 28.59 per cent. At Port-au-Prince, the leading
city in the import trade, values declined Gdes. 9,615,510, or 23.86 per cent.
The value of total exports, by months, was much more evenly distributed
throughout the year in 1930-31 than is normally the case. March was the
month of greatest exports, and in that month the total value of all exports
was Gdes. 5,976,799. In the previous year, the peak of export values was
not reached until April when exports were valued at Gdes. 9,129,417.

CHART No. 1
VALUES OF TOTAL IMPORTS. TOTAL EXPORTS AND COFFEE EXPORTS
FISCAL YEARS 1924-25 TO 1930-31
MILLIONS OF
60URDE. I
Is

it
clne G, 2 or 6 \ ct a

.. s




25 p c \e 2 r 4.2 p
Co ree E xpot' : '
1324- 25 1925- 6 1926- 27 197 28 1928-29 1929-30 1930 -31

Cap Haitien lost most heavily in the export trade for the year. Shipments
from that port in 1930-31 were less than export values recorded in 1929-30
by Gdes. 5,568.822. or 58.79 per cent. Export values at Port-de-Paix de-
clined Gdes. 2.573.144, or 58.68 per cent; at J6romie, Gdes. 2,861,912, or
48.25 per cent; at Gonaives, Gdes. 2,548,753, or 41.20 per cent; at Jacmel,
Gdes. 3,420,269 or 36.05 per cent; and at Port-au-Prince, Gdes. 4,170,034, or
30.03 per cent.
Commodities Imported
Haiti unfortunately is still unable to grow a sufficient quantity of staple
foodstuffs to meet the demands of the population and consequently large
quantities of wheat, fish, rice, meat and other food products must be
purchased abroad. In 1930-31, the value of imported foodstuffs comprised
29.81 per cent of the value of total imports. This is a considerable increase
from the 26.59 per cent recorded in 1929-30, and would appear to indicate
that reduced purchasing power of the people is being directed towards
buying necessities rather than non-essentials and luxuries. At the same





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


time it is undoubtedly true that larger quantities of rice, corn and vegetables
are being grown by the peasants on their farms and that this increase* in
'home-grown food products is tending to supplant large quantities of
foodstuffs which in more favorable times would be imported. Thus, in
1930-31, imports of fish and meats declined in quantity 21.42 per cent and
15.52 per cent respectively. Imports of wheat flour and rice, on the other
hand, increased considerably in quantity over imports reported in 1929-30.
The increase was 3,654,880 kilos, or 18.39 per cent, in the case of wheat flour,
and 711,491 kilos, or 27.51 per cent, in the case of rice.
This marked increase in wheat and rice imports was due to two factors:
First, to the extraordinary decline in the price of these two commodities;
and secondly, to the fact that the exceptionally heavy rains of the spring
and early summer in many parts of the country destroyed'growing, crops
and made necessary the importation of large quantities of food to meet the
needs of the population in the flooded districts. The exact extent .of: the
damage done to crops by the rains is not known, but it is believed to have
been: considerable. Certain ,it is that large quantities of staple foodstuffs
.were imported as a direct result of the shortage caused by the rains.
SThe world price of wheat declined so sharply during the last year that
imported wheat flour was able to compete successfully in Haiti with
domestic foodstuffs. That fact undoubtedly influenced the quantity of flour
"Imported which, in spite of the increase of 18.39 per cent in quantity,
declined in value from Gdes. 7,629,613 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 6,644,975 in
1930-31, or 12.90 per cent.
SRice was another commodity which'declined sharply in value and which
was imported in greater quantities than in 1929-30. Rice importations
totalled 3,297,733 kilos in 1930-31 as against 2,586,242 kilos in 1929-30,
an increase in quantity of 711,491 kilos, or 27.51 per cent. Although the
unit value of rice importations in 1930-31 was 18.92 per cent less than the
unit value in the previous year, the quantity imported in 1930-31 was so
much greater that expressed in terms of value, the rice importations of the
last year exceeded those of 1929-30 by Gdes. 41,451, or 4.31 per cent. Rice
and tobacco-were the only important items of import received in greater
quantity and value in 1930-31.
Imports- of fish declined 2142 per cent in quantity and 30.05 per cent
'in'value.' Meat importations declined 15.52 per cent in quantity and 20.28 per
cent in value. Foodstuffs in the "all other" category declined in value from
Gdes. 4,814,198 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 3,957,682 in 1930-31, or 17.79 per cent.
Imported cotton textiles are the most important manufactured articles
of domestic consumption. The degree of prosperity of the retail trade in
Haiti depends largely upon the market for cotton cloth of the cheaper
;varieties. As is to be expected in view of the contraction of the amount of
money coming into the country, the demand for textiles has fallen off
roughly by. a third of the normal requirements and imports of textiles have
declined accordingly. In 1930-31, textile importations amounted to 2,038,010




HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


kilos valued at Gdes. 8,990,467 compared with 2,583,774 kilos valued at
Gdes. 13,360,777 in 1929-30, registering declines of 21.13 per cent in quan-
tity and 32.71 per cent in value. There can be little hope of a greater
demand for textiles until exports of coffee and other commodities bring
more money into the country and increase the buying power of the people.
Gasoline, kerosene, and other mineral oils in recent years have formed
the third most important group of commodities received from abroad.
Imports of gasoline in 1930-31 totalled 8,125,598 liters, a decline of
2,335,302 liters, or 22.32 per cent, from the 1929-30 figure. Kerosene imports
over the same period dropped from 4,546.295 liters to 4,041,344 liters, a
decline of 11.11 per cent. At the same time the unit value of gasoline and
kerosene dropped precipitately with the result that the total value of mineral
oil importations in 1930-31 was 29.91 per cent less than the value of the
greater quantities imported in the preceding fiscal period.
The decline in oil importations does not necessarily indicate a corres-
pondingly severe decline in oil consumption. Large quantities of gasoline
were being stored in Haiti at the beginning of the fiscal year 1930-31, and
it is probable that part of domestic consumption during the year was
supplied from stocks already on hand which were not replaced.
The decline in imports of building materials is a fair indication of the
extent of the present depression. Lumber importations declined 42.15 per
cent in quantity and 47.65 per cent in value. Importations of cement
totalled 4,900,874 kilos in 1930-31, as against 7,227,011 kilos in the previous
year. Iron and steel manufactures declined in value from Gdes. 3,277,339
in 1929-30 to Gdes. 1,633,207 in the year just ended. Taken as a whole,
imports of building materials have dropped 47.90 per cent in value during
the year 1930-31 when compared with the previous year, and while a
part of the decline may be accounted for by lower unit costs, it is evident
that by far the greater part is due to an actual decline in building activity
and a consequent lack of demand for cement, iron, steel, lumber and other
building materials.
All of the other important groups of commodity imports showed declines
in value ranging from ten to thirty-three per cent with the single
exception of chemical and pharmaceutical products which were valued at
Gdes. 895,213 in 1930-31 as compared with Gdes. 907,039 in 1929-30, thus
registering a decline of only Gdes. 11,826, or 1.30 per cent. Soap imports,
for example, declined in value 18.89 per cent; manufactured cotton goods
(excluding piece goods) fell 29.21 per cent; motor vehicles 32.35 per cent;
and liquors 22.30 per cent.
Special attention should be called to the fact that imports of leaf tobacco
rose from 19,903 kilos in 1929-30 to 43,732 kilos in 1930-31, an increase
of 119.74 per cent. Comparing values, these imports represent a 96.24 per
cent increase. An almost prohibitive import duty was placed on tobacco in
1926 for the purpose of encouraging the production of native tobacco.






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


Previous to 1926, tobacco was one of the leading articles of import. The
experience of the last six years has demonstrated conclusively that fair
quality long leaf tobacco can be grown successfully in Haiti. At the same
time, it is evident from the fact that imports are increasing rapidly in spite
of a high tariff that the country as yet is unable to grow all of its require-
ments. It is therefore the opinion of this office that the present duty on
tobacco should be lowered to a point where tobacco may be imported more
freely so as to supplement any deficiency in domestic production; while
at the same time a sufficient protective tariff should be maintained to
encourage the continued development of tobacco growing enterprises.
The striking change which has taken place in the prices of the principal
articles of import may be seen from the table below showing unit prices of
twelve of the principal imports during the last five years:

Imports 1926-27 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30 1930-31

Gdea. Gdes. Gdes. Gdes. Gdes.
Cement...... ........... kilo........... .07 .07 .07 .07 .07
Fish ................... kilo........... .54 .65 .71 .65 .58
Wheat Flour..............kilo........... .45 .43 .40 .38 .28
Meats................... kilo........... 1.17 1.16 1.25 1.25 1.18
Rice.................... kilo .......... .44 .38 .38 .37 .30
Liquors................ liter.......... 1.04 1.27 1.31 1.35 1.35
Lumber................. bic meter..... 109.37 109.65 122.57 114.40 103.52
Gasoline................ liter ........... .38 .39 .35 .25 .20
Kerosene................ iter .......... .26 .27 .28 .28 .25
Soap... .............. .. .kilo........... .78 .77 .78 .76 .66
Textiles, cotton. .......... kilo ..... .. .. 5.48 5.68 5.68 5.05 4.29
Tobacco. ................ l a ........... 1.92 1.55 1.95 2.22 1.99

With the exception of cement and liquors, in both of which schedules no
change.was recorded, the unit price of each of the commodities listed fell
appreciably, the percentage decline varying from 5.60 per cent in the case
of meats to a 26.32 per cent decline in the case of wheat flour. The 18.92 per
cent decline recorded in the unit value of rice importations is nearly as
striking as the decline in wheat. Gasoline importations declined 20.00 per
cent in unit price, while cotton textiles and soap fell off 15.05 per cent and
13.16 per cent respectively. Other price declines expressed similarly as
percentages of unit prices recorded in 1929-30 are: Fish, 10.77 per cent;
kerosene, 10.71 per cent; tobacco, 10.36 per cent; and lumber, 9.51 per cent.
It is at once apparent that a downward revision in commodity prices so
general in scope and so extensive in point of severity must have a profound
effect on the economic life of the country. It remains still to be seen whether
world commodity prices have reached their bottom level. Meanwhile, it is
practically certain that it will be a matter of years before prices return to
their former level, if ever. All-parts of the community are feeling the effect
of these changes. Importers, retailers, and merchants in general are finding
that the same volume of merchandise handled in former years expressed
in terms of present day prices does not bring in the same returns; that if
goods are to move the margin of profit must be cut and that to this extent
the merchant's loss must become the consumer's gain. These adjustments,





12 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER

however, require time, and it is doubtful if in Haiti the consumer has yet
received the full benefit of this downward revision in the cost of goods
received from abroad.
It is interesting in this connection to estimate in terms of gourdes the
actual saving to merchants and consumers which has resulted from this
decline in the prices of goods received from abroad. The total value of
imports in 1930-31 was Gdes. 47,881,591. If to the quantities represented
by this value we apply the various unit prices paid for the same commodities
in 1929-30 we find that the value of these commodities would have been
approximately Gdes. 57,000,000. Thus, the people of Haiti during the past
year have benefited approximately to the extent of Gdes. 9,000,000 in that
they have been able to purchase goods more cheaply. Probably the greater
part of this saving already has been passed on to the consumer.

Commodities Exported
The degree of prosperity or adversity in Haiti still is measured by the
size and value of the annual coffee crop. Serious attempts have been made
to encourage the development of other crops for export, but in 1930-31 the
value of the twenty or more other articles produced in Haiti and shipped
abroad constituted only 25.40 per cent of the value of total exports. The
coffee crop, in other words, represented in value nearly three-quarters
of the value of the entire list of products which can be raised successfully
in Haiti for shipment and sale abroad.
With so large a share of the foreign trade of Haiti engaged in exporting
coffee, or in importing merchandise whose sale is made possible only
through money received in exchange for coffee, it is inevitable that a poor
crop or a fall in the price of coffee will have a far-reaching effect on the
economic well-being of the country. It will be remembered that in the year
preceding that under review the coffee crop was above average in quantity.
The precipitous drop in coffee prices at the beginning of that year so reduced
the value of the crop that business was adversely affected in spite of a
good crop. In the year which has just ended, not only did coffee prices
suffer a still further decline, but the crop itself was far below average.
Only 26,296,152 kilos were exported, although the yearly crops for the
last sixteen years have averaged 31,056,929 kilos, and the trend has
been towards increased production. In 1929-30, coffee exports totalled
34,321,114 kilos, from which the 1930-31 figure represents a decline of
8,024,962 kilos, or 23.38 per cent.
Undoubtedly the price factor was important in keeping coffee from
the market. Peasants hoarded their coffee waiting for higher prices; but
most of the crop was harvested, although less than the usual amount of
care was given to the coffee trees. At the same time it is not likely that
many coffee trees were destroyed to make way for other crops, and the
potential yield of the trees in no respect has been impaired.




HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


Climatic conditions also were unfavorable. The season was preceded by
unusually dry weather which retarded the crop and undoubtedly reduced
the yield. Heavy rains towards the close of the season interfered with
the harvest and in some regions were so severe as to damage the trees.
The full extent of the damage done by the rains is still to be learned and
it is feared that the excessive moisture last spring interfered with polleni-
zation to such an extent that the normal yield of the trees during the
1931-32 season will be reduced.
The price of coffee fell still further from the low level to which it had
declined in 1929-30. The unit value of the 1930-31 crop was Gdes. 1.27 per
kilo compared with a unit value of Gdes. 1.53 per kilo in 1929-30. Thus
there was a decline of 16.99 per cent from the already low prices of the
previous year. It was particularly unfortunate that the price of coffee

CHART No. 2
COFFEE PRICES, FISCAL YEAR 1928-29 TO 1930-31
r ancos od v
70C







60 -- o ---60d -l-e-rta---








1328O-29 1929-30 1930

abroad was weakest during the months when Haitian coffee is exported in
the greatest quantities. An examination of Chart No. 2 will reveal that
Haitian coffee, following roughly the price of other coffees in the world
market, was quoted at its lowest level for many years during December,
1930. and January, 1931, which months coincide exactly with the months
of heaviest-coffee exports from Haiti. From the January low, prices,re-
covered gradually until in June they were at about the same level as prices
quoted in Havre at the beginning of the Haitian fiscal year.
Thus, as a result both of a poor crop and low prices, the value of coffee
exports in 1930-31 was only Gdes. 33,434,881, as against Gdes. 52,032,362
in 1929-30. The decline in value amounted to Gdes. 18,597,481, or 35.74 per
cent.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


Unfortunately, the deficiency of the coffee crop was not relieved in any
way by increased values of any of the other important export products.
Of the six most valuable exports exclusive of coffee, only one product-
goatskins--was exported in greater quantity in 1930-31, and in value
these products were from ten to seventy-five per cent under the value of
the same articles of export in 1929-30.
Cotton is still the second most valuable export crop. In 1930-31 the
value of cotton shipments was 9.49 per cent of total export values. This
is a decline both from the average of 10.04 per cent recorded for the period
of the Receivership and from the 11.11 per cent recorded in 1929-30. In
quantity, exports of cotton declined from 5,124,551 kilos in 1929-30 to
4,172, 537 kilos in the year just ended, a drop of 18.58 per cent. An even
greater decline occurred in cotton prices than in the case of coffee. Cotton
exports in 1929-30 were valued at Gdes. 7,858,656. In 1930-31, the crop
was valued at Gdes. 4,254,476, a loss of Gdes. 3,604,180, or 45.87 per cent.
The low price of the product more than any other factor kept cotton from
the market, and reduced the quantity exported to the lowest figure since
1924-25.
It had been believed that the best hope of achieving greater export
diversification lay through developing cotton as an export product. Indeed,
cotton exports since the beginning of the Receivership have shown a
gratifying upward trend, and the value of cotton exports from year to year
has taken an increasingly larger share of total export values. It is therefore
disappointing to record that a setback has taken place. Haitian long fiber
cotton still has great possibilities, and it is believed that when prices are
again stabilized exports of this commodity will continue upward.
Logwood exports declined only 5.28 per cent in quantity, but the 1930-31
export of logwood was valued at Gdes. 1,923,381, which amount is 21.24 per
cent less than the value of shipments in 1929-30. In times of adversity
logwood is the peasant's best commercial resource, and had it been possible
to transport logwood as usual an increase instead of a decline probably
would have been registered.
Shipments of raw sugar increased from 11,184,537 kilos in 1929-30 to
11,549,419 kilos in 1930-31, but in spite of the increased exports the value
of raw sugar exported was Gdes. 435,280, or 21.96 per cent, less than raw
sugar exports in 1929-30. The comparatively large shipments of refined
sugar exported in 1929-30 were reduced 78.43 per cent in quantity and
80.97 per cent in value in 1930-31. Increased competition of British sugar
in Canada and England, together with a new tariff on sugar in Colombia
during 1930-31 reduced the importance of these countries as markets for
raw and refined sugar produced in Haiti.
The most severe decline of all took place in the case of cacao shipments
which fell off 48.62 per cent in quantity and 74.00 per cent in value. The
price of cacao at the beginning of the year had dropped to a point where




HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


exportation of that commodity was unprofitable. Assistance was immedi-
ately afforded to growers by removal of the export duty on properly
prepared cacao through application of the standardization law; but in
spite of the removal of the export duty the demand for cacao abroad was
not sufficient to induce growers in Haiti to harvest their crop. Little can
be expected in the way of increased cacao exports until prices rise.
It already has been noted that exports of goatskins increased in 1930-31.
In value, however, shipments of goatskins declined Gdes. 103,800, or
10.65 per cent, from the 1929-30 figure. Cottonseed cake exports declined
14.70 per cent in quantity and 3.55 per cent in value.
Next in importance are sisal and canned pineapples, although both
together comprise only a very small portion of total export values. Sisal
exports increased 167.57 per cent in volume and 103.31 per cent in value;
shipments of canned pineapples increased 171.05 per cent in volume and
129.56 per cent in value. Both of these products are grown on plantations
which represent a considerable outlay of capital on which no return has
yet been received. The year 1930-31 was the first fiscal period in which
shipments of these products reached figures of any importance, as the
plantations are just coming into production. Unfortunately, the beginning
of sisal and pineapple production on a large scale has coincided with
overproduction of these products in other countries and prices have
declined to a point where further exports are not profitable. Little can be
expected in the way of increased exports of these two commodities until
prices improve. As a matter of fact, few shipments of canned pineapples
may be expected during 1931-32 as the single plant where pineapples are
canned has suspended operations until price conditions are more favorable.

Standardization
Progress made during 1930-31 in controlling the quality of export pro-
ducts briefly may be summarized as follows:
(1) The principle of standard grading of exports has been extended to
include cacao.
(2) The various branches of the government have endeavored to enforce
the executive order of August 9, 1930, prohibiting commerce in. coffee which
has been improperly prepared.
(3) In order to promote a better understanding between the coffee trade
in Haiti and coffee buyers in France, an agent of the Agricultural Service
was sent to France where he spent several months explaining the methods
and aims of the Haitian government and endeavoring to have the Haitian
standard types of coffee accepted by the coffee syndicate at Havre as the
basis for trading.
(4) Greater uniformity in grading coffee has been brought about and
the earlier objections of exporters and merchants largely have been
overcome. Coffee shipments of the three highest types in 1930-31 were





HAITI: REPORT. OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


more than twice the quantity of the three highest types exported in the
previous year, thus demonstrating conclusively that standardization is
improving the quality of coffee exported.
Official grading of cacao for export was decreed on October 16, 1930.
As explained in the last chapter, this measure was taken primarily to permit
the shipment of cacao free of export duty and thus to enable the Haitian
product to compete in price with cacao from other countries. At the same
time, it was believed that by grading the cacao and putting a lower tariff
on the better grades the quality of the product shipped would be improved.
In principle, the method of grading cacao was the same as had previously
been followed with coffee. Five different defects in the beans were listed.
Shipments of fermented cacao, well dried and free from foreign matter,
were exempted from all export duty provided that they contained no more
than five per cent of defective beans in a sample of five hundred grammes.
Cacao measuring up to this standard was known as Type A. Cacao,
fermented or not, and containing not more than eight per cent of defective
beans (Type B) was taxed ten centimes per kilo. Type C included all other
cacao, and the old rate of duty, Gdes. 0.23364 per kilo, was retained.
SCacao grown in Haiti has an excellent flavor when properly prepared,
and a good demand for the better quality normally exists. Lack of the
proper facilities for preparing cacao has limited its market. It is hoped
that the encouragement given to growers through the reduction in export
duties will .result in greater efforts to improve the quality of the product
shipped.'
As regards coffee, standardization, efforts during the year were concen-
trated on carrying out existing regulations more thoroughly. There were
no changes during the year in the scale of customs duties on the various
types of coffee, or in the methods of grading. A concerted effort, however,
was made by the government to enforce the provisions of the executive
order of Angust 9, 1930.* To this end the government requested the co-
operation of,the Customs Service, the Guard of Haiti, the Agricultural
Service, the prefects of the arrondissements, and the parish priests. On
August 29, 1931, Collectors of Customs were given instructions to examine
all coffee shipments arriving by boat from other Haitian ports and to
order the seizure of all coffee shipments containing more than ten per cent of
defective beans.
No unexpected difficulty was encountered by the Customs Service in
carrying out its part of the program. A few shipments were seized, and the
owners were given opportunity, as provided in the executive order, to
clean or prepare the coffee so that it would come within the legal require-
ments. A few protests were received, due to lack of knowledge of the law.
Also, it was reported in some districts that receipts of coffee were slower
than usual because peasants did not understand the law and were afraid

SAnnual Report of the Financial Adviser-General Receiver, 1929-30, page 37.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


that their coffee would be confiscated. Nevertheless, collectors soon were
able to report that the quality of the coffee coming to port was showing
marked improvement, and at the end of the year indications were that
with continued enforcement of the law by all branches of the government
the new measures would meet with complete success.
It must be recorded, however, with some regret, that at the present
writing (December, 1931), the executive order governing the interior
marketing of coffee no longer is enforced. Thus, this new attempt at
improving the quality of coffee brought to market has become a dead letter.
It will be recalled that a similar fate, overtook the executive order of
July 18, 1929 which had the same object in view.
The voyage of Mr. Louis Dejoie to Havre in the early part of the fiscal
year resulted in a report which was of great assistance to the Central
Standardization Commission. At Havre, Mr. Dejoie consulted with members
of the Chambre Syndicale des Caf6s and with coffee merchants from
whom he gathered much useful-information making it possible to compare
minutely the French requirements governing the grading of coffee with the
standards established in Haiti. It was found that certain grades of coffee
shipped under existing regulations from Haiti do not correspond uniformly
with the nearest equivalent classifications used in the French coffee trade.
For example, coffee correctly classified at the time of shipment from Haiti
as Type 5 is not always accepted as "Contrat No. 2" coffee at Havre when
measured by the standards of the French coffee trade. The French syn-
dicate has therefore been reluctant to give its unqualified acceptance of the
Haitian standards as a basis for transactions. It is believed, however, that
if the present standards in Haiti are continued, and if the utmost uniformity
in grading is maintained, the French coffee trade in the course of time
will recognize more fully that the Haitian standards offer the more sat-
isfactory classification.
Meanwhile, it should be pointed out that during the past year the grading
of coffee by customs employees has been thoroughly satisfactory, and
complaints of inaccuracies and lack of uniformity which, as had been
fepected, attended the inception of the new system, have been reduced to
a minimum. There is no doubt but that coffee standardization has resulted
in a marked improvement in the quality of coffee exports. During 1929-30,
the first year of -offee standardization, exports of the first three grades
totalled 1,054,930 kilos. In 1930-31, exports of coffee classified under the
same grades totalled 2,176,499 kilos. Expressed as percentages of total
exports, the share which includes the three highest types increased from
3.07 per cent in 1929-30 to 8.27 per cent in 1930-31.
This increase in the exportation of better coffee represents a considerable
gain to exporters and "speculators", not only through the fact that they
undoubtedly have been able to get a higher price for their product, but
through the fact that the higher grades carry a considerable reduction in




HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


export duties. This saving to coffee traders in 1930-31 amounted approxi-
mately to Gdes. 185,000. Of this amount, a saving of Gdes. 119,000 was
due to the reduction on September 1, 1930, of the export duty on Type 3
and to the further reduction of the duties previously collected on Types 1 and
2.* Similarly, exporters of cacao benefited to the extent of Gdes. 154,000 by
the reduction and removal of export duties on that product.
It is difficult to estimate accurately the effect which standardization has
had on the price of Haitian coffee. Chart No. 2 reveals conclusively,
however, that the premium which the Haitian variety enjoys over inferior
coffees is steadily increasing. Part of this increase probably is due to a
greater demand for the better grades because of the low prices at which all
grades of coffee can be bought. Also, the world overproduction of coffee
was chiefly due to increased production of the inferior Brazilian grades,
and the oversupply of coffee stocks therefore applies principally to those
varieties. At the same time it undoubtedly is true that to a considerable
extent the marked increase in the premium of Haitian coffee over Santos
coffee is due to standardization of Haitian coffee and the resultant improve-
ment in the preparation and quality of coffee exported.

Customs Administration
At the beginning of the fiscal year the Customs Service took over from
the Agricultural Service all of the more important activities of the De-
partment of Markets. This department had been organized for the purpose
of developing new markets for Haitian exports, and promoting foreign
trade in general. The work carried on by the Department of Markets had
been of great value, particularly in connection with investigating conditions
in the coffee market and preparing a plan for the standardization of coffee.
Lack of funds made it necessary for the Agricultural Service to give up
the Department of Markets.
For several months the Customs Service continued to print and distribute
the weekly bulletin of commercial information formerly published by the
Department of Markets. It also continued the work of disseminating current
price quotations, answering requests for business information, checking
samples of coffee, and various minor activities. A small staff of employees
was taken over from the Department of Markets for handling this work.
Later in the year, however, it was found necessary because of the expense
to give up the publication of the bulletin of commercial information and
further to restrict the other activities. It is hoped that an increase in
revenues will make it possible to continue again the valuable work of this
division of the Customs Service.
Otherwise, there was little change during the year in the organization
of the Customs Service. Activities were chiefly directed towards maintain-
ing efficiency with a reduced personnel, and towards effecting economies
Annual Report of the Financial Adviser-General Receiver, 1929-30, page 36.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


to enable the service to operate within the greatly restricted availabilities.
Notwithstanding the handicap of a smaller staff and the necessity for the
strictest economy in all operations, it can be said with considerable pride
that there was no loss in the efficiency with which customs revenues were
collected.
Tariff Revision
Under authority of the Law of August 14, 1928, the export duty on
logwood roots was reduced to Gdes. 0.005 per kilo by an executive order
dated September 3, 1931. The duty on logwood logs at the same time was
maintained at the previous rate of Gdes. 0.01534 per kilo.
The price of logwood had fallen to a point where it was profitable to
export only the logs, and the roots were left in the ground. This resulted
in rendering fertile land difficult to cultivate where logwood had been cut.
It is hoped that the new export duty will be followed by increased logwood
exports and will at the same time result in the clearing for cultivation of
large areas of fertile land.
Reference already has been made to cacao standardization and to the
removal and reduction of the export duties on cacao of Types A and B
respectively. No other changes were made in the export duties or in the
import tariff schedules during the year. In view of the reduction in the
excise tax rates which came into effect on September 10, 1931, and the
consequent loss in revenue from that source, it will not be possible to make
further reductions in export and import duties unless further sources of
income are found through new internal revenue legislation.

Customs Service
By the exercise of the strictest economy coupled with drastic reductions
in personnel, expenditures from the "five per cent fund"* including, as
usual, full payment of one per cent of customs revenue receipts to the
Banque Nationale de la Republique d'Haiti as compensation for its services
as treasury agent, were reduced from Gdes. 1,729,289.80 in 1929-30 to
Gdes. 1,443,140.97 in 1930-31. The saving amounted to Gdes. 286,148.83,
or 16.55 per cent.
Since the five per cent fund is a fixed percentage of customs receipts,
it follows that accruals to the fund in 1930-31 suffered the same severe
decline as did customs revenues. Five per cent of customs revenues dropped
from Gdes. 1,541,953.74 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 1,278,139.20 in 1930-31, or
17.11 per cent. The reductions in expenditures of the Customs Service
during the year were not sufficient to bring costs within the limit of the
total amount accruing to the fund in 1930-31. The surplus accumulated
in previous years was reduced by Gdes. 165,001.77, and on September 30,
1931, a surplus of only Gdes. 4,128.40 remained in the account.

*Annual Report of the Financial Adviser-General Receiver. 1929-30 page 47.




HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


Five per cent of customs receipts from the beginning of the Receivership
until September 30, 1931, amounted to Gdes. 22,526,496.53. Expenditures
of the Customs Service during the same period totalled Gdes. 22,522,368.13.
The latter figure, however, includes many capital expenditures which were
financed by the Receivership in accord with the government, *together with
the regular payment of the bank commission of one per cent referred to
above, and which, properly speaking, is an obligation of the government
rather than of the Receivership. Consequently, expenditures of the Re-
ceivership have been kept well within the limit of five per cent of customs
receipts fixed by the Treaty of September 16, 1915.
Estimates made before the beginning of the fiscal year 1931-32 indicated
that customs receipts for that year would not exceed Gdes. 25,800,000. This
means that only Gdes. 1,290,000 will accrue to the five per cent fund in
1931-32 to which may be added the surplus of Gdes. 4,128.40 carried over
from the previous year.. Still further reductions have been made in per-
sonnel expenditures, and the Customs Service has been budgeted in a way
which will bring total expenditures for the year. within the limit of
Gdes. 1,294,128.40 and at the same time leave sufficient funds to provide
for the full payment of the bank commission. At the present writing it
appears possible that the earlier estimate of customs receipts may not be
attained, in which event it may be necessary to pay at least part of the
bank commission from the general funds of the treasury.
The reductions in expenditures effected during 1930-31 have been drastic
in the extreme. Out of total savings amounting to Gdes. 286,148.83, the
reductions under the general classification of administration and operation
amounted to Gdes. 111,587.19. Of this amount, Gdes. 94,547.28 represented
reductions in expenditures for salaries and wages, and the total amount
disbursed for this purpose was reduced from Gdes. 1,124,419.03 in 1929-30
to Gdes. 1,029,871.75 in 1930-31. Monthly disbursements for salaries and
wages were reduced from Gdes. 97,309.71 in September, 1930, to
Gdes. 78,561.80 in the same month of 1931. All other administration and
operating expenditures were reduced from Gdes. 153,433.45 in 1929-30 to
Gdes. 136,393.54 in 1930-31. Under other general classifications, expen-
ditures for the acquisition of property declined from Gdes. 115,479.47 in
1929-30 to Gdes. 11,544,62 in 1930-31, and for repairs and maintenance
from Gdes. 27,567.10 to Gdes. 9,703.22. Fixed charges, representing the
contractual payment of the bank commission, declined from Gdes. 308,390.75
in 1929-30 to Gdes. 255,627.84 in 1930-31.
The cost of making civil payments in 1930-31 was still a substantial
item, although recorded expenses for this account were reduced from
Gdes. 17,157.08 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 13,749.03 in 1930-31. The cost of
supplies and materials purchased over the same period declined from
Gdes. 63,079.74 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 43,453.30 in 1930-31. Transportation

Annual Report of the Financial Adviser-General Receiver. 1929-30. page 48.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


costs, on the other hand, increased from Gdes. 66,688.57 in 1929-30 to
Gdes. 70,287.23 in 1930-31, due to the expense of transferring various
members of the personnel to new posts in October, 1930. Communication
costs rose from Gdes. 244.93 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 2,181.85 in 1930-31 due
to taking over the Department of Markets from the Agricultural Service at
the beginning of the year. An important part of the work of the Department
of Markets was that of receiving cabled quotations from abroad of export
commodity prices and relaying these prices by telegram to the various
ports of the Republic. This service to exporters was continued by the
Customs Service after taking over the Department of Markets. Special
and miscellaneous expenditures were reduced from Gdes. 23,953.71 in
1929-30 to Gdes. 22,481.16 in 1930-31. Of these amounts the chief item
is' the cost of the yearly audit made by auditors from the office of the
Comptroller General of the. United States. The cost of this audit was
Gdes. 20,381.65 in 1930-31 compared with Gdes. 22,874.15 in 1929-30.
The low level to which customs receipts declined in 1930-31 resulted in
a slight addition to the cost per gourde collected, notwithstanding the
great economies which were effected in operating costs. In 1930-31 the
total cost per gourde collected, including payment of the bank commission,
was. Gde. .0565, compared with Gde. .0561 in 1929-30 and Gde. .0529 in
1928-29. Costs were cheapest per gourde collected at Miragoane, Petit
Goive, Jacmel, J6r6mie, Port-au-Prince, Gonaives, Saint Marc, Port-de-
Paix, Cayes, Cap Haitien, Fort Libert6, and Aquin in the order named.
The cost per gourde collected as usual was high at the frontier stations at
Glore, Belladere, and Ouanaminthe, which are maintained only to control
smuggling. Of the four major ports, costs per gourde collected increased
from Gde. .0207 to Gde. .0218 at Port-au-Prince; from Gde. .0191 to
Gde. .0299 at Cap Haitien; From Gde. .0249 to Gde. 0.259 at Cayes; and
from Gde. .0171 to Gde. .0190 at Jacmel.

Internal Revenue Service
Expenditures of the Internal Revenue Service were reduced from
Gdes. 993,017.74 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 770,681.47 in 1930-31. The reduction
amounted to Gdes. 222,336.27, or 22.39 per cent. During the same period,
the operating allowance of this service, which is established by law
at fifteen per cent of internal revenue collections, declined from
Gdes. 993,024.61 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 774,062.00 in the year just ended. Thus,
expenditures were kept within the limit of availabilities in spite of the
unexpectedly severe drop in internal revenue collections, and at the end of
the year a surplus of Gdes. 3,380.53 reverted to the treasury.
As in the case of the Customs Service, it was necessary to make extensive
reductions in expenditures for personnel in order to keep within the
authorized limit. Administration and operation expenditures, of which
73.85 per cent in 1930-31 was for payment of salaries and wages, were





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


reduced from Gdes. 800,451.39 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 702,475.22 in 1930-31.
Much needed improvements and additions to property had to be deferred,
and expenditures under that heading declined from Gdes. 121,082.97 in
1929-30 to Gdes. 15,760.02 in 1930-31. Repairs and maintenance costs
showed a decline amounting to Gdes. 4,439.64. Fixed charges, which, as in
the case of the Customs Service, consist of one per cent of total collections
payable regularly at the end of the year to the Banque Nationale de la
R6publique d'Haiti for its services as treasury agent, in 1930-31 amounted
to Gdes. 51,604.13 compared with Gdes. 66,201.64 the previous year.
A detailed subdivision of disbursements coming under the general classi-
fication of administration and operation expenditures indicates that
payments for supplies and materials were reduced from Gdes. 86,905.76 in
1929-30 to Gdes. 47,639.55 in 1930-31. Similarly, special and miscellaneous
expenditures declined from Gdes. 62,898.13 to Gdes. 33,757.68 and payments
for rent from Gdes. 2,662 to Gdes. 1,275.63. Transportation costs rose
during the same period from Gdes. 80,286.20 to Gdes. 100,940.30 due to
the necessity of replacing part of the automotive equipment during the year.

Land Legislation
Unfortunately, this office must report that almost no progress was made
during the year in settling the important agrarian problem in Haiti.
Existing legislation affecting the clearing of titles, the settlement of land
disputes, the conducting of common real estate transactions, and liens on"
real property and their foreclosure needs modernizing. Land laws in their
present form are responsible for a great deal of unnecessary confusion
and litigation. A system of accurate land surveys is badly needed to correct
uncertainties with respect to the determination of property boundaries. A
cadastral law embodying a system for registering titles and interest in
real property is also needed. The lack of such legislation, and failure to
reform existing land legislation, have retarded the normal enhancement
of property values and have delayed the construction of new irrigation
systems and the establishment of an agricultural bank. Irrigation laws,
and a method of extending credit to the owners of agricultural land would
be of immense assistance to the country in its program of developing its
resources, but such reform must be deferred until existing legislation is
modernized, and new laws are provided.
The State is owner of immense areas of fertile land. Some of this is
unoccupied; the rest is rented by tenants who have no opportunity to obtain
title to the land they cultivate, hence, they have no inducement permanently
to improve their farms. A homestead law would open up unoccupied state
lands and undoubtedly would increase the production of land now held
by tenants since they would be given the prospect of eventual ownership.
Notwithstanding the urgent need of legislative measures of the kind
described above, the Legislative Body while in session during the year




HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


found that the press of other business prevented any constructive action
towards a solution of the land problem. It is hoped, however, that much
in the way of needed land legislation will be accomplished during 1931-32.
This office has endeavored to be of assistance during the year through
the preparation of a homestead law. In preparing this project of law much
valuable material was obtained from several projects prepared in Haiti in
1929 by Judge R. C. Round in connection with the proposed establishment
of a system of land registration. The chief objection to these projects at
that time was that their provisions were too ambitious for the finances of
the country adequately to meet the necessary costs of survey, a land office,
new courts and other expenses incidental to their enactment. The project
prepared by this office was undertaken with that objection in mind, and it
is believed that a law has been drafted which will be wholly acceptable.
Briefly, the new project provides that any citizen of Haiti who is or shall
become a tenant of state-owned rural land suitable for agricultural develop-
ment may become owner of a homestead estate up to the amount of five
hectares. The applicant shall have been a State tenant of three years'
standing at the time he shall make his application; he shall have paid three
consecutive years' rental, including the year in which application is made;
and he actually shall have dwelt upon and cultivated the land during the
three-year period.
As soon after the application is made as the government can assure itself
that the requirements of residence and occupation have been met by the
applicant; that the application is made in good faith for the purpose of
securing a home for the tenant and his family; that no private claims to
the land are pending; and that the land has been accurately surveyed, a
certificate granting a homestead estate in the land shall be issued and deliv-
ered to the tenant who shall thereafter enjoy all the rights of pro-
prietorship including complete power of alienation except for the limitations
usually incident to homestead estates where the homesteader is the head of
a family.
This project will be presented to the Secretary of State for Finance at
an early date, and it is hoped that early in the next legislative session it
will he enacted into law. Its enactment should be of immense benefit to
the country in that it will give to the tenant a proprietor's interest in the
land which should serve as an incentive for him to improve and increase
the productivity of the land he occupies. The increase in the number of
small landed proprietors which would result from the law should be an
important factor of social and economic stability.
Customs Receipts
Revenue collections quite naturally have followed the downward trend
of foreign commerce values. In 1930-31, revenue collections from all
sources totalled Gdes. 31,746,582.38, compared with Gdes. 38,648,163.39 in
1929-30. The decline amounted to Gdes. 6,901,581.01, or 17.86 per cent.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


By far the greater part of revenue receipts still is derived from customs
duties on exports and imports. In 1930-31, customs receipts constituted
80.54 per cent of the total revenues of the Republic, compared with
79.79 per cent in 1929-30, and 82.89 per cent in 1928-29. The duties on
exports are specific, while those on imports are both specific and ad
valorem. It follows that when both exports and imports decline in quantity
and value, as they did in 1930-31, the revenues of the country will fall off
correspondingly.
SCustoms receipts derived from export duties were the most severely
affected of all sources of revenue. Collections from this source totalled
only Gdes. 8,821,209.96 in 1930-31, as against Gdes. 11,952,580.99 in .the
preceding year. The decline amounted to Gdes. 3,131,371.03, or 26.20 per
cent, and reflects sub-normal shipments of all of the principal export crops.
An important factor also was the reduction in the export duties on coffee

CHART No. 3
TOTAL REVENUE RECEIPTS OF HAITI, FISCAL YEARS 1889-90 TO 1930-31
MLUaK5 Or
GOUROLDE


64











S90 Z 5946 96 00-01 04 0506078O 10 4 11 1 7381 2 -20 1 t 24 25267 S3



Iat all if the export duty had not been modified so as to reduce the bu2e 2




on the growers.
Although the value office estimportes was responsible for a reduction of
the amount of duties collected from this was source fell off only 11.36 per cent.
ductImport duties collected duties probably were compensated in some deg16,677,081.40 compare
increased revenues. 18,813,703.58 during the previous fiscal period.prole
a much greater part of the cacao crop never would have been exported




at all if the export tariff schedules carry both specific and ad valorem
rates for each taxable article, and imports are taxable under whichever
Although the value of goods imported in 1930-31 fell off 25.42 per cent,
the amount of duties collected from this source fell off only 11.36 per cent.
Import duties collected during 1930-31 totalled Gdes. 16,677,081.40 compared
with'Gdes.. 18,813,703.58 during the previous fiscal period.
Most of the import tariff schedules carry both specific and ad valorem
rates for each taxable article, and imports are taxable under whichever





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


rate produces the greater revenue. The tariff of 1926 was computed in such
a way that normally most imports would be taxable in accordance with the
ad valorem rate, and the specific duties would come into effect only when
goods were quoted at abnormally low values. During the past year the
prices of a great many articles commonly imported into Haiti have under-
gone extreme reductions in value. In many cases the unit values have
declined to a point where specific duties have become applicable rather than
the ad valorem rates under which these articles formerly were taxed. Thus,
the tendenicy during the year has been for import.revenues to become more
and more constant regardless of fluctuations in value since an increasingly
larger share of imported articles is being taxed in accordance with specific
rates of duty. Some such safeguard is necessary in a country which relies
predominantly on customs duties for its revenue. These specific rates of
duty, though comparatively heavy during the period of depression,.probably
will permit the government to continue its normal functions without having
to cope with further sudden and wide fluctuations in receipts from import
duties.
In order that the full significance of the operation of specific duties in
times of abnormally low prices may be understood, it is only necessary to
state that in 1928-29 import duties represented 29.35 per cent of import
values, in 1929-30 they represented 29.30 per cent of such values, and in
1930-31, when the effects of the depression began to exert a greater
influence on prices of merchandise imported, the percentage rose to 34.83.
.Export taxes also have shown an increase over last year in. comparison
with export values. In 1930-31 these duties constituted 19.68 per cent of
the value of commodities exported, as compared with 16.90 per cent for
1929-30 ahd 11.77 per cent for 1928-29. Since all export duties are specific,
the.percentage of value which they represent fluctuates with commodity
prices. During this period of low prices they are admittedly heavy, but
infiofar as can be learned they have not affected appreciably the export
of any product except cacao, and prompt measures were taken to effect the
necessary modifications in the duty on this commodity. Cacao had become
of increasingly less importance as a source of revenue, and action was
necessary if the Haitian producers were to continue in competition with
those of other countries.
In the foregoing paragraphs on customs rates, attention is directed to
the fact that the present tariff came into effect in 1926. At that time there
was a general plan of spreading the incidence of taxation as widely as
possible by the establishment of internal revenue taxes, more particularly
in the form of taxes on alcohol and tobacco. As a part of this plan, it was
proposed to reduce customs duties whenever the increased revenue from
excise taxes permitted the government to make customs tariff reductions
and at the same time balance its annual budget. This plan was working
satisfactorily from a fiscal point of view, and export taxes were being






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


reduced as rapidly as budget availabilities permitted reductions to be
considered. The reduction in the excise taxes during the year completely
destroyed the balance of the plan. If the tariff schedules had not carried
both specific and ad valorem rates for each article, the decrease in merchan-
dise values automatically would have reduced customs revenues to a
degree which would have forced either the discontinuance of many govern-
mental activities or an unwarranted drain on treasury reserves.
The amount of imports is a matter which is determined entirely by the
ability of the Haitian people to purchase foreign exchange, since Haiti is
undersupplied both with foodstuffs and manufactured goods. Actually, con-
ditions in Haiti in this regard are analogous to those in several South Ameri-
can countries, except that Haiti has been fortunate during this period of
world depression in that, because of large government cash reserves in New
York, and important invisible exports, together with the fact that crops
largely have been marketed, a sufficient amount of exchange has accumulated
to meet foreign payments. One of the present difficulties that is becoming
increasingly grave is the fact that invisible exports are now seriously
reduced. A substantial amount of capital has been invested in Haiti in the
last few years in the establishment of pineapple and sisal plantations,
but no further investments of this kind are in immediate prospect. A very
large amount of capital in the form of wages was secured by Haitiah
laborers who annually went abroad to work on sugar plantations. This
work has been closed to Haitians this year. Money expended in maintain-
ing the United States Marines has been reduced, and United States Fleet
operations in the Bay of Gonaives, which in the past resulted in large
expenditures ashore, have been curtailed, with resultant loss of income to
the Haitian public. In considering the balance of payments of Haiti, these
invisible exports, plus commodity exports, in recent years have made
possible a favorable balance. But, in addition to the payment for Haitian
imports, the invisible import of the Haitian debt charges is becoming
increasingly important in its effect upon the balance of payments. Haitian
prosperity is dependent on efforts to increase exports, and to secure or
reestablish the invisible exports to a point where the balance of payments
will become favorable. But it must be admitted that during the last year
Haiti has faced an adverse balance of payments, and that this condition is
likely to continue during the coming year.
The question before the people of Haiti, therefore, is a more complicated
question than simply that of specific duties or export taxes. Export taxes,
in a balanced system of finance, are generally regarded as theoretically
unsound. The possible exception to this would be the case of a world
monopoly in some exportable product. When the financial plan is relatively
undeveloped, or where a balanced plan has been disorganized, there would





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


be no question as to the expediency of export tariffs. In Haiti, rapid
progress had been made until 1931 in developing sources of revenue other
than customs duties.
In the opinion of this office, the policy of a further downward .revision
of present customs duties is one that cannot be extended except as a part
of a balanced system of taxation which includes its fair proportion of
internal revenues. Total revenues must be maintained, or payments for
essential services cannot be made. The one source of supply of money for
the government budget is taxation; and taxation should be as widespread
and evenly distributed as possible, in order to lighten the individual burden.
But the total of taxation must depend entirely upon the cost of maintaining
essential government services and meeting all necessary expenditures.

Internal Revenue Receipts
The year 1930-31 was particularly disappointing as regards internal
revenue collections. This source of income produced only Gdes. 5,160,413.33
in 1930-31, compared with Gdes. 6,620,164.04 in 1929-30. The decline
amounted to Gdes. 1,459,750.71, or 22.05 per cent.
The greater part of the decline was due to decreased revenues from
the excise taxes. These taxes produced only Gdes. 1,889,942.34 in 1930-31
compared with Gdes. 2,732,478.75 in 1929-30, and showed a decline of 30.86
per cent from the latter figure. All other internal revenue taxes produced
Gdes. 3,270,470.99 in 1930-31 compared with Gdes. 3,887,685.29 in 1929-30.
The decline amounted to Gdes. 617,214.30, or 15.90 per cent.
This decline of nearly sixteen per cent in collections other than those
coming from the excise taxes is no greater than might have been expected
in view of the depression in business and general commercial inactivity.
The yield from the operation of the telephone and telegraph service, for
example, declined from Gdes. 791,129.48 to Gdes. 727,955.11; the income
tax, from Gdes. 666,327.25 to Gdes. 538,841.68; documentary recording
fees, from Gdes. 359,118.11 to Gdes. 345,761.25; documentary stamp taxes,
from Gdes. 424,367.06 to Gdes. 329,848.25; and the occupational tax on
foreigners from Gdes. 363,862.68 to Gdes. 314,446.65. Every other impor-
tant tax in this group produced less revenues in 1930-31 in like proportion.
Emigration fees, formerly an important source of income, produced no
revenueat all in 1930-31 due to the complete cessation of the export of
labor under the special labor emigration laws.
The decline of Gdes. 842,536.41, or 30.86 per cent, in the yield of the
excise taxes, on the other hand, merits a more detailed explanation. It is
probable that not more than half of this surprising decline was due directly
to the adverse economic conditions and to a decline in the consumption of
alcohol and tobacco. The experience of other countries demonstrates
conclusively that the consumption of alcohol and tobacco tends to remain
relatively stable even in times of economic depression. Excise taxes,





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


therefore, should yield a comparatively stable income, in spite of conditions
that affect general business unfavorably. This had been the case in Haiti
until the past year. Just before the beginning of the last fiscal year,
however, candidates for political offices made use of the excise taxes as
a political issue, and there were included in the platforms of some of
the winning candidates in the last elections promises of cheaper alcohol
and cheaper tobacco through immediate removal of the taxes on those
products. No program was offered for the replacement of revenues lost in
this way, although at the time it was perfectly evident that the government
needed every bit of revenue it could obtain under the then existing legislation.
Reduction in revenue must be compensated by a cut in the budget, depletion
of the treasury surplus or an increase in the public debt. A balanced
budget offers the only sound solution since the treasury surplus at the end
of the present year is expected to be reduced to a point where it will barely
represent the amount necessary to permit the government to carry on its
operations in an orderly manner. Obviously, borrowing to pay current
expenses must be avoided if possible.
The promises of the politicians were not realized until the publication
in the Moniteur on September 10, 1931, of the excise law of August 5,
1931, which created a new basis of taxation resulting in a substantially
lower revenue yield. Thus, from the beginning of the fiscal year under
review, ard extending practically to the end of the year, the people lived
in the belief that the existing excise taxes soon would be reduced or removed
altogether. Many distillers delayed payment of alcohol taxes or suspended
operations in the belief that a reduction in the tax rate was immediately
at hand. Other distillers, influenced by the widespread propaganda, delib-
erately evaded the law in various ways, apparently in the belief that the
promises already had the effect of law, and that attempts to enforce the
existing law would be ineffectual. In the latter respect they were too often
right. Time and again distillers who clearly had evaded the law were
reported but no immediate and satisfactory action resulted. Again, illicit
stills were discovered by agents of the Internal Revenue Service, and in
spite of appeals directed to the proper local authorities little or no effort
was made to put an end to the condition that daily was depriving 'the
treasury of revenue. This apathetic attitude increased the prevailing feeling
of disregard for the excise law and on two occasions the hostile attitude of
law-breaking distillers led to violence against agents of the Internal Reve-
nue Service.
The total loss in revenue is difficult to estimate but it was substantial,
and was a considerable factor in the reduction necessary in the 1931-32
budget. Prior to the elections of 1930, no insurmountable difficulties had
been encountered in obtaining considerable revenue from the excise taxes.
Excise tax collections in 1929-30 amounted to Gdes. 2,732,478.75, the high-
est on record. It had been demonstrated amply that the excise taxes were





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


not too burdensome, that with the cooperation of all branches of the govern-
ment they could be easily enforced, and that they provided a profitable
source of revenue. The government had benefited through three years of
experience in collecting excise taxes. Excise taxes when new are never
popular, but by 1931 the period of adjustment was largely over, and if the
constant pressure of competition had not forced the small producer into an
increasingly difficult position in which he eagerly turned to any suggested
remedy, the new taxes would not have offered material for use in political
campaigns. Had it not been for the activities of political candidates, it is
probable that by now the taxes would have been entirely acceptable to the
people, and that at the same time they would have been of great assistance
to the government during this difficult period of adjustment.
From the foregoing it can be seen that the loss in internal revenue
collections during 1930-31 was not a loss for that year alone. The reasons
for the alarmingly decreased yield of the old excise taxes still exist.
Taxpayers still regard these taxes as uncertain, and it will take time
before that attitude is overcome.
The new excise law of August 5, 1931, changed the basis of the alcohol
tax. Formerly the tax was based on volume of alcohol produced, but the
new tax is based on the capacity of distilling apparatus in use. The old
tax reflected the consumption of alcohol in the country and permitted State
revenues to expand as consumption increased. The new tax does not
offer this flexibility, and, in fact, as efficiency in distilling and marketing
alcohol is improved the base of the tax will be narrowed and the revenue
reduced. The new tax is an additional incentive to efficiency and offers
additional income to the distiller, at the expense of the State, as he
increases the output of his plant. The new law, therefore, changes the
prospect from one of a constantly expanding income from the alcohol tax
to one of a constantly diminishing return until the ultimate minimum is
reached. Furthermore, the actual effect of this law has been to put a
premium on large distilleries with fully equipped laboratories, enabling
them to obtain maximum distilling efficiency, and adversely to affect the
earning capacity of the' small distiller who has found to his surprise that
instead of helping him maintain himself in the field of competition, the
law has had exactly the contrary effect, leaving him worse off than' he was
under the previous law.
The Law of August 5, 1931, fixing the tax on alcohol on the basis of the
capacity of stills, accentuates the advantage already enjoyed by large
distillers in being able to function continually, in spite of seasonal variation
in consumption. Having sufficient capital, they are able to store their
product during periods of slackened demand and thus diminish the per
litre tax on alcohol produced by obtaining the maximum annual production
from each unit capacity of the apparatus. Since it is well recognized by
large producers that large volume and small profit per unit will, in the





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


long run, yield more than small volume and high profit, the advantage
offered the larger distillers under the present law is apparent and might
well render it impossible for small distillers to produce alcohol as cheaply
as it can be sold by well capitalized concerns. The difficulties and distress
among the small distillers of Haiti in the opinion of this office are occasion-
ed by the operation of the simple economic laws of competition between
efficient and constant production and inefficient casual production, yet in
an attempt made avowedly to help the small man the only result has been
to increase his difficulties.
Miscellaneous Receipts
Practically all of the miscellaneous receipts of the treasury are derived
from interest received on investments and on deposits of the government.
The income, therefore, varies in accordance with the amounts invested or
deposited, and the rates of interest paid.
In 1930-31 miscellaneous receipts dropped to Gdes. 1,023,385.07 from
Gdes. 1,188,924.60 in 1929-30. The decline amounted to Gdes. 165,539.53.
or 13.92 per cent of miscellaneous receipts the previous year. Not only
did interest-bearing funds of the government decline sharply in amount
(the total of dollar funds, including securities, in New York on September
30, 1931 was Gdes. 5,397,823.95 less than on the same date the year before),
but the rates of interest on the time and sight deposits in New York funds
were reduced several times during the course of the year. At the beginning
of the year the rates were 2j% per cent for funds requiring thirty days notice
of withdrawal and 2 per cent for deposits payable on demand. The corres-
ponding rates at the end of the year were 1% per cent and Y2 per cent
respectively.
Expenditures
For the third successive year, expenditures have exceeded revenue
receipts. In 1928-29 and in 1929-30, the yearly deficits were Gdes.
1,597,975.54 and Gdes. 1,995,066.13 respectively. In the fiscal year which
has just ended the deficit amounted to Gdes. 4,443,488.07. Total revenues
amounted to Gdes. 31,746,582.38, while total expenditures from revenue
reached Gdes. 36,190,070.45.
The deficit might have reached a much greater figure had it not been for
executive action in reducing the ordinary budget of expenditures to Gdes.
35,184,273.79 at the beginning of the year* combined with the efficient
cooperation of the administrative heads of government services in effecting
important economies and curtailment of activities within budgetary limits.
In addition to the ordinary budgeted expenditures the year began with
extraordinary appropriations still outstanding in the amount of Gdes.
361,878.91, which amount was still expendible. Moreover, during the course
of the year it became necessary because of unforeseen contingencies to
*Annual Report of the Financial Adviser General Receiver, 1929-30 page 103.






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


appropriate supplementary and additional extraordinary credits in the total
amount of Gdes. 1,617,368.14. Consequently, there was legally expendible
during the course of the year a total of Gdes. 37,163,520.34. Nevertheless,
economies effected during the year brought total expenditures down to
Gdes. 36,190,070.45, which amount was Gdes 4,453,159.07, or 10.96 per cent,
less than expenditures during the preceding fiscal period.
A large part of the reduction in expenditures was due to the fact that
supplementary amortization payments on the public debt (regulated by
contract) were not required during 1930-31, whereas during the previous
year a substantial supplementary payment was made because revenues
exceeded Gdes. 35,000,000.*. All other important reductions were due to
actual retrenchment in activities and economy in operation. The table
below shows in detail the departments and services of the government
where these economies were effected:
Reductions Percentage reduction
in expenditures in expenditures
from 1929-30 from 1929-30
Gourdes Per cent
Public Debt (including payments to fiduciary
currency reserve and international institu-
tions)............................................................ 1,815,760.25 17.32
Public W orks Service...................................... 1,665,846.36 24.36
Agricultural Service (including Vocational
Education .................................................. 628,870.70 19.86
Office of the Financial Adviser-General Receiver
(including the Internal Revenue Service).... 508,485.10 18.68
Public Health Service...................................... 140,359.89 3.47
Guard of Haiti ................................................. 133,615.46 2.07
Total ........................................................ 4,892,937.76
All other departments and services of the government, taken as a whole,
reported an increase in expenditures from Gdes. 6,929,920.30 in 1929-30 to
Gdes. 7,369,698.99 in 1930-31, or 6.36 per cent.
Of those departments reporting increased expenditures, the greatest
increase was recorded in the case of the Department of Finance with
expenditures in 1930-31 exceeding those of the previous year by
Gdes. 285,343.53, or 41.88 per cent. The increase was due to the settlement
of an unusually large number of claims against the State and to payments
to officials of the various American services in accordance with the terms
of an Accord signed on August 5, 1931, between the Haitian government
and the government of the United States by which certain services were
Haitianized, the existing American personnel being withdrawn. The services
affected were the Public Works Service, the Public Health Service, and
the Agricultural and Vocational Educational Services.
The Department of the Interior incurred unusually heavy expenditures
because of the elections in the early part of the year and the installation
of the new Legislative Body. Expenditures increased by Gdes. 95,190.56, or

SAnnual Report of the Financial Adviser-- General Receiver. 1929-30. page 78.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


6.36 per cent. The Department of Foreign Relations also was affected by
the political changes in that a number of changes in foreign diplomatic
officers of the government was necessary. As a result, expenditures of that
department increased by Gdes. 44,249.55, or 7.73 per cent. The Department
of. Commerce similarly showed increased expenditures amounting to
Gdes. 32,450.53, due in part to the appropriation of funds making it possible
for Haiti to be represented at the Colonial Exposition at Paris during the
summer of 1931. Also, increased expenditures were reported by the De-
partment of Public Instruction, due to a number of changes made inthe
educational system.
The remaining departments, namely, Public Works, Justice, Agriculture,
and Religion, reported that expenditures in 1930-31 were Gdes. 39,007.76
under those of the previous year. The economies reported by the De-
partments of Public Works and of Religion were particularly to be noted, in
that expenditures were 21.28 per cent and 3.81 per cent, respectively, under
those of the previous year.
That even greater economies were not effected by the government may
be ascribed to the fact that during the year the total of supplementary and
extraordinary credits was somewhat higher than in the previous fiscal
period. With the exception of the appropriations already mentioned, these
credits for the most part were small in amount individually, but in the
aggregate they made up a substantial total. Extraordinary appropriations
totalled Gdes. 839,389.82. Among individual items should be mentioned
Gdes. 95,000 for the completion of a Brothers' School at Port-de-Paix,
Gdes. 75,000 for purchasing equipment for the School of Medicine at Port-
au-Prince, Gdes. 50,000 for use of the Haitian-Dominican Frontier Com-
mission, Gdes. 50,000 for flood relief, and Gdes.33,000 for repairing damaged
telephone and telegraph lines. Supplementary credits totalled Gdes.
1,060,776.62, of which Gdes. 681,511 were allocated to the Department of
the Interior, chiefly for the purpose of defraying new expenses for salaries
and allowances occasioned by the installation of the Legislative Body on
November 10, 1930, and also for the payment of increased expense allow-
ances to senators and deputies in accordance with a law passed by the
Legislative Body on May 26, 1931. Other supplementary credits included
one for Gdes. 100,000 made necessary by the large number of claims against
the State which were paid during the year, and several credits, totalling
Gdes. 226,808, allocated to the Department of Public Instruction, principally
for the purpose of meeting deficiencies in the regular budgetary allocations
for school rentals and salaries of teachers. Also, a supplementary credit
for Gdes. 52,457.62 was allotted to the Department of Foreign Relations
to cover the cost of transferring consular and diplomatic agents during
the year.
Besides the expenditures from revenue already discussed, there were
considerable amounts disbursed during 1930-31 from funds other than





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


those derived from revenue. A number of special accounts are maintained
for the control of funds received by the government from sources which
do not represent actual revenue receipts, among which may be mentioned
in.particular a credit originally in the amount of Gdes. 1,400,000 represent-
ing the unused balance of funds received from the proceeds of the Series
A loan. The latter amount had been appropriated for the purpose of
constructing or improving roads and trails. On September 30, 1931, there
had been expended from this credit a total of Gdes. 563.094.97, leaving on
that date an unused balance of Gdes. 863,905.03 which has been appropriated
for various road construction projects and probably will be used in its
entirety during the fiscal year 1931-32.
Among the eleven other accounts coming under the same classification,
the most important are the revolving fund of the Public Works Service for
the purchase of supplies, the deposit of savings accounts of the Guard of
Haiti, the construction fund of the National Railroad Company, and the
account to which are deposited the receipts collected by the sequestrator of
La Gonave Island. The last two accounts showed balances on Sep-
tember 30, 1931, of Gdes. 330,623.55 and Gdes. 212,860.20 respectively.
Taking all non-revenue accounts as a whole, net withdrawals (expen-
ditures) under the non-revenue classification during 1930-31 amounted to
Gdes. 711,306.06 compared with Gdes. 1,204,072.89 during the preceding
year. Hence all expenditures of the government, including those from
revenue with those from other funds totalled Gdes. 36,901,376.51 during
1930-31 compared with Gdes. 41,847,302.39 during the previous fiscal period.
The decline was Gdes. 4,945,925.88, or 11.82 per cent.
The modern accounting system maintained by this office makes it possible
to classify in considerable detail all expenditures of the government,
including those from non-revenue accounts. Retaining the same classifica-
tion by functions which has been maintained for a number of years, it
appears that service of the public debt still is the most important item in
spite of greatly reduced disbursements under that heading during 1931-32.
Payments for account of the public debt in 1930-31 comprised 23.05 per
cent of total governmental expenditures as, against 24.44 per cent in 1929-30.
Next in importance were disbursements for maintenance of public safety
which increased from 14.75 per cent of total expenditures in 1929-30 to
15.97 per cent in the year just ended. Education was still third in impor-
tance in 1930-31, although the percentage declined from 13.45 per cent
in 1929-30 to 11.42 per cent in 1930-31. Similarly, a smaller percentage
of total expenditures in 1930-31 was taken by administration of the public
finances, by agricultural development, by disbursements.for the maintenance
of the water service, and by trade development, while a, greater share of
the public funds in 1930-31 was devoted to public health, transportation,





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


general executive expenditures, public works, the judiciary, street improve-
ments, communications, the legislative function, foreign affairs, religion,
and pensions.
Apportioning all disbursements of the government by objects of ex-
penditures, we find that amounts spent in 1930-31 for administration and
operation comprised 65.33 per cent of the total, whereas in 1929-30, pay-
ments under that heading comprised only 57.06 per cent of the total for
the latter year. This increase is to be expected in view of the fact that
with the exception of only a few departments and services of the govern-
ment, there had been no reductions in government salaries or personnel
in 1930-31. The economies that had been effected are traceable, therefore,
to other sources, and upon examination it appears that a considerable
reduction in disbursements for the acquisition of property was to a great
extent responsible for the lower expenditure total reported in the year
just ended. Disbursements classified under the heading "Acquisition of
Property" in 1930-31 amounted only to Gdes. 1,542,144.52 as against
Gdes. 4,269,522.20 in 1929-30. Fixed charges in 1930-31 were reduced by
Gdes. 2,017,634.07; and payments for repairs and maintenance were-reduced
by Gdes. 486,485.52.
As usual, the monthly total of expenditures from revenue fluctuated
greatly during the course of the year. In October they reached the high
of Gdes. 8,802,232.30, due to the customary anticipation of interest and
amortization requirements of the Series A and Series C loans for the
ensuing fiscal year. February was the low month with disbursements in
that month totalling Gdes. 2,195,201.86. In the previous year the low month
was June, with Gdes. 2,229,735.43 recorded as having been expended during
the month.
Treasury Position
The treasury balance sheet at September 30, 1931, showed assets
totalling Gdes. 24,426,136.23 and liabilities of Gdes. 7,963,294.73, leaving
an unobligated treasury surplus of Gdes. 16,462,841.50.
On September 30, 1930, the treasury surplus amounted to Gdes
19,677,358.74. Consequently, fiscal operations of the year 1930-31 resulted
in a reduction of the surplus amounting to Gdes. 3,214,517.24.
Unfortunately, it must be recorded that the figure for total assets at the
end of the year 1930-31 no longer represents exclusively liquid assets. Up
to September 30, 1931, the treasury had acquired under authority of the
Law of August 3, 1926, securities of the Series A, B and C loans, the par
value of which amounted to Gdes. 10,489,092.10. These bonds had been
purchased over a period of five years as an investment at a cost of Gdes.
9,844,222.65, or slightly under par. In the balance sheet at the end of the
last fiscal year, as well as in previous years, these securities were carried
at their cost price as cash reserves of the treasury. Since the month of





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


April, 1931, however, these bonds no longer represented investments which
were readily marketable at prices which would bring a return as great or
greater than the original cost price. The disfavor with which the bond
market had come to look upon all Latin-American bond issues, together
with the continued falling off in Haitian revenues, led to a mistaken appre-
hension as to the security of the issues, and brought the market price of the
Series A bonds to a low of 55 during the month of September, 1931. At
the end of the same month, the Series A bonds were selling at 65, and
the Series C bonds at about the same price. The Series B bonds, since they
are very closely held and are part of an internal loan, were not subject to
the extreme fluctuations which prevailed abroad, and at the end of the
fiscal year purchases could not be made under 91.
It is clear that with so great a drop in the foreign market's valuation of
Haitian securities, the treasury cannot hope to realize from the sale of its
security holdings until such time as public confidence will have been
restored. Any large share of the present holdings could not be sold without
depressing the price still further, and while the bonds could be used for
future amortization requirements, to do so at present would mean a consi-
derable sacrifice due to the relatively high prices at which the bonds were
acquired.
For sake of clarity and convenience, the figure of Gdes. 24,426,136.23
on the balance sheet*, representing total assets at September 30, 1931,
including investments at cost, may best be divided into three parts, viz.,
cash assets, investments, and other assets.
Items which were exclusively liquid cash assets on September 30, 1931,
totalled Gdes. 10,413,225.89. Of this amount, Gdes. 8,708,904.60 were
deposited with the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti as a time
account in New York funds, drawing interest at 12 per cent, and payable
upon thirty days' notice. Of the remainder, Gdes. 1,453,001.85 represented
New York funds available on demand, Gdes. 241,171.11 represented the
balance of the current account of the General Receiver in gourdes in the
Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti, and Gdes. 10,148.33 represented
the amount of cash in the hands of disbursing officers.
Investments, as explained above, were listed at cost value, amounting to
Gdes. 9,844,222.65, of which Gdes. 7,452,779 were Series A and Series C
bonds, and Gdes. 2,391,443.65 were Series B bonds.
Other assets amounted to Gdes. 4,168,687.69, and consisted of a deposit
of Gdes. 3,622,500, with the Banque Nationale de la Republique d'Haiti to
cover fiduciary currency out of circulation, another deposit of Gdes.
212,860.20, representing revenues collected by the sequestrator of the
concession for the exploitation of La Gonave Island, and Gdes. 333,327.49.
representing funds owed to the government by various communes to which

*Table 51.


. 35





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


money had been advanced for financing needed improvements or to defray
the cost of holding elections. Difficulty has been experienced in collecting
advances included in the last item, and in a number of instances communes
have defaulted on loans which were payable before the end of the fiscal year
1930-31.
No appraisal has been made for accounting purposes of other assets of
the State such as state owned land, buildings, equipment, water systems,
telephone and telegraph lines, and the contingent interest of the government
in the net receipts of the National Railroad. These items consequently do
not appear on the balance sheet of the treasury.*
Current liabilities on September 30, 1931, exclusive of liabilities fully
covered by special accounts, as in the case of the fiduciary currency reserve,
or by other assets, may be listed as follows:
Gourdes
Extraordinary credits outstanding.......................................... 363,255.02
"Non-revenue" credits:
Road construction ............................................ .... 836,905.03 .
Construction fund of the National Railroad.................... 330,623.55
Revolving fund of the Public Works Service............... 214,171.29
O thers................ ............................................................ '312,832 92
Five per cent fund of the General Receiver............................ 4,128.40
Checks outstanding ................................................................ 907,090.83
Claims unadjusted.................................................................. 825,600.00
Total .............................................................................. 3,794,607.04
Reserves amounted to Gdes. 4,168,687.69, of which Gdes. 3,622,500-re-
presented the government's liability to the Banque Nationale de la Repu-
blique d'Haiti for fiduciary currency out of circulation. Of the remainder,
Gdes. 212,860.20 was an amount set aside by the government pending a
decision on the La Gonave question, settlement of which would entail
payment of the entire amount with the exception of three per cent which
would be retained by the government.
By way of summary, the statement of treasury assets and liabilities as of
September 30, 1931, may be set down in simplified form as follows:
ASSETS LIABILITIES
Gourdes Gourdes
Current assets ........ 10,626,086.09 Current liabilities.... 3,794,607.04
Investments ............ 9,844,222.65 Reserves.................. 4,168,687.69
Other assets............ 3,955,827.49 Surplus.................. 16,462,841.50
24,426,136.23 24,426,136.23
It readily can be seen that at the end of the year the current obligations
of the government, amounting to Gdes. 3,794,607.04, were well protected
by over ten million gourdes in cash. While at first sight this amount may
seem more than sufficient to cover all cash requirements for 1931-32 and
leave sufficient funds to cover an expected budgetary deficit of perhaps
Gdes. 3,500,000, at the same time it must be remembered that both revenues
and expenditures in Haiti are subject to extreme fluctuations from month

Annual Report of the Financial Adviser-General Receiver. 1929-30, page 92.


36 -





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


to month and it is vitally nec-ssary that the treasury maintain a strong
cash position at all times. In October, 1930, for example, expenditures
exceeded receipts by almost five million gourdes. Similar monthly deficits
may be expected in the future if the government's present policy of antici-
pating debt service is maintained, and these deficits must be covered by
accumulated cash reserves if payments are to be met promptly and short-
term borrowing is to be avoided.
The events of the past two years have been a remarkable vindication of
the policy followed in previous years of accumulating cash reserves which
to some critics have seemed unnecessarily large. For three successive years
the treasury has met increasingly large yearly deficits without strain and
without additional borrowing, and at the present time the treasury still is
in a position where it chn meet payments regularly and can cover an
expected deficit at the end of the fiscal year. But it is equally true that this
strong position cannot be maintained indefinitely in the face of further
deficits, and that every effort must be made to balance the budget for
1932-33.
Public Debt
A complete description of the public debt of Haiti and its administration
since the beginning of the Receivership will be found in the Annual Report
of this office for the fiscal year 1929-30. Much useful information also will
be found in previous reports issued by this office.*
All payments of interest and amortization on the three outstanding series
of the loan were met promptly during 1930-31. Total payments for interest
and debt retirement, together with Gdes. 141,600 which were added to the
fiduciary currency reserve, amounted to Gdes. 8,647,481.30, thereby reducing
the gross public debt from Gdes.' 82,705,649.35 on September 30, 1930, to
Gdes. 78,357,576.10 on the same date in 1931.
During the fiscal year 1929-30, expenditures for account of the public
debt amounted to 27.00 per cent of total revenue in that year. Notwithstand-
ing the exceptional decline in revenues which took place in the following
year, the corresponding ratio increased only to 27.23 per cent. This was
due to the fact that since revenues were less than Gdes. 35,000,000, the
supplementary amortization required by the bond contracts did not come
into effect in 1930-31. Expenditures for debt service in 1930-31 consequently
were only Gdes. 8,647,481.30, compared with Gdes. 10,432,707.38 in 1929-30.
For the same reason, the percentage of public debt expenditures devoted
exclusively to amortization declined from 14.50 per cent in 1929-30 to
12.88 per cent in 1930-31, while the percentage representing payments of
interest increased from 12.42 per cent in 1929-30 to 14.30 per cent in 1930-31.

A limited number of the Annual Reports of this office are still available and they will be furnished upon
application.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


Disbursements
Creditors of the government were paid promptly throughout the year.
The monthly distribution of government checks for salaries, pensions, and
rents in the interior of the country was effected, for the most part, as in the
previous year, by officials of the Customs and Internal Revenue Services.
Exceptional difficulties were encountered in making civil payments in
some of the more remote parts of the country because of the heavy rains
in the spring of the year and the consequent damage to roads and trails.
Nevertheless, delays were surprisingly few considering the difficulties of
communication during and after the months of heavy rainfall.

Supplies
Office supplies and equipment for this office and for other departments of
the government were purchased as usual during 1930-31 through the
Bureau of Supplies which since 1916 has been operated as a division of the
General Receiver's office.
Total gross sales declined from Gdes. 296,783.58 in 1929-30 to Gdes.
242,009.67 in the year which has just ended. Net profits declined over the
same period from Gdes. 16,182.81 to Gdes. 814.03, and inventory and
equipment from Gdes. 172,025.41 to Gdes. 140,783.83.

The Budget and Financial Legislation
The political events of 1930 prevented the preparation and voting of-the
usual finance laws and the annual budget of expenditures for the fiscal
year.1930-31. Consequently, on September 3, 1930, the 1929-30 finance laws
and the budget of expenditures were prorogued by executive order, and it
was under the authority of the prorogued laws that expenditures were
effected during the year under review.
The finance laws as prorogued were quite satisfactory and no difficulty
was experienced during the year in working under them. The prorogued
budget of expenditures, on the other hand, called for a revenue program
of over Gdes. 40,000,000, a figure far in excess of revenue probabilities for
the year. Accordingly, during the month of October budget cuts were
established which effectively reduced the budget to Gdes. 35,184,273.29.
Activities were sharply curtailed in all departments, but chiefly in the
Departments of Agriculture, Public Works, the Interior, and Labor. Con-
siderable economies also were effected through the fact that with ways and
means of only Gdes. 35,000,000, it was no longer necessary to make bud-
getary provision for supplementary amortization of the public debt.
The budget cuts made in October resulted in a saving to the government
of nearly five million gourdes. Nevertheless, it was noticed soon after the
beginning of the fiscal year that receipts were continuing to fall rapidly,
and that the substantial reduction in expenditures already made would not
be sufficient to prevent a heavy deficit at the year end.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--ENERAL RECEIVER


On April 10, 1931, the government declared it evident that revenues for
the year 1930-31 would total only Gdes. 31,000,000, or a little more; that
ways and means for the following year should be estimated as not exceeding
the probabilities for 1930-31, or Gdes. 31,000,000; and that the ordinary
budget of expenditures for 1931-32 should call for an expenditure program
of Gdes. 31,000,000 and a fraction.
It was well realized at the time that a really serious problem had to be
confronted by the government. In spite of budget cuts of five million gour-
des,. a.deficit of several millions was probable at the year end; unless the
1931-32 budget were cut to Gdes. 31,000,000, it was probable that an equal-
ly alarming deficit would result the following year. Accordingly, in the sub-
sequent months of the year efforts were directed towards the preparation
of a budget which would prevent too heavy a drain on treasury reserves
during the year 1931-32.
'The first effort of the government to prepare a budget for 1931-32 with
adequate reductions in appropriations was unsuccessful. The project called
for expenditures of Gdes. 32,796,673.66 which were to be met by ways and
means totalling slightly more than that figure. It was evident, however, that
ways and means would not approach the figure given in the project. Never-
theless, as the session of the Legislative Body was drawing to a close, the
government's project was presented to that body, and it was passed with
only minor modifications on August 5, 1931.
Because of the Haitianization and reorganization of the various Ameridan
services which was to take place on October 1, 1931, as a result of the Ac-
cord of August 5, 1931, between the Haitian government and the govern-
ment of the United States, the Haitian government was unable to decide on
the necessary reductions in the 1931-32 budget before the close of the year,
although the Legislative Body had given full power by law to the executive
branch of the government to maintain expenditures within the limit of re-
ceipts and to effect such changes in the budget as voted as might be neces-
sary in order to carry out the reorganization planned in the Accord of
August 5, 1931.
The year 1930-31, therefore, ended before a budget had been prepared
which would bring expenditures for 1931-32 within an amount reasonably
close to probable revenues in the latter year. However, on November 23,
1931, the budget of expenditures was reduced by executive order to Gdes.
31,999,977.47, thereby relieving the burden on the treasury during 1931-32
by over seven hundred thousand gourdes.
As in the case of the budget, the annual Law of Expenditures and the
Law of Ways and Means were delayed in preparation, and it was not
until August 5, 1931, that they were passed by the Legislative Body. They
were signed by the President on August 29, 1931, and were published
on September 17, 1931.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


Other legislation and decrees affecting revenues which were passed
during the fiscal year 1931-32 were relatively of little importance with the
exception of the new excise tax law to which reference already has been
made.
Auditing and Accounting
A second annual audit of accounts by representatives of the Comptroller
General of the United States was made in October and November 1930.
The report which the auditors later furnished gave assurance that the ac-
counts of the previous fiscal year were correct and that the methods of
accounting for government funds were on the whole satisfactory. However,
some minor changes were suggested by the auditors which recommenda-
tions were given effect.
For example, a new printed form was prepared for use in effecting de-
posits at the bank of cash reimbursements to credits. The form which
previously had been used likewise served the purpose of effecting book
transfers between appropriations. This led to a certain amount of confu-
sion which the new form has eliminated.
The auditors suggested a change in the method employed by the Public
Works Service in accounting for property acquired through disbursements
from the revolving fund of that service and subject to depreciation. A new
method has been devised which presents a clear statement of operations
conducted under that fund.
The principal accounting innovation during the year was the establish-
ment of an improved system of control over checks outstanding. The new
system has facilitated the reconciliation of treasury accounts with the
Banque Nationale de la Republique d'Haiti.
Formerly, cash receipts collected at the frontier customs posts and not
yet deposited in the bank were accounted for under the general heading
of funds in the hands of paymasters. These receipts now are recorded, in
a separate account known as "Receipts in Suspense". Also, cash advances
to Guard paymasters at Lascahobas and Hinche, formerly recorded under
the same general heading, are now charged directly to appropriations.
Currency
On September 30, 1931, the total amount of currency in circulation
in Haiti was as follows:
Gourdes
Notes of the Banque Nationale de la Republique d'Haiti........ 6,951,562
United States currency, $680,000 (estimated)...................... 3,400,000
Subsidiary currency .................................................................. 3,597,097
Total ............................................................................. 13,948,659
On the same date the previous year, total currency in circulation
amounted to Gdes. 16,139,694, from which the 1931 figure represents a
decline of Gdes. 2,191,035, or 13.57 per cent. This sharp decline in the





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


amount of currency in use in Haiti strikingly illustrates the severity of
the business depression and the extent to which the decline in commodity
values has lessened the demand for a medium of exchange. Expressed in
terms of per capital currency in circulation, the share of each of Haiti's
2,600,000 inhabitants was only Gdes. 5.37 on September 30, 1931, compared
with Gdes. 6.21 per capital the previous year.
, The average monthly circulation of notes of the Banque Nationale de la
Republique d'Haiti fell from Gdes. 9,662,328 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 7,958,378
in 1930-31, indicating a decline in note circulation of 17.64 per cent.

Banking and Credit
The average of total loans and discounts reported by the two commercial
banks which do business in Haiti declined from Gdes. 17,088,183.51 in
1929-30 to Gdes. 15,717,631.01 in 1930-31.
With the depression in foreign trade and business activity, together
with the greatly lowered prices at which commodities were being traded, it
follows that the credit requirements of commerce were much less in 1930-31
;than.:in 1929-30. Moreover, banks were forced .to exercise greater caution
in extending creditin view of the uncertain condition of the weaker busi-
ness houses. But in spite of the poor showing made by business in Haiti,
it is gratifying to note that the number of bankruptcies recorded in 1930-31
was no. greater than in the previous year, when only four. firms of. any
importance were forced to close. All of the leading business houses weath-
ered the storm successfully, although profits have been small or lacking
.altogether. Among the smaller establishments, casualties have been more
frequent.: There have been an indefinite number-of liquidations and trans-
fers of ownership, all of which are indicative of increased business diffi-
culties. .No accurate figures are available as to the number of these smaller
establishments which have failed, but it is probable that.such failures were
more frequent in 1930-31 than in the previous year. Taken as a-whole,
however, the amounts involved in these failures have not been great, and
it is believed that business in Haiti already has adjusted itself as satisfac-
torily as could be expected to the lower scale of commodity prices and to
the reduced volume of trade.
The banks have reported that collections have been very slow in the
case of the smaller business houses and individual tradesmen, but that the
ten or a dozen important firms which handle the great bulk of the foreign
trade and much of the retail trade in Haiti meet their obligations satis-
factorily.
Bank deposits, excluding those of the government, declined from an
average of Gdes. 15,959,755 in 1929-30 to Gdes. 14,442,504.20 in 1930-31.
Similarly government deposits fell from Gdes. 19,860,772.63 in 1929-30 to
Gdes. 16,445,873.10 in 1930-31.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


Claims
An unusually large number of claims against the State were paid during
1930-31. There were over seventy individual items totalling Gourdes
166,419.64, of which, with the exception of one payment, all were for
comparatively small amounts. The exception was a payment of Gourdes
106,375.75 to Mr. Suirard Villard in settlement of a long outstanding claim
in connection with a theater concession which was adjuged to have been
granted to Mr. Villard many years ago.
A great deal of time during 1930-31 was devoted by the administrative
and legal divisions of this office to the study of the claims which were
presented to it for'consideration or reconsideration. Many of the claims
concerned events which had occurred years before, and considerable
research and study was necessary before decisions could be reached. '
Existing legislation affecting pecuniary claims against the State is de-
fective in that no protection is given to the government against the un-
Slimited accumulation of penalties and interest charges, nor is the State
able to request the review of judicial decisions rendered against it, even
though, as often has happened, it clearly is shown that the State was not
defended. The. only defense available to the State has been refusal to
make funds available for the liquidation of unjust claims. To correct this
anomalous and potentially dangerous situation a project of law has been
prepared which it is hoped the government will present to the Legislative
Body at the -beginning of the next session. Briefly, this project provides
that:-(1) The execution of decisions against the State involving pecuniary
awards shall be suspended until special budgetary credits shall have been
provided for their execution; (2) settlement of such claims can only be
nade'from.a credit voted in each annual budget of expenditures; (3) the
Secretary of State for Finance may request a review of decisions against
the State involving pecuniary awards when, in his opinion, the State has
not:been properly, defended.
Personnel
The vacancy caused by the appointment of Mr. J. C., Craddock as.Di-
rector General of Internal Revenue necessitated a number of other changes
at the beginning of the fiscal year. Mr. B. C. Scott was transferred from
the position of Assistant to the Financial'Adviser to that of Comptroller.
Mr. E. M. Goodwin became Assistant to the Financial Adviser on October
1, 1930, and his former position as Chief of the Customs Audit and Sta-
tistics Section was filled by the transfer of Mr. T. J. Grant to Port-au-Prince
from Cap Haitien where Mr. Grant had been serving as Collector of Cus-
toms and Internal Revenue. The vacancy thus created at Cap Haitien was
filled by the transfer of Mr. F. R. Crumbie, Jr., who had been Collector of
Customs and Internal Revenue at Jer6mie. On February 28, 1931, Mr.
Crumble resigned, and his place was taken by Mr. R. A. Farmer, who since





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


October 1, 1930, had served as Collector at Jacmel and prior to that as
Deputy Collector at Cap Haitien. Mr. Farmer was replaced as Collector of
Customs at Jacmel by Mr. Berryer Oriol and as Collector of Internal Re-
venue by Mr. Ferol Oriol. On October 15, 1930, Mr. Melville Monk was
appointed Collector of Customs and Internal Revenue at Saint Marc, and
later in the year was given general supervision over the collection of cus-
toms and internal revenue in the entire Gonaives-Saint Marc district.
The services of a number of customs and internal revenue officials were
lost during the year. In addition to Mr. Crumbie, those who resigned during
the year were: Mr. Joseph Carre, Collector at Fort Libert6; Mr. Joseph
Courtney, Collector at Gonaives; Mr. H. T. Hall, Collector at Saint Marc;
Mr. Irvine I. MacManus, Internal Revenue Inspector; Mr. Ernest H. Mahy
Deputy Collector of Customs at Cap Haitien; and Mr. J. Gibson Taylor,
Collector at Fort Libert6 prior to the appointment of Mr. Carr6.
The places of those officials who left the service were filled entirely by
the promotion of other members of the staff. Mr. Taylor's position as
Collector at Fort Liberte, as stated above, was taken over by Mr. Joseph
Carre, who later resigned and was replaced by Mr. Romulus Voigt. At
Jer6mie, Mr. Camille Sansaricq became Collector of Customs and Internal
Revenue upon the transfer of Mr. Crumbie to Cap Haitien. Mr. Fernand
Lemaine was put in charge of the collection of customs and internal re-
venues at Petit Goive to fill the vacancy created by the transfer of
Mr. Mahy to Cap Haitien at the beginning of the year.
The many resignations and changes .in the official staff and other
personnel during the year added greatly to the amount of work which had
to be performed by the remaining employees. No new appointments to
important positions were made during the year and vacancies were filled
from promotions within the service. Greater responsibilities were assumed
cheerfully and capably by those employees who were chosen for new posts,
even when it was not possible to grant increased compensation.
The monthly payroll of the combined Customs and Internal Revenue
Services in September 1931 amounted to Gdes. 116,393.01, compared with
Gdes. 144,028.21 in September of the previous year. The decline was
Gdes. 27,635.20, or 19.2 per cent. The payroll of Haitian employees was
Gdes. 17,635.20, or 18.8 per cent, less than a year ago, while the payroll
of Americans in the combined services was reduced by Gdes. 10,000, or
20 per cent.
Conclusion
In some respects the fiscal year 1930-31 was not so unsatisfactory as
might be supposed from the admittedly discouraging record of declining
foreign trade, of lower prices for export commodities, of poor crops, busi-
ness stagnation, and greatly diminished revenues. On the whole, the country
has adjusted itself surprisingly well to changed conditions.





HAITI: REPORT OP FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


Haiti in a way is fortunate in having a population the great mass of
which lives upon the land, and is able to supply its few wants for the most
part directly from the products which it raises. The distressing problem of
obtaining sufficient food and shelter does not present itself with the same
force as in colder climates or in highly industrialized countries. Unemploy-
ment exists only in the few towns and cities of any size, and even then it
affects comparatively few of the two and a half million inhabitants of the
country. The small land-owners and the peasants hardly feel the effects
of the depression save that the small crops of coffee or of cotton which they
have grown on their farms produce only a portion of the income which
they received in former years. Consequently, they buy fewer cotton goods
and smaller quantities of imported foodstuffs, and devote a greater portion
of their land to rice and vegetables.
In the interior of the country, and even in the smaller settlements, trading
is carried on in its simplest form. There is no well-to-do merchant class
except in the few centers of trade. Peasants carry their surplus produce
to the nearest market, which may be simply a small clearing where two
trails meet. There they exchange, their produce against the goods which
they require, often using money as a medium of exchange, but not in-
frequently resorting to barter. Coffee, cotton, and other export products
must be carried still farther to the larger centers of trade, there to be sold
to "speculators", or middlemen. Household requirements for salt, sugar,
tobacco, soap, and other simple needs are supplied by pedlars who move
about from market to market, but it is only in the larger country markets
and in the towns and cities that cotton cloth, machetes, kitchen utensils,
and other articles of common use in Haiti ordinarily can be purchased.
Most of these articles are imported from abroad, and they are sold by retail
merchants who carry relatively small stocks.
The retail merchants, together with the exporters and importers, have
felt the effects of the business depression in Haiti more severely than any
other class; and it is from these merchants, or more properly, from the
foreign commerce which they handle, that the government derives by far
the greater part of its revenues.
Besides the importers, exporters and retail merchants, a large proportion
of whom are foreigners, and the peasants, small land-owners and more
prosperous country people, there are only two classes of people in Haiti:
First the relatively large number of government employees, officials and
other persons deriving their incomes from the State; and secondly, the
small group in the larger cities composed of lawyers, doctors and others
who are professionally trained.
Up to the end of the last fiscal year the full force of the world economic
depression had been felt directly only by that class which carries on the
foreign and retail trade of the Republic. The weaker establishments were
forced out of business, either through business failure or through the





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


serious and demoralizing threat to commercial credit of discriminatory
legislation. Other houses, including all of the more important business
establishments, have managed to survive. The unemployment problem in
the cities largely is due to the fact that these establishments, in order to
economize, have had to reduce their personnel; and such reductions pro-
gressively have affected all of the urban population to a severe extent.
When it became evident towards the end of the last year that the gov-
ernment probably would be obliged to use reserves to meet its budget for
1931-32, the possibility that the effects of the depression, if revenue receipts
continued to decrease, would at length reach directly the other classes of
the population came prominently to the fore. It has been mentioned above
that the government derives most of its income from foreign trade. If
that trade declines to a point where it is unable to supply sufficient revenues
to the State to enable it to carry on all governmental functions and projects,
it follows that the remaining classes of the population also must suffer.
For three successive years the expenditures of carrying on the gov-
ernment have been far in excess of revenues. During the last year, in
particular, the expenses of the State were very seriously out of proportion
to governmental income. Notwithstanding, the government found itself
unable to reduce expenditures, or increase revenues, to a point where a still
further drain on its already diminished resources could be avoided. A heavy
deficit between income and expenses must be faced in the present year, and
reserves will be reduced to a point where the treasury will be required to
take steps to increase revenues or decrease .expenditures.
The all important problem, then, which is before the treasury at the
present time is to bring expenditures in line with receipts. Whether that
object will be accomplished by reducing expenditures, by increasing re-
venues, or both, remains to be decided, but it is evident that the budget
for 1932-33 must be balanced.
The emergency is too near at hand to rely entirely on the hope of higher
commodity prices, better business conditions, larger crops, or increased
production. Measures can, and should, be undertaken to increase the
production of the land, to extend irrigation, to promote the scientific de-
velopment of agriculture, to open up state land, to encourage foreign
capital, and other projects aiming towards betterment of conditions. But
such measures can have no immediate effect on revenues. More direct means
of balancing the budget for this year must be found.
Expenditures of the government undoubtedly can be reduced still further
without seriously interfering with the orderly operation of all essential
governmental activities. But it is equally certain that the comparatively
few savings which can be effected in this way will not balance the budget.
Revenues must be increased directly through new taxation and through
more effective enforcement of existing revenue laws.





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


The experience of the latter part of the year and up to the present writing
has demonstrated conclusively the failure of the excise taxation as enacted
by the last session of the legislature. Unnecessary losses in revenue resulted
with no betterment of operating conditions for the small distiller and no
improvement in business or protection to the tobacco planter or manu-
facturer. The country in the present crisis cannot afford to accumulate
further losses. Tax law violators must be apprehended and brought to
justice promptly. The failure of the legal machinery to work promptly
during the past year has had a most dangerous and demoralizing effect. The
impression has been circulated that laws will not be enforced; and that
taxes can be evaded with impunity. These ideas can, and must, be corrected
if taxes are to be collected.
SIt is unfortunate that in times of extreme business depression, when
taxpayers are least able to support increased burdens, that countries all
over the world are forced to maintain themselves by imposing higher
taxation. Haiti has been able to avoid higher imposts through two years
of depression; in fact, taxes actually have been reduced to a considerable
extent, particularly the export duties and excise taxes. Present conditions
indicate that Haiti cannot maintain this relatively favorable position during
the coming year if the budget of expenditures is not reduced.
The experience of the last few years has demonstrated that with the
cooperation of all branches of the government, the excise taxes can become
a very profitable source of revenue. Because of the increase in internal
revenues it was found possible in 1929 and in 1930 to reduce or remove the
export tariff on coffee, cacao, and a number of other articles of export.
The advantage to the government has been lost, however, through the
recent-reduction in the excise taxes. The old taxes should be reenacted, or
new charges should be devised. In hardly any other country are alcohol and
tobacco taxed at rates as low as those which prevail in Haiti. Excise taxes
are easily understood, they are relatively inexpensive to collect, and they
provide lucrative sources of revenue in all civilized countries. There is
no excuse for failure to take advantage of normal sources of revenue in
Haiti.
New methods of taxation should be devised. Among other taxes, it is
suggested that a poll tax be provided which will require all citizens to pay
a small amount each year in return for a card of identification. The burden
would be very small individually, but in the aggregate the revenue returns
should be considerable. Similar taxes have been successful in other
countries, particularly in countries where the civil administration is re-
latively undeveloped and where the percentage of illiteracy is high.
It is to be hoped that an acceptable homestead law soon will be enacted.
There is a large amount of state owned agricultural land in Haiti, the bulk
of which is producing only a small portion of what it would be capable of
producing if occupied by settlers who have the prospect of eventual owner-





HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


ship. Occupants of state land at present, since they lack the pride of
ownership, have no incentive to improve the soil or to establish permanent
buildings on the land they occupy. A law holding forth the prospect of
proprietorship rights, conditioned only upon a period of residence and
cultivation, should have the effect of awakening interest and initiative
which eventually should be reflected in increased agricultural production
and increased revenue.
.A very serious situation exists in regard to the settlement of judicial deci-
sions rendered against the State involving the payment of money. Present
methods of settling such claims are haphazard and necessarily dilatory.
The State is not adequately protected.against unfair accumulations of penal-
ties or punitive damages, and legislation permitting revision of decisions
against the State does not exist. The result is a dangerous and destructive
element in the future of the Republic. Remedial legislation should be enact-
ed at once which will permit the executive branch of the government to
review decisions, and to achieve some measure of coordination between the
legal obligations of the government and the ability of the treasury to pay
them. Before payment is obligatory on the part of the treasury, the execu-
tive branch should have the right to review and have the judicial
branch determine that the amounts carried in judgments against the State
are proportionate to the wrong for which redress is sought. Such judg-
ments as are well-founded should be included each year in the annual budget
proposals in order that orderly service of the treasury may not be disrupted
by depletion of treasury availabilities to meet unexpected demands caused
by judicial decisions against the State.
Much needed action respecting important new contracts has not yet. been
obtained. Failure to take any action on the National Railroad Contract
during the last year was directly responsible for the closing down of the
railroad and a loss of many thousands of gourdes in revenue to the treasury.
The question of the railroad contract is still unsettled, and the same remark
applies to the proposed contract with the Compagnie des Chemins de Fer
de la Plaine du Cul-de-Sac.
.Failure to take any action in the case of these contracts has placed a
serious impediment in the way of receiving help from further investment of
foreign capital. Further obstacles have been created by the measures
threatened at the last session of the Legislative Body which would have
precluded many foreigners from doing business in Haiti. This proposed
legislation was widely sponsored in the local press. A number of bills
seeking to discriminate against foreigners actually were passed by the
Legislative Body, although only one of them became law. The law in
question sought to confer certain advantages upon Haitian shoemakers,
tailors, and hatmakers in connection with outfitting the personnel of the
Guard of Haiti. Of itself, this law was quite innocuous, but it had a most
harmful effect, in combination with the other bills which the executive





HAITI:' REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


branch of 'te government wisely refused to promulgate, in that there was
evidenced an attitude of hostility which received wide publicity. Foreigners
interested in investing money in Haiti are effectively discouraged by these
threats of discrimination, and the prospect of a normal infiltration of
foreign capital without special concessions or safeguards from the govern-
ment is not reassuring.
It is only fair to state that this outburst of anti-foreign legislative pro-
jects does' not' represent the considered attitude of responsible Haitians
either in official or private life. Nevertheless, the President's action in
putting aside the legislation mentioned did not receive the same publicity
given the proposed laws while they were under discussion. Therefore the
bad effect of this publicity remains.
Haiti'cannot progress without foreign assistance. There is not enough
money within the country to develop large modern plantations, new systems
of irrigation, or industrial enterprises; although the potential yield of the
country's natural resources undoubtedly is great. There are no easily acces-
sible mineral 'resources which can be turned quickly into profit without the
outlay of considerable amounts of capital. Yet there exist powerful ele-
ments in the body politic which-undoubtedly with the best of intentions-
have insisted upon the exclusion of foreign capital or assistance in any form
from abroad, unless it be by way of special grants of concessions, protected
by' special legislative sanctions, and incorporating monopolistic provisions
which eliminate any possibility of a normal and healthy condition of 'cdm-
petitive business. The history'of Haiti is full of similar experiments in- the
past, most of which this country has since had cause to regret. Concessions
are easy. to grant, but very difficult to terminate or modify except at exoibi-
tant cost.
Until confidence is restored in foreign money markets, Haiti scarcely can
hope-to obtain much new capital; and so closely is the economic life of the
country tied up with commercial conditions abroad that it cannot expect aiy
great' improvement'in business until prices have been stabilized and pros-
perity has returned to the countries upon which Haiti is so dependent.
Meanwhile, Haiti can best serve its interests by setting its economic house
in order: It can make the country a desirable place for further investiienit
of private capital; it can remedy defective or discriminatory legislation it
can enact new and progressive laws; it can improve the enforcement of its
fiscal laws and encourage a greater respect for them; and finally, most
important of all at the present moment, it can adjust its expenditures and its
taxes in such a way as to bring its disbursements in line with its revenues.

Respectfully submitted,

S. DE LA RUE,
Financial Adviser-General Receiver

















TABLES











HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 51


TABLE No. 1

VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS, AND EXCESS OF IMPORTS OR EXPORTS
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Excess Excess
Imports Exports Total Imnorts Exports


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes

1916-17 ............ 43.030.428 44,664,428 87,694,856 ..... 1,634,000
1917-18............. 50,903.468 38,717,650 89.621,118 12.185,818 ....
1918-19............. 85,588,041 123,811.096 209,399,137 .. ........... 38.223.055
1919-20 ............ 136.992.055 108.104.639 245.096,694 28.887,416 ....
1920-21 ............ 59.786.029 32,952.045 92.738.074 26.833,984 ....
1921-22 ........... 61.751.355 53.561,050 115.312,405 8.190.305 ....
1922-23 .......... 70,789,815 72.955,060 143.744.875 .......... 2,165.245
1923-24 ............ 73.480,640 70.881.610 144.362.250 2,599,030 ....
1924-25............ 101.187,825 97,018.810 198,206,635 4.169,015 ....
1925-26............. 94.257.030 101.241.025 195.498.055 .......... 6.983.995
1926-27............ 78.756,600 76.495,442 155,252.042 2.261,158 .....
1927-28............. 101,241.283 113,336.230 214,577.513 .......... 12.094,947
1928-29............. 86,189,612 83,619.167 169,808.779 2,570,445 ...
1929-30............ 64.208,132 70,722,835 134.930.967 .......... 6.514.703
1930-31............. 47.881,591 44.817.093 92,698.684 3.064.498 ....

Total .......... 11.156,043.904 1,132.898.180 2,288,942.084 90.761.669 67.615.945





TABLE No. 2

VALUE OF IMPORTS SHOWING COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN IN PERCENTAGES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Average Average Average Average
Country of Origin 1916-17- 1921-22- 1926-27- 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17-
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 1930-31


Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent

United States .................... 87.09 79.37 72.10 70.09 68.69 79.52
fr.nce. .. ..................... 4.71 5.97 7.00 6.61 6.88 5.89
United Kingdom ............... 5.85 7.30 6.55 7.30 6.96 6.57
A ustralia .......... .......... ...... 0.01
Austria ....................... 0.01 0.02 0.02
Bahama Islands ............... 0.03 0.02 0.04
Belgium ...................... 0.83 1.01 1.10
British India ............... 0.07 0.04 0.01
Canada ...................... 0.12 0.13 0.20
Canal Zone. .................... 0.12 0.15 0.05
China ......... ........ ... ... ... 0.01 0.01
Cuba ......................... 0.16 0.12 0.55
Curacao ........................ 1.65 3.21 1.40
Czechoslovakia ................ 1 0.02 0.02 0.05
Denmark ........... ...... ....... 0.24 0.21 0.20
Dominican Republic .............. 0.61 0.46 0.59
Germany ...... ................. 2.35 7.36 4.44 4.31 4.78 8.02
Guiana. British .................. 0.08 0.06 0.32
Guiana. Dutch......... ........... I ...... 0.01
Italy ............................ 0.85 0.79 0.87
Jamaica ....................- 0.10 0.04 0.06
Japan ......................... 0.15 0.21 0.25
Netherlands ................... 2,67 3.05 4.22
Norway .................... 0.13 0.30 0.23
Porto Rico .......... ........ 1.88 1.60 2.28
Spain .... ..................... 0.07 0.06 0.08
Sweden ....................... 0.02 0.03 0.03
Switzerland ...... ............. 0.10 0.14 0.09
T rinidad ...................... J ....... 0.01 0.02

Total .................. 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00







52 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 3

VALUE OF EXPORTS SHOWING COUNTRIES OF DESTINATION IN PERCENTAGES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31



Average Average Average Average
Country of Destination 1916-17- 1921-22- 1926-27- 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17-
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 1930-31


Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent

United States .................... 52.85 11.02 8.23 9.23 8.11 24.03
France ........................ 35.98 62.29 50.61 49.72 50.75 49.63
United Kingdom ................ 1.45 4.40 5.54 4.67 8.50 3.80
A rgentina ..................... ....... 0.01
Bahama Islands ................ 0.06 0.04 0.03
Barbados ...................... ....... 0.02
Belgium .................... 6.65 7.52 8.71
Canada ..................... 0.79 .. .. 0.05
Canal Zone ................... 0.14 0.16 0.20
Colombia ..................... 0.11 0.35 0.15
Corsica ....................... 0.01 ....... 0.04
Cuba ........................ 1.28 0.77 ...
Curacao ...................... 0.17 0.03 0.03
Czechoslovakia ................. .... ...... 0.01
Denmark ...................... 7.90 6.91 9.11
Dominican Republic ............ 0.03 0.02 0.01
Equador ...................... 0.02 ...
Finland .. .................. 9.72 22.29 0.15 0.06 0.03 22.54
French Africa .................. 0.07 0.15 0.06
Germany ...................... 5.08 7.04 3.11
G ibraltar ..................... ...... 0.01
Italy ......................... 7.26 9.34 9.00
Jamaica ...................... 0.02 0.05 0.05
Japan ........................ 0.02 0.03 ...
M exico ....................... ...... 0.03 ...
Netherlands .... ......... 2.23 1.07 0.94
Norway ..................... 0.47 0.35 0.13
Porto Rico .................... 0.29 0.01 0.01
Spain ........................ 2.20 1.98 0.40
Sweden ......... .. 0.65 0.43 0.44
V enezuela .................... 0.02 .... ... ....
Virgin Islands ............ 0.02 0.02 0.09

Total ............. 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 53


TABLE No. 4

VALUE OF TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY COUNTRIES IN PERCENTAGES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31



Average Average Average Average
Country 1916-17- 1921-22- 1926-27- 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17-
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 1930-31



Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
United States ................... 72.53 45.63 39.88 38.19 39.40 52.68
Frnce ....................... 18.39 33.83 28.98 29.21 28.09 27.07
United Kingdom ................ 4.03 5.85 6.02 5.92 7.71 5.30
Austria ....................... ...0.01 0.01
Bahama Islands ....... ....... 0.05 0.03 0.04
Barbados ...................... ....... ....... 0.01
Belgium ....................... 3.76 4.42 4.78
British India .................. 0.03 0.02 ..
Canada ....................... 0.45 0.06 0.13
Canal Zone .................. ..... 0.13 0.16 0.12
Colombia ..................... 0.06 0.18 0.07
Corsica ....................... .. ...... 0.02
Cuba ......................... 0.72 0.46 0.29
Curacao ....................... 0.90 1.55 0.74
Czechoslovakia ................. 0.01 0.01 0.03
Denmark ...................... 4.09 3.72 4.51
Dominican Republic .............. 0.32 0.23 0.31
Equador ...................... 5.05 14.69 ....... 0.01 ...... 14.95
Finland ..................... 0.08 0.03 0.02
French Africa .................. 0.04 0.08 0.03
Germany ...................... 4.78 5.74 3.97
Guiana, British ................. 0.04 0.03 0.17
Italy ......................... 4.09 5.27 4.80
Jamaica ....................... 0.07 0.05 0.05
Japan ........................ 0.08 0.11 0.13
M exico ....................... ..... 0.01
Netherlands .................... 2.47 2.01 2.64
Norway ....................... 0.31 0.33 0.18
Porto Rico .................... 1.08 0.77 1.18
Spain ........................ 1.15 1.07 0.24
Sweden ....................... 0.34 0.24 0.23
Switzerland ................. 0.05 0.07 0.05
T rinidad ...................... .... ....... 0.01
Venezuela ..................... 0.01
Virgin Islands .................. 0.01 0.01 0.04

Total .................... 1 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00








HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 5

VALUE AND PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND TOTAL FOREIGN
COMMERCE BY COUNTRIES-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Country


Argentina .. ...............
Australia ..................
A ustria ...................
Bahama Islands ............
Barbados ..................
Belgium ..................
Brazil .................
British India ...............
Canada ...................
Canal Zone ................
C while .....................
China ....................
Colombia .................
Corsica ...................
Cuba .....................
Curacao ...................
Czechoslovakia .............
Denmark ..................
Dominican Republic ..........
Egypt ....................
Finland ... ....... ......
France .................
French Africa ..............
Germany ..................
Cibraltar ..................
G reece ....................
Guadeloupe ................
Guiana, British ..............
Guiana, Dutch...............
H ungary ..................
Indo China ................
Italy ..........
Jamaica ..........
Japan .......... ........
M exico :................
Netherlands ...............
Norway ...................
Palestine ..................
Porto Rico ................
Spain ...........
Sweden ...................
Switzerland ..............
Syria ........ ..... .......
Trinidad ..................
Tripoli ...................
United Kingdom ............
United States ..............
Venezuela .................
Virgin Islands ..............

Total ...............


Imports


Gourdes
10
3,096
7.879
19.077

525,209
326
3.303
94,136
22,541
1.979
5.413


265,342
668,477
25.283
97,710
280,778
31

3.292,741

2.288,633

17

151,43;
3,70C
25
6E
415,948
26,724
121,436
2.194
2.021,620
111,799
89
1,091.427
39.767
15.685
44.505
177
8.150
9
3,334,335
32,887,970
2.541


47.881,591


Per cent

0.01
0.02
0.04

1.10

0.01
0.20
0.05

0.01


0.55
1.40
0.05
0.20
0.59


6.88

4.78



0.32
0.01


0.87
0.06
0.25

4.22
0.23

2.28
0.08
0.03
0.09

0.02

6.96
68.69



100.00


Expor


Gourdes
3,974


15.193
8,878
3,905.173


22,411
90.302


66,317
18,550
365
13.029
6,213
4,083.254
4,348

14.658
22,744,883
25.901
1.391,490
2,644
. . .

1,065



4,032,557
21.774


422,556
55,979

6,496
178,362
195,660




3,809.534
3,636.132
250
39,145

44,817,093


rts Total



Per cent Gourdes
0.01 3.984
...... 3.096
...... 7,879
0.03 34,270
0.02 8,878
8.71 4,430.382
S ..... 326
..... 3,303
0.05 116,547
0.20 112.843
...... 1,979
.... 5,413
0.15 66,317
0.04 18,550
..... 265,707
0.03 681.506
0.01 31,496
9.11 4.180,964
0.01 285.126
.. .. 3 1
0.03 14,658
50.75 26,037.624
0.06 25,901
3.11 3,680,123
0.01 2,644
...... 17
4
.. .. 152.502
....... 3,700
..... 25
...... 68
9.00 4,448,505
0.05 48.498
...... 121.436
...... 2,194
0.94 2,444.176
0.13 167,778
...... 89
0.01 1.097,923
0.40 218.129
0.44 211.345
44,505
.. 177
8,150

8.50 7,143,869
8.11, 36,524,102
.. 2,791
0.09 39,145

100.00 92,698,684


Per cent


0.01
0.04
0.01
4.78


0.13
0.12


0.07
0.02
0.29
0.74
0.03
4.51
0.31

0.02
28.09
0.03
3.97



0.17



4.80
0.05
0.13

2.64
0.18

1.18
0.24
0.23
0.05

0.01

7.71
39.40

0.04

100.00







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 6

VALUE OF IMPORTS BY PORTS OF ENTRY-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Port of Entry


Aquin .........
Belladire .......
Cap Haitien .....
Cayes ..........
Fort Libert .....
Glare ..........
Gonaves .......
Jacmel .........
Jirdmie ........
Miragolie ......
Ouanaminthe ..
Petit Golve......
.Port.au-Prince ..
Port-de-Paix..
Saint Marc .

: Total .....


Average
1916-17-
1920-21


Gourdes

156,514

9,987.651
6.443,055
257

3.922,744
3,457.767
1.942.796
518,426
27.035
2.674.944
41,712.019
2.087.026
2.329.771


Average
1921-22-
1925-26


Gourdes

120,425
6,482
8,293.009
7,440,221
618
81,567
3.732,077
4.904,482
1.579.913
956,170
287.016
2.081.535
45.889.008
2.059.178
2.861.632


75.260.005 j80,293,333


TABLE No. 7


VALUE OF EXPORTS BY PORTS OF SHIPMENT-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Average Average Average Average
Port of Shipment 1916-17- 1921-22- 1926-27- 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17-
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 1930-31


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes

Aquin ......... 517,420 1,254.059 305.227 188.431 54,781 692.235
Belladire ....... ........... 52 9,982 3,023 533 3.345
Cap Haltien ..... 10.601,902 9,794.332 9,829.289 9.471,206 3.902,384 10,075.174
Cayes .......... 4.543,658 6,652.145 6.186.142 5,721.689 4,473,726 5.793.982
Fort Liberti ..... 323,746 62,057 188.315 249,678 546,114 191.373
Glore .......... .......... 11.015 218 77 ......... 3.744
Gonalves ....... 4,934,835 6.618.885 6,675.137 6.186.480 3,637.727 6.076.286
Jacmel ......... 8.416.717 10,231.039 11.035.134 9,486,897 6.066.628 9.894,297
Jirtmie ........ 3,350.333 3,226,006 4.952,977 5,930.691 3,068,779 3,843.105
Miragone ...... 1.009.265 1,871.386 2,733,711 2,432,018 2.306,015 1,871,454
Onanaminthe .. 9.015 7.284 2,762 1.179 3,490 6,354
Petit Golve .... 4.167,273 9,837.361 8,799.606 6,959.621 4,971.701 7.601.413
Port-au-Prince ... 23,557,713 18.772.347 16,783,239 13.889.129 9.719.095 19,704,433
Port-de-Paix .... 3,788,030 4,201.144 4.114,143 4,385,346 1,812,202 4.034,439
Saint Marc ...... 4,430,065 6.592,399 6.182.271 5.817,370 4,253.918 5,734,912

Total ..... 69,649,9Z2 79.131.511 77.798.153 70,722,835 44,817.093 75,526,546


Average
1926-27-
1930-31


Gourdes

6.384
164.003
7,836,730
5,364,502
156.510
51,427
3,389.829
3,746.895
2,203,983
859.672
138,690
1.641,739
46,142.317
1,833.370
2.119.392

75.655.443


1929-30



Gourdes

1,624
78.243
7,636,909
4.270.112
56,888
22.998
2,794,623
2,393,539
1,942,842
560,554
109.511
1,057,839
40.303.471
1.364.225
1,614,754

64.208,132


1930-31



Gourdes

1,022
71,473
5.219,144
2.986,965
242,908
12,772
1,872.675
1,709.123
1,401,420
466.982
122,383
805.052
30.687,961
970.161
1,311,550

47,881,591


Average
1916-17-
1930-31


Gourdes

94,441
56,828
8,705,797
6,415.926
52,462
44,331
3,681,550
4.036,381
1,908.897
778,089
150,914
2.132.739
44,581,115
1,993,191
2.436.932

77,069.593


I







56 HAITI: REPORT OP FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 8

VALUE AND PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND TOTAL FOREIGN
COMMERCE BY PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Imports Exports Total

Gourdes Per cent 'Gourdes Per cent Goutdes Per cent
Aquin .................... 1,022 ..... 54.781 0.12 55,803 0.06
Belladire .................. 71.473 0.15 533 ...... 72,006 0.08
Cap Haltien................. 5,219,144 10.90 3.902.384 8.71 9,121,528 9.84
Cayes ........................ 2,986.965 6.24 4,473.726 9.98 7,460,691 8.05
Fort Liberti......... ...... 242,908 0.51 546.114 1.22 789.022 0.85
Glore ..... ............. .. 12,772 0.03 ........ ..... 12,772 0.01
Gonaves ................. .. 1.872,675 3.91 3.637.727 8.12 5,510,402 5.95
Jacmel ................... 1.709,123 3.57 6.066,628 13.54 7.775.751 8.39
Jtrmie ............... .... 1,401,420 2.93 3.068.779 6.85 4.470,199 4.82
Miragolne ................... 466.982 0.97 2.306,015 5.14 2.772.997 2.99
Ouanaminthe .. .......... 122,383 0.25 3,490 0.01 125.873 0:1'4
Petit Golve ......... ....... 805.052 1.68 4.971,701 11.09 5,776.753 6.2'3
Port-au-Prince .............. 30,687961 64.09 9,719,095 21.69 40.407.056 -43.59
Port-de-Paix .... .. .. 970,161 2.03 1,812.202 4.04 2,782.363 3.00
Saint Marc ............. 1,311,550 2.74 4,253,918 9.49 5.565,468 6.00

Total ......... ....... 47,881.591 100.00 44,817.093 100.00 92,698,684 100.00


.1,. -1







TABLE No. 9

NET TONNAGE OF STEAM AND MOTOR VESSELS IN FOREIGN COMMERCE ENTERED AND CLEARED BY REGISTRY AND MONTHS
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

Steam and Motor Vessels Entered


Months


October 1930 .. .. ...
N november .. ........
December ..
January 1931 ..............
February ......... ........
M arch ............
A pril .... ... .............
M ay .. ... .. .
June ....... .. .. ........
July . . .
A ugust ...................
Septem ber ...................

T otal ........... ....


American


British


Tonnage INo. Tonnage


58,466
53.932
47,432
49.420
46,189
45,597
55,963
53,189
44.301
51.310
48.172
S52,893

606,864


1.834
2,043
26.194
36,880
32.788
55,548
3.839
1,848
2,875
3,046
1,457
1.834

170.186


Dutch



No. Tonnage



14 15,256
14 15,006
16 37,617
14 32.798
12 13.669
13 14.006
12 16,489
11 13.125
13 14,692
13 14,635
12 16.055
11 10.813

155 214,161


French


German


No. ITonnage No. Tonnage


6.437
7.216
20.229
4.735

3,968
12,412

3,968
5,334
4.652
5.334

74,285


15,822
16.258
16,893
27,982
13.407
11.508
24,788
13.403
14,814
12.999
7.620
13,885

189.379


All other



No. Tonnage



5 8,264
3 3,166
3 3.723
3 3.089
3 2.958
3 3.213
7 7.540
8 8.876
4 4.431
3 3.432
6 5.643
4 4,515

52 58,850


Total >



No. Tonnage
___0

53 106,079
47 97.621 0
51 152,088
52 154.904
42 109.011
42 133,840 z
51 121.031
43 90.441
42 85.081
44 90.756 >
43 83,599 0
41 89,274 <

551 1.313,725


Steam and Motor Vessels Cleared


October 1930 ...... ............ 18 55.213 1 1.834 15 16.233 2 2,898 10 15.822 4 7.096 50 99.096
November .................... 18 57.185 2 2,043 13 14.2?8 4 10.755 8 14.388 3 3.281 48 101,930
December ........ ............ 15 47,432 4 26.194 16 37.702 3 18.161 10 18,763 3 3.144 51 151,396
January 1931 ................ 17 49,420 5 36.880 14 32.713 2 4.136 11 27.982 4 4.721 53 155,852
February ................. ... 15 46.189 5 32.788 12 13.318 1 2.667 5 9.624 3 2.958 41 107.544
March ...................... .. 12 45.597 5 55,548 14 15.085 2 3,968 8 13,973 3 3.213 44 137.384
April ....................... 16 53,763 2 3,839 11 15.662 3 8,873 8 22,333 6 6,421 46 110,891
May ........................ 17 55.389 ...... 10 12,046 1 3,539 8 15,247 7 7.944 43 94.165
June ......................... 13 44.301 3 4,723 13 15.128 2 3,968 8 14.840 6 6,482 45 89.442
July ........................ 15 48.066 2 3.046 13 14,427 2 5.334 8 14,902 4 3,544 44 89,319
August ....................... 19 51.416 1 1.457 14 17.733 2 4.652 4 6,637 5 5.531 45 87,426
September .................... 14 51.281 1 1,834 11 10.813 2 5,334 9 14,868 3 3,404 40 87,534

Total .................. 185 605,252 31 170,186 156 215,138 26 74,285 97 189,379 51 57,739 550 1,311,979


z




rt








58 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 10

NET TONNAGE OF SAILING VESSELS IN FOREIGN COMMERCE ENTERED AND CLEARED
BY REGISTRY AND MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

Sailing Vessels Entered


American

Months

No. Tonnage


October, 1930..
November .....
December .....
January, 1931..
February ......
March ........
April .....
M ay .........
June .........
July .........
August ....
September ....

Total ....


1,365
650
803
3.532

19
22
1.365
1.792

1,365

10.913


British


Tonnage



102
91
103
28
206
84
97
162
119
164
52
33

1.241


Haitian


Tonnage


All other


Total


No. I Tonnage No. Tonnage


12

3,208



1,355


948
964

6,487


102
1.468
753
4.039
3,738
84
116
1.539
1.484
1.956
1.000
2,362

18.641


Sailing Vessels Cleared



October, 1930. ... ... ... 11 107 .... ........ 1 13 12 120
November ..... .. 12 101 .... ........ 1 12 13 113
December .... 2 2,015 11 102 .... ........ ... ... ..... 13 2.117
January. 1931.. 2 803 5 38 .... ........ 1 1,948 8 2.789
February ...... 3 2172 8 179 .... ........ I 1,260 12 3,611
March ....... 1 I 1.360 8 111 .... ....... .... 9 1.471
April ........ 1 19 8 90 .... ....... ..... .9 109
May .......... 1 22 8 119 ..... ...... 2 1,355 11 1.496
June ... .. .. ...... 15 138 .... ........ .... 15 138
July ........ 3 3.157 15 154 .... ........ ...... 18 3,311
August ......... ... ........ 11 90 ..... .... 1 948 12 1.038
September ..... .... ....... 2 24 .... ...... 2 24

Total .... 13 9.548 114 1,253 .... ........ 7 5.536 134 16.337





TABLE No. 11
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY REGISTRY OF CARRYING VESSELS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Country




Argentina ..........
A ustralia ............
Austria .............
Bahama Islands .......
Belgium .......
Brazil ............
British India..........
Canada ......
Canal Zone ..........
Chile .......
China ..............
Cuba ...... ........
Curacao .............
Czechoslovakia .......
Denmark ............
Dominican Republic ....
Egypt ..............
France ......
Germany ............
Greece ..............
Guadeloupe ..........
Guiana, British .......
Guiana, Dutch ........
Hungary ............
Indo China ..........
Italy ........ .. .....
Jamaica .............
Japan ........
Mexico ............
Netherlands ........ .
Norway .............
Palestine ............
Porto Rico ..........
Spain ....... ... .....
Sweden .............
Switzerland ..........
Syria ............ .. .
T rinidad ............
T ripoli .............
United Kingdom ......
United States ......
Venezuela ..... .

Total .
Per cent .. .


Merchandise Merchandise
free of duty subjecrttoduty


Gourdes





13.825


160
13.691
500
4.647
4.016
232.564
5.923
1,286
34,203
8
134.953
172,737




8

2.785
1.114
12.523
2.189
14,891


119,927.
S8

303

53

135,559
3.161,489


4.069.363
8.50


Gourdes

10
3,096
7,878
19,077
511.384
326
3,303
93,976
8.850
1,479
766
261.326
435.913
19.360
96,424
246.575
23
3.157,788
2.115,896
17
4
151,437
3,700
17
68
413,163
25.610
108,913
5
2,006.729
111.799
89
971,500
39,759
15,685
44,202
177
8,097
9
3.198,776
29,726.481
2.541

43.812.228
91.50


American


Gourdes


. .. .
2

40,429
3

34.598
22,541

4,742
3.188
62.130
344
55,954
18

233,511
76,061


17.604

17

267.888
142
110.945
30
48.099
4

1,052.174
24,542
7.285
3,277
8


1.189.460
20.660,404
2.541

23,917.941
49.95


British


Gourdes


758

19.077
4,506

3.135
10.210





701



2,187
1.387





412
3.146








3



232,574
268.156


546,252
1.14


TABLE No. 11
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY REGISTRY OF CARRYING VESSELS--FISCAL YEAR 1930-3 !


Dutch


Gourdes

10
2.338
2.824

11.615


44,143




87,924
7.619
33,936
18,480

63,454
935,387


133,833
3,700


34.979
9.791
3,992
5
1,966,310
33,756

13.499
6,019
1,555
11.938

8.150

1.667,469
8.265,567


13,368.293'
27.92


French


Gourdes



87


323
168
541

575
670
10.759



188
23
2.972,424
6.463
15
2



68
11,898

1.805

513

72
9,452
702

1,325
169

9
4,830



3,023,081
6.31


German


Gourdes



4.966

467.587


4,614

1.404
1
166
279.423
16.619
3,716
29.280

12.318
1,260.091




8

93,682
13.645
4.694
2.159
5,629
78,039
17
16.297
3,370
3,563
27,935



239,683
1.170.180


3,739.087
7.81


Norwegian


Gourdes





1,039






187,362




















3,282





1.789.919


1.981.602
4.14


1,305.335 47,881,591
2.73 ....... ...


All other


Gourdes





33


30



251.229
51,638

4,104
232.812
8
8,847
9,243
2
2




7.089



1.069


5
5,134

27



319
733.744


Per cent


Total


Gourdes

10
3,096
7,879
19.077
525,209
326
3.303
94,136
22,541
1.979
5.413
265,342
668,477
25.283
97,710
280,778
31
3,292,741
2,288.633
17
4
151,437
3,700
25
68
415,948
26,724
121.436
2,194
2.021,620
111.799
89
1,091,427
39,767
15.685
44.505
177
8,150
9
3.334.335
32.887.970
2.541


......... I


0.01
0.02
0.04
1.10

0.01
0.20
0.05

0.01
0.55
1.40
0.05
0.20
0.59

6.88
4.78


0.32
0.01


0.87
0.06
0.25

4.22
0.23

2.28
0.08
0.03
0.09

0.02

6.96
68.69


100.00


1










TABLE No. 12



VALUE OF EXPORTS BY REGISTRY OF CARRYING VESSELS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Country


Argentina .......
Bahama Islands...
Barbados ........
Belgium ........
Canada ........
Canal Zone......
Colombia .......
Corsica .........
Cuba ..........
Curacao ........
Czechoslovakia ..
Denmark .......
Dominican Republic
Finland .........
France ........
French Africa ....
Germany ...
Gibraltar .......
Guiana, British ..
Italy ... .. ...
Jamaica ... ...
Netherlands ....
Norway .. .....
P6rto Rico ......
Spain ........ .
Sweden ........
United Kingdom.
United States ..
Venezuela .......
Virgin Islands ...

Total ......
Per cent ....


Mer- Merchan-
chandise disc sub-
free of ject to American
duty duty


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes

.. .... 3.974 .........
9.763 5.430 ........
..... 8.878 .........
..... 3.905.173 366.098
..... 22.411 .......
5.677 84.625 90.302
..... 66,317 66.317
..... 18.550 8.219
66 299 ........
6.050 6,979 ........
6.213 .
..... 4.083.254 513.815
..... 44.348 ........
..... 14.658 ........
..... 22.744.883 1.198.941
..... 25;901 5,160
502 1.390.988 20.753
..... 2.644 1.528
.... 1,065
..... 4,032.557 .1702.173
..... 21,774 ........
..... 422.556 2,238
...... 55.979 ....
...... 6,496 6.496
...... 178,362 100.047
...... 195.660 21.216
..... 3.809.534 55.331
27,526 3.608.606 916.288
250 .......... .......
...... 39.145 39.145

49.834 44.767,259 5.114.067
0.11 99.89 11.41


British



Gourdes


15,193
8,878
304,195






3.436
424.269


3.300,837

85,243




10.971



23.727
697.394




4,874,143
10.88


Danish



Gourdes














16.908















16.908
0.04


Dutch



Gourdes

3.974


1.322.752
22.345


10.202

13.029
2.218
2.106.639
325

6.081.514
18,383
476.244
1.116
1.065
2.278.416

3-8.644
24.160

78.315
98.323
1,231.494
1,722.328
250


15,861.736
35.39


French



Gourdes




320.877



129



304,816


4.728.744
43
86.666


12.110

5.736
9,229


9.693
122,865




5.600,908
12.50


German



Gourdes




1.591.251
66



365

559
733.715

14.658
7.294.261
2,315
722.584


39.858
21.774
34,967
22.590


42,701
1.702,450
490,149



12.714.263
28.37


Nor-
wegian



Gourdes



























507,367



507,367
1.13


All other



Gourdes












4.023

123,678















127.701
0.28


Total



Gourdes

3.974
15,193
8,878
3,905,173
22,411
90.302
66.317
18.550
365
13.029
6.213
4.083.254
4.348
14,658
12,744.883
25.901
1.391.49C
2,644
1,065
4.032.557
21,774
422.556
55.979
6,496
178.362
195.660
3.809,534
3,636.132
250
39.145

44.817,093


Per cent





0.01
0.03
0.02
8.71
0.05
0.20
0.15
0.04

0.03
0.01
9.11
0.01
0.03
50.75
0.06
3.11
0.01

9.00
0.05
0.94
0.13
0.01
0.40
0.44
8.50
8.11

0.09

100.00




TABLE No. 13
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY MONTHS AND PORTS OF ENTRY-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31 COMPARED WITH 1929-30

Port of Entry October November December January "February March April May

Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin ................................... 430 39 21 86 ........ ....... 130 37
Belladire ................................... .... ......... 6.769 8,808 8,930 11,260 13,744 8,113 3,178
Cap Haitien ............................ 914.520 591.413 637.485 455,238 272,890 316.024 275.027 300.013 >
Cayes ........................................ 466,859 361.429 353,966 269,939 279.029 167.141 141.147 165.715
Fort Liberti .. .................... ... 67 308 55 47 ........... 29 55 26,702
Glore .................................... ....... 1.030 804 149 .. 241 2,943 3.863
Gonaives .................................... 278,155 220.529 201.136 196,879 123.086 96,487 138,252 152,244 g
Jacmel ................................... 229,750 179,485 165.479 120,012 112.516 129,872 106,746 114,444 "0
Jird mie ... ........................... 250,795 212,986 198.356 85.314 80,386 72,481 73,551 76,421 O
Miragolne ............. .................. 85.629 59.776 52.962 36,487 27.394 20,994 33.940 26,031
Ouanaminthe ......... .............. 12,241 28.365 4.893 12.590 6,385 19,009 9,205 4.364
Petit Go ve.. ........................... 68,669 131.267 127.550 73.582 48.570 63.377 47,096 33809 0
Port-au-Prince ............................. 3.540,805 3,233,632 3.303.038 2,660.811 2,582.747 2,508.740 2,190.701 1,925.981
Port-de-Paix .... ......................... 130,135 132,627 115.239 73,635 71,126 49.220 65,390 84,454 2
Saint Marc .. ............................ 129,815 117.409 98,564 159,741 90.121 147.260 161,646 74.363 Z

Total 1930-31 ......................... 6.107,870 5.277.064 5,268,356 4.153.440 3.705,510 3.604.619 3,253,942 2,991.619
Total 1929-30 ..................... 6.762.090 6,448.595 6.138,484 5,252,882 5,290,551 5.424,534 5,122,852 4,850,832

Increase 1930-31 ............. .... .......... .. ............ .......
Decrease 1930-31 ......................... 654,220 1.171,531 870,128 1.099,442 1,585,041 1,819,915 1,868,910 1.859,213.

Port of Entry June July August September Total 1930-31 Total 1929-30 Increase Decrease "

Au. Gourdes Gourder Gourdes Gourde Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin .125 30 48 76 1,022 1.624 .......... 602 m
Belladire .. ....................... ... 1.599 1,310 3.892 3.870 71,473 78,243 .......... 6.770
Cap Haitien .......... .... ................. 433.415 280,695 303.150 439.274 5.219.144 7.636,909 ......... 2.4 7.76i
Cayes ........... ....................... 250.553 186.541 140,086 204.560 2.986,965 4,270.112 .......... 1.283.147 >
Fort Liberti .. ..................... .. 58,098 52.089 41 105,417 242.908 56,888 186.020 ...
Glore ....... .. ....................... ... 3.071 620 21 30 12.772 22,998 .......... 10.226
Gonaives ..... ................... 107,087 71.414 136.943 150.463 1,872,675 2.794.623 .......... 921,948 r
Jacmel ........... ................ 107.096 153,701 172.930 117.092 1,709.123 2,393,539 6......... 684,416 m
Jremie ................................. .. 74.015 100.016 96,752 80,347 1.401,420 1,942,842 ........ 541,422
Miragoane ................................ 34,703 34,450 27.695 26,921 466.982 560,554 ...... 93.572
Ouanaminthe ........ ................ 2,646 7.559 8,368 6,758 122,383 109.511 12,872 .....
Petit Golve ............... ............... 49,598 63,495 55,899 42,140 805,052 1,057,839 ........ 252,787
Port-au-Prince ....... ....................... 2.174.462 2.084,823 2.161.181 2.321.040 30.687.961 40,303.471 .......... 9615.510
Port-de-Paix .............................. 64.017 62,097 60.026 62.195 970.161 1.364,225 ........ 394.064
Saint Marc .............................. .. 95,034 44.112 109.409 84.076 1.311,550 1.614,754 ........... 303,204
Total 1930.31 ...................... .... 3,455,519 3.142.952 3,276.441 3.644,259 47,881.591 .. ......... 198,892 16.525,433
Total 1929-30 ..................... 4.970.112 4,601.478 4.821.351 4.524.371 ...... ..... 64.208,132 .......... ..........
Increase 1930-31 ........... ............. ..
Decrease 1930-31 ........................... 1 1.514,593 1.458,526 1.544.910 880 112 16.326,541.










TABLE No. 14
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY MONTHS AND PORTS OF SHIPMENT-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31 COMPARED WITH 1929-30


Port of Shipment



A quin ................ ...................
B ellad re .. ........ .. ......... ... .........
Cap Haitien ...............
C ayes ....... .. .. .... ...... .... ..........
Fort Libert .
Gonaives .... .............
Jacm el ................................
JN rim ie .............. ..................
M iragolne ................
Ouanam inthe ............. ...........
Petit Golve ...............................
Port-au-Prince ............... ............
Port-dt-Paix .......................... .
Saint M arc ................................

T otal 1930-31 ........................
Total 1929-30........... .............

Increase 1930-31 ................... .......
Decrease 1930-31 ......... ...............

Port of Shipment



A quin ................
B elladire .. . .. . .. .
Cap Itaitien ...............
C ayes .................. .... ...
Fort Libert ................
G lore . . . . .
Gonaives ..................................
Jacm el ...................................
Jirim it ..... .......... .. .... .. .. ...... .. .
M iragoine ................
Ouanaminthe ..............................
Petit Golve ...............................
Port-au-Prince .. ..........................
Port-de-Paix ...............................
Saint M arc .... .. .... ..... ..... ...

T otal 1930-31 .... ... ......
Total 1929-30 ........ .... ......

Increase 1930-31 ......... .. ...
Decrease 1930-31 ... ..


October


Gourdes
4.049

703.370
390,858

445,249
539,023
401.361
182.599
125
282.144
627.655
290.185
340.024

4.206.642
4.882,382

675,740

June


Gourdes
3.200

301.242
353.696
37.987

142.890
249,103
179.897
152,878
2
373,247
500.996
130.948
223,421

2.649,507
3.710.246


1.060.739


November


Gourdes
2.716

339.070
318.234

407,503
441.882
288,959
166.719
448
368,662
801.392
128.424
322,245

3.586.254
7.803.099


4,216,845

July


Gourdes


101,540
348,021
49,658

131,265
323.634
246.405
135,793
209
302,720
396.993
56.455
152,308

2,245,001
2,070,506

174.495-


December


Gourdes
4.510

388,979
369,682
38.218
343.772
560.544
589.535
344.242
220
560,462
837,362
319,207
281.884

4.638,617
7.862,621


3.224,004

August


Gourdes
2.365

175.949
136.852
94.525

92.562
368.186
107.352
84,820
13
94,363
276.010
44.230
117.761

1.594.988
S1.723,799


128.811


January


Gourdes
1.281

592,661
431,522
58,180
316.439
568,905
433.923
155,705
2,318
618.575
1.172.404
107.882
333.687

4.793,482
7,066.632


2.273.150

September


Gourdes
16.908

129,746
279,247
36.457

134,019
379.856
40,802
159.832
12
155,069
482,925
131.196
110.742

2.056.811
3.106.018


1.049,207


March


Gourdes


424.522
475.974
138.029
479.108
804,674
143.320
228.269
39
723.624
1,519.990
134,049
905,201

5.976.799
9,078,283


3,101.484


Total 1930-31 Total 1929-3(


Gourdes
54,781
533
3.902,384
4.473,726
546,114

3.637.727
6,066,628
3.068,779
2.306,015
3.490
4.971.701
9,719,095
1,812.202
4.253.918

S44.817.093



25.905.742


Gourdes
188.431
3,023
9,471,206
5.721.689
249.678
77
6,186,480
9,486,897
5.930,691
2,432.018
1,179
6.959,621
13,889,129
4,385.346
5,817.370


70.722,835


April


Gourdes

533
311.993
401.044
15,500
531,949
732,048
241,807
323.350

526,820
1,526,777
143.459
567.208

5.322.488
9.129.417


3,806,929


Increase Decrease


Gourdes Gourdes
.......... 133.650
...... .... 2.490
......... 5.568.822
......... 1,247,963
296.436 ....
.......... 777
.......... 2,548.753
......... 3,420,269
......... 2.861.912
.... ..... 126.003
2.311
.......... 1,987.920
........... 4,170,034
.......... 2.573.144
.......... 1.563.452




298,747 ....
....... 26.204.489


February


Gourdes
7.810

261,016
614.112
77.560
275.480
656.764
171.373
193.739
104
529.096
984.854
175.112
476.477

4.423.497
7.773.312


3,349,815


May

Gourdes
11.942

172.296
354.484

337.491
442,009
224.045
178,069

436,919
591.737
151,055
422.960

3.323,007
6,516.520


3,193.513







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 15

VALUE OF IMPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Commodity




Agricultural implements...
Books and other printed matter
Cement ..............
Chemical and pharmaceutical
products ............
Cotton and manufactures of
other than textiles.....
Fibers, vegetable and manu-
factures of, other than
cotton and- textiles.....
Foodstuffs:
Fish .............
Wheat flour ........
M eats ............
R ice .............
All other .........
Ilousehold utensils: crockery,
porcelain, glassware, cutlery
and kitchen utensils, of
aluminium, iron and steel
Iron, steel and manufactures
of other than specified..
Leather ...............
Liquors and beverages ....
Lumber ...............
Motor vehicles:
'Automobiles passenger.
Trucks ....... .
dils, mineral:
Gasoline ..........
Kerosene .........
All other...........
Shoes ................
Silk and manufactures of
except textiles ........
Soap .................
Textiles, cotton. ........
All other .......
Tobacco ..............
Wool, hair and manufactures
of except textiles ......
All other ..............

Total ............


Average
1916-17-
1920-21


Gourdes


453,756

644,320




2.114.647

2,380,691
10.671,303
1.129.413
1,735,650
6,544,557





3,460.075
780.115
1.229,720
1,054,752



354,469
1.108,696
175,174



3.849.333
19.708.185
2.058,189
2.009,210


13.797,749

75.260,004


Average
1921-22-
1925-26


Gourdes
*

426,121

928.705




1.856,885

3.289,025
12.044.975
1,452,559
1,293,365
5,786.803





3,411,649
785.827
1.433,548
1,345,746



855.634
935,008
361.676



3,060.897
21.150,406
2.060.451
1,770.269


16,043.784

80.293.333


Average
1926-27-
1930-31


Gourdes
561,758
319.717
708,521

961,562

3,341.450


1.133,803

3,276,411
10.987.422
1,262,670
1,704,546
6,135,900



1.080.639

3,615,690
307,544
1,007,712
1,579.319

1,5477757
521.839

2.319,923
1,236,788
782,138
921.824

203.099
2.981.036
14.364.675
756,300
226,481

226,701
11,582.219


1929-30


Gourdes
516.344
435,300
519,999

907.039

2,934,611


893.159

2,607,833
7,629,613
1,061.524
960.608
4.814,198



804,385

3,277,339
252.391
825.217
1,403,390

1.293.920
519.415

2.586,841
1.280,972
828,446
800,448

186,742
2.808,322
12,860,803
499.974
44,279

184.402
10.470.618


75.655.444 64.208,132


* No separate figures available.


1930-31


Gourdes
415 053
340.663
341,496

895,213

2.077,511


830,264

1.824,151
6,644,975
846,361
1.002,059
3.957,682



630,580

,1.633,207
196;670
641,220
734.937

984.715
242,160

1,647,984
1,018,812
624,677
587,620

147.222
2,277,808
8,568,855
421.612
86,895

164,458
8,096.731

47.881.591


Average
1916-17-
1930-31


Gourdes


529,466

844.862




1.701.778

2,982.042
11.234,567
1.281.547
1,577,854
6,155,753





3.495,805
624.495
1,223,660
1,326,606



1.176,675
1,093,497
439.663



3,297,089
18,407,755
1,624,980
1,335.320


16,716,180

77,069.594










HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 16
QUANTITY OF IMPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Average Average Average Average
Commodity Unit 1916-17- 1921-22- 1926-27- 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17-
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 1930-31


Cement ............
Cotton and manufactures
of other than textiles
Fibers, vegetable and ma-
nufactures of, other
than cotton and tex-
tiles ............
Foodstuffs:
Fish .........
Wheat flour......
Meats .........
Rice ..........
Leather ............
Liquors and beverages..
Lumber .......... .
Motor vehicles:
Automobiles, pas-
senger ......
Trucks .......
Oils, mineral:
Gasoline .
Kerosene ......
Shoes .............
Silks, natural and arti-
ficial and manufac-
tures of. except tex-
tiles ........... .
Soap ..............
Textiles, cotton .....
All other ..
Tobacco .........
Wool, hair and manu.
factures of, except
textiles ..........


Kilo











Liter
Cubic meter


Number


Liter

Pairs


Kilo


3,518,741 5.675,884 9,856,604

367,74.8


2,166,642
12.354.104
500.144
675.744

686.337
6,769.43




547.523
2,894,769




2.830.380
2.685,127
361.788
694.984

*


4.298,888
28.161,255
923.154
2,859,235
*
1.126,049
14,321.29

*


2,254,239
3,623.516




3.605,622
3.708.304

821.907

*


737,822

5,311,642
27,710.108
1.053.446
4.469,193
18,642
804.225
14.009.65


412
133

7.704,611
4,574,678
177.997


3,371
3.955,471
2.707.401
66.548
134.759


14.814


7,227,011

310,793


555,117

4,008.490
19.876.285
'848,238
2,586,242
14,986
607.576
12,266.98


367
129

10.460,900
4,546,295
141,100


2,924
3,712,040
2,545,429
38,345
19.903


11.684


4.900.8741 6.350.410


252,851



661,774

3.149,885
23,531.165
716.610
3,297,733
13.621
475.362
7,099.36


340
70


3,925,724
Z2.741,822
825,581
2,668.057

872.204
11,700.12


8,125.598 3,502.124
4,041.344 3.697.654
113.768 *


2,495
3.476,573
1,999.146
38,864
43.732


9.598


3,463,824
3.033.611

550.550

*


* No separate figures available.










HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 17

VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Bananas .....
Beeswax .....
Cacao .......
Cashew nuts ..
Castor beans..
Coffee .......
Corn ........
cotton, raw ..
Cottonseed ..
Cottonseed cake.
Cowhides .....
Goatskins ....
Honey .......
Lignum vita..
Logwood ....
Molasses .
Pineapple, canned
Pineapple, fresh.
Sisal ........
Sugar, raw ...
Sugar, refined. .
Turtle shells...
All other exports

Total ...


Average
1916-17-
1920-21


Gourdes

559(1)
59.995
2,726.921

734,328
46,999.359
1.073.905(3)
5,595,881
428,686
58,891
426,618
1,068,096
794,093
436,616
6.145,079
1.704(1)


93,558
1.876,976(4)

61.149
1.067,558

69,649.972


Average
1921-22-
1925-26


Gourdes

20(2)
4,053
1.240,007
18.160(1)
69,583
60,437.516
18,400
9.186,908
761,204
53,086(2)
4,471(4)
419,784
344.518
200,299
2.286,293


3,370
2,403,398

95,205
1.585,236

79,131.511


Average
1926-27-
1930-31


Gourdes

3.318(4)
7.424
1.516,652
133.554
37,799
59,293,086
7.190
7,961,770
205,037
587,621
28,905
770,788
474.912
76.944
2,600.025
274,191(3)
118.959(4)
39,151
152,343
2,216.281
265.983(3)
47.160
979,061

77.798.154


1929-30


Gourdes

7,851
6,656
1,974.797
81,346
28,575
52.032,362
8,077
7,858,656
94,829
519,849
23.036
974,933
301,229
51,184
2,441.619
573,858
180.424
37,470
226,700
1.981,866
987.163
65,657
264.698

70,722,835





1930-31


Gourdes

3,166
1,655
513,433
30,584
12,986
33,434.881
3,277
4.254.476
127.033
501,370
11,489
871.133
130,729
28,316
1,923,381
170,572
414,154
59
460.906
1,546.586
187,811
53,488
135,608

44,817,093


Figures in parenthesis indicate number of years the commodity was shipped during the five year period.




TABLE No. 18

QUANTITY OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-1917 TO 1930-31


Bananas ..........
Beeswax ........ .
Cacao, crude ......
Cashew nuts ......
Castor beans ......
Coffee ..........
Corn ........
Cotton fiber........
Cottonseed .......
Cottonseed cake ...
Cowhides ........
Goatskins ..... ..
Honey ..........
Lignum vita .....
Logwood ........
Molasses ........
Pineapple, canned .
Pineapple, fresh .
Sisal ............
Sugar, raw .
Sugar. refined ...
Turtle shells .....


Average Average
1916-17- 1921-22-
1920-21 1925-26


Kilos
*279 (1)
19,277
1,958,832

1.102.620
29.307,941
2.230.066 (3)
2,487,783
2,480,810
1,066,180
127.835
154,966
731,880
4,036,687
54.869,896
1.995 (1)


116,915
2,543,397 (4)

1.635


Kilos
*9 (2)
2,910
1.908.678
9,270 (1)
179.214
32,060.107
96.174
3,895.790
5,604.133
728.997 (2)
4.380 (4)
127,445
547,907
2,710,852
27,816,496


7.603
6.731,098

1,478


Average
1926-27-
1930-31


Kilos
*1,616 (4)
3,203
1,765,943
79,004
91.961
31,802.740
27,040
4,675.990
1,840.750
5,900.693
17.017
221,180
577,253
581.747
27.997,433
3,556.867 (3)
155.991 (4)
106.689
285,172
9,758.153
1,019.656 (3)
1,285


1929-30


1930-31


Average
1916-17-
1930-31


Kilos Kilos Kilos
*5.174 *2,130 ........
2.981 1.354 8.463
2,272.863 1.167.680 1,877,818
55,794 21,987 .........
100,449 48,265 457.932
34,321,114 26,296.152 31,056.929
S43,555 31,032 784.427
5.124,551 4,172.537 3,686,521
1.447,366 1.863,251 3,308,564
5.710,539 4,871,182 2.565,290
16.279 12,648 49.744
238,233 246.921 167,864
526,136 323.314 619,013
606,515 185,424 2.443.095
26.775.964 25,362.884 36.894.608
6,087,573 1.825,741 ........
210.131 569,509 ........
121.865 350 ........
364,173 974.405 136.563
11.184,537 11,549,419 6.344,216
3.757.271 810,415 .......
1,290 1,070 1.466


Figures in parenthesis indicate number of years the commodity was shipped during the five year period.
* Bunches.


Average
1916-17-
1930-31


Gourdes


23,824
1,827.860

280.570
55,576,654
366,498
7,581,520
464,976
233,199
153,331
752,889
537.841
237.953
3,677,132



8 3.090
2,165,552

67,838
1.495.818

75.526,545


















TABLE No. 19


QUANTITY AND VALUE OF FIVE PRINCIPAL EXPORTS B' PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31 COMPARED WITH 1929-30 t
O

Coffee Cotton fiber Logwood Sugar Cacao, crude O
Port
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Z

Aquin .................... 12,273 16.859 ......... ....... 490.000 28,163 ...... ......... ....
Cap Haitien ................ 2.018,321 2.512,423 ......... ......... 6.856.636 707.812 .......... ........ 135,018 42,182 -
Cayes ....................... 3.232.356 4.159.191 241,429 237.647 ......... .......... ........
Fort Liberti .......... ...... ..... ........ 2,290.000 205,694 ...... ......... ....
Gonaives ................. ... 2.131.990 2.684.379 660.365 684.650 1.226,142 69.125
Jacmel .................... 4,050.676 5.174.347 655.558 694.650 75.000 5.727 .......... ......... ..... .. .. ........
Jirimie ........ .... 2,120.320 2.678.398 ......... ......... .... .. ...... ........ ...... 707.911 325.856 m
M iragolne ................. 1.414.265 1.824.121 .. ....... ........ 6,731 106 425,981 ...... ..... .....
Petit Golve ................ 3.855.419 4.960.335 ......... ......... ..
Port-au-Prince ............... 4.634,237 5,868.198 1,012,816 986,760 1.469.500 88,914 12.359.834 1,734,397 120,220 48,797 M
Port-de-Paix ................. 1.273.715 1.604,719 ......... .... ...... ......... .......... ....... 204.531 96.598 Z
Saint Marc ................. 1,552.580 1.951.911 1,602.369 1.650.769 6.224,500 391.965 .......... ......... ......... ........
Total 1930-31 .......... 26.296,152 33.434.881 4.172.537 4,254.476 25.362,884 1.923,381 12.359,834 1.734.397 1.167,680 513.433 r
Total 1929-30 ......... 34.321,114 52.032,362 5.124,551 7.858.656 26,775.964 2.441.619 14,941,808 2,969,029 2.272,863 1,974,797
Increase 1930-31 ............................................................. ........................ .... ........
Decrease 1930-31 ........... 8,024,962 18,597,481 952.014 3,604.180 1.413,080 518,238 2.581,974 1,234.632 1.105.183 1.461,364 m
h-


~~ _I~~l__il_~_ __ ____ __ ~_ ____ 1 __ ~_ __









HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 20


PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Average Average Average Average
1916-17- 1921-22- 1926-27-- 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17-
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 1930-31

Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
Coffee ......................... 67.48 76.38 76.21 73.57 74.60 73.59
Cotton ........................ 8.03 11.61 10.23 11.11 9.49 10.04
Logwood ..................... 8.82 2.89 3.34 3.45 4.29 4.87
Sugar ................... ...... 2.69 3.04 3.19 4.20 3.87 2.98
Cacao, crude ....................... 3.92 1.56 1.95 2.79 1.15 2.42
All other..... ................... 9.06 4.52 5.08 4.88 6.60 6.10

Total .............. ......... 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00










TABLE No. 21


QUANTITY AND VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES AND MONTHS
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Month Coffee Cotton Logwood

Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes
October, 1930...... 3,036.537 3,765.319 14.237 15,698 2,236,000 189,110
November ......... 2.714,934 3,224,235 17,120 20,886 330.136 14.106
December ......... 3,564.451 4.135,084 ........ ..... 2.555,000 158.751
January. 1931...... 3,265,905 3.837,541 34,978 33,929 3,807.642 344,167
February .......... 2,639,535 3,317.469 576.930 623,354 853.500 73.158
March ..... ..... 2.665.099 3,569,165 1.160,503 1.322,971 3,275.250 308,093
April .......... 2,506.874 3.391,212 923,981 954,457 1,460.000 107.686
May ........... 1,713,952 2,460,048 506.487 484,581 1,315,000 88.313
June ............ 1,276,289 1,837.858 257.167 223,719 2,317,500 182.826
July ..... ...... 1,009.635 1,486,695 329,812 315,942 1.664.544 102.914
August ........... 672,444 988.494 33,819 31,790 3.248,312 212,729
September ......... 1,230,497 1,421,761 317,503 227,149 2.300.000 141,528

Total ........ 26.296.152 33,434,881 4,172,537 4,254,476 25,362.884 1.923.381


Month Sugar Cacao, crude All other All exports

Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
'October, 1930...... 36.280 6,749 28.289 16.139 213.627 4.206.642
November ... .'.'. 99.770 20,700 111.830 46,604 259,723 3.586,254
December .......... 101.584 20.745 204.327 107,224 216,813 4,638,617
January. 1931. ...... 3.132.006 394,469 131,964 60,224 123.152 4,793,482
February .......... 1,164.64T 160,212 119,209 59.383 189,921 4,423,497
March ........... 3,343,504 443.587 96,908 38,256 294,727 5,976,799
April ........... .- 4,167,772 614.289 75,369 28,118 226,726 5,322.488
May ........ 42.629 9,607 87.544 35.286 245.172 3,323.007
June .............. 54,420 11.404 138,463 61,318 332.382 2.649,507
July ............. 54,420 12.609 98,491 29.932 296,909 2,245,001
August ..... 102,037 26.420 73,330 30,450 305.105 1.594.988
September ......... 60.769 13,606 1.956 499 252,268 2,056,811

Total ........ 12.359,834 1,734,397 1,167,680 513,433 2,956,525 44,817,093










68 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 22

RECEIVERSHIP FUND-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


September 1916 ..............
19 16-17 ...................
1917-18......................
1918-19 ...................
1919-20 ........... ........
1920-21 ............. ........
1921-22. ...................
1922-23. ...................
1923-24. ...................
1924-25. ...................
1925-26. ...................
1926-27 ....................
1927-28. ...................
1928-29. ...................
1929-30. ...................
1930.31 ....................

T otal .................
Average 1916-17 to 1930-31....
Surplus for period.............


Five per cent
of customs
receipts


Gourdes
60,211.85
914,794.70
755,464.80
1,432,176.60
1,603,639.95
882,854.05
1.377,811.70
1.555.057.00
1,607,569.51
1.787.500.90
2,029.741.59
1.683.093.81
2,254.104.63
1,762,382.50
1,541.953.74
1.278.139.20

22.526,496.53
1.497.752.31


Expenditures



Gourdes
89,850.15
796.625.70
741,055.80
700,035.60
1,380,460.60
1.452.073.10
1,279.142.25
1,438,506.15
1.896.332.08
1,849,537.49
1,698,379.86
2.278.241.30
1.884.994.88
1,864,702.40
1.729.289.80
1,443,140.97

22.522,368.13
1.495,501.20


Surplus



Gourdes

118.169.00
14.409.00
732.141.00
223.179.35

98.669.45
116.550.85


331.361.73

369.109.75



2,003.590.13
1.999.461.73
4.128.40


Deficit



Gourdes
29.638.30




569.219.05


288.762.57
62,036.59

595,147.49

102.319.90
187.336.06
165,001.77

1,999,461.73


TABLE No. 23


EXPENSES OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER BY OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


September 1916...
1916-17 .......
1917-18 ......
1918-19 .......
1919-20........
1920-21........
1921-22 ........
1922-23 ........
1923-24........
1924-25 .... :..
1925-26. .......
1926-27........
1927-28 .......
1928-29. .......
1929.30 .......
1930-31 ........

Average 1919-20..
to 1930-31 ...


Adminis-
tration


Gourdes




329.634.0C
426.498.7C
404.251.7C
503,997.4C
455,447.21
461,316.07
467.996.66
523.192.77
514,017.30
578.827.16
640,263.91
583,723.66


490,763.88


Customs
operation


Gourdes




508.570.75
547.194.55
605,773.60
600.627.10
648,959.62
673,495.96
669.394.41
712.154.94
684.563.61
671,332.50
637,588.57
582.541.63


628.516.44


Repairs and
mainte-
nance*


Gourdes













24,027.32
27,567.10
9,703.22


5.108.13


Acquisition
of property


Gourdes




114,500.00



500,000.00
57.745.41
155.040.47
706,274.83
235.593.04
238.038.92
115,479.47
11.544.62

177.851.40


Fixed
charges


Gourdes




427.755.85
478,379.85
269,116.95
333.881.65
291.925.25
656,980.05
405,948.32
336,618.76
450.820.93
352.476.50
308,390.75
255,627.84


Total


Gourdes

89,850.15
796.625.70
741,055.80
700,035.60
1.380,460.60
1,452,073.10
1.279.142.25
1.438.506.15
1.896.332.08
1,849.537.49
1,698.379.86
2.278,241.30
1.884,994.88
1.864.702.40
1.729.289.80
1.443.140.97


380,660.22 1.682.900.07


*Prior to 1928-29 repairs and maintenance expenses were charged to administration or customs operation.


- -







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 24

CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Month Administration Repairs and Acquisition Fixed Total
and operation maintenance of property charges


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October ................. 109,144.60 625.90 935.10 .......... 110,705.60
November................ 116,253.18 1,477.30 3,617.44 ........... 121,347.92
December................. 106,665.72 625.44 109.09* ........... 107,182.07
January ................. 96,258.24 1,659.25 4,516.90 ........... 102,434.39
February ................ 98,089.86 604.05 438.64 .......... 99,132.55
M arch .................. 95.114.29 1.122.73 315.84 ............ 96,552.86
April................... 98.601.45 395.35 156.50 .......... 99,153.30
May .................. ... 92,996.74 433.95 929.04 ............ 94.359.73
June ................... 97.010.94 1,144.25 60.00* ........... 98,095.19
July..................... 87,505.24 375.85 297.50 ........... 88,178.59
August .................. 83.566.56 590.65 71.35 .. ....... 84,228.56
September ............... 85,058.47 648.50 435.40 255,627.84 341,770.21

Total... ........... 1,166,265.29 9,703.22 11,544.62 255,627.84 1,443.140.97

Percentage 80.82 .67 .80 17.71 100.00

*Credit









TABLE No. 25

CLASSIFICATION OF ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES
OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER -FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

Special
Salaries Supplies Transpor- Commu- and
Month and and nication Rents Total
wages materials n service Miscel
laneous

Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October .... 89,829.05 4,220.45 14.513.01 595.10 10.00* 3.01* 109.144.60
November... 91,064.76 2,438.35 9,331.77 139.05 50.00 13,229.25 116,253.18
December. .. 88,781.20 3,653.28 6,677.54 179.00 75.00' 7,449.70 106,665.72
January ... 88.598.31 4,500.16 3,244.09 5.00 105.00* 15.68 96.258.24
February. ... 91,596.53 2,713.58 3,527.25 241.00 175.00* 186.50 98,089.86
March..... 82,823.98 7,825.27 3,704.61 272.00 235.00*i 723.43 95,114.29
April ..... 84.852.98 4,363,96 9.211.76 65.75 235.00* 342.00 98.601.45
May....... 84.258.21 2,458,61 5,922.06 307.20 175.00* 225.66 92,996.74
June....... 91.556.90 1,137.48 4,248.96 197.00 225.00* 95.60 97,010.94
July....... 78,391.42 5,089.01 4,173.28 49,90 275.00' 76.63 87,505.24
August..... 79,556.61 2.730.81 1,398.57 130.85 275.00* 24.72 83,566.56
September 78,561.80 2.322.34 4,334.33 ........ 275.00* 115.00 85,058.47

Total..... 1,029,871.75 43,453.30 70,287.23 2,181.85 2,0110.00* 22,481.16 1.166,265.29
Percentage. 88.30 3.72 6.03 .19 .17* 1.93 100.00

*Credit







70 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 26

DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES FROM RECEIVERSHIP FUND
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

Ratio to total Cost per
Port Customs customs Customs gourde
receipts receipts operation collected


Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Gourdes
Port-au-Pri'nce .......... ........... 12,173,513.16 47.62 265,242.44 .0218
Cap Haitien .......................... 2,275.844.14 8.90 68,029.28 .0299
Jacmel. ......... ....... .. .... 2.052.178.31 8.03 38,934.57 .0190
Cayes.. ........... .. .............. 2.211,866.73 8.65 57,212.95 .0259
Jrcmie.. .......... ................... 1,264,035.04 4.94 25,978.35 .0206
Gonaives ........................ ... 1,401.898.37 5.48 31,885.72 .0227
Petit Golve ... ......... ....... 1,446,138.93 5.66 25,521.61 .0176
Port-de-Pai..................... .... 804,222.97 3.15 19.999.45 .0249
Saint Marc ..................... ... 1,067.359.95 4.18 24,622.89 .0231
Miragoine.. ............... ......... 762,909.65 2.98 6,787.65 .0089
Aquin ............ ............ 13,244.22 .05 2.244.98 .1695
Fort Libert ......................... 60,512.65 .24 5.791.70 .0957
Ouanaminthe......................... 16,907.19 .07 3,186.57 .1885
Belladire.......................... 10,077.01 .04 4,372.31 .4339
Glore. ........... ................... 2.075.66 .01 2,731.16 1.3158
Total .. ...................... 25,562,783.98 100.00 582.541.63 .0228
Administration .................... ............. .......... 583,723.66 .0228

Total administration and customs operation. ..... ...... .. ....... .. 1,166,265.29 .0456
Repairs and maintenance................. ... .. ...... ............. 9,703.22 .0004
Acquisition of property ................ .... ........ ............. 11,544.62 .0005
Fixed charges .................... ... .............. .......... 255,627.84 .0100
Total expenditures from 5 per cent fund... .............. ............. 1,443140.97 .0565



TABLE No. 27

COST OF CUSTOMS OPERATIONS BY PORTS AND COSTS OF ADMINISTRATION.
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE. ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY. AND FIXED CHARGES
FISCAL YEARS 1919-20 TO 1930-31

Average Average Average
Port 1919-20 to 1924-25 to 1929-30 1930-31 1919-20 to
1923-24 1928-29 1930-31


Gourdes, Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin ....... ........... 4,144.35 3,130.94 2.121.52 2,244.98 3.395.24
Belladire ................ 898.96 5.083.92 4.134.94 4,372.31 3,201.81
Cap Haitien .... .... ..... :. 73,190.96 78,148.81 72,273.27 68,029.28 74,750.12
Cayes .................... 50,932.83 59,707.21 60,108.31 57,212.95 55,876.80
Fort Libert ...... .... ....... ......... 3.090.24 11.814.53 5,791.70 2,754.78
Glore .. .... ............ 860.12 2,674.68 2,381.80 2,731.16 1,898.92
Gonaives. ................. 37.507.43 40,387.92 39.072.23 31.885.72 38.369.55
Jacmel ................... .48,404.08 50,372.14 43,210.39 38.934.57 48,002.17
Jiremie .. .............. 29,439.82 33.643.05 32.448.29 25,978.35 31,153.41
Miragoane ............. ... 6.098.56 12.136.95 8.487.83 6.787.65 8,871.09
Ouanaminth .............. 4,180.33 3,414.82 2,947.97 3.186.57 3,675.85
Petit Golve ............... 26,449.52 32.025.21 28.349.87 25.521.61 28,853.76
Port-au-Prince .............. 256,158.43 310,317.16 284.030.60 265.242.44 281.804.25
Port-de-Paix ............ .. 17.548.24 20,540.82 21,429.26 19,999.45 19,322.83
Saint Marc................ 22.074.54 27.514.41 24,777.76 24,622.89 24,778.79
Total customs operation. -. 577.888.17 682.188.28 637,588.57 582,541.63 626,709.37
Administration ............ 423,965.80 509.070.00 640,263.91 583,723.66 490,763.88
Total administration and
operation .......... 1.001.853.97 1.191.258.28 1.277,852.48 1.166,265.29 1,117,473.25
Repairs and maintenance ...... .. ........ 4.805.46 27.567.10 9.703.22 5,108.14
Acquisition of property ...... 122,900.00 278.538.54 115,479.47 11.544.62 177,851.40
Fixed charges .............. 360,211.91 440.568.91 308,390.75 255,627.84 380,660.18
Total expenditures from
5 per cent fund...... 1.484.965.88 1.915.171.19 1.729.289.80 1.443.140.97 1.681.092.97







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 28

TOTAL COST OF COLLECTING EACH GOURDE OF CUSTOMS RECEIPTS
FISCAL YEARS 1919-20 TO 1930-31


A quin . . . . .
Belladire ... .. .... .. .. .. ... .. .. ... ..... .
Cap H aitien ......................... ....
C ayes . . . .
Fort Liberti ...................... ....
G lore .. ...... .. .. ..
Gonaives ............. ...... .......
Jacmel ................... ..... .. ..
Jirim ie .. .. ... ... ... ... .. .. ...
M irago ine.......................... ....
O uanam inthe .............. ....... ....
Petit Go ve ............... ..........
Port-au-Prince . .
Port-de-Paince.............................
Port-de-Paix . . . ..
Saint M arc .................... ..... ......

Total customs operation ............ ...
Administration ................. .. .....

Total administration and operation .
Repairs and maintenance ...................
Acquisition of property ............. .. ....
Fixed charges. ............................

Total expenditures from 5 per cent fund ....


Average Average
1919-20- 1924-25-
1923-24 1928-29


Gourdes
.0209
4.1225
.0230
.0195
.0975
1.8248
.0251
.0209
.0376
.0137
1.1820
.0163
.0217
.0167
.0222

.0217
.0161

.0378

.0046
.0136

.0560


Gourdes
.0245
.4277
.0179
.0177
.2458
.7946
.0201
.0152
.0203
.0171
.2077
.0136
.0178
.0142
.0228

.0179
.0134

.0313
.0001
.0073
.0116


1929-30 1930-31


Gourdes
.0517
.4020
.0191
.0249
.3336
.8109
.0218
.0171
.0176
.0126
.1796
.0164
.0207
.0165
.0257

.0207
.0208

.0415
.0009
.0037
.0100


Gourdes
.1695
.4339
.0299
.0259
.0957
1.3158
.0227
.0190
.0206
.0089
.1885
.0176
.0218
.0249
.0231

.0228
.0228

.0456
.0004
.0005
.0100


.0503 .0561 .0565


Average
1919-20-
1930-31



Gourder
.0242
.4396
.0206
.0194
.0867
.8865
.0222
.0176
.0244
.0148
.3312
.0150
.0197
.0159
.0228

.0198
.0153

.0353
.0002
.0056
.0120

.0531


TABLE No. 29


OPERATING ALLOWANCE OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

FISCAL YEARS 1923-24 TO 1930-31


Fifteen per cent of
internal revenue Expenses Surplus


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
August and September 1924. .................. ... 110,195.00 75,254.27 34.941.63
1924-25 ................................... 613,488.92 350,274.56 263.214.36
1925-26 .................................... 623,607.59 304.198.76 319,408,83
1926-27 ................... ......... ..... 622,993.20 306,308.68 316,684.52
1927-28 ...................... ........... 636,243.02 462.010.33 174,232.69
1928-29 ..................................... 905.289.72 799,076.94 106.212.78
1929-30 ................................... 993,024.61 993.017.74 6.87
1930-31 ...................... .. ............ 774,062.00 770,681.47 3,380.53






















TABLE No. 30


COSTS OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE BY OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEARS 1923-24 TO 1930-31


Cost per Gourde collected
Administration Repairs and Acquisition Fixed
and operation maintenance* of property* charges Total Administra- Repairs Acquisition
tion and and of Fixed Total
operation maintenance property charges

Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
August and September 1924...... 75,254.27 .................... ..... .... 75,254.27 .1024 ...... ..... .. 1024
1924-25 ............ ........ 302.028.90 ...... ... ......... 48,245.66 350,274.56 .0739 ........ ........ .0117 .0856
1925-26 .................... 262,647.06 ...... ... ......... 41.551.70 304,198.76 .0632 ........ ....... .0100 .0732
1926-27 ................... 264.775.80 ... ........... 41.532.88 306.308.68 .0638 ....... ....... .0100 .0738
1927-28 ................... 419.594.13 ......... ........... 42.416.20 462,010.33 .0989 ... ......... .0100 .1089
1928-29 .................. 671,173.86 2,161.50 65.388.9i 60,352.65 799.076.94 .1112 .0004 .0108 .0100 .1324
1929.30 .................... 800,451.39 5.281.74 121,082.97 66,201.64 993.017.74 .1209 .0007 .0183 .0100 .1499
1930-31 ............ .. ... 702.475.22 842.10 15,760.02 51.604.13 770,681.47 .1361 .0002 .0031 .0100 .1493

*Prior to 1928-29 repairs and maintenance and acquisition of property were included in administration and operation.


---- ------ --------------- ---- -- ---- --- --- --~---







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 73


TABLE No. 31

CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Administration Repairs and Acquisition of
and operation maintenance property Fixed charges Total


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October................ 66,974.04 45.00 2,374.76 ............ 69.393.80
November... ......... 66,227.61 43.00 1,673.32 ............ 67.943.93
December .............. 64,966.70 114.65 2,875.31 ............ 67,956.66
January................ 59,682.63 95.00 3,272.21 ........... 63,049.84
February ............... 57,898.08 50.00 365.10 ............ 58.313.18
March ................ 61.920.83 38.90 559.45 ....... ..... 62.519.18
April ................. 55,545.95 50.00 ........... ........... 55,595.95
May .................. 54,519.15 73.25 500.00 ........... ... 55,092.40
June .................. 65,201.75 132.50 60.00 ........... ... 65,394.25
July .................. 47.570.67 43.50 316.00 ............ 47.930.17
August ................ 50,935.29 106.30 3.552.50* ........... ... 47,489.09
September ............. 51,032.52 50.00 7,316.37 51,604.13 110.003.02

Total............. 702.475.22 842.10 15,760.02 51,604.13 770.681.47

Percentage. ........ 91.15 .11 2.04 6.70 100.00


TABLE No. 32


CLASSIFICATION OF ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES OF INTERNAL
REVENUE SERVICE-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Supplies
and
materials


Gourdes
3,528.66
2,907.81
3,959.40
2,898.74
2.817.78
8,602.40
3,009.55
2,192.13
7,709.79
2,189.44
3,529.10
4,294.75


Transpor-
tation


Gourdes
8,290.11
8,962.97
10,654.33
8,038.42
7,783.12
7.705.72
7.349.25
5.666.74
7.947.57
6,620.27
6.907.59
15,014.21


47,639.55 100,940.30
6.78 14.37


Commu-
nication
service


. Gourdes.





2.50
35.00

2.50


Rents



Gourdes
405.63
92.00
72.00
100.00
87.00
87.00
62.00
62.00
62.00
92.00
82.00
72.00


40.00 1,275.63
.01 .18


Salaries
and
wages


Gourdes
48,244.39
48,493.63
45,772.23
45,051.90
45,993.95
43,665.54
43,095.54
44,073.58
48,176.70
37,078.39
39,025.00
30,151.21

518.822.06
73.85


January..
February..
March ....
April. ....
May......
atne ......
July ......
August ....
September..
October...
November..
December..

Total...
Percentage..


Special
and
miscel-
laneous


Gourdes
6,505.25
5,771.20
4,508.74
3.593.57
1.216.23
1.860.17
2,027.11
2,489.70
1,305.69
1,588.07
1,391.60
1,500.35

33,757.68
4.81


Total



Gourdes
66,974.04
66.227.61
64,966.70
59,682.63
57,898.08
61.920.83
55,545.95
54,519.15
65,201.75
47.570.67
50,935.29
51,032.52

702,475.22
100.00


I




















1889-90 .............
1890-91 .............
1891-92 .............
1892-93 ............
1893-94 ........... .
1894-95 ......... .
1895-96 .........
1896-97 .......... .
1897-98 .........
1898-99 ......... .
1899-00 .............
1900-01 ............
1901-02 ............
1902-03 .............
1903.04 .............
1904.05 .............
1905.06 .............
1906-07 .............
1907-08 .............
1908-09 .............
1909-10 ........ .
19 10-11 .. ...........
19 11-12 .............
19 12-13 .... ........
1913-14 .............
1914-15 .. .. .
1915-16 ............
1916-17 .............
1917-18.............
19 18-19 .............
1919-20 .............
1920-21 ......... ...
1921-22 .............
1922-23 .............
1923-24 .............
1924-25 .............
1925-26 .............
1926-27 .............
1927-28 .............
1928-29 .............
1929-30 ..........
1930-31 .............


TABLE No. 33
REVENUE OF HAITI BY SOURCES*-FISCAL YEARS 1889-90 TO 1930-31

Customs Receipts


Imports


Gourdes





















13,652.334.70.
15.176.348.80
10.637.856.40
8.668,408.45
12,970,092.55
9.736,057.28
7,784.253.80
12.264,105.80
18.898,013.74
9.816.687.88
13.247.038.18
16.815,500.17
19,415.707.84
23.452.328.71
26.169.088.58
23.572.181.41
30.935.585.10
25,293.700.63
18,813.703.58
16.677.081.40


Exports


Gourdes

. . .
. . .
. . .


. . .














19.814.908.75.
10.280.211.40
13,413,711.10
6.441.318.45
9.201,376.30
8,473.752.35
7.331.366.55
16.503.370.20
13.143.137.45
8.184.194.70
10.077,988.15
12.312,916.60
9,984.701.92
10.617.525.63
12.660.447.87
10,015,913.41
14,040.033.56
9,841.455.54
11.952.580.99
8.821.209.96


Miscellaneous



Gourdes
. . .
. . .

. . .
.. . .,
. . .
. . .


. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .











262.538.80
5.897.52
13.665.10
13.611.90
31.877.91
29,982.42
41,543.37
64.169.58
550.497.38
1,680.164.00
1,765,295.29
73,781.41
106.474.14
112.493.83
72.790.18
64.492.62


Total



Gourdes






















33.467.243.45
25.456.560.20
24.051.567.50
15,372,265.70
22.171.468.85
18,215.707.15
15.129.285.45
28,781.087.90
32,073,029.10
18.030.865.00
23.366,569.70
29,192.586.35
29.950.907.14
35.750.018.34
40,594,831.74
33,661.876.23
45.082.092.80
35,247.650.00
30.839.074.75
25.562,783.98


Internal
revenues


Gourdes
.............





















912,014.55
670.522.20
706.709.70
353,533.40
543.610.05
717.005.60
911,203.40
1.159.974.00
1,886.174.99
1.897.171.70
1,580,246.77
2.699,443.24
2.795.870.53
4.089.926.19
4.155,170.28
4.153.287.97
4,241.620.14
6,035,264.80
6.620.164.04
5.160.413.33


Fluctuations in the gold value of the gourde prior to its stabilization May 2; 1919 have been calculated and are reflected in statistics of revenue before 1919-20.


Miscellaneous
receipts




Gourdes
. . .
S ..-............
. .. .. .















.............95
. ..............















............90
. . .



. . .
. . .

. . .














7,901.90
14.871.55
38,246.70
18,059.00
17.979.25
58.071.65
155,543.66
647.722.47
614,646.08
1.046.370.59
1,097.303.55
1.238.613.60
1.188.924.60
1.023.385.07


Total
receipts




Gourdes
31.533,254.85
40.868.026.30
34.799,016.95
34.880.361.45
33.853.640.75
34.917.258.60
28.047.666.65
30.665.202.15
23.753.709.25
19.467.977.35
24.416.719.00
21.986.480.60
18,834.716.35
17.517.062.85
20,087.928.90
13,741.365.95
16,695.679.00
11.977.500.00
10,524.189.40
15,044,393.45
23,014.530.50
20.520.595.90
34,379,258.00
26,127.082.40
24,758.277.20
15.725,799.10
22.715,078.90
18.934.684.70
16,048,390.75
29,955.933.45
33.997,450.79
19.946,095.70
24.964.795.72
31,950.101.24
32.902,321.33
40,487.667.00
45.364.648.10
38,861.534.79
50,421.016.49
42.521.528.40
38.648.163.39
31.746,582.38


- ----------- ---- ---- --- ---~ ~~







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 75


TABLE No. 34

RELATION BETWEEN IMPORT AND EXPORT VALUES AND CUSTOMS RECEIPTS
.FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


1916-17....
1917-18....
1918-19....
1919-20....
1920-21 ....
1921-22....
1922-23. ...
1923-24. ...
1924-25 ....
1925-26 ....
1926-27....
1927-28. ...
1928-29. ...
1929-30. ...
1930-31....

Average...


Imports


Value


Gourdes
43.030,428
50,903,468
85.588,041
136.992,055
59,786,029
61,751,355
70.789.815
73,480,640
101.187,825
94.257.030
78,756.600
101,241,283
86,189.612
64,208.132
47,881,591

77.069.597


Duty


Gourdes
9,741,954.80
7,797.918.90
12,277,717.70
18.929.891.65
9.846,670.3.0
13,288,581.55
16,879.669.75
19.966,205.22
25,132,492.71
27,808,486.25
23,572,181.41
30,935,585.10
25,293,700.63
18,813,703.58
16,677.081.40

18,464,122.73


Per cent



22.64
15.32
14.35
13.82
16.47
21.52
23.84
27.17
24.84
29.50
29.93
30.56
29.35
29.30
34.83

23.96


Exports


Value


Gourdes
44,664,428
38,717,650
123,811.096
108,104,639
32,952,045
53.561,050
72.955.060
70.881.610
97.018,810
101.241,025
76,495,442
113.336.230
83.619,167
70,722,835
44.817,093

75,526.546


Duty


Gourdes
8.473,752.35
7.331,366.55
16,503,370.20
13,143.137.45
8.184.194.70
10.077.988.15
12.312,916.60
9,984,701.92
10,617.525.63
12.660.447.87
10,015,913.41
14.040,033.56
9,841.455.54
11,952,580.99
8,821,209.96

10.932.439.66


Per ceat



18.97
18.93
13.33
12.16
24.84
18.82
16.88
14.09
10.95
12.51
13.09
12.39
11.77
16.90
19.68

14.47




















TABLE No. 35


0
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY MONTHS-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930.31

"T
Average Average Average 4
191617 to 1921-22to 1926-27 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30 1930-31 1916-17to
1920-21 1925-26 1930-31 >


Gourd GourGourdourde Go GourddGourdes ourdes Gurdes Gourdes Gourdes
October .......... 1,518,926.08 3.037.492.87 3.770,458.42 3,731.545.38 4.877.847.79 2.699.139.41 2.829.234.14 2.712.687.99 >
November. ......... 1,813.232.97 3.538,557.92 3.534.435.74 4,205.086.96 4,620.094.58 3.205.518.05 2.637.786.00 2.997.458.39 0
December ......... 2.195.593.43 3.854,936.07 3.923.268.01 5,324.916.59 4.410.265.07 3.361.925.56 2.871.519.02 3.342.969.45
January ........ .. 2.308,150.90 3.214,619.05 2.966.878.06 4,428.381.45 3.586.193.19 2.875.510.04 2.443,625.30 2.927.629.18
February........... 2,078.966.06 2.870.412.10 2.886,093.61 4.572.322.28 2.897.206.45 2.875.602.36 2.094,422.43 2.671.502.53
Match............ 2.077.327.60 2.968.218.94 2.949.459.94 4.689.408.32 2,640.030.70 3.021.610.59 2.279.028.42 2.720.484.72
April............ 2.109.606.72 2.429,607.04 2,443,025.84 3.644.378.62 2.681.417.88 2.787.424.11 2.043.075.11 2.419.692.69
May.............. 1,763.034.48 2.140,627.99 2.246.828.72 3,204.051.56 2,316.319.18 2,268.017.84 1.728.745.88 2.085,485.03
June ............. 1.942.219.96 1.871.308.14 2.149.413.19 2.750.736.89 1.804,732.42 2.099.321.08 1.694.850.25 1.971.112.96
July.............. 1,444,162.30 1.743.104.07 2.091.505.76 2.595,099.65 1.928,236.97 1,721.219.99 1.642.976.33 1,727.691.37
August............ 1.610.259.38 1.806.235.06 2.184.434.62 2.970.700.22 1.568.188.21 1.824.712.51 1.585.608.84 1.814.407.78
September.......... 1,569.050.83 2.295.863.38 2.516.074.32 2.965.464.88 1.917,117.56 2.099.073.21 1.711.912.26 2.035.614.21
Total. ....... 22.430.530.71 31.770,982.63 33,661.876.23 45.082.092.80 35.247.650.00 30.839,074.75 25.562.783.98 29.426.736.30


I I -- II~















TABLE No. 36


CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY PORTS-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Aquin ..........
Belladire ........
Cap Haitien......
Cayes ...........
Fort Libert ...
Glore ...........
Gonaives ........
Jacm el .........
Jeitmie ..........
Miragoine........
Ouanaminthe .....
Petit Golve.......
Port-au-Prince .. .
Port-de-Paix ......
Saint Marc.......

Total.........


Average
1916-17 to
1920-21


Gourdes
124,805.62
3,280.13
3,179,095.89
1.910,474.91
62,108.75
501.73
1.372.395.15
2.076.404.15
925.743.72
275.744.34
10,260.12
1.221.660.24
9.540,425.27
925,723.20
799,520.56

22.428.143.78


Average
1921-22 to
1925-26


Gourdes
222,392.84
653.80
3.646.227.43
3,205,206.20
14,532.22
915.20
1.762,959.97
2,858.299.20
1.119,908.59
559.994.05
7.336.32
.2,160.650.50
13,823.939.29
1,252.298.94
1.135,668.10

31,770.982.65


1926-27



Gourdes
113,122.24
13.458.33
3.254,525.83
3,408.107.55

3.553.51
1,668,692.47
2.973.165.49
1,365.664.38
705,299.97
12.516.45
2.147.929.25
15,698.321.56
1.123.445.51
1.174,073.69

33,661.876.23


1927-28



Gourdes
61,168.80
20,993.24
4.936.597.14
3.291.804.10

6.131.30
2.502.325.52
4.068.426.87
1.907.633.64
880,237.74
20.851.28
2.900,380.06
21.687.904.75
1.553,467.62
1.244.170.74

45.082.092.80


1928-29



Gourdes
11.962.40
22,804.23
4,605.834.01
2.832,663.98
62,863.70
4.926.31
2.041.322.95
2.950.342.36
1.765.515.10
784.514.31
26,053.25
1.498.540.79
16.065.576.58
1.557,766.80
1.016.963.23

35.247.650.00


1929-30



Gourdes
41,011.15
10.285.09
3.789,680.04
2.411.579.06
35,418.25
2.937.22
1.791,977.39
2.522.230.06
1.842.259.93
673,819.20
16.415.20
1.728,672.12
13,709,825.70
1.298,046.55
964,917.79


1930-31



Gourdes
13,244.22
10,077.01
2.275.844.14
2.211.866.73
60.512.65
2,075.66
1.401.898.37
2,052.178.31
1.264.035.04
762.909.65
16.907.19
1.446.138.93
12.173.513.16
804.222.97
1,067,359.95


30.839,074.75 25.562,783.98


Average
1916-17 to
1930-31


Gourdes
131,766.74
6,485.83
3.532,606.51
2.648,961.80
36.133.30
1,780.57
1.672.199.48
2.615.990.66
1.224.891.31
532,364.85
12.048.37
1.775.547.66
13.077.130.97
1.148.470.68
1.009,561.92

29.425,940.65













78 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER

TABLE No. 37

CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Aquin ...........
Belladire ...........
Cap Haitien ...................
Cayes ........................
Fort Liberti ..................
G lore ........................
Gonaives ......................
Jacm el .......................
Jirim ie ......................
Miragoine ...........
Ouanamintb ..........
Petit Golve ...................
Port-au-Prince .................
Port-de-Paix ..................
Saint Marc ....................

T otal ........ ...........


Imports


Gourdes
300.57
7,797.50
1,524,141.83
1,203.611.65
12,301.58
1,937.26
713,576.07
753,314.39
524,745.18
213,315.00
15.989.99
325,302.39
10,580,989.21
381,220.14
418,538.64

16,677.081.40


Exports


Gourdes
12.750.40
33.00
748,685.69
1,005,308.20
47,841.12

685,968.10
1,297,128.12
737,318.21
547.399.55
246.92
1.118,517.94
1,555,380.48
419,254.83
645,377.40

8,821,209.96


Miscellaneous


Gourdes
193.25
2,246.51
3,016.62
2.946.88
369.95
138.40
2.354.20
1,735.80
1,971.65
2,195.10
670.28
2,318.60
37,143.47
3,748.00
3,443.91

64,492.62


Total


Gourdes
13,244.22
10,077.01
2.275,844.14
2.211,866.73
60,512.65
2,075.66
1,401.898.37
2,052,178.31
1,264.035.04
762,909.65
16,907.19
1,446.138.93
12,173,513.16
804,222.97
1,067,359.95

25,562,783.98


TABLE No. 38
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND BY MONTHS
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

Imports Exports Miscellaneous Total


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October .................. ....... 1,868,924.86 953,565.73 6,743.55 2,829.234.14
November ..................... 1,765,893.23 861,185.78 10,706.99 2.637,786.00
December .......... ............. 1,719,642.37 1.146,991.70 4,884.95 2,871,519.02
January .......... ... ........... 1,355,575.20 1,082.909.77 5.140.33 2.443,625.30
February ...................... 1,239,446.86 849,783.92 5,191.65 2,094,422.43
March .................... ....... 1,340,042.62 934.908.89 4,076.91 2,279.028.42
April .... ................... .1,179,427.18 858,465.15 5.182.78 2,043.075.11
May ..... ...................... 1,146.024.94 577,781.83 4,939.11 1,728,745.88
June ..................... ... 1,217,637.82 472,776.51 4,435.92 1,694,850.25
July ......................... 1,270640.99 367,994.12 4,341.22 1,642,976.33
August ... ............... 1.301,591.23 279.652.67 4,364.94 1,585,608.84
September ... ................ 1,272,234.10 435.193.89 4,484.27 1,711,912.26

Total ............. ......... 16,677,081.40 8,821,209.96 64,492.62 25.562,783.98


TABLE No. 39
DISTRIBUTION OF CUSTOMS RECEIPTS-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31

Receipts Receipts Miscellaneous
from from customs
imports exports receipts Total


Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cenm
1916-17 .................. ..... ........ 53.45 46.52 .03 100.00
1917-18..................... ............ 51.45 48.46 .09 100.00
1918-19 ................................. 42.61 57.34 .05 100.00
1919-20 ......... .................... 58.92 40.98 .10 100.00
1920-21....................... ...... 54.44 45.39 .17 100.00
1921-22................. ........... .. 56.69 43.13 .18 100.00
1922-23................. ........... 57.60 42.18 .22 100.00
1923-24 .......... ..................... 64.83 33.34 1.83 100.00
1924-25 ......... ....... ...... 65.60 29.70 4.70 100.00
1925-26 ........ ............ .. 64.46 31.19 4.35 100.00
1926-27. ...... ................ 70.03 29.75 .22 100.00
1927-28 ....... ............... ... 68.62 31.14 .24 100.00
1928-29 ........ .............. ... 71.76 27.92 .32 100.00
1929-30 ...... ............. .... .. 61.01 38.75 .24 100.00
1930-31 ................................ 65.24 34.51 .25 100.00

Average ............................ 61.81 37.14 1.05 100.00




S--- TABLE No. 40
INTERNAL REVENUE RECEIPTS BY SOURCES FISCAL YEARS 1919-20 TO 1930.31


Excise:
Alcohol from cane
juice .........
Alcohol from other
matter .....
Malt liquors ......
Spirituous liquors...
Vinous liquors.....
Cigars ...........
Cigarettes ........
Manufactured tobacco

Total .........
Circulation tax on bank
notes ..........
Consular fees........
Court fees ..........
Diploma fees .......
Documentary recording
fees ............
Emigration fees......
Fines and penalties....
Income tax .........
Irrigation tax .......
Occupational tax on fo.
reigners .........
Official gazette.......
Patent and trade mark fees
Post office box rentals.
Public auction fees....
Public land rentals....
Stamp receipts:
Bank checks ......
Commercial account
books .........
Documentary stamps
Postage .........
Stamped paper ....
Stock and bond tax..
Telegraph and telephone
service ..........
Visas of manifests ....
Vital statistics fees....
Water service rents...
Miscellaneous .......

Total .........


Average
1919-20 to
1923.24


Gourdes




..........








81.728.11
7.147.06


252.579.03
239.884.20
1.886.01
281.810.55
6.995.21'

175,397.56
1.071.90
6.884.50
7.521.62
5,095.12
74,668.37

7.987.74

2.908.72
185,179.25
128,547.82
107.518.78
26,364.99

176.774.07
5.932.96
33.208.69
179.307.97
175.381.22

2.171.781.45


1924-25



Gourdes













34,615.93
152.914.40
7.919.87
574.75

288.784.19
945,022.90
24,770.82
625,086.64
8.543.14

208.045.27
1.220.20
5.700.00
11.348.90
1.463.34
177.919.02

15.915.40

4.643.20
371,795.54
195.755.00
55.620.51
55.099.40

541.103.31
5.237.50
94.034.03
240.533.54
15.839.39

4.089.506.19


1925-26



Gourdes

. .

.. . .


. .





53.827.22
157,080.30
8.293.50
2.650.00

304.368.31
1.014.012.50
4,222.25
503.202.81
11,027.95

239.062.51
1.025.00
15.982.50
12.129.25
2.612.06
191.390.71

18.280.30

6.043.89
403.171.62
197.485.43
52.565.15
63,089.91

580,979.77
3.680.00
90,531.14
216.222.78
2.233.42

4.155.170.28


1926-27


1927-28


1928-29 1929-30


Gourrde Gourdes Gourdes


21,142.80
127.984.45
8,798.05
1.809.50

332.337.12
960,933.75
5.309.00
533.757.96
10,296.10

245,150.50
960.00
11.832.50
12.529.26
2.992.95
213.850.77

18.737.00

4,285.85
368.841.38
210,119.85
65.301.25
51,280.21

574,002.81
1.095.OC
78.949.43
221.478.70
69.511.71

4,153.287.97


32.400.36

68.40
2,389.20
1,862.55
19,162.56
1,797.75
1,727.75
2.330.08

61.738.65

51.593.47
151,597.80
9.151.75
200.00

354,451.96
635,082.50
1,563.75
595.599.14
10.635.14

251,507.20
854.00
12.925.00
12.991.40
2.947.53
268.626.01

24.289.2C

3,698.40
406.315.32
187,202.84
72.471.87
53.709.28

685,821.80
1.075.0C
93.622.33
231.085.55
60.863.25

4.241.620.14


1.058.838.97

172,455.45
53.100.19
16.305.00
137,814.14
34.176.80
327.229.33
463.898.49

2.263.818.37

27,381.09
115.819.40
8.819.94
52.50

369,447.08
278.875.00
6,426.36
530,993.96
13,104.57

280.405.55
826.00
10,946.35
12,109.90
694.03
270.005.83

19,306.30

4,202.60
404.841.70
212,416.67
66.287.60
62,506.20

740.677.20
1,150.00
79.841.44
244,926.15
9,383.01

6,035.264.80


1


--


Average
1919-20 to
1930-31


Gourdes


1.091,466.89

373,745.67
59,070.30
15,913.35
101,870.80
34,740.48
383,229.70
672,441.56

'2.732.478.75

3.215.97
110,498.35
6,850.75
86.25

359,118.11
128.625.00
5,432.77
666,327.25
12.479.38

363.862.68
802.00
11.975.00
14,635.51
472.98
267.436.07

20.517.20

3,611.50
424,367.06
258.328.72
58.370.69
57.560.38

791.129.48
3.932.50
61,934.06
236,833.20
19,282.43

6.620.164.04


1930-31



Gourdes


462.964.60

434.163.10
51.099.00
11,209.07
89.485.65
19.251.63
350.347.25
471.422.04

1,889.942.34


98.281.95
5.808.25
33.75

345.761.25

11.470.45
538.841.68
10.471.63

314.446.65
654.00
7.015.00
11.762.54
515.82
223,460.58

18.265.8C

2.833.25
329,848.25
214,157.03
49.125.10
57,296.50

727.955.11
6.387.50
56.506.91
221.600.50
17.971.49

5.160.413.33


Gourdes

220.472.56

81.702.71
13.804.88 a
3,774.16 m
29.027.76 O
7.497.24
88.544.50 -
134,174.35 O

578,998.16 -4

15,981.37
110.234.76 Z
7.614.78
450.57

301,430.26
430.164.38 0
5,718.78
-450,238.51
9.294.47

231,622.35
975.06 t
9,233.28 m
10.426.23 g
3,097.86
165.502.57

14.604.15 0

3,655.29
302,923.09 I
176.517.05
79,778.00
44.363.90

460,461.65
4.351.85
60.121.89
209.101.68
89,332.56

3,776.194.50










80 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER

TABLE No. 41

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND BY MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

Interest on
governmental Conversion
deposits of francs Miscellaneous Total


Gourde Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October .............................. 243.561.20 18.922.50 1,897.26 264,380.96
November .......................... 19,046.05 18,323.80 2.836.07 40.205.92
December ............................. 44230.05 18,958.20 69.00 63.257.25
January .......................... 16,607.85 18.299.80 3,759.00 38,666.65
February .................... 31.104.35 18.909.80 940.00 50.954.15
March ....................... 16.654.35 18,873.60 1,049.50 36,577.45
April .. ......................... 280,464.20 17.036.20 1,427.45 298.927.85
May .. .......................... 17.875.40 18,873.50 1,123.73 37.872.63
June .. ....................... 37.969.60 18.276.25 1.007.50 57,253.35
July ........................ 24.670.10 18,897.45 1,126.75 44.694.30
August ............................ 34.883.85 18.287.70 8,883.00 62.054.55
September ..... ..................... 670.85 18,909.35 8,959.81 28,540.01
Total ............ ......... 767.737.85 222,568.15 33,079.07 1,023,385.07






HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 81














TABLE No. 42
TOTAL RECEIPTS OF HAITIAN. GOVERNMENT BY SOURCES, MONTHS AND PORTS
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31

October November December January February March April May June July August September Total


Gourdes ourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Goud rdeous Gous ourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gouds oude rdes
Customs Receipts:
Aquin ...... ......................... 434.82 1,237.23 850.84 306.07 1,471.65 ..... 31.88 2,529.09 709.39 17.64 718.99 4,936.62 13,244.22
Belladire ............................. 649.05 2.172.43 824.80 757.00 1,076.30 1,626.00 596.5C 950.00 308.05 137.25 435.85 543.78 10,077.01
Cap Haitien ......... ................... 351.408.54 243,705.67 287,751.06 253,185.25 122,840.59 190,202.08 152.956.38 132,053.95 156.339.74 116,988.57 115;628.53 152,783.78 2,275,844.14
Cayes ................. ............... 257,560.09 207,006.13 229,308.28 220,898.08 267.389.05 160,415.88 139,518.17 146.943.00 188,127.10 148,223.16 86,252.50 160,225.29 2.211,866.73
Fort Libert. .................. ............ 17.26 86.80 1,080.30 8,199.95 11,889.52 3.685.40 546.20 2,995.32 4,464.52 7,735.79 18,214.98 1,596.61 60,512.65
Glore ............... ................ 258.40 180.00 150.00 137.80 ..... 3.75 341.50 432.30 361.00 149.80 17.91 43.20 2,075.66
Gonaives ............................ 188,906.21 177,569.74 155,366.05 142,871.95 96,343.25 102,598.16 127,463.66 112,663.46 61,453.96 57.940.14 82,787.35 95,934.44 1.401,898.37
Jacmel .............................. 225,858.93 184,775.26 213,980.03 194,397.50 165,641.97 188.394.30 188,582.28 128,855.39 100,033.83 139.366.28 166,496.97 155,795.57 2.052,178.31
Jirlmie ............. .................. 175,582.69 160.619.46 225.496.31 146.757.27 73.009.60 57.305.82 84,204.63 79,267.56 70,679.22 91.676.17 58,282.59 41,153.72 1,264,035.04
Miragoine ........ .. ................ 78,495.52 68,734.29 110,897.08 56,598.64 59,551.73 60,808.93 93,475.49 52.704.56 50,712.23 47.761.78 31,764.00 51,405.40 762,909.65
Ouanaminthe ......................... .. 1.790.30 3,121.32 1,321.59 1,478.18 1.315.75 2,351.89 982.71 602.82 349.93 1.097.69 1,301.64 1.193.37 16,907.19
Petit Govre ................. ............ 83,643.10 142,904.14 185,836.36 183,148.09 134,535.78 180,250.66 134,397.40 105.129.74 103.618.21 93,593.55 44,082.38 54,999.52 1,446,138.93
Port-au-Prince .. ........................ 1,231,711.68 1,250,328.04 1,229.574.73 1.052.940.25 1.002.659.34 1,140.714.52 952.961.62 821,735.50 844,487.05 872,287.01 884.847.37 889,266.05 12,173,513.16
Port-de-Paix .. ......................... 114.934.26 80,035.84 127,906.87 59,272.33 64,637.23 50,651.64 55,462.85 67,428.75 56,328.60 37,892.40 31.794.82 57,877.38 804,222.97
Saint Marc ...... ..................... .. 117,983.29 115,309.65 101,174.72 122,676.94 92,060.67 140,019.39 111.553.84 74,454.44 56.877.42 28.109.10 62,982.96 44,157.53 1,067.359.95
Total customs receipts. ................... 2,829.234.14 2,637.786.00 2,871,519.02 2.443.625.30 2,094,422.43 2,279,028.42 2.043,075.11 1,728.745.88 1,694,850.25 1.642,976.33 1,585,608.84 1,711,912.26 25,562,783.98
Internal revenue receipts:
Administration Port-au-Prince ............... 493.454.37 306,135.20 306,956.05 423,340.19 258,103.88 284.833.14 372,859.66 201,410.74 210,371.69 257,052.59 196,179.92 206,365.85 3,517,063.28
Aquin ........................... 1,758.50 667.70 737.75 608.90 630.60 542.75 662.65 314.00 425.31 828.76 511.64 559.31 8,247.87
Cap Haitien.......... ......... 83,868.98 30,782.28 34,502.15 20,243.72 16,342.94 25.814.72 36,751.33 25,117.90 22,447.94 24,782.68 22,810.48 23,515.16 366,980.28
Cayes ....... .......... ............... 44.432.18 26,035.72 31,846.05 27.485.82 23,445.51 24,180.45 28.423.61 15,914.79 12,825.52 17,833.51 12,887.79 15,439.03 280.749.98
Fort Libert ..... .................. ...... 3,399.17 1,881.61 9,526.12 703.93 6,340.58 867.10 1,248.13 3,044.80 1,887.24 726.31 967.15 1,319.21 31,911.35
Gonaives ....... .... .............. 41.747.12 12.766.72 10,172.12 16,888.01 8,113.26 13,591.12 20,300.47 9,115.70 7.764.89 10,441.30 7,628.68 6,437.62 164,967.01
Jacmel ...... ................ ..... 26.297.40 11,083.55 14.033.73 12,642.95 12.117.65 12,318.60 19,004.63 11.199.00 9,223.80 14,178.35 8,204.85 8,774.10 159,078.61
Jirimie ................27,505.57 12,009.99 13.847.84 10,806.41 8,059.42 10,636.41 11.846.87 8.389.74 7.593.11 7,588.22 6,589.70 8,746.10 133,619.38
Miragolne ......... ........ 9.904.39 4.021.92 4,391.16 4,627.73 5,288.12 4,132.48 4.647.83 2,459.44 2.338.09 2,287.30 2,140.19 2,505.35 48,744.00
Prtit Ger... ................... 26,838.85 12,462.10 11,212.22 9,759.59 9,511.79 10,119.19 17,689.30 7,305.91 7,021.15 7,851.06 5,236.78 8,673.02 133,680.96
Port-de-Paix ........................... 28.675.47 7,710.89 11,340.26 8,657.52 8,360.70 9,915.63 10,854.77 9,639.05 7.038.49 8,485.18 6.474.30 5,732.50 122,884.76
Saint Marc............................... 45.463.84 14,510.61 11,961.78 13,752.31 14.457.86 22.671.57 29.570.96 13,656.52 9,387.11 7,117.32 4,824.13 5,111.84 192,485.85
Total internal revenue receipts ......... .. 833,345.84 440,068.29 460,527.23 549.517.08 370.772.31 419,623.16 553.860.21 307,567.59 298,324.34 359.172.58 274.455.61 293,179.09 5.160.413.33
Miscellaneous receipts:
Port-au-Prince ... ........ .......... 264.380.96 40,205.92 63,257.25 38,666.65 50.954.15 36,577.45 298.927.85 37,872.63 57.253.351 44.694.30 62,054.55 28,540.01 1.023,385.07

Total revenue receipts ......... ......... 3.926,960.94 3.118.060.21 3,395.303.50 3.031.809.03 2,516.148.89 2,735,229.03 2,895,863.17 2,074.186.10 2.050,427.94 2.046,843.21 1.922,119.00 2,033,631.36 31,746.582.38
Non revenue receipts........................ .......... ...' .'27.. ...........0. ... ......... .............

Total receipts ...... ...................... 3.926,960.94 3.118.060.21 3.395.303.50 3,031.809.03 2.516.148.89 2.735,229.03 2.895.863.17 2.074.186.10 2.050.427.94 2.046,843.21 1.922,119.00 2.033,631.36 31.746.582.38








HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER

















TABLE No. 43
ORDINARY SUPPLEMENTARY AND EXTRAORDINARY APPROPRIATIONS FROM REVENUE
FISCAL YEARS 1925-26 TO 1930-31


Department or Service


Public debt:
Financial Adviser-General Receiver .........
Internal Revenue Service ................
Series A loan. ........................
Series B loan. ....... ................
Series C loan ... ......................
Miscellaneous debt items. .................
Fiduciary currency .....................
International institutions ................
P. C. S. railroad subvention....... .......
Wharf Co. subvention ..................
Cable Co. subvention ....................

Total public debt .................


Guard ................................
Foreign relations ........................
Finance ...............................
Commerce .............................
Interior ...............................
Public Health Service. ....................
Public W orks ..........................
Public W orks Service .....................
Justice ....... ........................
A agriculture .... .......................
Agricultural Service ......................
Labor ................................
Public Instruction. .......................
R religion ..............................

Total appropriated from revenue......
Total revenue. ....................
Total expenditures from revenue .......


1925-26


Ordinary and
supplementary



Gourdes

1,698.379.86
539.944.84
6,908,047.60
2.148.625.00
1,141.421.00

420,000.00

206,400.00
201,000.00
120.000.00

13,383,818.30


6,151.035.64
636,886.08
880,580.00
268.760.00
1,262.257.60
2.250.000.00
42.233.00
4.618,000.00
1.413,835.60
43,112.60
1,745,000.00
366.000.00
2.111,689.19
401,709.30

35.574,917.31
45.364,648.10
40.930.725.08


Extraor- Ordinary and
dinary supplementary


Gourdes

. .
. .












89,000.00
5.000.00


25,000.00
1.235,140.00

3.373,53 0.00
4.580.00

80,500.00
270,100.00



5,082.850.00


Gourdes

2.278,241.30
540,000.00
6,637,370.05
2.065.682.40
1.099.239.70

420,000.00
53,600.00
206,400.00
250.000.00


13,550,533.45


6,433.160.89
558,960.00
909,180.00
262.170.00
1.170,558.00
3,070,634.17
42.500.00
5.338.770.00
1,404,065.00
43.910.00
2,025,700.00
447.800.00
2,092.293.00
402.832.50

37.753.067.01
38.861,534.79
39.747.163.75


1926-27


Extraor-
dinary



Gourdes

. .
. .












20,000.00

25,000.00
20,500.00
107,500.00


789,600.00
3.000.00

220,000.00

1,000.00


1.186,600.00


1927-28


1929-30


1930-31


Ordinary and
supplementary



Gourdes

1,884.994.88
600,000.00
6,985,999.80
2,160,624.98
1,157.125.09

420,000.00
53,600.00
206,400.00
250,000.00


13.718,744.75


6.374,782.86
608,960.00
904,980.00
269,865.00
1,183,434.80
3,167,940.00
42,500.00
5,668,800.00
1.447,395.00
43,910.00
2,130,000.00
618,500.00
2,089,368.00
426,337.50

38.695,517.91
50,421.016.49
40.977.914.49


Extraor-
dinary



Gourdes

. .















9.900.00

116,.889.00
1.025.335.00
5,728.000.00


422.500.00
10,000.00
8,000.00
52.500.00
52,500.00

7,373.124.00


1928


Ordinary and
supplementary



Gourdes

1.864,702.40
799,076.94
7.014.000.00
2.166,625.00
1.162.281.30

422,322.50
53,600.00
206,400.00



13.689.008.14


6,372.842.40
605,100.00
904,680.00
314,282.50
1.132.208.00
3,603,230.00
44,240.00
5,458.200.00
1.317,755.00
43.910.00
2.471,000.00
620,000.00
2.131,008.00
457.765.00

39.165.229.04
42,521.528.40
44.119.503.94


-29



Extraor-
dinary



Gourdes


. .
. .












30,000.00
15.560.00
161,791.35
38,600.00
301,740.00
209.000.00

2,411.956.50


12,500.00
10.000.00

75.000.00

3,266.147.85
...........


Ordinary and
supplementary



Gourdes

1,541.953.74
993,024.61
7,010,000.00
2.067,000.13
1,162,437.50

205.900.00
57,600.00
206.400.00



13,244.315.98


6,428,607.02
616.944.36
885,980.00
338.360.00
1,155,808.00
3,878,229.92
38,190.00
5.295,634.00
1,.322,095.00
44,000.00
2,351,666.60
711,070.18
2.104,856.00
457,672.50

38.873.429.56
38.648.163.39
40.643.229.50


SExtraor-
dinary



Gourdes

i . .
. . .












108.125.00



261,520.00
133.502.00

202,900.00






706,047.00


Ordinary and
supplementary



Gourdes

1,278,139.20
774,062.00
5.779,999.80
1,788.000.00
956,781.20

141,600.00
57,600.00
. .



10,776,182.20


6,253.455.08
617,157.62
852.040.00
323.370.00
1.826,919.00
3,784,588.44
30,140.00
5.043.167.77
1.3 00,895.00
43,360.00
1,912,820.00
646.000.00
2.113.564.00
438,592.50

35,962.251.61
31.746,582.38
36.190.070.45


1931-32
(as of Oct.
1, 1931)


Ordinary



Gourdes

1,290,000.00
596,250.00
5,803,500.00
1.794,000.00
959.937.40
.. .. .........

57,600.00
206,400.00



10,707.687.40


5,568.240.00
543.637.50
850,057.00
316,677.00
1.561,835.10
2.742,804.78
27,018.00
3,996,428.42
1.249,365.75
80,427.00
1.537,602.87
569,185.00
1.829,995.05
419,016.60

31.999.977.47


Extraor-
dinary



Gourdes



S. ..
. . .










150,000.00
10.239.00

25,000.00
311,077.29
125,000.00

218.073.53






839.389.82


-








HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 83







TABLE No. 44

REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES-FISCAL YEARS 1923-24 TO 1930-31

1923-24 1924-25 1925-26 1926-27 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30 1930-31


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
REVENUES
Customs ............... 29,950,907.14 35,750.018.34 40.594.831.74 33.661,876.23 45,082,092.80 35,247,650.00 30.839,074.75 25.562.783.98
Internal revenue .......... 2,795.870.53 4,089.926.19 4,155.170.28 4,153,287.97 4.241.620.14 6.035.264.80 6,620.164.04 5.160,413.33
Miscellaneous ................ 155.543.66 647,722.47 614,646.08 1.046.370.59 1,097.303.55 1.238,613.60 1.188,924.60 1.023,385.07

Total revenue ........ 32.902,321.33 40,487,667.00 45,364,648.10 38,861,534.79 50,421.016.49 42.521,528.40 38,648.163.39 31.746,582.38
Non fiscal receipts..... ............ 69,855.47 2,600.00 3,988.00 83,761.32 ...... ...........

Total receipts......... 32,902,321.33 40,557.522.47 45.367.248.10 38.865.522.79 50.504.777.81 42.521.528.40 38,648.163.39 31,746.582.38

EXPENDITURES
Public debt:
Financial Adviser-General
Receiver ............. 1.118.917.23 1.849.537.49 1.698.379.86 2.278.241.30 1.884.994.88 1.864,702.40 1,729,289.80 1.443.140.97
Internal Revenue Service... 73,478.88 342,928.16 304,198.76 306,308.68 462.010.33 799,076.94 993,017.74 770.681.47
Series A loan........... 5.589,864.50 7,336.491.75 6.908.047.60 6.637.370.05 6.960.374.65 6.999.195.50 7.001.587.15 5.763.933.75
Series B loan........... 1,695,970.36 2.453,151.14 2,148,625.00 2.065.682.40 2.160.624.98 2,166,625.00 2,067,000.13 1.788,000.00
Series C loan .......... 928.174.00 1,209.067.5! 1.141.421.00 1,099.239.70 1,157.060.69 1,153,170.05 1,158.220.10 953.947.55
Interior consolidated debt. . 195.839.01 . . .
Fiduciary currency ... .... ............. 420.000.00 420,000.00 420.000.00 420,000.00 422.322.50 205,900.00 141.600.00
Commissions paid to Banque
National ........ .. 828.227.51 27,958.63 ...... .... ...... ... ...... ....
Haitian Construction Co. note 433.915.00 ..... ...... ..... .. ... ... ...... .....
Roberts Dutton Co. claim 277,872.35 ...... ... .. .. .. .......................
Stamp sales, discounts, and ....... ... .... ..........
expenses ............. 13,285.42 3.191.31
International institutions... .. ......... .. ..... ...... 57.629.15 45,606.95 50.322.55 52,824.17 22,290.00
P. C. S. Railroad subventior 206,400.00 206,400.00 206,400.00 ............ ..................
Wharf company subvention 524,564.28 268.833.26 247,706.25 67,463.85 521.28 ... ... ......
Cable company subvention. 480,000.00 120,000.00 90,000.04 ........... .. ........... ......

Total .............. 12,170.669.53 14.433.403.3' 13,164.778.51 12,931.935.13 13.091.193.76 13.455.414.94 13.207,839.09 10,883,593.74
Guard .................. 5,322,449.22 5,579.242.54 6.062.415.34 6.496.006.55 6,427,467.21 6.368.579.33 6,459,654.24 6,326.038.78
Foreign Relations ......... 734,199.47 619,953.31 635,084.64 555,375.62 579.224.57 555,875.63 572,039.59 616,289.14
Finance ..... ........... 1.520.366.84 1.197.945.9f 1.062.756.19 827.576.63 634.374.38 721,811.41 681,569.38 966,912.91
Commerce .... ......... .. ......... 230.051.46 247.935.91 255,063.06 257.730.29 329.739.51 311,957.67 344,408.20
Interior ............. .... 1,363,403.06 1.208,067.76 1,224.369.56 1,229.080.99 1.241.170.42 1,265,557.13 1,494.643.19 1,589,833.75
Public Health Service...... 1.529,057.91 2,223,059.14 2,852.485.58 3,444.301.76 3.631.024.09 4,435,428.67 4,040,662.71 3.900,302.82
Public Works .............. 961,336.20 703.416.57 92,287,98 34.789.54 34.110.49 43,575.89 37,462.49 29,566.00
Public Works Service...... 5.895,159.05 7,533.943.51 9.082,496.06 7.166,798.42 8,435,445.55 9,621.862.65 6,837.531.17 5.171,684.81
Justice ..... ......... .. 1.372,533.28 1.333,838.31 1.395.153.62 1.369,351.38 1.333,376.69 1,297.719.99 1.309.419.18 1.294.973.13
Agriculture ......... .... 148,288.24 44.258.8t 41,426.15 43,039.34 43,611.39 43,105.13 42,956.98 42,480.87
Agricultural Service........ 434,445.89 1,526.891.70 2.185,104.58 2.452.380.38 2.170.007.41 2.815.688.95 2,408,006.25 1,899.038.68
Labor ....... ........ ..... 274.393.63 530,646.65 557,200.68 615,663.31 595.387.22 759,615.76 639,712.63
Public Instruction. .......... 2.306.194.25 1,942,599.20 1.965,167.09 1.996.720.01 2.059,021.14 2,053,664.29 2.055.190.00 2.076,742.28
Religion ..................... 457,393.00 367.136.7. 388.617.22 387,544.26 424,493.79 516.093.20 424.681.82 408.492.71
Total expenditures from
revenue .......... 34.215,495.94 39.218,202.02 40.930.725.08 39,747,163.75 40,977,914.49 44,119.503.94 40.643.229.52 36,190,070.45
Awards of the claims commission ........... 1,191.045.20 '1.671,072.85 8.015.25 ............ ...... ..
National Railroad construction, ......... .. 1.553,756.20 545.995.05 ......... 90.00 ..
Miscellaneous ........... ............ ........... 1.842,247.55 3,889,422.08 2.183,489.38 914,152.25 1,204.072.89 711,306.06

Total payments ....... 34.215.495.94 41.963,003.42 44.990,040.53 43.644,601.08 43.161.313.87 45.033.656.19 41,847.302.41 36.901.376.51
Pension deductions ........ ............ 151,460.29 91.430.92 103,264.06 ............ ...... ......
Net payments......... 34.215,495.94 41.811,543.13 44,898.609.61 43.541.337.02 43.161.313.87 45,033.656.19 41.847.302.41 36.901.376.51

Revenue over expenditures. .... ........ ...... 1.269,464.98 4,433,923.02 ..... ...... 9,443.102.00 ...... ...........
Expenditures over revenues ... 1,313,174.61 ......... ... ........... 885.628.96 ............. 1,597,975.54 1.995,066.13 4.443.488.07
Credit.














TABLE No. 45


FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES -FISCAL YEAR 1930--31


Function


L legislative ........................ ......
Judicial ........... .. ...... ....... ....
Executive:
G general ................. ..... .. .....
Foreign affairs ............. .............
Financial administration............. ......
Trade promotion. ........................
H health ......................... ......
Police ... .. .. .. ......... ... .. .. ......
Agricultural development ...................
Fisheries ...................... .......
Education ..............................
Religion ....................... .....
Transportation ..............
Communications .......... ......
Municipal:
Streets ...................... .....
Sewers and drains.................... .
W ater service ........................
Other municipal................ ... ...
Currency and banking ............. ......
P public works ..................... .......
Non functional:
Public debt ................. .......
Pensions ............. .......
Printing office and storehouses.... .. .......
Communes, individuals and companies .

Total expenditures. ............ .. .


Administration
and
operation



Gourdes
675,649.22
1,263.150.63

1,231,742.68
626,411.64
2,145,441.90
197,788.20
3.372,611.01
5.846,728.52
1,017,836.00

3,857.459.33
375,256.71
96,196.31
658,916.28

665,099.29

163,531.18


1,096.646.19



817,389.06


24,107,854.15


Repairs and
maintenance



Gourdes
834.00
640.00

60.146.07
381.00
11,069.92
71.313.34
67,486.08
18.528.48
50,076.63

41.279.04
640.00
1.310,425.64
45,601.52

147.062.44
. . .
75.605.05
. . .

98.021.04



334.465.73*


1,664,644.52


*Credit


Acquisition
of property



Gourdes
8,488.20
3,342.50

32.564.96
4,257.50
28,521.89
31.008.81
329.145.76
25,856.54
114,250.99

198,424.90
246.00
707,654.03
6.647.65

227,409.04

166.658.84


93,873.33



436,206.42*


1,542.144.52


Fixed
charges



Gourdes



2.781.78
22,290.00
307.231.97

46.487.73

6,261.25

118,572.67
32.350.00







141,600.00


8,505.881.30
312.053.03



9,495,509.73


Trust fund
repayments



Gourdes





. . .


. . .

















91.223.59

91.223.59
. . .
. . .
. . .







. . .
. . .

. . .
. . .
. . .
91 ..22. 9 .


Total
expenditures



Gourdes
684,971.42
1,267,133.13

1,327.235.49
653,340.14
2.492.265.68
300,110.35
3,815,730.58
5,891.113.54
1,188.424.87

4,215.735.94
408,492.71
2,114.275.98
711,165.45

1.039,570.77

405.795.07

141,600.00
1,288,54.56

8,505.881.30
312.053.03
46.716.91
91,223.59

36,901,376.51


Percentage
of total
expenditures




1.86
3.43

3.60
1.77
6.75
.81
10.34
15.97
3.22

11.42
1.11
5.73
1.92

2.82

1.10

.38
3.49

23.05
.85
.13
.25

100.00













TABLE No. 46



CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Department or Service


General Receiver ........................................
Internal Revenue Service ............................ ....
Public debt. ...........................................
Subventions ............................... ..........
G uard ........ ........... ..... ....... .
Foreign Relations ......................................
Finance ... ........... ...................... .........
Commerce ...... ..... ..... ..................
Interior- ............................... .......... .
Public Health Service......................................
Public W orks......... ................... .. ....
Public W orks Service ...................................
Justice .................................................
A agriculture ........... .................... .. .......
A agricultural Service................. ... ..
Labor ......... ......... .........
Public Instruction ......................................
Religion ..... ........................................

Total expenditures from revenue................. ....
Non fiscal expenditures ..................................

Total expenditures ..................................
Percentage ............... .......................

*Credit


Administration
and
operation



Gourdes
1,166.265.29
702.475.22


6.219.848.53
603,050.64
627.857:47
337.198.05
1.545,296,47
3,479.533.54
29,426.0(1
2.479,406.65
1,288,670.63,
38,390.87
1.833,861.88
595,671.20
2,022.186.84
375,256.71

23.344.395.99
763,458.16

24.107,854.15
65.33


Repairs and
maintenance



Gourdes
9,703.22
842.10
. . .

62,116.31
381.00
550.50
791.20
3.880.50
S67.870.34
115.00.
1.792.345.26"
640.00
130.00
5,425.32
774.88
590.00
640.00

1,946.795.63
282,151.11*

1.664.644.52
4.51


Acquisition
of property



Gourdes
11,544.62
15,760.02


44,073.94
12,857.50
23,060.13
6.418.95
10,056.78
318,535.96
25.00
899,932.90
3.342.50

39,931.75
5.744.55
11,838.50
246.00

1.403,369.10
138,775.42

1.542,144.52
4.18


Fixed
charges



.Gourdes
255,627.84
51,604.13
8,647.481.30
22.290.00


315,444.81

30.600.00
34.362.98


2.320.00
3,960.00
19,819.73
37.522.00
42.126.94
32.350.00

9.495,509.73


9.495,509.73
25.73


Trust fund
repayments



Gourdes



















91.223.59

91,223.59
0.25
. . .
. . .


. . .
. . .
. . .







91.223.59.
91,22.59..


Total



Gourdes
1.443,140.9 7
770,681.47
8,647,481.30
22.290.00
6,326,038.78
616,289.14
966,912.91
344,408.20
1,589,833.75
3,900,302.82
29,566.00
5,171.684.81
1,294,973.13
42,480.87
1,899,038.68
639,712.63
2,076,742.28
408,492.71

36.190,070.45
711,306.06

36.901,376.51
100.00
















TABLE No. 47


CLASSIFICATION OF ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES
FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


Department or Service


General Receiver... ..................... ..
Internal Revenue Service ....................
Public debt .. ......................... ..
Subventions ............................. .
Guard .................................
Foreign Relations ..........................
Finance ................................
Com m erce ...............................
Interior ................
Public Health Service .......................
Public W works .. ..........................
Public Works Service .......................
Justice .................
A agriculture ..............................
Agricultural Service .. .......................
Labor ..................................
Public Instruction. ..........................
R religion ................................

Total expenditures from revenue .........
Non fiscal .. ..............................

Total expenditures ........... .......
Percentage . .....


Salaries
and wages


Gourdes
1.029.841.75
518.822.06


3.858.085.75
503.126.54
343.912.46
190,824.93
1.404,791.77
2.130.519.70
27.101.08
1.480.962.53
1.238.233.38
34,535.50
1.569.170.59
426,700.08
1.784,170.08
333,137.97

16,873,936.17
333,653.03

17,207,589.20
71.38


Supplies
and materials Transportation


Gourdes Gourdes
43,483.30 70.287.23
47.547.17 101,032.68


1.841.674.01 444.698.13
8.497.33 83.188.62
11.308.87 5.320.50
18,449.04 119,319.18
47.957.88 67,062.22
919,942.17 404.352.35
1,600.97 287.60
766,126.75 145.429.24
8.580.25 1,745.30
2.888.02 545.00
160.519.32 48.176.69
105,676.90 23,169.82
29,355.97 7.932.90
717.54 40.312.50

4.014.325.49 1.562.859.96
508,725.50 79.119.92*

4,523.050.99 1.483.740.04
18.76 6.15


*Credit


Communi-
cation service


Gourdes
2,181.85
40.00


51.558.30
6.499.15
22.933.35
6,734.90
17.104.35
13,004.00
436.35
34.279.40
16.514.70
322.35
7,276.95
2.819.70
8,769.75
1,088.70

191,563.80
64.68*

191,499.12
.79


Rents


Gourdes
2.010.00*
1.275.63


2.431.15

3.062.83
1.740.00
600.00
5.953.50

10.821.97
23,346.70

1,465.00
1.00
191.655.34


240.343.12
432.50*

239.910.62
1.00


Special and
miscellaneous


Gourdes
22,481.16
33,757.68


21.401.19
1.739.00
241.319.46
130.00
7.780.25
5.761.82

41.786.76
250.30
100.00
47.253.33
37.303.70
302.80


461.367.45
696.73

462.064.18
1.92


Total


Gourdes
1,166.265.29
702,475.22


6,219.848.53
603,050.64
627,857.47
337,198.05
1.545.296.47
3.479,533.54
29,426.00
2.479,406.65
1,288.670.63
38,390.87
1.833,861.88
595.671.20
2.022,186.84
375.256.71

23.344,395.99
763,458.16

24.107.854.15
100.00


I
I I


,


,


,


*Credit







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER 87









TABLE No. 48


REIMBURSEMENTS TO APPROPRIATIONS-FISCAL YEARS 1925-26 TO 1930-31

1925-26 1926-27 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30 1930-31


Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
General Receiver ............. ........................... 1,102.15 3,445.90 10,221.26 19,956.71 51.056.92 57,516.83
Internal Revenue Service............ ,. ............. ....... ............ ......... .915.46 5,933.75 20,308.19 26.205.45
Finance:
Pensions ........ ........................ .. ..... ......... 92,066.19 165,599.63 148,384.54 120.251.69
Public Health Service:
Materials and supplies.. ................... .... ... .. 27,069.54 9.725.37 17,527.57 53,353.97 66,868.83 37.007.63
Medical school .... ...... ................... ....... ... ...... 75,000.00 ............ 50.245.60 2,749.75 1,724:65
Sanitation and quarantine............................. 135.139.06 129.861.94 95.138.58 96,659.17 117,361.61 81,659.47
Hospitals ........ ............................ 126,590.67 146,525.91 170,573.18 190,503.24 225,508.25 208,099.26
Aid to hurricane sufferers ................................ ...... ..... ........... 4,504.30 19,501.22 ............
Guard:
Rations ........................................... 83,452.34 49,084.84 115,517.40 106,394.90 97,718.65 54.402.01
Operation and maintenance...... .................. ..... 624,851.89 674,066.14 402,173.04 414,840.26 344,923.52 2'22,965.23
Prisons ............................................ 583.45 129.48 5,584.32 69.276.54 54,297.18 34,335.43
Coast guard and light houses........................... 9.093.20 28,829.35 988.80 15,032.99 17,965.09 18,454.24
Rural police ..................................... .. ..... .. ... ........... 8.90 625.15 110.05 25.90
Public Works Service:
Public buildings ................................... ........... .. ............ .2,410.77 34,835.29 28.156.07 14,608.03
School houses ....................... ............. ............ ........... ............ 82.50 427.68 ... ..
Telegraphs and telephones ........................... ............ ............ ............ ......... ... 15.976.15 15,590.98
Streets and parks .................................... 106,390.39 127.573.11 169,622.79 167,975.95 117,898.37 91,934.84
Roads, trails and bridges .......................... .. ............ ..... ..... 27,427.98 4,084.14 36,431.02 29,720.00
W ater service .................. ..... ............. 37,742.57 37,166.15 58.340.13 43,181.23 82,120.14 41,542.49
Materials and supplies.................... ........... .......... ... ........... 520.89 8,291.34 4,509.23 7.138.36
Agricultural Service:
Administration ..................................... 121.00 216.80 1,039.20 1,176.34 26,196.91 213,170.18
Central experimental farm ................... ........... 14,078.90 29,452.16 46,903.59 51,569.43 77,562.79 63,276.26
Breeding station ................................ 493.50 4,478.70 10,033.65 3,603.97 10,108.12 4,993.75
Coffee experimental station. : ............... .. ..... .......... .......... .. 848.50 261.50 3,924.60 3,042.60
Sylviculture .......................... ............. 5,726.84 8,731.40 29,253.10 46.296.93 55.640.03 .....
Cooperative demonstration farms. ....................... ............ .......... 466.50 5,766.15 5,074.25 4,343.81
Rural farm schools ................ .................. 2271.09 971.00 2,792.10 6,143.57 5,597.16 153.00
Agricultural college .................. ................ 13,243.67 31,114.84 15,430.99 23,728.61 24,140.40 20.403.55
Development of foreign markets......................... ............. ........... 2,370.20 4,569.70 7,990.88 ....
Printing plant .................................. .. .......... ............ 43,690.75 82.854.15 72,015.29 77,127.06
Soil analysis ...................................... ............ ...... ..... 1,085.07 1,646.60 3,195.45 .....
Veterinary clinics .................. .......... ......... .. ........ 142.00 246.15 ...........
Labor:
Reform school................................... .. 9,299.80 68,694.60 247.142.56 361,207.00 416,734.58 2.769.00
Elie Dubois school................. .................. 2,018.85 2,001.60 2,908.30 4,671.25 3,808.45 2.070.00
J. B. Damier school ................................. 9,279.00 14,365.88 2,211.40 6,203.57 2.060.05 1,336.90
Industrial school Gonaives. ................... ........ ............ .. .686.10 15,568.10 7,771.72 2.650.40 2,118.40
Industrial school Jacmel .................... ........ ............ 322.20 1,295.10 2,861.30 1,070.35 2,667.97
Industrial school Cap Haitien ......................... ............ ........... 200.00 678.60 1,908.10 2,559.60
Industrial school Jiremie ............................ .... ... ............ 200.00 270.00 2.589.38 173.50
Industrial school Saint Marc........................... .. ......... .. ........... 312.00 7,162.85 659.30 420.25
Primary industrial schools ............................ ............ .... .... ...... ............ ........... 1,047.20 251.50

Total ............... .............. ........... .. 1,208.547.91 1.442,443.47 1,597,434.67 2,085.062.97 2.156,744.93 1,464,059.82







38 HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER











TABLE No. 49

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES -FISCAL YEAR 1930-31


RECEIPTS
Customs ... ...........
Internal revenue ...........
M miscellaneous .............

Total revenue ..........
Non fiscal receipts ..........

Total receipts. .........

EXPENDITURES
Public debt:
General Receiver ..........
.Internal Revenue Service...
Series A loan.............
Series B loan............
Series C loan............
Fiduciary currency........
International institutions ....

Total public debt.......
Guard .... ..............
Foreign Relations ...........
Finance ..................
Commerce ................
Interior .............. ...
Sanitary Service............
Public W orks..............
Public Works Service........
Justice .
Agriculture ...............
Agricultural Service...........
Labor .........
Public Instruction ..........
Religion .........

Total revenue payments. .
M miscellaneous ..............

Total payments........

Revenue receipts. ............
Expenditures from revenue....

Difference ................

Cumulative revenue ..........
Cumulative payments fr. rev...

Difference ...............


tCredit
*Deficit


October



Gourdes

2.829.234.14
833,345.84
264,380.96

3.926.960.94


3.926,960.94



110.705.60
69,393.80
5.749.999.80
191.218.75
951.781.20
35,000.00


7,108.099.15
419,514.68
44,271.99
46,788.88
22.919.79
123,943.70
228.419.40
2.220.00
317.609.65
106,098.31
3,305.00
140.177.29
41.507.99
167,741.64
29,614.83

8,802,232.30
77,467.72

8,879.700.02

3.926.960.94
8,802.232.30

4.875.271.36*

3.926.960.94
8.802.232.30

4,875.271.36*


November



Gourdes

2,637,786.00
440,068.29
40,205.92

3.118.060.21


3.118.060.21



121.347.92
67.943.93

98.446.00

35.000.00


322.737.85
517,233.99
44.628.34
50,522.15
18,971.06
132,572.68
279,380.48
2,485.00
397,134.91
108,239.37
3.330.00
149,892.62
51,717.41
187,134.40
37,865.20

2.303.845.46
31.186.31

2,335.031.77

3,118.060.21
2,303,845.46

814.214.75

7,045,021.15
11.106.077.76

4.061.056.61*


December


Gourdes

2.871.519.02
460.527.23
63.257.25

3,395,303.50


3.395.303.50



107.182.07
67.956.66
4,670.35
2,187.50
755.85
35,000.00


217.752.43
502,236.22
72,166.30
52,677.70
34,606.75
150,506.51
285.137.60
2.541.20
432,011.01
109.286.69
3,864.33
177.541.72
52,850.80
177,078.82
53,890.39

2,324,148.47
134.989.66

2,459,138.13

3,395.303.50
2,324.148.47

1,071,155.03

10,440,324.65
13.430.226.23

2,989,901.58*


January


Gourdes

2.443,625.30
549.517.08
38,666.65

3,031,809.03


3,031.809.03



102,434.39
63.049.84

102,693.85

35.000.00


303,178.08
508,950.35
48,363.04
57,634.29
24,739.20
109.555.71
310,387.54
2,459.55
412.693.47
106.622.32
3.370.45
152,287.62
47.106.17
173,860.27
30,186.84

2.291.394.90
1.442.46

2.292,837.36

3,031.809.03
2.291.394.90

740,414.13

13,472.133.68
15.721,621.13


February


Gourdes

2.094,422.43
370,772.31
50,954.15

2,516.148.89


2.516.148.89



99.132.55
58,313.18


. . .
4,716.30

1,600.00
1,044.80

164,806.83
531,789.13
43,347.69
69,792.34
28,628.19
107.870.37
284.050.63
2.445.00
441,149.04
103.919.67
3.589.73
162,435.07
48.317.16
171.867.96
31,193.05

2,195,201.86
20.646.38

2.215,848.24

2.516.148.89
2,195,201.86

320,947.03

15,988.282.57
17.916.822.99


2.249,487.45* 1,928,540.42*


March


Gourdes

2,279.028.42
419,623.16
36,577.45

2.735.229.03


2.735.229.03



96,552.86
62.519.18

286,596.10
102.70

14,362.25

460,133.09
503,955.07
43,959.93
50,238.02
48.391.20
121,525.23
349,247.07
2.477.66
422,237.00
106.660.90
3,332.75
139,434.66
45,521.27
171,716.27
39,044.70

2.507.874.82
10.619.26t

2.497.255.56

2.735.229.03
2,507.874.82

227,354.21

18,723,511.60
20,424,197.81

1.701.186.21*


April


Gourdes

2,043.075.11
553.860.21
298,927.85

2.895.863.17


2.895.863.17



99,153.30
55,595.95
9,263.60
357,141.50
1,316.50



522,470.85
454,101.55
42.431.32
50,837.35
25.512.64
124,571.46
360,583.37
2,378.70
380,257.03
110.014.34
3,605.00
152,019.38
48,024.10
172,284.41
31,708.61

2.480,800.11
14,930.27

2,495.730.38

2.895.863.17
2.480.800.11

415,063.06

21.619,374.77
22.905.497.92

1.286,123.15*


May


Gourdes

1,728,745.88
307,567.59
37,872.63

2,074,186.10


2.074,186.10



94,359.73
55,092.40

149.000.00
8.70*
. . .


298,443.43
523,621.63
69,284.38
50,334.89
19.911.77
110,741.07
279,448.50
2,379.25
429,107.74
109,532.47
3,545.74
146,958.14
43,360.29
171.663.63
35,872.98

2.294.205.91
39,053.70

2.333,259.61

2.074,186.10
2.294.205.91

220.019.81*

23,693.560.87
25.199.703.83

1.506.142.96*


June


Gourdes

1,694,850.25
298.324.34
57.253.35

2.050,427.94


2.050,427.94



98,095.19
65,394.25

149.000.00
. . .
. . .
986.60

313,476.04
484.919.71
48,750.45
60,517.88
30,143.24
109,929.90
287.271.29
2,456.00
416.100.53
109,130.93
3.545.38
149.284.46
57,687.41
173.571.08
28,920.13

2,275.704.43
110,133.79

2.385.838.22

2.050,427.94
2,275,704.43

225,276.49*

25,743,988.81
27,475,408.26

1.731.419.45*


July


Gourdes

1.642,976.33
359,172.58
44,694.30

2.046,843.21


2.046,843.21



88,178.59
47,930.17

447,000.00


5.896.35

589.005.11
544,187.57
57.192.44
54,778.05
27,917.32
115.604.20
362,371.51
2,364.35
368,780.97
108.912.09
3.640.00
129,674.16
42,832.25
169,932.25
29,469.80

2.606.662.07
90.586.56

2.697.248.63

2.046.843.21
2,606.662.07

559,818.86*

27,790.832.02
30.082.070.33

2,291,238.31*


August


Gourdes

1,585.608.84
274,455.61
62.054.55

1.922.119.00


1.922,119.00



84,228.56
47.489.09





131,717.65
553,747.67
49,088.57
130.343.74
26,159.85
243,538.68
353.380.65
2.550.51
407.196.65
107,063.13
3,500.83
178,900.27
47,491.92
169,305.37
28,789.78

2,432.775.27
178,166.78

2,610,942.05

1.922.119.00
2.432.775.27

510.656.27*

29.712,951.02
32.514.845.60

2,801.894.58*


Total


Gourdes

1,711,912.26
293.179.09
28,540.01

2,033,631.36


2.033.631.36



341,770.21
110,003.02





451,773.23
781,781.21
52,804.69
292,447.62
36,507.19
139,474.24
520,624.78
2.808.78
747,406.81
109,492.91
3,851.66
220.433.29
113,295.86
170,586.18
31,936.40

3.675.224.85
23,321.69

3,698,546.54

2,033,631.36
3,675.224.85

1,641,593.49*

31,746,582.38
36,190,070.45

4,443,488.07*


September


Gourdes

25,562,783.98
5,160.413.33
1.023,385.07

31.746.582.38


31.746.582.38



1.443,140.97
770.681.47
5,763,933.75
1,788.000.00
953.947.55
141.600.00
22.290.00

10.883,593.74
6,326,038.78
616.289.14
966,912.91
344,408.20
1,589.833.75
3,900.302.82
29,566.00
5.171.684.81
1.294,973.13
42,480.87
1.899.038.68
639,712.63
2.076,742.28
408,492.71

36.190.070.45
711,306.06

36.901.376.51

31,746.582.38
36,190.070.45

4,443.488.07*

.............'
.............' '

... .... ......'







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 50

REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES AND EXCESS OF REVENUES OR EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1930-31


Year



1916-17 ...............
1917-18 ...............
1918-19 ...............
1919-20 ...............
1920-21 ...............
1921-22 ..............
1922-23 ...............
1923-24 ...............
1924-25. ..............
1925-26................
1926-27................
1927-28................
1928-29................
1929-30................
1930-31. ..............

Total...............

Surplus for period........


Revenues



Gourdes
18.934,684.70
16.048.390.75
29.955,933.45
33,997.450.79
19.946.095.70
24,964.795.72
31.950.101.24
32.902.321.33
40.487,667.00
45.364.648.10
38,861,534.79
50,421,016.49
42.521.528.40
38,648,163.39
31,746,582.38

496,750,914.23

.............. I


Expenditures



Gourdes
15,884,177.80
14,614.997.45
15,499,480.45
20,646,866 25
32.788,455.90
39.775.908.40
30.560,113.15
34.215,495.94
39,218.202.02
40.930,725.08
39,747.163.75
40,977,914.49
44,119.503.94
40.643,229.52
36,190,070.45

485,812,304.59

..............


Surplus


Gourdes
3,050,506.90
1,433.393.30
14,456,453.00
13.350.584.54

1.....389.988.09

1,269.464.98
4.433.923.02

9,443,102.00



48.827.415.83

10,938,609.64


Deficit



Gourdes



12.842,360.20
14,811,112.68

1,313,174.61


885,628.96

1,597,975.54
1.995.066.13
4.443,488.07

37.888,806.19

















TABLE No. 51

TREASURY ASSETS AND LIABILITIES


September 30.
1927


ASSETS
Deposit in Banque Nationale de la Republique d'Haii. ....................
In N ew York funds .........................................
In H aiti ........................ .... ....................
Cash in hands of disbursing officers .................. ...............
Fiduciary currency reserve ........ ..............................
Advances by the government-reimbursable .............................
T otal ................................................

LIABILITIES
Extraordinary credits ................ ..... ..................
Liquidation accounts* ............................................
N on revenue credits** ......... .. .. .................................
General Receiver's five per cent fund for cust. service ...................
General Receiver's checks outstanding .................................
Claim unadjusted ...............................................
Fiduciary currency reserve-reimbursable .. ...........................
Advances by the government-reimbursable ..... ..................
Net balance (Cash working balance) ...... ........... ............
T otal ................................. .............


Gourdes

20,247.087.10
3.164.566.17
158,568.36
2,432.677.50
140.500.00

26.143.399.13

746.342.92
1.684,215.22
6,357.027.34
142.338.19
1.952.968.13
206.400.00
2,432.677.50
140,500.00
12.480.929.83

26,143.399.13


September 30,
1928


Gourdes

26.108,276.65
4.961,995.63
115,953.13
2.852.677.50
121.000.00

34.159.902.91

4.967.421.07

4,487.532.23
458.786.13
1.278.891.26
619,200.00
2.852.677.50
121.000.00
19,374,394J2


September 30.
1929


Gourdes

25.591.428.26
3.425.908.09
96.782.53
3,275,000.00
304.263.02

32.693.381.90


2.355,998.04

4.103.311.06
356,466.23
1.111.285.32
825.600.00
3.275.000.00
304.263.02
20.361,458.23


34.159.902.91 I 32,693.381.90


September 30,
1930


Gourdes

23.012,509.40
2,794,868.66
7,827.70
3,413,845.70
344,926.50

29.573.977.96


361,878.91

2,899.238.17
169.130.18
1.814.945.46
825.600.00
3.480.900.00
344.926.50
19,677.358.74

29.573.977.96


September 30,
1931


Gourdes

17,614,685.45
2.845,474.96-
10,148.33
3,622,500.00
333,327.49

24,426,136.23


363,255.02

1.907.392.99
4.128.40
907,090.83
825,600.00
3,622,500:00
333.327.49
16,462,841.50

24,426.136.23


* Includes provisions shown in previous statements for interest-internal consolidated debt and General Receiver's fifteen per cent fund for internal revenue service.
** Includes provisions shown in previous statements for awards of Claims Commission, debt retirement, public works and for repayment of cash bonds deposited.


I







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL ADVISER--GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 52
PUBLIC DEBT


September 30; 1915
September 30. 1916
September 30, 1917
September 30. 1918
September 30, 1919
September 30, 1920
September 30, 1921
September 30, 1922
September 30. 1923
September 30, 1924
September 30, 1925
September 30, 1926
September 30, 1927
September 30, 1928
September 30, 1929
September 30, 1930
September 30. 1931


Series A


Gourdes
107,821.656.45
113,455,856.35
119.089.179.15
124.722,501.95
90,556,562.00
33,487.414.30
32,225,464.30
33.505,429.95
79,235,000.00
78,242.500.00
75.183,419.30
71,474.157.35
68,939,916.15
66,039,039.40
62,751,128.35
59.190,194.70
56,712,940.95


Series B


Gourdes
37.185,657.60
38,974,237.85
42,093,154.00
45,014,560.65
48,774,145.85
51,078,637.35
53.090,682.40
52,945,770.25
25,000,000.00
23,566,980.60
21.747,462.30
19,775,074.65
14,552,976.44
13,105,431.55
11,603,630.80
10,001,593.30
8.697,405.33


Series C



Gourdes








13.158. 711.10
12,640.072.70
11.825.524.80
11.401.640.00
0,.901,321.60
-10,352,636.85
9.749.761.35
9.324.729.82


Fiduciary
currency


Gourdes
8,853,754.80
8,352,663.15
7,786.974.80
7.510.837.75
7.245,000.00
7,245,000.00
6,080.362.50
6,080,362.50
6.080,362.50
6.080.309.50
5,660,309.50
5,232,322.50
4,812.322.50
4.392,322.50
3,970,000.00
3,764.100.00
3,622,500.00


Total


Gourdes
153,861,068.85
160,782.757.35
168,969,307.95
177.247.900.35
146,575.707.85
91,811,051.65
91.396,509.20
92,531,562.70
110,315.362.50
121.048,501.20
115,231,263.80
108,307,079.30
99,706,855.09
94.438,115.05
88,677,396.00
82,705,649.35
78,357,576.10


TABLE No. 53

EXPENDITURES FROM REVENUE FOR THE PUBLIC DEBT AND RELATION OF SUCH
EXPENDITURES TO REVENUE RECEIPTS -FISCAL YEARS 1929-30 AND 1930-31


Expenses Interest Amortization Total


FISCAL YEAR 1929-30 Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
SeriesA .......................... 26,587.15 3,552,750.00 3.422.250.00 7.001.587.15
Series B ........ ........ .. 664,504.86 1.402,495.27 2,067.000.13
SeriesC ....................... 2,782.60 585.383.20 570.054.30 1,158,220.10
Fiduciary Currency .............. ......... ...... .205.900.00 205,900.00

Total expenditures.......... ..29.369.75 4,802,638.06 5,600,699.57 10,432.707.38
Revenue receipts ............ ... ..... ...... .. ...... ........ ...... 38,648.163.39
Ratio of expenditures from revenue to
revenue receipts ... ............. .. .08 12.42 14.50 27.00

FISCAL YEAR 1930-31
Series A ..................... 13,933.95 3,403,200.00 2,346,799.80 5,763.933.75
Series B .... ..................... 578,595.53 1,209.404.47 1,788,000.00
Series C ............. ... ........ 2,166.35 559,718.87 392,062.33 953,947,55
Fiduciary Currency .............. .... .... ............. 141,600.00 141,600.00

Total expenditures ,. ........ 16,100.30 4,541,514.40 4,089,866.60 8,647,481.30
Revenue .receipts ................ ... .. ... ...... ....... .............. 31,746.582.38
Ratio of expenditures from revenue to
revrue receipts ................ .05 14.30 12.88 27.23


~







HAITI: REPORT OF FINANCIAL- ADVISER-GENERAL RECEIVER


TABLE No. 54
PROFIT AND LOSS STATEMENT -BUREAU OF SUPPLIES
FISCAL YEAR 1929-30

Gourdes Gourdes
Gross sales .................. ......... ............................. 296,783.58
Inventory Sept. 30, 1929 ................ ........................... 126,065.68
Purchases ......................................................... 301.406.70

Total ..................................................... 427.472.38
Inventory Sept. 30, 1930 ................ .......................... 158.944.96

Cost of merchandise sold ............................... .. ........... 268,527.42

Gross profit .................. ........ ...................... 28,256.16
Operating expense ......... .... ..... ................. 12,073.35

Net profit ....................... .......................... 16.182.81



FISCAL YEAR 1930-31-

Gourdes Gourdes
Gross sales .................................................... ... 242,009.67
Inventory Sept. 30, 1930 ...................... .. ..................... 158,944.96
Purchases ......................... .............................. 190,806.24

Total ..................................... .. ....................... 349,751.20
Inventory Sept. 30, 1931 ............. .... ............................. 127,879.88

Cost of merchandise sold................................ ............ 221,871.32

Gross profit ................................................. .. 20.138.35
Operating expense ............................................. 19.324.32

N et profit .............. ..................................... 814.03





TABLE No. 55


BALANCE SHEET BUREAU OF SUPPLIES

September 30. 1930 September 30. 1931


Assets
Gourdes Gourdes
Cash............................ ......... .. .... 3,309.99 39,657.95
Petty cash fund ......................... ....... 100.00 100.'00
Accounts receivable. ................... 704.00 29.37
Inventory ................. .... .... ........... 158,944.96 127,879.88
Equipment... ... ................... ... ......3..... 13,080.45 12,903.95

Total......... ........................... 176.139.40 180.571.19

Liabilities
Surplus. ................... .............. ..... 176.139.40 180,571.19